Science.gov

Sample records for zominthos central crete

  1. The Sedimentary History of Southern Central Crete: Implications for Neogene Uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, K.; Brachert, T. C.; Reuter, M.

    2003-04-01

    1000m since the Early Pliocene. At the Central Iraklion Ridge that separates the Messara and Iraclion Basins a similar history is indicated for the Psiloritis Mountains by fault movements within Neogene near shore sediments and their subsequent drowning. A structural model of the Neogene evolution of Crete therefore has to explain successive phases of uplift and subsidence in an over all extensional setting only slightly oblique to the modern direction of convergence between Africa and the Aegean microplate.

  2. River profile response to normal fault growth and linkage: an example from the Hellenic forearc of south-central Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, Sean F.; Wegmann, Karl W.

    2017-02-01

    Topography is a reflection of the tectonic and geodynamic processes that act to uplift the Earth's surface and the erosional processes that work to return it to base level. Numerous studies have shown that topography is a sensitive recorder of tectonic signals. A quasi-physical understanding of the relationship between river incision and rock uplift has made the analysis of fluvial topography a popular technique for deciphering relative, and some argue absolute, histories of rock uplift. Here we present results from a study of the fluvial topography from south-central Crete, demonstrating that river longitudinal profiles indeed record the relative history of uplift, but several other processes make it difficult to recover quantitative uplift histories. Prior research demonstrates that the south-central coastline of Crete is bound by a large ( ˜ 100 km long) E-W striking composite normal fault system. Marine terraces reveal that it is uplifting between 0.1 and 1.0 mm yr-1. These studies suggest that two normal fault systems, the offshore Ptolemy and onshore South-Central Crete faults, linked together in the recent geologic past (ca. 0.4-1 My BP). Fault mechanics predict that when adjacent faults link into a single fault the uplift rate in footwalls of the linkage zone will increase rapidly. We use this natural experiment to assess the response of river profiles to a temporal jump in uplift rate and to assess the applicability of the stream power incision model to this setting. Using river profile analysis we show that rivers in south-central Crete record the relative uplift history of fault growth and linkage as theory predicts that they should. Calibration of the commonly used stream power incision model shows that the slope exponent, n, is ˜ 0.5, contrary to most studies that find n ≥ 1. Analysis of fluvial knickpoints shows that migration distances are not proportional to upstream contributing drainage area, as predicted by the stream power incision model

  3. U-Pb zircon and biostratigraphic data of high-pressure/low-temperature metamorphic rocks of the Talea Ori: tracking the Paleotethys suture in central Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulauf, G.; Dörr, W.; Krahl, J.; Lahaye, Y.; Chatzaras, V.; Xypolias, P.

    2016-10-01

    Inherited deformation microfabrics of detrital quartz grains and U-Pb (Laser ablation (LA)-ICPMS and ID TIMS) ages of detrital zircons separated from the Phyllite-Quartzite Unit s.l. of the Talea Ori, central Crete, suggest strikingly different source rocks. Albite gneiss of the lower Rogdia Beds includes Cambrian and Neoproterozoic rounded zircons with main U-Pb age peaks at 628 and 988 Ma. These and minor Paleoproterozoic and Archean peaks, together with the lack of Variscan-aged and Mesoproterozoic zircons, are similar to the age spectra obtained from the Phyllite-Quartzite Unit s.str. of the Peloponnesus and eastern Crete and from the Taurides. All of these zircons should be derived from the northeastern passive margin of Gondwana (Cimmeria). Metatuffites of the uppermost Rogdia Beds and metasandstone of Bali beach, on the other hand, include euhedral detrital zircons displaying a Variscan U-Pb age spectra at ca. 300 Ma with concordia ages at 291 ± 3, 300 ± 1 Ma (Rogdia) and 286 ± 3, 300 ± 3, 313 ± 2 Ma (Bali). Both types of metasediments and their zircons are similar to those of the pre-Alpine basement and overlying Tyros Beds of eastern Crete, revealing a provenance at the southern active margin of Laurasia. Thus, in central Crete the Paleotethys suture should be situated inside the Rogdia Beds. Magmatic zircons separated from a rhyolite boulder of the lower Achlada Beds yielded a concordant U-Pb zircon age at 242 ± 2 Ma placing a maximum age for the deposition of the (meta)conglomerate from which the boulder was collected. This age is compatible with an Olenekian-early Anisian age of the underlying Vasilikon marble suggested by new findings of the foraminifera Meandrospira aff. pusilla. Both the Achlada Beds and the Vasilikon marble can be attributed to the lower Tyros Beds of eastern Crete. The Alpine deformation led to a pervasive mylonitic foliation, which is affecting most of the studied rocks. This foliation results from D2 top

  4. Reconstruction of Holocene Climate Variability within the Central Mediterranean Using Lake Sediments from the Akrotiri Peninsula, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, C. R.; Rosenmeier, M. F.; Cavallari, B. J.; Curtis, J. H.; Weiss, H.

    2005-12-01

    Middle and late Holocene geochemical records from the Limnes depression, a small sinkhole located within the Akrotiri Peninsula, Crete, document centennial and millennial-scale climate variability within the central Mediterranean region. The oldest sediments of the basin consist largely of fibrous plant macrofossils and organic matter and likely indicate lake filling and expansion of wetland vegetation beginning ~5700 radiocarbon years before present (14C-yrs B.P.) (4550 B.C.). The basal peat layers grade into predominantly open water and less shallow lacustrine deposits by 4500 14C-yrs B.P (3200 B.C.). Continuous open water sedimentation within the Limnes core is interrupted by a number of distinct lag deposits and peaty deposits centered at 3700, 1600, and 350 14C-yrs B.P (2100 B.C., 500 A.D., and 1500 A.D.) indicating periods of significantly lowered lake level or perhaps lake desiccation. These ages coincide roughly with oxygen isotope (δ18O) minima measured in biogenic carbonates (ostracod shells) and support the inference for low lake stage. Trace element (Ca, Mg, and Sr) concentrations in ostracod shells from the Limnes core parallel the oxygen isotope record, suggesting that the data reflect basin hydrology rather than changes in the isotopic composition of rainfall. Furthermore, covariance in both δ18O and Mg concentrations eliminate temperature as a control on the oxygen isotope record. Sediments from the basin also contain aragonite remains of the green alga Chara and isotope analysis of the calcite may record additional paleoenvironmental information. The paleoclimate history inferred from the Limnes record correlates temporally (albeit tenuously) to previous paleoenvironmental data that document abrupt onset of arid conditions in the eastern Mediterranean and western Asia ca. 2200 B.C. Moreover, stratigraphic and geochemical evidence of low lake level (drying) within the Limnes basin at 2100 B.C. may correspond to the termination of the Early Minoan

  5. Evaluation of Chem-Crete : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-01-01

    Two test sections, one on new construction and the other on a maintenance resurfacing project, were installed in the fall of 1980 to evaluate the proprietary product Chem-Crete. Laboratory tests and dynaflect and density measurements were performed o...

  6. The woman in Minoic Crete.

    PubMed

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis Emm

    2011-07-01

    Minoan Civilization (3000-1150 BC) was the first European civilization on the GREEK island of Crete. Fabulous architectonical constructions like great palaces, wonderful frescoes, and pottery as well as jewellery characterize this amazing civilization. According to all existing descriptions from ancient Greek historians and philosophers like Plato, Thucydides, Strabon but also from all the archaeological findings men and women lived freely and peacefully participating equal in all daily activities, sports, and games. The women were predominating. Minoan women enjoyed a higher social status than other women in later civilizations. Investigation of all the existing data concerning the Minoan culture. Archaeological databases, as well as data from the National University of Athens and other Greek historical institutions were collected and analyzed in order to present the Minoan culture. The Minoic civilization represents a paradigm of a well being society in which the woman played a dominant role. She was the 'mother' but also the 'active woman', who participated in all city activities. Four thousand years later a prototype of a society in which the role of the mother was recognized in an admirably way remains a magnificent paradigm.

  7. How Much Ocean Is Left Between Libya and Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makris, J.; Yegorova, T.

    The intense deformation of the Hellenides is due to crustal shortening and the collision between the European and African Plates. This processes creates the Mediterranean accretionary wedge known as Mediterranean Ridge, which is composed of thick sedi- mentary sequences exceeding 10 km in thickness. The stage of this collision has been under dispute for many years. We performed wide aperture seismic soundings between Crete and Libya along 5 seismic lines. The results were used to constrain gravity mod- elling and develop density models in 2D and 3D between Libya and the Cretan Sea. We identified the limits of the European continental crust extending south of Crete for more than 100 km and building the backstop of the sediment accumulation . The African continental crust extends to the north for about 80 to 100 km, so that the remaining space floored by the oceanic Thethian basement is at its narrowest point not more than 100 to 120 km wide. By modelling in 3D the gravity field of the sedi- ments, crust and uppermost mantle we identified significant variations of the density distribution of the upper mantle. The young intensely deforming area of the Aegean domain is floored by low density upper mantle due to the mobilization of magma and the activation of the thermal regime. The subducted cold oceanic slab sinks below the Cretan crust in NE orientation and is decupled from the continental crust between central Crete and the southeastern edge of the Peloponnese. The deformation of the sediments controlled by the compressional processes have their maximum accumu- lation at the limits of the backstop. Here the transition of the deep trough to the flat and nearly undeformed sedimentary sequence is very abrupt and the transition oc- curs along vertical displacements of 6 to 8 km near vertical throw. Near the southern transition of the oceanic crust to the African continental domain obducted ophiolites extend over large areas explaining gravity highs and also observed

  8. Evaluation of Soil Salinity Amelioration Technologies in Timpaki, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagea, Ioanna; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis; Tsanis, Ioannis; Schwilch, Gudrun

    2015-04-01

    Salinization is a soil threat that adversely affects ecosystem services and diminishes soil functions in many arid and semi-arid regions. Soil salinity management depends on a range of factors, and can be complex expensive and time demanding. Besides taking no action, possible management strategies include amelioration and adaptation measures. The WOCAT Technologies Questionnaire is a standardized methodology for monitoring, evaluating and documenting sustainable land management practices through interaction with the stakeholders. Here we use WOCAT for the systematic analysis and evaluation of soil salinization amelioration measures, for the RECARE project Case Study in Greece, the Timpaki basin, a semi-arid region in south-central Crete where the main land use is horticulture in greenhouses irrigated by groundwater. Excessive groundwater abstractions have resulted in a drop of the groundwater level in the coastal part of the aquifer, thus leading to seawater intrusion and in turn to soil salinization due to irrigation with brackish water. Amelioration technologies that have already been applied in the case study by the stakeholders are examined and classified depending on the function they promote and/or improve. The documented technologies are evaluated for their impacts on ecosystem services, cost and input requirements. Preliminary results show that technologies which promote maintaining existing crop types while enhancing productivity and decreasing soil salinity such as composting, mulching, rain water harvesting and seed biopriming are preferred by the stakeholders. Further work will include result validation using qualitative approaches. Keywords: soil salinity; salinization; evaluation of soil salinization amelioration techniques; WOCAT; RECARE FP7 project; Timpaki Crete

  9. The Hellenic Seismological Network Of Crete (HSNC): Validation and results of the 2013 aftershock sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzopoulos, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Ilias; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2015-04-01

    The number and quality of seismological networks in Europe has increased in the past decades. Nevertheless, the need for localized networks monitoring areas of great seismic and scientific interest is constant. Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC) covers this need for the vicinity of the South Aegean Sea and Crete Island. In the present work with the use of Z-map software (www.seismo.ethz.ch) the spatial variability of Magnitude of Completeness (Mc) is calculated from HSNC's manual analysis catalogue of events for the period 2011 until today, proving the good coverage of HSNC in the areas. Furthermore the 2013, South Aegean seismicity where two large shallow earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of Crete Island, is discussed. The first event takes place on 15th June 2013 in the front of the Hellenic Arc, south from central Crete, while the second one on 12th October, 2013 on the western part of Crete. The two main shocks and their aftershock sequences have been relocated with the use of hypoinverse earthquake location software and an appropriate crust model. The HSNC identified more than 500 and 300 aftershocks respectively followed after the main events. The detailed construction of aftershocks catalogue permits the applicability of modern theories based on complexity sciences as described recently in the frame of non extensive statistical physics. In addition site effects in the stations locations are presented using event and noise recordings. This work was implemented through the project IMPACT-ARC in the framework of action "ARCHIMEDES III-Support of Research Teams at TEI of Crete" (MIS380353) of the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" and is co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national funds References A. Tzanis and F. Vallianatos, "Distributed power-law seismicity changes and crustal deformation in the EW Hellenic Arc", Natural Hazards and Earth Systems Sciences, 3, 179-195, 2003 F. Vallianatos, G

  10. Active simultaneous uplift and margin-normal extension in a forearc high, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, S. F.; Wegmann, K. W.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Pazzaglia, F. J.; Brandon, M. T.; Fassoulas, C.

    2014-07-01

    The island of Crete occupies a forearc high in the central Hellenic subduction zone and is characterized by sustained exhumation, surface uplift and extension. The processes governing orogenesis and topographic development here remain poorly understood. Dramatic topographic relief (2-6 km) astride the southern coastline of Crete is associated with large margin-parallel faults responsible for deep bathymetric depressions known as the Hellenic troughs. These structures have been interpreted as both active and inactive with either contractional, strike-slip, or extensional movement histories. Distinguishing between these different structural styles and kinematic histories here allows us to explore more general models for improving our global understanding of the tectonic and geodynamic processes of syn-convergent extension. We present new observations from the south-central coastline of Crete that clarifies the role of these faults in the late Cenozoic evolution of the central Hellenic margin and the processes controlling Quaternary surface uplift. Pleistocene marine terraces are used in conjunction with optically stimulated luminesce dating and correlation to the Quaternary eustatic curve to document coastal uplift and identify active faults. Two south-dipping normal faults are observed, which extend offshore, offset these marine terrace deposits and indicate active N-S (margin-normal) extension. Further, marine terraces preserved in the footwall and hanging wall of both faults demonstrate that regional net uplift of Crete is occurring despite active extension. Field mapping and geometric reconstructions of an active onshore normal fault reveal that the subaqueous range-front fault of south-central Crete is synthetic to the south-dipping normal faults on shore. These findings are inconsistent with models of active horizontal shortening in the upper crust of the Hellenic forearc. Rather, they are consistent with topographic growth of the forearc in a viscous orogenic

  11. Epidemiology of Dermatophytoses in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Mavromanolaki, Viktoria Eirini

    2016-01-01

    Dermatophytoses are among the most frequently diagnosed skin infections worldwide. However, the distribution of pathogenic species and the predominating anatomical sites of infection vary with geographical location and change over time. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiological and aetiological factors of dermatophytoses in Crete, Greece over the last 5-year period (2011-2015) and their incidence in relation to the gender and the age of the patients. We compared our findings with those previously reported from the same area and from other parts of the world. A total of 2,910 clinical specimens (skin scrapings, nail clippings, and hair specimens) obtained from 2,751 patients with signs of dermatomycoses were examined using direct microscopy and culture. Overall, 294 specimens (10.1%) were proved mycologically positive for dermatophytes. The age of the patients ranged from 2 to 86 years (mean age, 37 years). Tinea corporis was the predominant clinical type of infection, followed by tinea unguium, tinea pedis, tinea capitis, tinea faciei, tinea cruris and tinea manuum. Among dermatophytes, eight species were isolated: Microsporum canis (35.8%), Trichophyton rubrum (35.1%), Trichophyton mentagrophytes (23.3%), Epidermophyton floccosum (2.5%), Microsporum gypseum (1.8%), Trichophyton violaceum (0.7%), Trichophyton verrucosum (0.4%), and Trichophyton tonsurans (0.4%). In our area, the most common dermatophyte was M. canis followed by T. rubrum. Increased migration, mass tourism, and climate changes will contribute to further changes in the epidemiology of dermatophytoses in our area. Continuing studies are necessary for determining the new epidemiological trends and to implement the appropriate control measures.

  12. The AD 365 earthquake: high resolution tsunami inundation for Crete and full scale simulation exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalligeris, N.; Flouri, E.; Okal, E.; Synolakis, C.

    2012-04-01

    In the eastern Mediterranean, historical and archaeological records document major earthquake and tsunami events in the past 2000 year (Ambraseys and Synolakis, 2010). The 1200km long Hellenic Arc has allegedly caused the strongest reported earthquakes and tsunamis in the region. Among them, the AD 365 and AD 1303 tsunamis have been extensively documented. They are likely due to ruptures of the Central and Eastern segments of the Hellenic Arc, respectively. Both events had widespread impact due to ground shaking, and e triggered tsunami waves that reportedly affected the entire eastern Mediterranean. The seismic mechanism of the AD 365 earthquake, located in western Crete, has been recently assigned a magnitude ranging from 8.3 to 8.5 by Shaw et al., (2008), using historical, sedimentological, geomorphic and archaeological evidence. Shaw et al (2008) have inferred that such large earthquakes occur in the Arc every 600 to 800 years, with the last known the AD 1303 event. We report on a full-scale simulation exercise that took place in Crete on 24-25 October 2011, based on a scenario sufficiently large to overwhelm the emergency response capability of Greece and necessitating the invocation of the Monitoring and Information Centre (MIC) of the EU and triggering help from other nations . A repeat of the 365 A.D. earthquake would likely overwhelm the civil defense capacities of Greece. Immediately following the rupture initiation it will cause substantial damage even to well-designed reinforced concrete structures in Crete. Minutes after initiation, the tsunami generated by the rapid displacement of the ocean floor would strike nearby coastal areas, inundating great distances in areas of low topography. The objective of the exercise was to help managers plan search and rescue operations, identify measures useful for inclusion in the coastal resiliency index of Ewing and Synolakis (2011). For the scenario design, the tsunami hazard for the AD 365 event was assessed for

  13. Spatio-temporal analysis of annual rainfall in Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.; Corzo, Gerald A.; Karatzas, George P.; Kotsopoulou, Anastasia

    2018-03-01

    Analysis of rainfall data from the island of Crete, Greece was performed to identify key hydrological years and return periods as well as to analyze the inter-annual behavior of the rainfall variability during the period 1981-2014. The rainfall spatial distribution was also examined in detail to identify vulnerable areas of the island. Data analysis using statistical tools and spectral analysis were applied to investigate and interpret the temporal course of the available rainfall data set. In addition, spatial analysis techniques were applied and compared to determine the rainfall spatial distribution on the island of Crete. The analysis presented that in contrast to Regional Climate Model estimations, rainfall rates have not decreased, while return periods vary depending on seasonality and geographic location. A small but statistical significant increasing trend was detected in the inter-annual rainfall variations as well as a significant rainfall cycle almost every 8 years. In addition, statistically significant correlation of the island's rainfall variability with the North Atlantic Oscillation is identified for the examined period. On the other hand, regression kriging method combining surface elevation as secondary information improved the estimation of the annual rainfall spatial variability on the island of Crete by 70% compared to ordinary kriging. The rainfall spatial and temporal trends on the island of Crete have variable characteristics that depend on the geographical area and on the hydrological period.

  14. The Fall of Crete 1941: Was Freyberg Culpable?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-16

    industrial support. Following the battles of Greece and Crete, and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour , Fraser faced significant pressure to bring...59 CHAPTER 5. THE BATTLE ...140 APPENDIX C. GERMAN ORDER OF BATTLE (OPERATION MERKUR) .............141 APPENDIX D. OPERATION MERKUR PLAN

  15. Increasing Incidence of Zoonotic Visceral Leishmaniasis on Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Maria; Messaritakis, Ippokratis; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Ascoksilaki, Ioanna; Kanavakis, Nikos; Sutton, Andrew J.; Carson, Connor

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether the incidence of canine leishmaniasis has increased on Crete, Greece, we fitted infection models to serodiagnostic records of 8,848 dog samples for 1990–2006. Models predicted that seroprevalence has increased 2.4% (95% confidence interval 1.61%–3.51%) per year and that incidence has increased 2.2- to 3.8-fold over this 17-year period. PMID:19523295

  16. Kreta als Beispiel: German Airlift During the Battle of Crete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    looked over his shoulder and saw the nervous young faces of the mountain infantrymen stuffed into his aircraft, their knees interlocking, their...white edelweiss patches standing out against the grey of their tunics. Most struggled with their collars against the heat or grasped their rifles with... mountains and northern coastal plains of Crete steadily grow larger in his windscreen. The island’s green orchards and olive trees appeared

  17. Extension for Organic Agriculture: A Comparative Study between Baden-Württemberg, Germany and Crete, Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Österle, Nina; Koutsouris, Alex; Livieratos, Yannis; Kabourakis, Emmanuil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to compare the extension services offered in the field of organic agriculture (OA) in Baden-Württemberg (BW), Germany and Crete, Greece. Design/methodology approach: 16 in-depth interviews, 10 in BW and 6 in Crete, were carried out with representatives of OA extension providers; interviews were qualitatively…

  18. Meteorological drought patterns and climate change for the island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroulis, Aristeidis G.; Vrohidou, Aggeliki K.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.; Jacob, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    A new index, named SN-SPI (Spatially Normalized-Standardized Precipitation Index), has been developed for assessing meteorological droughts. The SN-SPI is a variant index to SPI (Standardized Precipitation Index) and is based on the probability of precipitation at different time scales, but it is spatially normalized for improved assessment of drought severity. Results of this index incorporate the spatial distribution of precipitation and produces improved drought warnings. This index is applied in the island of Crete (Greece) and the drought results are compared to the ones of SPI. A 30-year long average monthly precipitation dataset from 130 watersheds of the island is used by the above indices for drought classification in terms of its duration and intensity. Bias adjusted monthly precipitation estimates from REMO regional climate model used to quantify the influence of global warming to drought conditions over the period 2010 - 2100. Results based on both indices from 3 basins in west, central and east part of the island show that: a) the extreme drought periods are the same (5%-7% of time) but the intensities based on SN-SPI are lower, b) the area covered by extreme droughts is 25% and 80% based on the SN-SPI and SPI respectively, c) more than half of the area of Crete is experiencing drought conditions during 46% of the 1973-2004 period and 7%, 63% and 92% for 2010-2040, 2040-2070 and 2070-2100 respectively and d) extremely dry conditions will cover 5% of the island for the future 90-year period.

  19. Correlation between Seismicity and Mental Health: Crete, 2008-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, George C.

    2013-04-01

    We present, for the first time, the results from a research on the possible influence of seismicity to the mental health of a population not exposed to trauma. The research was inspired by the results of (a) recent research on various electromagnetic phenomena related with earthquakes, (b) several experiments of electric, magnetic and electromagnetic effects on animals' behavior, (c) the electric and electromagnetic activity of the neural network of the brain and (d) the treatment of brain functions with traditional electric or electromagnetic methods. The Research was basically baised on a comparison of the number of M>2 earthquakes NE in a area including the island of Crete (210-290E, 32.50-380N), Greece, to the admissions to the Psychiatric Inpatient Unit of the University of Crete IPU/UoC) during the years 2008-2010. It was found that the number of monthly admissions to the Acute Care Unit of the IPU/UoC NAA reached their lowest values during, and in particular at the end (NAA=2; July 2008) of "a storm of strong earthquakes" in 2008 (G. Papadopoulos, EOS, 90, 46, 2009). On the contrary, the number of monthly admissions NAA increased with increasing the monthly number NE of earthquakes (EQs) during the rest of the time period 2008-2010, and showed a maximum rate (NAA= 31) during the month with the highest number of EQs (NE=70; August 2010) throughout the entire period examined. During the second period (October 2008-December 2010) we found a positive correlation between the total number of monthly admissions NA with the number of EQs NE (r=0.601 / P=0.001). When a daily resolution analysis was performed for the month with highest number of EQs NE(August 2010), we found that an abrupt appearance of a cluster of small earthquakes near Crete was followed by an increase in the number of acute admissions NAA, with a delay time of ~2 days. We hypothesize that seismic activity might be a major factor influencing the frequency of admissions of psychotic disorders in

  20. Clostridium difficile in Crete, Greece: epidemiology, microbiology and clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Samonis, G; Vardakas, K Z; Tansarli, G S; Dimopoulou, D; Papadimitriou, G; Kofteridis, D P; Maraki, S; Karanika, M; Falagas, M E

    2016-01-01

    We studied the epidemiology and microbiology of Clostridium difficile and the characteristics of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) in Crete in three groups of hospitalized patients with diarrhoea: group 1 [positive culture and positive toxin by enzyme immunoassay (EIA)]; group 2 (positive culture, negative toxin); group 3 (negative culture, negative toxin). Patients in group 1 were designated as those with definitive CDI (20 patients for whom data was available) and matched with cases in group 2 (40 patients) and group 3 (40 patients). C. difficile grew from 6% (263/4379) of stool specimens; 14·4% of these had positive EIA, of which 3% were resistant to metronidazole. Three isolates had decreased vancomycin susceptibility. Patients in groups 1 and 2 received more antibiotics (P = 0·03) and had more infectious episodes (P = 0·03) than patients in group 3 prior to diarrhoea. Antibiotic administration for C. difficile did not differ between groups 1 and 2. Mortality was similar in all three groups (10%, 12·5% and 5%, P = 0·49). CDI frequency was low in the University Hospital of Crete and isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin.

  1. Solar Orientations of Bronze Age Shrines in Gournia, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, G.; Blomberg, M.

    2009-08-01

    The measurements of orientations at Gournia are part of the Uppsala University project to investigate the nature of Minoan astronomy. The town is typical of Minoan settlements and therefore was chosen for the selection of representative buildings from different kinds of Minoan sites. We use classical archaeoastronomical methods and our own computer programs for calculation of the positions of the sun, moon and stars in the Aegean Bronze Age. We discovered that Gournia is the fourth Minoan site with shrines that are oriented to sunrise at lunar month intervals with respect to the equinoxes. There is also a Mycenaean shrine in the town and we compared its orientation to Mycenaean buildings of the same type in Crete.

  2. A European population in Minoan Bronze Age Crete

    PubMed Central

    Hughey, Jeffery R.; Paschou, Peristera; Drineas, Petros; Mastropaolo, Donald; Lotakis, Dimitra M.; Navas, Patrick A.; Michalodimitrakis, Manolis; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    The first advanced Bronze Age civilization of Europe was established by the Minoans about 5,000 years before present. Since Sir Arthur Evans exposed the Minoan civic centre of Knossos, archaeologists have speculated on the origin of the founders of the civilization. Evans proposed a North African origin; Cycladic, Balkan, Anatolian and Middle Eastern origins have also been proposed. Here we address the question of the origin of the Minoans by analysing mitochondrial DNA from Minoan osseous remains from a cave ossuary in the Lassithi plateau of Crete dated 4,400–3,700 years before present. Shared haplotypes, principal component and pairwise distance analyses refute the Evans North African hypothesis. Minoans show the strongest relationships with Neolithic and modern European populations and with the modern inhabitants of the Lassithi plateau. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis of an autochthonous development of the Minoan civilization by the descendants of the Neolithic settlers of the island. PMID:23673646

  3. First results on video meteors from Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelias, G.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the first systematic video meteor observations from a, forthcoming permanent, station in Crete, Greece, operating as the first official node within the International Meteor Organization's Video Network. It consists of a Watec 902 H2 Ultimate camera equipped with a Panasonic WV-LA1208 (focal length 12mm, f/0.8) lens running MetRec. The system operated for 42 nights during 2011 (August 19-December 30, 2011) recording 1905 meteors. It is significantly more performant than a previous system used by the author during the Perseids 2010 (DMK camera 21AF04.AS by The Imaging Source, CCTV lens of focal length 2.8 mm, UFO Capture v2.22), which operated for 17 nights (August 4-22, 2010) recording 32 meteors. Differences - according to the author's experience - between the two softwares (MetRec, UFO Capture) are discussed along with a small guide to video meteor hardware.

  4. Smoking cessation delivery by general practitioners in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Girvalaki, Charis; Papadakis, Sophia; Vardavas, Constantine; Petridou, Eleni; Pipe, Andrew; Lionis, Christos

    2018-06-01

    Tobacco dependence treatment in clinical settings is of prime public health importance, especially in Greece, a country experiencing one of the highest rates of tobacco use in Europe. Our study aimed to examine the characteristics of tobacco users and document rates of tobacco treatment delivery in general practice settings in Crete, Greece. A cross-sectional sample of patients (n = 2, 261) was screened for current tobacco use in 25 general practices in Crete, Greece in 2015/16. Current tobacco users completed a survey following their clinic appointment that collected information on patient characteristics and rates at which the primary care physician delivered tobacco treatment using the evidence-based 4 A's (Ask, Advise, Assist, Arrange) model during their medical appointment and over the previous 12-month period. Multi-level modeling was used to analyze data and examine predictors of 4 A's delivery. Tobacco use prevalence was 38% among all patients screened. A total of 840 tobacco users completed the study survey [mean age 48.0 (SD 14.5) years, 57.6% male]. Approximately, half of the tobacco users reported their general practitioner 'asked' about their tobacco use and 'advised' them to quit smoking. Receiving 'assistance' with quitting (15.7%) and 'arranging' follow-up support (<3%) was infrequent. Patient education, presence of smoking-related illness, a positive screen for anxiety or depression and the type of medical appointment were associated with 4 A's delivery. Given the fundamental importance of addressing tobacco treatment, increasing the rates of 4 A's treatment in primary care settings in Greece is an important target for improving patient care.

  5. Evaluation of tsunami risk in Heraklion city, Crete, Greece, by using GIS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Ioanna; Fokaefs, Anna; Novikova, Tatyana; Papadopoulos, Gerasimos A.; Vaitis, Michalis

    2016-04-01

    The Hellenic Arc is the most active seismotectonic structure in the Mediterranean region. The island of Crete occupies the central segment of the arc which is characterized by high seismic and tsunami activity. Several tsunamis generated by large earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and landslides were reported that hit the capital city of Heraklion in the historical past. We focus our tsunami risk study in the northern coastal area of Crete (ca. 6 km in length and 1 km in maximum width) which includes the western part of the city of Heraklion and a large part of the neighboring municipality of Gazi. The evaluation of tsunami risk included calculations and mapping with QGIS of (1) cost for repairing buildings after tsunami damage, (2) population exposed to tsunami attack, (3) optimum routes and times for evacuation. To calculate the cost for building reparation after a tsunami attack we have determined the tsunami inundation zone in the study area after numerical simulations for extreme tsunami scenarios. The geographical distribution of buildings per building block, obtained from the 2011 census data of the Hellenic Statistical Authority (EL.STAT) and satellite data, was mapped. By applying the SCHEMA Damage Tool we assessed the building vulnerability to tsunamis according to the types of buildings and their expected damage from the hydrodynamic impact. A set of official cost rates varying with the building types and the damage levels, following standards set by the state after the strong damaging earthquakes in Greece in 2014, was applied to calculate the cost of rebuilding or repairing buildings damaged by the tsunami. In the investigation of the population exposed to tsunami inundation we have used the interpolation method to smooth out the population geographical distribution per building block within the inundation zone. Then, the population distribution was correlated with tsunami hydrodynamic parameters in the inundation zone. The last approach of tsunami risk

  6. Evaluation of soil salinity amelioration technologies in Timpaki, Crete: a participatory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagea, I. S.; Daliakopoulos, I. N.; Tsanis, I. K.; Schwilch, G.

    2015-10-01

    Soil salinity management can be complex, expensive and time demanding, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. Besides taking no action, possible management strategies include amelioration and adaptation measures. Here we use the World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies (WOCAT) framework for the systematic analysis and evaluation of soil salinisation amelioration technologies in close collaboration with stakeholders. The participatory approach is applied in the RECARE Project Case Study of Timpaki, a semi-arid region in south-central Crete (Greece) where the main land use is horticulture in greenhouses irrigated by groundwater. Excessive groundwater abstractions have resulted in a drop of the groundwater level in the coastal part of the aquifer, thus leading to seawater intrusion and in turn to soil salinisation. The documented technologies are evaluated for their impacts on ecosystem services, cost and input requirements using a participatory approach and field evaluations. Results show that technologies which promote maintaining existing crop types while enhancing productivity and decreasing soil salinity are preferred by the stakeholders. The evaluation concludes that rain water harvesting is the optimal solution for direct soil salinity mitigation, whereas green manuring and the use of biological agents can support increasing production/efficiency and improving soil properties.

  7. Evaluation of promising technologies for soil salinity amelioration in Timpaki (Crete): a participatory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagea, I. S.; Daliakopoulos, I. N.; Tsanis, I. K.; Schwilch, G.

    2016-02-01

    Soil salinity management can be complex, expensive, and time demanding, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. Besides taking no action, possible management strategies include amelioration and adaptation measures. Here we apply the World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies (WOCAT) framework for the systematic analysis and evaluation and selection of soil salinisation amelioration technologies in close collaboration with stakeholders. The participatory approach is applied in the RECARE (Preventing and Remediating degradation of soils in Europe through Land Care) project case study of Timpaki, a semi-arid region in south-central Crete (Greece) where the main land use is horticulture in greenhouses irrigated by groundwater. Excessive groundwater abstractions have resulted in a drop of the groundwater level in the coastal part of the aquifer, thus leading to seawater intrusion and in turn to soil salinisation. The documented technologies are evaluated for their impacts on ecosystem services, cost, and input requirements using a participatory approach and field evaluations. Results show that technologies which promote maintaining existing crop types while enhancing productivity and decreasing soil salinity are preferred by the stakeholders. The evaluation concludes that rainwater harvesting is the optimal solution for direct soil salinity mitigation, as it addresses a wider range of ecosystem and human well-being benefits. Nevertheless, this merit is offset by poor financial motivation making agronomic measures more attractive to users.

  8. Geostatistical Study of Precipitation on the Island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agou, Vasiliki D.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.; Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding and predicting the spatiotemporal patterns of precipitation in the Mediterranean islands is an important topic of research, which is emphasized by alarming long-term predictions for increased drought conditions [4]. The analysis of records from drought-prone areas around the world has demonstrated that precipitation data are non-Gaussian. Typically, such data are fitted to the gamma distribution function and then transformed into a normalized index, the so-called Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) [5]. The SPI can be defined for different time scales and has been applied to data from various regions [2]. Precipitation maps can be constructed using the stochastic method of Ordinary Kriging [1]. Such mathematical tools help to better understand the space-time variability and to plan water resources management. We present preliminary results of an ongoing investigation of the space-time precipitation distribution on the island of Crete (Greece). The study spans the time period from 1948 to 2012 and extends over an area of 8 336 km2. The data comprise monthly precipitation measured at 56 stations. Analysis of the data showed that the most severe drought occurred in 1950 followed by 1989, whereas the wettest year was 2002 followed by 1977. A spatial trend was observed with the spatially averaged annual precipitation in the West measured at about 450mm higher than in the East. Analysis of the data also revealed strong correlations between the precipitation in the western and eastern parts of the island. In addition to longitude, elevation (masl) was determined to be an important factor that exhibits strong linear correlation with precipitation. The precipitation data exhibit wet and dry periods with strong variability even during the wet period. Thus, fitting the data to specific probability distribution models has proved challenging. Different time scales, e.g. monthly, biannual, and annual have been investigated. Herein we focus on annual

  9. Active faulting on the island of Crete (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Riccardo; Catalano, Stefano; Monaco, Carmelo; Romagnoli, Gino; Tortorici, Giuseppe; Tortorici, Luigi

    2010-10-01

    ABSTRACT In order to characterize and quantify the Middle-Late Quaternary and ongoing deformation within the Southern Aegean forearc, we analyse the major tectonic structures affecting the island of Crete and its offshore. The normal faults typically consist of 4-30-km-long dip-slip segments locally organised in more complex fault zones. They separate carbonate and/or metamorphic massifs, in the footwall block, from loose to poorly consolidated alluvial and colluvial materials within the hangingwall. All these faults show clear evidences of recent re-activations and trend parallel to two principal directions: WNW-ESE and NNE-SSW. Based on all available data for both onland and offshore structures (morphological and structural mapping, satellite imagery and airphotographs remote sensing as well as the analysis of seismic profiles and the investigation of marine terraces and Holocene raised notches along the island coasts), for each fault we estimate and constrain some of the principal seismotectonic parameters and particularly the fault kinematics, the cumulative amount of slip and the slip-rate. Following simple assumptions and empirical relationships, maximum expected magnitudes and mean recurrence periods are also suggested. Summing up the contribution to crustal extension provided by the two major fault sets we calculate both arc-normal and arc-parallel long-term strain rates. The occurrence of slightly deeper and more external low-angle thrust planes associated with the incipient continental collision occurring in western Crete is also analysed. Although these contractional structures can generate stronger seismic events (M ~ 7.5.) they are probably much rarer and thus providing a minor contribution to the overall morphotectonic evolution of the island and the forearc. A comparison of our geologically-based results with those obtained from GPS measurements show a good agreement, therefore suggesting that the present-day crustal deformation is probably active

  10. Epidemiology of dermatophytoses in Crete, Greece between 2004 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Maraki, S

    2012-06-01

    The present work was undertaken in order to study the epidemiology of dermatophytoses in the island of Crete, Greece, over a 7-year period (2004-2010) and to compare the results with those reported earlier from this region and from other parts of the world. A total of 3236 clinical specimens obtained from 2674 patients with signs of dermatomycoses were examined by direct micropscopy and culture. Overall, 392 specimens (12.1%) were proved mycologically positive for dermatophytes. The age of the patients ranged from 2 to 90 years (mean age, 41 years). Onychomycosis was the predominant clinical type of infection, followed by tinea pedis, tinea corporis, tinea capitis, tinea faciei, tinea manuum and tinea cruris. Among dermatophytes, nine species were isolated: Trichophyton rubrum (51%), Microsporum canis (18.9%), Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. interdigitale (18.4%), Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes (5.1%), Epidermophyton floccosum (3.6%), Microsporum gypseum (1.5%), Trichophyton violaceum (0.8%), Trichophyton verrucosum (0.5%) and Trichophyton tonsurans (0.2%). In our area, the most common dermatophyte was T. rubrum followed by M. canis. Epidemiological studies regarding the current prevalence of dermatophytes in a certain region are needed for the appropriate management of these infections and implementation of effective prevention and control measures.

  11. Ups and downs in western Crete (Hellenic subduction zone)

    PubMed Central

    Tiberti, Mara Monica; Basili, Roberto; Vannoli, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Studies of past sea-level markers are commonly used to unveil the tectonic history and seismic behavior of subduction zones. We present new evidence on vertical motions of the Hellenic subduction zone as resulting from a suite of Late Pleistocene - Holocene shorelines in western Crete (Greece). Shoreline ages obtained by AMS radiocarbon dating of seashells, together with the reappraisal of shoreline ages from previous works, testify a long-term uplift rate of 2.5–2.7 mm/y. This average value, however, includes periods in which the vertical motions vary significantly: 2.6–3.2 mm/y subsidence rate from 42 ka to 23 ka, followed by ~7.7 mm/y sustained uplift rate from 23 ka to present. The last ~5 ky shows a relatively slower uplift rate of 3.0–3.3 mm/y, yet slightly higher than the long-term average. A preliminary tectonic model attempts at explaining these up and down motions by across-strike partitioning of fault activity in the subduction zone. PMID:25022313

  12. Dittany of Crete: a botanical and ethnopharmacological review.

    PubMed

    Liolios, Christos C; Graikou, Konstantia; Skaltsa, Eleni; Chinou, Ioanna

    2010-09-15

    Origanum dictamnus (Lamiaceae family), an endemic plant of the Greek island of Crete, is widely used as a traditional medicine since antiquity, all over Europe. The aim of the present review is to present comprehensive information of the plant's botanical taxonomy and morphology, as well as of the chemical constituents, biological and pharmacological research on O. dictamnus, which will be presented and critically evaluated. The paper also highlights particularly interesting aspects and common medicinal uses not previously described in the specific ethnobotanical literature. An increasing number of chemical and pharmacological studies have been reported recently, some of which strongly support its traditional medicinal uses against various illnesses such as sore throat, cough and gastric ulcer. A variety of compounds, including flavonoids, lipids and terpenoids (mainly carvacrol and thymol) have been identified from the plant. Current studies have showed that the extracts, the essential oil, as well as their active principles possess several pharmacological properties, like antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-ulcer ones. The recent scientific data and the rich historical evidence of its medicinal uses could support further research as well as its use as a safe herbal medicinal product. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of acute hemorrhagic stroke outcomes in 2 populations: the Crete-Boston study.

    PubMed

    Zaganas, Ioannis; Halpin, Amy P; Oleinik, Alexandra; Alegakis, Athanasios; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Zafiris, Spiros; Chlapoutaki, Chryssanthi; Tsimoulis, Dimitris; Giannakoudakis, Emmanouil; Chochlidakis, Nikolaos; Ntailiani, Aikaterini; Valatsou, Christina; Papadaki, Efrosini; Vakis, Antonios; Furie, Karen L; Greenberg, Steven M; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Although corticosteroid use in acute hemorrhagic stroke is not widely adopted, management with intravenous dexamethasone has been standard of care at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete with observed outcomes superior to those reported in the literature. To explore this further, we conducted a retrospective, multivariable-adjusted 2-center study. We studied 391 acute hemorrhagic stroke cases admitted to the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete between January 1997 and July 2010 and compared them with 510 acute hemorrhagic stroke cases admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, from January 2003 to September 2009. Of the Cretan cases, 340 received a tapering scheme of intravenous dexamethasone, starting with 16 to 32 mg/day, whereas the Boston patients were managed without steroids. The 2 cohorts had comparable demographics and stroke severity on admission, although anticoagulation was more frequent in Boston. The in-hospital mortality was significantly lower on Crete (23.8%, n=340) than in Boston (38.0%, n=510; P<0.001) as was the 30-day mortality (Crete: 25.4%, n=307; Boston: 39.4%, n=510; P<0.001). Exclusion of patients on anticoagulants showed even greater differences (30-day mortality: Crete 20.8%; n=259; Boston 37.0%; n=359; P<0.001). The improved survival on Crete was observed 3 days after initiation of intravenous dexamethasone and was pronounced for deep-seated hemorrhages. After adjusting for acute hemorrhagic stroke volume/location, Glasgow Coma Scale, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, coronary artery disease and statin, antiplatelet, and anticoagulant use, intravenous dexamethasone treatment was associated with better functional outcomes and significantly lower risk of death at 30 days (OR, 0.357; 95% CI, 0.174-0.732). This study suggests that intravenous dexamethasone improves outcome in acute hemorrhagic stroke and supports a randomized clinical trial using this approach.

  14. Kinematic evolution of southern Hellenides (western Crete, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzaras, V.; Xypolias, P.; Kokkalas, S.; Koukouvelas, I. K.

    2010-05-01

    Combined kinematic, structural and paleostress analyses were performed to reevaluate the tectonic evolution of the southern Hellenides in western Crete. Our work shows that the structural architecture of the study area was mainly established by two contractional deformation phases. SSW-directed thrusting from Oligocene to lower Miocene times (D1 phase) lead to brittle stacking of the upper thrust sheets and concomitant ductile exhumation-related imbrication of the lower HP tectonic units (Phyllite-Quartzite (PQ), Tripali and Plattenkalk units). Kinematic analysis in the PQ unit reveals a main southward ductile transport followed by late bulk coaxial deformation. The PQ unit rocks comprise the body of a crustal scale shear zone confined at its base by a major ductile thrust and in accordance with the proposed models we suggest that the exhumation process of the PQ unit involved S-directed ductile extrusion. Structural trends of ductile D1 thrusts define a salient bounded to the east by a NE-trending transverse zone situated in the western margin of the Lefka Ori window. At the eastern limb of the salient, the trajectories of L1 stretching lineation formed on a gently dipping S1 foliation in the PQ unit, show a clockwise rotation with proximity to the transverse zone. This suggests that the latter acted as an oblique buttress against the southward extruding PQ unit rocks causing their lateral escape. D2 phase was governed by regional NNW to NNE compression and involved significant folding and out-of-sequence with respect to D1 thrusting. The early D2a phase is related to the brittle-stage of exhumation of the HP-units and spans from middle to upper Miocene. D2a deformation involved thrust-related folding, tectonic imbrication and the formation of a middle Miocene thrust-top basin. The F2a folds are characterized by a predominant S(SE)-vergence and show a pronounced curvature of their hinge orientations from a regional E-W to a local NE-SW trend, the latter only

  15. Assessing tsunami vulnerability, an example from Herakleio, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathoma, M.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Zong, Y.; Smith, D.

    Recent tsunami have caused massive loss of life, destruction of coastal infrastructures and disruption to economic activity. To date, tsunami hazard studies have concentrated on determining the frequency and magnitude of events and in the production of simplistic flood maps. In general, such maps appear to have assumed a uniform vulnerability of population, infrastructure and business. In reality however, a complex set of factors interact to produce a pattern of vulnerability that varies spatially and temporally. A new vulnerability assessment approach is described, that incorporates multiple factors (e.g. parameters relating to the natural and built environments and socio-demographics) that contribute to tsunami vulnerability. The new methodology is applied on a coastal segment in Greece and, in particular, in Crete, westof the city of Herakleio. The results are presented within a Geographic Information System (GIS). The application of GIS ensures the approach is novel for tsunami studies, since it permits interrogation of the primary database by several different end-users. For example, the GIS may be used: (1) to determine immediate post-tsunami disaster response needs by the emergency services; (2) to preplan tsunami mitigation measures by disaster planners; (3) as a tool for local planning by the municipal authorities or; (4) as a basis for catastrophe modelling by insurance companies. We show that population density varies markedly with the time of the year and that 30% of buildings within the inundation zone are only single story thus increasing the vulnerability of their occupants. Within the high inundation depth zone, 11% of buildings are identified as in need of reinforcement and this figure rises to 50% within the medium inundation depth zone. 10% of businesses are located within the high inundation depth zone and these may need to consider their level of insurance cover to protect against primary building damage, contents loss and business interruption

  16. Tsunami Evacuation Exercises: the Case of Heraklion, Crete Isl., Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, I.; Charalampakis, M.; Bocchini, G. M.; Novikova, T.; Papadopoulos, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    Effective tsunami evacuation requires appropriate awareness as regards good shelters selection. Field exercises may improve public awareness. A field exercise was organized in Heraklion, Crete Isl., in 2016. The area is part of the Hellenic Arc which is the most active structure in the Mediterranean. Large earthquakes triggered tsunamis that hit Heraklion in the past, such in AD 1303. After selecting various fault models, simulation of the 1303 tsunami showed important inundation zone in Heraklion. For the exercise needs a team of 30 volunteers was divided in 3 groups of 10 people each. Everyone was equipped with a mobile phone and a GPS device. The 3 groups were gathered in 3 coastal spots Heraklion situated 400 m apart each other. The scenario was that immediately after receiving in their mobile a tsunami warning message they will set on their personal GPS device and start evacuating inland on the best way they believed to do so. In each group, only 5 out of 10 volunteers were notified beforehand that the Eleftherias Square, located inland at distance satisfying evacuation needs in case of repeat of the 1303 tsunami, would be a good shelter to go. Using the Road Graph Plugin of QGIS, we calculated the shortest path distances which found equal to 800, 700 and 680 m. Adopting average velocity of 3 km/h we found that these distances can be covered within 18, 16 and 15 min, respectively. The routes towards the settlement spots as well as the times needed to arrive there by each one of the 30 volunteers were recorded by their personal GPS devices. The processing of the GPS tracks and their comparison with the theoretical routes and times showed good evacuation performance which is encouraging for the next phases of the Heraklion tsunami hazard mitigation program. This is contribution to the EU-FP7 projects ZIP (Zooming In between Plates, grant no: 604713, 2013) and ASTARTE (Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe), grant no: 603839, 2013.

  17. Medicine and art: facial palsy depicted in archaic Greek art on Crete.

    PubMed

    Pirsig, W; Helidonis, E; Velegrakis, G

    1995-01-01

    A small earthenware statuette was evacuated from the votive-depot of acropolis of Gortys, an ancient town in South-Crete/Greece. This ex-voto is dated approximately 7th to 6th century BC and very probably represents some symptoms of a stroke, especially the left facial palsy and the contracture of the left arm. Since the Minoan time until today, people of Crete have been offering ex-votos to gods or saints to ask for help in specific diseases.

  18. Overweight and obesity in relation to cardiovascular disease risk factors among medical students in Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Bertsias, George; Mammas, Ioannis; Linardakis, Manolis; Kafatos, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    Background Recent data indicate increasing rates of adult obesity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Greece. No data, however, are available on prevalence of overweight and obesity in relation to CVD risk factors among young adults in Greece. Methods A total of 989 third-year medical students (527 men, 462 women), aged 22 ± 2 years, were recruited from the University of Crete during the period 1989–2001. Anthropometric measures and blood chemistries were obtained. The relationships between obesity indices (body mass index [BMI], waist circumference [WC], waist-to-hip ratio [WHpR], waist-to-height ratio [WHtR]) and CVD risk factor variables (blood pressure, glucose, serum lipoproteins) were investigated. Results Approximately 40% of men and 23% of women had BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2. Central obesity was found in 33.4% (average percentage corresponding to WC ≥ 90 cm, WHpR ≥ 0.9 and WHtR ≥ 50.0) of male and 21.7% (using WC ≥ 80 cm, WHpR ≥ 0.8, WHtR ≥ 50.0) of female students. Subjects above the obesity indices cut-offs had significantly higher values of CVD risk factor variables. BMI was the strongest predictor of hypertension. WHtR in men and WC in women were the most important indicators of dyslipidaemia. Conclusion A substantial proportion of Greek medical students were overweight or obese, obesity status being related to the presence of hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Simple anthropometric indices can be used to identify these CVD risk factors. Our results underscore the need to implement health promotion programmes and perform large-scale epidemiological studies within the general Greek young adult population. PMID:12517305

  19. Relocation of the Mw 6.4 July 1, 2009 earthquake to the south of Crete and modeling of its associated small tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchini, Gian Maria; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.; Novikova, Tatiana; Karastathis, Vassilis K.; Mouzakiotis, Aggelos; Voulgaris, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    On July 1, 2009 (09:30 UTC) a Mw6.4 earthquake ruptured south of Crete Island triggering a small tsunami. Eyewitness reported the tsunami from Myrtos and Arvi Port, in the SE coast of Crete, and in Chrisi islet. In Arvi 4 or 5 wave arrivals were reported after a withdrawal of the sea of about 1 m. The sea disturbance lasted for about 1 h. The earthquake occurred as the result of the subduction of the oceanic African Plate beneath the continental Eurasian Plate along the Hellenic Subduction Zone (HSZ). South of Crete the Nubia-Aegean convergence rate (~3.5 cm/yr) is partially accommodated by low-angle (~20-25°) thrust faults at 20-40km depths and by steeper (>30°) reverse-faults at shallower depths. The area of interest has been struck by large magnitude earthquakes in historical times that in some cases triggered damaging tsunamis (e.g AD 1303). Routine earthquake locations performed by NOA do not provide good quality hypocenters for the area under investigation given the poor azimuthal coverage and the low density of the seismic stations. The 2009 earthquake, given its tsunamigenic nature, has been identified as a key event to study the central segment of the HSZ. We performed the relocation of the 2009 mainshock along with the seismicity of the area (ML>=3, period 2008-2015) using the NLLoc algorithm and testing several 1D velocity models available for the area and a 2D velocity model obtained from a published N-S seismic refraction profile across Crete. The hypocenters obtained from NLLoc have been subsequently relocated with HypoDD algorithm using catalog phase data. The results from the various relocation procedures showed a shallow hypocentral depth (12-17km) of the 2009 event and its likely intraplate nature. A set of hypocentral solutions were selected on the basis of minimum RMS and smaller errors with the aim to perform tsunami simulations with varying source parameters. Two different fault dips were used to discriminate between the intraplate (dip 32

  20. Prevalent genotypes of Toxoplasma gondii in pregnant women and patients from Crete and Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Messaritakis, Ippokratis; Detsika, Maria; Koliou, Maria; Sifakis, Stavros; Antoniou, Maria

    2008-08-01

    Molecular genotyping has been used to characterize Toxoplasma gondii strains into the three clonal lineages known as types I, II, and III. To characterize T. gondii strains from Greece and Cyprus, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on the GRA6 gene was performed directly on 20 clinical samples from 18 humans (11 pregnant women, six patients with lymphadenopathy, and one patient positive for human immunodeficiency virus) and two rats. Characterization of T. gondii types was performed after digestion of amplified products with Mse I. The 20 strains were characterized as type II (20%) and type III (80%). Of these strains, 19 originated from the island of Crete (4 strains type II and 15 strains type III), and 1 from the island of Cyprus (type III). Although both type II and type III strains were found, type III was the most prevalent in Crete.

  1. Introducing seasonal hydro-meteorological forecasts in local water management. First reflections from the Messara site, Crete, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Grillakis, Manolis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2017-04-01

    Seasonal prediction is recently at the center of the forecasting research efforts, especially for regions that are projected to be severely affected by global warming. The value of skillful seasonal forecasts can be considerable for many sectors and especially for the agricultural in which water users and managers can benefit to better anticipate against drought conditions. Here we present the first reflections from the user/stakeholder interactions and the design of a tailored drought decision support system in an attempt to bring seasonal predictions into local practice for the Messara valley located in the central-south area of Crete, Greece. Findings from interactions with the users and stakeholders reveal that although long range and seasonal predictions are not used, there is a strong interest for this type of information. The increase in the skill of short range weather predictions is also of great interest. The drought monitoring and prediction tool under development that support local water and agricultural management will include (a) sources of skillful short to medium term forecast information, (b) tailored drought monitoring and forecasting indices for the local groundwater aquifer and rain-fed agriculture, and (c) seasonal inflow forecasts for the local dam through hydrologic simulation to support management of freshwater resources and drought impacts on irrigated agriculture.

  2. Archaeomagnetic Directional Determinations On Various Archaeological Materials From The Late Minoan Destruction Site At Malia, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, W. S.

    An archaeomagnetic directional study of Late Minoan archaeological materials, (burnt mud brick, a clay/ash horizon and hearth material), was carried out at locations within the archaeological complex at Malia, Crete. The study aimed to establish the suitability of materials for archaeomagnetic sampling and to obtain archaeomagnetic directions for comparison with other Late Minoan "fired" sites on Crete. Results from 42 oriented samples measured on a fluxgate spinner magnetometer from homogeneously distributed burnt mud brick (constituting low elevation, in situ, partition walls), gave precise values of ancient field directions for, Malia Palace (area 13) and Maison äα. These directions are statistically identical (at a 95% confidence level) and also identical to directions obtained from other Late Minoan archaeological sites, on Crete. This, may suggest, simultaneous 'fire-involved' destruction. Other archaeomagnetic directions obtained from Malia (Quartier ɛ), from a 'clay/ash' horizon (34 samples) and hearth (19 samples), produced some spurious results, with detrimental consequences for directional accuracy. For the burnt mud brick, small viscous components were easily removed and evidence from coercivity spectra obtained, after step-wise alternating field demagnetizations, suggests that, the magnetic carriers are single domain, (low titanium), titanomagnetite.

  3. Drought, flood and rainfall analysis under climate change in Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapoglou, Evdokia; Vozinaki, Anthi-Eirini; Tsanis, Ioannis; Nerantzaki, Sofia; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    In this study an analysis on the drought frequency and magnitude under climate change in Crete, Greece is performed. The analysis was performed for the time period from 1983-2100, divided into three sub-periods (1983-1999, 2000-2049 and 2050-2099) for inter-comparison. Two climate models were studied MPI-ESM-LR-r1-CSC-REMO and EC-EARTH-r12-SMHI-RCA4, following three possible representative concentration pathways (+2.6, +4.5 and +8.5 W/m2). In order to perform the analysis the results of a SWAT simulation which covered the entity of Crete using 352 subbasins, was used. Drought events are recognized by using the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) to identify the meteorological drought events and Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) for hydrological droughts. SPI and SRI drought indices, were used in order to identify the number of drought events for each climate model and scenario. In all cases, an increase in both severity and number of drought events was calculated for the future periods, compared to the baseline period 1983-1999. This increase was smaller for the +2.6 W/m2 scenario and largest for the +8.5 W/m2. The magnitude of events with 10 and 100 years return period was calculated for the subbasins of Crete and the most vulnerable were identified, both in terms of severity and the change throughout the years in index magnitude. Next a flood frequency analysis was performed for the entity of Crete Island in order to calculate the magnitude of events with 10 and 100 years return period. In order to perform the flood frequency analysis, the results of the SWAT simulation in terms of runoff in each subbasin are used. By calculating the magnitude of flood events with 10 and 100 years return period and the change in the magnitude throughout the time periods the most vulnerable subbasins are identified. The same frequency analysis was performed for the precipitation at each subbasin, and the magnitude of extreme precipitation events with 10 and 100 years return

  4. Trends in metabolic syndrome risk factors among adolescents in rural Crete between 1989 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Girvalaki, Charis; Vardavas, Constantine; Papandreou, Christopher; Christaki, Georgia; Vergetaki, Anna; Tsiligianni, Ioanna G; Hatzis, Christos; Kafatos, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    To investigate all the important factors contributing to the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) as well as to explore the changes of these factors, over time, by comparing adolescent populations of rural areas of Heraklion, Crete, for the years 2011 and 1989. This study was carried out within two rural areas of the Heraklion region in Crete, Greece. The 1989 study was conducted in the village of Agia Varvara and the respective 2011 study within the municipality of Minoa Pediados. The study population consisted of 150 high school students (97 girls and 69 boys) in 1989 and 66 (30 girls and 36 boys) elementary (6th grade) and high school students in 2011, aged from 12 to 14 years old. Anthropometric, blood pressure and biochemical information was obtained. Of the MetS risk factors studied, only obesity incidence was found higher in 2011 compared to 1989 (obese adolescents 1.3% in 1989 versus 21.2% in 2011, p<0.001). On the other hand, hypertension levels were higher in 1989 compared to 2011 (46.7% versus 6.3%, respectively, p<0.001). In addition, glucose and LDL-C levels were lower in 2011. The present study supports the fact that there are significant changes in metabolic risk factors through time in adolescent populations of Crete, mainly due to the rise in obesity levels as well as to the decrease in hypertension, total cholesterol and LDL- cholesterol, as observed from the comparison of the years 1989 and 2011.

  5. Sources of atmospheric aerosols controlling PM10 levels in Heraklion, Crete during winter time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, Nikolaos; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Kandilogiannaki, Maria; Vavadaki, Katerina; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of Particulate Matter (PM) in the atmosphere have negative impact to human health. Thresholds for ambient concentrations that are defined by the directive 2008/50/EC are frequently exceeded even at background conditions in the Mediterranean region as shown in earlier studies. The sources of atmospheric particles in the urban environment of a medium size city of eastern Mediterranean are studied in the present work in order to better understand the causes and characteristics of exceedances of the daily mean PM10limit value of 50 μg m-3. Measurements were performed at the atmospheric quality measurement station of the Region of Crete, at the Heraklion city center on Crete island, during the winter/spring period of 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. Special emphasis was given to the study of the contribution of Black Carbon (BC) to the levels of PM10. Continuous measurements were performed using a beta-attenuation PM10monitor and a 7-wavelength Aethalometer with a time resolution of 30 and 5 minutes respectively. For direct comparison to background regional conditions, concurrent routine measurements at the atmospheric research station of University of Crete at Finokalia were used as background reference. Analysis of exceedances in the daily PM10 mass concentration showed that the total of the exceedances was related to long range transport of Saharan dust rather than local sources. However, compared to the Finokalia station it was found that there were 20% more exceedances in Heraklion, the addition of transported dust on the local pollution was the reason for the additional exceedance days. Excluding dust events, it was found that the PM10variability was dependent on the BC abundance, traffic during rush hours in the morning and biomass burning for domestic heating in the evening contributed significantly to PM10levels in Heraklion.

  6. Human thermal bioclimatic conditions associated with acute cardiovascular syndromes in Crete Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleta, Anastasia G.; Nastos, Panagiotis T.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the association between bioclimatic conditions and daily counts of admissions for non-fatal acute cardiovascular (acute coronary syndrome, arrhythmia, decompensation of heart failure) syndromes (ACS) registered by the two main hospitals in Heraklion, Crete Island, during a five-year period 2008-2012. The bioclimatic conditions analyzed are based on human thermal bioclimatic indices such as the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI). Mean daily meteorological parameters, such as air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and cloudiness, were acquired from the meteorological station of Heraklion (Hellenic National Meteorological Service). These parameters were used as input variables in modeling the aforementioned thermal indices, in order to interpret the grade of the thermo-physiological stress. The PET and UTCI analysis was performed by the use of the radiation and bioclimate model, "RayMan", which is well-suited to calculate radiation fluxes and human biometeorological indices. Generalized linear models (GLM) were applied to time series of daily numbers of outpatients with ACS against bioclimatic variations, after controlling for possible confounders and adjustment for season and trends. The interpretation of the results of this analysis suggests a significant association between cold weather and increased coronary heart disease incidence, especially in the elderly and males. Additionally, heat stress plays an important role in the configuration of daily ACS outpatients, even in temperate climate, as that in Crete Island. In this point it is worth mentioning that Crete Island is frequently affected by Saharan outbreaks, which are associated in many cases with miscellaneous phenomena, such as Föhn winds - hot and dry winds - causing extreme bioclimatic conditions (strong heat stress). Taking into consideration the projected increased ambient temperature in the future, ACS

  7. Monitoring of Saharan dust fallout on Crete and its contribution to soil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihlén, Tomas; Mattsson, Jan O.; Rapp, Anders; Gagaoudaki, Chrisoula; Kornaros, Georges; Papageorgiou, John

    1995-07-01

    A series of 6 dust traps was established in 1988 distributed over the island of Crete (Greece). Eolian dust has been collected in the traps each year and in each season during the 4years of investigation which is still going on. The mean deposition rate for the 6 stations and 4years was calculated as 21.3g m-2yr-1. Using the highest and lowest values, the deposition can be extrapolated to 6.6-21.4mm for 1000years, which is in agreement with other researchers' findings. The trapped dust shows a homogeneous grain-size distribution. Its mineralogy is similar to what characterizes soil samples from Psiloritis on Crete and source areas in southern Tunisia. In the fine fraction of the soil (particles < 10µm), the contents of the clay mineral kaolinite and of quartz are high. In addition, the oxygen isotope composition of the 3 types of substrate is similar but differs from the weathering products of the limestone bedrock. Statistics of dust episodes covering the period c. 1955-1990 from 10 meteorological stations in Greece revealed that long-distance transport of dust in combination with winds from a southerly sector is common in the Aegean area during spring.

  8. Suicide by pesticide poisoning: findings from the island of Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kastanaki, Anastasia E; Kraniotis, Christos F; Kranioti, Elena F; Nathena, Despoina; Theodorakis, Pavlos N; Michalodimitrakis, Manolis

    2010-01-01

    The role of pesticides in suicidal acts has not yet received adequate attention in Greece despite an evident rise of 39% in pesticide use over the period 1990-1992 to 2002-2004. To investigate the epidemiology of pesticide suicide on the Greek island of Crete, a largely rural agricultural area, and by further exploring the victim profiles, as well as patterns and trends of pesticide ingestion, to suggest probable preventive measures. Self-poisoning suicides between 1999 and 2007 were reviewed and information gathered was entered into a computerized database. The overall incidence of intentional pesticide poisoning was 1.7 per 100,000, representing the second most frequently used suicide method after hanging. The victim profile was composed of the following features: middle aged male, rural habitant, who carried out a suicidal act by consuming primarily methomyl or paraquat (WHO toxicity class Ib and class II, respectively). As to the place of death, the vast majority was found dead in the place of intoxication. Pesticide self-poisoning accounts for a quarter of the suicides in Crete. More detailed research is required to identify aspects of these deaths amenable to prevention, but measures such as bans on the most toxic pesticides and changes in storage practice would appear to be sensible initial approaches.

  9. Tamarix minoa (Tamaricaceae), a new species from the island of Crete (Greece) based on morphological and plastid molecular sequence data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tamarix minoa is described from material collected on the S Aegean island of Crete (Kriti), Greece. A morphological comparison with the species considered to be closest, T. africana and T. hampeana, is provided. An original illustration showing the main morphological characters of the new species is...

  10. Prevalence of obesity and physical inactivity among farmers from Crete (Greece), four decades after the Seven Countries Study.

    PubMed

    Vardavas, C I; Linardakis, M K; Hatzis, C M; Saris, W H M; Kafatos, A G

    2009-03-01

    As first shown 40 years ago farmers from Crete had one of the healthiest lifestyles compared to other participants of the Seven Countries Study. Taking the above into account we investigated the prevalence of obesity and its indexes among farmers in Crete in 2005. 502 farmers (18-79 years old) from the Valley of Messara in Crete were randomly selected and examined. Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (W/Hip Ratio), waist-to-height ratio (W/Height Ratio), conicity index, percentage of body fat and hours of daily light physical activity (LPhA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPhA) were calculated for each subject. 86,1% of the study population was overweight and/or obese. Specifically 42.9% had a BMI of 25.1-30 kg/m(2) and were overweight and 43.2% were obese with a BMI>30 kg/m(2). The percentage of body fat was estimated at 27.3% of total body weight among males and 39.3% among females, while all obesity indexes were found to differ between genders. In comparison to middle aged male farmers from Crete in the 1960s, mean weight has increased by 20 kg (83 kg vs. 63 kg), which has lead to a 7 kg/m(2) in mean BMI (22.9 kg/m(2) vs. 29.8 kg/m(2)), findings that support the fact that the prevalence of obesity in Greece has risen dramatically over the years, even among farmers from Crete, a population historically known for being the gold standard of health status globally.

  11. On the dynamics of synoptic scale cyclones associated with flood events in Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flocas, Helena; Katavoutas, George; Tsanis, Ioannis; Iordanidou, Vasiliki

    2015-04-01

    Flood events in the Mediterranean are frequently linked to synoptic scale cyclones, although topographical or anthropogenic factors can play important role. The knowledge of the vertical profile and dynamics of these cyclones can serve as a reliable early flood warning system that can further help in hazard mitigation and risk management planning. Crete is the second largest island in the eastern Mediterranean region, being characterized by high precipitation amounts during winter, frequently causing flood events. The objective of this study is to examine the dynamic and thermodynamic mechanisms at the upper and lower levels responsible for the generation of these events, according to their origin domain. The flooding events were recorded for a period of almost 20 years. The surface cyclones are identified with the aid of MS scheme that was appropriately modified and extensively employed in the Mediterranean region in previous studies. Then, the software VTS, specially developed for the Mediterranean cyclones, was employed to investigate the vertical extension, slope and dynamic/kinematic characteristics of the surface cyclones. Composite maps of dynamic/thermodynamic parameters, such as potential vorticity, temperature advection, divergence, surface fluxes were then constructed before and during the time of the flood. The dataset includes 6-hourly surface and isobaric analyses on a 0.5° x 0.5° regular latitude-longitude grid, as derived from the ERA-INTERIM Reanalysis of the ECMWF. It was found that cyclones associated with flood events in Crete mainly generate over northern Africa or southern eastern Mediterranean region and experience their minimum pressure over Crete or southwestern Greece. About 84% of the cyclones extend up to 500hPa, demonstrating that they are well vertically well-organized systems. The vast majority (almost 84%) of the surface cyclones attains their minimum pressure when their 500 hpa counterparts are located in the NW or SW, confirming

  12. Integrated protecting plan for beach erosion. A case study in Plaka beach, E. Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrakis, Stelios; Alexandrakis, George; Kozyrakis, George; Hatziyanni, Eleni; Kampanis, Nikolaos

    2015-04-01

    Coastal zones are among the most active areas on Earth, being subjected to extreme wind / wave conditions, thus vulnerable to erosion. In Greece and Crete in particular, beach zones are extremely important for the welfare of the inhabitants, since, apart for the important biological and archaeological value of the beach zones, the socio-economic value is critical since a great number of human activities are concentrated in such areas (touristic facilities, fishing harbors etc.). The present study investigates the erosional procedures observed in Plaka beach, E. Crete, Greece, a highly touristic developed area with great archaeological interest and proposes a cost-effective solution. The factors taken into consideration for the proposed solution in reducing the erosion of the beach were the study of the climatological, geological and geomorphological regime of the area, the recent (~70 years) shifting of the coastline through the study of topographic maps, aerial photographs and satellite images, the creation of detailed bathymetric and seabed classification maps of the area and finally, a risk analysis in terms of erosional phenomena. On the basis of the above, it is concluded that the area under investigation is subjected to an erosional rate of about 1 m/10 years and the total land-loss for the past 70 years is about 4600 m2. Through the simulation of the wave regime we studied 3 possible scenarios, the "do-nothing" scenario, the construction of a detached submerged breakwater at the depth of 3 meters and, finally, the armoring of the existing beach-wall through the placement of appropriate size and material boulders, forming an artificial slope for the reducing of the wave breaking energy and a small scale nourishment plan. As a result, through the modeling of the above, the most appropriate and cost-effective solution was found to be the third, armoring of the existing coastal wall and nourishment of the beach periodically, thus the further undermining of the

  13. Neotectonic control on drainage systems: GIS-based geomorphometric and morphotectonic assessment for Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyriou, Athanasios V.; Teeuw, Richard M.; Soupios, Pantelis; Sarris, Apostolos

    2017-11-01

    Geomorphic indices can be used to examine the geomorphological and tectonic processes responsible for the development of the drainage basins. Such indices can be dependent on tectonics, erosional processes and other factors that control the morphology of the landforms. The inter-relationships between geomorphic indices can determine the influence of regional tectonic activity in the shape development of drainage basins. A Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) procedure has been used to perform an integrated cluster analysis that highlights information associated with the dominant regional tectonic activity. Factor Analysis (FA) and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) were considered within that procedure, producing a representation of the distributed regional tectonic activity of the drainage basins studied. The study area is western Crete, located in the outer fore-arc of the Hellenic subduction zone, one of the world's most tectonically active regions. The results indicate that in the landscape evolution of the study area (especially the western basins) tectonic controls dominate over lithological controls.

  14. Microtremors for seismic response assessments of important modern and historical structures of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarita, Moisidi; Filippos, Vallianatos

    2017-12-01

    Strengthening seismic risk resilience undertaken by the civil protection authorities is an important issue towards to the guidelines given by Sendai Framework, 2013 European Union Civil Protection legislation and the global agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Moreover, in recent years it has been emphasized that site effect specifications are important issues for the seismic hazard assessments of modern, historical and monumental structures. This study assess the frequencies of vibration of historical, monumental and modern structures in the cities of Chania, Rethymno and Heraklion of Crete using ambient noise recordings processed through the Horizontal to Vertical spectral ratio and examines potential soil-structure interaction phenomena. Examples of the seismic response of high rise structures such as a church bell tower and the lighthouses in Chania are presented.

  15. First endemic freshwater Gammarus from Crete and its evolutionary history-an integrative taxonomy approach.

    PubMed

    Hupało, Kamil; Mamos, Tomasz; Wrzesińska, Weronika; Grabowski, Michał

    2018-01-01

    The Mediterranean islands are known as natural laboratories of evolution with a high level of endemic biodiversity. However, most biodiversity assessments have focused mainly on terrestrial and marine fauna, leaving the freshwater animals aside. Crete is one of the largest islands in the Mediterranean Basin, with a long history of isolation from the continental mainland. Gammarid amphipods are often dominant in macrozoobenthic communities in European inland waters. They are widely used in biomonitoring and exotoxicological studies. Herein, we describe Gammarus plaitisi sp. nov., endemic to Cretan streams, based on morphological characters and a set of molecular species delimitation methods using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S rRNA genes as well as nuclear 28S rDNA, ITS1 and EF1-alpha genes. The divergence of the new species is strongly connected with the geological history of the island supporting its continental origin.

  16. Impact of the financial crisis on adherence to treatment of a rural population in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsiligianni, Ioanna G; Papadokostakis, Polyvios; Prokopiadou, Dimitra; Stefanaki, Ioanna; Tsakountakis, Nikolaos; Lionis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    The global economic crisis has affected Greece. Data on patients' adherence to medications for chronic diseases are missing. The objective of this study was to identify to what extent the financial crisis and the repeated pharmacists strike have influenced patients adherence to therapy. A quantitative and qualitative study in rural Crete was designed and implemented in February 2013 with the use of a pretested questionnaire with opened and closed questions. Setting Rural practices in a well-defined geographical area of Crete. The questionnaire was addressed in all patients that visited the rural practices with chronic or acute diseases for two consecutive weeks. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s): Age, annual income, adherence to therapy, patient's views and feelings. 288 patients participated. The mean age was 68±6.87. The majority of the patients have lowered the doses of several medications by themselves as they weren't able to afford the cost ie; all patients receiving insulin had lowered the dosages; 46.42% of patients with COPD or asthma had stopped their medications completely, decreased dosages or used similar medications that had in the past; patients with dislipidemia received their medications as suggested only in 51.8%. Patients with cardiovascular diseases received their medications as suggested in 75.6% while the rest have dismissed or skipped dosages. Most common emotions reported were those of sadness, fear, stress, anxiety and isolation. The economic crisis has influenced patients' adherence to therapy in rural areas as well as their psychological and emotional status. There is an urgent need for action within the context of primary care.

  17. Absolute Sea Level Monitoring and Altimeter Calibration At Gavdos, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.; Gavdos Team

    We present the mean sea level (MSL) monitoring aspect of the altimeter calibration fa- cility under deployment on western Crete and the isle of Gavdos. The Eastern Mediter- ranean area is one of great interest for its intense tectonic activity as well as for its regional oceanography. Recent observations have convincingly demonstrated the im- portance of that area for the regional meteorological and climatological changes. Tide- gauge monitoring with GPS has gained importance lately since tectonics contaminate the inferred sea level variations, and a global network of tide-gauges with long his- torical records can be used as satellite altimeter calibration sites for current and fu- ture missions (e.g. TOPEX/POSEIDON, GFO, JASON-1, ENVISAT, etc.). This is at present a common IOC-GLOSS-IGS effort, already underway (TIGA). Crete hosts two of the oldest tide-gauges in the regional network and our project will further ex- pand it to the south of the island with a new site on the isle of Gavdos, the southernmost European parcel of land. One component of our "GAVDOS" project is the repeated occupation of two already in existence tide-gauge sites at Souda Bay and Heraklion, and their tie to the new facility. We show here initial results from positioning of these sites and some of the available tidal records. Gavdos is situated under a ground-track crossing point of the present T/P and JASON-1 orbits. It is an ideal calibration site if the tectonic motions are monitored precisely and continuously. Our plans include the deployment of additional instrumentation at this site: GPS and DORIS beacons for positioning, transponders for direct calibration, water vapor radiometers, GPS-loaded buoys, airborne surveys with gravimeters and laser profiling lidars, etc., to ensure the best possible and most reliable results.

  18. Absolute Sea-level Monitoring and Altimeter Calibration Facility at Gavdos, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.

    2002-12-01

    We introduce the recently instrumented mean sea level (MSL) monitoring facility on western Crete and the isle of Gavdos. We will focus on the altimeter calibration aspect of the facility, in particular, its application to the JASON mission. The Eastern Mediterranean area is one of great interest for its intense tectonic activity as well as for its regional oceanography. Recent observations have convincingly demonstrated the importance of that area for the regional meteorological and climatologic changes. Tide-gauge monitoring with continuous GPS has gained importance lately since tectonics contaminate the inferred sea level variations, and a global network of tide-gauges with long historical records can be used as satellite altimeter calibration sites (e.g. TOPEX/POSEIDON, GFO, JASON-1, ENVISAT, etc.). This is at present a common IOC-GLOSS-IGS effort, already underway (TIGA), and our facility is part of it. Crete hosts two of the oldest tide-gauges in the regional network and our project will further expand it to the south with a new site on the isle of Gavdos, the southernmost European parcel of land. One component of our "GAVDOS" project is the repeated occupation of two already in existence tide-gauge sites at Souda Bay and Heraklion, and their tie to the new facility. We show here initial results from positioning of these sites and some of the available tidal records. Gavdos is situated under a ground-track crossing point of the original T/P and present JASON-1 orbits. It is an ideal calibration site if the tectonic motions are monitored precisely and continuously. The facility hosts in addition to the tide gauges: GPS and DORIS beacons for positioning, transponders for direct calibration, water vapor radiometers and solar spectrometers, GPS-loaded buoys, airborne surveys with gravimeters and laser profiling lidars, transportable laser ranging systems, etc., to ensure the best possible and most reliable results.

  19. Epidemiology, Microbiological and Clinical Features, Treatment, and Outcomes of Infective Endocarditis in Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Papakonstantinou, Panteleimon E.; Samonis, George; Andrianaki, Angeliki M.; Christofaki, Maria; Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Papadakis, John; Gikas, Achilleas

    2018-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the epidemiology, clinical and microbiological features, treatment, and outcomes of infective endocarditis (IE) on the island of Crete, a region with high levels of antimicrobial resistance. Materials and Methods Medical records of all hospitalized patients diagnosed with IE at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece, from 1995 to 2015, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who met the modified Duke's criteria for definite or possible IE were included. Results A total of 82 IE patients (median age 67 [range 21–86] years) were included. Most patients suffered from left-sided IE (94%), while most cases of infection occurred in native valves (53.6%). Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria were lacking in almost half of the patient population. The leading causative microorganism was Staphylococcus aureus, isolated in 24 cases (29%), followed by Streptococcus spp. in 15 (18%) and Enterococcus spp. in 12 (14.5%). A number of rare and difficult to treat microorganisms had been identified, such as Gemella morbillorum in four cases (4.5%), Streptococcus lugdunensis in two (2.5%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae in one (1%). One patient was serologically positive for Coxiella burnetii (1%). All patients received empirical antimicrobial treatment, proven appropriate in 39 blood culture-positive patients (56.5%). Thirteen (16%) patients were classified as culture negative. Seven patients (8.5%) were surgically treated. In-hospital death occurred in 9 patients (11%). Conclusion Changes in IE profile requires continuous epidemiological updates. Staphylococcus and Streptococcus spp. remain the most common etiologic agents. However, the presence of uncommon and/or difficult to treat pathogens raise concerns on the appropriate prophylaxis as well as empirical treatment. PMID:29637749

  20. Impact of climate change on water resources status: A case study for Crete Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroulis, Aristeidis G.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis N.; Jacob, Daniela

    2013-02-01

    SummaryAn assessment of the impact of global climate change on the water resources status of the island of Crete, for a range of 24 different scenarios of projected hydro-climatological regime is presented. Three "state of the art" Global Climate Models (GCMs) and an ensemble of Regional Climate Models (RCMs) under emission scenarios B1, A2 and A1B provide future precipitation (P) and temperature (T) estimates that are bias adjusted against observations. The ensemble of RCMs for the A1B scenario project a higher P reduction compared to GCMs projections under A2 and B1 scenarios. Among GCMs model results, the ECHAM model projects a higher P reduction compared to IPSL and CNCM. Water availability for the whole island at basin scale until 2100 is estimated using the SAC-SMA rainfall-runoff model And a set of demand and infrastructure scenarios are adopted to simulate potential water use. While predicted reduction of water availability under the B1 emission scenario can be handled with water demand stabilized at present values and full implementation of planned infrastructure, other scenarios require additional measures and a robust signal of water insufficiency is projected. Despite inherent uncertainties, the quantitative impact of the projected changes on water availability indicates that climate change plays an important role to water use and management in controlling future water status in a Mediterranean island like Crete. The results of the study reinforce the necessity to improve and update local water management planning and adaptation strategies in order to attain future water security.

  1. Association of allergic rhinitis with pesticide use among grape farmers in Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Chatzi, Leda; Alegakis, Athanasios; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Siafakas, Nikolaos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Lionis, Christos

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore the association of allergic rhinitis with the use of pesticides among grape farmers in Crete. Methods A cross‐sectional study of 120 grape farmers and 100 controls at the Malevisi region in Northern Crete was conducted. The protocol consisted of a questionnaire, skin prick tests for 16 common allergens, measurement of specific IgE antibodies against 8 allergens, and spirometry before and after bronchodilatation. Results Grape farmers who used pesticides had higher prevalence rates of allergic rhinitis symptoms (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.4 to 6.2) compared with grape farmers who reported no current use of pesticides, and control subjects. Logistic regression models controlling for age, sex and smoking status showed that 6 of the 12 predefined groups of major pesticides were significantly related to allergic rhinitis symptoms. The highest risks were observed for paraquat and other bipyridyl herbicides (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0 to 4.8), dithiocarbamate fungicides (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 5.3) and carbamate insecticides (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.4 to 6.5). A factor analysis of pesticides used identified 3 distinct factors. The most common factor was that of multiple pesticide use that included 9 pesticides and was significantly associated with allergic rhinitis (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0 to 2.3). ORs were higher when allergic rhinitis was defined using both questionnaire data on symptoms and atopy. Conclusions Occupational exposure to multiple agricultural chemicals could be related to allergic rhinitis in grape farmers. PMID:17182637

  2. Municipal solid waste composition determination supporting the integrated solid waste management system in the island of Crete.

    PubMed

    Gidarakos, E; Havas, G; Ntzamilis, P

    2006-01-01

    A one-year survey was conducted in the greater region of Crete (located at the lower region of the Aegean Sea) for the purpose of identifying waste composition (including chemical and physical characterization), as well as any seasonal variation. The investigation was carried out repeatedly at seven landfills and one transfer station in Crete, in four phases. Each sampling phase corresponded to a season (autumn, winter, spring, summer). ASTM D5231-92(2003) standard method and RCRA Waste Sampling Draft Technical Guidance were used. Hand sorting was used for classifying the collected wastes into the following categories: plastics, paper, metals, aluminium, leather-wood-textiles-rubbers, organic wastes, non-combustibles and miscellaneous. Further analysis included proximate and ultimate analysis of combustible materials. Metals such as lead, cadmium and mercury were also investigated. The results show that there has been a significant decrease of organic wastes during the last decade due to the increase of packaging materials, as a result of a change in consumption patterns. Three main waste categories were determined: organic wastes, paper and plastics, which combined represent 76% of the total waste in Crete. Furthermore, a high fraction of glass and a seasonal variation of aluminium indicate a strong correlation of waste composition with certain human activities, such as tourism. There is also a variation between the municipal solid waste (MSW) composition in the region of Crete (2003-2004) and MSW composition suggested in the National Solid Waste Planning (2000) [National Solid Waste Planning, 2000. Completion and particularization of Common Ministerial Act 113944//1944/1997: National Solid Waste Planning, June 2000]. The results of this survey are to be utilized by the regional solid waste authorities in order to establish an integrated waste treatment site, capable of fulfilling the regional waste management demands.

  3. Municipal solid waste composition determination supporting the integrated solid waste management system in the island of Crete

    SciTech Connect

    Gidarakos, E.; Havas, G.; Ntzamilis, P.

    A one-year survey was conducted in the greater region of Crete (located at the lower region of the Aegean Sea) for the purpose of identifying waste composition (including chemical and physical characterization), as well as any seasonal variation. The investigation was carried out repeatedly at seven landfills and one transfer station in Crete, in four phases. Each sampling phase corresponded to a season (autumn, winter, spring, summer). ASTM D5231-92(2003) standard method and RCRA Waste Sampling Draft Technical Guidance were used. Hand sorting was used for classifying the collected wastes into the following categories: plastics, paper, metals, aluminium, leather-wood-textiles-rubbers, organic wastes,more » non-combustibles and miscellaneous. Further analysis included proximate and ultimate analysis of combustible materials. Metals such as lead, cadmium and mercury were also investigated. The results show that there has been a significant decrease of organic wastes during the last decade due to the increase of packaging materials, as a result of a change in consumption patterns. Three main waste categories were determined: organic wastes, paper and plastics, which combined represent 76% of the total waste in Crete. Furthermore, a high fraction of glass and a seasonal variation of aluminium indicate a strong correlation of waste composition with certain human activities, such as tourism. There is also a variation between the municipal solid waste (MSW) composition in the region of Crete (2003-2004) and MSW composition suggested in the National Solid Waste Planning (2000) [National Solid Waste Planning, 2000. Completion and particularization of Common Ministerial Act 113944//1944/1997: National Solid Waste Planning, June 2000]. The results of this survey are to be utilized by the regional solid waste authorities in order to establish an integrated waste treatment site, capable of fulfilling the regional waste management demands.« less

  4. Human management and landscape changes at Palaikastro (Eastern Crete) from the Late Neolithic to the Early Minoan period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañellas-Boltà, N.; Riera-Mora, S.; Orengo, H. A.; Livarda, A.; Knappett, C.

    2018-03-01

    On the east Mediterranean island of Crete, a hierarchical society centred on large palatial complexes emerges during the Bronze Age. The economic basis for this significant social change has long been debated, particularly concerning the role of olive cultivation in the island's agricultural system. With the aim of studying vegetation changes and human management to understand the landscape history from Late Neolithic to Bronze Age, two palaeoenvironmental records have been studied at Kouremenos marsh, near the site of Palaikastro (Eastern Crete). Pollen, NPP and charcoal particles analyses evidenced seven phases of landscape change, resulting from different agricultural and pastoral practices and the use of fire probably to manage vegetation. Moreover, the Kouremenos records show the importance of the olive tree in the area. They reflect a clear trend for its increasing use and exploitation from 3600 cal yr BC (Final Neolithic) to the Early Minoan period, that is coeval with an opening of the landscape. The increase of Olea pollen was due to the expansion of the tree and its management using pruning and mechanical cleaning. The onset of olive expansion at c. 3600 cal yr BC places Crete among the first locales in the eastern Mediterranean in the management of this tree. Between c. 2780 and 2525 cal yr BC the landscape was largely occupied by olive and grasslands, coinciding with an increase in grazing practices. The high Olea pollen percentages (40-45%) suggest an intensive and large-scale exploitation of the olive tree. The results suggest that a complex and organized landscape with complementary land uses and activities was already in place since the Final Neolithic. The notable expansion of olive trees suggests the relevance of olive exploitation in the socio-economic development of Minoan towns of eastern Crete. Other crops, such as cereals and vine, and activities such as grazing have also played an important role in the configuration of the past landscape.

  5. Measuring the burden of herpes zoster and post herpetic neuralgia within primary care in rural Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research has indicated that general practitioners (GPs) have good clinical judgment in regards to diagnosing and managing herpes zoster (HZ) within clinical practice in a country with limited resources for primary care and general practice. The objective of the current study was to assess the burden of HZ and post herpetic neuralgia (PHN) within rural general practices in Crete, Greece. Methods The current study took place within a rural setting in Crete, Greece during the period of November 2007 to November 2009 within the catchment area in which the Cretan Rural Practice-based Research Network is operating. In total 19 GP's from 14 health care units in rural Crete were invited to participate, covering a total turnover patient population of approximately 25, 000 subjects. For the purpose of this study an electronic record database was constructed and used as the main tool for monitoring HZ and PHN incidence. Stress related data was also collected with the use of the Short Anxiety Screening Test (SAST). Results The crude incidence rate of HZ was 1.4/1000 patients/year throughout the entire network of health centers and satellite practices, while among satellite practices alone it was calculated at 1.3/1000 patients/year. Additionally, the standardised incidence density within satellite practices was calculated at 1.6/1000 patients/year. In regards to the stress associated with HZ and PHN, the latter were found to have lower levels of anxiety, as assessed through the SAST score (17.4 ± 3.9 vs. 21.1 ± 5.7; p = 0.029). Conclusions The implementation of an electronic surveillance system was feasible so as to measure the burden of HZ and PHN within the rural general practice setting in Crete. PMID:22145678

  6. Attitudes to kidney donation among primary care patients in rural Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Symvoulakis, Emmanouil K; Komninos, Ioannis D; Antonakis, Nikos; Morgan, Myfanwy; Alegakis, Athanasios; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Chatziarsenis, Marios; Philalithis, Anastas; Jones, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Background In Greece, there is limited research on issues related to organ donation, and the low rate of registration as donors requires explanation. This study reports the findings of a survey of knowledge and attitudes to kidney donation among primary care patients in rural Crete, Greece. Methods Two rural primary care settings in the island of Crete, Anogia Health Centre and Vrachasi Practice, were involved in a questionnaire survey. This was conducted among primary care patients (aged 18 years and over) with routine appointments, to assess their knowledge and attitudes to kidney donation. General practitioners (GPs) recruited patients and questionnaires were completed following the patients' medical consultation. Pearson's chi square tests were used and crude odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated in order to investigate into the possible associations between the respondents' knowledge, attitudes and specific concerns in relation to their socio-demographic features. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine differences by geographical location. Results The 224 (92.5%) of the 242 primary care attenders who were approached agreed to participate. Only 2.2% (5/224) of the respondents carried a donor card. Most participants (84.4%, 189/224) did not feel well informed about registering as a kidney donor. More than half of the respondents (54.3%, 121/223) were unwilling to register as a kidney donor and donate kidneys for transplant after death. Over a third of respondents (35.4%, 79/223) were not confident that medical teams would try as hard as possible to save the life of a person who has agreed to donate organs. People with a higher level of education were more likely to be willing to register as kidney donors [(OR: 3.3; 95% CI: 1.8–6.0), p < 0.001)] and to be less worried about their kidneys being removed after death [(OR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1–0.5), p < 0.001)] than those having a lower level of education. Conclusion Lack

  7. Clinical undergraduate training and assessment in primary health care: Experiences gained from Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Belos, George; Lionis, Christos; Fioretos, Michael; Vlachonicolis, John; Philalithis, Anastas

    2005-01-01

    Background Primary Health Care (PHC) is increasingly being introduced into undergraduate medical education. In Greece, the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Crete was the first to introduce a 4-week long training in primary health care. This paper presents the experiences gained from the initial implementation of the teaching of practice-based primary care in rural Crete and reports on the assessment scale that was developed. Methods 284 students' case write-ups from the 6 primary care units (PCUs) where they were allocated for the period 1990 to 1994 were analysed. The demographic data of the students and patients and the number of home visits were studied. Content analysis of the students' write-ups was carried out, using an assessment scale consisting of 10 dichotomous variables, in order to quantify eight (8) primary qualitative criteria. Results Internal reliability was estimated by the index KR20 = 0.67. Face and content validity was found to conform to the standards set for the course, while logistic linear regression analysis showed that the quality criteria could be used as an assessment scale. The number of home visits carried out varied between the various different PCUs (p < 0.001) and more were reported in the write-ups that fulfilled criteria related to the biopsychosocial approach (p < 0.05). Nine quantitative criteria were fulfilled in more than 90% of case reports, but laboratory investigations were reported only in 69.0% of case reports. Statistically significant differences between the PCUs were observed in the fulfilment of criteria related to the community approach, patient assessment and information related to the patient's perception of the illness, but not to those related to aspects of clinical patient management. Differences in reporting laboratory investigations (p < 0.001) are explained by the lack of such facilities in some PCUs. Demographic characteristics of the patients or the students' do not affect the criteria. Conclusion

  8. Attitudes to kidney donation among primary care patients in rural Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Symvoulakis, Emmanouil K; Komninos, Ioannis D; Antonakis, Nikos; Morgan, Myfanwy; Alegakis, Athanasios; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Chatziarsenis, Marios; Philalithis, Anastas; Jones, Roger

    2009-02-10

    In Greece, there is limited research on issues related to organ donation, and the low rate of registration as donors requires explanation. This study reports the findings of a survey of knowledge and attitudes to kidney donation among primary care patients in rural Crete, Greece. Two rural primary care settings in the island of Crete, Anogia Health Centre and Vrachasi Practice, were involved in a questionnaire survey. This was conducted among primary care patients (aged 18 years and over) with routine appointments, to assess their knowledge and attitudes to kidney donation. General practitioners (GPs) recruited patients and questionnaires were completed following the patients' medical consultation. Pearson's chi square tests were used and crude odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated in order to investigate into the possible associations between the respondents' knowledge, attitudes and specific concerns in relation to their socio-demographic features. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine differences by geographical location. The 224 (92.5%) of the 242 primary care attenders who were approached agreed to participate. Only 2.2% (5/224) of the respondents carried a donor card. Most participants (84.4%, 189/224) did not feel well informed about registering as a kidney donor. More than half of the respondents (54.3%, 121/223) were unwilling to register as a kidney donor and donate kidneys for transplant after death. Over a third of respondents (35.4%, 79/223) were not confident that medical teams would try as hard as possible to save the life of a person who has agreed to donate organs. People with a higher level of education were more likely to be willing to register as kidney donors [(OR: 3.3; 95% CI: 1.8-6.0), p < 0.001)] and to be less worried about their kidneys being removed after death [(OR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.5), p < 0.001)] than those having a lower level of education. Lack of knowledge and information regarding

  9. Coastal geomorphological study of pocket beaches in Crete, with the use of planview indices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, George; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Poulos, Serafim; Kampanis, Nikos

    2013-04-01

    The formation of pocket beaches is a result of a large number of processes and mechanisms that vary on space and time scales. This study aims in defining the planform characteristics of pocket beaches in Crete Isl. and to determine their sheltering effect, embaymentization and their status of equilibrium. Thus, data from 30 pocket beaches along the coastline of Crete, with different geomorphological and hydrodynamical setting, were collected. Planform parameters were applied and coastal planview indices from the bibliography were applied. The parameters included: length and orientation of the headlands between the pocket beach; length between the bay entrance and the center of the beach; lengths of the i) embayed shoreline, ii) embayed beach, iii) beach segment located at the shadow of a headland; linear distance and orientation between the edges of the embayed beach; direction of the incident wave energy flux; wave crest obliquity to the control line; beach area, maximum beach width and headland orientation and river/ torrent catchment areas in beach zones that an active river system existed (Bowman et al.2009). For the morphological mapping of the study areas, 1:5000 orthophoto maps were used. Wave regime has been calculated with the use of prognostic equations and utilising local wind data (mean annual frequency of wind speed and direction), provided by the Wind and Wave Atlas of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The diffraction and refraction of the waves has been simulated with the use of numerical models. The study shows that Cretan pocket beaches display a wide range of indentation, suggesting that is the result of several parameters that include tectonics, coastal hydrodynamics and river catchment areas. The more indented bays are, the shorter their beaches become, while low-indented pocket beaches are the widest and the longest ones. Beaches with headland with large length appear to be more protected and receive smaller amount of wave energy. Most of the

  10. Orientations of the Bronze Age Villa Complex at Vathypetro in Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, M.; Henriksson, G.

    We present the results of our archaeoastronomical study of the villa and the tripartite shrine at Vathypetro. We found orientations to three major celestial events (counting the equinoxes as one): to sunrise at the equinoxes and the winter solstice in the case of the villa and to sunset at the summer solstice in the case of the tripartite stone. The axis of symmetry of the major room of the villa was oriented to sunrise of the 22nd of October in the Late Minoan period. This was also the orientation of the axis of symmetry of the main cult room in the west wing of the palace at Malia. We propose that this orientation marked the time for planting and thus the beginning of the agricultural year. It is unusual that archaeoastronomical studies make contributions to historical debates. However certain orientations dating after Late Minoan I seem to reflect the Mycenaean presence in Crete. The orientation of the tripartite shrine to sunset at the summer solstice is the same as the orientations of the small shrines at Malia and Agia Triada, all of which we argue to have been built for Mycenaeans. We propose that there are two types of orientations in the island: those to the east within the limits for sunrise - made by Minoans, and some to the west - made by (or for) Mycenaeans.

  11. Suicide by firearms on the island of Crete: a 9-year record.

    PubMed

    Kastanaki, Anastasia E; Kranioti, Elena F; Papavdi, Asteria; Theodorakis, Pavlos N; Michalodimitrakis, Manolis

    2010-01-01

    Whereas firearm suicide mortality has been a longstanding public concern worldwide, in Greece no systematic analysis has been reported so far despite the recent evidence of a rising rate of gun ownership. To estimate the proportion of firearm suicides on the island of Crete, Southern Greece, well-known for its widespread gun ownership; to describe the victims' sociodemographic profile and firearm-related suicide variables; and to assess the severity of suicidal intention in the group. Records of suicides between 1999 and 2007 were reviewed and information was extracted into a computerized database. A rating of the circumstances section of the Beck's Suicide Intent Scale (SIS) for each case was also performed. The firearm suicide rate was 1.3 per 100,000, with males constituting the vast majority. These men were more likely to be less than 55 years of age, to have lived in the western part of the island, to have some degree of planning prior to the suicidal act, and to have used a shotgun, but less likely to have left a note. As an important first step toward implementing preventive initiatives the authors stress the need for a thorough look at the sociocultural factors associated with firearms in the region.

  12. Quaternary marine terraces as indicators of neotectonic activity of the Ierapetra normal fault SE Crete (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaki-Papanastassiou, K.; Karymbalis, E.; Papanastassiou, D.; Maroukian, H.

    2009-03-01

    Along the southern coast of the island of Crete, a series of east-west oriented Late Pleistocene marine terraces exist, demonstrating the significant coastal uplift of this area. Five uplifted terraces were mapped in detail and correlated with Middle-Late Pleistocene sea-level stands following the global sea-level fluctuations. These terraces are deformed by the vertical movements of the NNE-SSW trending and dipping west Ierapetra normal fault. The elevation of the inner edges of the terraces was estimated at several sites by using aerial photographs and detailed topographic maps and diagrams, supported by extensive field observations. In this way detailed geomorphological maps were constructed utilizing GIS technology. All these allowed us to obtain rates of 0.3 mm/yr for the regional component of uplift and 0.1 mm/yr for the vertical slip movements of the Ierapetra fault. Based on the obtained rates and the existence of coastal archaeological Roman ruins it is concluded that Ierapetra fault should have been reactivated sometime after the Roman period.

  13. Resistance phenotypes and susceptibility of contemporary Serratia isolates in the university hospital of Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Samonis, George; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Maraki, Sofia; Stamouli, Petroula; Mavromanolaki, Viktoria-Eirini; Kofteridis, Diamantis P; Falagas, Matthew E

    To study changes in the susceptibility of Serratia spp. in Crete, Greece (2010-2015). Non-duplicate isolates were examined using automated systems. Phenotypic confirmatory tests were applied. Three hundred and seventy-eight Serratia spp. were analyzed. Serratia marcescens (88.3%) was the predominant species. Fluoroquinolones (97.9%), carbapenems (97.4%) and fosfomycin (97.4%) were the most active followed by amikacin (95.5%), piperacillin/tazobactam (94.7%), and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (94.4%). The activity of 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins was 87-88.6%. The distribution of multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains varied, with a trend towards increasing frequency. ESBL (7.9%), carbapenemase (2.9%), AmpC (2.1%) and aminoglycoside modifying enzyme (10.6%) production were the commonest resistant phenotypes. The susceptibility of Serratia spp. varied during the study period a trend towards decreasing susceptibility, especially for non-carbapenem β-lactams and aminoglycosides.

  14. 2014 Southern δ-Aquariid observing campaign - carried out from Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, T.

    2016-01-01

    With a peak ZHR of 15-20 at the end of July, the Southern δ-Aquariids rank as a major annual shower, but observation is often neglected in favor of the much more active Perseids of August, mainly as a consequence of their southerly radiant, which makes the stream a prominent target from low latitudes and the southern hemisphere. The extended activity period of more than a month, lacking a distinctive peak, and the paucity of bright meteors does not enhance interest of most observers, either. Nevertheless, one has not to go too far south in order to monitor the stream properly to gain scientific results. The Greek island of Crete, at the southernmost tip of Europe, is such a place, offering sufficiently dark skies and a 90 % probability of clear weather in July and August. Encouraged by a New Moon on July 26th an eight-night-long visual observing campaign was carried out in 2014. As a consequence, I managed to record nearly 250 Southern δ-Aquariids within 40 hours of effective observing time. An impression of the campaign together with a summary of the results is presented.

  15. Projections of water resources availability in Crete for the 21st century under the global change perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroulis, A. G.; Tsanis, I. K.; Jacob, D.

    2012-04-01

    A robust signal of a warmer and drier climate over the western Mediterranean region is projected from the majority of climate models. This effect appears more pronounced during warm periods, when the seasonal decrease of precipitation can exceed control climatology by 25-30%. The rapid development of Crete in the last 30 years has exerted strong pressures on the natural resources of the region. Urbanization and growth of agriculture, tourism and industry had strong impact on the water resources of island by substantially increasing water demand. The objective of this study is to analyze and assess the impact of global change on the water resources status for the island of Crete for a range of 24 different scenarios of projected hydro-climatological regime, demand and supply potential. Water resources application issues analyzed and facilitated within this study, focusing on a refinement of the future water demands of the island, and comparing with "state of the art" global climate model (GCM) results and an ensemble of regional climate models (RCMs) under three different emission scenarios, to estimate water resources availability, during the 21st century. A robust signal of water scarcity is projected for all the combinations of emission (A2, A1B and B1), demand and infrastructure scenarios. Despite the uncertainty of the assessments, the quantitative impact of the projected changes on water availability indicates that climate change plays an equally important role to water use and management in controlling future water status in a Mediterranean island like the island of Crete. The outcome of this analysis will assist in short and long-term strategic water resources planning by prioritizing water related infrastructure development.

  16. Regional scale hydrologic modeling of a karst-dominant geomorphology: The case study of the Island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagò, Anna; Efstathiou, Dionissios; Bouraoui, Fayçal; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P.; Franchini, Marco; Bidoglio, Giovanni; Kritsotakis, Marinos

    2016-09-01

    Crete Island (Greece) is a karst dominated region that faces limited water supply and increased seasonal demand, especially during summer for agricultural and touristic uses. In addition, due to the mountainous terrain, interbasin water transfer is very limited. The resulting water imbalance requires a correct quantification of available water resources in view of developing appropriate management plans to face the problem of water shortage. The aim of this work is the development of a methodology using the SWAT model and a karst-flow model (KSWAT, Karst SWAT model) for the quantification of a spatially and temporally explicit hydrologic water balance of karst-dominated geomorphology in order to assess the sustainability of the actual water use. The application was conducted in the Island of Crete using both hard (long time series of streamflow and spring monitoring stations) and soft data (i.e. literature information of individual processes). The KSWAT model estimated the water balance under normal hydrological condition as follows: 6400 Mm3/y of precipitation, of which 40% (2500 Mm3/y) was lost through evapotranspiration, 5% was surface runoff and 55% percolated into the soil contributing to lateral flow (2%), and recharging the shallow (9%) and deep aquifer (44%). The water yield was estimated as 22% of precipitation, of which about half was the contribution from spring discharges (9% of precipitation). The application of the KSWAT model increased our knowledge about water resources availability and distribution in Crete under different hydrologic conditions. The model was able to capture the hydrology of the karst areas allowing a better management and planning of water resources under scarcity.

  17. Measuring the frequency of functional gastrointestinal disorders in rural Crete: a need for improving primary care physicians' diagnostic skills.

    PubMed

    Lionis, Christos; Olsen-Faresjo, Ashild; Anastasiou, Foteini; Wallander, Mari-Ann; Johansson, Saga; Faresjo, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    Studies of the frequency and aetiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders in the general population have received increasing interest over the past few years; the field seems to be neglected in Southern Europe. The aim of this study was to report on the frequency of functional dyspepsia (FD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroenteritis within the primary care setting, to provide some information on the extent to which the recorded diagnoses in the physicians' notes fulfil existing diagnostic criteria. A retrospective study was used, where all new cases of these diseases at five primary health care centres in three rural and two semi-rural areas of Crete were identified by scrutinizing medical records from 280,000 consecutive visits during a 4 year period. The occurrence rate per 1000 person-years were calculated for the three conditions. We also checked the extent to which the Talley's criteria for FD and Rome II diagnostic criteria for IBS were followed. Gastroenteritis was revealed to be a quite frequent health problem among the rural population on Crete, while the occurrence rates for other problems, such as dyspepsia and IBS, were found to be lower than expected. IBS was over-represented among women compared with men, OR 2.04 (CI 1.39-3.00). In many cases a diagnosis of FD, IBS or gastroenteritis was evident to the research team on the basis of findings recorded in the notes, but the diagnosis was not recorded by the clinician at the time of consultation. This study yielded two key messages: the first that gastroenteritis is still a frequent health problem, and the second that primary care physicians in rural Crete seem to fail in adequately diagnosing FD and IBS and need further training.

  18. Present and future responses of growing degree days for Crete Island in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparrizos, Spyridon; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Climate affects practically all the physiological processes that determine plant life (IPCC, 2014). A major challenge and objective of the agricultural science is to predict the occurrences of specific physical or biological events. For this reason, flower phenology has been widely used to study the flowering in plant species of economic interest, and in this concept, temperature and heat units have been widely accepted as the most important factors affecting processes leading to flowering. The determination of heat requirements in the first developing phases of plants has been expressed as Growing Degree Days (GDD). Determination of GDD is useful for achieving a better understanding of the flowering season development in several plant species, and for forecasting when flowering will occur (Paparrizos and Matzarakis, 2017). Temperature and GDD represent two important spatially-dynamic climatic variables, as they both play vital roles in influencing forest development by directly affecting plant functions such as evapotranspiration, photosynthesis and plant transpiration. Understanding the spatial distribution of GDD is crucial to the practice of sustainable agricultural and forest management, as GDD relates to the integration of growth and provides precise point estimates (Hasan et al., 2007; Matzarakis et al., 2007). The aim of the current study was to estimate and map through downscaling spatial interpolation and multi-linear regression techniques, the future variation of GDD for the periods 2021-2050 and 2071-2100, under the A1B and B1 IPCC emission scenarios in relation with the reference periods for Crete Island in Greece. Future temperature data were obtained, validated and analysed from the ENSEMBLES European project. A combination of dynamical and statistical approach was conducted in order to downscale and perform the spatial interpolation of GDD through ArcGIS 10.2.1. The results indicated that in the future, GDD will be increased and the existing

  19. The impact of changing climate conditions on the hydrological behavior of several Mediterranean sub-catchments in Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eirini Vozinaki, Anthi; Tapoglou, Evdokia; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2017-04-01

    Climate change, although is already happening, consists of a big threat capable of causing lots of inconveniences in future societies and their economies. In this work, the climate change impact on the hydrological behavior of several Mediterranean sub-catchments, in Crete, is presented. The sensitivity of these hydrological systems to several climate change scenarios is also provided. The HBV hydrological model has been used, calibrated and validated for the study sub-catchments against measured weather and streamflow data and inputs. The impact of climate change on several hydro-meteorological parameters (i.e. precipitation, streamflow etc.) and hydrological signatures (i.e. spring flood peak, length and volume, base flow, flow duration curves, seasonality etc.) have been statistically elaborated and analyzed, defining areas of increased probability risk associated additionally to flooding or drought. The potential impacts of climate change on current and future water resources have been quantified by driving HBV model with current and future scenarios, respectively, for specific climate periods. This work aims to present an integrated methodology for the definition of future climate and hydrological risks and the prediction of future water resources behavior. Future water resources management could be rationally effectuated, in Mediterranean sub-catchments prone to drought or flooding, using the proposed methodology. The research reported in this paper was fully supported by the Project "Innovative solutions to climate change adaptation and governance in the water management of the Region of Crete - AQUAMAN" funded within the framework of the EEA Financial Mechanism 2009-2014.

  20. Low prevalence of liver-kidney microsomal autoantibodies of type 1 (LKM1) in hepatitis C seropositive subjects on Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Drygiannakis, D; Lionis, C; Drygiannakis, I; Pappas, G; Kouroumalis, E

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a serious problem on the Greek island of Crete, where a high prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis C (anti-HCV) has recently been reported. This article reports the findings of a study carried out in Crete, which investigated the prevalence of serum autoantibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C. One hundred and forty two patients (59 men and 83 women), who were found anti-HCV seropositive in two hospitals and two Primary Health Care Centres in Crete, were eligible. Sixty healthy blood donors (46 men, 14 women), which were negative to anti-HCV, were used as the control group. They were randomly selected from those attending Rethymnon Hospital. Autoantibodies were identified using the indirect immunofluorescence (IFL) technique on human epithelial cells from larynx cancer (HEp-2 cells), rat liver-kidney-stomach substrate (CT3) and Chrithidia Luciliae (CL). Serum autoantibodies were detected in 104 HCV patients, yielding an overall prevalence of 73.2%. The most frequent autoantibodies were antinuclear antibodies (ANA), positive in 72 patients (50.7%). Anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA) were detected in 33 patients (23.2%). Only one patient was positive for LKM1 autoantibodies. No autoantibodies were found in 38 patients (26.7%). Autoantibodies were also found in 5 out of the 60 examined healthy blood donors (8.3%). Autoantibodies, mainly ANA and ASMA are very common in HCV seropositive patients from Crete. By contrast LKM1 autoantibodies are exceptionally rare in these patients.

  1. In vitro susceptibility and resistance phenotypes in contemporary Enterobacter isolates in a university hospital in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Samonis, George; Perdikis, Dimitrios; Mavromanolaki, Viktoria Eirini; Kofteridis, Diamantis P; Falagas, Matthew E

    2017-06-01

    To study the evolution in the susceptibility of Enterobacter spp. in Crete, Greece from 2010 to 2015. Non-duplicate isolates were studied using automated systems. Phenotypic confirmatory tests were applied. A total of 939 Enterobacter isolates were included. Colistin was the most active antibiotic (97.9%) followed by imipenem (96.1%), gentamicin (95.7%), tigecycline (91.8%), cefepime (89.4%), chloramphenicol (85.8%), fosfomycin (85.5%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (83.3%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (73.3%). Antibiotic resistance did not increase during the study period for most antibiotics. Lower susceptibility was observed among multidrug-resistant strains and carbapenem-nonsusceptible isolates. AmpC was the most common resistant mechanism (21%); carbapenemases (3.7%) and aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (6.5%) were also detected. A significant proportion of Enterobacter spp. was resistant to several antibiotics, most notably β-lactams.

  2. Metabolic Profile in Early Pregnancy Is Associated with Offspring Adiposity at 4 Years of Age: The Rhea Pregnancy Cohort Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Daraki, Vasiliki; Georgiou, Vaggelis; Papavasiliou, Stathis; Chalkiadaki, Georgia; Karahaliou, Marianna; Koinaki, Stella; Sarri, Katerina; Vassilaki, Maria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Chatzi, Leda

    2015-01-01

    Context Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity may increase the risk of childhood obesity but it is unknown whether other metabolic factors in early pregnancy such as lipid profile and hypertension are associated with offspring cardiometabolic traits. Objective Our objective was to investigate whether fasting lipid, glucose, and insulin levels during early pregnancy and maternal pre-pregnancy weight status, are associated with offspring adiposity measures, lipid levels and blood pressure at preschool age. Design and Methods The study included 618 mother-child pairs of the pregnancy cohort “Rhea” study in Crete, Greece. Pregnant women were recruited at the first prenatal visit (mean: 12weeks, SD: 0.7). A subset of 348 women provided fasting serum samples for glucose and lipid measurements. Outcomes measures were body mass index, abdominal circumference, sum of skinfold thickness, and blood pressure measurements at 4 years of age. A subsample of 525 children provided non-fasting blood samples for lipid measurements. Results Pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity was associated with greater risk of offspring overweight/obesity (RR: 1.83, 95%CI: 1.19, 2.81), central adiposity (RR: 1.97, 95%CI: 1.11, 3.49), and greater fat mass by 5.10mm (95%CI: 2.49, 7.71) at 4 years of age. These associations were more pronounced in girls. An increase of 40mg/dl in fasting serum cholesterol levels in early pregnancy was associated with greater skinfold thickness by 3.30mm (95%CI: 1.41, 5.20) at 4 years of age after adjusting for pre-pregnancy BMI and several other confounders. An increase of 10mmHg in diastolic blood pressure in early pregnancy was associated with increased risk of offspring overweight/obesity (RR: 1.22, 95%CI: 1.03, 1.45), and greater skinfold thickness by 1.71mm (95% CI: 0.57, 2.86) at 4 years of age. Conclusions Metabolic dysregulation in early pregnancy may increase the risk of obesity at preschool age. PMID:25970502

  3. A Study of the Groundwater Level Spatial Variability in the Messara Valley of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varouchakis, E. A.; Hristopulos, D. T.; Karatzas, G. P.

    2009-04-01

    The island of Crete (Greece) has a dry sub-humid climate and marginal groundwater resources, which are extensively used for agricultural activities and human consumption. The Messara valley is located in the south of the Heraklion prefecture, it covers an area of 398 km2, and it is the largest and most productive valley of the island. Over-exploitation during the past thirty (30) years has led to a dramatic decrease of thirty five (35) meters in the groundwater level. Possible future climatic changes in the Mediterranean region, potential desertification, population increase, and extensive agricultural activity generate concern over the sustainability of the water resources of the area. The accurate estimation of the water table depth is important for an integrated groundwater resource management plan. This study focuses on the Mires basin of the Messara valley for reasons of hydro-geological data availability and geological homogeneity. The research goal is to model and map the spatial variability of the basin's groundwater level accurately. The data used in this study consist of seventy (70) piezometric head measurements for the hydrological year 2001-2002. These are unevenly distributed and mostly concentrated along a temporary river that crosses the basin. The range of piezometric heads varies from an extreme low value of 9.4 meters above sea level (masl) to 62 masl, for the wet period of the year (October to April). An initial goal of the study is to develop spatial models for the accurate generation of static maps of groundwater level. At a second stage, these maps should extend the models to dynamic (space-time) situations for the prediction of future water levels. Preliminary data analysis shows that the piezometric head variations are not normally distributed. Several methods including Box-Cox transformation and a modified version of it, transgaussian Kriging, and Gaussian anamorphosis have been used to obtain a spatial model for the piezometric head. A

  4. Low prevalence of liver-kidney microsomal autoantibodies of type 1 (LKM1) in hepatitis C seropositive subjects on Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Drygiannakis, Dimitrios; Lionis, Christos; Drygiannakis, Ioannis; Pappas, Georgios; Kouroumalis, Elias

    2001-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C is a serious problem on the Greek island of Crete, where a high prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis C (anti-HCV) has recently been reported. This article reports the findings of a study carried out in Crete, which investigated the prevalence of serum autoantibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Patients and Methods One hundred and forty two patients (59 men and 83 women), who were found anti-HCV seropositive in two hospitals and two Primary Health Care Centres in Crete, were eligible. Sixty healthy blood donors (46 men, 14 women), which were negative to anti-HCV, were used as the control group. They were randomly selected from those attending Rethymnon Hospital. Autoantibodies were identified using the indirect immunofluorescence (IFL) technique on human epithelial cells from larynx cancer (HEp-2 cells), rat liver-kidney-stomach substrate (CT3) and Chrithidia Luciliae (CL). Results Serum autoantibodies were detected in 104 HCV patients, yielding an overall prevalence of 73.2%. The most frequent autoantibodies were antinuclear antibodies (ANA), positive in 72 patients (50.7%). Anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA) were detected in 33 patients (23.2%). Only one patient was positive for LKM1 autoantibodies. No autoantibodies were found in 38 patients (26.7%). Autoantibodies were also found in 5 out of the 60 examined healthy blood donors (8.3%). Conclusions Autoantibodies, mainly ANA and ASMA are very common in HCV seropositive patients from Crete. By contrast LKM1 autoantibodies are exceptionally rare in these patients. PMID:11418082

  5. Seasonal monitoring of soil erosion at regional scale: An application of the G2 model in Crete focusing on agricultural land uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagos, Panagos; Christos, Karydas; Cristiano, Ballabio; Ioannis, Gitas

    2014-04-01

    A new soil erosion model, namely G2, was applied in the island of Crete with a focus on agricultural land uses, including potential grazing lands. The G2 model was developed within the Geoland2 project as an agro-environmental service in the framework of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES, now Copernicus) initiative. The G2 model takes advantage of the empirical background of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and the Gavrilovic model, together with readily available time series of vegetation layers and 10-min rainfall intensity data to produce monthly time-step erosion risk maps at 300 m cell size. The innovations of the G2 model include the implementation of land-use influence parameters based on empirical data and the introduction of a corrective term in the estimation of the topographic influence factor. The mean annual erosion rate in Crete was found to be 8.123 t ha-1. The season from October to January (the rainy season in Crete) was found to be the most critical, accounting for 80% of the annual erosion in the island. Seasonal erosion figures proved to be crucial for the identification of erosion hotspots and of risky land uses. In Crete, high annual erosion figures were detected in natural grasslands and shrublands (14.023 t ha-1), mainly due to the intensification of livestock grazing during the past decades. The G2 model allows for the integrated spatio-temporal monitoring of soil erosion per land-use type based on moderate data input requirements and existing datasets.

  6. A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: the South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago M; Kokinou, Eleni; Zodiatis, George

    2014-09-15

    This study combines bathymetric, geomorphological, geological data and oil spill predictions to model the impact of oil spills in two accident scenarios from offshore Crete, Eastern Mediterranean. The aim is to present a new three-step method of use by emergency teams and local authorities in the assessment of shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills. The three-step method comprises: (1) real-time analyses of bathymetric, geomorphological, geological and oceanographic data; (2) oil dispersion simulations under known wind and sea current conditions; and (3) the compilation of final hazard maps based on information from (1) and (2) and on shoreline susceptibility data. The results in this paper show that zones of high to very-high susceptibility around the island of Crete are related to: (a) offshore bathymetric features, including the presence of offshore scarps and seamounts; (b) shoreline geology, and (c) the presence near the shore of sedimentary basins filled with unconsolidated deposits of high permeability. Oil spills, under particular weather and oceanographic conditions, may quickly spread and reach the shoreline 5-96 h after the initial accident. As a corollary of this work, we present the South Aegean region around Crete as a valid case-study for confined marine basins, narrow seaways, or interior seas around island groups. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring the association of sense of coherence, and spiritual and religious beliefs in a rural population group on the island of Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Stefanaki, Ioanna N; Shea, Sue; Linardakis, Manolis; Symvoulakis, Emmanouil K; Wynyard, Robin; Lionis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of an observation study, aimed at exploring an association between spirituality, religiousness, and sense of coherence in a population group residing in a rural area of Crete, Greece. The study was conducted during the period 2007-2009. Subjects aged 65 years and older (n = 118) living in two remote and rural villages in the Heraklion county (Crete) were eligible. Eighty-nine people (51 women and 38 men) participated. Demographic data were obtained, and all participants were asked to complete the Greek version of the self-reported Royal Free Interview for Spiritual and Religious Beliefs, and the Sense of Coherence Scale. Most participants reported strong religious beliefs and this was found to be related with increased age. Widowed participants expressed greater religiousness and spirituality (p = 0.029). The total score for Sense of Coherence was negatively correlated with gender (women have lower scores, p < 0.05), marital status (widows presented lower scores, p < 0.001), and increased age. A strong positive correlation of the Sense of Coherence score with the Spiritual Scale as measured by three questions of the Royal Free Interview was also identified (p = 0.039). The impact of gender and marital status seem to be emerging determinants in defining sense of coherence among inhabitants of rural Crete. The positive association between religious/spiritual beliefs and sense of coherence deserves further attention to promote a multidimensional approach in its study.

  8. Supporting the extensive dairy sheep smallholders of the semi-arid region of Crete through technical intervention.

    PubMed

    Volanis, M; Stefanakis, A; Hadjigeorgiou, I; Zoiopoulos, P

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this field study was to depict the extensive system of dairy sheep farming in the semi-arid environment of the island of Crete and to assess the potential margins of improvement through technical intervention. Forty-three family-run farms keeping a total of 13,870 sheep were surveyed in seven representative areas of the island. Several parameters were dealt with, concerning socio-economy, flock management and productivity. Study areas differed widely regarding feeds supplied per sheep, land cultivated for feeds, grazing land utilized and housing space. A range of parameters were recorded on flock size and their production characteristics such as births, fertility and number of lambs weaned. Milk yield and parameters associated with milk quality, such as somatic cell counts and total microbial flora, were also recorded. Technical intervention was directed towards removal of non-productive animals, programming of matings, balancing of diets, management of grazing lands and health care. Ewe fertility and numbers of lambs weaned per ewe, as well as harvested milk and milk quality (based on somatic cell counts and microbial load of milk) were also significantly improved. Information derived from this study stresses the important role of extension services to small farm sustainability and contributes to our knowledge of the dairy sheep farming systems in countries around the Mediterranean and elsewhere.

  9. Expansionary Adaptive Transformations of Socio-Hydrological Systems (SHSs): The Case of Drought in Messara Plain, Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Sapountzaki, Kalliopi; Daskalakis, Ioannis

    2018-05-01

    The paper attempts to document the ontology of socio-hydrological systems (SHSs), propose approaches of delimitation of SHSs' (territorial) boundaries, and investigate operational aspects of their adaptation to drought including repercussions on sustainability. To this end, a series of hypotheses are tested: (a) SHSs contain social subsystems with different expectations regarding water resources, different adaptive capacities, adaptation limits and prospects of sustainability, (b) SHSs do not adapt homogenously; some of their subsystems manage optimum adaptation, others fail to adapt and (c) territorial transformation of SHSs (e.g., through expansion of SHSs) may be the result of differential adaptation and sustainability potential within the SHS owing to power relations. After testing above hypotheses in the SHS of Messara Plain, Crete, the authors found out that powerful and dynamic sub-SHSs expand or break the boundaries of the initial SHS by establishing new relationships with other SHSs for the sake of resilience resources. Conversely, powerless sub-SHSs incapable to adapt descend and disappear. Therefore, territorial transformation of SHSs comes about from a combination of successful and failed adaptations, or in other words from different adaptation limits within SHSs. Consequently, water management and local development planning to guarantee adaptability to drought for all should be based on SHSs' analysis and management, not on jurisdictional areas or hydrological basins.

  10. A household survey on the extent of home medication storage. A cross-sectional study from rural Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsiligianni, Ioanna G; Delgatty, Candida; Alegakis, Athanasios; Lionis, Christos

    2012-03-01

    Patients often have multiple chronic diseases, use multiple prescriptions and over the counter medications resulting in polypharmacy. Many of them store these medications for future use in their homes, rather than take them as directed by their physician, resulting in a waste of health care resources, and potentially dangerous misuse. This study aimed to investigate the magnitude of medication home hoarding, the exchange of medication with family/friends, families' beliefs about the medication use, source of medication, pharmaceutical class, cost of stored medicine and conditions of storage. A structured questionnaire was administered within the homes in two rural areas in Crete. Forty families participated in the study including 85 individual household members (36 men, and 49 women with an average age of 56.5 ± 24.3 mean ± SD). There were a total of 557 medications recorded, with 324 different medications representing a total value of €8954. The mean quantity of medication boxes stored in each home was 8.5 ± 5.8. Cardiovascular medications accounted for 56% of medications for current use; whereas analgesics (24%), and antibiotics (17%), were the most medications being stored for future use. Exchange of medicine was very common (95%). Beliefs that 'more expensive medication is more effective', and that 'over the counter medications are safe because they were easily available' were expressed. Medications are being stored in large quantities in these rural areas, with a large percentage of them being wasted or misused.

  11. A Spatio-Temporal Algorithmic Procedure for Environmental Policymaking in the Municipality of Arkalochori in the Greek Island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, F. A.; Sidiras, D. K.; Giannopoulos, Ch.; Spetsidis, I.

    2009-08-01

    This work deals with a methodological framework designed/developed under the form of a spatio-temporal algorithmic procedure for environmental policymaking at local level. The procedure includes 25 activity stages and 9 decision nodes, putting emphasis on (i) mapping on GIS layers water supply/demand and modeling of aquatic pollution coming from point and non-point sources, (ii) environmental monitoring by periodically measuring the main pollutants in situ and in the laboratory, (iii) design of environmental projects, decomposition of them into sub-projects and combination of the latter to form attainable alternatives, (iv) multicriteria ranking of alternatives, according to a modified Delphi method, by using as criteria the expected environmental benefit, the attitude of inhabitants, the priority within the programme of regional development, the capital required for the investment and the operating cost, and (v) knowledge Base (KB) operation/enrichment, functioning in combination with a data mining mechanism to extract knowledge/information/data from external Bases. An implementation is presented referring to the Municipality of Arkalochori in the Greek island of Crete.

  12. Evidence of Hierarchy in the Complex Fractured System of Geropotamos (Crete, Greece), as Extracted from Transient Electromagnetic Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, Filippos; Kouli, Maria; Kalisperi, Despina

    2018-03-01

    The essential goals of this paper are to test the transient electromagnetic (TEM) response in a fractured geological complex medium and to better understand the physics introduced by associating a roughness parameter β to the geological formation. An anomalous fractional diffusion approach is incorporated to describe the electromagnetic induction in rough multi-scaled geological structures. The multi-scaling characteristics of Geropotamos basin in Crete are revealed through the analysis of transient step-off response of an EM loop antenna. The semi-empirical parameters derived from late-time TEM measurements are correlated with the multi-scale heterogeneities of the medium. Certain interesting properties of the late-time slope γ(β) and the power law of near surface resistivity distribution, as extracted from TEM inversion for different depth, are presented. The analysis of the parameter γ(β) which scales the induced voltage in the loop in the late stage of the electromagnetic response leads to a different view of the EM geophysical data interpretation. We show that it is strongly correlated with areas of high fracture density within the geological formations of the Geropotamos area. For that reason, it is proposed as a local multi-scaling empirical index. The results of this paper suggest that anomalous diffusion could be a viable physical mechanism for the fractal transport of charge carriers, explaining observed late-time TEM responses across a variety of natural geological settings.

  13. Assessing the knowledge of bronchial asthma among primary health care physicians in Crete: A pre- and post-test following an educational course

    PubMed Central

    Rovithis, Emmanouil; Lionis, Christos; Schiza, Sofia E; Bouros, Dimosthenis; Karokis, Antonis; Vlachonikolis, loannis; Siafakas, Nikolaos M

    2001-01-01

    Aim To assess the level of knowledge for bronchial asthma of the primary healthcare physicians serving a rural population on the island of Crete, both before and immediately after a one-day educational course. Methods Twenty-one primary health care physicians, randomly selected from a list of 14 Health Care Centres on the island of Crete were invited to participate in the study and attended an educational course. Nine of the 21 physicians were fully qualified general practitioners, while the remainder were non-specialized (NSs) physicians who had recently graduated from the University of Crete, Medical School. A questionnaire of 20 items based on current bronchial asthma clinical guidelines was used. Three scores, the mean total, knowledge subscore and attitudes subscore, were calculated for each group of physicians, both before and after the course. Results At baseline mean total score and knowledge and attitudes subscores were higher for non-specialized physicians than for the general practitioners, but the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The knowledge subscore was improved in both groups, however the difference was statistically significant only for the non-specialized physicians (t = 2.628, d.f. = 11, p < 0.05). The mean total score after the course was significantly higher for the non-specialized physicians in comparison to that of the general practitioners (t=-2.688, d.f. = 19, p < 0.05). Conclusions This study adds to the information about the success of continuing medical education, and also demonstrates that the recent graduates in the studied population, could be educated with more positive results than the fully qualified practitioners PMID:11511327

  14. Footwall degradation styles and associated sedimentary facies distribution in SE Crete: Insights into tilt-block extensional basins on continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Tiago M.; Cupkovic, Tomas

    2018-05-01

    Depositional facies resulting from footwall degradation in extensional basins of SE Crete are studied based on detailed geological maps, regional transects, lithological columns and outcrop photos. During an extensional episode affecting Crete in the late Miocene-early Pliocene, depocentres trending N20°E and N70°E were filled with fan deltas, submarine mass-wasting deposits, sandy turbidites and fine-grained hemipelagites sourced from both nearby and distal sediment sources. Deposition of proximal continental and shallow-marine units, and relatively deep (marine) turbidites and mass-transport deposits, occurred within a complex mosaic of tectonically controlled depocentres. The new geological maps and transects in this work reveal that depositional facies in SE Crete were controlled by: a) their relative proximity to active faults and uplifting footwall blocks, b) the relative position (depth and relative height above sea level) of hanging-wall basins, and c) the nature of the basement units eroded from adjacent footwall blocks. Distal sediment sources supplied background siliciclastic sediment ('hemipelagites'), which differ markedly from strata sourced from local footwalls. In parallel, mass-transport of sediment was ubiquitous on tectonically active slopes, and so was the presence of coarse-grained sediment with sizes varying from large blocks > 50 m-wide to heterolithic mass-transport deposits and silty-sandy turbidites. We expect similar tectono-sedimentary settings to have predominated in tectonically active Miocene basins of the eastern Mediterranean, in which hydrocarbon exploration is occurring at present, and on rifted continental margins across the world.

  15. Elevational Gradient of Vascular Plant Species Richness and Endemism in Crete – The Effect of Post-Isolation Mountain Uplift on a Continental Island System

    PubMed Central

    Trigas, Panayiotis; Panitsa, Maria; Tsiftsis, Spyros

    2013-01-01

    Understanding diversity patterns along environmental gradients and their underlying mechanisms is a major topic in current biodiversity research. In this study, we investigate for the first time elevational patterns of vascular plant species richness and endemism on a long-isolated continental island (Crete) that has experienced extensive post-isolation mountain uplift. We used all available data on distribution and elevational ranges of the Cretan plants to interpolate their presence between minimum and maximum elevations in 100-m elevational intervals, along the entire elevational gradient of Crete (0–2400 m). We evaluate the influence of elevation, area, mid-domain effect, elevational Rapoport effect and the post-isolation mountain uplift on plant species richness and endemism elevational patterns. Furthermore, we test the influence of the island condition and the post-isolation mountain uplift to the elevational range sizes of the Cretan plants, using the Peloponnese as a continental control area. Total species richness monotonically decreases with increasing elevation, while endemic species richness has a unimodal response to elevation showing a peak at mid-elevation intervals. Area alone explains a significant amount of variation in species richness along the elevational gradient. Mid-domain effect is not the underlying mechanism of the elevational gradient of plant species richness in Crete, and Rapoport's rule only partly explains the observed patterns. Our results are largely congruent with the post-isolation uplift of the Cretan mountains and their colonization mainly by the available lowland vascular plant species, as high-elevation specialists are almost lacking from the Cretan flora. The increase in the proportion of Cretan endemics with increasing elevation can only be regarded as a result of diversification processes towards Cretan mountains (especially mid-elevation areas), supported by elevation-driven ecological isolation. Cretan plants have

  16. First Report of the Carolina Spiral Nematode, Scutellonema brachyurus, from Soil of a Garden in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Tzortzakakis, Emmanuel A; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Carolina; Archidona-Yuste, Antonio; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Castillo, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Members of the genus Scutellonema can cause substantial crop losses to ornamental and cultivated plants directly by feeding ectoparasitically on plant roots (Bridge et al., 2005; Coyne et al., 2006). In May 2015, a soil sample from a house garden from Heraklion city in Crete, Greece, was sent for diagnosis of plant-parasitic nematodes. In this place, there had been cactus (Opuntia sp.) plants (probably imported), which were uprooted 3 to 4 years earlier. After that, the area was cropped with cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in spring-summer and leaf vegetables such as spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) in autumn-winter. The soil was collected 1 mon after the end of chicory crop. A population density (ca. 30 individuals/100 cm(3) of soil) of spiral nematodes (Scutellonema sp.) was found by extracting soil with the wet sieving and decanting method (Cobb, 1918). Morphological and molecular analyses of females identified the species as Scutellonema brachyurus (Steiner, 1938) Andrássy, 1958. The morphology of females was characterized by a hemispherical lip region with four to six annuli, morphometric data for 12 females were L, 640 to 760 μm; a, 24.6 to 30.6; b, 5.8 to 7.4; c, 69.1 to 99.3; c´ 0.5 to 0.6; stylet, 24.5 to 27.5 μm with anterior part shorter than posterior; and spermatheca nonfunctional and male absent. The morphology agreed with the description of S. brachyurus (van den Berg et al., 2013). Alignment indicated that the D2-D3 and ITS sequences (KU059494 and KU059495, respectively) showed 99% and 100% to 99% similarity, respectively, to other sequences of S. brachyurus (type A) deposited in GenBank from the United States, Italy, and Korea (JX472037-JX472046, DQ328753, FJ485643; and JX472069, JX472070, JX472071, respectively), differing from one to six nucleotides. Phylogenetic analyses using Bayesian inference of these sequences placed the Scutellonema sp. in a highly supported (100%) clade that included all S. brachyurus

  17. Abundance, zoonotic potential and risk factors of intestinal parasitism amongst dog and cat populations: The scenario of Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulou, Despoina; Claerebout, Edwin; Arvanitis, Dimitrios; Ligda, Panagiota; Voutzourakis, Nikolaos; Casaert, Stijn; Sotiraki, Smaragda

    2017-01-25

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and infection intensity of intestinal parasites in different dog and cat populations in Crete, Greece, estimate the zoonotic risk and identify risk factors. Faecal samples from shelter, household and shepherd dogs and shelter and household cats were analyzed using sedimentation/flotation techniques. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected by a quantitative direct immunofluorescence assay (IFA). PCR and sequencing was performed to evaluate the zoonotic potential of Giardia and Cryptosporidium positive samples. Totals of 879 dog and 264 cat faecal samples were examined. In dogs, the overall prevalence was 25.2% (CI: 22.4-28.1) for Giardia spp.; 9.2% (CI: 7.3-11.1) for Ancylostoma/Uncinaria spp.; 7.6% (CI: 5.9-9.4) for Toxocara spp.; 5.9% (CI: 4.4-7.5) for Cryptosporidium spp.; 4.6% (CI: 3.2-5.9) for Cystoisospora spp.; 2.7% (CI: 1.7-3.8) for Toxascaris leonina; 1.7% (CI: 0.9-2.6) for Capillaria spp.; 0.8% (CI: 0.2-1.4) for taeniid eggs; 0.2% (CI: 0-0.5) for Dipylidium caninum; and 0.1% (CI: 0-0.3) for Strongyloides stercoralis. In cats, the prevalence was 20.5% (CI: 15.6-25.3) for Giardia spp.; 9.5% (CI: 5.9-13.0) for Cystoisospora spp.; 8.3% (CI: 5.0-11.7) for Toxocara spp.; 7.6% (CI: 4.4-10.8) for Ancylostoma/Uncinaria spp.; 6.8% (CI: 3.8-9.9) for Cryptosporidium spp.; 4.2% (CI: 1.8-6.6) for Capillaria spp.; 0.8% (CI: 0-1.8) for taeniid eggs; and 0.4% (CI: 0-1.1) for Hammondia/Toxoplasma. Concerning the risk factors evaluated, there was a negative association between age and Giardia infection and between age and T. leonina infection intensity for dogs. Sequencing results revealed the presence of mainly animal-specific G. duodenalis assemblages C and D in dogs and assemblages F, C and BIV-like in cats, with only a limited number of (co-)infections with assemblage A. As for Cryptosporidium, the dog-specific C. canis and the pig-specific C. scrofarum were detected in dogs and the cat-specific C. felis was

  18. Is Kissamos Bay in NW Crete, Greece worth to be exploited as a marine aggregates deposit? An integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasatou, Marianthi; Tsoutsia, Antonia; Petrakis, Stelios; Rousakis, Grigoris; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Hasiotis, Thomas; Kapsimalis, Vasilios; Poulos, Serafim; Stamatakis, Michael

    2017-04-01

    This study uses an integrated approach to investigate the offshore area of Kissamos Bay, NW Crete Island, Greece, as a prospective marine aggregate (MA) deposit. Non-fuel marine minerals and especially marine aggregates (sand and gravel) are reviewed from the perspective of resources during the last decades. The possible MA deposit of Kissamos Bay was explored during the implementation of the research project THALES-MARE, considering existing information of previous extraction activities in the wider area. Kissamos Bay is located at the inner continental shelf off NW Crete. The onshore basement rocks are composed of Mesozoic to Eocene limestones, shale and sandstone units, along with Neogene sediments such as marls, sandstones and claystones, which locally host Messinian gypsum layers. Sixteen sea-bottom sediment samples were collected with a Smith-McIntyretype grab along four transects, vertical to the shoreline, at water depths of 11 to 44m. A sub-bottom acoustic profiler survey was conducted in order to quantitatively determine the deposit (dimensions and structure). Mineralogical, geochemical, sedimentological and benthic analyses of the samples were carried out, in order to determine the quality of the reservoir and the environmental impact of a potential exploitation. Mineralogical results indicated that the bulk samples consist predominantly of quartz, while calcite occurs as a second significant phase. Chemical analysis of major and trace elements revealed that the average SiO2 content is around 55% with samples closer to the beach (depths <15m) reaching 70%. SO3 content, attributed to the presence of gypsum, is lower than 1%. The Cl- content of the unwashed material reflected mainly the presence of halite and is approximately 0.2%. The results of the benthic analysis indicated that no pressure will occur at the local ecosystem due to a potential exploitation of the deposit. Granulometric analysis of the sediments indicated that the main particle size

  19. Adolescent drinking, academic achievement and leisure time use by secondary education students in a rural area of Crete.

    PubMed

    Koutra, Kleio; Papadovassilaki, Kyriaki; Kalpoutzaki, Pelagia; Kargatzi, Maria; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Koukouli, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the alcohol consumption of secondary education students and their relationship to school life and leisure time use with peers. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in March 2007, and the study population consisted of 14- to 19-year-old students living in an agricultural area of Crete. The final sample consisted of 117 individuals (response rate 90.0%). A short previously validated self-completion questionnaire was used collecting information on: personal and family characteristics; school progress; leisure time activities and relations with other adolescents; and alcohol consumption. Alcohol consumption differed significantly between male (75.5%) and female (25.8%) students (P < 0.001). Almost half of the participants (48.3%) reported alcohol consumption during nights out with friends. The mean grade for the previous year for students consuming alcohol was lower compared with those who did not, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.066). Statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that students who consumed alcohol had more absences and this association was stronger for male students. The frequency of alcohol consumption was found to relate to the number of absences for both sexes. Male students who had been suspended from school were more likely to drink alcohol than those who had not been suspended. Statistical evidence also supported the hypotheses that students who spent their free time in cafeterias, bars or billiard halls were more likely to drink alcohol and also consume alcohol at higher frequencies than those that did not spend their free time this way (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). More health education programmes and actions are needed at the national and local level to help students, families, schools, communities and the state better understand the real dimensions of the problem. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Social capital, tolerance of diversity and adherence to Mediterranean diet: the Rhea Mother-Child Cohort in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kritsotakis, George; Chatzi, Leda; Vassilaki, Maria; Georgiou, Vaggelis; Kogevinas, Manolis; Philalithis, Anastassios E; Koutis, Antonis

    2015-05-01

    To estimate the associations of individual maternal social capital and social capital dimensions (Participation in the Community, Feelings of Safety, Value of Life and Social Agency, Tolerance of Diversity) with adherence to the Mediterranean diet during pregnancy. This is a cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective mother-child cohort (Rhea Study). Participants completed a social capital questionnaire and an FFQ in mid-pregnancy. Mediterranean diet adherence was evaluated through an a priori score ranging from 0 to 8 (minimal-maximal adherence). Maternal social capital scores were categorized into three groups: the upper 10 % was the high social capital group, the middle 80 % was the medium and the lowest 10 % was the low social capital group. Multivariable log-binomial and linear regression models adjusted for confounders were performed. Heraklion, Crete, Greece. A total of 377 women with singleton pregnancies. High maternal Total Social Capital was associated with an increase of almost 1 point in Mediterranean diet score (highest v. lowest group: β coefficient=0·95, 95 % CI 0·23, 1·68), after adjustment for confounders. Similar dose-response effects were noted for the scale Tolerance of Diversity (highest v. lowest group: adjusted β coefficient=1·08, 95 % CI 0·39, 1·77). Individual social capital and tolerance of diversity are associated with adherence to the Mediterranean diet in pregnancy. Women with higher social capital may exhibit a higher sense of obligation to themselves and to others that may lead to proactive nutrition-related activities. Less tolerant women may not provide the opportunity to new healthier, but unfamiliar, nutritional recommendations to become part of their regular diet.

  1. In vitro susceptibility and resistance phenotypes in contemporary Citrobacter isolates in a University Hospital in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Mavromanolaki, Viktoria-Eirini; Kyriakidou, Margarita; Spais, George; Kofteridis, Diamantis P; Samonis, George; Falagas, Matthew E

    2017-07-01

    Data on Citrobacter spp. susceptibility are scarce. We sought to study the evolution in the susceptibility of 385 Citrobacter spp. at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece during a six-year period (2010-2015). Non-duplicate strains isolated from inpatients (intensive care unit, oncology, surgery, internal medicine, paediatrics) and outpatients were studied using Vitek 2. Phenotypic confirmatory tests were applied for detection of β-lactamases and aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. C. freundii (172, 44.7%) and C. koseri (166, 43.1%) were the most commonly isolated species. C. braakii (34), C. amalonaticus (6), C. youngae (6) and C. sedlakii (1) were the remaining isolates. Colistin and fosfomycin were the most active antibiotics (both 99.2%) followed by carbapenems (99%) aminoglycosides (96.6-98.4%), tigecycline (96.1%), cefepime (94.8%), ciprofloxacin (94.3%), tetracycline (92.7%), trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (91.4%), chloramphenicol (88.1%), piperacillin/tazobactam (86.5%) and 3rd generation cephalosporins (85.7%). C. freundii were more resistant than C. koseri. Antibiotic resistance did not increase during the study period for most antibiotics. Lower susceptibility to all antibiotics was observed among multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains. AmpC was the most common resistant mechanism (10.9%); carbapenemases (1.3%) and aminoglycoside modifying enzymes (2.9%) were also detected. All AmpC producers were resistant to cephalosporins but not to carbapenems. In all but one isolates aminoglycoside resistance was accompanied by acquired β-lactamases. Although Citrobacter species in general were susceptible, antibiotic susceptibility testing is required for the detection of resistant isolates.

  2. Epidemiology and molecular analysis of hepatitis A, B and C in a semi-urban and rural area of Crete.

    PubMed

    Drositis, I; Bertsias, A; Lionis, C; Kouroumalis, E

    2013-12-01

    An observational seroepidemiological study was carried out in a well-defined primary-care district on the island of Crete in order to determine the recent endemicity of viral hepatitis in Cretan-population. The setting consisted of a semi-urban group and a remote & rural group. Serum samples were collected from 876 subjects (437 males, 439 females) aged 15 years or above. Subjects were randomly selected from the permanent population of the area that consisted of 5705 individuals. The aim was to measure the prevalence of selected viral-hepatitis markers. Hepatitis B surface-antigen (HBsAg) was found positive in twenty-nine individuals, (3.3%). Antibodies to hepatitis B virus core-antigen (HBcAb) were detected in 287 subjects (32.8%) and antibodies to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) were detected in nineteen subjects (2.2%). Seropositivities for the semi-urban group were: 3.4%, 19.1%, 2.1% and 3.2%, 48.8%, 2.2% in remote & rural group respectively. Virtually, all subjects >45 years old were seropositive for antibodies to hepatitis A, whereas approximately 80% of those in the 15-44 age-group were found to be seropositive. A threefold increase in the HBV exposure and carrier proportion was found in Cretan native-population and in rural-areas compared to older studies carried out in other rural-populations of the island. It is still unknown whether the recent economic crisis or the demographic changes in Cretan-population contributed to these findings. HCV endemicity remains relatively constant, however an alteration of hepatitis C genotypes was observed. Exposure to HAV was found to be higher in remote and rural areas compared to semi-urban areas. © 2013.

  3. Human induced coastal changes and their impact on the coastal urban landscape. The case of Heraklion, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempis, Nikolaos; Alexandrakis, George; Kampanis, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    Coastal zone is a vital part of human society due to sea activities. Α variety of activities and uses are present and are further developing in the coastal and marine are. Coastal ecosystems and landscape are under severe pressure due to population growth and continuous expansion of human activities and supplemented from the effects of climate change (e.g. coastal flooding, erosion). Heraklion is the largest urban center in Crete. Its suburban and coastal area receives intensive urban sprawl pressures, changing the urban landscape and resulting negative impacts on the human and natural environment. The saturation of coastal area of Heraklion creates the need for new development interventions (e.g. new marina, coastal protection, urban regeneration). This study examine the impacts of the new programmed coastal development intervention in the coastal landscape of Heraklion. A decision analytic approach was implemented, based on the need of stakeholders for the protection and further development of coastal area of Heraklion. In this direction, local authorities have proposed the realization of several development interventions which include a new marina, expansion of bathing beaches and coastal regeneration project in a large beach. The results indicate that the realization of any coastal development projects, also increases the negative effects that are related to land-sea interaction. The negative effects are a result of the interaction between different human activities but also between human activities and the environment. The development of the marina in the selected location, increases the pressure on the sea area as the navigation will increase, but also increases the pressure on land space, as traffic flows will change, creating new pressures in urban areas. The extension of bathing beaches implies larger number of bathers, thus creating greater needs for infrastructures in land area for their service. Coastal protection projects, as planned, will upgrade the

  4. Evaluation results after seven years of operation for the permanent Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, F.; Hloupis, G.; Papadopoulos, I.

    2012-04-01

    The Hellenic arc and the adjacent areas of the Greek mainland are the most active in western Eurasia and some of the most seismically active zones of the world. The seismicity of South Aegean is extremely high and is characterised by the frequent occurrence of large shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes. Until 2004, the installed seismological stations from several providers (NOA, GEOFON, MEDNET) provide average interstation distance around 130km resulting to catalogues with minimum magnitude of completeness (Mc) equals to 3.7. Towards to the direction of providing dense and state of the art instrumental coverage of seismicity in the South Aegean, HSNC begun its operation in 2004. Today it consists of (12) permanent seismological stations equipped with short period and broadband seismographs coupled with 3rd generation 24bit data loggers as well as from (2) accelerographs . The addition of HSNC along with combined use of all the active networks in South Aegean area (NOA, GEOFON, AUTH) decrease the average interstation distance to 60km and provide catalogues with Mc≥3.2. Data transmission and telemetry is implemented by a hybrid network consisting of dedicated wired ADSL links as well as VSAT links by using a unique private satellite hub. Real time data spread over collaborating networks (AUTH) and laboratories (Department of Earth Science - UCL) while at the same time, events are appended automatically and manually to EMSC database. Additional value to the network is provided by means of prototype systems which deployed in-situ for the purposes of: a) Acquiring aftershock data in the minimum time after main event. This is a mobile seismological network called RaDeSeis (Rapid Deployment Seismological network) which consists of a central station acting also as the central communication hub and wifi coupled mobile stations. b) The development of dedicated hardware and software solutions for rapid installation times (around 1 hour for each station) leading to

  5. International conference on "Photosynthesis research for sustainability-2015" in honor of George C. Papageorgiou", September 21-26, 2015, Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Tomo, Tatsuya; Stamatakis, Kostas; Govindjee

    2016-12-01

    During September 21-26, 2015, an international conference entitled ''Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability-2015'' was held in honor of George C. Papageorgiou at the Conference Center of the Orthodox Academy of Crete, an exceptionally beautiful location right on the Mediterranean Sea coast, Kolymvari, Chania, Crete, (Greece) (see http://photosynthesis2015.cellreg.org/ ). The meeting was held under the auspices of the Greek "General Secretariat for Research and Technology" (GSRT). We first provide a brief introduction and key contributions of George C. Papageorgiou, the honored scientist, and then information on the conference, on the speakers, and the program. A special feature of this conference was awards given to 13 young investigators, who are recognized in this Report. Several photographs are also included; they show the pleasant ambience at this conference. We invite the readers to the next conference on "Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability-2016," which will honor Nathan Nelson and T. Nejat Veziroglu; it will be held during June 19-25, 2016, in Pushchino, Moscow Region, Russia (see http://photosynthesis2016.cellreg.org/ ).

  6. Relative validity of an FFQ for pre-school children in the mother-child 'Rhea' birth cohort in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Leventakou, Vasiliki; Georgiou, Vaggelis; Chatzi, Leda; Sarri, Katerina

    2015-02-01

    To examine the relative validity of an FFQ based on parental report for pre-school children in the mother-child 'Rhea' birth cohort. The children's mothers completed an FFQ that referred to the children's dietary intake for the previous year by telephone interview. Mothers completed also three food records, two on weekdays and one on a weekend day. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated for the energy-adjusted values. Weighted kappa statistics (κ(w)) and the Bland-Altman technique were used to test the degree of agreement between the two dietary methods. Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 2011-2012. A total of ninety-nine mothers (corresponding to fifty-one boys and forty-eight girls) participated in the validation study. The mean and median values of all food group and nutrient intakes did not differ significantly between the two dietary methods. Overall, fair agreement was observed between the FFQ and the food records for ranking participants based on their intake, with κ(w) ranging from 0·21 to 0·40 for most foods and nutrients. On average, 88 % of participants were classified into the same or adjacent tertiles for nutrient and food group intakes by both dietary methods. The degree of agreement was also confirmed by the visual examination of the Bland-Altman plots. The study indicates that the Rhea 4 years FFQ is a relatively accurate tool for assessing habitual food group and nutrient intakes among pre-school children in Crete, Greece.

  7. Quantification and site-specification of the support practice factor when mapping soil erosion risk associated with olive plantations in the Mediterranean island of Crete.

    PubMed

    Karydas, Christos G; Sekuloska, Tijana; Silleos, Georgios N

    2009-02-01

    Due to inappropriate agricultural management practices, soil erosion is becoming one of the most dangerous forms of soil degradation in many olive farming areas in the Mediterranean region, leading to significant decrease of soil fertility and yield. In order to prevent further soil degradation, proper measures are necessary to be locally implemented. In this perspective, an increase in the spatial accuracy of remote sensing datasets and advanced image analysis are significant tools necessary and efficient for mapping soil erosion risk on a fine scale. In this study, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) was implemented in the spatial domain using GIS, while a very high resolution satellite image, namely a QuickBird image, was used for deriving cover management (C) and support practice (P) factors, in order to map the risk of soil erosion in Kolymvari, a typical olive farming area in the island of Crete, Greece. The results comprised a risk map of soil erosion when P factor was taken uniform (conventional approach) and a risk map when P factor was quantified site-specifically using object-oriented image analysis. The results showed that the QuickBird image was necessary in order to achieve site-specificity of the P factor and therefore to support fine scale mapping of soil erosion risk in an olive cultivation area, such as the one of Kolymvari in Crete. Increasing the accuracy of the QB image classification will further improve the resulted soil erosion mapping.

  8. Long-term change in incidence and risk factors of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in Crete, Greece: a 25-year study.

    PubMed

    Karageorgos, Spyridon A; Stratakou, Soultana; Koulentaki, Mairi; Voumvouraki, Argyro; Mantaka, Aikaterini; Samonakis, Dimitrios; Notas, George; Kouroumalis, Elias A

    2017-01-01

    No sequential long-term data exist for Greece on the etiological evolution and incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, we studied their etiological evolution over a period of 25 years in the island of Crete. We studied 812 cases of cirrhosis (561 male, median age 69 years) and 321 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (234 male, median age 70 years) from the database of our Center. Cases were classified into five-year periods according to incidence and etiology (hepatitis B, hepatitis C, alcohol, alcohol plus viral, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). Overall, there was an increase in the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. A significant fourfold reduction in the incidence of hepatitis C-related cirrhosis was observed, which was degraded from first to third place as a risk factor for cirrhosis. Alcohol gradually became the first risk factor in cirrhosis (1990-94: 36.1%, 2010-14: 52.3%) and carcinoma, while the steepest increase in incidence of cirrhosis and carcinoma was associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The incidence of cirrhosis remained constant over the years, but the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma increased during the last decade. Risk factors for cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma have changed over the past 25 years in Crete. The initial high hepatitis C virus association has significantly decreased, with alcohol now ranking first among risk factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is continually increasing and is a prominent risk factor for cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Αutomated 2D shoreline detection from coastal video imagery: an example from the island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velegrakis, A. F.; Trygonis, V.; Vousdoukas, M. I.; Ghionis, G.; Chatzipavlis, A.; Andreadis, O.; Psarros, F.; Hasiotis, Th.

    2015-06-01

    Beaches are both sensitive and critical coastal system components as they: (i) are vulnerable to coastal erosion (due to e.g. wave regime changes and the short- and long-term sea level rise) and (ii) form valuable ecosystems and economic resources. In order to identify/understand the current and future beach morphodynamics, effective monitoring of the beach spatial characteristics (e.g. the shoreline position) at adequate spatio-temporal resolutions is required. In this contribution we present the results of a new, fully-automated detection method of the (2-D) shoreline positions using high resolution video imaging from a Greek island beach (Ammoudara, Crete). A fully-automated feature detection method was developed/used to monitor the shoreline position in geo-rectified coastal imagery obtained through a video system set to collect 10 min videos every daylight hour with a sampling rate of 5 Hz, from which snapshot, time-averaged (TIMEX) and variance images (SIGMA) were generated. The developed coastal feature detector is based on a very fast algorithm using a localised kernel that progressively grows along the SIGMA or TIMEX digital image, following the maximum backscatter intensity along the feature of interest; the detector results were found to compare very well with those obtained from a semi-automated `manual' shoreline detection procedure. The automated procedure was tested on video imagery obtained from the eastern part of Ammoudara beach in two 5-day periods, a low wave energy period (6-10 April 2014) and a high wave energy period (1 -5 November 2014). The results showed that, during the high wave energy event, there have been much higher levels of shoreline variance which, however, appeared to be similarly unevenly distributed along the shoreline as that related to the low wave energy event, Shoreline variance `hot spots' were found to be related to the presence/architecture of an offshore submerged shallow beachrock reef, found at a distance of 50-80 m

  10. Upwelling history of the Mediterranean Sea revealed by stunted growth in the planktic foraminifera Orbulina universa (early Messinian, Crete, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachert, T. C.; Bornemann, A.; Reuter, M.; Galer, S. J.; Grimm, K. I.; Fassoulas, C.

    2015-01-01

    Microfossil and stable isotope data (δ13C, δ18O) from deep-water sediments of Late Miocene age in the Mediterranean region have revealed a stepwise restriction of the Mediterranean prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis which was modulated by a cyclicity responding to orbital precession. Very little is known with regard to the effects of these changes on shallow water environments of carbonate platforms and ramps. This work is based on a geological section on Crete (Greece) exposing sediments of early Messinian age, which documents the coeval response of pelagic and neritic systems to oceanographic changes. We discuss a dataset of planktic and benthic foraminifera assemblages in conjunction with size measurements ( n = 6,777) and isotope analyses (δ18O, δ13C) of the planktic foraminifera Orbulina universa with regard to reef growth patterns. The planktic foraminifera fauna displays pronounced cyclical abundance changes of warm, oligotrophic ( O. universa) and cold, meso- to eu-trophic taxa (globigerinids, neogloboquadrinids). This cyclicity corresponds to lithological changes from laminated to homogeneous marls on the precessional frequency band. In beds rich in mesotrophic foraminifera, O. universa is rare and the test is ~50 % smaller than average. Growth and size of O. universa is affected by various environmental factors, including temperature, trophic resources, illumination and O2 content of ambient water. Explaining size variability by water temperature implies a change of ~11 °C over one precessional cycle. This estimate is in disagreement with growth patterns and stable isotope data of displaced reef corals ( Porites, Tarbellastraea) documenting almost constant sea-surface temperatures, but substantial evaporation. Therefore, moderate temperature changes in a context of intense evaporation (high salinity) and water column destabilization associated with upward mixing of colder water masses with higher nutrient concentrations and low O2 content better

  11. Outdoor air pollution exposures and micronuclei frequencies in lymphocytes from pregnant women and newborns in Crete, Greece (Rhea cohort).

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan-Gordo, Cristina; Fthenou, Eleni; Pedersen, Marie; Espinosa, Ana; Chatzi, Leda; Beelen, Rob; Chalkiadaki, Georgia; Decordier, Ilse; Hoek, Gerard; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Vafeiadi, Marina; Vande Loock, Kim; Kleinjans, Jos; Stephanou, Euripides; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-11-01

    Micronuclei (MN) are biomarkers of early genetic effects that have been used to investigate the association between environmental exposures and cancer. However, few studies have examined the association between environmental exposures during pregnancy and MN in mothers and newborns. We examined MN frequency in maternal blood and in cord blood, in relation to maternal air pollution exposure, and the potential interaction with maternal vitamin C intake and maternal smoking. We used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay to assess MN frequency per 1000 bi-nucleated T-lymphocytes from 181 mothers and 183 newborns born in 2007-2008 in Heraklion (Crete, Greece). The ESCAPE land-use regression methods were used to estimate annual mean exposure to outdoor air pollution [particulate matter (PM), black carbon, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx)] at maternal home addresses. Food frequency questionnaires were used to estimate maternal dietary vitamin C intake during pregnancy. Smoking habits were self-reported using questionnaires which were checked by measuring maternal urinary cotinine levels. Exposure to PM2.5 was associated with increased MN frequencies in pregnant women [rate ratio [RR (95%CI)] per 5 µg/m(3)=1.53 (1.02, 2.29)]. This increase was considerably higher among women who did not fulfill the recommended vitamin C dietary allowances [RR=9.35 (2.77, 31.61); n=20]. Exposure to PM2.5-10, PM10, NO2 and NOx were also associated with a higher incidence of MN frequencies in smoker women (n=56). No associations were found for newborns. We found an association between air pollution, particularly PM2.5, and MN frequency in mothers but not in newborns. This association was more pronounced among women with a lower dietary intake of vitamin C during pregnancy and among women who smoked during pregnancy. While results are clear in mothers, the association between maternal carcinogenic exposures during pregnancy and biomarkers of early biologic effect in the

  12. Geoarchaeology of the karstic area of Mirambello, North-East Crete (Greece): palaeoenvironmental investigations and human settlement implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilardi, M.; Kunesch, S.; Robert, V.; Farnoux, A.; Wurmser, H.

    2009-04-01

    The present work aims to detail the preliminary researches dealing with the geomorphologic, topographic and archaeological setting from two major settlements located in north east Crete. The project undertook by the French school of Archaeology in Athens aims to reconstruct the palaeoenvironmental evolution of the whole area during the last millennia. Fieldworks, including coring, had already been done in August 2006, April 2007 and September 2008; we propose to present the main results. The settlements of Latô and Dreros belong to the area of Mirambello characterized by its spectacular karstic processes and landforms, different karstic depressions with different size can be identified and classified into Dolines and Poljés. As far as the archaeological interest is concerned, villages and cities were occupied during the hellenestic period; several remains are still present around and inside these depressions. Using a G.I.S., the first step consisted in establishing a local geomorphological mapping, taking into account the geological background and the historical occupation of the area. The second step consisted in establishing topographic cross sections of the doline, where the ancient settlement of Latô is located, based on various DGPS surveys. Several questions concerning the occupation of this depression arose : how and for which reasons people decided to leave close to this specific landform ? Which type of activities (farming, grazing, cultivation…) existed and did they were related with natural resources exploitation ? A project associating the local greek archaeological services (Ephoria of Aghios Nikolaos, Director Ms. Apostolakou), the mayor of Nea Polis, the University of Paris 12 (GEONAT EA 435) and the French School of Athens tries to depict the historical evolution of the landscape. Four boreholes (up to a maximum depth of 5 meters) had been drilled in the poljé of Dreros and in a doline situated 1 km away from the ancient settlement of Lat

  13. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for spatio-temporal monitoring of soil erosion and roughness in Chania, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexakis, Dimitrios; Seiradakis, Kostas; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    This article presents a remote sensing approach for spatio-temporal monitoring of both soil erosion and roughness using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). Soil erosion by water is commonly known as one of the main reasons for land degradation. Gully erosion causes considerable soil loss and soil degradation. Furthermore, quantification of soil roughness (irregularities of the soil surface due to soil texture) is important and affects surface storage and infiltration. Soil roughness is one of the most susceptible to variation in time and space characteristics and depends on different parameters such as cultivation practices and soil aggregation. A UAV equipped with a digital camera was employed to monitor soil in terms of erosion and roughness in two different study areas in Chania, Crete, Greece. The UAV followed predicted flight paths computed by the relevant flight planning software. The photogrammetric image processing enabled the development of sophisticated Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and ortho-image mosaics with very high resolution on a sub-decimeter level. The DTMs were developed using photogrammetric processing of more than 500 images acquired with the UAV from different heights above the ground level. As the geomorphic formations can be observed from above using UAVs, shadowing effects do not generally occur and the generated point clouds have very homogeneous and high point densities. The DTMs generated from UAV were compared in terms of vertical absolute accuracies with a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) survey. The developed data products were used for quantifying gully erosion and soil roughness in 3D as well as for the analysis of the surrounding areas. The significant elevation changes from multi-temporal UAV elevation data were used for estimating diachronically soil loss and sediment delivery without installing sediment traps. Concerning roughness, statistical indicators of surface elevation point measurements were estimated and various

  14. Human thermal perception related to Föhn winds due to Saharan dust outbreaks in Crete Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastos, P. T.; Bleta, A. G.; Matsangouras, I. T.

    2017-05-01

    Crete Island is located in the southmost border of East Mediterranean basin, facing exacerbating atmospheric conditions (mainly concentrations of particulates) due to Saharan dust outbreaks. It is worth to note that these episodes are more frequent during spring and autumn, when mild biometeorological conditions become intolerable due to the synergy of the so called Föhn winds. Cretan mountains, especially Psiloritis Mt. (summit at 2456 m), are orientated perpendicularly to the southwest air mass flow, generating the Föhn winds. Propagating from the leeward of the mountains, these dry, hot winds have an effect on prevailing biometeorological conditions. While descending to the lowlands on the leeward side of the range, the wind becomes strong, gusty, and desiccating. This wind often lasts less than an hour to several days, with gradual weakening after the first or the second day. Sometimes, it stops very abruptly. In this work, the authors examined and analyzed the abrupt changes of human thermal perception within specific case studies during which Föhn winds appeared in Heraklion city at the leeward of Psiloritis Mt, associated with extreme Saharan dust episodes, observed within the period 2006-2010. In order to verify the development of Föhn winds, Meteorological Terminal Aviation Routine Weather Reports (METARs, meteorological observations every half hour), were acquired from the Heraklion meteorological station installed by the Hellenic National Meteorological Service (HNMS). The biometeorological conditions analyzed are based on human thermal bioclimatic indices such as the Physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI). METAR recordings of meteorological variables, such as air temperature, vapor pressure, wind speed, and cloudiness, were used as input variables in modeling the aforementioned thermal indices, so that to interpret the grade of the thermo-physiological stress. The PET and UTCI analysis was

  15. Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols during the MINOS campaign in Crete, July August 2001: a multi-analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciare, J.; Cachier, H.; Oikonomou, K.; Ausset, P.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2003-10-01

    During the major part of the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) campaign (summer 2001, Crete Isl.), the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) air was influenced by long range transport of biomass burning from the northern and western part of the Black Sea. During this campaign, carbonaceous aerosols were collected on quartz filters at a Free Tropospheric (FT) site, and at a MBL site together with size-resolved distribution of aerosols. Three Evolution Gas Analysis (EGA) protocols have been tested in order to better characterize the collected aged biomass burning smoke: A 2-step thermal method (Cachier et al., 1989) and a thermo-optical technique using two different temperature programs. The later temperature programs are those used for IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments) and NIOSH 5040 (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health). Artifacts were observed using the NIOSH temperature program and identified as interactions between carbon and dust deposited on the filter matrix at high temperature (T>550ºC) under the pure helium step of the analysis. During the MINOS campaign, Black Carbon (BC) and Organic Carbon (OC) mass concentrations were on average respectively 1.19±0.56 and 3.62±1.08 mgC/m3 for the IMPROVE temperature program, and 1.09±0.36 and 3.75±1.24 mgC/m3 for the thermal method. Though these values compare well on average and the agreement between the Total Carbon (TC) measurements sample to sample was excellent (slope=1.00, r2=0.93, n=56), important discrepancies were observed in determining BC concentrations from these two methods (average error of 33±22%). BC from the IMPROVE temperature program compared well with non-sea-salt potassium (nss-K) pointing out an optical sensitivity to biomass burning. On the other hand, BC from the thermal method showed a better agreement with non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO4), considered as a tracer for fossil fuel combustion during the MINOS campaign. The coupling between these

  16. Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols during the MINOS campaign in Crete, July-August 2001: a multi-analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciare, J.; Cachier, H.; Oikonomou, K.; Ausset, P.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2003-07-01

    During the major part of the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) campaign (summer 2001, Crete Isl.), the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) air was influenced by long range transport of biomass burning from the northern and western part of the Black Sea. During this campaign, carbonaceous aerosols were collected on quartz filters at a Free Tropospheric (FT) site, and at a MBL site together with size-resolved distribution of aerosols. Three Evolution Gas Analysis (EGA) protocols have been tested in order to better characterize the collected aged biomass burning smoke: A 2-step thermal method (Cachier et al., 1989) and a thermo-optical technique using two different temperature programs. The later temperature programs are those used for IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments) and NIOSH 5040 (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health). Artifacts were observed using the NIOSH temperature program and identified as interactions between carbon and dust deposited on the filter matrix at high temperature (T=550°C) under the pure helium step of the analysis. During the MINOS campaign, Black Carbon (BC) and Organic Carbon (OC) concentrations were on average respectively 1.19±0.56 and 3.62±1.08 μgC/m3 for the IMPROVE temperature program, and 1.09±0.36 and 3.75±1.24 μgC/m3 for the thermal method. Though these values compare well on average and the agreement between the Total Carbon (TC) measurements sample to sample was excellent (slope = 1.00, r2=0.93, n=56), important discrepancies were observed in determining BC concentrations from these two methods (average error of 33±22%). BC from the IMPROVE temperature program compared well with non-sea-salt potassium (nss-K) pointing out an optical sensitivity to biomass burning. On the other hand, BC from the thermal method showed a better agreement with non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO4), considered as a tracer for fossil fuel combustion during the MINOS campaign. The coupling between

  17. A comparison of attitudes toward lesbians and gay men among students of helping professions in Crete, Greece: the cases of social work, psychology, medicine, and nursing.

    PubMed

    Papadaki, Vasileia; Plotnikof, Kyriaki; Gioumidou, Meropi; Zisimou, Vasiliki; Papadaki, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes toward lesbians and gay men among social work, psychology, medical, and nursing students in Crete, Greece, using Herek's ATLG scale. No respondents held completely heterosexist attitudes; only 1.6% held completely non-heterosexist attitudes. The 44.96 total ATLG score indicates a slightly positive attitude toward lesbians and gay men. Psychology students scored higher than all others on positive attitudes, followed by social work students, medical students, and nursing students. Gender, having lesbian or gay acquaintances or friends, and religiosity were significant factors influencing students' attitudes, while no impact on attitudes due to the effects of higher education could be discerned. Implications for curriculum design and teaching methods are discussed.

  18. TEC variations over the Mediterranean before and during the strong earthquake (M = 6.5) of 12th October 2013 in Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Arabelos, D. N.; Vergos, G.; Spatalas, S. D.; Skordilis, M.

    In this paper, the total electron content (TEC) data from eight global positioning system (GPS) stations of the EUREF network, provided by IONOLAB (Turkey), were analyzed using discrete Fourier analysis to investigate the TEC variations over the Mediterranean before and during the strong earthquake of 12th October 2013, which occurred west of Crete, Greece. In accordance with the results of similar analyses in the area, the main conclusions of this study are the following: (a) TEC oscillations in a broad range of frequencies occur randomly over an area of several hundred km from the earthquake and (b) high frequency oscillations (f ⩾ 0.0003 Hz, periods T ⩽ 60 m) may point to the location of the earthquake with questionable accuracy. The fractal characteristics of the frequency distribution may point to the locus of the earthquake with higher accuracy. We conclude that the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) mechanism through acoustic or gravity waves could explain this phenomenology.

  19. An integrated multi-parameter monitoring approach for the quantification and mitigation of the climate change impact on the coasts of Eastern Crete, S. Aegean Sea (Project AKTAIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghionis, George; Alexandrakis, George; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Sifnioti, Dafni; Vousdoukas, Michalis; Andreadis, Olympos; Petrakis, Stelios; Poulos, Serafim; Velegrakis, Adonis; Kampanis, Nikolaos; Lipakis, Michalis

    2014-05-01

    The AKTAIA project aims at the production of new knowledge regarding the forms of manifestation of the climate change and its influence on the stability and evolution of the coastal landforms along the shoreline of eastern Crete (approximate length: 757 km), taking into account the various aspects of human intervention. Aerial photographs, satellite images and orthophotomaps have been used to produce a detailed coastline map and to study the morphological characteristics of the coastal zone of Eastern Crete. More than 100 beach zones have been visited during three field campaigns, which included geomorphological and human intervention mapping, topographic, meteorological and oceanographic measurements and sedimentological sampling and observations. In addition, two pilot sites (one in the north and one in the south part of Crete) are being monitored, via the installation of coastal video monitoring systems, shore-based meteorological stations and wave-tide recorders installed in the nearshore zone. Detailed seafloor mapping with the use of side scan sonar and scuba diving and bathymetric surveys were conducted in the two pilot sites. Meteorological and oceanographic data from all existing land-based meteorological stations, oceanographic buoys and the ERA-interim dataset are used to determine the wind and wave climate of each beach. The collected climatic, sedimentological and coastal environmental data are being integrated in a GIS database that will be used to forecast the climatic trends in the area of Crete for the next decades and to model the impact of the climatic change on the future evolution of the coastal zone. New methodologies for the continuous monitoring of land-sea interaction and for the quantification of the loss of sensitive coastal zones due to sea-level rise and a modified Coastal Vulnerability Index for a comparative evaluation of the vulnerability of the coasts are being developed. Numerical modelling of the nearshore hydrodynamics and the

  20. Dietary and other lifestyle correlates of serum folate concentrations in a healthy adult population in Crete, Greece: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hatzis, Christos M; Bertsias, George K; Linardakis, Manolis; Scott, John M; Kafatos, Anthony G

    2006-01-01

    Background Folate has emerged as a key nutrient for optimising health. Impaired folate status has been identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, various types of cancers, and neurocognitive disorders. The study aimed at examining the distribution and determinants of serum folate concentrations in a healthy adult population in Crete, Greece. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 486 healthy adults (250 men, 236 women) aged 39 ± 14 years, personnel of the Medical School and the University Hospital of Crete in Greece, was examined. Serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations were measured by microbiological assay, and total homocysteine was determined fluorometrically and by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Lifestyle questionnaires were completed, and nutrient intakes and food consumption were assessed by 24-h dietary recalls. Multivariate analyses were performed using SPSS v10.1. Results The geometric mean (95% confidence interval) concentrations of serum folate were 15.6 μmol/l (14.6–16.8) in men and 19.2 μmol/l (17.9–20.7) in women (p < 0.001). Inadequate folate levels (≤7 nmol/l) were present in 6.8% of men and 2.1% of women (p < 0.001). Approximately 76% of men and 87% of women did not meet the reference dietary intake for folate (400 μg/day). Serum folate was inversely related to total homocysteine levels (p < 0.001). Increased tobacco and coffee consumption were associated with lower folate concentrations (p < 0.05 for both) but these associations disappeared after controlling for nutrient intakes. In multivariate analysis, intakes of MUFA, fibre, calcium, magnesium, folate, and vitamins A, E, C, B1, and B6 were positively associated with serum folate. Consumption of potatoes, legumes, fruits, and vegetables were favourably related to the serum folate status. Conclusion Serum folate concentrations were associated with various demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors in healthy Cretan adults. Large-scale epidemiological studies should

  1. Studying the burden of community-acquired pneumonia in adults aged ⩾50 years in primary health care: an observational study in rural Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Bertsias, Antonios; Tsiligianni, Ioanna G; Duijker, George; Siafakas, Nikolaos; Lionis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Background: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a potentially life-threatening condition that often requires hospitalisation particularly in the elderly population or in patients with comorbidities. Aims: The aims of this study were to estimate the CAP frequency and severity in a well-defined primary healthcare setting in rural Crete, to record patient characteristics, their immunisation status and to estimate hospitalisation frequency and determinants. Methods: An observational study was designed and implemented in a rural setting within the prefecture of Heraklion in the island of Crete, Greece. Eligible patients were those aged 50 years or above, presenting with CAP based on signs and symptoms and positive X-ray findings. Results: A total of 124 CAP cases were recorded, 40 of which (32.3%) were hospitalised. Τhe age-standardised CAP incidence was estimated to be 236.7 cases per 100,000 persons aged ⩾50 years. Forty-three patients (35.2%) were vaccinated against pneumococcus. The most frequent chronic illnesses were heart disease (64.5%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (32.5%), and type 2 diabetes (21%). Hospitalisation determinants included advanced age (⩾74 years, Odds ratio (OR) 7.13; P value=0.001; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.23–22.79), obesity (OR 3.36, P=0.037; 95% CI, 1.08–10.52), ⩾40 pack-years of smoking (OR 3.82, P value=0.040; 95% CI, 1.07–18.42), presence of multimorbidity (OR 5.77, P value=0.003; 95% CI, 1.81–18.42) and pneumococcal vaccination (OR 0.29, P value=0.041; 95% CI, 0.09–0.95). Conclusions: This study highlighted patient characteristics and aspects of CAP epidemiology in the context of a rural primary care setting in southern Europe where limited data have been published until now. PMID:24965889

  2. The importance of geological data and derived information in seismic response assessment for urban sites. An example from the Island of Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsangaratos, Paraskevas; Loupasakis, Constantinos; Rozos, Dimitrios; Rondoyianni, Theodora; Vafidis, Antonios; Savvaidis, Alexandros; Soupios, Pantelis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Sarris, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    The magnitude, frequency content and duration of an earthquake ground motion depends mainly on the surrounding geological, tectonic and geomorphological conditions. Numerous reports have been contacted illustrating the necessity of providing accurate geological information in order to estimate the level of seismic hazard. In this context, geological information is the outcome of processing primary, raw field data and geotechnical investigation data that are non - organized and associated with the geological model of the study area. In most cases, the geological information is provided as an advance element, a key component of the "function" that solves any geo-environmental problem and is primarily reflected on analogue or digital maps. The main objective of the present study is to illustrate the importance of accurate geological information in the thirteen (13) selected sites of the Hellenic Accelerometric Network (HAN) in the area of Crete Island, in order to estimate the seismic action according to Eurocode (EC8). As an example the detailed geological-geotechnical map of the area around HAN site in Rethymno city, Crete is presented. The research area covers a 250m radius surrounding the RTHE HAN-station at a scale of 1: 2000 with detail description of the geological and geotechnical characteristics of the formations as well as the tectonic features (cracks, upthrust, thrust, etc) of the rock mass. The field survey showed that the RTHE station is founded over limestones and dolomites formations. The formations exhibit very good geomechanical behaviour; however they present extensive fragmentation and karstification. At this particular site the identification of a fault nearby the station proved to be significant information for the geophysical research as the location and orientation of the tectonic setting provided new perspective on the models of seismic wave prorogation. So, the geological data and the induced information along with the tectonic structure of

  3. Groundwater footprint methodology as policy tool for balancing water needs (agriculture & tourism) in water scarce islands - The case of Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kourgialas, Nektarios N; Karatzas, George P; Dokou, Zoi; Kokorogiannis, Andreas

    2018-02-15

    In many Mediterranean islands with limited surface water resources, the growth of agricultural and touristic sectors, which are the main water consumers, highly depends on the sustainable water resources management. This work highlights the crucial role of groundwater footprint (GF) as a tool for the sustainable management of water resources, especially in water scarce islands. The groundwater footprint represents the water budget between inflows and outflows in an aquifer system and is used as an index of the effect of groundwater use in natural resources and environmental flows. The case study presented in this paper is the island of Crete, which consists of 11 main aquifer systems. The data used for estimating the groundwater footprint in each system were groundwater recharges, abstractions through 412 wells, environmental flows (discharges) from 76 springs and 19 streams present in the area of study. The proposed methodology takes into consideration not only the water quantity but also the water quality of the aquifer systems and can be used as an integrated decision making tool for the sustainable management of groundwater resources. This methodology can be applied in any groundwater system. The results serve as a tool for assessing the potential of sustainable use and the optimal distribution of water needs under the current and future climatic conditions, considering both quantitative and qualitative factors. Adaptation measures and water policies that will effectively promote sustainable development are also proposed for the management of the aquifer systems that exhibit a large groundwater footprint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Studying the association between musculoskeletal disorders, quality of life and mental health. A primary care pilot study in rural Crete, Greece

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The burden of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) on the general health and well-being of the population has been documented in various studies. The objective of this study was to explore the association between MSD and the quality of life and mental health of patients and to discuss issues concerning care seeking patterns in rural Greece. Methods Patients registered at one rural Primary Care Centre (PCC) in Crete were invited to complete the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms, together with validated instruments for measuring health related quality of life (SF-36) and mental distress (GHQ-28). Results The prevalence rate of MSD was found to be 71.2%, with low back and knee pain being the most common symptoms. Most conditions significantly impaired the quality of life, especially the physical dimensions of SF-36. Depression was strongly correlated to most MSD (p < 0.001). Multiple logistic analyses revealed that patients who consulted the PCC due to MSD were likely to have more mental distress or impaired physical functioning compared to those who did not. Conclusion Musculoskeletal disorders were common in patients attending the rural PCC of this study and were associated with a poor quality of life and mental distress that affected their consultation behaviour. PMID:19930570

  5. Deployable centralizers

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Knudsen, Steven D.

    2017-02-28

    A centralizer assembly is disclosed that allows for the assembly to be deployed in-situ. The centralizer assembly includes flexible members that can be extended into the well bore in situ by the initiation of a gas generating device. The centralizer assembly can support a large load carrying capability compared to a traditional bow spring with little or no installation drag. Additionally, larger displacements can be produced to centralize an extremely deviated casing.

  6. Near surface geotechnical and geophysical data cross validated for site characterization applications. The cases of selected accelerometric stations in Crete island (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupasakis, Constantinos; Tsangaratos, Paraskevas; Rozos, Dimitrios; Rondoyianni, Theodora; Vafidis, Antonis; Steiakakis, Emanouil; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Savvaidis, Alexandros; Soupios, Pantelis; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Sarris, Apostolos; Mangriotis, Maria-Dafni; Dikmen, Unal

    2015-04-01

    The near surface ground conditions are highly important for the design of civil constructions. These conditions determine primarily the ability of the foundation formations to bear loads, the stress - strain relations and the corresponding deformations, as well as the soil amplification and corresponding peak ground motion in case of dynamic loading. The static and dynamic geotechnical parameters as well as the ground-type/soil-category can be determined by combining geotechnical and geophysical methods, such as engineering geological surface mapping, geotechnical drilling, in situ and laboratory testing and geophysical investigations. The above mentioned methods were combined for the site characterization in selected sites of the Hellenic Accelerometric Network (HAN) in the area of Crete Island. The combination of the geotechnical and geophysical methods in thirteen (13) sites provided sufficient information about their limitations, setting up the minimum tests requirements in relation to the type of the geological formations. The reduced accuracy of the surface mapping in urban sites, the uncertainties introduced by the geophysical survey in sites with complex geology and the 1-D data provided by the geotechnical drills are some of the causes affecting the right order and the quantity of the necessary investigation methods. Through this study the gradual improvement on the accuracy of the site characterization data in regards to the applied investigation techniques is presented by providing characteristic examples from the total number of thirteen sites. As an example of the gradual improvement of the knowledge about the ground conditions the case of AGN1 strong motion station, located at Agios Nikolaos city (Eastern Crete), is briefly presented. According to the medium scale geological map of IGME the station was supposed to be founded over limestone. The detailed geological mapping reveled that a few meters of loose alluvial deposits occupy the area, expected

  7. Maternal depression and personality traits in association with child neuropsychological and behavioral development in preschool years: Mother-child cohort (Rhea Study) in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Koutra, Katerina; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Kyriklaki, Andriani; Kampouri, Mariza; Sarri, Katerina; Vassilaki, Maria; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Chatzi, Leda

    2017-08-01

    Poor perinatal maternal mental health has been linked with negative outcomes on early child development; however, the importance of maternal personality has been neglected thus far. We aimed to examine the effects of antenatal and postnatal maternal mental health, including assessment of maternal personality characteristics, on child neuropsychological and behavioral development at preschool years in a population based mother-child cohort (Rhea Study) in Crete, Greece. Self-reported measures of maternal depression (EPDS), trait anxiety (STAI-Trait) and personality traits (EPQ-R) were assessed in a sample of 288 women at 28-32 weeks of gestation. A larger sample of 642 mothers completed the EPDS scale at 8 weeks postpartum. Children's neuropsychological (MSCA) and behavioral (ADHDT and SDQ) development were assessed at 4 years of age. Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the associations between the exposures and outcomes of interest after adjustment for potential confounders. Regarding child neuropsychological development, increased postnatal depressive symptoms were associated with child's perceptual performance, whereas increased maternal psychoticism was linked with child's motor ability at 4 years of age. Furthermore, elevated levels of maternal depression during pregnancy and postpartum, and the predisposing personality characteristics of trait anxiety and neuroticism, were associated with children's behavioral difficulties. A clinical diagnostic instrument for maternal mental health was not used and assessment of children's behavior was based on maternal report. These findings suggest that poor perinatal maternal mental health and an adverse personality profile may be associated with impaired child neuropsychological and behavioral development at preschool years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. GC×GC measurements of C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane hydrocarbons on Crete, in air from Eastern Europe during the MINOS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Williams, C.; Plass-Dülmer, H.; Berresheim, H.; Salisbury, G.; Lange, L.; Lelieveld, J.

    2003-09-01

    During the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) campaign in August 2001 gas-phase organic compounds were measured using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) at the Finokalia ground station, Crete. In this paper, C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane measurements are presented and interpreted. The mean mixing ratios of the hydrocarbons varied from 1±1 pptv (i-propylbenzene) to 43±36 pptv (toluene). The observed mixing ratios showed strong day-to-day variations and generally higher levels during the first half of the campaign. Mean diel profiles showed maxima at local midnight and late morning, and minima in the early morning and evening. Results from analysis using a simplified box model suggest that both the chemical sink (i.e. reaction with OH) and the variability of source strengths were the causes of the observed variations in hydrocarbon mixing ratios. The logarithms of hydrocarbon concentrations were negatively correlated with the OH concentrations integral over a day prior to the hydrocarbon measurements. Slopes of the regression lines derived from these correlations for different compounds are compared with literature rate constants for their reactions with OH. The slopes for most compounds agree reasonably well with the literature rate constants. A sequential reaction model has been applied to the interpretation of the relationship between ethylbenzene and two of its potential products, i.e. acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde. The model can explain the good correlation observed between [acetophenone]/[ethylbenzene] and [benzeneacetaldehyde]/[ethylbenzene]. The model results and field measurements suggest that the reactivity of benzeneacetaldehyde may lie between those of acetophenone and ethylbenzene and that the ratio between yields of acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde may be up to 28:1. Photochemical ages of trace gases sampled at Finokalia during the campaign are estimated using the sequential reaction model and related data

  9. GC×GC measurements of C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane hydrocarbons on Crete, in air from Eastern Europe during the MINOS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Williams, J.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.; Salisbury, G.; Lange, L.; Lelieveld, J.

    2003-03-01

    During the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) campaign in August 2001 gas-phase organic compounds were measured using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) at the Finokalia ground station, Crete. In this paper, C7-C11 aromatic and n-alkane measurements are presented and interpreted. The mean mixing ratios of the hydrocarbons varied from 1+/-1 pptv (i-propylbenzene) to 43+/-36 pptv (toluene). The observed mixing ratios showed strong day-to-day variations and generally higher levels during the first half of the campaign. Mean diel profiles showed maxima at local midnight and late morning, and minima in the early morning and evening. Results from analysis using a simplified box model suggest that both the chemical sink (i.e. reaction with OH) and the variability of source strengths were the causes of the observed variations in hydrocarbon mixing ratios. The logarithms of hydrocarbon concentrations were negatively correlated with the OH concentrations integral over a day prior to the hydrocarbon measurements. Slopes of the regression lines derived from these correlations for different compounds are compared with literature rate constants for their reactions with OH. The slopes for most compounds agree reasonably well with the literature rate constants. A sequential reaction model has been applied to the interpretation of the relationship between ethylbenzene and two of its potential products, i.e. acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde. The model can explain the good correlation observed between [acetophenone]/[ethylbenzene] and [benzeneacetaldehyde]/[ethylbenzene]. The model results and field measurements suggest that the reactivity of benzeneacetaldehyde may lie between those of acetophenone and ethylbenzene and that the ratio between yields of acetophenone and benzeneacetaldehyde may be up to 28:1. Photochemical ages of trace gases sampled at Finokalia during the campaign are estimated using the sequential reaction model and related data

  10. The Pattern of Change in the Abundances of Specific Bacterioplankton Groups Is Consistent across Different Nutrient-Enriched Habitats in Crete

    PubMed Central

    Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Papageorgiou, Nafsika; Pitta, Paraskevi; Kasapidis, Panagiotis; Karakassis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    A common source of disturbance for coastal aquatic habitats is nutrient enrichment through anthropogenic activities. Although the water column bacterioplankton communities in these environments have been characterized in some cases, changes in α-diversity and/or the abundances of specific taxonomic groups across enriched habitats remain unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial community changes at three different nutrient-enriched and adjacent undisturbed habitats along the north coast of Crete, Greece: a fish farm, a closed bay within a town with low water renewal rates, and a city port where the level of nutrient enrichment and the trophic status of the habitat were different. Even though changes in α-diversity were different at each site, we observed across the sites a common change pattern accounting for most of the community variation for five of the most abundant bacterial groups: a decrease in the abundance of the Pelagibacteraceae and SAR86 and an increase in the abundance of the Alteromonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Cryomorphaceae in the impacted sites. The abundances of the groups that increased and decreased in the impacted sites were significantly correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the total heterotrophic bacterial counts and the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and/or dissolved nitrogen and chlorophyll α, indicating that the common change pattern was associated with nutrient enrichment. Our results provide an in situ indication concerning the association of specific bacterioplankton groups with nutrient enrichment. These groups could potentially be used as indicators for nutrient enrichment if the pattern is confirmed over a broader spatial and temporal scale by future studies. PMID:24747897

  11. Effect of parental obesity and gestational diabetes on child neuropsychological and behavioral development at 4 years of age: the Rhea mother-child cohort, Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Daraki, Vasiliki; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Koutra, Katerina; Georgiou, Vaggelis; Kampouri, Mariza; Kyriklaki, Andriani; Vafeiadi, Marina; Papavasiliou, Stathis; Kogevinas, Manolis; Chatzi, Leda

    2017-06-01

    Studies have suggested an association between maternal obesity pre-pregnancy and gestational diabetes (GDM) with impaired offspring neurodevelopment, but it is not clear if these associations are explained by shared familiar characteristics. We aimed to assess the associations of maternal and paternal obesity, maternal glucose intolerance in early pregnancy and GDM, with offspring neurodevelopment at 4 years of age. We included 772 mother-child pairs from the "Rhea" Mother-Child cohort in Crete, Greece. Data on maternal/paternal body mass index (BMI) and maternal fasting serum samples for glucose and insulin measurements were collected at 12 weeks of gestation. GDM screening was performed at 24-28 weeks. Neurodevelopment at 4 years was assessed using the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities. Behavioral difficulties were assessed by Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Test. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that maternal obesity was associated with a significant score reduction in general cognitive ability (β-coeff -4.03, 95% CI: -7.08, -0.97), perceptual performance (β-coeff -4.60, 95% CI: -7.74, -1.47), quantitative ability (β-coeff -4.43, 95% CI: -7.68, -1.18), and executive functions (β-coeff -4.92, 95% CI: -8.06, -1.78) at 4 years of age, after adjustment for several confounders and paternal BMI. Maternal obesity was also associated with increased behavioral difficulties (β-coeff 1.22, 95% CI: 0.09, 2.34) and ADHD symptoms (β-coeff 4.28, 95% CI: 1.20, 7.36) at preschool age. Paternal obesity maternal glucose intolerance in early pregnancy and GDM was not associated with child neurodevelopment. These findings suggest that maternal obesity may impair optimal child neurodevelopment at preschool age independently of family shared characteristics.

  12. Bio-psychosocial determinants of cardiovascular disease in a rural population on Crete, Greece: formulating a hypothesis and designing the SPILI-III study.

    PubMed

    Lionis, Christos; Anyfantakis, Dimitrios; Symvoulakis, Emmanouil K; Shea, Sue; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Castanas, Elias

    2010-10-11

    In 1988, the SPILI project was established in order to evaluate the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profile of the inhabitants of Spili, in rural Crete, Greece. The first reports from this project revealed that against the unfavourable risk factors' profile observed, only a few men with a previous myocardial infarction were encountered. A follow-up study (SPILI II) was performed twelve years after the initial examination, and the unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile was re-confirmed. This paper presents a hypothesis formulated on the basis of previous research to investigate if dynamic psycho-social determinants, including social coherence of the local community, religiosity and spirituality, are protective against the development of coronary heart disease in a well-defined population. A follow-up examination of this Cretan cohort is currently being performed to assess the link between psychosocial factors and CVD. Psychosocial factors including sense of control, religiosity and spirituality are assessed in together with conventional CVD risk factors. Smoking and alcohol consumption, as well as dietary habits and activity levels are recorded. Oxidative stress and inflammatory markers, as well as ultrasound measurement of carotid intima media thickness, a preclinical marker of atherosclerosis, will also be measured. IMPLICATIONS OF THE HYPOTHESIS TESTED: The issue of the cardio-protective effect of psycho-social factors would be revisited based on the results of this Cretan cohort; nevertheless, further research is needed across different sub-populations in order to establish a definite relationship. A comprehensive approach based on the aspects of bio-social life may result in more accurate CVD risk management.

  13. TEC variations over Mediteranean before and during the strong earthquake (M=6.2) of 12th October 2013 in Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael; Arabelos, Dimitrios; Vergos, Georgios; Spatalas, Spyridon

    2014-05-01

    In this paper the Total Electron Content (TEC) data of 9 Global Positioning System (GPS) stations of the EUREF network, which are being provided by IONOLAB (Turkey), were analysed using Discrete Fourier Analysis in order to investigate the TEC variations over Mediteranean before and during the strong earthquake of 12th of October 2013, Which occur in western of Crete, Greece. In accordance to the results of similar analysis on the occasion of earthquakes in the area (Contadakis et al 2008, 2012a,2012b) the main conclusions of this analysis are the following. (a) TEC oscillations in a broad range of frequencies occur randomly over a broad area of several hundred km from the earthquake and (b) high frequency oscillations (f ≥ 0.0003Hz, periods T ≤ 60m) seems to point to the location of the earthquake with a questionable accuracy but the fractal characteristics of the frequencies distribution, points to the locus of the earthquake with a rather higher accuracy. We conclude that the LAIC mechanism through acoustic or gravity wave could explain this phenomenology. Key words: GPS network, ionospheric total electron content, wavelet analysis References Contadakis, M.E., Arabelos, D.N. G. Asteriadis, S.D. Spatalas and Ch. Pikridas, 2008. TEC variations over the Mediterranean during the seismic activity period of the last quarter of 2005 in the area of Greece, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 1267-1276 M.E. Contadakis, D.N. Arabelos, Ch. Pikridas and S.D. Spatalas, 2012a,TEC variations over Southern Europe before and during the M6.3 Abruzzo earthquake of 6th April 2009, Annals of Geophysics, Vol.55,1, p.83-93 M.E.Contadakis, D.N.Arabelos, and G.Vergos, 2012b, TEC variations over North-western Balkan peninsula before and during the seismic activity of 24th May 2009, EGU GA, Geoph. Res. Abs., Vol. 14, EGU2012-2319-2

  14. Innovative tidal notch detection using TLS and fuzzy logic: Implications for palaeo-shorelines from compressional (Crete) and extensional (Gulf of Corinth) tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiderwind, S.; Boulton, S. J.; Papanikolaou, I.; Reicherter, K.

    2017-04-01

    Tidal notches are a generally accepted sea-level marker and maintain particular interest for palaeoseismic studies since coastal seismic activity potentially displaces them from their genetic position. The result of subsequent seismic events is a notch sequence reflecting the cumulative coastal uplift. In order to evaluate preserved notch sequences, an innovative and interdisciplinary workflow is presented that accurately highlights evidence for palaeo-sea-level markers. The workflow uses data from terrestrial laser scanning and iteratively combines high-resolution curvature analysis, high performance edge detection, and feature extraction. Based on the assumptions that remnants, such as the roof of tidal notches, form convex patterns, edge detection is performed on principal curvature images. In addition, a standard algorithm is compared to edge detection results from a custom Fuzzy logic approach. The results pass through a Hough transform in order to extract continuous line features of an almost horizontal orientation. The workflow was initially developed on a single, distinct, and sheltered exposure in southern Crete and afterwards successfully tested on laser scans of different coastal cliffs from the Perachora Peninsula. This approach allows a detailed examination of otherwise inaccessible locations and the evaluation of lateral and 3D geometries, thus evidence for previously unrecognised sea-level markers can be identified even when poorly developed. High resolution laser scans of entire cliff exposures allow local variations to be quantified. Edge detection aims to reduce information on the surface curvature and Hough transform limits the results towards orientation and continuity. Thus, the presented objective methodology enhances the recognition of tidal notches and supports palaeoseismic studies by contributing spatial information and accurate measurements of horizontal movements, beyond that recognised during traditional surveys. This is especially

  15. Gis-based assessment of marine oil spill hazard and environmental vulnerability for the coasts of Crete in South Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Nikiforakis, Ioannis K.; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2017-04-01

    Developing effective early warning and coordination systems can save thousands of lives and protect people, property and the environment in the event of natural and man-made disasters. In its document "Towards Better Protection of Citizens against Disaster Risks: Strengthening Early Warning Systems in Europe", the Commission points out that it seeks to follow a multi-hazard approach, to develop near real time alert systems, to ensure a near real time dissemination of alerts to Participating States, and to improve its rapid analytical capacity. In this context, the EU project DECATASTROPHIZE (http://decatastrophize.eu/project/) co-financed by the EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection aims to develop a Geospatial Early warning Decision Support System (GE-DSS) to assess, prepare for and respond to multiple and/or simultaneous natural and man-made hazards, disasters, and environmental incidents by using existing models/systems in each partner country (Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy and Spain) in a synergistic way on ONE multi-platform, called DECAT. Specifically, project partners will establish appropriate geo-databases for test areas and use existing hazard models to produce hazard and vulnerability geo-spatial information for earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, floods, forest fires and marine oil spills. The GE-DSS in will consist of one source code with six geodatabases, i.e., one for each partner and risk data in the respective test area. Each partner organization will be able to manage and monitor its own data/database and their results using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA). The GE-DSS will be demonstrated at the local, regional and national levels through a set of Command Post and Table Top Disaster Exercises. As part of the DECAT GE-DSS, the gis-based geo-database and assessment of marine oil spill hazard and environmental vulnerability for the coasts of Crete in South Aegean Sea are presented here. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps are

  16. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  17. A GIS policy approach for assessing the effect of fertilizers on the quality of drinking and irrigation water and wellhead protection zones (Crete, Greece).

    PubMed

    Kourgialas, Nektarios N; Karatzas, George P; Koubouris, Georgios C

    2017-03-15

    Fertilizers have undoubtedly contributed to the significant increase in yields worldwide and therefore to the considerable improvement of quality of life of man and animals. Today, attention is focussed on the risks imposed by agricultural fertilizers. These effects include the dissolution and transport of excess quantities of fertilizer major- and trace-elements to the groundwater that deteriorate the quality of drinking and irrigation water. In this study, a map for the Fertilizer Water Pollution Index (FWPI) was generated for assessing the impact of agricultural fertilizers on drinking and irrigation water quality. The proposed methodology was applied to one of the most intensively cultivated with tree crops area in Crete (Greece) where potential pollutant loads are derived exclusively from agricultural activities and groundwater is the main water source. In this region of 215 km 2 , groundwater sampling data from 235 wells were collected over a 15-year time period and analyzed for the presence of anionic (ΝΟ -3 , PO -3 4 ) and cationic (K +1 , Fe +2 , Mn +2 , Zn +2 , Cu +2 , B +3 ) fertilizer trace elements. These chemicals are the components of the primary fertilizers used in local tree crop production. Eight factors/maps were considered in order to estimate the spatial distribution of groundwater contamination for each fertilizer element. The eight factors combined were used to generate the Fertilizer Water Pollution Index (FWPI) map indicating the areas with drinking/irrigation water pollution due to the high groundwater contamination caused by excessive fertilizer use. Moreover, by taking into consideration the groundwater flow direction and seepage velocity, the pathway through which groundwater supply become polluted can be predicted. The groundwater quality results show that a small part of the study area, about 8 km 2 (3.72%), is polluted or moderately polluted by the excessive use of fertilizers. Considering that in this area drinking water sources

  18. Breastfeeding duration and cognitive, language and motor development at 18 months of age: Rhea mother-child cohort in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Leventakou, Vasiliki; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Koutra, Katerina; Vassilaki, Maria; Mantzouranis, Evangelia; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Chatzi, Leda

    2015-03-01

    Breast feeding duration has been associated with improved cognitive development in children. However, few population-based prospective studies have evaluated dose-response relationships of breastfeeding duration with language and motor development at early ages, and results are discrepant. The study uses data from the prospective mother-child cohort ('Rhea' study) in Crete, Greece. 540 mother-child pairs were included in the present analysis. Information about parental and child characteristics and breastfeeding practices was obtained by interview-administered questionnaires. Trained psychologists assessed cognitive, language and motor development by using the Bayley Scales of Infant Toddler Development (3rd edition) at the age of 18 months. Duration of breast feeding was linearly positively associated with all the Bayley scales, except of gross motor. The association persisted after adjustment for potential confounders with an increase of 0.28 points in the scale of cognitive development (β=0.28; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.55), 0.29 points in the scale of receptive communication (β=0.29; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.54), 0.30 points in the scale of expressive communication (β=0.30; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.57) and 0.29 points in the scale of fine motor development (β=0.29; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.56) per accumulated month of breast feeding. Children who were breast fed longer than 6 months had a 4.44-point increase in the scale of fine motor development (β=4.44; 95% CI 0.06 to 8.82) compared with those never breast fed. Longer duration of breast feeding was associated with increased scores in cognitive, language and motor development at 18 months of age, independently from a wide range of parental and infant characteristics. Additional longitudinal studies and trials are needed to confirm these results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Epidemiology and burden of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Southern European population: data from the community-based lupus registry of Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Gergianaki, Irini; Fanouriakis, Antonis; Repa, Argyro; Tzanakakis, Michalis; Adamichou, Christina; Pompieri, Alexandra; Spirou, Giorgis; Bertsias, Antonios; Kabouraki, Eleni; Tzanakis, Ioannis; Chatzi, Leda; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Bertsias, George K

    2017-12-01

    Several population-based studies on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been reported, yet community-based, individual-case validated, comprehensive reports are missing. We studied the SLE epidemiology and burden on the island of Crete during 1999-2013. Multisource case-finding included patients ≥15 years old. Cases were ascertained by the ACR 1997, SLICC 2012 criteria and rheumatologist diagnosis, and validated through synthesis of medical charts, administrative and patient-generated data. Overall age-adjusted/sex-adjusted incidence was 7.4 (95% CI 6.8 to 7.9) per 100 000 persons/year, with stabilising trends in women but increasing in men, and average (±SD) age of diagnosis at 43 (±15) years. Adjusted and crude prevalence (December 2013) was 123.4 (113.9 to 132.9) and 143 (133 to 154)/10 5 (165/10 5 in urban vs 123/10 5 in rural regions, p<0.001), respectively. Age-adjusted/sex-adjusted nephritis incidence was 0.6 (0.4 to 0.8) with stable trends, whereas that of neuropsychiatric SLE was 0.5 (0.4 to 0.7) per 100 000 persons/year and increasing. Although half of prevalent cases had mild manifestations, 30.5% developed organ damage after 7.2 (±6.6) years of disease duration, with the neuropsychiatric domain most frequently afflicted, and 4.4% of patients with nephritis developed end-stage renal disease. The ACR 1997 and SLICC 2012 classification criteria showed high concordance (87%), yet physician-based diagnosis occurred earlier than criteria-based in about 20% of cases. By the use of a comprehensive methodology, we describe the full spectrum of SLE from the community to tertiary care, with almost half of the cases having mild disease, yet with significant damage accrual. SLE is not rare, affects predominantly middle-aged women and is increasingly recognised in men. Neuropsychiatric disease is an emerging frontier in lupus prevention and care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All

  20. Central Venous Catheter (Central Line)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin entry site. With care, central venous catheters can remain in the body for several months without becoming infected. ■ ■ Blocking or kinking— Blood clots may begin to form in the catheter but ...

  1. Central Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The beginning of spring in central Chile looked like this to SeaWiFS. The snow-covered Andes mark the country's eastern border, and phytoplankton blooms and river sediment plumes fill the waters off its west coast. A large eddy due west of Concepcion is highlighted by the phytoplankton it contains.

  2. Central Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 8 September 2003

    The degraded remains of this crater central peak have a surface cover that is characteristic of high latitudes. This type of surface material is thought to be a mixture of dust and ice. The nameless crater that this central peak is found in is approximately 150 km in diameter and is located in the southern highlands.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -51.6, Longitude 231.4 East (128.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Secular trends in fitness, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and TV-viewing among first grade school children of Crete, Greece between 1992/93 and 2006/07.

    PubMed

    Smpokos, Emmanouil A; Linardakis, Manolis; Papadaki, Angeliki; Lionis, Christos; Kafatos, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    To assess secular changes in physical fitness (PF), moderate-to-vigorous-physical activity (MVPA) and TV-viewing in 1st-grade children from Crete, Greece. Cross-sectional cohorts examined in academic years 1992/93 and 2006/07. Two representative samples of children, aged 5.9-7.8 years, were studied during 1992/93 (N=606) and 2006/07 (N=361). PF (sit-and-reach, standing-broad-jump, sit-ups and 20 m-shuttle-run-test) was assessed by the European-PF test battery and MVPA by a physical activity (PA) questionnaire. Data on the frequency of TV-viewing was also collected. Between 1992/93 and 2006/07, there was a significant increase in all fitness tests in both genders (P<0.001) and in MVPA in boys (76.5 min/week vs. 38.7 min/week, P<0.001). Time spent watching TV on weekdays was significantly more in both genders in 2006/07, compared to 1992/93 (P<0.001). In 2006/07, active boys and active girls spent more time in MVPA than active boys and girls in 1992/93 (P<0.001). Significantly higher proportions of boys and girls engaged in vigorous activities in 2006/07, than 1992/93 (P<0.001 and P=0.027, respectively). A significant increase in physical and cardiorespiratory fitness in both genders and MVPA in boys was observed in children from Crete between 1992/93 and 2006/07. The increase in weekday TV-viewing, despite being parallel to an increase in leisure-time MVPA, could have an unfavorable effect on health and should be tackled in future interventions in this population. Dietary, anthropometric and biochemical indices should also be investigated to assess their impact on the secular changes in physical fitness and activity observed in this sample of children. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of data mining techniques and data analysis methods to measure cancer morbidity and mortality data in a regional cancer registry: The case of the island of Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Varlamis, Iraklis; Apostolakis, Ioannis; Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Dey, Nilanjan; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Lionis, Christos

    2017-07-01

    Micro or macro-level mapping of cancer statistics is a challenging task that requires long-term planning, prospective studies and continuous monitoring of all cancer cases. The objective of the current study is to present how cancer registry data could be processed using data mining techniques in order to improve the statistical analysis outcomes. Data were collected from the Cancer Registry of Crete in Greece (counties of Rethymno and Lasithi) for the period 1998-2004. Data collection was performed on paper forms and manually transcribed to a single data file, thus introducing errors and noise (e.g. missing and erroneous values, duplicate entries etc.). Data were pre-processed and prepared for analysis using data mining tools and algorithms. Feature selection was applied to evaluate the contribution of each collected feature in predicting patients' survival. Several classifiers were trained and evaluated for their ability to predict survival of patients. Finally, statistical analysis of cancer morbidity and mortality rates in the two regions was performed in order to validate the initial findings. Several critical points in the process of data collection, preprocessing and analysis of cancer data were derived from the results, while a road-map for future population data studies was developed. In addition, increased morbidity rates were observed in the counties of Crete (Age Standardized Morbidity/Incidence Rates ASIR= 396.45 ± 2.89 and 274.77 ±2.48 for men and women, respectively) compared to European and world averages (ASIR= 281.6 and 207.3 for men and women in Europe and 203.8 and 165.1 in world level). Significant variation in cancer types between sexes and age groups (the ratio between deaths and reported cases for young patients, less than 34 years old, is at 0.055 when the respective ratio for patients over 75 years old is 0.366) was also observed. This study introduced a methodology for preprocessing and analyzing cancer data, using a

  5. Central sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - central; Obesity - central sleep apnea; Cheyne-Stokes - central sleep apnea; Heart failure - central sleep apnea ... or conditions of the cervical spine (neck) Severe obesity Certain medicines, such as narcotic painkillers If the ...

  6. Common Infections with Polyomaviruses and Herpesviruses and Neuropsychological Development at 4 Years of Age, the Rhea Birth Cohort in Crete, Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karachaliou, Marianna; Chatzi, Leda; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Kampouri, Mariza; Kyriklaki, Andriani; Koutra, Katerina; Chalkiadaki, Georgia; Michel, Angelika; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Kogevinas, Manolis; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim; de Sanjose, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Viral infections of the central nervous system may have detrimental effects for the developing brain, but the effects of less virulent common infections are unclear. We aim to investigate the impact of common viral infections of early childhood on neuropsychological performance of children at age four. Methods: We used cross-sectional…

  7. Towards climatological study on the characteristics of aerosols in Central Africa and Mediterranean sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhalifa, Jamel; Chaabane, Mabrouk

    2016-02-01

    The atmosphere contains molecules, clouds and aerosols that are sub-millimeter particles having a large variability in size, shape, chemical composition, lifetime and contents. The aerosols concentration depends greatly on the geographical situation, meteorological and environmental conditions, which makes aerosol climatology difficult to assess. Setting up a solar photometer (automatic, autonomous and portable instrument) on a given site allows carrying out the necessary measurements for aerosol characterization. The particle microphysical and optical properties are obtained from photometric measurements. The objective of this study is to analyze the spatial variability of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in several Mediterranean regions and Central Africa, we considered a set of simultaneous data in the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from six sites, two of which are located in Central Africa (Banizoumbou and Zinder Airport) and the rest are Mediterranean sites (Barcelona, Malaga, Lampedusa, and Forth Crete). The results have shown that the physical properties of aerosols are closely linked to the climate nature of the studied site. The optical thickness, single scattering albedo and aerosols size distribution can be due to the aging of the dust aerosol as they are transported over the Mediterranean basin.

  8. Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Vasculitis / Central Nervous System (CNS) Vasculitis Central Nervous System (CNS) Vasculitis Swap out your current Facebook Profile ... Facebook personal page. Replace with this image. Central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis is inflammation of blood vessel walls ...

  9. North Central IPM Center

    Science.gov Websites

    ) solutions, based in the North Central region. North Central IPM Center Invasive Plants in Trade Working webpage to learn about the North Central IPM Center's grants program and other IPM-related funding Tribal IPM Urban Ag IPM Partners In IPM Working Groups Critical Issues Projects North Central IPM

  10. Martian Central Pit Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillman, E.; Barlow, N. G.

    2005-01-01

    Impact craters containing central pits are rare on the terrestrial planets but common on icy bodies. Mars is the exception among the terrestrial planets, where central pits are seen on crater floors ( floor pits ) as well as on top of central peaks ( summit pits ). Wood et al. [1] proposed that degassing of subsurface volatiles during crater formation produced central pits. Croft [2] argued instead that central pits might form during the impact of volatile-rich comets. Although central pits are seen in impact craters on icy moons such as Ganymede, they do show some significant differences from their martian counterparts: (a) only floor pits are seen on Ganymede, and (b) central pits begin to occur at crater diameters where the peak ring interior morphology begins to appear in terrestrial planet craters [3]. A study of craters containing central pits was conducted by Barlow and Bradley [4] using Viking imagery. They found that 28% of craters displaying an interior morphology on Mars contain central pits. Diameters of craters containing central pits ranged from 16 to 64 km. Barlow and Bradley noted that summit pit craters tended to be smaller than craters containing floor pits. They also noted a correlation of central pit craters with the proposed rings of large impact basins. They argued that basin ring formation fractured the martian crust and allowed subsurface volatiles to concentrate in these locations. They favored the model that degassing of the substrate during crater formation was responsible for central pit formation due to the preferential location of central pit craters along these basin rings.

  11. Central Pit Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-13

    Crater floors can have a range of features, from flat to a central peak or a central pit. This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows an unnamed crater in Terra Sabaea has a central pit. This unnamed crater in Terra Sabaea has a central pit. The different floor features develop do due several factors, including the size of the impactor, the geology of the surface material and the geology of the materials at depth. Orbit Number: 60737 Latitude: 22.3358 Longitude: 61.2019 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-08-23 20:13 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20092

  12. Diabetes insipidus - central

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Central diabetes insipidus; Neurogenic diabetes insipidus Images Endocrine glands References Brimioulle S. Diabetes insipidus. In: Vincent J-L, Abraham E, Moore FA, Kochanek PM, Fink ...

  13. The 2013 Crete (Hellenic Arc) Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakostas, V. G.; Papadimitriou, E. E.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    The western Hellenic Arc is a well known place of active interplate deformation, where the convergence motion vector is perpendicular to the subduction front. On 12 October 2013 this area was hit by a strong (Mw=6.7) earthquake, occurred on a thrust fault onto the coupled part of the overriding and descending plates, with the compression axis being oriented in the direction of plate convergence. This was the first strong (M>6.0) event to have occurred onto this segment of the descending slab, which has accommodated the largest (M8.3) known earthquake in the Mediterranean area, and to be recorded by the Hellenic Unified Seismological Network (HUSN) that has been considerably improved in the last five years. The first 2-days relocated seismicity shows activation of the upper part of the descending slab, downdip of the plate interface and forming a relatively narrow aftershock area on map view. The less densely visited by aftershocks area, where the main shock is also encompassed, is considered as the high-slip area along the downdip portion of the subducting plane. Dense concentration of the intraslab aftershocks are probably due to the increase of static stress generated by the main shock. A spectacular feature of the aftershock activity concerns the lateral extension of the slipped area, which appears very sharply defined. This provides evidence on localized coupling and aseismically creeping areas, explaining the low coupling ratio in the Hellenic Arc, as it derives from comparison between relative plate motion and seismic energy release. Elucidating the issue of how far the associated large-slip zone might be extended along the plate interface during the main rupture is crucial in assessing future earthquake hazards from subduction events in the study area. This research has been co-funded by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national resources under the framework of the "THALES Program: SEISMO FEAR HELLARC" project.

  14. Iowa research with Chem-Crete bitumen.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1984-01-01

    With the spiraling cost of construction, coupled with inflation, : engineers must develop and research new techniques to better utilize : the public's dollar. One area i n which these new technologies must be : researched is in the field of highway c...

  15. Erosion in the Beaches of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synolakis, C. E.; Foteinis, S.; Voukouvalas, V.; Kalligeris, N.

    2009-04-01

    In the past decade, erosion rates for the coastlines of Greece are rapidly increasing. Many beaches on the northern coast of the island have substantially retreated, while others have disappeared or will disappear within the present or the following decade if no action is taken. For the better understanding and visualization of the current situation, specific examples of rapid erosion are described and afterwards we speculate as to the causes. We infer that, as in other parts of the Mediterranean, the causes are anthropogenic and include removal of sand dunes to build roads, sand mining from beaches and rivers, permanent building construction within the active coastal zone, on or too close to shoreline, and poor design of coastal structures. The reason behind the rapid erosion of Greece coastlines is the complete lack of any semblance of coastal zone management and antiquated legislation. We conclude that unless urgent measures for the protection and even salvation of the beaches are taken and if the sand mining and dune removal does not stop, then several beaches will disappear within the present and the following decade.

  16. Idiopathic central diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Grace, Mary; Balachandran, Venu; Menon, Sooraj

    2011-10-01

    Idiopathic central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a rare disorder characterized clinically by polyuria and polydipsia, and an abnormal urinary concentration without any identified etiology. We report a case of central diabetes insipidus in a 60-year-old lady in the absence of secondary causes like trauma, infection, and infiltrative disorders of brain.

  17. Central nervous system

    MedlinePlus

    The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. Your brain and spinal cord serve as the main "processing center" for your entire nervous system. They control all the workings of your body.

  18. Balanced Centrality of Networks.

    PubMed

    Debono, Mark; Lauri, Josef; Sciriha, Irene

    2014-01-01

    There is an age-old question in all branches of network analysis. What makes an actor in a network important, courted, or sought? Both Crossley and Bonacich contend that rather than its intrinsic wealth or value, an actor's status lies in the structures of its interactions with other actors. Since pairwise relation data in a network can be stored in a two-dimensional array or matrix, graph theory and linear algebra lend themselves as great tools to gauge the centrality (interpreted as importance, power, or popularity, depending on the purpose of the network) of each actor. We express known and new centralities in terms of only two matrices associated with the network. We show that derivations of these expressions can be handled exclusively through the main eigenvectors (not orthogonal to the all-one vector) associated with the adjacency matrix. We also propose a centrality vector (SWIPD) which is a linear combination of the square, walk, power, and degree centrality vectors with weightings of the various centralities depending on the purpose of the network. By comparing actors' scores for various weightings, a clear understanding of which actors are most central is obtained. Moreover, for threshold networks, the (SWIPD) measure turns out to be independent of the weightings.

  19. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    ROMINE, L.D.

    2006-02-01

    A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach tomore » Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.« less

  20. Centralized mouse repositories.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T

    2012-10-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world.

  1. Centralized Mouse Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Leah Rae; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T.

    2013-01-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world. PMID:22945696

  2. The central hardwood forest

    Treesearch

    F. Bryan Clark

    1989-01-01

    The central hardwood forest covers a vast area of the United States where the dominant native vegetation is hardwood trees. It is one of the largest forest areas in the country and contains about 100 million acres. The forests include more than 70 hardwood tree species, several conifers, many shrubs and herbaceous plants, and a large number of animal species.

  3. Central hardwood notes

    Treesearch

    F. Bryan Clark; Jay G. Hutchinson

    1989-01-01

    The central hardwood forest covers a vast area of the United States where the dominant native vegetation is hardwood trees. It is one of the largest forest areas in the country and contains about 100 million acres. The forests include more than 70 hardwood tree species, several conifers, many shrubs and herbaceaous plants, and a large number of animal species. This...

  4. Central American Climatology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    Central America, as where mean temperatures are relatively warm throughout the year de- so spite seasonal rainfall changes. 75 Elevation, solar angle...November 1982 Control Hidalgo Anos.1952-1963, Republica de Nicaragua, Ministerio de Formento Y O0.PP, Comision Nacional de Energia . Craig, Richard A., The

  5. NCEP Central Operations

    Science.gov Websites

    Climate Climate Prediction Climate Archives Weather Safety Storm Ready NOAA Central Library Photo Library NCO's MISSION * Execute the NCEP operational model suite - Create climate, weather, ocean, space and ) NCO Organizational Chart NOAA's Weather and Climate Operational Supercomputing System is known as

  6. Channeling the Central Dogma.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Ronald L

    2014-05-21

    How do neurons and networks achieve their characteristic electrical activity, regulate this activity homeostatically, and yet show population variability in expression? In this issue of Neuron, O'Leary et al. (2014) address some of these thorny questions in this theoretical analysis that starts with the Central Dogma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Central Dogma Goes Digital.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yihan; Elowitz, Michael B

    2016-03-17

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Tay and colleagues (Albayrak et al., 2016) describe a new technique to digitally quantify the numbers of protein and mRNA in the same mammalian cell, providing a new way to look at the central dogma of molecular biology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Channeling the Central Dogma

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    How do neurons and networks achieve their characteristic electrical activity, regulate this activity homeostatically, and yet show population variability in expression? O'Leary et al. address some of these thorny questions in this theoretical analysis that starts with the Central Dogma. PMID:24853932

  9. [Centralization versus decentralization. Hematology].

    PubMed

    Borregaard, Niels

    2006-04-10

    Clinical haematology is the result of teamwork among dedicated specialists in pathology, molecular diagnostics, imaging, radiotherapy and the haematologist, who in turn can focus on only a limited fraction of the various and highly complex diseases that together constitute clinical haematology. The treatment of patients should be centralized in departments large enough to permit internal subspecialization and to provide expert service focused on haematology. No more than three such hematology centers are needed in Denmark.

  10. Central Dental Evacuation Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    handpiece . Inlets to this system are required throughout the dental facility for all disciplines of patient treatment where coolant and irrigation liquids...speed air turbine dental handpiece is used and for practically all other procedures in the practice of modern dentistry. Performance and reliability...AD-AI16 653 SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE BROOKS AFR TX F/G 6/5 CENTRAL DENTAL EVACUATION SYSTEMS.(U) MAY 52 J M POWELL, J M YOUNG UNCLASSIFIED SAM-TR

  11. Gangs in Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-02

    Societal stigmas against gangs and gang- deportees from the United States have made the process of leaving a gang extremely difficult. A recent...often unwilling to hire them. Tattooed former gang members, especially returning deportees from the United States who are often native English...recipients of deportees on a per capita basis. For all Central American countries, with the exception of Panama, those deported on criminal grounds

  12. FNAL central email systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jack; Lilianstrom, Al; Pasetes, Ray

    2004-10-01

    The FNAL Email System is the primary point of entry for email destined for an employee or user at Fermilab. This centrally supported system is designed for reliability and availability. It uses multiple layers of protection to help ensure that: (1) SPAM messages are tagged properly; (2) All mail is inspected for viruses; and (3) Valid mail gets delivered. This system employs numerous redundant subsystems to accomplish these tasks.

  13. Central American Flying Weather

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    CEILING; VISIBILITY; WIND, PRECIPITATIDNc’--." HAZE, SMOKE, TEMPORALE ; MOUNTAIN WAVE; MILITARY METEOROLOGY. 4k- / ’A. bstract; Asummary of~ing weather...1 The " Temporale " ....................................1 Mountain Waves ......................I...............1 Severe Thunderstorms...charts. The for any part of Central America lies in having: Tactical Pilota.e Chart series , produced by the Df -.nse Mapping Agency, is * A good, basic

  14. Centralized versus distributed propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The functions and requirements of auxiliary propulsion systems are reviewed. None of the three major tasks (attitude control, stationkeeping, and shape control) can be performed by a collection of thrusters at a single central location. If a centralized system is defined as a collection of separated clusters, made up of the minimum number of propulsion units, then such a system can provide attitude control and stationkeeping for most vehicles. A distributed propulsion system is characterized by more numerous propulsion units in a regularly distributed arrangement. Various proposed large space systems are reviewed and it is concluded that centralized auxiliary propulsion is best suited to vehicles with a relatively rigid core. These vehicles may carry a number of flexible or movable appendages. A second group, consisting of one or more large flexible flat plates, may need distributed propulsion for shape control. There is a third group, consisting of vehicles built up from multiple shuttle launches, which may be forced into a distributed system because of the need to add additional propulsion units as the vehicles grow. The effects of distributed propulsion on a beam-like structure were examined. The deflection of the structure under both translational and rotational thrusts is shown as a function of the number of equally spaced thrusters. When two thrusters only are used it is shown that location is an important parameter. The possibility of using distributed propulsion to achieve minimum overall system weight is also examined. Finally, an examination of the active damping by distributed propulsion is described.

  15. Central Campus Construction Progress

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-18

    The new headquarters building’s seven floors are clearly visible as construction continues in the industrial area at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 200,000-square-foot facility will anchor the spaceport’s Central Campus and house about 500 NASA civil service and contractor employees. The building will be more energy efficient than the current Headquarters building and will feature the latest in office and administrative building technology to fulfill Kennedy's role as the premiere multi-user spaceport for NASA and, increasingly, commercial entities.

  16. Central Campus Construction Progress

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-18

    A large crane towers overhead as the new, seven-story headquarters building takes shape in the industrial area at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 200,000-square-foot facility will anchor the spaceport’s Central Campus and house about 500 NASA civil service and contractor employees. The building will be more energy efficient than the current Headquarters building and will feature the latest in office and administrative building technology to fulfill Kennedy's role as the premiere multi-user spaceport for NASA and, increasingly, commercial entities.

  17. Central nervous system histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, Joseph; Myint, Thein; Guo, Ying; Kemmer, Phebe; Hage, Chadi; Terry, Colin; Azar, Marwan M.; Riddell, James; Ender, Peter; Chen, Sharon; Shehab, Kareem; Cleveland, Kerry; Esguerra, Eden; Johnson, James; Wright, Patty; Douglas, Vanja; Vergidis, Pascalis; Ooi, Winnie; Baddley, John; Bamberger, David; Khairy, Raed; Vikram, Holenarasipur; Jenny-Avital, Elizabeth; Sivasubramanian, Geetha; Bowlware, Karen; Pahud, Barbara; Sarria, Juan; Tsai, Townson; Assi, Maha; Mocherla, Satish; Prakash, Vidhya; Allen, David; Passaretti, Catherine; Huprikar, Shirish; Anderson, Albert

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Central nervous system (CNS) involvement occurs in 5 to 10% of individuals with disseminated histoplasmosis. Most experience has been derived from small single center case series, or case report literature reviews. Therefore, a larger study of central nervous system (CNS) histoplasmosis is needed in order to guide the approach to diagnosis, and treatment. A convenience sample of 77 patients with histoplasmosis infection of the CNS was evaluated. Data was collected that focused on recognition of infection, diagnostic techniques, and outcomes of treatment. Twenty nine percent of patients were not immunosuppressed. Histoplasma antigen, or anti-Histoplasma antibodies were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 75% of patients. One year survival was 75% among patients treated initially with amphotericin B, and was highest with liposomal, or deoxycholate formulations. Mortality was higher in immunocompromised patients, and patients 54 years of age, or older. Six percent of patients relapsed, all of whom had the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and were poorly adherent with treatment. While CNS histoplasmosis occurred most often in immunocompromised individuals, a significant proportion of patients were previously, healthy. The diagnosis can be established by antigen, and antibody testing of the CSF, and serum, and antigen testing of the urine in most patients. Treatment with liposomal amphotericin B (AMB-L) for at least 1 month; followed by itraconazole for at least 1 year, results in survival among the majority of individuals. Patients should be followed for relapse for at least 1 year, after stopping therapy. PMID:29595679

  18. Fires Cover Central Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    The Suomi NPP satellite's Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument captured a look at huge numbers of fires burning and the resulting smoke in central Africa on June 27, 2017. Actively burning areas, detected by VIIRS are outlined in red. The fires obscure most of the landscape in central Africa. June heralds the end of the crop season in this part of the world, and these fires may be intentional agricultural fires set by people to rid the area of left over crops and get it ready for the next season. So too some of these may also be lightning strike fires or they may be accidental fires which may have gotten out of control. The Suomi NPP satellite is a joint mission between NASA and NOAA. NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  19. Feature Centrality and Property Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjichristidis, Constantinos; Sloman, Steven; Stevenson, Rosemary; Over, David

    2004-01-01

    A feature is central to a concept to the extent that other features depend on it. Four studies tested the hypothesis that people will project a feature from a base concept to a target concept to the extent that they believe the feature is central to the two concepts. This centrality hypothesis implies that feature projection is guided by a…

  20. Haze in central China

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-24

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this natural-color image of central China on January 23, 2013 at 04:05 UTC. The image shows extensive haze over the region. In areas where the ground is visible, some of the landscape is covered with lingering snow. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  1. Flooding in Central China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, frequent, heavy rains gave rise to floods and landslides throughout China that have killed over 1,000 people and affected millions. This false-color image of the western Yangtze River and Dongting Lake in central China was acquired on August 21, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. (right) The latest flooding crisis in China centers on Dingtong Lake in the center of the image. Heavy rains have caused it to swell over its banks and swamp lakefront towns in the province of Hunan. As of August 23, 2002, more than 250,000 people have been evacuated, and over one million people have been brought in to fortify the dikes around the lake. Normally the lake would appear much smaller and more defined in the MODIS image. Credit: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC.

  2. Central solar energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Drost, M. Kevin

    1983-01-01

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  3. Central Campus Construction Progress

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-17

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is a premier, multi-user spaceport with ongoing construction adding new, ultra-modern facilities. A key element of the Central Campus makeover is a new, seven-story, 200,000-square-foot headquarters building that has taken shape in the heart of the spaceport. The headquarters building's glass facade, as seen from NASA Causeway, is complete. The exterior skin of the building also is nearly finished. The remainder of the glass components are being installed on each floor. Construction of interior walls and utilities on most floors is well underway. Construction of the headquarters building is targeted for completion in November 2017 and employees are expected to be able to move in soon after.

  4. Fires in Central Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Widespread agricultural burning continues throughout central Africa. Smoke and fires in several countries were seen by the Suomi NPP satellite. Most of the fires were burning in the southern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Zambia and Angola. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite's Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument captured a look at multiple fires and smoke on August 1 at 7:55 a.m. EDT (11:55 UTC). Actively burning areas, detected by VIIRS are outlined in red. Credit: NASA/Jeff Schmaltz/NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Central control of thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Clapham, John C

    2012-07-01

    In mammals and birds, conservation of body heat at around 37 °C is vital to life. Thermogenesis is the production of this heat which can be obligatory, as in basal metabolic rate, or it can be facultative such as the response to cold. A complex regulatory system has evolved which senses environmental or core temperature and integrates this information in hypothalamic regions such as the preoptic area and dorsomedial hypothalamus. These areas then send the appropriate signals to generate and conserve heat (or dissipate it). In this review, the importance of the sympathetic nervous system is discussed in relation to its role in basal metabolic rate and adaptive thermogenesis with a particular emphasis to human obesity. The efferent sympathetic pathway does not uniformly act on all tissues; different tissues can receive different levels of sympathetic drive at the same time. This is an important concept in the discussion of the pharmacotherapy of obesity. Despite decades of work the medicine chest contains only one pill for the long term treatment of obesity, orlistat, a lipase inhibitor that prevents the absorption of lipid from the gut and is itself not systemically absorbed. The central controlling system for thermogenesis has many potential intervention points. Several drugs, previously marketed, awaiting approval or in the earlier stages of development may have a thermogenic effect via activation of the sympathetic nervous system at some point in the thermoregulatory circuit and are discussed in this review. If the balance is weighted to the "wrong" side there is the burden of increased cardiovascular risk while a shift to the "right" side, if possible, will afford a thermogenic benefit that is conducive to weight loss maintenance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control Food Intake' Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Central sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sanner, B; Schäfer, T

    2008-04-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is characterized by a lack of drive to inspire for at least 10 sec. In the CSA-syndrome accompanying arousals and desaturations of the arterial blood cause sleep disturbances and sympathetic nerve activations which lead to excessive daytime sleepiness and increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity. There are six manifestations of CSA: a rare primary or idiopathic form, often in hypocapnic patients with an increased hypercapnic ventilatory drive; Cheyne-Stokes respiration, characterised by periodic CSA and a crescendo/decrescendo breathing pattern, often in patients with severe cardiac or neurological diseases; high altitude-induced periodic breathing (above 4000 m), CSA due to medical or neurological conditions; CSA due to drug or substance use; and primary sleep apnea of infancy. Besides the consequent treatment of the underlying medical conditions therapeutic options include the use of drugs, e. g. acetacolamide or oxygen, as well as non-invasive ventilation, e. g. continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or adaptive servo-ventilation.

  7. Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zeeshan

    2015-01-01

    The central disorders of hypersomnolence are characterized by severe daytime sleepiness, which is present despite normal quality and timing of nocturnal sleep. Recent reclassification distinguishes three main subtypes: narcolepsy type 1, narcolepsy type 2, and idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), which are the focus of this review. Narcolepsy type 1 results from loss of hypothalamic hypocretin neurons, while the pathophysiology underlying narcolepsy type 2 and IH remains to be fully elucidated. Treatment of all three disorders focuses on the management of sleepiness, with additional treatment of cataplexy in those patients with narcolepsy type 1. Sleepiness can be treated with modafinil/armodafinil or sympathomimetic CNS stimulants, which have been shown to be beneficial in randomized controlled trials of narcolepsy and, quite recently, IH. In those patients with narcolepsy type 1, sodium oxybate is effective for the treatment of both sleepiness and cataplexy. Despite these treatments, there remains a subset of hypersomnolent patients with persistent sleepiness, in whom alternate therapies are needed. Emerging treatments for sleepiness include histamine H3 antagonists (eg, pitolisant) and possibly negative allosteric modulators of the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor (eg, clarithromycin and flumazenil). PMID:26149554

  8. Mexico and Central America.

    PubMed

    Bronfman, M

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on migration and HIV/AIDS in Mexico and Central America, including Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. Most migrants travel to the US through Mexico. US-Mexico trade agreements created opportunities for increased risk of HIV transmission. The research literature focuses on Mexico. Most countries, with the exception of Belize and Costa Rica, are sending countries. Human rights of migrants are violated in transit and at destination. Migration policies determine migration processes. The Mexican-born population in the US is about 3% of US population and 8% of Mexico's population. About 22% arrived during 1992-97, and about 500,000 are naturalized US citizens. An additional 11 million have a Mexican ethnic background. Mexican migrants are usually economically active men who had jobs before leaving and were urban people who settled in California, Texas, Illinois, and Arizona. Most Mexican migrants enter illegally. Many return to Mexico. The main paths of HIV transmission are homosexual, heterosexual, and IV-drug-injecting persons. Latino migrants frequently use prostitutes, adopt new sexual practices including anal penetration among men, greater diversity of sexual partners, and use of injectable drugs.

  9. Malignant central airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mudambi, Lakshmi; Miller, Russell

    2017-01-01

    This review comprehensively describes recent advances in the management of malignant central airway obstruction (CAO). Malignant CAO can be a dramatic and devastating manifestation of primary lung cancer or metastatic disease. A variety of diagnostic modalities are available to provide valuable information to plan a therapeutic intervention. Clinical heterogeneity in the presentation of malignant CAO provides opportunities to adapt and utilize endoscopic technology and tools in many ways. Mechanical debulking, thermal tools, cryotherapy and airway stents are methods and instruments used to rapidly restore airway patency. Delayed bronchoscopic methods, such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) and brachytherapy can also be utilized in specific non-emergent situations to establish airway patency. Although data regarding the success and complications of therapeutic interventions are retrospective and characterized by clinical and outcome measure variability, the symptoms of malignant CAO can often be successfully palliated. Assessment of risks and benefits of interventions in each individual patient during the decision-making process forms the critical foundation of the management of malignant CAO. PMID:29214067

  10. Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    The Central African Republic contains 242,000 square miles, which rolling terrain almost 2000 feet above sea level. The climate is tropical, and it has a population of 2.8 million people with a 2.5% growth rate. There are more than 80 ethnic groups including Baya 34%, Banda 28%, Sara 10%, Mandja 9%, Mboum 9%, and M'Baka 7%. The religions are traditional African 35%, protestant 25%, Roman Catholic 25%, and Muslim 15%, and the languages are French and Sangho. The infant mortality rate is 143/1000, with expectancy at 49 years and a 40% literacy rate. The work force of 1 million is 70% agricultural, industry 6% and commerce and service 6% and government 3%. The government consists of a president assisted by cabinet ministers and a single party. Natural resources include diamonds, uranium, timber, gold, and oil, and major industries are beverages, textiles, and soap. Agricultural products feature coffee, cotton, peanuts, tobacco, food crops and livestock. Most of the population live in rural areas and most of the 80 ethnic groups have their own language. This is one of the world's least developed countries, with a per capita income of $375/year. The main problems with development are the poor transportation infrastructure, and the weak internal and international marketing systems. The US and various international organizations have aided in agriculture development, health programs, and family planning. US investment is mainly in diamond and gold mining, and although oil drilling has been successful it is not economically feasible at current prices.

  11. North Central Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This radar image shows the dramatic landscape in the Phang Hoei Range of north central Thailand, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of the city of Lom Sak. The plateau, shown in green to the left of center, is the area of Phu Kradung National Park. This plateau is a remnant of a once larger plateau, another portion of which is seen along the right side of the image. The plateaus have been dissected by water erosion over thousands of years. Forest areas appear green on the image; agricultural areas and settlements appear as red and blue. North is toward the lower right. The area shown is 38 by 50 kilometers (24 by 31 miles) and is centered at 16.96 degrees north latitude, 101.67 degrees east longitude. Colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted and horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar on October 3, 1994, when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR is a joint mission of the U.S./German and Italian space agencies.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by

  12. Central control of body temperature

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.

    2016-01-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate the behavioral and autonomic repertoire that maintains body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and alters body temperature during the inflammatory response and behavioral states and in response to declining energy homeostasis. This review summarizes the central nervous system circuit mechanisms controlling the principal thermoeffectors for body temperature regulation: cutaneous vasoconstriction regulating heat loss and shivering and brown adipose tissue for thermogenesis. The activation of these thermoeffectors is regulated by parallel but distinct efferent pathways within the central nervous system that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. The model for the neural circuit mechanism underlying central thermoregulatory control provides a useful platform for further understanding of the functional organization of central thermoregulation, for elucidating the hypothalamic circuitry and neurotransmitters involved in body temperature regulation, and for the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to modulating body temperature and energy homeostasis. PMID:27239289

  13. Central control of body temperature.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-01-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate the behavioral and autonomic repertoire that maintains body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and alters body temperature during the inflammatory response and behavioral states and in response to declining energy homeostasis. This review summarizes the central nervous system circuit mechanisms controlling the principal thermoeffectors for body temperature regulation: cutaneous vasoconstriction regulating heat loss and shivering and brown adipose tissue for thermogenesis. The activation of these thermoeffectors is regulated by parallel but distinct efferent pathways within the central nervous system that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. The model for the neural circuit mechanism underlying central thermoregulatory control provides a useful platform for further understanding of the functional organization of central thermoregulation, for elucidating the hypothalamic circuitry and neurotransmitters involved in body temperature regulation, and for the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to modulating body temperature and energy homeostasis.

  14. Central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Adamson, D Cory; Rasheed, B Ahmed K; McLendon, Roger E; Bigner, Darell D

    2010-01-01

    Several different types of tumors, benign and malignant, have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS). The prognoses for these tumors are related to several factors, such as the age of the patient and the location and histology of the tumor. In adults, about half of all CNS tumors are malignant, whereas in pediatric patients, more than 75% are malignant. For most benign CNS tumors that require treatment, neurosurgeons can offer curative resections or at least provide significant relief from mass effect. Unfortunately, we still lack effective treatments for most primary and secondary malignant CNS tumors. However, the past decade has witnessed an explosion in the understanding of the early molecular events in malignant primary CNS tumors, and for the first time in history, oncologists are seeing that a plethora of new therapies targeting these molecular events are being tested in clinical trials. There is hope on the horizon for the fight against these deadly tumors. The distribution of CNS tumors by location has remained constant for numerous years. The majority of primary CNS tumors arise in the major cortical lobes. Twenty nine percent of primary CNS tumors arise from the dural meninges that encase the CNS structures. The vast majority of these are meningiomas, of which over 90% are benign. About 10% of primary CNS tumors are found in the sella turcica region, where the pituitary gland resides. Other much less common sites of primary CNS tumors include the pineal region, ventricular system, cerebellum, brain stem, cranial nerves, and spinal cord. The distribution of CNS tumors by histology has seen a slight increase in more malignant tumors over the past decade, possibly due to increased neuroimaging practices or environmental exposures. Arising from glial cells, gliomas represent over 36% of all primary CNS tumors and consist of astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, mixed gliomas, and neuroepithelial tumors. The benign meningiomas make up 32

  15. [Central diabetes insipidus: diagnostic difficulties].

    PubMed

    Matoussi, N; Aissa, K; Fitouri, Z; Hajji, M; Makni, S; Bellagha, I; Ben Becher, S

    2008-06-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is rare in children. Characteristic features include polyuria and polydipsia due to arginine vasopressin deficiency. The differential diagnosis of polyuric states may be difficult. Etiologic diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus may be an equally difficult task. To specify the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus and to point out features of the etiologic work-up and of long-term follow-up of children with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. A retrospective study of 12 children admitted with a polyuria/polydipsia syndrome to the pediatric - consultation and emergency unit of the children's hospital of Tunis between 1988 and 2005. Children with acquired nephrogenic central diabetes insipidus were excluded. Fourteen-hour fluid restriction test and/or desmopressin test were used without plasma vasopressin measurement. Eight patients were classified as having central diabetes insipidus, which was severe in seven children and partial in one girl. One patient was classified as having primary polydipsia. The diagnosis remains unclear in three patients. The etiological work-up in eight patients with central diabetes insipidus enabled the identification of Langerhan's-cell histiocytosis in two patients and neurosurgical trauma in one. The cause was considered idiopathic in five patients. The median follow-up of the five patients with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus was five years two months plus or minus six years seven months (range five months, 14.5 years). During this follow-up, neither brain magnetic resonance imaging scans findings nor anterior pituitary function have changed. Fluid restriction and desmopressin tests did not enable an accurate distinction between partial diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia. Regular surveillance is warranted in patients with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus to identify potential etiologies.

  16. Central Chemoreceptors: Locations and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nattie, Eugene; Li, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Central chemoreception traditionally refers to a change in ventilation attributable to changes in CO2/H+ detected within the brain. Interest in central chemoreception has grown substantially since the previous Handbook of Physiology published in 1986. Initially, central chemoreception was localized to areas on the ventral medullary surface, a hypothesis complemented by the recent identification of neurons with specific phenotypes near one of these areas as putative chemoreceptor cells. However, there is substantial evidence that many sites participate in central chemoreception some located at a distance from the ventral medulla. Functionally, central chemoreception, via the sensing of brain interstitial fluid H+, serves to detect and integrate information on 1) alveolar ventilation (arterial PCO2), 2) brain blood flow and metabolism and 3) acid-base balance, and, in response, can affect breathing, airway resistance, blood pressure (sympathetic tone) and arousal. In addition, central chemoreception provides a tonic ‘drive’ (source of excitation) at the normal, baseline PCO2 level that maintains a degree of functional connectivity among brainstem respiratory neurons necessary to produce eupneic breathing. Central chemoreception responds to small variations in PCO2 to regulate normal gas exchange and to large changes in PCO2 to minimize acid-base changes. Central chemoreceptor sites vary in function with sex and with development. From an evolutionary perspective, central chemoreception grew out of the demands posed by air vs. water breathing, homeothermy, sleep, optimization of the work of breathing with the ‘ideal’ arterial PCO2, and the maintenance of the appropriate pH at 37°C for optimal protein structure and function. PMID:23728974

  17. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 26. Smith SF, Duell DJ, Martin BC, Gonzalez L, Aebersold M. Central vascular access devices. In: Smith SF, Duell DJ, Martin BC, Gonzalez L, Aebersold ...

  18. Super Kitchen Centralizes Food Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1975

    1975-01-01

    To centralize food service within the entire Pittsburgh school district, a 90,000-square-foot food service preparation building contains cranes and monorails to move 500-pound capacity vats throughout the kitchen. (Author/MLF)

  19. Central American Tactical Airlift Wing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-17

    will examine the airlift demands for Central America. Then it will examine the success of the HAW in Europe. Next, cost analysis will illustrate the...feasibility of a collaborative airlift wing in Central America. Finally, we will offer a proposal for the construct of the Tactical Airlift Wing...been unable to perform outside of the HAW construct . In the same way that the HAW provides heavy airlift to partner nations that would otherwise be

  20. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  1. Hydrothorax after Central Venous Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Rudge, C. J.; Bewick, M.; McColl, I.

    1973-01-01

    Three patients are described who developed hydrothorax as a complication of central venous catheterization. Respiratory distress associated with physical signs of fluid in the chest should arouse suspicion that the venous catheter has perforated the wall of the vein. The complications of central venous catheterization are reviewed and three cases of hydrothorax are presented. Comments on the prevention of these complications, their diagnosis and treatment if they occur, are made. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4717421

  2. Genetics Home Reference: central core disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Central core disease Central core disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Central core disease is a disorder that affects muscles used ...

  3. Coverage centralities for temporal networks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Yano, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Structure of real networked systems, such as social relationship, can be modeled as temporal networks in which each edge appears only at the prescribed time. Understanding the structure of temporal networks requires quantifying the importance of a temporal vertex, which is a pair of vertex index and time. In this paper, we define two centrality measures of a temporal vertex based on the fastest temporal paths which use the temporal vertex. The definition is free from parameters and robust against the change in time scale on which we focus. In addition, we can efficiently compute these centrality values for all temporal vertices. Using the two centrality measures, we reveal that distributions of these centrality values of real-world temporal networks are heterogeneous. For various datasets, we also demonstrate that a majority of the highly central temporal vertices are located within a narrow time window around a particular time. In other words, there is a bottleneck time at which most information sent in the temporal network passes through a small number of temporal vertices, which suggests an important role of these temporal vertices in spreading phenomena. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-60498-7

  4. Inferring Centrality from Network Snapshots

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Haibin; Mesbahi, Mehran; Li, Dewei; Xi, Yugeng

    2017-01-01

    The topology and dynamics of a complex network shape its functionality. However, the topologies of many large-scale networks are either unavailable or incomplete. Without the explicit knowledge of network topology, we show how the data generated from the network dynamics can be utilised to infer the tempo centrality, which is proposed to quantify the influence of nodes in a consensus network. We show that the tempo centrality can be used to construct an accurate estimate of both the propagation rate of influence exerted on consensus networks and the Kirchhoff index of the underlying graph. Moreover, the tempo centrality also encodes the disturbance rejection of nodes in a consensus network. Our findings provide an approach to infer the performance of a consensus network from its temporal data. PMID:28098166

  5. Inferring Centrality from Network Snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Haibin; Mesbahi, Mehran; Li, Dewei; Xi, Yugeng

    2017-01-01

    The topology and dynamics of a complex network shape its functionality. However, the topologies of many large-scale networks are either unavailable or incomplete. Without the explicit knowledge of network topology, we show how the data generated from the network dynamics can be utilised to infer the tempo centrality, which is proposed to quantify the influence of nodes in a consensus network. We show that the tempo centrality can be used to construct an accurate estimate of both the propagation rate of influence exerted on consensus networks and the Kirchhoff index of the underlying graph. Moreover, the tempo centrality also encodes the disturbance rejection of nodes in a consensus network. Our findings provide an approach to infer the performance of a consensus network from its temporal data.

  6. Central Hypothyroidism in Miniature Schnauzers.

    PubMed

    Voorbij, Annemarie M W Y; Leegwater, Peter A J; Buijtels, Jenny J C W M; Daminet, Sylvie; Kooistra, Hans S

    2016-01-01

    Primary hypothyroidism is a common endocrinopathy in dogs. In contrast, central hypothyroidism is rare in this species. The objective of this article is to describe the occurrence and clinical presentation of central hypothyroidism in Miniature Schnauzers. Additionally, the possible role of the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR) gene and the TSHβ (TSHB) gene was investigated. Miniature Schnauzers with proven central hypothyroidism, based on scintigraphy, and the results of a 3-day-TSH-stimulation test, or a TSH-releasing hormone (TRH)-stimulation test or both, presented to the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals at Utrecht University or the Department of Medicine and Clinical Biology of Small Animals at Ghent University from 2008 to 2012. Retrospective study. Pituitary function tests, thyroid scintigraphy, and computed tomography (CT) of the pituitary area were performed. Gene fragments of affected dogs and controls were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences of the products were analyzed. Central hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 7 Miniature Schnauzers. Three dogs had disproportionate dwarfism and at least one of them had a combined deficiency of TSH and prolactin. No disease-causing mutations were found in the TSHB gene and the exons of the TRHR gene of these Schnauzers. Central hypothyroidism could be underdiagnosed in Miniature Schnauzers with hypothyroidism, especially in those of normal stature. The fact that this rare disorder occurred in 7 dogs from the same breed suggests that central hypothyroidism could have a genetic background in Miniature Schnauzers. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. Pathology of Central American Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molesky, Jean

    1986-01-01

    The rapidly increasing numbers of Central American refugees in the United States include many whose sufferings have led to severe psychological problems. The article attempts to lay a foundation for assisting them by discussing the following: (1) origins of disorders; (2) culture shock and stress; (3) prevalence of symptoms; and (4) suggestions…

  8. Central nervous system magnesium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Langley, W F; Mann, D

    1991-03-01

    The central nervous system concentration of magnesium (Mg++) appears to have a critical level below which neurologic dysfunction occurs. Observations presented suggest that the interchange of the Mg++ ion between the cerebrospinal fluid, extracellular fluid, and bone is more rapid and dynamic than is usually believed. This is especially so when the hypertrophied parathyroid gland is associated with significant skeletal depletion of Mg++ as judged by history rather than serum level. Magnesium, much like calcium, has a large presence in bone and has a negative feedback relationship with the parathyroid gland. A decline in central nervous system Mg++ may occur when the skeletal buffer system orchestrated largely by the parathyroid glands is activated by an increase in serum calcium. Observations in veterinary medicine and obstetrics suggest that the transfer of Mg++ from the extracellular fluid into bone during mineralization processes may be extensive. If the inhibition of the hypertrophied parathyroid gland is prolonged and the skeletal depletion of Mg++ extreme, serious neurologic symptoms, including seizures, coma, and death, may occur. Noise, excitement, and bodily contact appear to precipitate neurologic symptoms in Mg+(+)-deficient human subjects as it has been documented to occur in Mg+(+)-deficient experimental animals. The similarity of the acute central nervous system demyelinating syndromes with reactive central nervous system Mg++ deficiency is reviewed.

  9. The Centrality of Ethical Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrich, Lisa C.; Harris, Jessica; Klenowski, Val; Smeed, Judy; Spina, Nerida

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The central argument in this paper is that ethical school leadership is imperative in a context of increasing performance-driven accountability. The purpose of this paper is to focus on school principals' perceptions of how they understand ethical leadership and how they lead the ethical use of data. Design/Methodology/Approach: This…

  10. Fire management in central America

    Treesearch

    Andrea L. Koonce; Armando González-Cabán

    1992-01-01

    Information on fire management operations in Central America is scant. To evaluate the known level of fire occurrence in seven countries in that area, fire management officers were asked to provide information on their fire control organizations and on any available fire statistics. The seven countries surveyed were Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua,...

  11. Central America: A Regional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowry, George; Lacy, Ann

    This lesson is a series of activities and multi-media presentations designed to enable students to understand the historic and geographic roots of some of the problems that Central American nations have faced. Geography, history, writing, and storytelling are used as ways of understanding a multicultural world. Creative thinking and participation…

  12. Music Libraries: Centralization versus Decentralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuyper-Rushing, Lois

    2002-01-01

    Considers the decision that branch libraries, music libraries in particular, have struggled with concerning a centralized location in the main library versus a decentralized collection. Reports on a study of the Association of Research Libraries that investigated the location of music libraries, motivation for the location, degrees offered,…

  13. Central Contractor Registration Handbook (CCR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    Assistance Center 888-227-2423 or 616-961-4725 Report Documentation Page Report Date 00/03/2002 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and......Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Central Contractor Registration Assistance Center (888-227-2423) or (616-961-4725

  14. Central New York's New Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for an Urban Future, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Conducted in late 2008 in partnership with the Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce and the Mohawk Valley Chamber of Commerce, this is the largest survey ever taken of Central New York businesses regarding the English language skills of the area workforce. The online survey was emailed to several hundred local businesses; 126 responses were…

  15. Grazing in central hardwood forests

    Treesearch

    Robert A. McQuilkin; Harold Scholten

    1989-01-01

    Woodland grazing is a major forestry and land management problem in parts of the central hardwood region. Most forest grazing is by cattle and, to a lesser extent, hogs in woodlands adjacent to pastures or feedlots. The practice is particularly common in the cattle producing areas of the Corn Belt where often 50 percent or more of the upland forest is grazed. Woodland...

  16. Earth Works Central. [Educational Packet].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kids for Saving Earth Worldwide, Minneapolis, MN.

    Earth Works Central is an educational curriculum tool designed to provide environmental education support for the classroom. It features environmental materials for science, geography, history, art, music, dramatics, and physical education. It includes information on creating an environmental center where kids can learn and become empowered to…

  17. Chapter 1: Central Arizona Highlands

    Treesearch

    Peter F. Ffolliott

    1999-01-01

    The Central Arizona Highlands are a distinct biogeographic, climatic, and physiographic province that forms a diverse ecotone between the larger Colorado Plateau to the north and the Sonoran Desert ecoregions to the south (figure 1). The Highlands coincide approximately with the Arizona Transition Zone identified by ecologists, geologists and others. This region is one...

  18. Central Corneal Thickness in Children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the central corneal thickness (CCT) in healthy white, African-American, and Hispanic children from birth to 17 years of age. Design Prospective observational multicenter study. Central corneal thickness was measured with a hand-held contact pachymeter. Results Two thousand seventy-nine children were included in the study, with ages ranging from day of birth to 17 years. Included were 807 white, 494 Hispanic, and 474 African-American individuals, in addition to Asian, unknown and mixed race individuals. African-American children had thinner corneas on average than that of both white (p< .001) and Hispanic children (p< .001) by approximately 20 micrometers. Thicker median CCT was observed with each successive year of age from age 1 to 11 years, with year-to-year differences steadily decreasing and reaching a plateau after age 11 at 573 micrometers in white and Hispanic children and 551 micrometers in African-American children. For every 100 micrometers of thicker CCT measured, the intraocular pressure was 1.5 mmHg higher on average (p< 0.001). For every diopter of increased myopic refractive error (p< 0.001) CCT was 1 micrometer thinner on average. Conclusions Median CCT increases with age from 1 to 11 years with the greatest increase present in the youngest age groups. African-American children on average have thinner central corneas than white and Hispanic children, while white and Hispanic children demonstrate similar central corneal thickness. PMID:21911662

  19. Forest statistics of central Kentucky

    Treesearch

    The Forest Survey Organization Central States Forest Experiment Station

    1950-01-01

    This Survey Release presents the more significant preliminary statistics on the forest area and timber volume for each of the four regions of Central Kentucky. A similar report has been published for the Western Kentucky region and a release for the eastern region will be issued as soon as field work and tabulations are completed. Later an analytical report for the...

  20. Central California Action Associates, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sortor, Maia, Comp.

    The overall goal of the Central California Action Associates Inc. (CCAA) program is to provide basic education and pre-vocational training so that migrant and seasonal adult farm workers will be able to upgrade their economic and social lives. Without increased educational attainment, the San Joaquin Valley farm workers face a grim future because…

  1. Central Libraries in Uncertain Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Brian J.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses security and safety issues for public libraries, especially high-profile central facilities, in light of the September 11 terrorist attacks. Highlights include inspecting bags as patrons enter as well as exit; the need for security guidelines for any type of disaster or emergency; building design; and the importance of communication.…

  2. Network Centrality of Metro Systems

    PubMed Central

    Derrible, Sybil

    2012-01-01

    Whilst being hailed as the remedy to the world’s ills, cities will need to adapt in the 21st century. In particular, the role of public transport is likely to increase significantly, and new methods and technics to better plan transit systems are in dire need. This paper examines one fundamental aspect of transit: network centrality. By applying the notion of betweenness centrality to 28 worldwide metro systems, the main goal of this paper is to study the emergence of global trends in the evolution of centrality with network size and examine several individual systems in more detail. Betweenness was notably found to consistently become more evenly distributed with size (i.e. no “winner takes all”) unlike other complex network properties. Two distinct regimes were also observed that are representative of their structure. Moreover, the share of betweenness was found to decrease in a power law with size (with exponent 1 for the average node), but the share of most central nodes decreases much slower than least central nodes (0.87 vs. 2.48). Finally the betweenness of individual stations in several systems were examined, which can be useful to locate stations where passengers can be redistributed to relieve pressure from overcrowded stations. Overall, this study offers significant insights that can help planners in their task to design the systems of tomorrow, and similar undertakings can easily be imagined to other urban infrastructure systems (e.g., electricity grid, water/wastewater system, etc.) to develop more sustainable cities. PMID:22792373

  3. Public water supplies in central and north-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundstrom, Raymond W.; Broadhurst, W.L.; Dwyer, B.C.

    1949-01-01

    This report gives a summarized description of the public water supplies in 35 counties of central and north-central Texas, extending from the southern boundaries of Travis, Blanco, Gillespie, and Kerr Counties northward to the TexasOklahoma State line. It gives the available data as follows for each of the 145 communities: Population of the community; name of the official from whom the information was obtained; ownership of water works, whether private or municipal source of supply, whether ground water or surface water; the amount of water consumed; the facilities for storage; the number of customers served; the character of the chemical and sanitary treatment, if any; and chemical analyses of the water. Where ground water is used, the following is also given: Records of wells, including drillers' logs; character of the pumping equipment; yields of the wells, and records of water levels, if available.

  4. A centralized audio presentation manager

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, A.L. III; Blattner, M.M.

    1994-05-16

    The centralized audio presentation manager addresses the problems which occur when multiple programs running simultaneously attempt to use the audio output of a computer system. Time dependence of sound means that certain auditory messages must be scheduled simultaneously, which can lead to perceptual problems due to psychoacoustic phenomena. Furthermore, the combination of speech and nonspeech audio is examined; each presents its own problems of perceptibility in an acoustic environment composed of multiple auditory streams. The centralized audio presentation manager receives abstract parameterized message requests from the currently running programs, and attempts to create and present a sonic representation in themore » most perceptible manner through the use of a theoretically and empirically designed rule set.« less

  5. Centrality in earthquake multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Nastaran; Darooneh, Amir Hossein; Rodrigues, Francisco A.

    2018-06-01

    Seismic time series has been mapped as a complex network, where a geographical region is divided into square cells that represent the nodes and connections are defined according to the sequence of earthquakes. In this paper, we map a seismic time series to a temporal network, described by a multiplex network, and characterize the evolution of the network structure in terms of the eigenvector centrality measure. We generalize previous works that considered the single layer representation of earthquake networks. Our results suggest that the multiplex representation captures better earthquake activity than methods based on single layer networks. We also verify that the regions with highest seismological activities in Iran and California can be identified from the network centrality analysis. The temporal modeling of seismic data provided here may open new possibilities for a better comprehension of the physics of earthquakes.

  6. The Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunt, C.; Belitz, K.; Hanson, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Historically, California’s Central Valley has been one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California’s expanding urban population. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, subsidence, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS made a detailed assessment of the Central Valley aquifer system that includes the present status of water resources and how these resources have changed over time. The principal product of this assessment is a tool, referred to as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM), that simulates surface-water flows, groundwater flows, and land subsidence in response to stresses from human uses and from climate variability throughout the entire Central Valley. The CVHM utilizes MODFLOW combined with a new tool called “Farm Process” to simulate groundwater and surface-water flow, irrigated agriculture, land subsidence, and other key processes in the Central Valley on a monthly basis. This model was discretized horizontally into 20,000 1-mi2 cells and vertically into 10 layers ranging in thickness from 50 feet at the land surface to 750 feet at depth. A texture model constructed by using data from more than 8,500 drillers’ logs was used to estimate hydraulic properties. Unmetered pumpage and surface-water deliveries for 21 water-balance regions were simulated with the Farm Process. Model results indicate that human activities, predominately surface-water deliveries and groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture, have dramatically influenced the hydrology of the Central Valley. These human activities have increased flow though the aquifer system by about a factor of six compared to pre-development conditions. The simulated hydrology reflects spatial

  7. Geochronology Database for Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.; Evans, K.V.; deWitt, E.H.

    2010-01-01

    This database is a compilation of published and some unpublished isotopic and fission track age determinations in central Colorado. The compiled area extends from the southern Wyoming border to the northern New Mexico border and from approximately the longitude of Denver on the east to Gunnison on the west. Data for the tephrochronology of Pleistocene volcanic ash, carbon-14, Pb-alpha, common-lead, and U-Pb determinations on uranium ore minerals have been excluded.

  8. Central America: A Strategic Imperative.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, A AMA 87 1 7 2 , o2, 7... , ,. , ,. AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY CENTRAL AMERICA: A STRATEGIC IMPERATIVE by a Florian H. Yoste... FORCE BASE, ALABAMA @ i MARCH 1987 ti Acoession For DTIC TAB 0 Utinnounced 0 Justificato-- By Distributionl Availability Codes 7-- Avall and/or ’Dist...College or the Department of the Air Force . This document is the property of the United States Government and is not to be reproduced in whole or in

  9. Tectonics of the central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Arthur L.; Isacks, Bryan L.; Fielding, Eric J.; Fox, Andrew N.; Gubbels, Timothy L.

    1989-01-01

    Acquisition of nearly complete coverage of Thematic Mapper data for the central Andes between about 15 to 34 degrees S has stimulated a comprehensive and unprecedented study of the interaction of tectonics and climate in a young and actively developing major continental mountain belt. The current state of the synoptic mapping of key physiographic, tectonic, and climatic indicators of the dynamics of the mountain/climate system are briefly reviewed.

  10. Volcanic hazards in Central America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, William I.; Bluth, Gregg J.S.; Carr, Michael J.; Ewert, John W.; Patino, Lina C.; Vallance, James W.

    2006-01-01

    This volume is a sampling of current scientific work about volcanoes in Central America with specific application to hazards. The papers reflect a variety of international and interdisciplinary collaborations and employ new methods. The book will be of interest to a broad cross section of scientists, especially volcanologists. The volume also will interest students who aspire to work in the field of volcano hazards mitigation or who may want to work in one of Earth’s most volcanically active areas.

  11. Central corneal thickness in children.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, Yasmin S; Melia, B Michele; Repka, Michael X; Kaminski, Brett M; Davitt, Bradley V; Johnson, David A; Kraker, Raymond T; Manny, Ruth E; Matta, Noelle S; Weise, Katherine K; Schloff, Susan

    2011-09-01

    To determine the central corneal thickness (CCT) in healthy white, African American, and Hispanic children from birth to 17 years of age and to determine whether CCT varies by age, race, or ethnicity. Prospective observational multicenter study. Central corneal thickness was measured with a handheld contact pachymeter. A total of 2079 children were included in the study, with ages ranging from birth to 17 years. Included were 807 whites, 494 Hispanics, and 474 African Americans, in addition to Asian, unknown race, and mixed-race individuals. African American children had thinner corneas on average than that of both white and Hispanic children (P < .001 for both) by approximately 20 μm. Thicker median CCT was observed with each successive year of age from age 1 to 11 years, with year-to-year differences steadily decreasing and reaching a plateau after age 11 at 573 μm in white and Hispanic children and 551 μm in African American children. For every 100 μm of thicker CCT measured, the intraocular pressure was 1.5 mm Hg higher on average (P < .001). For every diopter of increased myopic refractive error, CCT was 1 μm thinner on average (P < .001). Median CCT increases with age from 1 to 11 years, with the greatest increase present in the youngest age groups. African American children on average have thinner central corneas than white and Hispanic children, whereas white and Hispanic children demonstrate similar CCT.

  12. Central vein stenosis: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil K

    2009-09-01

    Central vein stenosis (CVS) is a common complication of the central venous catheter (CVC) placement. The prevalence of CVS has mostly been studied in those who present with symptoms such as swelling of the extremity, neck and breast. CVS compromises arteriovenous access and can be resistant to treatment. A previous history of CVC placement is the most important risk factor for the development of CVS later. Pacemaker and defibrillator wires are associated with a high incidence of CVS. Increasingly liberal use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) is likely to increase the incidence of CVS. The trauma and inflammation related to the catheter placement is thought to result in microthrombi formation, intimal hyperplasia and fibrotic response, with development of CVS. Treatment of CVS by endovascular procedures involves angioplasty of the stenosis. An elastic or recurrent stenosis may require a stent placement. The long-term benefits of the endovascular procedures, although improved with newer technology, remain modest. Surgical options are usually limited. Future studies to explore the pathogenesis and the use of novel therapies to prevent and treat CVS are needed. The key to reducing the prevalence of CVS is in reducing CVC placement and placement of arteriovenous accesses prior to initiating dialysis. Early referral of the patients to the nephrologists by the primary care physicians is important. Timely vein mapping and referral to the surgeon for fistula creation can obviate the need for a CVC and decrease incidence of CVS.

  13. Civilian Resistance in Crete: 20 May 1941 - 15 May 1945

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-23

    indoctrinated since childhood , - these men were in a space of few hours, defeated by the valour of those whose soil they had attacked. How different might the...Metaxas, established a dictatorship in Greece. Metaxas ideologically was a nationalist, fascist, and a monarchist. Even though his movement on the...Cretans revolted against the dictatorship . The revolt collapsed after twelve days and a climate of terror was established. Because of the revolt, the

  14. Crustal structure of Central Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustiniani, Michela; Tinivella, Umberta; Nicolich, Rinaldo

    2018-01-01

    We processed crustal seismic profile SIRIPRO, acquired across Central Sicily. To improve the seismic image we utilized the wave equation datuming technique, a process of upward or downward continuation of the wave-field between two arbitrarily shaped surfaces. Wave equation datuming was applied to move shots and receivers to a given datum plane, removing time shifts related to topography and to near-surface velocity variations. The datuming procedure largely contributed to attenuate ground roll, enhance higher frequencies, increase resolution and improve the signal/noise ratio. Processed data allow recognizing geometries of crust structures differentiating seismic facies and offering a direct image of ongoing tectonic setting within variable lithologies characterizing the crust of Central Sicily. Migrated sections underline distinctive features of Hyblean Plateau foreland and above all a crustal thinning towards the Caltanissetta trough, to the contact with a likely deep Permo-Triassic rifted basin or rather a zone of a continent to oceanic transition. Inhomogeneity and fragmentation of Sicily crust, with a distinct separation of Central Sicily basin from western and eastern blocks, appear to have guided the tectonic transport inside the Caltanissetta crustal scale syncline and the accumulation of allochthonous terrains with south and north-verging thrusts. Major tectonic stack operated on the construction of a wide anticline of the Maghrebian chain in northern Sicily. Sequential south-verging imbrications of deep elements forming the anticline core denote a crust wedge indenting foreland structures. Deformation processes involved multiple detachment planes down to decoupling levels located near crust/mantle transition, supporting a presence of high-density lenses beneath the chain, interrelated to a southwards push of Tyrrhenian mantle and asthenosphere.

  15. Cancer mortality in central Serbia.

    PubMed

    Markovic-Denic, Ljiljana; Cirkovic, Andia; Zivkovic, Snezana; Stanic, Danica; Skodric-Trifunovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the one of the leading cause of death worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine cancer mortality trends in the population of central Serbia in the period from 2002 to 2011. The descriptive epidemiological method was used. The mortality from all malignant tumors (code C00-C96 of the International Disease Classification) was registered. The source of mortality data was the published material of the Cancer Registry of Serbia. The source of population data was the census of 2002 and 2011 and the estimates for inter-census years. Non-standardized, age-adjusted and age-specific mortality rates were calculated. Age adjustment of mortality rates was performed by the direct method of standardization. Trend lines were estimated using linear regression. During 2002-2011, cancer caused about 20% of all deaths each year in central Serbia. More men (56.9%) than women (43.1%) died of cancer. The average mortality rate for men was 1.3 times higher compared to women. A significant trend of increase of the age-adjusted mortality rates was recorded both for males (p<0.001) and for females (p=0.02). Except gastric cancer, the age-adjusted mortality rates in men were significantly increased for lung cancer (p=0.02), colorectal cancer (p<0.05), prostate cancer (p=0.01) and pancreatic cancer (p=0.01). Age-adjusted mortality rates for breast cancer in females were remarkably increased (p=0.01), especially after 2007. In central Serbia during the period from 2002 to 2011, there was an increasing trend in mortality rates due to cancers in both sexes. Cancer mortality in males was 1.3-fold higher compared to females.

  16. Volcanoes in Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Indonesian island of Java (8.0S, 112.0) has over 35 active volcanoes, some of which are the most explosive in the world, and form an east/west line of peaks the length of the island. Five are in this image and at least one is thought to be currently active. The plume flowing north from Welirang (just east of the central cloud mass) is believed to be steam emissions. Also, the lack of vegetation at the peak indicates volcanic activity.

  17. The central arctic caribou herd

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, Raymond D.; Smith, Walter T.; White, Robert G.; Griffith, Brad; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    From the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s, use of calving and summer habitats by Central Arctic herd caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) declined near petroleum development infrastructure on Alaska's arctic coastal plain (Cameron et al. 1979; Cameron and Whitten 1980, Smith and Cameron 1983. Whitten and Cameron 1983a, 1985: Dau and Cameron 1986).With surface development continuing to expand westward from the Prudhoe Bay petroleum development area (Fig. 4.1), concerns arose that the resultant cumulative losses of habitat would eventually reduce productivity of the caribou herd. Specifically, reduced access of adult females to preferred foraging areas might adversely affect growth and fattening (Elison et al. 1986. Clough et al. 1987), in turn depressing calf production (Dauphiné 1976, Thomas 1982, Reimers 1983, White 1983, Eloranta and Nieminen 1986. Lenvik et al. 1988, Thomas and Kiliaan 1991) and survival (Haukioja and Salovaara 1978, Rognmo et al. 1983, Skogland 1984, Eloranta and Nieminen 1986, Adamczewski et al. 1987).Those concerns, though justified in theory, lacked empirical support. With industrial development in arctic Alaska virtually unprecedented, there was little basis for predicting the extent and duration of habitat loss, much less the secondary short- and long-term effects on the well-being of a particular caribou herd.Furthermore, despite a general acceptance that body condition and fecundity of the females are functionally related for reindeer and caribou, it seemed unlikely that any single model would apply to all subspecies of Rangifer, and perhaps not even within a subspecies in different geographic regions. We therefore lacked a complete understanding of the behavioral responses of arctic caribou to industrial development, the manner in which access to habitats might be affected, and how changes in habitat use might translate into measurable effects on fecundity and herd growth rate.Our study addressed the following objectives: 1) estimate

  18. Central Saudi Arabia, Persian Gulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This panoramic view of Central Saudi Arabia and the Persian Gulf (28.0N, 47.0E) dramatically illustrates the stark beauty of the deserts. Riyadh, the capital city, lies in the foreground, with the Persian Gulf in the middle and Iran in the background. The coastal oil terminals of Al Hufuf and Ad Dammam are also visible. Black smudges of soot from the oil fires set during the Gulf War can be seen on the sands to the north and south of Kuwait City.

  19. Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A final progress report is presented on the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary purpose of the CSIS is to demonstrate and evaluate real time interactive computerized data collection, interpretation and display techniques as applied to severe weather forecasting. CSIS objectives pertaining to improved severe storm forecasting and warning systems are outlined. The positive impact that CSIS has had on the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is discussed. The benefits of interactive processing systems on the forecasting ability of the NSSFC are described.

  20. Pediatric environmental medicine in Eastern Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Muceniece, S; Muszynska, M; Otto, M; Rozentale, G; Rudkowski, Z; Skerliene, B; Slotova, K; Suurorg, L; Tur, I; von Mühlendahl, K E

    2007-10-01

    Pediatric environmental medicine in Central Eastern Europe needs support and development on national, institutional and individual basis. This situation is quantitatively, but not fundamentally different from what is to be found in Central Europe.

  1. 49 CFR 71.6 - Central zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... States that is west of the boundary line between the eastern and central standard time zones described in... between the central and mountain time zones. The Chicago, Rock Island and Gulf Railway Company and the...

  2. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    DOEpatents

    Satterfield, David L; Sexton, James C

    2013-10-22

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  3. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    DOEpatents

    Satterfield, David L.; Sexton, James C.

    2013-01-22

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  4. Central fabrication: Carved positive assessment

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Joan E; Severance, Michael R; Myers, Timothy R; Ciol, Marcia A

    2015-01-01

    In this research we investigated the degree of error during the carving phase of central fabrication of prosthetic sockets for people with limb amputation. Three different model shapes were ordered from each of ten central fabrication companies. Using an accurate custom mechanical digitizer and alignment algorithm, we digitized the models and then compared the model shapes with the electronic file shapes. Results showed that 24 of the 30 models had volumes larger than the electronic file shapes while 24 had volumes that were smaller. 29 of the 30 models were oversized at the proximal aspect of the tibial tuberosity and undersized at the patellar tendon and popliteal areas. This error would result in a socket that had less tibial tubercle relief than intended in addition to a larger anterior-posterior dimension than desired. Comparison of the model shapes with socket shapes assessed for nine of the companies in a previous study showed that for five of the companies the sockets were relatively undersized over the tibial crest and fibular head. The results indicate that the socket the prosthetist receives will not always fit as planned, and that errors in the carving process are a source of the discrepancies. PMID:21515893

  5. Central East Pacific Flight Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Shon; Sridhar, Banavar; Kopardekar, Parimal; Cheng, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of the Federal Aviation Administration s Advanced Technology and Oceanic Procedures system at the Oakland Oceanic Center, a level of automation now exists in the oceanic environment to potentially begin accommodating increased user preferred routing requests. This paper presents the results of an initial feasibility assessment which examines the potential benefits of transitioning from the fixed Central East Pacific routes to user preferred routes. As a surrogate for the actual user-provided routing requests, a minimum-travel-time, wind-optimal dynamic programming algorithm was developed and utilized in this paper. After first describing the characteristics (e.g., origin airport, destination airport, vertical distribution and temporal distribution) of the westbound flights utilizing the Central East Pacific routes on Dec. 14-16 and 19-20, the results of both a flight-plan-based simulation and a wind-optimal-based simulation are presented. Whereas the lateral and longitudinal distribution of the aircraft trajectories in these two simulations varied dramatically, the number of simulated first-loss-of-separation events remained relatively constant. One area of concern that was uncovered in this initial analysis was a potential workload issue associated with the redistribution of traffic in the oceanic sectors due to thc prevailing wind patterns.

  6. Precipitation chemistry in central Amazonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Talbot, R. W.; Berresheim, H.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Rain samples from three sites in central Amazonia were collected over a period of 6 weeks during the 1987 wet season and analyzed for ionic species and dissolved organic carbon. A continuous record of precipitation chemistry and amount was obtained at two of these sites, which were free from local or regional pollution, for a time period of over 1 month. The volume-weighted mean concentrations of most species were found to be about a factor of 5 lower during the wet season compared with previous results from the dry season. Only sodium, potassium, and chloride showed similar concentrations in both seasons. When the seasonal difference in rainfall amount is taken into consideration, the deposition fluxes are only slightly lower for most species during the wet season than during the dry season, again with the exception of chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium and chloride are present in the same ratio as in sea salt; rapid advection of air masses of marine origin to the central Amazon Basin during the wet season may be responsible for the observed higher deposition flux of these species. Statistical analysis suggests that sulfate is, to a large extent, of marine (sea salt and biogenic) origin, but that long-range transport of combustion-derived aerosols also makes a significant contribution to sulfate and nitrate levels in Amazonian rain. Organic acid concentrations in rain were responsible for a large fraction of the observed precipitation acidity; their concentration was strongly influenced by gas/liquid interactions.

  7. Primary hypersomnias of central origin.

    PubMed

    Frenette, Eric; Kushida, Clete A

    2009-09-01

    Hypersomnia is a frequently encountered symptom in clinical practice. The cardinal manifestation is inappropriate daytime sleepiness, common to all types of hypersomnias. Hypersomnias of central origin are a rare cause of excessive daytime sleepiness, much rarer than the hypersomnia related to other pathologies, such as sleep-disordered breathing. Narcolepsy, with or without cataplexy, remains the most well studied of the primary hypersomnias. Although recognized more than a century ago, it was not until the end of the 20th century that major breakthroughs led to a better understanding of the disease, with hope of more specific therapies. The authors review the major aspects of this disorder, including the newer treatment modalities. Idiopathic hypersomnia is also part of the primary hypersomnias. Although difficult to diagnose, certain peculiarities stand out to help us differentiate it from the more commonly seen narcolepsy. The recurrent hypersomnias, particularly the Kleine-Levin syndrome, will be discussed. This rare disorder has been studied more closely in the last few years with abundant epidemiologic data assembled through literature and worldwide case reviews. Understanding the primary central hypersomnias warrants a thorough look from the original description, as well as a peek at the future, while more efficacious diagnostic and therapeutic interventions are currently being developed. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  8. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity | |more » < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.« less

  9. Low clouds in central California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-10

    Low clouds filled California’s Central Valley in late January, 2015. Such winter fog is considered a common phenomenon, and can be so dense that it snarls traffic, causes fender-benders, and can make symptoms worse in those with respiratory disease. At the same time, the moist winter fog helps keep temperatures low in the rich agricultural region by reflecting sunlight and keeping the ground from warming, which helps keep the abundant fruit and nut trees dormant, allowing for bountiful harvests. Scientific studies have reported that winter fogs (also called Thule fogs) are occurring less frequently in the Central Valley. One study, by Dennis Baldocchi and Eric Waller, was published in May, 2014. It finds that since 1981 the number of fog days between November and February has decreased by 46 percent. The severe drought that California has experienced in recent years may also have decreased the number of fog events even more since 2012. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this true-color image on January 24, 2015. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  10. 49 CFR 71.6 - Central zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.6 Central zone. The third zone, the central standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of the boundary line between the eastern and central standard time zones described in § 71.5 and east of the...

  11. Central State University: Phase III Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This document is the final report on Central State University's implementation of Section 371 of Ohio Amended Substitute House Bill 153. Implementation of Phase I action items required that deliverables and timelines be shifted to give Central State the best opportunity for early success. In Phase II, Central State responded aggressively to a…

  12. 20 CFR 346.1 - Central register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Central register. 346.1 Section 346.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT RAILROAD HIRING § 346.1 Central register. (a) The Board shall maintain a central register of railroad...

  13. 20 CFR 346.1 - Central register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Central register. 346.1 Section 346.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT RAILROAD HIRING § 346.1 Central register. (a) The Board shall maintain a central register of railroad...

  14. 20 CFR 346.1 - Central register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Central register. 346.1 Section 346.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT RAILROAD HIRING § 346.1 Central register. (a) The Board shall maintain a central register of railroad...

  15. 20 CFR 346.1 - Central register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Central register. 346.1 Section 346.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT RAILROAD HIRING § 346.1 Central register. (a) The Board shall maintain a central register of railroad...

  16. Crustal seismicity in central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos, S.; Vera, E.; Alvarado, P.; Monfret, T.

    2004-06-01

    Both the genesis and rates of activity of shallow intraplate seismic activity in central Chile are poorly understood, mainly because of the lack of association of seismicity with recognizable fault features at the surface and a poor record of seismic activity. The goal of this work is to detail the characteristics of seismicity that takes place in the western flank of the Andes in central Chile. This region, located less than 100 km from Santiago, has been the site of earthquakes with magnitudes up to 6.9, including several 5+ magnitude shocks in recent years. Because most of the events lie outside the Central Chile Seismic Network, at distances up to 60 km to the east, it is essential to have adequate knowledge of the velocity structure in the Andean region to produce the highest possible quality of epicentral locations. For this, a N-S refraction line, using mining blasts of the Disputada de Las Condes open pit mine, has been acquired. These blasts were detected and recorded as far as 180 km south of the mine. Interpretation of the travel times indicates an upper crustal model consisting of three layers: 2.2-, 6.7-, and 6.1-km thick, overlying a half space; their associated P wave velocities are 4.75-5.0 (gradient), 5.8-6.0 (gradient), 6.2, and 6.6 km/s, respectively. Hypocentral relocation of earthquakes in 1986-2001, using the newly developed velocity model, reveals several regions of concentrated seismicity. One clearly delineates the fault zone and extensions of the strike-slip earthquake that took place in September 1987 at the source of the Cachapoal River. Other regions of activity are near the San José volcano, the source of the Maipo River, and two previously recognized lineaments that correspond to the southern extension of the Pocuro fault and Olivares River. A temporary array of seismographs, installed in the high Maipo River (1996) and San José volcano (1997) regions, established the hypocentral location of events with errors of less than 1 km

  17. Biotea: semantics for Pubmed Central.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alexander; Lopez, Federico; Garcia, Leyla; Giraldo, Olga; Bucheli, Victor; Dumontier, Michel

    2018-01-01

    A significant portion of biomedical literature is represented in a manner that makes it difficult for consumers to find or aggregate content through a computational query. One approach to facilitate reuse of the scientific literature is to structure this information as linked data using standardized web technologies. In this paper we present the second version of Biotea, a semantic, linked data version of the open-access subset of PubMed Central that has been enhanced with specialized annotation pipelines that uses existing infrastructure from the National Center for Biomedical Ontology. We expose our models, services, software and datasets. Our infrastructure enables manual and semi-automatic annotation, resulting data are represented as RDF-based linked data and can be readily queried using the SPARQL query language. We illustrate the utility of our system with several use cases. Our datasets, methods and techniques are available at http://biotea.github.io.

  18. Central solar-energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-10-27

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan is described. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  19. Lithospheric Structure of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. J.; Gulen, L.; Sun, Y.; Toksoz, M. N.

    2009-12-01

    The active tectonics of Central Asia is the result of ongoing, active continental collision between the Indian and the Eurasian plates. This geologically and tectonically complex area is also one of the most seismically active regions in the world. Previous studies in this region mostly depended on teleseismic data and the local and regional data from the stations located in China. In this study we used the local travel time data from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan to study the lithospheric structure in this region. We selected the events and stations between 32°N-65°E and 45°N-85°E and focused on the areas of Pamir and Tien Shan. In this data set, there are more than 3000 P and S arrivals received at 68 stations from about 220 events. The double difference tomography is applied to relocate events and to invert for seismic structure simultaneously. Our results provide accurate locations of earthquakes and high resolution lithospheric structure in this region. We use both; the local travel times, and also the regional travel times to invert the 3D lithospheric velocity structure in this region. More than 2200 P wave phase picks were used in the inversion. The average grid spacing is 100km and the inverted grids lay on six layers. Then we use the Double Difference Tomography method developed by Zhang and Thurber (2003, 2006) to invert the 3-D P-wave velocity structure. Our tomographic results show highly heterogeneous crust and upper mantle structure for Central Asia. Some crustal low velocity zones are found beneath Tien Shan, the northern Pamir, and the Tajik depression, while high velocity anomalies are found beneath the Kazakh shield, the southern Pamir, and the Tarim basin.

  20. Wooden Calendars from Central Rhodopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, V.

    2008-10-01

    Four wooden calendars from the village of Polkovnik Serafimovo, Smolyan region, in the Central Rhodopes are presented here, and three of them - for the first time. The shape and size, the kind of the signs and structure of the calendar record bear the characteristic features of the rest of the Bulgarian wooden calendars. The short notches on the edges represent the days of the year in the Julian (solar) calendar. The special signs on the sides mark the fixed festivals of the Orthodox Church calendar and are also influenced by the local tradition. The type of the signs confirms that the wooden sticks belong to the group of calendars from the Central Rhodopes. According to the beginning date of the calendar record on the sticks, two of the calendars are of the April (May) or October (November) type which corresponds to the very popular economic division of the year in the folk calendar into two periods -- warm and cold. The other two sticks, which are very similar to each other, make an exception in this respect among the rest of the Bulgarian wooden calendars. The months are divided into four groups (seasons) on each of the four edges of the stick (only one calendar from Burgas region has the same structure). The most interesting thing about the two sticks is that this is the only case among all known Bulgarian calendars that the beginning of the calendar record coincides with the beginning of the civil year on 1st January (January type) like some wooden calendars from Western Europe. Nowadays it is getting harder and harder to find wooden calendars in Bulgaria and in the neighbouring Balkan countries. The thorough knowledge about them could be helpful in various scientific fields, e.g. history of religion, ethnology, history of astronomy and mathematics, as well as semiotics.

  1. Unsettled weather across central Australia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    In late July 2013, a low pressure system off Australia’s southeast coast and moist onshore winds combined to create unsettled weather across central Australia – and a striking image of a broad cloud band across the stark winter landscape. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this true-color image on July 22 at 01:05 UTC (10:35 a.m. Australian Central Standard Time). To the west of the low pressure trough the skies are clear and dry. To the east, the broad band of bright white clouds obscures the landscape. The system brought wind, precipitation and cooler temperatures to the region. The same day as MODIS captured this image, the Naval Research Lab (NRL) published an edition of the Global Storm Tracker (GST), which gave a world-wide view of the low-pressure systems across the world. This tracker shows the entire cloud band across Australia, as well as the location of the low pressure system. A good view of the Storm Tracker is provided by Red Orbit at: www.redorbit.com/media/uploads/2013/07/072213-weather-003... Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Event centrality prospectively predicts PTSD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Boals, Adriel; Ruggero, Camilo

    2016-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that event centrality has a prominent association with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. However, evidence for this notion thus far has been mostly correlational. We report two studies that prospectively examined the relationship between event centrality and PTSD symptoms. Study 1 METHODS: Participants (N = 1438) reported their most stressful event ("prior event"), along with event centrality, PTSD symptoms, and neuroticism. At Time 2 participants reported their most stressful event since Time 1 ("critical event"), along with measures of event centrality and PTSD symptoms. Study 1 RESULTS: Event centrality for the critical event predicted PTSD symptoms, after controlling for event centrality and PTSD symptoms of the prior event and neuroticism. Study In the second study (N = 161) we examined changes in event centrality and PTSD symptoms over a month. Study 2 RESULTS: Using a cross-lagged panel design, results revealed event centrality at Time 1 significantly predicted PTSD symptoms at Time 2, but the reverse was not significant. In two studies, a prospective association between event centrality and PTSD symptoms, but not the reverse, emerged. This evidence implicates event centrality in the pathogenesis and/or maintenance of PTSD symptoms.

  3. Rainfall erosivity in Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Carlos A.; Vidal, Karim L.

    2011-11-01

    SummaryOne of the most widely used indicators of potential water erosion risk is the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor ( R) of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). R is traditionally determined by calculating a long-term average of the annual sum of the product of a storm's kinetic energy ( E) and its maximum 30-min intensity ( I30), known as the EI30. The original method used to calculate EI30 requires pluviograph records for at most 30-min time intervals. Such high resolution data is difficult to obtain in many parts of the world, and processing it is laborious and time-consuming. In Chile, even though there is a well-distributed rain gauge network, there is no systematic characterization of the territory in terms of rainfall erosivity. This study presents a rainfall erosivity map for most of the cultivated land in the country. R values were calculated by the prescribed method for 16 stations with continuous graphical record rain gauges in Central Chile. The stations were distributed along 800 km (north-south), and spanned a precipitation gradient of 140-2200 mm yr -1. More than 270 years of data were used, and 5400 storms were analyzed. Additionally, 241 spatially distributed R values were generated by using an empirical procedure based on annual rainfall. Point estimates generated by both methods were interpolated by using kriging to create a map of rainfall erosivity for Central Chile. The results show that the empirical procedure used in this study predicted the annual rainfall erosivity well (model efficiency = 0.88). Also, an increment in the rainfall erosivities was found as a result of the rainfall depths, a regional feature determined by elevation and increasing with latitude from north to south. R values in the study area range from 90 MJ mm ha -1 h -1 yr -1 in the north up to 7375 MJ mm ha -1 h -1 yr -1 in the southern area, at the foothills of the Andes Mountains. Although the map and the estimates could be improved in the future by

  4. ITER Central Solenoid Module Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, John

    The fabrication of the modules for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) has started in a dedicated production facility located in Poway, California, USA. The necessary tools have been designed, built, installed, and tested in the facility to enable the start of production. The current schedule has first module fabrication completed in 2017, followed by testing and subsequent shipment to ITER. The Central Solenoid is a key component of the ITER tokamak providing the inductive voltage to initiate and sustain the plasma current and to position and shape the plasma. The design of the CS has been a collaborative effort betweenmore » the US ITER Project Office (US ITER), the international ITER Organization (IO) and General Atomics (GA). GA’s responsibility includes: completing the fabrication design, developing and qualifying the fabrication processes and tools, and then completing the fabrication of the seven 110 tonne CS modules. The modules will be shipped separately to the ITER site, and then stacked and aligned in the Assembly Hall prior to insertion in the core of the ITER tokamak. A dedicated facility in Poway, California, USA has been established by GA to complete the fabrication of the seven modules. Infrastructure improvements included thick reinforced concrete floors, a diesel generator for backup power, along with, cranes for moving the tooling within the facility. The fabrication process for a single module requires approximately 22 months followed by five months of testing, which includes preliminary electrical testing followed by high current (48.5 kA) tests at 4.7K. The production of the seven modules is completed in a parallel fashion through ten process stations. The process stations have been designed and built with most stations having completed testing and qualification for carrying out the required fabrication processes. The final qualification step for each process station is achieved by the successful production of a prototype coil. Fabrication of

  5. Central neural pathways for thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate a homeostatic repertoire to maintain body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and to alter body temperature during the inflammatory response. This review summarizes the functional organization of the neural pathways through which cutaneous thermal receptors alter thermoregulatory effectors: the cutaneous circulation for heat loss, the brown adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and heart for thermogenesis and species-dependent mechanisms (sweating, panting and saliva spreading) for evaporative heat loss. These effectors are regulated by parallel but distinct, effector-specific neural pathways that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. The thermal afferent circuits include cutaneous thermal receptors, spinal dorsal horn neurons and lateral parabrachial nucleus neurons projecting to the preoptic area to influence warm-sensitive, inhibitory output neurons which control thermogenesis-promoting neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus that project to premotor neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla, including the raphe pallidus, that descend to provide the excitation necessary to drive thermogenic thermal effectors. A distinct population of warm-sensitive preoptic neurons controls heat loss through an inhibitory input to raphe pallidus neurons controlling cutaneous vasoconstriction. PMID:21196160

  6. Central-Monitor Software Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron; Foster, Conrad

    2005-01-01

    One of the software modules of the emergency-vehicle traffic-light-preemption system of the two preceding articles performs numerous functions for the central monitoring subsystem. This module monitors the states of all units (vehicle transponders and intersection controllers): It provides real-time access to the phases of traffic and pedestrian lights, and maps the positions and states of all emergency vehicles. Most of this module is used for installation and configuration of units as they are added to the system. The module logs all activity in the system, thereby providing information that can be analyzed to minimize response times and optimize response strategies. The module can be used from any location within communication range of the system; with proper configuration, it can also be used via the Internet. It can be integrated into call-response centers, where it can be used for alerting emergency vehicles and managing their responses to specific incidents. A variety of utility subprograms provide access to any or all units for purposes of monitoring, testing, and modification. Included are "sniffer" utility subprograms that monitor incoming and outgoing data for accuracy and timeliness, and that quickly and autonomously shut off malfunctioning vehicle or intersection units.

  7. Central neural pathways for thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shaun F; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate a homeostatic repertoire to maintain body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and to alter body temperature during the inflammatory response. This review summarizes the functional organization of the neural pathways through which cutaneous thermal receptors alter thermoregulatory effectors: the cutaneous circulation for heat loss, the brown adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and heart for thermogenesis and species-dependent mechanisms (sweating, panting and saliva spreading) for evaporative heat loss. These effectors are regulated by parallel but distinct, effector-specific neural pathways that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. The thermal afferent circuits include cutaneous thermal receptors, spinal dorsal horn neurons and lateral parabrachial nucleus neurons projecting to the preoptic area to influence warm-sensitive, inhibitory output neurons which control thermogenesis-promoting neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus that project to premotor neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla, including the raphe pallidus, that descend to provide the excitation necessary to drive thermogenic thermal effectors. A distinct population of warm-sensitive preoptic neurons controls heat loss through an inhibitory input to raphe pallidus neurons controlling cutaneous vasoconstriction.

  8. Central corneal thickness in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Sng, Chelvin C A; Ang, Marcus; Barton, Keith

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the role of central corneal thickness (CCT) in the clinical management of a glaucoma patient. The prognostic value of CCT is well recognized in patients with ocular hypertension. However, its predictive value in other glaucoma suspects and patients with established glaucoma is less certain. Tonometry artefacts can result from variations in CCT. However, an adequately validated correction algorithm for Goldmann applanation tonometry measurements does not exist. Newer methods of tonometry are potentially less influenced by CCT but are limited in their clinical use. There may also be biological and genetic associations between corneal thickness and glaucoma. Demographics, environmental factors, glaucoma treatment and the measurement device used have a significant influence on CCT, and should be considered when interpreting the effect of cornea thickness in patients with glaucoma. New measurements of the biomechanical properties of the cornea are likely to be better approximations of the globe biomechanics than CCT, but these require further evaluation. The clinical significance of CCT is well recognized in the context of glaucoma diagnosis and management, though the extent of its importance remains debatable. Corneal biomechanical properties may be more significantly associated with glaucoma than CCT.

  9. Primary Central Nervous System Fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Vinodh, V P; Harun, Rahmat; Sellamuthu, Pulivendhan; Kandasamy, Regunath

    2017-08-01

    We report a rare case of a young female with primary brain fibrosarcoma, and to the best of our knowledge, we believe that only <50 cases have been reported or described worldwide so far. Fibrosarcoma is a malignant neoplasm, in which histologically the predominant cells are fibroblasts that divide excessively without cellular control and they can invade local tissues or metastasize. Primary central nervous system fibrosarcomas are very aggressive neoplasms and generally have a poor prognosis. This tumor is either from sarcomatous transformation of a meningioma or arises de novo within the brain parenchyma. Our patient, a 48-year-old woman, who presented with progressive speech disorder over the period of 4 months, showed a left temporoparietal lesion with surrounding edema and local mass effect. Total surgical resection was achieved. Histopathology revealed classical fibrosarcoma features and secondary screening revealed no other distant lesion as diagnosis of primary brain fibrosarcoma was established. This case is deemed to be extremely rare because most reports claim that recurrence is within 6 months with poor prognosis; however, this patient is currently recurrence-free at 3 years. This would suggest of the possibility for a relook into this disease's course and recurrence rate when complete excision is achieved. Due to extreme rarity of these tumors, more comparative studies will be needed to improve the disease outcome.

  10. Maximal switchability of centralized networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulenko, Sergei; Morozov, Ivan; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2016-08-01

    We consider continuous time Hopfield-like recurrent networks as dynamical models for gene regulation and neural networks. We are interested in networks that contain n high-degree nodes preferably connected to a large number of N s weakly connected satellites, a property that we call n/N s -centrality. If the hub dynamics is slow, we obtain that the large time network dynamics is completely defined by the hub dynamics. Moreover, such networks are maximally flexible and switchable, in the sense that they can switch from a globally attractive rest state to any structurally stable dynamics when the response time of a special controller hub is changed. In particular, we show that a decrease of the controller hub response time can lead to a sharp variation in the network attractor structure: we can obtain a set of new local attractors, whose number can increase exponentially with N, the total number of nodes of the nework. These new attractors can be periodic or even chaotic. We provide an algorithm, which allows us to design networks with the desired switching properties, or to learn them from time series, by adjusting the interactions between hubs and satellites. Such switchable networks could be used as models for context dependent adaptation in functional genetics or as models for cognitive functions in neuroscience.

  11. Conductivity Anomalies in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neska, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a review of studies which, by applying the magnetotelluric, geomagnetic deep sounding, and magnetovariational sounding methods (the latter refers to usage of the horizontal magnetic tensor), investigate Central Europe for zones of enhanced electrical conductivity. The study areas comprise the region of the Trans-European Suture Zone (i.e. the south Baltic region and Poland), the North German Basin, the German and Czech Variscides, the Pannonian Basin (Hungary), and the Polish, Slovakian, Ukrainian, and Romanian Carpathians. This part of the world is well investigated in terms of data coverage and of the density of published studies, whereas the certainty that the results lead to comprehensive interpretations varies within the reviewed literature. A comparison of spatially coincident or adjacent studies reveals the important role that the data coverage of a distinct conductivity anomaly plays for the consistency of results. The encountered conductivity anomalies are understood as linked to basin sediments, asthenospheric upwelling, large differences in lithospheric age, and—this concerns most of them, which all concentrate in the middle crust—tectonic boundaries that developed during all mountain building phases that have taken place on the continent.

  12. Windthrow Variability in Central Amazonia

    SciTech Connect

    Negrón-Juárez, Robinson; Jenkins, Hillary; Raupp, Carlos

    Windthrows are a recurrent disturbance in Amazonia and are an important driver of forest dynamics and carbon storage. In this study, we present for the first time the seasonal and interannual variability of windthrows, focusing on Central Amazonia, and discuss the potential meteorological factors associated with this variability. Landsat images over the 1998-2010 time period were used to detect the occurrence of windthrows, which were identified based on their spectral characteristics and shape. Here, we found that windthrows occurred every year but were more frequent between September and February. Organized convective activity associated with multicell storms embedded in mesoscale convectivemore » systems, such as northerly squall lines (that move from northeast to southwest) and southerly squall lines (that move from southwest to northeast) can cause windthrows. We also found that southerly squall lines occurred more frequently than their previously reported ~50 year interval. At the interannual scale, we did not find an association between El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and windthrows.« less

  13. Towards a centralized Grid Speedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunov, I.; Andreeva, J.; Fajardo, E.; Gutsche, O.; Luyckx, S.; Saiz, P.

    2014-06-01

    Given the distributed nature of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid and the way CPU resources are pledged and shared around the globe, Virtual Organizations (VOs) face the challenge of monitoring the use of these resources. For CMS and the operation of centralized workflows, the monitoring of how many production jobs are running and pending in the Glidein WMS production pools is very important. The Dashboard Site Status Board (SSB) provides a very flexible framework to collect, aggregate and visualize data. The CMS production monitoring team uses the SSB to define the metrics that have to be monitored and the alarms that have to be raised. During the integration of CMS production monitoring into the SSB, several enhancements to the core functionality of the SSB were required; They were implemented in a generic way, so that other VOs using the SSB can exploit them. Alongside these enhancements, there were a number of changes to the core of the SSB framework. This paper presents the details of the implementation and the advantages for current and future usage of the new features in SSB.

  14. Windthrow Variability in Central Amazonia

    DOE PAGES

    Negrón-Juárez, Robinson; Jenkins, Hillary; Raupp, Carlos; ...

    2017-02-04

    Windthrows are a recurrent disturbance in Amazonia and are an important driver of forest dynamics and carbon storage. In this study, we present for the first time the seasonal and interannual variability of windthrows, focusing on Central Amazonia, and discuss the potential meteorological factors associated with this variability. Landsat images over the 1998-2010 time period were used to detect the occurrence of windthrows, which were identified based on their spectral characteristics and shape. Here, we found that windthrows occurred every year but were more frequent between September and February. Organized convective activity associated with multicell storms embedded in mesoscale convectivemore » systems, such as northerly squall lines (that move from northeast to southwest) and southerly squall lines (that move from southwest to northeast) can cause windthrows. We also found that southerly squall lines occurred more frequently than their previously reported ~50 year interval. At the interannual scale, we did not find an association between El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and windthrows.« less

  15. The economics of central billing offices.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, E; Nguyen, L

    2000-01-01

    The anticipation of economies of scale in physician billing has led many medical practices to consolidate their billing operations. This article analyzes these economies of scale, comparing performance indicators from centralized and decentralized operations. While consolidation provides compliance, control and information, diseconomies of scale can exist in the centralized receivables management process. The authors conclude that physician practices should consider a hybrid approach to billing, thus reaping the benefits of both centralization and decentralization.

  16. Properties of the Central American cold surge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.; Reding, Philip J.; Zhang, Yuxia

    1993-01-01

    The Central American cold surge (CACS) is a frontal incursion from the United States into Central America and resembles the East Asian cold surge. They occur more frequently than analyzed by NMC or by published results, based on our observations between 1979 and 1990. Climatology and structure are quantified, based on surface and upper air stations throughout Central America and satellite products from GOES visible and infrared sensors and SSM/I precipitable water and rain rate sensors.

  17. Afghanistan and Stability in Central Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-23

    St ra te gy Re se ar ch Pr oj ec t AFGHANISTAN AND STABILITY IN CENTRAL ASIA BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL ABDULLAH HALIM Afghan Army U.S. Army War College...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Afghanistan and Stability in Central Asia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...STABILITY IN CENTRAL ASIA by Lieutenant Colonel Abdullah Halim Afghan Army Colonel David A. Kelley Project Adviser Only a work of the United States

  18. Central Asia: A New Great Game?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-17

    CENTRAL ASIA: A NEW GREAT GAME? Dianne L. Smith June 17, 1996 ******* The views expressed in this report are those of the author and do not...power vacuum in Central Asia seems a remote concern at first blush. Colonel Smith’s review makes clear, however, that the paramount American stake...will always subordinate its relations with Central Asia to those with Russia. Iran still views Iraq as its greatest regional threat. Teheran will do

  19. Central Nervous System Infections in Denmark

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-02-04

    Central Nervous System Infections; Bacterial Meningitis; Viral Meningitis; Aseptic Meningitis; Encephalitis; Brain Abscess; Neuroborreliosis; Neurosyphilis; Lyme Disease; Tertiary Syphilis; Cerebral Abscess; Meningitis

  20. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  1. Historical Seismicity of Central Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, E.

    2013-05-01

    Central Panama lies in the Panama microplate, neighboring seismically active regions of Costa Rica and Colombia. This region, crossed by the Panama Canal, concentrates most of the population and economic activity of the Republic of Panama. Instrumental observation of earthquakes in Panama began on 1882 by the Compagnie Universelle du Canal Interocéanique de Panama and continued from 1904 to 1977 by the Panama Canal Company. From October 1997 to March 1998 the USGS deployed a temporary digital seismic network. Since 2003 this region is monitored by a digital seismic network operated by the Panama Canal Authority and I complemented by the broad band stations of the University of Panama seismic network. The seismicity in this region is very diffuse and the few events which are recorded have magnitudes less than 3.0. Historical archives and antique newspapers from Spain, Colombia, Panama and the United Sates have been searched looking for historical earthquake information which could provide a better estimate of the seismicity in this region. We find that Panama City has been shaken by two destructive earthquakes in historical times. One by a local fault (i.e. Pedro Miguel fault) on May 2, 1621 (I=Vlll MM), and a subduction event from the North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB) on September 7, 1882 (I=Vll MM). To test these findings two earthquakes scenarios were generated, using SELENA, for Panama City Old Quarter. Panama City was rebuilt on January 21, 1673, on a rocky point facing the Pacific Ocean after the sack by pirate Morgan on January 28, 1671. The pattern of damage to calicanto (unreinforced colonial masonry) and wood structures for a crustal local event are higher than those for an event from the NPDB and seem to confirm that the city has not been shaken by a major local event since May 2, 1621 and a subduction event since September 7, 1882

  2. Tethyan evolution of central Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Sengor, A.M.C.

    1990-05-01

    The study area extends from the eastern shores of the Caspian Sea in the west to the Helan Shan and Longmen Shan in the east and from about 40{degree}N parallel in the north to the neo-Tethyan sutures in the south, thus including what is called Middle Asia in the Soviet literature. In the region thus delineated lies the boundary between the largely late Paleozoic core of Asia (Altaids) and the Tethyside superorogenic complex. This boundary passes through continental objects that collided with nuclear Asia in the late Paleozoic to terminate its Altaid evolution. Subduction to the south of some ofmore » these had commenced before they collided (e.g., Tarim in the Kuen-Lun), in others later (e.g., South Ghissar area west of Pamirs). This subduction 1ed, in the late Paleozoic, to the opening of marginal basins, at least one of which may be partly extant (Tarim). Giant subduction accretion complexes of Paleozoic to earliest Triassic age dominate farther south in the basement of Turan (mainly in Turkmenian SSR) and in the Kuen-Lun/Nan Shan ranges. No discrete continental collisions or any continental basement in these regions could be unequivocally recognized contrary to most current interpretations. Magmatic arcs that developed along the southern margin of Asia in the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic grew atop these subduction-accretion complexes and record a gradual southerly migration of magmatism through time. Subduction also dominated the northern margin of Gondwanaland between Iran and China in late Paleozoic time, although the record in Afghanistan and northwest Tibet is scrappy. It led to back-arc basin formation, which in Iran and Oman became neo-Tethys and, in at least parts of central Asia, the Waser-Mushan-Pshart/Banggong Co-Nu Jiang ocean. This ocean was probably connected with the Omani part of the neo-Tethys via the Sistan region.« less

  3. Central venous catheters: legal issues.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Martina, Valentina; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Gravellone, Luciana; Mobilia, Francesca; Giordano, Antonino; Cusi, Daniele; Genovese, Umberto

    2011-01-01

    In dialysis patients, both central venous catheter (CVC) insertion and CVC use during the dialysis procedure pose important legal issues, because of potentially severe, even fatal, complications. The first issue is the decision of the kind of vascular access that should be proposed to patients: an arteriovenous (AV) fistula, a graft, or a CVC. The second issue, when choosing the CVC option, is the choice of CVC: nontunneled versus tunneled. Leaving a temporary nontunneled CVC for a prolonged time increases the risk of complications and could raise a liability issue. Even when choosing a long-term tunneled CVC, nephrologists should systematically explain its potential harms, presenting them as "unsafe for long-term use" unless there is a clear contraindication to an AV native or prosthetic access. Another critical issue is the preparation of a complete, informative, and easy-to-understand consent form. The CVC insertion procedure has many aspects of legal interest, including the choice of CVC, the use of ECG monitoring, the use of ultrasound guidance for cannulation, and the use of fluoroscopy for checking the position of the metal guidewire during the procedure as well as the CVC tip before the end of the procedure. Use of insertion devices and techniques that can prevent complications should obviously be encouraged. Complications of CVC use are mainly thrombosis and infection. These are theoretically expected as pure complications (and not as malpractice effects), but legal issues might relate to inappropriate catheter care (in both the inpatient and outpatient settings) rather than to the event per se. Thus, in the individual case it is indeed very difficult to establish malpractice and liability with a catheter-related infection or thrombosis. In conclusion, we cannot avoid complications completely when using CVCs, but reducing them to a minimum and adopting safe approaches to their insertion and use will reduce legal liability.

  4. Tree biomass in the North Central Region.

    Treesearch

    Gerhard K. Raile; Pamela J. Jakes

    1982-01-01

    Methods for calculating tree biomass are outlined, and the biomass on commercial forest land is estimated for 11 north-central states. Tree biomass in the North Central Region totals 3.6 billion tons, or 50 tons per commercial forest acre. For all species, total tree biomass is concentrated in growing-stock boles.

  5. Traveling Policies: Hijacked in Central Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silova, Iveta

    2005-01-01

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Central Asian education reform discourses have become increasingly similar to distinctive Western policy discourses traveling globally across national boundaries. Tracing the trajectory of "traveling policies" in Central Asia, this article discusses the way Western education discourses have been…

  6. Forest statistics of central and northern Indiana

    Treesearch

    The Forest Survey Organization Central States Forest Experiment Station

    1952-01-01

    The Forest Survey is conducted in the various regions by the forest experiment stations of the Forest Service. In Indiana the project is directed by the Central States Forest Experiment Station with headquarters in Columbus, Ohio. This Survey Release presents the more significant preliminary statistics on the forest area and timber volume for Central and Northern...

  7. Decentralization or centralization: striking a balance.

    PubMed

    Dirschel, K M

    1994-09-01

    An Executive Vice President for Nursing can provide the necessary link to meet diverse clinical demands when encountering centralization--decentralization decisions. Centralized communication links hospital departments giving nurses a unified voice. Decentralization acknowledges the need for diversity and achieves the right balance of uniformity through a responsive communications network.

  8. Proceedings, 8th Central Hardwood Forest Conference

    Treesearch

    Larry H. McCormick; Kurt W., eds. Gottschalk

    1991-01-01

    Two invited papers, forty-five volunteer papers, and twenty volunteer poster summaries presented at the 8th Central Hardwood Forest Conference. Presentations were on economics, forest amenities, harvesting, utilization, physiology, genetics, ecology, regeneration, silviculture, protection, management, hydrology, soils, nutrient cycling, and hardwood markets of central...

  9. The Latino Experience in Central Falls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Central Falls is, by far, the poorest community in Rhode Island. More than 40 percent of the children under 18 live in poverty, and 40 percent of that group live in severe poverty. At Central Falls High School, low-income Latino students have fallen behind their white counterparts, with shockingly low graduation, poor literacy, and low…

  10. Voices from the Field: Central Office Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    School systems' central office administrators sometimes take paths that seem easiest, even when it is clear the paths will not lead to sustained positive results that are needed--particularly in terms of twice-exceptional (2e) students. To appropriately address the needs of 2e learners, we must ensure that central office administrative services…

  11. Connecting Students, Creating Futures at Central Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosin, Julie; Erbes, Elizabeth; Britt, James; Good, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Des Moines is an urban community located in the heart of Iowa. Des Moines Public Schools serves 32,000 students in a system with 62 buildings, including Central Campus--a Regional Academy. Central Campus is housed in four buildings, including the main campus at 1800 Grand located on the western edge of downtown Des Moines. As a regional academy,…

  12. South-central Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Treesearch

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2005-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent south-central Alaska inventory conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). South-central Alaska has about 18.5 million acres, of which one-fifth (4 million acres) is forested. Species diversity is greatest in closed and open Sitka spruce forests, spruce...

  13. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M., E-mail: alexbarnacle@yahoo.co.uk; Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  14. External Review Teams Training in Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva-Trivino; Moises; Ramirez-Gatica, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Many Latin American countries have started actions to promote a higher education quality assurance system. Central America appears as a regional effort that includes universities from all seven countries under the initiative of Central American University Higher Council (CSUCA). After focusing in quality management and self-study processes, CSUCA…

  15. Visualizing the Central Limit Theorem through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggieri, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Central Limit Theorem is one of the most important concepts taught in an introductory statistics course, however, it may be the least understood by students. Sure, students can plug numbers into a formula and solve problems, but conceptually, do they really understand what the Central Limit Theorem is saying? This paper describes a simulation…

  16. Centralization and Decentralization in American Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBoer, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the trend toward centralization in American education policy over the last century through a variety of lenses. The overall picture that emerges is one of a continuous tug-of-war, with national and local policymakers stumbling together toward incrementally more standardized and centralized policies. There is a center of power…

  17. Central State University: Phase II Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In accordance with Ohio Amended Substitute House Bill 153, the Chancellor submitted to the state Legislature and the Governor a plan, developed in consultation with Central State University, that assures the Central State Supplement will be used to promote the goals of increasing enrollment, improving course completion, and increasing the number…

  18. Primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Peereboom, David M

    2010-07-01

    Management goals for patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) include long-term disease control, management of neurologic complications, and preservation of neurocognitive function. Various treatment options can achieve several of these goals. Chemotherapy as monotherapy or as combination therapy has emerged as the cornerstone of therapy for patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL. Outside of a clinical trial, patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL should receive high-dose intravenous methotrexate (MTX) as a single agent or as part of a combination regimen with radiation therapy reserved for relapse. The regimen should have an adequate MTX dose (>3 g/m(2)) to reach cytotoxic concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to treat occult leptomeningeal disease (LMD). Alternative modes of chemotherapy delivery for selected patients, preferably in the context of a clinical trial, include high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue and intra-arterial chemotherapy with blood-brain barrier disruption. Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in standard doses and fractionation carries an unacceptable rate of long-term neurocognitive toxicity. However, lower doses in daily divided fractions may offer the possibility of adding this modality with preservation of cognition but should be performed only in the context of a clinical trial. The long-term efficacy and toxicity of this approach is currently under investigation. Certain presentations of PCNSL require different strategies. Patients with ocular lymphoma at diagnosis should receive high-dose MTX as this drug can reach cytotoxic intravitreal concentrations. Recurrence in the eyes is managed with intravitreal chemotherapy including MTX or rituximab or with radiation therapy. The field of treatment (eyes vs whole brain) should be individualized. Intrathecal (IT) MTX should be included in the treatment regimen for those patients with a positive CSF cytology, or in regimens in which lower doses of

  19. Targeting bacterial central metabolism for drug development.

    PubMed

    Murima, Paul; McKinney, John D; Pethe, Kevin

    2014-11-20

    Current antibiotics, derived mainly from natural sources, inhibit a narrow spectrum of cellular processes, namely DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cell wall biosynthesis. With the worldwide explosion of drug resistance, there is renewed interest in the investigation of alternate essential cellular processes, including bacterial central metabolic pathways, as a drug target space for the next generation of antibiotics. However, the validation of targets in central metabolism is more complex, as essentiality of such targets can be conditional and/or contextual. Bearing in mind our enhanced understanding of prokaryotic central metabolism, a key question arises: can central metabolism be bacteria's Achilles' heel and a therapeutic target for the development of new classes of antibiotics? In this review, we draw lessons from oncology and attempt to address some of the open questions related to feasibility of targeting bacterial central metabolism as a strategy for developing new antibacterial drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Central station market development strategies for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-11-01

    Federal market development strategies designed to accelerate the market penetration of central station applications of photovoltaic energy system are analyzed. Since no specific goals were set for the commercialization of central station applications, strategic principles are explored which, when coupled with specific objectives for central stations, can produce a market development implementation plan. The study includes (1) background information on the National Photovoltaic Program, photovoltaic technology, and central stations; (2) a brief market assessment; (3) a discussion of the viewpoints of the electric utility industry with respect to solar energy; (4) a discussion of commercialization issues; and (5) strategy principles. It is recommended that a set of specific goals and objectives be defined for the photovoltaic central station program, and that these goals and objectives evolve into an implementation plan that identifies the appropriate federal role.

  1. Central station market development strategies for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Federal market development strategies designed to accelerate the market penetration of central station applications of photovoltaic energy system are analyzed. Since no specific goals were set for the commercialization of central station applications, strategic principles are explored which, when coupled with specific objectives for central stations, can produce a market development implementation plan. The study includes (1) background information on the National Photovoltaic Program, photovoltaic technology, and central stations; (2) a brief market assessment; (3) a discussion of the viewpoints of the electric utility industry with respect to solar energy; (4) a discussion of commercialization issues; and (5) strategy principles. It is recommended that a set of specific goals and objectives be defined for the photovoltaic central station program, and that these goals and objectives evolve into an implementation plan that identifies the appropriate federal role.

  2. 76 FR 22746 - Wiregrass Central Railway, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Wiregrass Central Railroad...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... Railway, LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Wiregrass Central Railroad Company, Inc. Wiregrass Central Railway, LLC (WCR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from Wiregrass Central Railroad Company, Inc. (WGCR), and to operate approximately 21.2 miles of...

  3. 12 CFR 234.4 - Standards for central securities depositories and central counterparties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... it meets or exceeds the following risk-management standards with respect to the payment, clearing... central counterparty's risk-management procedures. (9) The central securities depository or central... plausible market conditions. (b) The Board, by order, may apply heightened risk-management standards to a...

  4. 12 CFR 234.4 - Standards for central securities depositories and central counterparties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... it meets or exceeds the following risk-management standards with respect to the payment, clearing... central counterparty's risk-management procedures. (9) The central securities depository or central... plausible market conditions. (b) The Board, by order, may apply heightened risk-management standards to a...

  5. XNAT Central: Open sourcing imaging research data.

    PubMed

    Herrick, Rick; Horton, William; Olsen, Timothy; McKay, Michael; Archie, Kevin A; Marcus, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    XNAT Central is a publicly accessible medical imaging data repository based on the XNAT open-source imaging informatics platform. It hosts a wide variety of research imaging data sets. The primary motivation for creating XNAT Central was to provide a central repository to host and provide access to a wide variety of neuroimaging data. In this capacity, XNAT Central hosts a number of data sets from research labs and investigative efforts from around the world, including the OASIS Brains imaging studies, the NUSDAST study of schizophrenia, and more. Over time, XNAT Central has expanded to include imaging data from many different fields of research, including oncology, orthopedics, cardiology, and animal studies, but continues to emphasize neuroimaging data. Through the use of XNAT's DICOM metadata extraction capabilities, XNAT Central provides a searchable repository of imaging data that can be referenced by groups, labs, or individuals working in many different areas of research. The future development of XNAT Central will be geared towards greater ease of use as a reference library of heterogeneous neuroimaging data and associated synthetic data. It will also become a tool for making data available supporting published research and academic articles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Centralized drug review processes: are they fair?

    PubMed

    Mitton, Craig R; McMahon, Meghan; Morgan, Steve; Gibson, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Numerous countries have implemented centralized drug review processes to assist in making drug coverage decisions. In addition to examining the final recommendations of these bodies, it is also important to ensure fairness in decision making. Accountability for reasonableness is an ethics-based framework for examining the fairness of priority setting processes. The objective of this study was to assess the fairness of four internationally established centralized drug review processes using accountability for reasonableness. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with stakeholders in Canada, New Zealand, Australia and the UK (n=16). Participants were asked to evaluate their country's centralized drug review process against the four conditions of accountability for reasonableness. Each centralized drug review process satisfied at least one of the four ethical conditions, but none satisfied all four conditions. All participants viewed transparency as critical to both the legitimacy and fairness of centralized drug review processes. Additional strides need to be made in each of the four countries under study to improve the fairness of their centralized drug review processes. Ideally, a fair priority setting process should foster constructive stakeholder engagement and enhance the legitimacy of decisions made in assessing pharmaceutical products for funding. As policy makers are under increasing scrutiny in allocating limited resources, fair process should be seen as a critical component of such activity. This study represents the first attempt to conduct an international comparison of the fairness of centralized drug review agencies in the eyes of participating stakeholders.

  7. Central hypothyroidism - a neglected thyroid disorder.

    PubMed

    Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Rodari, Giulia; Giavoli, Claudia; Lania, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Central hypothyroidism is a rare and heterogeneous disorder that is characterized by a defect in thyroid hormone secretion in an otherwise normal thyroid gland due to insufficient stimulation by TSH. The disease results from the abnormal function of the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, or both. Moreover, central hypothyroidism can be isolated or combined with other pituitary hormone deficiencies, which are mostly acquired and are rarely congenital. The clinical manifestations of central hypothyroidism are usually milder than those observed in primary hypothyroidism. Obtaining a positive diagnosis for central hypothyroidism can be difficult from both a clinical and a biochemical perspective. The diagnosis of central hypothyroidism is based on low circulating levels of free T 4 in the presence of low to normal TSH concentrations. The correct diagnosis of both acquired (also termed sporadic) and congenital (also termed genetic) central hypothyroidism can be hindered by methodological interference in free T 4 or TSH measurements; routine utilization of total T 4 or T 3 measurements; concurrent systemic illness that is characterized by low levels of free T 4 and normal TSH concentrations; the use of the sole TSH-reflex strategy, which is the measurement of the sole level of TSH, without free T 4 , if levels of TSH are in the normal range; and the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism based on TSH analysis without the concomitant measurement of serum levels of T 4 . In this Review, we discuss current knowledge of the causes of central hypothyroidism, emphasizing possible pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of this disorder.

  8. Use of peripherally inserted central catheters as an alternative to central catheters in neurocritical care units.

    PubMed

    DeLemos, Christi; Abi-Nader, Judy; Akins, Paul T

    2011-04-01

    Patients in neurological critical care units often have lengthy stays that require extended vascular access and invasive hemodynamic monitoring. The traditional approach for these patients has relied heavily on central venous and pulmonary artery catheters. The aim of this study was to evaluate peripherally inserted central catheters as an alternative to central venous catheters in neurocritical care settings. Data on 35 patients who had peripherally inserted central catheters rather than central venous or pulmonary artery catheters for intravascular access and monitoring were collected from a prospective registry of neurological critical care admissions. These data were cross-referenced with information from hospital-based data registries for peripherally inserted central catheters and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Complete data were available on 33 patients with Hunt-Hess grade IV-V aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Catheters remained in place a total of 649 days (mean, 19 days; range, 4-64 days). One patient (3%) had deep vein thrombosis in an upper extremity. In 2 patients, central venous pressure measured with a peripherally inserted catheter was higher than pressure measured concurrently with a central venous catheter. None of the 33 patients had a central catheter bloodstream infection or persistent insertion-related complications. CONCLUSIONS Use of peripherally inserted central catheters rather than central venous catheters or pulmonary artery catheters in the neurocritical care unit reduced procedural and infection risk without compromising patient management.

  9. Centralized vs. decentralized child mental health services.

    PubMed

    Adams, M S

    1977-09-01

    One of the basic tenets of the Community Mental Health Center movement is that services should be provided in the consumers' community. Various centers across the country have attempted to do this in either a centralized or decentralized fashion. Historically, most health services have been provided centrally, a good example being the traditional general hospital with its centralized medical services. Over the years, some of these services have become decentralized to take the form of local health centers, health maintenance organizations, community clinics, etc, and now various large mental health centers are also being broken down into smaller community units. An example of each type of mental health facility is delineated here.

  10. The South Central Superpave Center Summary Report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-11-01

    This is the summary report for Research Project 0-1250, The South Central Superpave Center." Initiated and sponsored by the Texas Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration, the Superpave Center fostered the implementation of...

  11. Colorful Central Peak in an Unnamed Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-05

    The colorful rocks exposed in the central peak visible in this image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter probably reflect variations in mineral content that were caused by water activity early in Mars history.

  12. Development of the ZEUS central tracking detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, C. B.; Bullock, F. W.; Cashmore, R. J.; Devenish, R. C.; Foster, B.; Fraser, T. J.; Gibson, M. D.; Gilmore, R. S.; Gingrich, D.; Harnew, N.; Hart, J. C.; Heath, G. P.; Hiddleston, J.; Holmes, A. R.; Jamdagni, A. K.; Jones, T. W.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Long, K. R.; Lush, G. J.; Malos, J.; Martin, N. C.; McArthur, I.; McCubbin, N. A.; McQuillan, D.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morgado, C.; Nash, J.; Nixon, G.; Parham, A. G.; Payne, B. T.; Roberts, J. H. C.; Salmon, G.; Saxon, D. H.; Sephton, A. J.; Shaw, D.; Shaw, T. B.; Shield, P. D.; Shulman, J.; Silvester, I.; Smith, S.; Strachan, D. E.; Tapper, R. J.; Tkaczyk, S. M.; Toudup, L. W.; Wallis, E. W.; Wastie, R.; Wells, J.; White, D. J.; Wilson, F. F.; Yeo, K. L.; ZEUS-UK Collaboration

    1989-11-01

    The design concept and development of the ZEUS central tracking detector is described. This is a cylindrical drift chamber designed for track reconstruction, electron identification and event triggering in a high-crossing-rate, high-magnetic-field environment.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: central precocious puberty

    MedlinePlus

    ... girls and between ages 9 and 14 in boys, girls with central precocious puberty begin exhibiting signs before ... of puberty is even earlier than normal in girls than in boys. Boys with an MKRN3 gene mutation inherited from ...

  14. Proceedings. 14th Central Hardwood Forest Conference

    Treesearch

    Daniel A. Yaussy; David M. Hix; Robert P. Long; P. Charles, eds. Goebel

    2004-01-01

    Proceedings of the 14th Central Hardwood Forest conference held 16-19 March in Wooster Ohio. Includes 102 papers and abstracts dealing with silviculture, wildlife, human dimensions, harvesting and utilization, physiology, genetics, soils, nutrient cycling, and biometrics.

  15. Space Radar Image of Tuva, Central Asia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-15

    This spaceborne radar image shows part of the remote central Asian region of Tuva, an autonomous republic of the Russian Federation. Tuva is a mostly mountainous region that lies between western Mongolia and southern Siberia.

  16. NCI Central Review Board Receives Accreditation

    Cancer.gov

    The Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs has awarded the NCI Central Institutional Review Board full accreditation. AAHRPP awards accreditation to organizations demonstrating the highest ethical standards in clinical res

  17. Midwifery education in Central-Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Mivšek, Polona; Baškova, Martina; Wilhelmova, Radka

    2016-02-01

    Problems in midwifery in many Central-Eastern European countries are very similar; it is possible to speak about the evolving Central-Eastern model of midwifery care. The educational models of this region have a relatively strong theoretical part; however, there is an insufficient practical dimension. Theoretical part of midwifery education in the universities is relatively autonomous and is slowly changing the professional identity of graduates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Centralizing physician office functions. A paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Croopnick, J G

    1999-01-01

    Recent trends show that organizations that once thought business office centralization was beneficial are re-thinking their strategies and decentralizing business office functions. This article focuses on the paradigm shift from business office centralization to decentralization and the political factors effecting this shift. It provides actual case summaries to demonstrate what has transpired, and presents an alternative strategy to establishing successful business office functions, a hybrid business office.

  19. Regional Strategic Appraisal of Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-07

    effective region, to increase its competitiveness in the face of the challenges from globalization . Therefore, I recommend a deepening of the regional...centroamericanos, 1970 a 1999, Mexico City, Mach 2000. 7 Agosin, Bloom and Gitli, Globalization , Liberalization, and Sustainable Human Development in Central...Bloom, and Eduardo Gitli, “ Globalization , Liberalization, and Sustainable Human Development in Central America,” February, 2000; available from <http

  20. Central diffractive resonance production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Roberto; Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Schicker, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    Central production of resonances resulting from the scattering of Pomerons in the central rapidity region of proton-proton scattering is studied. Estimates for relevant cross sections are presented. L.J. gratefully acknowledges an EMMI visiting Professorship at the University of Heidelberg for completion of this work. He is grateful to the organizers of this meeting for their hospitality and support. His work was supported also by DOMUS, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

  1. Gullies in a Central Pit Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-14

    Sometimes a central pit forms inside some Martian craters, especially when there substantial ground ice. Such is the case in this observation from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. Sometimes what we call "mass wasting" processes (think small avalanches or landslides) occur on the slopes of the central pit. We took this image to search for any recent activity that would add to or modify previously identified gullies. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20005

  2. Collection development at the NOAA Central Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quillen, Steve R.

    1994-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Central Library collection, approximately one million volumes, incorporates the holdings of its predecessor agencies. Within the library, the collections are filed separately, based on their source and/or classification schemes. The NOAA Central Library provides a variety of services to users, ranging from quick reference and interlibrary loan to in-depth research and online data bases.

  3. Central Rotations of Milky Way Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Noyola, Eva; Rukdee, Surangkhana; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Thomas, Jens; Opitsch, Michael; Williams, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    Most Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) exhibit measurable flattening, even if on a very low level. Both cluster rotation and tidal fields are thought to cause this flattening. Nevertheless, rotation has only been confirmed in a handful of GCs, based mostly on individual radial velocities at large radii. We are conducting a survey of the central kinematics of Galactic GCs using the new Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W. We detect rotation in all 11 GCs that we have observed so far, rendering it likely that a large majority of the Milky Way GCs rotate. We use published catalogs of GCs to derive central ellipticities and position angles. We show that in all cases where the central ellipticity permits an accurate measurement of the position angle, those angles are in excellent agreement with the kinematic position angles that we derive from the VIRUS-W velocity fields. We find an unexpected tight correlation between central rotation and outer ellipticity, indicating that rotation drives flattening for the objects in our sample. We also find a tight correlation between central rotation and published values for the central velocity dispersion, most likely due to rotation impacting the old dispersion measurements. This Letter includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  4. Visual processing in the central bee brain.

    PubMed

    Paulk, Angelique C; Dacks, Andrew M; Phillips-Portillo, James; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Gronenberg, Wulfila

    2009-08-12

    Visual scenes comprise enormous amounts of information from which nervous systems extract behaviorally relevant cues. In most model systems, little is known about the transformation of visual information as it occurs along visual pathways. We examined how visual information is transformed physiologically as it is communicated from the eye to higher-order brain centers using bumblebees, which are known for their visual capabilities. We recorded intracellularly in vivo from 30 neurons in the central bumblebee brain (the lateral protocerebrum) and compared these neurons to 132 neurons from more distal areas along the visual pathway, namely the medulla and the lobula. In these three brain regions (medulla, lobula, and central brain), we examined correlations between the neurons' branching patterns and their responses primarily to color, but also to motion stimuli. Visual neurons projecting to the anterior central brain were generally color sensitive, while neurons projecting to the posterior central brain were predominantly motion sensitive. The temporal response properties differed significantly between these areas, with an increase in spike time precision across trials and a decrease in average reliable spiking as visual information processing progressed from the periphery to the central brain. These data suggest that neurons along the visual pathway to the central brain not only are segregated with regard to the physical features of the stimuli (e.g., color and motion), but also differ in the way they encode stimuli, possibly to allow for efficient parallel processing to occur.

  5. Community centrality and social science research

    PubMed Central

    Allman, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Community centrality is a growing requirement of social science. The field's research practices are increasingly expected to conform to prescribed relationships with the people studied. Expectations about community centrality influence scholarly activities. These expectations can pressure social scientists to adhere to models of community involvement that are immediate and that include community-based co-investigators, advisory boards, and liaisons. In this context, disregarding community centrality can be interpreted as failure. This paper considers evolving norms about the centrality of community in social science. It problematises community inclusion and discusses concerns about the impact of community centrality on incremental theory development, academic integrity, freedom of speech, and the value of liberal versus communitarian knowledge. Through the application of a constructivist approach, this paper argues that social science in which community is omitted or on the periphery is not failed science, because not all social science requires a community base to make a genuine and valuable contribution. The utility of community centrality is not necessarily universal across all social science pursuits. The practices of knowing within social science disciplines may be difficult to transfer to a community. These practices of knowing require degrees of specialisation and interest that not all communities may want or have. PMID:26440071

  6. Community centrality and social science research.

    PubMed

    Allman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Community centrality is a growing requirement of social science. The field's research practices are increasingly expected to conform to prescribed relationships with the people studied. Expectations about community centrality influence scholarly activities. These expectations can pressure social scientists to adhere to models of community involvement that are immediate and that include community-based co-investigators, advisory boards, and liaisons. In this context, disregarding community centrality can be interpreted as failure. This paper considers evolving norms about the centrality of community in social science. It problematises community inclusion and discusses concerns about the impact of community centrality on incremental theory development, academic integrity, freedom of speech, and the value of liberal versus communitarian knowledge. Through the application of a constructivist approach, this paper argues that social science in which community is omitted or on the periphery is not failed science, because not all social science requires a community base to make a genuine and valuable contribution. The utility of community centrality is not necessarily universal across all social science pursuits. The practices of knowing within social science disciplines may be difficult to transfer to a community. These practices of knowing require degrees of specialisation and interest that not all communities may want or have.

  7. Health challenges in Kazakhstan and Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Adambekov, Shalkar; Kaiyrlykyzy, Aiym; Igissinov, Nurbek; Linkov, Faina

    2016-01-01

    The Central Asian region, which encompasses Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Kyrgyzstan, is an interesting geographic region with a rich history dating back to the Silk Road, Mongol conquests and expansion of the Russian Empire. However, from a public health viewpoint, the Central Asian region is under-investigated, and many public health challenges exist, as countries of Central Asia inherited the centralised medical systems practiced in the Soviet Union, and are currently undergoing rapid transitions. A large number of low and middle-income countries around the world, including countries of Central Asia, face a double burden of chronic and infectious disease. This essay focuses on the exploration of the most important public health challenges in the Central Asian region, including limited scientific productivity, the double burden of chronic and infectious disease, the need for healthcare reform and the reduction in care variation. Central Asia has a large number of medical schools, medical centres, and emerging research institutes that can be used to foster a change in medical and public health practice in the region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Microsurgical anatomy of the central lobe.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, Thomas; Paglioli, Eliseu; de Oliveira, Evandro; Rhoton, Albert L

    2015-03-01

    The central lobe consists of the pre- and postcentral gyri on the lateral surface and the paracentral lobule on the medial surface and corresponds to the sensorimotor cortex. The objective of the present study was to define the neural features, craniometric relationships, arterial supply, and venous drainage of the central lobe. Cadaveric hemispheres dissected using microsurgical techniques provided the material for this study. The coronal suture is closer to the precentral gyrus and central sulcus at its lower rather than at its upper end, but they are closest at a point near where the superior temporal line crosses the coronal suture. The arterial supply of the lower two-thirds of the lateral surface of the central lobe was from the central, precentral, and anterior parietal branches that arose predominantly from the superior trunk of the middle cerebral artery. The medial surface and the superior third of the lateral surface were supplied by the posterior interior frontal, paracentral, and superior parietal branches of the pericallosal and callosomarginal arteries. The venous drainage of the superior two-thirds of the lateral surface and the central lobe on the medial surface was predominantly through the superior sagittal sinus, and the inferior third of the lateral surface was predominantly through the superficial sylvian veins to the sphenoparietal sinus or the vein of Labbé to the transverse sinus. The pre- and postcentral gyri and paracentral lobule have a morphological and functional anatomy that differentiates them from the remainder of their respective lobes and are considered by many as a single lobe. An understanding of the anatomical relationships of the central lobe can be useful in preoperative planning and in establishing reliable intraoperative landmarks.

  9. 21 CFR 1305.24 - Central processing of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... or more registered locations and maintains a central processing computer system in which orders are... order with all linked records on the central computer system. (b) A company that has central processing... the company owns and operates. ...

  10. 21 CFR 1305.24 - Central processing of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or more registered locations and maintains a central processing computer system in which orders are... order with all linked records on the central computer system. (b) A company that has central processing... the company owns and operates. ...

  11. 21 CFR 1305.24 - Central processing of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... or more registered locations and maintains a central processing computer system in which orders are... order with all linked records on the central computer system. (b) A company that has central processing... the company owns and operates. ...

  12. 21 CFR 1305.24 - Central processing of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or more registered locations and maintains a central processing computer system in which orders are... order with all linked records on the central computer system. (b) A company that has central processing... the company owns and operates. ...

  13. 21 CFR 1305.24 - Central processing of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... or more registered locations and maintains a central processing computer system in which orders are... order with all linked records on the central computer system. (b) A company that has central processing... the company owns and operates. ...

  14. Geometry of complex networks and topological centrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Gyan; Zhang, Zhi-Li

    2013-09-01

    We explore the geometry of complex networks in terms of an n-dimensional Euclidean embedding represented by the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of the graph Laplacian (L). The squared distance of a node i to the origin in this n-dimensional space (lii+), yields a topological centrality index, defined as C∗(i)=1/lii+. In turn, the sum of reciprocals of individual node centralities, ∑i1/C∗(i)=∑ilii+, or the trace of L, yields the well-known Kirchhoff index (K), an overall structural descriptor for the network. To put into context this geometric definition of centrality, we provide alternative interpretations of the proposed indices that connect them to meaningful topological characteristics - first, as forced detour overheads and frequency of recurrences in random walks that has an interesting analogy to voltage distributions in the equivalent electrical network; and then as the average connectedness of i in all the bi-partitions of the graph. These interpretations respectively help establish the topological centrality (C∗(i)) of node i as a measure of its overall position as well as its overall connectedness in the network; thus reflecting the robustness of i to random multiple edge failures. Through empirical evaluations using synthetic and real world networks, we demonstrate how the topological centrality is better able to distinguish nodes in terms of their structural roles in the network and, along with Kirchhoff index, is appropriately sensitive to perturbations/re-wirings in the network.

  15. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Yanyun; Ren Zhongzhou; Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy-Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S prefer to occupy the 1d{sub 3/2} state rather than the 2s{sub 1/2} state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of {sup 46}Armore » and {sup 44}S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.« less

  16. Central poststroke pain: an abstruse outcome.

    PubMed

    Henry, James L; Lalloo, Chitra; Yashpal, Kiran

    2008-01-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP), formerly known as thalamic pain syndrome of Déjerine and Roussy, is a central neuropathic pain occurring in patients affected by stroke. It is one manifestation of central pain, which is broadly defined as central neuropathic pain caused by lesions or dysfunction in the central nervous system. Thalamic pain was first described 100 years ago by Déjerine and Roussy and has been described as "among the most spectacular, distressing, and intractable of pain syndromes". CPSP is characterized by constant or intermittent pain and is associated with sensory abnormalities, particularly of thermal sensation. While the pain is frequently described as burning, scalding, or burning and freezing, other symptoms are usually vague and hard to characterize, making an early diagnosis particularly difficult. In fact, those who develop CPSP may no longer be under the care of health care professionals when their symptoms begin to manifest, resulting in misdiagnosis or a significant delay before treatment begins. Diagnosis is further complicated by cognitive and speech limitations that may occur following stroke, as well as by depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances. Patients may also exhibit spontaneous dysesthesia and the stimulus-evoked sensory disturbances of dysesthesia, allodynia and hyperalgesia. The present study offers a historical reference point for future clinical and basic research into this elusive type of debilitating pain.

  17. Central poststroke pain: An abstruse outcome

    PubMed Central

    Henry, James L; Lalloo, Chitra; Yashpal, Kiran

    2008-01-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP), formerly known as thalamic pain syndrome of Déjerine and Roussy, is a central neuropathic pain occurring in patients affected by stroke. It is one manifestation of central pain, which is broadly defined as central neuropathic pain caused by lesions or dysfunction in the central nervous system. Thalamic pain was first described 100 years ago by Déjerine and Roussy and has been described as “among the most spectacular, distressing, and intractable of pain syndromes”. CPSP is characterized by constant or intermittent pain and is associated with sensory abnormalities, particularly of thermal sensation. While the pain is frequently described as burning, scalding, or burning and freezing, other symptoms are usually vague and hard to characterize, making an early diagnosis particularly difficult. In fact, those who develop CPSP may no longer be under the care of health care professionals when their symptoms begin to manifest, resulting in misdiagnosis or a significant delay before treatment begins. Diagnosis is further complicated by cognitive and speech limitations that may occur following stroke, as well as by depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances. Patients may also exhibit spontaneous dysesthesia and the stimulus-evoked sensory disturbances of dysesthesia, allodynia and hyperalgesia. The present study offers a historical reference point for future clinical and basic research into this elusive type of debilitating pain. PMID:18301815

  18. Finasteride for chronic central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Forooghian, Farzin; Meleth, Annal D; Cukras, Catherine; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T; Meyerle, Catherine B

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of finasteride, an inhibitor of dihydrotestosterone synthesis, in the treatment of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy. Five patients with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy were prospectively enrolled in this pilot study. Patients were administered finasteride (5 mg) daily for 3 months, after which study medication was withheld and patients were observed for 3 months. Main outcome measures included best-corrected visual acuity, central subfield macular thickness, and subretinal fluid volume as assessed by optical coherence tomography. Serum dihydrotestosterone, serum testosterone, and urinary cortisol were also measured. There was no change in mean best-corrected visual acuity. Mean center-subfield macular thickness and subretinal fluid volume reached a nadir at 3 months and rose to levels that were below baseline by 6 months. The changes in both optical coherence tomography parameters paralleled those in serum dihydrotestosterone level. In four patients, center-subfield macular thickness and/or subretinal fluid volume increased after discontinuation of finasteride. In the remaining patient, both optical coherence tomography parameters normalized with finasteride and remained stable when the study medication was discontinued. Finasteride may represent a novel medical treatment for chronic central serous chorioretinopathy. Larger controlled clinical trials are needed to further assess the efficacy of finasteride for the treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy.

  19. Central Venous Occlusion in the Hemodialysis Patient.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Vinay Narasimha; Eason, Joseph B; Allon, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Central venous stenosis (CVS) is encountered frequently among hemodialysis patients. Prior ipsilateral central venous catheterization and cardiac rhythm device insertions are common risk factors, but CVS can also occur in the absence of this history. Chronic CVS can cause thrombosis with partial or complete occlusion of the central vein at the site of stenosis. CVS is frequently asymptomatic and identified as an incidental finding during imaging studies. Symptomatic CVS presents most commonly as an upper- or lower-extremity edema ipsilateral to the CVS. Previously unsuspected CVS may become symptomatic after placement of an ipsilateral vascular access. The likelihood of symptomatic CVS may be affected by the central venous catheter (CVC) location; CVC side; duration of CVC dependence; type, location, and blood flow of the ipsilateral access; and extent of collateral veins. Venous angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement can improve the stenosis and alleviate symptoms, but CVS typically recurs frequently, requiring repeated interventions. Refractory symptomatic CVS may require ligation of the ipsilateral vascular access. Because no available treatment option is curative, the goal should be to prevent CVS by minimizing catheters and central vein instrumentation in patients with chronic kidney disease and dialysis patients. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential Y-chromosome Anatolian influences on the Greek and Cretan Neolithic.

    PubMed

    King, R J; Ozcan, S S; Carter, T; Kalfoğlu, E; Atasoy, S; Triantaphyllidis, C; Kouvatsi, A; Lin, A A; Chow, C-E T; Zhivotovsky, L A; Michalodimitrakis, M; Underhill, P A

    2008-03-01

    The earliest Neolithic sites of Europe are located in Crete and mainland Greece. A debate persists concerning whether these farmers originated in neighboring Anatolia and the role of maritime colonization. To address these issues 171 samples were collected from areas near three known early Neolithic settlements in Greece together with 193 samples from Crete. An analysis of Y-chromosome haplogroups determined that the samples from the Greek Neolithic sites showed strong affinity to Balkan data, while Crete shows affinity with central/Mediterranean Anatolia. Haplogroup J2b-M12 was frequent in Thessaly and Greek Macedonia while haplogroup J2a-M410 was scarce. Alternatively, Crete, like Anatolia showed a high frequency of J2a-M410 and a low frequency of J2b-M12. This dichotomy parallels archaeobotanical evidence, specifically that while bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is known from Neolithic Anatolia, Crete and southern Italy; it is absent from earliest Neolithic Greece. The expansion time of YSTR variation for haplogroup E3b1a2-V13, in the Peloponnese was consistent with an indigenous Mesolithic presence. In turn, two distinctive haplogroups, J2a1h-M319 and J2a1b1-M92, have demographic properties consistent with Bronze Age expansions in Crete, arguably from NW/W Anatolia and Syro-Palestine, while a later mainland (Mycenaean) contribution to Crete is indicated by relative frequencies of V13.

  1. Health and health services in Central America.

    PubMed

    Garfield, R M; Rodriguez, P F

    1985-08-16

    Despite rapid economic growth since World War II, health conditions improved only slowly in most of Central America. This is a result of poor medical, social, and economic infrastructure, income maldistribution, and the poor utilization of health investments. The economic crisis of the 1980s and civil strife have further endangered health in the region. Life expectancy has fallen among men in El Salvador and civil strife has become the most common cause of death in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and El Salvador. Large-scale US assistance has done little to improve conditions, and refugees continue to pour into North America. It is estimated that there are more than a million refugees within Central America, while a million have fled to the United States. Costa Rica and Nicaragua are partial exceptions to this dismal health picture. An effective approach to the many health problems in Central America will require joint planning and cooperation among all countries in the region.

  2. Centralized vs. Decentralized Child Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Milton S.

    1977-01-01

    One of the basic tenets of the Community Mental Health Center movement is that services should be provided in the consumers' community. Various centers across the country have attempted to do this in either a centralized or decentralized fashion. Historically, most health services have been provided centrally, a good example being the traditional general hospital with its centralized medical services. Over the years, some of these services have become decentralized to take the form of local health centers, health maintenance organizations, community clinics, etc, and now various large mental health centers are also being broken down into smaller community units. An example of each type of mental health facility is delineated here. PMID:904014

  3. Hydrogels for central nervous system therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Russo, Teresa; Tunesi, Marta; Giordano, Carmen; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    The central nervous system shows a limited regenerative capacity, and injuries or diseases, such as those in the spinal, brain and retina, are a great problem since current therapies seem to be unable to achieve good results in terms of significant functional recovery. Different promising therapies have been suggested, the aim being to restore at least some of the lost functions. The current review deals with the use of hydrogels in developing advanced devices for central nervous system therapeutic strategies. Several approaches, involving cell-based therapy, delivery of bioactive molecules and nanoparticle-based drug delivery, will be first reviewed. Finally, some examples of injectable hydrogels for the delivery of bioactive molecules in central nervous system will be reported, and the key features as well as the basic principles in designing multifunctional devices will be described. © IMechE 2015.

  4. Endovascular interventions for central vein stenosis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil K

    2015-12-01

    Central vein stenosis is common because of the placement of venous access and cardiac intravascular devices and compromises vascular access for dialysis. Endovascular intervention with angioplasty and/or stent placement is the preferred approach, but the results are suboptimal and limited. Primary patency after angioplasty alone is poor, but secondary patency can be maintained with repeated angioplasty. Stent placement is recommended for quick recurrence or elastic recoil of stenosis. Primary patency of stents is also poor, though covered stents have recently shown better patency than bare metal stents. Secondary patency requires repeated intervention. Recanalization of occluded central veins is tedious and not always successful. Placement of hybrid graft-catheter with a combined endovascular surgical approach can maintain patency in many cases. In the presence of debilitating symptoms, palliative approach with endovascular banding or occlusion of the access may be necessary. Prevention of central vein stenosis is the most desirable strategy.

  5. Dry needling — peripheral and central considerations

    PubMed Central

    Dommerholt, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Dry needling is a common treatment technique in orthopedic manual physical therapy. Although various dry needling approaches exist, the more common and best supported approach targets myofascial trigger points. This article aims to place trigger point dry needling within the context of pain sciences. From a pain science perspective, trigger points are constant sources of peripheral nociceptive input leading to peripheral and central sensitization. Dry needling cannot only reverse some aspects of central sensitization, it reduces local and referred pain, improves range of motion and muscle activation pattern, and alters the chemical environment of trigger points. Trigger point dry needling should be based on a thorough understanding of the scientific background of trigger points, the differences and similarities between active and latent trigger points, motor adaptation, and central sensitize application. Several outcome studies are included, as well as comments on dry needling and acupuncture. PMID:23115475

  6. Diagnosis and management of central hypersomnias

    PubMed Central

    Susta, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Central hypersomnias are diseases manifested in excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) not caused by disturbed nocturnal sleep or misaligned circadian rhythms. Central hypersomnias includes narcolepsy with and without cataplexy, recurrent hypersomnia, idiopathic hypersomnia, with and without long sleep time, behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome, hypersomnia and narcolepsy due to medical conditions, and finally hypersomnia induced by substance intake. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale is a subjective tool mostly used for EDS assessment, while the Multiple Sleep Latency Test serves as an objective diagnostic method for narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnias. As for symptomatic therapy of EDS, the central nervous system stimulants modafinil and methylphenidate seem to work well in most cases and in narcolepsy and Parkinson’s disease; sodium oxybate also has notable therapeutic value. PMID:22973425

  7. [Central nervous system control of energy homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Machleidt, F; Lehnert, H

    2011-03-01

    The brain is continuously supplied with information about the distribution and amount of energy stores from the body periphery. Endocrine, autonomic and cognitive-hedonic signals are centrally integrated and exert effects on the whole organism via anabolic and catabolic pathways. The adiposity signals insulin and leptin reflect the amount of body fat and are part of a negative feedback mechanism between the periphery and the central nervous system. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is the most important central nervous structure, which integrates this information. Furthermore, the CNS is able to directly measure and to respond to changes in the concentration of certain nutrients. In order to develop effective therapies for the treatment of disorders of energy balance the further elucidation of these neuro-biological processes is of crucial importance. This article provides an overview of the CNS regulation of metabolism and its underlying molecular mechanisms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Correcting intermittent central suppression improves binocular marksmanship.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Eric S

    2007-04-01

    Intermittent central suppression (ICS) is a defect in normal binocular (two-eyed) vision that causes confusion in visual detail. ICS is a repetitive intermittent loss of visual sensation in the central area of vision. As the central vision of either eye "turns on and off", aiming errors in sight can occur that must be corrected when both eyes are seeing again. Any aiming errors in sight might be expected to interfere with marksmanship during two-eyed seeing. We compared monocular (one-eyed, patched) and binocular (two-eyed) marksmanship with pistol shooting with an Army ROTC cadet before and after successful therapy for diagnosed ICS. Pretreatment, monocular marksmanship was significantly better than binocular marksmanship, suggesting defective binocularity reduced accuracy. After treatment for ICS, binocular and monocular marksmanship were essentially the same. Results confirmed predictions that with increased visual stability from correcting the suppression, binocular and monocular marksmanship accuracies should merge.

  9. FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE LIFETIMES AND CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Dysli, Chantal; Berger, Lieselotte; Wolf, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify retinal fluorescence lifetimes in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) and to identify disease specific lifetime characteristics over the course of disease. Methods: Forty-seven participants were included in this study. Patients with central serous chorioretinopathy were imaged with fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) and compared with age-matched controls. Retinal autofluorescence was excited using a 473-nm blue laser light and emitted fluorescence light was detected in 2 distinct wavelengths channels (498–560 nm and 560–720 nm). Clinical features, mean retinal autofluorescence lifetimes, autofluorescence intensity, and corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT) images were further analyzed. Results: Thirty-five central serous chorioretinopathy patients with a mean visual acuity of 78 ETDRS letters (range, 50–90; mean Snellen equivalent: 20/32) and 12 age-matched controls were included. In the acute stage of central serous chorioretinopathy, retinal fluorescence lifetimes were shortened by 15% and 17% in the respective wavelength channels. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that fluorescence lifetimes were significantly influenced by the disease duration (P < 0.001) and accumulation of photoreceptor outer segments (P = 0.03) but independent of the presence or absence of subretinal fluid. Prolonged central macular autofluorescence lifetimes, particularly in eyes with retinal pigment epithelial atrophy, were associated with poor visual acuity. Conclusion: This study establishes that autofluorescence lifetime changes occurring in central serous chorioretinopathy exhibit explicit patterns which can be used to estimate perturbations of the outer retinal layers with a high degree of statistical significance. PMID:28099314

  10. FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE LIFETIMES AND CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY.

    PubMed

    Dysli, Chantal; Berger, Lieselotte; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2017-11-01

    To quantify retinal fluorescence lifetimes in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) and to identify disease specific lifetime characteristics over the course of disease. Forty-seven participants were included in this study. Patients with central serous chorioretinopathy were imaged with fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) and compared with age-matched controls. Retinal autofluorescence was excited using a 473-nm blue laser light and emitted fluorescence light was detected in 2 distinct wavelengths channels (498-560 nm and 560-720 nm). Clinical features, mean retinal autofluorescence lifetimes, autofluorescence intensity, and corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT) images were further analyzed. Thirty-five central serous chorioretinopathy patients with a mean visual acuity of 78 ETDRS letters (range, 50-90; mean Snellen equivalent: 20/32) and 12 age-matched controls were included. In the acute stage of central serous chorioretinopathy, retinal fluorescence lifetimes were shortened by 15% and 17% in the respective wavelength channels. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that fluorescence lifetimes were significantly influenced by the disease duration (P < 0.001) and accumulation of photoreceptor outer segments (P = 0.03) but independent of the presence or absence of subretinal fluid. Prolonged central macular autofluorescence lifetimes, particularly in eyes with retinal pigment epithelial atrophy, were associated with poor visual acuity. This study establishes that autofluorescence lifetime changes occurring in central serous chorioretinopathy exhibit explicit patterns which can be used to estimate perturbations of the outer retinal layers with a high degree of statistical significance.

  11. District Central Office Leadership as Teaching: How Central Office Administrators Support Principals' Development as Instructional Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Meredith I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Research on educational leadership underscores the importance of principals operating as instructional leaders and intensive job-embedded supports for such work; this research also identifies central office staff as key support providers. However, it teaches little about what central office staff do when they provide such support and how…

  12. [Centralization in obstetrics: pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Roemer, V M; Ramb, S

    1996-01-01

    Possible advantages and disadvantages of a general centralization of German obstetric facilities are analysed in the study. The need for centralization of risk cases, especially premature births (regionalization) is pointed out. Centralization appears appropriate, since every fifth maternity unit in Germany (19.78%) has 300 or fewer deliveries per year. This one fifth of perinatal clinics accounts for 6.3% of all deliveries (N = 49450). There are appreciable differences between the old and new federal states (Bundesländer): in the recently acceded federal states, 48.7% of all perinatal clinics have deliveries of 300 and less per year. This group of perinatal clinics accounts for 29% of all deliveries in the new federal states. We have carried out a survey of the mother's attitude to centralization: out of 416 patients in the Detmold women's hospital whose mean age was 29.0 +/- 4.2 years, 90.4% were not in favor of general centralization of obstetrics. 43% were also against a centralization of risk cases (regionalization). 75% of the women surveyed objected to centralized obstetrics because of the 'possible absence of the family', the 'possible absence of students and trainees' (44.9%), the 'unfamiliarity with staff and premises' (41.8%) and 'fear of anonymity' (44.5%). The majority of all women (84.1%) did not want to have a drive more than 20 km to an obstetrics center. Fear of 'delivery in a taxi'(78.6%), the 'fear that the husband will come too late to the delivery' (65.4%) and that the 'overall course of the delivery might not be adequate for reasons of time'. The presence of a pediatrics department in conjunction with the perinatal clinic was rated very positively (93%). It is concluded from the data and further juridical considerations that centralization of risk cases (regionalization) is indispensable in the near future and that somewhat more further into the future decentralization should be carried out by closing obstetrics departments with substantially

  13. Rare Primary Central Nervous System Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kubicky, Charlotte Dai; Sahgal, Arjun; Chang, Eric L.; Lo, Simon S.

    2014-01-01

    There are close to 70,000 new cases of primary central nervous system tumors diagnosed annually in the United States. Meningiomas, gliomas, nerve sheath tumors and pituitary tumors account for 85% of them. There is abundant literature on these commonly occurring tumors but data from the literature on infrequently encountered tumors such as atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, choroid plexus carcinoma, ganglioglioma, hemangiopericytoma, and pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma are limited. This review provides an overview of the clinicopathologic and therapeutic aspects of these rare primary central nervous system tumors. PMID:25276324

  14. On central-difference and upwind schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Turkel, Eli

    1990-01-01

    A class of numerical dissipation models for central-difference schemes constructed with second- and fourth-difference terms is considered. The notion of matrix dissipation associated with upwind schemes is used to establish improved shock capturing capability for these models. In addition, conditions are given that guarantee that such dissipation models produce a Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) scheme. Appropriate switches for this type of model to ensure satisfaction of the TVD property are presented. Significant improvements in the accuracy of a central-difference scheme are demonstrated by computing both inviscid and viscous transonic airfoil flows.

  15. Toward centrality determination at NICA/MPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galoyan, A. S.; Uzhinsky, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    Geometrical properties of nucleus-nucleus interactions at various centralities are calculated for the NICA energy range. A modified version of the Glauber Monte Carlo simulation code has been used for the calculations. It is shown that the geometrical properties of nucleus-nucleus interactions at the energies 5 - 10 GeV (NICA/MPD) and at energy 200 GeV (RHIC) are quite close to each other. A possible determination of centrality at NICA/MPD experiment using calculations of various Monte Carlo event generators are considered.

  16. Oxcarbazepine Therapy for Complete Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Basmah; Hodgins, Spencer; Landry, Daniel; O'shea, Michael; Braden, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine cause hyponatremia by unknown mechanisms. We describe a patient with complete central diabetes insipidus and seizures who developed worsening hyponatremia when her dose of oxcarbazepine was increased. The patient maintained a normal serum sodium level and has had appropriately concentrated urine for 5 years on just oxcarbazepine, despite undetectable antidiuretic hormone (ADH) levels. This suggests that oxcarbazepine (or one of its metabolites) may stimulate collecting tubule V2 receptor-G protein complex independent of ADH, resulting in increased renal tubular water reabsorption. Oxcarbazepine may be useful as an alternative therapy for patients with central diabetes insipidus.

  17. Hyperthyroidism hidden by congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fox, Danya A; Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Wensley, David F; Stewart, Laura L

    2015-05-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare neurocristopathy with severe central hypoventilation. CCHS results from a mutation in the paired-like homeobox 2B gene (PHOX2B). In addition to hypoventilation, patients with CCHS display a wide array of autonomic nervous system abnormalities, including decreased heart rate variability and abrupt sinus pauses, esophageal dysmotility, abnormal pupillary light response, and temperature dysregulation, to name a few. To date, there has been no documentation of a child with both CCHS and hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a young child with CCHS who presented with tachycardia, which was later found to be due to Grave's disease, after many months of investigation.

  18. Hydrological climate change projections for Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Hugo G.; Amador, Jorge A.; Alfaro, Eric J.; Quesada, Beatriz

    2013-07-01

    Runoff climate change projections for the 21st century were calculated from a suite of 30 General Circulation Model (GCM) simulations for the A1B emission scenario in a 0.5° × 0.5° grid over Central America. The GCM data were downscaled using a version of the Bias Correction and Spatial Downscaling (BCSD) method and then used in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale hydrological model. The VIC model showed calibration skill in Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama, but the results for some of the northern countries (Guatemala, El Salvador and Belize) and for the Caribbean coast of Central America was not satisfactory. Bias correction showed to remove effectively the biases in the GCMs. Results of the projected climate in the 2050-2099 period showed median significant reductions in precipitation (as much as 5-10%) and runoff (as much as 10-30%) in northern Central America. Therefore in this sub-region the prevalence of severe drought may increase significantly in the future under this emissions scenario. Northern Central America could warm as much as 3 °C during 2050-2099 and southern Central America could reach increases as much as 4 °C during the same period. The projected dry pattern over Central America is consistent with a southward displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). In addition, downscaling of the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data from 1948 to 2012 and posterior run in VIC, for two locations in the northern and southern sub-regions of Central America, suggested that the annual runoff has been decreasing since ca. 1980, which is consistent with the sign of the runoff changes of the GCM projections. However, the Reanalysis 1980-2012 drying trends are generally much stronger than the corresponding GCM trends. Among the possible reasons for that discrepancy are model deficiencies, amplification of the trends due to constructive interference with natural modes of variability in the Reanalysis data, errors in the Reanalysis

  19. Central anticholinergic syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moos, Daniel D

    2007-10-01

    Postoperative central anticholinergic syndrome (CAS) is caused by anticholinergic medications that cross the blood-brain barrier. Medications with central anticholinergic effects block muscarinic cholinergic receptors, resulting in a wide array of symptoms. Symptoms may range from coma to a highly agitated state. CAS may be underdiagnosed because of its varying presentation and lack of awareness. Differential diagnosis for the patient presenting with abnormal neurological signs and symptoms should include CAS after the exclusion of other potential causes. This case report details the occurrence of CAS in a patient in her 20's. A review of CAS including causes, signs and symptoms, incidence, differential diagnosis, and treatment is discussed.

  20. Urbanization in Central Java and Yogyakarta.

    PubMed

    Soehartadji

    1980-06-01

    The author examines urbanization in the provinces of Central Java and Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Changes in the number and definition of rural and urban areas and in the proportion of the population living in these areas between 1930 and 1971 are analyzed. Causes of urbanization are then discussed, with attention to income levels, push and pull factors, and trade and communication. The study reveals that the rate of urbanization is comparatively low because economic conditions in the cities and towns of Central Java and Yogyakarta are less favorable than in the urban areas of other provinces, with the result that migrants tend to choose destinations in these other provinces.

  1. Hydrology of Central Florida Lakes - A Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiffer, Donna M.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lakes are among the most valued natural resources of central Florida. The landscape of central Florida is riddled with lakeswhen viewed from the air, it almost seems there is more water than land. Florida has more naturally formed lakes than other southeastern States, where many lakes are created by building dams across streams. The abundance of lakes on the Florida peninsula is a result of the geology and geologic history of the State. An estimated 7,800 lakes in Florida are greater than 1 acre in surface area. Of these, 35 percent are located in just four counties (fig. 1): Lake, Orange, Osceola, and Polk (Hughes, 1974b). Lakes add to the aesthetic and commercial value of the area and are used by many residents and visitors for fishing, boating, swimming, and other types of outdoor recreation. Lakes also are used for other purposes such as irrigation, flood control, water supply, and navigation. Residents and visitors commonly ask questions such as Whyare there so many lakes here?, Why is my lake drying up (or flooding)?, or Is my lake spring-fed? These questions indicate that the basic hydrology of lakes and the interaction of lakes with ground water and surface water are not well understood by the general population. Because of the importance of lakes to residents of central Florida and the many questions and misconceptions about lakes, this primer was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District and the South Florida Water Management District. The USGS has been collecting hydrologic data in central Florida since the 1920s, obtaining valuable information that has been used to better understand the hydrology of the water resources of central Florida, including lakes. In addition to data collection, as of 1994, the USGS had published 66 reports and maps on central Florida lakes (Garcia and Hoy, 1995). The main purpose of this primer is to describe the hydrology of lakes in central

  2. Central and non-central networks, cognition, clinical symptoms, and polygenic risk scores in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Alloza, Clara; Bastin, Mark E; Cox, Simon R; Gibson, Jude; Duff, Barbara; Semple, Scott I; Whalley, Heather C; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2017-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that may be the result of aberrant connections between specific brain regions rather than focal brain abnormalities. Here, we investigate the relationships between brain structural connectivity as described by network analysis, intelligence, symptoms, and polygenic risk scores (PGRS) for schizophrenia in a group of patients with schizophrenia and a group of healthy controls. Recently, researchers have shown an interest in the role of high centrality networks in the disorder. However, the importance of non-central networks still remains unclear. Thus, we specifically examined network-averaged fractional anisotropy (mean edge weight) in central and non-central subnetworks. Connections with the highest betweenness centrality within the average network (>75% of centrality values) were selected to represent the central subnetwork. The remaining connections were assigned to the non-central subnetwork. Additionally, we calculated graph theory measures from the average network (connections that occur in at least 2/3 of participants). Density, strength, global efficiency, and clustering coefficient were significantly lower in patients compared with healthy controls for the average network (p FDR  < 0.05). All metrics across networks were significantly associated with intelligence (p FDR  < 0.05). There was a tendency towards significance for a correlation between intelligence and PGRS for schizophrenia (r = -0.508, p = 0.052) that was significantly mediated by central and non-central mean edge weight and every graph metric from the average network. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that intelligence deficits are associated with a genetic risk for schizophrenia, which is mediated via the disruption of distributed brain networks. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5919-5930, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Forest statistics for Central Tennessee counties

    Treesearch

    Renewable Resources Evaluation Research Work Unit

    1981-01-01

    These tables were derived from data obtained during a 1980 inventory of 23 counties comprising the Central Unit of Tennessee (fig. 1). The data on forest acreage and timber volume were secured by a systematic sampling method involving a forest-non-forest classification on aerial photographs and on-the-ground measurements of trees at sample locations. The sample...

  4. 20 CFR 346.1 - Central register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Central register. 346.1 Section 346.1 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT... employees with at least one year of service who have declared their current availability for rail industry...

  5. The Centrality of Engagement in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hiram E.; Bruns, Karen; Sonka, Steven T.; Furco, Andrew; Swanson, Louis

    2016-01-01

    The centrality of engagement is critical to the success of higher education in the future. Engagement is essential to most effectively achieving the overall purpose of the university, which is focused on the knowledge enterprise. Today's engagement is scholarly, is an aspect of learning and discovery, and enhances society and higher education.…

  6. Gravimetric maps of the Central African Republic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albouy, J.; Godivier, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Gravimetric maps of the Central African Republic are described including a map of Bouguer anomalies at 1/1,000,000 in two sections (eastern sheet, western sheet) and a map, in color, of Bouguer anomalies at 1/2,000,000. Instrumentation, data acquisition, calibration, and data correction procedures are discussed.

  7. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome mimicking mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Descartes, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Later-onset congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (LO-CCHS) does not present only breathing problems but can be present as episodic multiple organs involvement. Our unique case demonstrated LO-CCHS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases and having nontypical polysomnography result.

  8. Prescribed burning in the North Central States.

    Treesearch

    Linda R. Donoghue; Von J. Johnson

    1975-01-01

    Describes 5 years of prescribed burning in the North Central States from 1968 through 1972. Provides information concerning participating agencies, burned-acreage, purpose-of-burn, fuels, and weather. Also examines other aspects such as ignition and burning techniques, hours-to-complete, time of fire start, and cost-per-acre.

  9. Proceedings, 16th central hardwood forest conference

    Treesearch

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Charles H., eds. Michler

    2008-01-01

    Proceedings of the 16th Central Hardwood Forest Conference held April 8-9, 2008, in West Lafayette, IN. Includes 64 papers pertaining to forest regeneration and propagation, forest products, ecology and forest dynamics, human dimensions and economics, forest biometrics and modeling, silviculture and genetics, forest health and protection, and soil and mineral nutrition...

  10. Universities and Knowledge Production in Central Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwiek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses an East/West divide in Europe in university knowledge production. It argues that the communist and post-communist legacies in the four major Central European economies studied (Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic) matter substantially for educational and research systems. The differences in university…

  11. Woody encroachment in the Central United States

    Treesearch

    Greg C. Liknes; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Kevin Nimerfro

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of the central United States is dominated by cropland and rangeland mixed with remnants of short- and tall-grass prairies that were once prevalent. Since the last ice age, these areas had sparse tree cover due to cyclical severe droughts, intentional fires used by indigenous people as a land management tool, and natural fires caused by lightning. More...

  12. The Suffix "-oso" in Central American Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scavnicky, Gary Eugene A.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the lexical formative "-oso," which is added to nominal and verbal roots to form adjectives to denote possession of the quality contained in the primitive, in Central American Spanish. Concludes it is used with traditional Spanish denotations and has undergone various semantic shifts and is being applied to roots in a completely…

  13. Forest statistics for North Central Georgia, 1998

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1998-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of North Central Georgia. Field work began in June 1997 and was completed in November 1997. Six previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1953, 196 1, 1972, 1983, and 1989 provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 6 1 years. This report primarily emphasizes the changes and...

  14. Forest statistics for Central Georgia, 1997

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1998-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of Central Georgia. Field work began in November 1996 and was completed in August 1997. Six previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1952, 1961, 1972, 1982, and 1989 provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 61 years. This report primarily emphasizes the changes and trends...

  15. Forest statistics for Central Florida - 1995

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Brown

    1996-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the seventh forest survey of Central Florida. Field work began in February 1995 and was completed in May 1995. Six previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1949, 1959, 1970, 1960, and 1988 provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 59 years. This report primarily emphasizes the changes and trends since...

  16. Equity and Difference in Centralized Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macedo, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on the promise of equity that underlies centralized evaluation policies and its relation to difference, or in other words to the singularity of the subject. I defend that without taking the issue of difference into consideration, there is no education, and that the unique subject is what is aspired by education. The analyses rely…

  17. Responsibility for Curriculum Evaluation in Centralized Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschamp, Phil; McGaw, Barry

    1979-01-01

    While responsibility for curriculum development in Australia is devolving to the local level, the state systems, in the name of accountability, are retaining responsibility for curriculum evaluation. This article examines the curriculum centralization/decentralization patterns in Australia's states, points out the paradoxes in such systems, and…

  18. Forest statistics for west central Oregon.

    Treesearch

    John W. Hazard; Melvin E. Metcalf

    1965-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the latest reinventory of four counties centrally located in western Oregon: Benton, Lane, Lincoln, and Linn. This block of four counties is one of 10 such blocks set up in the States of Oregon and Washington by the Forest Survey to facilitate orderly reinventories of the timber resources. Each block will be reinventoried at...

  19. Timber resource statistics for central Oregon.

    Treesearch

    John M. Berger

    1968-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the third inventory of the timber resources of nine counties in central Oregon: Crook, Deschutes, Gilliam, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Sherman, Wasco, and Wheeler. This block of nine counties is one of 10 such blocks set up in the States of Oregon and Washington by the Forest Survey to facilitate orderly reinventories of the...

  20. Forest Statistics for Minnesota's Central Hardwood Unit.

    Treesearch

    Earl C. Leatherberry

    1991-01-01

    In 1990, the fifth inventory of Minnesota's Central Hardwood Unit found 11.9 million acres of land, of which 2.4 million acres are forested. This bulletin presents statistical highlights and contains detailed tables of forest area, as well as timber volume, growth, removal, mortality, and ownership.

  1. Proceedings, 10th Central Hardwood Forest Conference

    Treesearch

    Kurt W. Gottschalk; Sandra L.C., eds. Fosbroke

    1995-01-01

    Two invited papers, 57 volunteer papers, and 22 volunteer poster summaries presented at the 10th Central Hardwood Forest Conference. Presentation topics included economics, forest amenities, harvesting, logging safety, utilization, physiology, genetics, ecology, regeneration, silviculture, protection, management, hydrology, soils, nutrient cycling, and hardwood markets...

  2. Forest statistics for Central Tennessee counties - 1989

    Treesearch

    Dennis M. May; John S. Vissage

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 survey of the Central Unit of Tennessee revealed the following:Timberland now covers 2,416.3 thousand acres, an increase of 14 percent since 1980.Ninety-five percent of the unit’s timberland is privately owned.Cedar and mixed cedar-hardwood stands occupy 456.1 thousand acres of timberland....

  3. Forest statistics for Central Mississippi counties - 1987

    Treesearch

    John F. Kelly; F. Dee Hines

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 survey of the 14 counties in the Central Mississippi unit indicated the following changes since the previous survey in 1977:Timberland area, now covering 4,097.0 thousand acres, has increased 6 percent.Forest industry-owned timberland increased 112.5 thousand acres or 13 percent.Pine forest types...

  4. [Systemic paracoccidioidomycosis with central nervous system involvement].

    PubMed

    Duarte, A L; Baruffa, G; Terra, H B; Renck, D V; de Moura, D; Petrucci, C

    1999-01-01

    A clinical case of a patient bearing systemic paracoccidioidomycosis with regional ganglionic and oral exposure and later pulmonary involvement is presented. The patient was treated with specific drugs (amphotericin B, itraconazole, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim) and followed throughout a 6-year period and eventually died showing an extensive involvement of the central nervous system.

  5. [WN] central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, H.; Miszalski, B.; Toalá, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    While most of the low-mass stars stay hydrogen-rich on their surface throughout their evolution, a considerable fraction of white dwarfs as well as central stars of planetary nebulae have a hydrogen-deficient surface composition. The majority of these H-deficient central stars exhibit spectra very similar to massive Wolf-Rayet stars of the carbon sequence, i.e. with broad emission lines of carbon, helium, and oxygen. In analogy to the massive Wolf-Rayet stars, they are classified as [WC] stars. Their formation, which is relatively well understood, is thought to be the result of a (very) late thermal pulse of the helium burning shell. It is therefore surprising that some H-deficient central stars which have been found recently, e.g. IC 4663 and Abell 48, exhibit spectra that resemble those of the massive Wolf-Rayet stars of the nitrogen sequence, i.e. with strong emission lines of nitrogen instead of carbon. This new type of central stars is therefore labelled [WN]. We present spectral analyses of these objects and discuss the status of further candidates as well as the evolutionary status and origin of the [WN] stars.

  6. Procedures of Operation at Cranbrook Central Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranbrook Institutions, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Central Library.

    This manual outlines the ordering, cataloging and classification, and processing procedures for books, periodicals, government documents, and non-book materials for a central library serving three schools--a co-ed elementary school and separate junior-senior high schools for boys and girls--and four special libraries--a fine and rare books…

  7. Central serous chorioretinopathy due to tadalafil use.

    PubMed

    Türkcü, Fatih Mehmet; Yüksel, Harun; Şahin, Alparslan; Murat, Mehmet; Bozkurt, Yaşar; Çaça, Ihsan

    2013-04-01

    Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors are commonly used in the treatment of erectile dysfunction. There are a small number of case reports that associate this agent with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Our report presents the treatment approach to a 42-year-old patient who described blurred vision and metamorphopsia and was diagnosed with CSCR following the use of tadalafil, a PDE5 inhibitor.

  8. PROGRAMMED LEARNING IN CENTRAL AFRICAN CONTEXTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAWKRIDGE, D.G.

    SINCE 1964, THE PROGRAMMED LEARNING CENTRE AT THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF RHODESIA HAS BEEN INVESTIGATING THE POTENTIALITIES OF PROGRAMED LEARNING FOR CENTRAL AFRICA THROUGH A SERIES OF CONTROLLED EXPERIMENTS USING LOCALLY-WRITTEN AND PUBLISHED PROGRAMS. ASSESSMENT OF THE DESIRABILITY AND USEFULNESS OF PROGRAMS IN TEACHING, AND ASSESSMENT OF THEIR…

  9. Forest statistics for Central Georgia, 1982

    Treesearch

    Raymond M. Sheffield; John B. Tansey

    1982-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the fifth forest survey of Central Georgia. Fieldwork began in October 1981 and was completed in June 1982. Four previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1952, 1961, and 1972, provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 46 years. The primary emphasis in this report is on the changes and trends since...

  10. Eye Movement Correlates of Acquired Central Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schattka, Kerstin I.; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has…

  11. Forest statistics for Central Alabama counties

    Treesearch

    Arnold Hedlund; J.M. Earles

    1972-01-01

    This report tabulates information from a new forest inventory of counties in central Alabama. The tables are intended for use as source data in compiling estimates for groups of counties. Because the sampling procedure is designed primarily to furnish inventory data for the State as a whole, estimates for individual counties have limited and variable accuracy.

  12. Recovery of central Appalachian forested watershed

    Treesearch

    Mary Beth Adams; James N. Kochendenfer [sic

    2014-01-01

    The Fernow Experimental Forest (FEF) was established to conduct research in forest and watershed management in the central Appalachians. The 1868-ha FEF, located south of Parsons, West Virginia, is administered by the Northern Research Station of the USDA Forest Service and provides a valuable point of comparison with the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (CHL), located in...

  13. Restoration of a fractured central incisor.

    PubMed

    Olson, Bradley J

    2012-03-01

    The treatment of a traumatically damaged single central incisor poses significant challenges relative to function and esthetics to the restoring clinician. Providing a good long-term prognosis is paramount when determining whether to maintain or extract a structurally compromised tooth. Successful restoration demands timely and thorough risk assessment along with excellent communication with both the patient and the laboratory fabricating the restoration.

  14. Proceedings 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference

    Treesearch

    John W. Groninger; Eric J. Holzmueller; Clayton K. Nielsen; Daniel C., eds. Dey

    2014-01-01

    Proceedings from the 2014 Central Hardwood Forest Conference in Carbondale, IL. The published proceedings include 27 papers and 47 abstracts pertaining to research conducted on biofuels and bioenergy, forest biometrics, forest ecology and physiology, forest economics, forest health including invasive species, forest soils and hydrology, geographic information systems,...

  15. Best Minds Sought for Central Office, Startups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    The central office isn't being overlooked in the movement to find and develop top talent for school districts. Although ways to recruit, groom, and keep top teachers and strong principals tend to dominate discussions of "human capital" needs in education, a handful of nonprofit organizations and foundations also see providing smart managers as…

  16. 13th Central Hardwoods Forest Conference

    Treesearch

    J.W. Van Sambeek; Jeffrey O. Dawson; Felix Jr Ponder; Edward F. Loewenstein; James S. Fralish

    2003-01-01

    This conference was the 13th in a series of biennial meetings that have been hosted by numerous universities and research stations of the USDA Forest Service in the Central Hardwood forest region in the eastern United States. The purpose of the Conference has remained the same since it's inception -- that is to provide a forum for the formal and informal exchange...

  17. Proceedings, 15th central hardwood forest conference

    Treesearch

    David S. Buckley; Wayne K. Clatterbuck; [Editors

    2007-01-01

    Proceedings of the 15th central hardwood forest conference held February 27–March 1, 2006, in Knoxville, TN. Includes 86 papers and 30 posters pertaining to forest health and protection, ecology and forest dynamics, natural and artificial regeneration, forest products, wildlife, site classification, management and forest resources, mensuration and models, soil and...

  18. 12th Central Hardwood Forest Conference

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey W. Stringer; David L. Loftis; Michael Lacki; Thomas Barnes; Robert A. Muller

    1999-01-01

    There were 32 oral presentations, 11 abstracts, and 22 poster presentations presented at the 12th Central Hardwood Forest Conference. Presentation topics included wildlife management, nutrient dynamics, stand structure, reforestation/reclamation, timber harvesting, modeling and inventory, silviculture, disturbance effects, and genetics/tree improvement.

  19. 2011 floods of the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    * Do floods contribute to the transport and fate of contaminants that affect human and ecosystem health? In an effort to help address these and other questions, USGS Professional Paper 1798 consists of independent but complementary chapters dealing with various scientific aspects of the 2011 floods in the Central United States.

  20. Forest resources of west central Alabama

    Treesearch

    A.R. Spillers

    1940-01-01

    Lying west of Birmingham and north of Demopolis, West Central Alabama (Forest survey Unit Alabama No. 4) includes almost 4.5 million acres within the following 9 counties: Bibb, Fayette, Greene, Hale, Lamar, Marion, Perry, Pickens, and Tuscaloosa (map, fig. 1). This distinctly rural area includes only one incorporated city or town with a population of 2,500 people or...

  1. Genetics and diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel G

    2012-04-01

    Most of the central diabetes insipidus cases seen in general practice are acquired but the rare cases of hereditary autosomal dominant or recessive neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus have provided further cellular understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pre-hormone folding, maturation and release. Autosomal dominant central diabetes insipidus is secondary to the toxic accumulation of vasopressin mutants as fibrillar aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of hypothalamic magnocellular neurons producing vasopressin. As well, Trpv1(-/-) and Trpv4(-/-) mice have shed new light on the perception of tonicity through the stretch receptors TRPVs expressed both in central and peripheral neurons. The genomic information provided by sequencing the AVP gene is key to the routine care of these patients and, as in other genetic diseases, reduces health costs and provides psychological benefits to patients and families. In addition, simple, inexpensive blood and urine measurements together with clinical characteristics and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could distinguish between central, nephrogenic and polydipsic cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of high elevation central Appalachian wetlands

    Treesearch

    K.E. Francl; W.M. Ford; S.B. and Castleberry

    2004-01-01

    We characterized 20 high elevation wetlands in the central Appalachian Mountains in West Virginia and Maryland, in terms of vegetation, soils, hydrology, and geology. Plant species were distributed along soil chemical (pH, conductivity) and physical (organic matter depth) gradients across sites. Topography and geology appear to explain differences among these wetlands...

  3. Evolution in a centralized transfusion service.

    PubMed

    AuBuchon, James P; Linauts, Sandra; Vaughan, Mimi; Wagner, Jeffrey; Delaney, Meghan; Nester, Theresa

    2011-12-01

    The metropolitan Seattle area has utilized a centralized transfusion service model throughout the modern era of blood banking. This approach has used four laboratories to serve over 20 hospitals and clinics, providing greater capabilities for all at a lower consumption of resources than if each depended on its own laboratory and staff for these functions. In addition, this centralized model has facilitated wider use of the medical capabilities of the blood center's physicians, and a county-wide network of transfusion safety officers is now being developed to increase the impact of the blood center's transfusion expertise at the patient's bedside. Medical expectations and traffic have led the blood center to evolve the centralized model to include on-site laboratories at facilities with complex transfusion requirements (e.g., a children's hospital) and to implement in all the others a system of remote allocation. This new capability places a refrigerator stocked with uncrossmatched units in the hospital but retains control over the dispensing of these through the blood center's computer system; the correct unit can be electronically cross-matched and released on demand, obviating the need for transportation to the hospital and thus speeding transfusion. This centralized transfusion model has withstood the test of time and continues to evolve to meet new situations and ensure optimal patient care. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  4. Library and Information Networks: Centralization and Decentralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, JoAnn S.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the development of centralized library networks and the current factors that make library sharing on a smaller scale feasible. The discussion covers the need to decide the level at which library cooperation should occur and the possibility of linking via the Open System Interface Reference Model. (37 references) (CLB)

  5. Central Computational Facility CCF communications subsystem options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, K. B.

    1979-01-01

    A MITRE study which investigated the communication options available to support both the remaining Central Computational Facility (CCF) computer systems and the proposed U1108 replacements is presented. The facilities utilized to link the remote user terminals with the CCF were analyzed and guidelines to provide more efficient communications were established.

  6. Stand hazard rating for central Idaho forests

    Treesearch

    Robert Steele; Ralph E. Williams; Julie C. Weatherby; Elizabeth D. Reinhardt; James T. Hoffman; R. W. Thier

    1996-01-01

    Growing concern over sustainability of central ldaho forests has created a need to assess the health of forest stands on a relative basis. A stand hazard rating was developed as a composite of 11 individual ratings to compare the health hazards of different stands. The composite rating includes Douglas-fir beetle, mountain pine beetle, western pine beetle, spruce...

  7. Forest habitat types of central Idaho

    Treesearch

    Robert Steele; Robert D. Pfister; Russell A. Ryker; Jay A. Kittams

    1981-01-01

    A land-classification system based upon potential natural vegetation is presented for the forests of central Idaho. It is based on reconnaissance sampling of about 800 stands. A hierarchical taxonomic classification of forest sites was developed using the habitat type concept. A total of eight climax series, 64 habitat types, and 55 additional phases of habitat types...

  8. Forest statistics for North Central Georgia, 1989

    Treesearch

    Tony G. Johnson

    1989-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the sixth forest survey in North Central Georgia. Field work began in February 1989 and was completed in April 1989. Five previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1953, 1961, 1972, and 1983, provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 53 years. The primary emphasis in this report is on the changes and...

  9. Forest statistics for North Central Georgia, 1983

    Treesearch

    John B. Tansey

    1983-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the fifth forest survey of North Central Georgia. Fieldwork began in May 1982 and was completed in September 1982. Four previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1953, 1961, and 1972, provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 47 years. The primary emphasis in this report is on the changes and trends...

  10. A concise history of central venous access.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Michael V

    2011-12-01

    Central venous access has become a mainstay of modern interventional radiology practice. Its history has paralleled and enabled many current medical therapies. This short overview provides an interesting historical perspective of these increasingly common interventional procedures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The timber resources of central Washington.

    Treesearch

    James O. Howard

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the latest inventory of the timber resources of central Washington indicate there are 50.9 billion board feet of sawtimber on 4,370,000 acres of commercial forest land. Land owned or administered by public agencies accounts for 73 percent of the area and 84 percent of the sawtimber volume; farmer and miscellaneous private ownerships account for 17...

  12. Diagnostic Challenges of Central Nervous System Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Loeffler, Ann M.; Honarmand, Somayeh; Flood, Jennifer M.; Baxter, Roger; Jacobson, Susan; Alexander, Rick; Glaser, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system tuberculosis (TB) was identified in 20 cases of unexplained encephalitis referred to the California Encephalitis Project. Atypical features (encephalitic symptoms, rapid onset, age) and diagnostic challenges (insensitive cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] TB PCR result, elevated CSF glucose levels in patients with diabetes, negative result for tuberculin skin test) complicated diagnosis. PMID:18760024

  13. Genetics Home Reference: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... M, Stevens CA, Berry-Kravis EM, Weese-Mayer DE. PHOX2B mutation-confirmed congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: presentation ... on PubMed Axelrod FB, Chelimsky GG, Weese-Mayer DE. Pediatric autonomic disorders. Pediatrics. 2006 Jul;118(1): ...

  14. Oak Regeneration Guidelines for the Central Appalachians

    Treesearch

    Kim C. Steiner; James C. Finley; Peter J. Gould; Songlin Fei; Marc McDill

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the first explicit guidelines for regenerating oaks in the central Appalachians. The objectives of this paper are (1) to describe the research foundation on which the guidelines are based and (2) to provide users with the instructions, data collection forms, supplementary tables, and decision charts needed to apply the guidelines in the field. The...

  15. The Central Purpose of American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Policies Commission, Washington, DC.

    Seen throughout all the goals of education (the development of individuality, self-realization, human relationships, economic efficiency, and civic responsibility), the central purpose of education today is the development of rational powers to create the freedom of mind necessary for dealing with traditional tasks as well as with recent changes.…

  16. Central State University: Phase I Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In December of 2011, a team of eight consultants authored a report to the Ohio Board of Regents and Central State University titled "Accentuating Strengths/Accelerating Progress (AS/AP)." AS/AP provided a road map for the administration, faculty, and staff of CSU to achieve the excellence it has sought under the leadership of President…

  17. Forest statistics for Central Florida - 1980

    Treesearch

    Raymond M. Sheffield

    1981-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the fifth forest survey of Central Florida. Fieldwork began in December 1979 and was completed in March 1980. Four previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1949, 1959, and 1970, provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 44 years. The primary emphasis in this report is on the changes and trends since...

  18. Forest statistics for Central Florida - 1988

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Brown

    1988-01-01

    This report highlights the principal findings of the sixth forest survey of Central Florida. Field work began in July 1987 and was completed in September 1987. Five previous surveys, completed in 1936, 1949, 1959, 1970, and 1980, provide statistics for measuring changes and trends over the past 52 years. The primary emphasis in this report is on the changes and trends...

  19. Forest statistics for Central Georgia, 1989

    Treesearch

    Michael T. Thompson

    1989-01-01

    Since 1982, area of timberland in Central Georgia has increased 2.5 percent and now totals 7.2 million acres. Nonindustrial private owners control 68 percent of the region's timberland. The annual rate of stand regeneration more than doubled and averaged more than 217,000 acres each year. Number of live 2-inch softwood trees increased 17 percent. Volume of...

  20. Centralized waste treatment of industrial wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzberg, E.R.; Cushnie, G.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Centralized waste treatment (CWT) for industrial wastewater is described in this book. With the CWT approach, industrial firms send their wastes to a common processing plant. The book addresses the engineering and business-related problems that are encountered by private CWT firms, local governments, and industry in creating sufficient CWT capacity to meet the growing demand for CWT services.

  1. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Testing the Predictions of the Central Capacity Sharing Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tombu, Michael; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The divergent predictions of 2 models of dual-task performance are investigated. The central bottleneck and central capacity sharing models argue that a central stage of information processing is capacity limited, whereas stages before and after are capacity free. The models disagree about the nature of this central capacity limitation. The…

  3. 48 CFR 52.204-7 - Central Contractor Registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Central Contractor....204-7 Central Contractor Registration. As prescribed in 4.1105, use the following clause: Central Contractor Registration (APR 2008) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause— Central Contractor Registration...

  4. Central diabetes insipidus, central hypothyroidism, renal tubular acidosis and dandy-walker syndrome: new associations.

    PubMed

    Alafif, M M; Aljaid, S S; Al-Agha, A E

    2015-01-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a rare brain malformation involving the cerebellum, and the fluid filled spaces around it, usually detected during the antenatal period or the early infancy. Clinically, it is characterized by mental retardation, developmental delay as well as cerebellar ataxia. It has been frequently associated with other conditions such as congenital heart diseases, primary hypothyroidism, and other disorders of the central nervous, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and orthopedic systems. In this report, we describe a 3-month-old Saudi boy with the rare association of DWS with central diabetes insipidus, congenital central hypothyroidism, and type-2 renal tubular acidosis.

  5. Central Diabetes Insipidus, Central Hypothyroidism, Renal Tubular Acidosis and Dandy-Walker Syndrome: New Associations

    PubMed Central

    Alafif, MM; Aljaid, SS; Al-Agha, AE

    2015-01-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a rare brain malformation involving the cerebellum, and the fluid filled spaces around it, usually detected during the antenatal period or the early infancy. Clinically, it is characterized by mental retardation, developmental delay as well as cerebellar ataxia. It has been frequently associated with other conditions such as congenital heart diseases, primary hypothyroidism, and other disorders of the central nervous, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and orthopedic systems. In this report, we describe a 3-month-old Saudi boy with the rare association of DWS with central diabetes insipidus, congenital central hypothyroidism, and type-2 renal tubular acidosis. PMID:25861538

  6. HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN TB

    2011-01-14

    Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of themore » River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were

  7. Improving the accuracy of central difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli

    1988-01-01

    General difference approximations to the fluid dynamic equations require an artificial viscosity in order to converge to a steady state. This artificial viscosity serves two purposes. One is to suppress high frequency noise which is not damped by the central differences. The second purpose is to introduce an entropy-like condition so that shocks can be captured. These viscosities need a coefficient to measure the amount of viscosity to be added. In the standard scheme, a scalar coefficient is used based on the spectral radius of the Jacobian of the convective flux. However, this can add too much viscosity to the slower waves. Hence, it is suggested that a matrix viscosity be used. This gives an appropriate viscosity for each wave component. With this matrix valued coefficient, the central difference scheme becomes closer to upwind biased methods.

  8. Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng

    2011-04-29

    Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity,more » and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.« less

  9. Central hyperadrenergic state after lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Ahlskog, J Eric; Singer, Wolfgang; Gelfman, Russell; Sheldon, Seth H; Seime, Richard J; Craft, Jennifer M; Staab, Jeffrey P; Kantor, Birgit; Low, Phillip A

    2013-08-01

    To describe and review autonomic complications of lightning strike. Case report and laboratory data including autonomic function tests in a subject who was struck by lightning. A 24-year-old man was struck by lightning. Following that, he developed dysautonomia, with persistent inappropriate sinus tachycardia and autonomic storms, as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and functional neurologic problems. The combination of persistent sinus tachycardia and episodic exacerbations associated with hypertension, diaphoresis, and agitation was highly suggestive of a central hyperadrenergic state with superimposed autonomic storms. Whether the additional PTSD and functional neurologic deficits were due to a direct effect of the lightning strike on the central nervous system or a secondary response is open to speculation.

  10. Central masking with bilateral cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Payton; Lu, Thomas; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2013-01-01

    Across bilateral cochlear implants, contralateral threshold shift has been investigated as a function of electrode difference between the masking and probe electrodes. For contralateral electric masking, maximum threshold elevations occurred when the position of the masker and probe electrode was approximately place-matched across ears. The amount of masking diminished with increasing masker-probe electrode separation. Place-dependent masking occurred in both sequentially implanted ears, and was not affected by the masker intensity or the time delay from the masker onset. When compared to previous contralateral masking results in normal hearing, the similarities between place-dependent central masking patterns suggest comparable mechanisms of overlapping excitation in the central auditory nervous system. PMID:23363113

  11. Centralization vs. decentralization in medical school libraries.

    PubMed

    Crawford, H

    1966-07-01

    Does the medical school library in the United States operate more commonly under the university library or the medical school administration? University-connected medical school libraries were asked to indicate (a) the source of their budgets, whether from the central library or the medical school, and (b) the responsibility for their acquisitions and cataloging. Returns received from sixtyeight of the seventy eligible institutions showed decentralization to be much the most common: 71 percent of the libraries are funded by their medical schools; 79 percent are responsible for their own acquisitions and processing. The factor most often associated with centralization of both budget and operation is public ownership. Decentralization is associated with service to one or two rather than three or more professional schools. Location of the medical school in a different city from the university is highly favorable to autonomy. Other factors associated with these trends are discussed.

  12. Centralization vs. Decentralization in Medical School Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Helen

    1966-01-01

    Does the medical school library in the United States operate more commonly under the university library or the medical school administration? University-connected medical school libraries were asked to indicate (a) the source of their budgets, whether from the central library or the medical school, and (b) the responsibility for their acquisitions and cataloging. Returns received from sixtyeight of the seventy eligible institutions showed decentralization to be much the most common: 71 percent of the libraries are funded by their medical schools; 79 percent are responsible for their own acquisitions and processing. The factor most often associated with centralization of both budget and operation is public ownership. Decentralization is associated with service to one or two rather than three or more professional schools. Location of the medical school in a different city from the university is highly favorable to autonomy. Other factors associated with these trends are discussed. PMID:5945568

  13. Central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Andrei S; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2016-02-02

    High-level neurons processing complex, behaviorally relevant signals are sensitive to conjunctions of features. Characterizing the receptive fields of such neurons is difficult with standard statistical tools, however, and the principles governing their organization remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate multiple distinct receptive-field features in individual high-level auditory neurons in a songbird, European starling, in response to natural vocal signals (songs). We then show that receptive fields with similar characteristics can be reproduced by an unsupervised neural network trained to represent starling songs with a single learning rule that enforces sparseness and divisive normalization. We conclude that central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields that can arise through a combination of sparseness and normalization in neural circuits. Our results, along with descriptions of random, discontinuous receptive fields in the central olfactory neurons in mammals and insects, suggest general principles of neural computation across sensory systems and animal classes.

  14. Iowa Central Quality Fuel Testing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Heach, Don; Bidieman, Julaine

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this project is to finalize the creation of an independent quality fuel testing laboratory on the campus of Iowa Central Community College in Fort Dodge, Iowa that shall provide the exploding biofuels industry a timely and cost-effective centrally located laboratory to complete all state and federal fuel and related tests that are required. The recipient shall work with various state regulatory agencies, biofuel companies and state and national industry associations to ensure that training and testing needs of their members and American consumers are met. The recipient shall work with the Iowa Department of Ag and Landmore » Stewardship on the development of an Iowa Biofuel Quality Standard along with the Development of a standard that can be used throughout industry.« less

  15. Hyperopic photorefractive keratectomy and central islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, Pier Giorgio; Carones, Francesco; Morico, Alessandro; Vigo, Luca; Brancato, Rosario

    1998-06-01

    We have evaluated the refractive evolution in patients treated with yhyperopic PRK to assess the extent of the initial overcorrection and the time constant of regression. To this end, the time history of the refractive error (i.e. the difference between achieved and intended refractive correction) has been fitted by means of an exponential statistical model, giving information characterizing the surgical procedure with a direct clinical meaning. Both hyperopic and myopic PRk procedures have been analyzed by this method. The analysis of the fitting model parameters shows that hyperopic PRK patients exhibit a definitely higher initial overcorrection than myopic ones, and a regression time constant which is much longer. A common mechanism is proposed to be responsible for the refractive outcomes in hyperopic treatments and in myopic patients exhibiting significant central islands. The interpretation is in terms of superhydration of the central cornea, and is based on a simple physical model evaluating the amount of centripetal compression in the apical cornea.

  16. Imaging the fetal central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    De Keersmaecker, B.; Claus, F.; De Catte, L.

    2011-01-01

    The low prevalence of fetal central nervous system anomalies results in a restricted level of exposure and limited experience for most of the obstetricians involved in prenatal ultrasound. Sonographic guidelines for screening the fetal brain in a systematic way will probably increase the detection rate and enhance a correct referral to a tertiary care center, offering the patient a multidisciplinary approach of the condition. This paper aims to elaborate on prenatal sonographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis and outcome of various central nervous system malformations. Detailed neurosonographic investigation has become available through high resolution vaginal ultrasound probes and the development of a variety of 3D ultrasound modalities e.g. ultrasound tomographic imaging. In addition, fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the detection of gyration and neurulation anomalies and disorders of the gray and white matter. PMID:24753859

  17. Does the central dogma still stand?

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-08-23

    Prions are agents of analog, protein conformation-based inheritance that can confer beneficial phenotypes to cells, especially under stress. Combined with genetic variation, prion-mediated inheritance can be channeled into prion-independent genomic inheritance. Latest screening shows that prions are common, at least in fungi. Thus, there is non-negligible flow of information from proteins to the genome in modern cells, in a direct violation of the Central Dogma of molecular biology. The prion-mediated heredity that violates the Central Dogma appears to be a specific, most radical manifestation of the widespread assimilation of protein (epigenetic) variation into genetic variation. The epigenetic variation precedes and facilitates genetic adaptation through a general 'look-ahead effect' of phenotypic mutations. This direction of the information flow is likely to be one of the important routes of environment-genome interaction and could substantially contribute to the evolution of complex adaptive traits.

  18. Gravitational Study of the Central Nervous System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments conducted at 1G are discussed with reference to the role of calcium ions in information processing by the central nervous system. A technique is described which allows thin sections of a mammalian hippocampus to be isolated while maintaining neural activity. Two experiments carried out in hypergravic fields are also addressed; one investigating altered stimulation in the auditory system, the other determining temperature regulation responses in hypergravic fields.

  19. Pathogenesis of Central and Complex Sleep Apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Jeremy E.; Malhotra, Atul; Sands, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Central sleep apnoea (CSA)—the temporary absence or diminution of ventilator effort during sleep—is seen in a variety of forms including periodic breathing in infancy and healthy adults at altitude and Cheyne-Stokes respiration in heart failure. In most circumstances, the cyclic absence of effort is paradoxically a consequence of hypersensitive ventilatory chemoreflex responses to oppose changes in airflow, i.e. elevated loop gain, leading to overshoot/undershoot ventilatory oscillations. Considerable evidence illustrates overlap between CSA and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), including elevated loop gain in patients with OSA and the presence of pharyngeal narrowing during central apnoeas. Indeed, treatment of OSA, whether via CPAP, tracheostomy, or oral appliances, can reveal CSA, an occurrence referred to as complex sleep apnoea. Factors influencing loop gain include increased chemosensitivity (increased controller gain), reduced damping of blood gas levels (increased plant gain) and increased lung to chemoreceptor circulatory delay. Sleep-wake transitions and pharyngeal dilator muscle responses effectively raise the controller gain and therefore also contribute to total loop gain and overall instability. In some circumstances, for example apnoea of infancy and central congenital hypoventilation syndrome, central apnoeas are the consequence of ventilatory depression and defective ventilatory responses, i.e. low loop gain. The efficacy of available treatments for CSA can be explained in terms of their effects on loop gain, e.g. CPAP improves lung volume (plant gain), stimulants reduce the alveolar-inspired PCO2 difference, supplemental oxygen lowers chemosensitivity. Understanding the magnitude of loop gain and the mechanisms contributing to instability may facilitate personalised interventions for CSA. PMID:27797160

  20. Pathogenesis of central and complex sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Orr, Jeremy E; Malhotra, Atul; Sands, Scott A

    2017-01-01

    Central sleep apnoea (CSA) - the temporary absence or diminution of ventilatory effort during sleep - is seen in a variety of forms including periodic breathing in infancy and healthy adults at altitude and Cheyne-Stokes respiration in heart failure. In most circumstances, the cyclic absence of effort is paradoxically a consequence of hypersensitive ventilatory chemoreflex responses to oppose changes in airflow, that is elevated loop gain, leading to overshoot/undershoot ventilatory oscillations. Considerable evidence illustrates overlap between CSA and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), including elevated loop gain in patients with OSA and the presence of pharyngeal narrowing during central apnoeas. Indeed, treatment of OSA, whether via continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), tracheostomy or oral appliances, can reveal CSA, an occurrence referred to as complex sleep apnoea. Factors influencing loop gain include increased chemosensitivity (increased controller gain), reduced damping of blood gas levels (increased plant gain) and increased lung to chemoreceptor circulatory delay. Sleep-wake transitions and pharyngeal dilator muscle responses effectively raise the controller gain and therefore also contribute to total loop gain and overall instability. In some circumstances, for example apnoea of infancy and central congenital hypoventilation syndrome, central apnoeas are the consequence of ventilatory depression and defective ventilatory responses, that is low loop gain. The efficacy of available treatments for CSA can be explained in terms of their effects on loop gain, for example CPAP improves lung volume (plant gain), stimulants reduce the alveolar-inspired PCO 2 difference and supplemental oxygen lowers chemosensitivity. Understanding the magnitude of loop gain and the mechanisms contributing to instability may facilitate personalized interventions for CSA. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  1. Incremental Centrality Algorithms for Dynamic Network Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    encouragement he gave me to complete my degree. Last but not least, I would like to thank CASOS members for insightful discussions and feedback they gave me at...Systems ( CASOS ) under the Institute for Software Research within the School of Computer Science (SCS) at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Financial...discusses several ways of generalizing betweenness 23 centrality including scaling of values with respect to length, inclusion of end-points in the

  2. Forest statistics for Central Florida - 1970

    Treesearch

    Nolan L. Snyder; Herbert A. Knight

    1970-01-01

    Since 1959, area of commercial forest in Central Florida has declined from 3.2 to 2.7 million acres, or 16 percent, excluding the reclassification of 1.7 million acres from non-stocked forest to natural rangeland. Some 589,400 acres were actually diverted from commercial forest to other land uses, while only 56,400 acres of new forest were added. Volume of softwood...

  3. Government Venture Capital: Centralized or Decentralized Execution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU NSN 7540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18 ii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT...and Public Policy iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v GOVERNMENT VENTURE CAPITAL: CENTRALIZED OR DECENTRALIZED EXECUTION? ABSTRACT

  4. CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTION DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Zunt, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is susceptible to bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. Suppression of the immune system by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation increases susceptibility to CNS infection and modifies the presentation, diagnosis, and recommended treatment of various CNS infections. This chapter discusses how suppression of the host immune status modifies the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of selected CNS infections. PMID:11754299

  5. Exercise, Stress Resistance, and Central Serotonergic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Fleshner, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary exercise reduces the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders in humans and prevents serotonin-dependent behavioral consequences of stress in rodents. Evidence reviewed herein is consistent with the hypothesis that exercise increases stress resistance by producing neuroplasticity at multiple sites of the central serotonergic system, which all help to limit the behavioral impact of acute increases in serotonin during stressor exposure. PMID:21508844

  6. Growing Magnetic Fields in Central Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, C. G.; Page, D.

    2011-10-01

    We study the effects of growth models of magnetic fields in Central Compact Objects (CCOs). Such a field evolution is not a new idea (Blandford, Applegate, & Hernquist 1983) but the evolutionary implications not have been followed up completely (Michel 1994). We discussed the new class of neutron stars which belong to five main types that have mainly been recognized in the last ten years. The possibility that a rapid weakly magnetized pulsar might have formed in SN1987A is commented.

  7. Pbx3 Deficiency Results in Central Hypoventilation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Joon Whan; Arata, Akiko; Selleri, Licia; Jacobs, Yakop; Arata, Satoru; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Cleary, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Pbx proteins comprise a family of TALE (three amino acid loop extension) class homeodomain transcription factors that are implicated in developmental gene expression through their abilities to form hetero-oligomeric DNA-binding complexes and function as transcriptional regulators in numerous cell types. We demonstrate here that one member of this family, Pbx3, is expressed at high levels predominantly in the developing central nervous system, including a region of the medulla oblongata that is implicated in the control of respiration. Pbx3-deficient mice develop to term but die within a few hours of birth from central respiratory failure due to abnormal activity of inspiratory neurons in the medulla. This partially phenocopies the defect in mice deficient for Rnx, a metaHox homeodomain transcription factor, that we demonstrate here is capable of forming a DNA-binding complex with Pbx3. Rnx expression is unperturbed in Pbx3-deficient mice, but its ability to enhance transcription in vitro as a complex with TALE proteins is compromised in the absence of Pbx3. Thus, Pbx3 is essential for respiration and, like its DNA-binding partner Rnx, is critical for proper development of medullary respiratory control mechanisms. Pbx3-deficient mice provide a model for congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and suggest that Pbx3 mutations may promote the pathogenesis of this disorder. PMID:15466398

  8. Health, vital goals, and central human capabilities.

    PubMed

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-06-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or 'central human capabilities and functionings'. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings-or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Magnitude scale for the Central American tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatori, Tokutaro

    1995-09-01

    Based on the tsunami data in the Central American region, the regional characteristic of tsunami magnitude scales is discussed in relation to earthquake magnitudes during the period from 1900 to 1993. Tsunami magnitudes on the Imamura-Iida scale of the 1985 Mexico and 1992 Nicaragua tsunamis are determined to be m=2.5, judging from the tsunami height-distance diagram. The magnitude values of the Central American tsunamis are relatively small compared to earthquakes with similar size in other regions. However, there are a few large tsunamis generated by low-frequency earthquakes such as the 1992 Nicaragua earthquake. Inundation heights of these unusual tsunamis are about 10 times higher than those of normal tsunamis for the same earthquake magnitude ( M s =6.9 7.2). The Central American tsunamis having magnitude m>1 have been observed by the Japanese tide stations, but the effect of directivity toward Japan is very small compared to that of the South American tsunamis.

  10. The central uplift of Ritchey crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ning; Bray, Veronica J.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Mattson, Sarah S.; Okubo, Chris H.; Chojnacki, Matthew; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2015-05-01

    Ritchey crater is a ∼79 km diameter complex crater near the boundary between Hesperian ridged plains and Noachian highland terrain on Mars (28.8°S, 309.0°E) that formed after the Noachian. High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images of the central peak reveal fractured massive bedrock and megabreccia with large clasts. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectral analysis reveals low calcium pyroxene (LCP), olivine (OL), hydrated silicates (phyllosilicates) and a possible identification of plagioclase bedrock. We mapped the Ritchey crater central uplift into ten units, with 4 main groups from oldest and originally deepest to youngest: (1) megabreccia with large clasts rich in LCP and OL, and with alteration to phyllosilicates; (2) massive bedrock with bright and dark regions rich in LCP or OL, respectively; (3) LCP and OL-rich impactites draped over the central uplift; and (4) aeolian deposits. We interpret the primitive martian crust as igneous rocks rich in LCP, OL, and probably plagioclase, as previously observed in eastern Valles Marineris. We do not observe high-calcium pyroxene (HCP) rich bedrock as seen in Argyre or western Valles Marineris. The association of phyllosilicates with deep megabreccia could be from impact-induced alteration, either as a result of the Richey impact, or alteration of pre-existing impactites from Argyre basin and other large impacts that preceded the Ritchey impact, or both.

  11. HEALTH, VITAL GOALS, AND CENTRAL HUMAN CAPABILITIES

    PubMed Central

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or ‘central human capabilities and functionings’. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings—or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings. PMID:22420910

  12. Plants and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Carlini, E A

    2003-06-01

    This review article draws the attention to the many species of plants possessing activity on the central nervous system (CNS). In fact, they cover the whole spectrum of central activity such as psychoanaleptic, psycholeptic and psychodysleptic effects, and several of these plants are currently used in therapeutics to treat human ailments. Among the psychoanaleptic (stimulant) plants, those utilized by human beings to reduce body weight [Ephedra spp. (Ma Huang), Paullinia spp. (guaraná), Catha edulis Forssk. (khat)] and plants used to improve general health conditions (plant adaptogens) were scrutinized. Many species of hallucinogenic (psychodysleptic) plants are used by humans throughout the world to achieve states of mind distortions; among those, a few have been used for therapeutic purposes, such as Cannabis sativa L., Tabernanthe iboga Baill. and the mixture of Psychotria viridis Ruiz and Pav. and Banisteriopsis caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) C.V. Morton. Plants showing central psycholeptic activities, such as analgesic or anxiolytic actions (Passiflora incarnata L., Valeriana spp. and Piper methysticum G. Forst.), were also analysed.Finally, the use of crude or semipurified extracts of such plants instead of the active substances seemingly responsible for their therapeutic effect is discussed.

  13. Recent landscape change in California's Central Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulard, C. E.; Wilson, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    Long term monitoring of land use and land cover in California's intensively farmed Central Valley reveals several key physical and socioeconomic factors driving landscape change. As part of the USGS Land Cover Trends Project, we analyzed modern land-use/land-cover change for the California Central Valley ecoregion between 2000 and 2010, monitoring annual change between 2005 and 2010, while creating two new change intervals (2000-2005 and 2005-2010) to update the existing 27-year, interval-based analysis. Between 2000 and 2010, agricultural lands fluctuated due to changes in water allocations and emerging drought conditions, or were lost permanently to development (240 square km). Land-use pressure from agriculture and development also led to a decline in grasslands and shrublands across the region (280 square km). Overall, 400 square km of new developed lands were added in the first decade of the 21st century. From 2007 to 2010, development only expanded by 50 square km, coinciding with defaults in the banking system, the onset of historic foreclosure crisis in California and the global economic downturn. Our annual LULC change estimates capture landscape-level change in response to regional policy changes, climate, and fluctuations (e.g., growth or decline) in the national and global economy. The resulting change data provide insights into the drivers of landscape change in the California Central Valley and the combination of two consistent mapping efforts represents the first continuous, 37-year endeavor of its kind.

  14. Central and peripheral control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, M M I

    2017-01-01

    The maintenance of the body weight at a stable level is a major determinant in keeping the higher animals and mammals survive. Th e body weight depends on the balance between the energy intake and energy expenditure. Increased food intake over the energy expenditure of prolonged time period results in an obesity. Th e obesity has become an important worldwide health problem, even at low levels. The obesity has an evil effect on the health and is associated with a shorter life expectancy. A complex of central and peripheral physiological signals is involved in the control of the food intake. Centrally, the food intake is controlled by the hypothalamus, the brainstem, and endocannabinoids and peripherally by the satiety and adiposity signals. Comprehension of the signals that control food intake and energy balance may open a new therapeutic approaches directed against the obesity and its associated complications, as is the insulin resistance and others. In conclusion, the present review summarizes the current knowledge about the complex system of the peripheral and central regulatory mechanisms of food intake and their potential therapeutic implications in the treatment of obesity.

  15. The central uplift of Ritchey crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ding, Ning; Bray, Veronica J.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Mattson, Sarah S.; Okubo, Chris H.; Chojnacki, Matthew; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2015-01-01

    Ritchey crater is a ∼79 km diameter complex crater near the boundary between Hesperian ridged plains and Noachian highland terrain on Mars (28.8°S, 309.0°E) that formed after the Noachian. High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images of the central peak reveal fractured massive bedrock and megabreccia with large clasts. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectral analysis reveals low calcium pyroxene (LCP), olivine (OL), hydrated silicates (phyllosilicates) and a possible identification of plagioclase bedrock. We mapped the Ritchey crater central uplift into ten units, with 4 main groups from oldest and originally deepest to youngest: (1) megabreccia with large clasts rich in LCP and OL, and with alteration to phyllosilicates; (2) massive bedrock with bright and dark regions rich in LCP or OL, respectively; (3) LCP and OL-rich impactites draped over the central uplift; and (4) aeolian deposits. We interpret the primitive martian crust as igneous rocks rich in LCP, OL, and probably plagioclase, as previously observed in eastern Valles Marineris. We do not observe high-calcium pyroxene (HCP) rich bedrock as seen in Argyre or western Valles Marineris. The association of phyllosilicates with deep megabreccia could be from impact-induced alteration, either as a result of the Richey impact, or alteration of pre-existing impactites from Argyre basin and other large impacts that preceded the Ritchey impact, or both.

  16. Temporal node centrality in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoungshick; Anderson, Ross

    2012-02-01

    Many networks are dynamic in that their topology changes rapidly—on the same time scale as the communications of interest between network nodes. Examples are the human contact networks involved in the transmission of disease, ad hoc radio networks between moving vehicles, and the transactions between principals in a market. While we have good models of static networks, so far these have been lacking for the dynamic case. In this paper we present a simple but powerful model, the time-ordered graph, which reduces a dynamic network to a static network with directed flows. This enables us to extend network properties such as vertex degree, closeness, and betweenness centrality metrics in a very natural way to the dynamic case. We then demonstrate how our model applies to a number of interesting edge cases, such as where the network connectivity depends on a small number of highly mobile vertices or edges, and show that our centrality definition allows us to track the evolution of connectivity. Finally we apply our model and techniques to two real-world dynamic graphs of human contact networks and then discuss the implication of temporal centrality metrics in the real world.

  17. Augmented Central Pain Processing in Vulvodynia

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Johnson P.; Reed, Barbara D.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Bhavsar, Rupal; Gracely, Richard H.; Haefner, Hope K.; Harris, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Vulvodynia (VVD) is a chronic pain disorder, wherein women display sensitivity to evoked stimuli at the vulva and/or spontaneous vulvar pain. Our previous work suggests generalized hyperalgesia in this population, however little is known about central neurobiological factors that may influence pain in VVD. Here we investigated local (vulvar) and remote (thumb) pressure evoked pain processing in 24 VVD patients compared to 13 age-matched, pain-free healthy controls (HC). As a positive control we also examined thumb pressure pain in 24 fibromyalgia (FM) patients. The VVD and FM patients displayed overlapping insular brain activations that were greater than HC, in response to thumb stimulation (P<0.005 corrected). Compared to HC, VVD participants displayed greater levels of activation during thumb stimulation within the insula, dorsal mid-cingulate, posterior cingulate and thalamus (P<0.005 corrected). Significant differences between VVD subgroups (primary versus secondary and provoked versus unprovoked) were seen within the posterior cingulate with thumb stimulation, and within the precuneus region with vulvar stimulation (provoked versus unprovoked only). The augmented brain activation in VVD patients in response to a stimulus remote from the vulva suggests central neural pathology in this disorder. Moreover, differing central activity between VVD subgroups suggests heterogeneous pathologies within this diagnosis. PMID:23578957

  18. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer in central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkle, D.L.; Christenson, S.C.; Rea, Alan

    1997-01-01

    ARC/INFO export files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Cleveland, Lincoln, Logan, Oklahoma, Payne, and Pottawatomie Counties. The Central Oklahoma aquifer includes the alluvial and terrace deposits along major streams, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. The Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits consist of unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The Permian-age Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations consist of sandstone with interbedded siltstone and mudstone. The Permian-age Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups consist of sandstone, shale, and thin limestone. The Central Oklahoma aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma where the aquifer is used extensively for municipal, industrial, commercial, and domestic water supplies. Most of the usable ground water within the aquifer is from the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations. Substantial quantities of usable ground water also are present in the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups, and in alluvial and terrace deposits associated with the major streams. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity and recharge values, and ground-water level elevation contours are from previously published reports.

  19. Optical quality in central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungmin; Sohn, Joonhong; Choi, Jong Gil; Chung, Sung Kun

    2014-12-02

    To assess optical quality and intraocular scattering using the Optical Quality Analysis System (OQAS) in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) and to determine the effects of retinal changes on optical quality. This was a prospective, case-control study. Participants were 29 patients with diagnosis of CSC. The control group consisted of the patients' unaffected eyes. Initial logMAR visual acuity, central macular thickness (by spectral domain optical coherence tomography), and optical quality parameters including modulation transfer function (MTF) cutoff frequency, Strehl (2-dimensional) ratio, and OQAS values at 100%, 20%, and 9% contrast levels were investigated. Objective scattering index (OSI) at 4.0-mm pupil size was assessed in both eyes by using the OQAS. After 3 months of treatment, which included observation and focal laser or injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor, every CSC-affected eye was followed. Main outcome measures were differences between clinical parameters of the CSC-affected eye and those of the control eye and changes in those parameters according to the clinical course of CSC over 3 months. In CSC-affected eyes, the MTF cutoff was significantly reduced (P = 0.01), and OSI was significantly increased (P = 0.03). As macular thickness decreased, OSI decreased but did not become normalized compared to the control eye, nor was it statistically significantly correlated with central macular thickness change. Retinal change affected optical quality and intraocular scatter. Therefore, when the severity of a cataract is assessed using the OQAS, retinal status should be considered when interpreting OQAS values. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  20. Local Data Integration in East Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Manobianco, John T.

    1999-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit has configured a Local Data Integration System (LDIS) for east central Florida which assimilates in-situ and remotely-sensed observational data into a series of high-resolution gridded analyses. The ultimate goal for running LDIS is to generate products that may enhance weather nowcasts and short-range (less than 6 h) forecasts issued in support of the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the Melbourne National Weather Service (NWS MLB) operational requirements. LDIS has the potential to provide added value for nowcasts and short-ten-n forecasts for two reasons. First, it incorporates all data operationally available in east central Florida. Second, it is run at finer spatial and temporal resolutions than current national-scale operational models such as the Rapid Update Cycle and Eta models. LDIS combines all available data to produce grid analyses of primary variables (wind, temperature, etc.) at specified temporal and spatial resolutions. These analyses of primary variables can be used to compute diagnostic quantities such as vorticity and divergence. This paper demonstrates the utility of LDIS over east central Florida for a warm season case study. The evolution of a significant thunderstorm outflow boundary is depicted through horizontal and vertical cross section plots of wind speed, divergence, and circulation. In combination with a suitable visualization too], LDIS may provide users with a more complete and comprehensive understanding of evolving mesoscale weather than could be developed by individually examining the disparate data sets over the same area and time.

  1. Central Atlantic regional ecological test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The work of the Central Atlantic Regional Ecological Test Site (CARETS) project is discussed. The primary aim of CARETS is to test the hypothesis that data from ERTS-A can be made an integral part of a regional land resources information system, encompassing both inventory of the resource base and monitoring of changes, along with their effects on the quality of the environment. Another objective of the project is to determine scaling factors for developing land use information and regional analysis for regions of any given size.

  2. [Medical specialization in Chile. A centralized vision].

    PubMed

    Clouet-Huerta, Diego E; González, Bárbara; Correa, Katherine

    2017-11-01

    Medical graduates face different postgraduate training options, but their priority is to obtain a primary medical specialty, defined as a specialty that does not derive from other. There are different specialty training programs in Chile, which can be dependent or independent of the Ministry of Health. The information about these programs is available in different Internet sites. However a centralized information service that groups and synthetize these programs is lacking, hampering graduate choice decisions. This article aims to review all specialization program modalities, providing a general vision of the institutional structure and implications that govern the specialization process in Chile.

  3. Fires and Smoke in Central Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This year's fire season in central Africa may have been the most severe ever. This true-color image also shows the location of fires (red dots) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Angola, and Zambia. The image was taken by the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA 's Terra spacecraft on August 23, 2000, and was produced using the MODIS Active Fire Detection product. NASA scientists studied these fires during the SAFARI 2000 field campaign. Image By Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Team

  4. Central and North Gulf Coast, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In this view of the central and north Gulf Coast of Texas (30.0N, 96.0W), San Antonio Bay, Matagorda Bay and Galveston/Trinity Bay are clearly seen though small sediment plumes at the tidal passes are visible. The large field patterns of irrigated agriculture highlights an ancient deltaic plain formed by the Colorado and Brazos Rivers. Many manmade lakes and reservoirs, as far west as Lake Belton and Lake Waco and as far east as Toledo Bend are visible.

  5. Central neurocytoma presenting with gigantism: case report.

    PubMed

    Araki, Y; Sakai, N; Andoh, T; Yoshimura, S; Yamada, H

    1992-08-01

    We report a case of central neurocytoma presenting with gigantism. The patient was a 19-year-old man with a 2-year history of rapid growth. Computed tomography revealed a round, slightly enhancing calcified tumor in the septal region. This lesion was resected, and postoperative radiotherapy was given. The preoperative serum growth hormone level was 20.7 ng/mL, and postoperatively this fell to 0.9 ng/mL. Pituitary dysfunction was not noted either before or after the operation. A low level of production of growth hormone releasing factor was detected when tumor cells obtained during surgery were cultured.

  6. Fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    van der Schee, Wilke; Romatschke, Paul; Pratt, Scott

    2013-11-27

    We present a fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions around midrapidity at LHC energies. Unlike previous treatments, we simulate all phases of the collision, including the equilibration of the system. For the simulation, we use numerical relativity solutions to anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory for the preequilibrium stage, viscous hydrodynamics for the plasma equilibrium stage, and kinetic theory for the low-density hadronic stage. Our preequilibrium stage provides initial conditions for hydrodynamics, resulting in sizable radial flow. The resulting light particle spectra reproduce the measurements from the ALICE experiment at all transverse momenta.

  7. Surgical treatment of central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Berker, Nilufer; Batman, Cosar

    2008-05-01

    The treatment of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is still a subject of debate. Medical therapy efforts, as well as retinal laser photocoagulation, have mostly dealt with management of the sequelae of CRVO, and have shown limited success in improving visual acuity. The unsatisfactory results of such therapeutic efforts led to the development of new treatment strategies focused on the surgical treatment of the occluded retinal vein. The purpose of this review is to summarize the outcomes of commonly reported surgical treatment strategies and to review different opinions on the various surgical approaches to the treatment of CRVO.

  8. Central limit theorems under special relativity

    PubMed Central

    McKeague, Ian W.

    2015-01-01

    Several relativistic extensions of the Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution have been proposed, but they do not explain observed lognormal tail-behavior in the flux distribution of various astrophysical sources. Motivated by this question, extensions of classical central limit theorems are developed under the conditions of special relativity. The results are related to CLTs on locally compact Lie groups developed by Wehn, Stroock and Varadhan, but in this special case the asymptotic distribution has an explicit form that is readily seen to exhibit lognormal tail behavior. PMID:25798020

  9. Central limit theorems under special relativity.

    PubMed

    McKeague, Ian W

    2015-04-01

    Several relativistic extensions of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution have been proposed, but they do not explain observed lognormal tail-behavior in the flux distribution of various astrophysical sources. Motivated by this question, extensions of classical central limit theorems are developed under the conditions of special relativity. The results are related to CLTs on locally compact Lie groups developed by Wehn, Stroock and Varadhan, but in this special case the asymptotic distribution has an explicit form that is readily seen to exhibit lognormal tail behavior.

  10. Radionuclides at Descartes in the central highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Throium, uranium, potassium, aluminium-26, and sodium-22 were measured by nondestructive gamma ray spectrometry in six soil and two rock samples gathered by Apollo 16 in the lunar central highlands. The soil samples probably include both major geologic formations in the vicinity, the Cayley and Descartes Formations, although it is possible that the Descartes Formation is not represented. The rock samples have low concentrations of primordial radionuclides. The Al concentrations were lower than could be expected from the high abundance of alumina in the Apollo 16 soils reported earlier, but this could be due to lower concentrations of target elements in these soils, sampling depth variations, or regolithic mixing (exposure age variations).

  11. Hydrothermal Alkalinity in Central Nepal Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. J.; Derry, L. A.

    2002-12-01

    Numerous hot springs flow along the base of the Himalayan front, at or near the Main Central Thrust, in the Narayani drainage of central Nepal. The springs are found in a narrow zone characterized by rapid uplift and high incision rates. In this zone, hot rocks are brought to the near-surface where they interact with meteoric waters to produce the hydrothermal system. Water-rock interaction produces springs with high solute loads (TDS up to 8000 mg/L.) The springs drive significant chemical anomalies (e.g. Cl, Na, K and Ge) in the rivers that flow through the hydrothermal zone In order to quantify the impact the springs have on the river chemistry, the spring discharge must be estimated. Direct measurement of the spring discharge is difficult, as the springs often flow within the stream bed itself or are inaccessible. We take advantage of the wide disparity in stream vs. hydrothermal [Ge] to calculate spring discharge by chemical mass balance. The hot springs have [Ge] up to 684 nmol/kg and Ge/Si ratios from 200 to 1000 μmol/mol while river waters have [Ge] near 0.15 nmol/kg and Ge/Si ratios near 0.5 μmol/mol, typical of non-polluted rivers. The discharge calculated from the Ge mass balance for individual springs ranges from 0.03 x 106 to 5.6 x 106 m3/yr, and accounts for a small percentage of the total river discharge (0.03% to 1.9%). The hot spring discharge for all of central Nepal is around 1.5x108 m3/yr, 0.5% of the Narayani river discharge. Distinguishing between silicate and carbonate sources is important to assessing the role of weathering on atmospheric CO2 levels and the relative contributions of silicate and carbonate alkalinity in central Nepal rivers are still not well resolved. The hot springs derive up to 100% of their alkalinity from silicate sources. Using the discharge estimates for the springs, we find that the sum of the silicate alkalinity fluxes from all the spring systems is 2.8 x 108 mol/yr. This implies that the hot springs deliver around

  12. Group updates Gravity Database for central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MIGRA Group; Götze, H.-J.

    Between 1993 and 1995 a group of scientists from Chile, Argentina, and Germany incorporated some 2000 new gravity observations into a database that covers a remote region of the Central Andes in northern Chile and northwestern Argentina (between 64°-71°W and 20°-29°S). The database can be used to study the structure and evolution of the Andes. About 14,000 gravity values are included in the database, including older, reprocessed data. Researchers at universities or governmental agencies are welcome to use the data for noncommercial purposes.

  13. Parasuicide in central London 1984-1988.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, G N; Rea, A J; Payne, J F; Lant, A F

    1989-01-01

    Experience of a central London unit dedicated to the care of patients following parasuicide between 1984 and 1988 is reviewed. There were 1160 admissions, which accounted for 11% of all acute adult medical admissions. The female to male ratio was 1.3, with a peak rate for females below 25 years and for males between 20 and 35. Unemployment was found to be a risk factor for parasuicide in men. Benzodiazepines were the most frequently used drug in parasuicide (35%), followed by paracetamol (13%) and aspirin (9%). PMID:2574238

  14. Relativistic Newtonian Dynamics under a central force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Yaakov

    2016-10-01

    Planck's formula and General Relativity indicate that potential energy influences spacetime. Using Einstein's Equivalence Principle and an extension of his Clock Hypothesis, an explicit description of this influence is derived. We present a new relativity model by incorporating the influence of the potential energy on spacetime in Newton's dynamics for motion under a central force. This model extends the model used by Friedman and Steiner (EPL, 113 (2016) 39001) to obtain the exact precession of Mercury without curving spacetime. We also present a solution of this model for a hydrogen-like atom, which explains the reason for a probabilistic description.

  15. Aromatic Medicinal Plants from Tajikistan (Central Asia)

    PubMed Central

    Sharopov, Farukh S.; Zhang, Hanjing; Wink, Michael; Setzer, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Tajikistan is a small country located in Central Asia. The mostly mountainous terrain with a continental, subtropical, and semiarid climate, is characterized by diverse flora. Many people in Tajikistan rely on medicinal plants as their traditional form of medicine to prevent and cure health disorders. Aromatic medicinal plants, in particular, have played an important role for the local people. In this review, we present a summary of the uses of 18 aromatic medicinal plants from Tajikistan and their compositions of secondary metabolites. PMID:28933380

  16. Central mechanisms of odour object perception

    PubMed Central

    Gottfried, Jay A.

    2013-01-01

    The stimulus complexity of naturally occurring odours presents unique challenges for central nervous systems that are aiming to internalize the external olfactory landscape. One mechanism by which the brain encodes perceptual representations of behaviourally relevant smells is through the synthesis of different olfactory inputs into a unified perceptual experience — an odour object. Recent evidence indicates that the identification, categorization and discrimination of olfactory stimuli rely on the formation and modulation of odour objects in the piriform cortex. Convergent findings from human and rodent models suggest that distributed piriform ensemble patterns of olfactory qualities and categories are crucial for maintaining the perceptual constancy of ecologically inconstant stimuli. PMID:20700142

  17. 29. INTERIOR VIEW OF FERRY MOUSE, SOUTH CENTRAL BUILDING, FIRST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. INTERIOR VIEW OF FERRY MOUSE, SOUTH CENTRAL BUILDING, FIRST LEVEL, LOOKING WEST, FERRYMEN'S QUARTERS - Central Railroad of New Jersey, Jersey City Ferry Terminal, Johnson Avenue at Hudson River, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  18. 75 FR 12562 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR THE UTAH RECLAMATION MITIGATION AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION Central...-- Water and Science; Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission; and the Central Utah Water... of Public Scoping for the proposed Provo River Delta Restoration, Utah County, Utah. SUMMARY...

  19. GFT centrality: A new node importance measure for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rahul; Chakraborty, Abhishek; Manoj, B. S.

    2017-12-01

    Identifying central nodes is very crucial to design efficient communication networks or to recognize key individuals of a social network. In this paper, we introduce Graph Fourier Transform Centrality (GFT-C), a metric that incorporates local as well as global characteristics of a node, to quantify the importance of a node in a complex network. GFT-C of a reference node in a network is estimated from the GFT coefficients derived from the importance signal of the reference node. Our study reveals the superiority of GFT-C over traditional centralities such as degree centrality, betweenness centrality, closeness centrality, eigenvector centrality, and Google PageRank centrality, in the context of various arbitrary and real-world networks with different degree-degree correlations.

  20. Ionospheric turbulence from TEC variations and VLF/LF transmitter signal observations before and during the destructive seismic activity of August and October 2016 in Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael E.; Arabelos, Demetrios N.; Vergos, George; Spatala, Spyrous; Skeberis, Christos; Xenos, Tomas D.; Biagi, Pierfrancesco; Scordilis, Emmanuel M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the ionospheric turbulence from TEC variations and VLF/LF transmitter signal observations before and during the disastrous seismic activity of August and October 2016 in Central Italy . The Total Electron Content (TEC) data of 8 Global Positioning System (GPS) stations of the EUREF network, which are being provided by IONOLAB (Turkey), were analysed using Discrete Fourier Analysis in order to investigate the TEC variations (Contadakis et al. 2009, Contadakis et al. 2012, Contadakis et al. 2015). The data acquired for VLF/LF signal observations are from the receiver of Thessaloniki(40.59N, 22,78E), Greece (Skeberis et al. 2015) which monitor the VLF/LF transmitters of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). A method of normalization according to the distance between the receiver and the transmitter is applied on the above data and then they are processed by the Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT) to produce the corresponding spectra for visual analysis. The results of this investigation indicate that the High- Frequency limit fo, of the ionospheric turbulence content, increases as the site and the moment of the earthquake occurrence is approaching, pointing to the earthquake locus. In accordence ,the analyzed data from the receiver of INFREP network in Thessaloniki, Greece show that the signals from the two VLF European transmitters, Tavolara ( Italy) and Le Blanc (France), for wich the transmission path crosses the epicentral zones, indicate enhanced high frequency variations, the last ten days before the moment of the earthquake occurrence. We conclude that the LAIC mechanism through acoustic or gravity wave could explain this phenomenology. Reference Contadakis, M.E., Arabelos, D.N., Asteriadis, G., Spatalas, S.D., Pikridas, C. TEC variations over the Mediterranean during the seismic activity period of the last quarter of 2005 in the area of Greece, Nat. Hazards and Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 1267

  1. Central Control of Brown Adipose Tissue Thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Madden, Christopher J.; Tupone, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    Thermogenesis, the production of heat energy, is an essential component of the homeostatic repertoire to maintain body temperature during the challenge of low environmental temperature and plays a key role in elevating body temperature during the febrile response to infection. Mitochondrial oxidation in brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a significant source of neurally regulated metabolic heat production in many species from mouse to man. BAT thermogenesis is regulated by neural networks in the central nervous system which responds to feedforward afferent signals from cutaneous and core body thermoreceptors and to feedback signals from brain thermosensitive neurons to activate BAT sympathetic nerve activity. This review summarizes the research leading to a model of the feedforward reflex pathway through which environmental cold stimulates BAT thermogenesis and includes the influence on this thermoregulatory network of the pyrogenic mediator, prostaglandin E2, to increase body temperature during fever. The cold thermal afferent circuit from cutaneous thermal receptors, through second-order thermosensory neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord ascends to activate neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus which drive GABAergic interneurons in the preoptic area (POA) to inhibit warm-sensitive, inhibitory output neurons of the POA. The resulting disinhibition of BAT thermogenesis-promoting neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus activates BAT sympathetic premotor neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla, including the rostral raphe pallidus, which provide excitatory, and possibly disinhibitory, inputs to spinal sympathetic circuits to drive BAT thermogenesis. Other recently recognized central sites influencing BAT thermogenesis and energy expenditure are also described. PMID:22389645

  2. Exploration in Ordovician of central Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.H.; Barratt, M.W.

    1985-12-01

    Deep wells in the central Michigan basin have provided sufficient data to define two new mappable formations - the Foster Formation and the Bruggers Formation. Recent conodont studies have corrected the age assignments of the strata containing these formations. Previously, the lower section (Foster) was classified as mostly Cambrian, and the upper unit (Bruggers) was identified as Early Ordovician. Conodont identifications indicate an Early and Middle Ordovician age for the Foster Formation and a Middle Ordovician age for the Bruggers Formation. The Michigan basin existed in embryonic form in the Late Cambrian, but the full outline of the present-day basinmore » did not develop until Early Ordovician. Gas and condensate are produced from the Bruggers Formation as deep as 11,252 ft (3429 m). Geothermal investigations suggest that gas production is possible to the base of the Paleozoic section in the central basin (17,000 ft or 5181 m). Paleotemperatures were higher during the Paleozoic owing to 3000-4000 ft (914-1291 m) of additional sedimentary cover. Five wells are producing from the Bruggers Formation. All are deeper tests in anticlines producing from Devonian reservoirs discovered earlier. The structures are the result of vertical movements of basement fault blocks activated by regional stresses. 12 figures, 2 tables.« less

  3. Functional neuroanatomy of the central noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Szabadi, Elemer

    2013-08-01

    The central noradrenergic neurone, like the peripheral sympathetic neurone, is characterized by a diffusely arborizing terminal axonal network. The central neurones aggregate in distinct brainstem nuclei, of which the locus coeruleus (LC) is the most prominent. LC neurones project widely to most areas of the neuraxis, where they mediate dual effects: neuronal excitation by α₁-adrenoceptors and inhibition by α₂-adrenoceptors. The LC plays an important role in physiological regulatory networks. In the sleep/arousal network the LC promotes wakefulness, via excitatory projections to the cerebral cortex and other wakefulness-promoting nuclei, and inhibitory projections to sleep-promoting nuclei. The LC, together with other pontine noradrenergic nuclei, modulates autonomic functions by excitatory projections to preganglionic sympathetic, and inhibitory projections to preganglionic parasympathetic neurones. The LC also modulates the acute effects of light on physiological functions ('photomodulation'): stimulation of arousal and sympathetic activity by light via the LC opposes the inhibitory effects of light mediated by the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus on arousal and by the paraventricular nucleus on sympathetic activity. Photostimulation of arousal by light via the LC may enable diurnal animals to function during daytime. LC neurones degenerate early and progressively in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, leading to cognitive impairment, depression and sleep disturbance.

  4. Impact of centrality on cooperative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Herrmann, Sebastian; Fontanari, José F.

    2017-02-01

    The solution of today's complex problems requires the grouping of task forces whose members are usually connected remotely over long physical distances and different time zones. Hence, understanding the effects of imposed communication patterns (i.e., who can communicate with whom) on group performance is important. Here we use an agent-based model to explore the influence of the betweenness centrality of the nodes on the time the group requires to find the global maxima of NK-fitness landscapes. The agents cooperate by broadcasting messages, informing on their fitness to their neighbors, and use this information to copy the more successful agents in their neighborhood. We find that for easy tasks (smooth landscapes), the topology of the communication network has no effect on the performance of the group, and that the more central nodes are the most likely to find the global maximum first. For difficult tasks (rugged landscapes), however, we find a positive correlation between the variance of the betweenness among the network nodes and the group performance. For these tasks, the performances of individual nodes are strongly influenced by the agents' dispositions to cooperate and by the particular realizations of the rugged landscapes.

  5. Imaging in Central Nervous System Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Roger N; Rabiner, Eugenii A

    2017-01-01

    The discovery and development of central nervous system (CNS) drugs is an extremely challenging process requiring large resources, timelines, and associated costs. The high risk of failure leads to high levels of risk. Over the past couple of decades PET imaging has become a central component of the CNS drug-development process, enabling decision-making in phase I studies, where early discharge of risk provides increased confidence to progress a candidate to more costly later phase testing at the right dose level or alternatively to kill a compound through failure to meet key criteria. The so called "3 pillars" of drug survival, namely; tissue exposure, target engagement, and pharmacologic activity, are particularly well suited for evaluation by PET imaging. This review introduces the process of CNS drug development before considering how PET imaging of the "3 pillars" has advanced to provide valuable tools for decision-making on the critical path of CNS drug development. Finally, we review the advances in PET science of biomarker development and analysis that enable sophisticated drug-development studies in man. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Central Alaska Network vital signs monitoring plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCluskie, Margaret C.; Oakley, Karen L.; McDonald, Trent; Wilder, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Denali National Park and Preserve, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve have been organized into the Central Alaska Network (CAKN) for the purposes of carrying out ecological monitoring activities under the National Park Services’ Vital Signs Monitoring program. The Phase III Report is the initial draft of the Vital Signs Monitoring Plan for the Central Alaska Network. It includes updated material from the Phase I and II documents. This report, and draft protocols for 11 of the network’s Vital Signs, were peer reviewed early in 2005. Review comments were incorporated into the document bringing the network to the final stage of having a Vital Signs Monitoring Plan. Implementation of the program will formally begin in FY 2006. The broad goals of the CAKN monitoring program are to: (1) better understand the dynamic nature and condition of park ecosystems; and (2) provide reference points for comparisons with other, altered environments. The focus of the CAKN program will be to monitor ecosystems in order to detect change in ecological components and in the relationships among the components. Water quality monitoring is fully integrated within the CAKN monitoring program. A monitoring program for lentic (non-moving water) has been determined, and the program for lotic systems (moving water) is under development.

  7. Geodynamics of Cenozoic deformation in central Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the tectonic stresses in central Asia based on an interpretation of satellite gravity data for mantle convection and supplemented with published fault plane solutions of earthquakes. Northwest-southeast to north-south compressional stresses exist in the Tien Shan region where reverse faulting dominates. The maximum compressive stress is oriented approximately northeast-southwest in the regions of Altai and southern Mongolia. Farther north, compressive stress gives way to tensional stress which causes normal faulting in the Baikal rift system. It is also shown that all of the tectonic stresses in the Tibetan plateau and Himalayan frontal thrust are related to the convection-generated stress patterns inferred from satellite gravity data. These results suggest that the complex crustal deformation in central Asia can be convincingly described by the deformation of the lithosphere on top of the up- and down-welling asthenospheric material beneath it. This observational fact may not only upset the simple view of the fluid crustal model of the Tibetan plateau, but also provide some useful constraints for the future development of deformation theory of continental crust.

  8. Geodynamics of Cenozoic deformation in central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a study of the tectonic stresses in central Asia based on an interpretation of satellite gravity data for mantle convection and supplemented with published fault plane solutions of earthquakes. Northwest-southeast to north-south compressional stresses exist in the Tien Shan region where reverse faulting dominates. The maximum compressive stress is oriented approximately northeast-southwest in the regions of Altai and southern Mongolia. Farther north, compressive stress gives way to tensional stress which causes normal faulting in the Baikal rift system. It is also shown that all of the tectonic stresses in the Tibetan plateau and Himalayan frontal thrust are related to the convection-generated stress patterns inferred from satellite gravity data. These results suggest that the complex crustal deformation in central Asia can be convincingly described by the deformation of the lithosphere on top of the up- and down-welling asthenospheric material beneath it. This observational fact may not only upset the simple view of the fluid crustal model of the Tibetan plateau, but also provide some useful constraints for the future development of deformation theory of continental crust.

  9. [Central blood pressure and vascular damage].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lahiguera, Francisco; Rodilla, Enrique; Costa, José Antonio; Pascual, José María

    2015-07-20

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between central blood pressure and vascular damage. This cross-sectional study involved 393 never treated hypertensive patients (166 women). Clinical blood pressure (BP), 24h blood pressure (BP24h) and central blood pressure (CBP) were measured. Vascular organ damage (VOD) was assessed by calculating the albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), wave pulse pressure velocity and echocardiographic left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Patients with VOD had higher values of BP, BP24h, and CBP than patients without ACR. When comparing several systolic BP, systolic BP24h had a higher linear correlation with CBP (Z Steiger test: 2.26; P=.02) and LVMI (Z Steiger test: 3.23; P=.01) than PAC. In a multiple regression analysis corrected by age, sex and metabolic syndrome, all pressures were related with VOD but systolic BP24h showed the highest correlation. In a logistic regression analysis, having the highest tercile of systolic BP24h was the stronger predictor of VOD (multivariate odds ratio: 3.4; CI 95%: 2.5-5.5, P=.001). CBP does not have more correlation with VOD than other measurements of peripheral BP. Systolic BP24h is the BP measurement that best predicts VOD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Randomized central limit theorems: A unified theory.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The central limit theorems (CLTs) characterize the macroscopic statistical behavior of large ensembles of independent and identically distributed random variables. The CLTs assert that the universal probability laws governing ensembles' aggregate statistics are either Gaussian or Lévy, and that the universal probability laws governing ensembles' extreme statistics are Fréchet, Weibull, or Gumbel. The scaling schemes underlying the CLTs are deterministic-scaling all ensemble components by a common deterministic scale. However, there are "random environment" settings in which the underlying scaling schemes are stochastic-scaling the ensemble components by different random scales. Examples of such settings include Holtsmark's law for gravitational fields and the Stretched Exponential law for relaxation times. In this paper we establish a unified theory of randomized central limit theorems (RCLTs)-in which the deterministic CLT scaling schemes are replaced with stochastic scaling schemes-and present "randomized counterparts" to the classic CLTs. The RCLT scaling schemes are shown to be governed by Poisson processes with power-law statistics, and the RCLTs are shown to universally yield the Lévy, Fréchet, and Weibull probability laws.

  11. Randomized central limit theorems: A unified theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The central limit theorems (CLTs) characterize the macroscopic statistical behavior of large ensembles of independent and identically distributed random variables. The CLTs assert that the universal probability laws governing ensembles’ aggregate statistics are either Gaussian or Lévy, and that the universal probability laws governing ensembles’ extreme statistics are Fréchet, Weibull, or Gumbel. The scaling schemes underlying the CLTs are deterministic—scaling all ensemble components by a common deterministic scale. However, there are “random environment” settings in which the underlying scaling schemes are stochastic—scaling the ensemble components by different random scales. Examples of such settings include Holtsmark’s law for gravitational fields and the Stretched Exponential law for relaxation times. In this paper we establish a unified theory of randomized central limit theorems (RCLTs)—in which the deterministic CLT scaling schemes are replaced with stochastic scaling schemes—and present “randomized counterparts” to the classic CLTs. The RCLT scaling schemes are shown to be governed by Poisson processes with power-law statistics, and the RCLTs are shown to universally yield the Lévy, Fréchet, and Weibull probability laws.

  12. Badgastein spa—Austrian central Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zötl, J. G.

    1995-12-01

    The Badgastein spa shows almost all the special geological and hydrological features existing in the northeastern central Alps. Situated within the Tauern window, the open joint system enables the infiltration of surface water to great depths. There it becomes heated and loaded with radon and trace elements such as fluor. The water discharges as thermal water springs at the steep right flank of the cascade of the Gastein-Ache. This hydraulic process occurs during a span of 3600 3800 years. The springs are captured in galleries, and the largest discharge is in gallery IX (2518 m3/d-1). The spa became known worldwide in the 19th century by visiting aristocrats from Central and Eastern Europe. The most important event in the 20th century was the discovery of the heat joint in the Böckstein gallery. In 1940 an effort to reactivate gold mining in the Radhausberg near Böckstein south of Badgastein failed. However, the miners had the unexpected experience of being cured of rheumatism. A connection between the great depth and high temperature in the gallery was made by the discovery of the joint set with heat and radon emanation. In the medical stations of the Böckstein gallery treatment of polyarthritis has become especially successful.

  13. Recent advances in central congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Schoenmakers, Nadia; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Chatterjee, V Krishna; Dattani, Mehul T

    2015-01-01

    Central congenital hypothyroidism (CCH) may occur in isolation, or more frequently in combination with additional pituitary hormone deficits with or without associated extrapituitary abnormalities. Although uncommon, it may be more prevalent than previously thought, affecting up to 1:16 000 neonates in the Netherlands. Since TSH is not elevated, CCH will evade diagnosis in primary, TSH-based, CH screening programs and delayed detection may result in neurodevelopmental delay due to untreated neonatal hypothyroidism. Alternatively, coexisting growth hormones or ACTH deficiency may pose additional risks, such as life threatening hypoglycaemia. Genetic ascertainment is possible in a minority of cases and reveals mutations in genes controlling the TSH biosynthetic pathway (TSHB, TRHR, IGSF1) in isolated TSH deficiency, or early (HESX1, LHX3, LHX4, SOX3, OTX2) or late (PROP1, POU1F1) pituitary transcription factors in combined hormone deficits. Since TSH cannot be used as an indicator of euthyroidism, adequacy of treatment can be difficult to monitor due to a paucity of alternative biomarkers. This review will summarize the normal physiology of pituitary development and the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis, then describe known genetic causes of isolated central hypothyroidism and combined pituitary hormone deficits associated with TSH deficiency. Difficulties in diagnosis and management of these conditions will then be discussed. PMID:26416826

  14. Parameterized centrality metric for network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Rumi; Lerman, Kristina

    2011-06-01

    A variety of metrics have been proposed to measure the relative importance of nodes in a network. One of these, alpha-centrality [P. Bonacich, Am. J. Sociol.0002-960210.1086/228631 92, 1170 (1987)], measures the number of attenuated paths that exist between nodes. We introduce a normalized version of this metric and use it to study network structure, for example, to rank nodes and find community structure of the network. Specifically, we extend the modularity-maximization method for community detection to use this metric as the measure of node connectivity. Normalized alpha-centrality is a powerful tool for network analysis, since it contains a tunable parameter that sets the length scale of interactions. Studying how rankings and discovered communities change when this parameter is varied allows us to identify locally and globally important nodes and structures. We apply the proposed metric to several benchmark networks and show that it leads to better insights into network structure than alternative metrics.

  15. Applicability of central auditory processing disorder models.

    PubMed

    Jutras, Benoît; Loubert, Monique; Dupuis, Jean-Luc; Marcoux, Caroline; Dumont, Véronique; Baril, Michèle

    2007-12-01

    Central auditory processing disorder ([C]APD) is a relatively recent construct that has given rise to 2 theoretical models: the Buffalo Model and the Bellis/Ferre Model. These models describe 4 and 5 (C)APD categories, respectively. The present study examines the applicability of these models to clinical practice. Neither of these models was based on data from peer-reviewed sources. This is a retrospective study that reviewed 178 records of children diagnosed with (C)APD, of which 48 were retained for analysis. More than 80% of the children could be classified into one of the Buffalo Model categories, while more than 90% remained unclassified under the Bellis/Ferre Model. This discrepancy can be explained by the fact that the classification of the Buffalo Model is based primarily on a single central auditory test (Staggered Spondaic Word), whereas the Bellis/Ferre Model classification uses a combination of auditory test results. The 2 models provide a conceptual framework for (C)APD, but they must be further refined to be fully applicable in clinical settings.

  16. Morphology of AGN in the Central Kiloparsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Paul

    Hubble Space Telescope observations of the central kiloparsec of AGN have revealed a wealth of structure, particularly nuclear bars and spirals, that are distinct from analogous features in the disks of spiral galaxies. WFPC2 and NICMOS images of a large sample of AGN observed at high spatial resolution make it possible to quantify the frequency and detailed properties of these structures. Nearly all AGN have nuclear spiral dust lanes in the central kiloparsec, while only a small minority contain nuclear bars. If these nuclear dust spirals trace shocks in the circumnuclear, gaseous disks, they may dissipate sufficient angular momentum to fuel the active nucleus. I would like to thank my collaborators in this project---Rick Pogge, John Mulchaey, and Mike Regan---for allowing me to present this work in advance of publication, as well as Johan Knapen for organizing such an interesting meeting. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers GO-7867 and GO-8597 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  17. A central black hole in M32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonry, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Observations are presented of the stellar rotation and velocity dispersion in M32. The projected rotation curve has an unresolved cusp at the center, with an amplitude of at least 60 km/s. The stellar velocity dispersion is constant at 56 + or - 5 km/s to a radius of 20 arcsec; a central bump in the observed dispersion is an artifact due to the rotation. The form of the rotation is such that isophotes have constant angular rotation velocity. The three-dimensional rotation field is modeled and the internal mean rotation of the stars around the center of M32 must reach at least 90 km/s at a radius of 2 pc. Hydrostatic equilibrium then requires 3-10 x 10 to the 6th solar masses of dark mass within the central parsec of M32. The possibility that M32 is undergoing core collapse and that this dark mass consists of dark stellar remnants is discussed, but ultimately rejected because the time scale for core collapse of M32 should be 2000 Hubble times. A more likely explanation of this dark mass, especially because of the presence of an X-ray point source at the center of M32, is a massive black hole.

  18. Late Neanderthals at Jarama VI (central Iberia)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehl, Martin; Burow, Christoph; Hilgers, Alexandra; Navazo, Marta; Pastoors, Andreas; Weniger, Gerd-Christian; Wood, Rachel; Jordá Pardo, Jesús F.

    2013-09-01

    Previous geochronological and archaeological studies on the rock shelter Jarama VI suggested a late survival of Neanderthals in central Iberia and the presence of lithic assemblages of Early Upper Paleolithic affinity. New data on granulometry, mineralogical composition, geochemical fingerprints and micromorphology of the sequence corroborate the previous notion that the archaeological units JVI.2.1 to JVI.2.3 are slackwater deposits of superfloods, which did not experience significant post-depositional changes, whereas the artifact-rich units JVI.3 and JVI.1 mainly received sediment inputs by sheetwash and cave spall. New AMS radiocarbon measurements on three samples of cut-marked bone using the ultrafiltration technique yielded ages close to, or beyond, the limit of radiocarbon dating at ca. 50 14C ka BP, and hence suggest much higher antiquity than assumed previously. Furthermore, elevated temperature post-IR IRSL luminescence measurements on K feldspars yielded burial ages for subunits JVI.2.2 and JVI.2.3 between 50 and 60 ka. Finally, our reappraisal of the stone industry strongly suggests that the whole sequence is of Mousterian affinity. In conclusion, Jarama VI most probably does not document a late survival of Neanderthals nor an Early Upper Paleolithic occupation in central Iberia, but rather indicates an occupation breakdown after the Middle Paleolithic.

  19. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  20. Melanin concentrating hormone in central hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Peyron, Christelle; Valentin, Françoise; Bayard, Sophie; Hanriot, Lucie; Bedetti, Christophe; Rousset, Bernard; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2011-09-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is a disabling disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and abnormal rapid eye movement (REM) sleep manifestations, due to a deficient hypocretin/orexin neurotransmission. Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons involved in the homeostatic regulation of REM sleep are intact. We hypothesized that an increased release of MCH in NC would be partly responsible for the abnormal REM sleep manifestations. Twenty-two untreated patients affected with central hypersomnia were included: 14 NC, six idiopathic hypersomnia with long sleep time, and two post-traumatic hypersomnia. Fourteen neurological patients without any sleep disorders were included as controls. Using radioimmunoassays, we measured hypocretin-1 and MCH levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The MCH level was slightly but significantly lower in patients with hypersomnia (98 ± 32 pg/ml) compared to controls (118 ± 20 pg/ml). After exclusion of patients affected with post-traumatic hypersomnia the difference became non-significant. We also failed to find any association between MCH level and hypocretin level, the severity of daytime sleepiness, the number of SOREMPs, the frequency of cataplexy, and the presence of hypnagogic hallucinations or sleep paralysis. This study reports the first measurement of MCH in CSF using radioimmunoassay technology. It appears to be a non-informative tool to differentiate etiologies of central hypersomnia with or without REM sleep dysregulation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.