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Sample records for zona pellucida binding

  1. Body mass index is not associated with sperm-zona pellucida binding ability in subfertile males.

    PubMed

    Sermondade, Nathalie; Dupont, Charlotte; Faure, Céline; Boubaya, Marouane; Cédrin-Durnerin, Isabelle; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Sifer, Christophe; Lévy, Rachel

    2013-09-01

    Lifestyle factors, such as weight and nutritional status may affect male fertility, including sperm fertilization ability. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the association between body mass index (BMI) and sperm-zona pellucida binding ability assessed according to the zona binding (ZB) test, which has been described to be a relevant diagnostic tool for the prediction of in vitro fertilization (IVF) ability. Three hundred and six male patients from couples diagnosed with primary idiopathic or mild male factor infertility were included. Correlations between BMI and semen parameters according to ZB test indices were assessed, together with frequencies of positive and negative tests across the BMI categories. In this selected population, BMI was not related to conventional semen parameters or sperm quality assessed according to the ability of spermatozoa to bind to the zona pellucida. The previously described poor outcomes of IVF procedures in cases of male obesity could be due to other sperm defects, such as alterations of sperm capacitation or acrosome reaction. The link between male BMI and biological outcomes during IVF procedures, such as fertilization rates, should be further evaluated.

  2. Human sperm bind to the N-terminal domain of ZP2 in humanized zonae pellucidae in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Baibakov, Boris; Boggs, Nathan A.; Yauger, Belinda; Baibakov, Galina

    2012-01-01

    Fertilization requires taxon-specific gamete recognition, and human sperm do not bind to zonae pellucidae (ZP1–3) surrounding mouse eggs. Using transgenesis to replace endogenous mouse proteins with human homologues, gain-of-function sperm-binding assays were established to evaluate human gamete recognition. Human sperm bound only to zonae pellucidae containing human ZP2, either alone or coexpressed with other human zona proteins. Binding to the humanized matrix was a dominant effect that resulted in human sperm penetration of the zona pellucida and accumulation in the perivitelline space, where they were unable to fuse with mouse eggs. Using recombinant peptides, the site of gamete recognition was located to a defined domain in the N terminus of ZP2. These results provide experimental evidence for the role of ZP2 in mediating sperm binding to the zona pellucida and support a model in which human sperm–egg recognition is dependent on an N-terminal domain of ZP2, which is degraded after fertilization to provide a definitive block to polyspermy. PMID:22734000

  3. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation in human sperm in response to binding to zona pellucida or hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Sati, Leyla; Cayli, Sevil; Delpiano, Elena; Sakkas, Denny; Huszar, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    In mammalian species, acquisition of sperm fertilization competence is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the key elements of capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation (TP) in various sperm membrane regions. In previous studies performed, the pattern of TP was examined in human sperm bound to zona pellucida of oocytes. In the present comparative study, TP patterns upon sperm binding to the zona pellucida or hyaluronic acid (HA) were investigated in spermatozoa arising from the same semen samples. Tyrosine phosphorylation, visualized by immunofluorescence, was localized within the acrosomal cap, equatorial head region, neck, and the principal piece. Tyrosine phosphorylation has increased in a time-related manner as capacitation progressed, and the phosphorylation pattern was identical within the principal piece and neck, regardless of the sperm bound to the zona pellucida or HA. Thus, the data demonstrated that the patterns of sperm activation-related TP were similar regardless of the spermatozoa bound to zona pellucida or HA. Further, sperm with incomplete development, as detected by excess cytoplasmic retention, failed to exhibit TP.

  4. The Pattern of Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Human Sperm in Response to Binding to Zona Pellucida or Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Sati, Leyla; Cayli, Sevil; Delpiano, Elena; Sakkas, Denny

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian species, acquisition of sperm fertilization competence is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the key elements of capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation (TP) in various sperm membrane regions. In previous studies performed, the pattern of TP was examined in human sperm bound to zona pellucida of oocytes. In the present comparative study, TP patterns upon sperm binding to the zona pellucida or hyaluronic acid (HA) were investigated in spermatozoa arising from the same semen samples. Tyrosine phosphorylation, visualized by immunofluorescence, was localized within the acrosomal cap, equatorial head region, neck, and the principal piece. Tyrosine phosphorylation has increased in a time-related manner as capacitation progressed, and the phosphorylation pattern was identical within the principal piece and neck, regardless of the sperm bound to the zona pellucida or HA. Thus, the data demonstrated that the patterns of sperm activation-related TP were similar regardless of the spermatozoa bound to zona pellucida or HA. Further, sperm with incomplete development, as detected by excess cytoplasmic retention, failed to exhibit TP. PMID:24077441

  5. Capacitation in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin results in enhanced zona pellucida-binding ability of stallion spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Aitken, R John; Gibb, Zamira; Lambourne, Sarah R; Nixon, Brett

    2014-02-01

    While IVF has been widely successful in many domesticated species, the development of a robust IVF system for the horse remains an elusive and highly valued goal. A major impediment to the development of equine IVF is the fact that optimised conditions for the capacitation of equine spermatozoa are yet to be developed. Conversely, it is known that stallion spermatozoa are particularly susceptible to damage arising as a consequence of capacitation-like changes induced prematurely in response to semen handling and transport conditions. To address these limitations, this study sought to develop an effective system to both suppress and promote the in vitro capacitation of stallion spermatozoa. Our data indicated that the latter could be achieved in a bicarbonate-rich medium supplemented with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, a cyclic AMP analogue, and methyl-β-cyclodextrin, an efficient cholesterol-withdrawing agent. The populations of spermatozoa generated under these conditions displayed a number of hallmarks of capacitation, including elevated levels of tyrosine phosphorylation, a reorganisation of the plasma membrane leading to lipid raft coalescence in the peri-acrosomal region of the sperm head, and a dramatic increase in their ability to interact with heterologous bovine zona pellucida (ZP) and undergo agonist-induced acrosomal exocytosis. Furthermore, this functional transformation was effectively suppressed in media devoid of bicarbonate. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of efficient cholesterol removal in priming stallion spermatozoa for ZP binding in vitro.

  6. Ability of spermatozoa to bind to the zona pellucida during oligozoospermia induced with testosterone during a male contraceptive trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, D Y; Johnston, R; Baker, H W

    1995-06-01

    To determine the ability of spermatozoa to bind to the zona pellucida (ZP) in testosterone-induced oligozoospermia, previously fertile men participating in the World Heath Organization (WHO) male contraceptive trial in Melbourne were studied while oligozoospermic to various degrees. Semen analysis were performed according to WHO methods. One or two ejaculates from each subject were cryopreserved before commencing weekly intramuscular injections of 200 mg testosterone enanthate. The frozen spermatozoa were used as controls for ZP-binding tests of spermatozoa obtained during testosterone-induced oligozoospermia (< 10 x 10(6)/ml) in either the suppression or efficacy (n = 6) and recovery (n = 3) phases. Two other subjects in the recovery phase with normozoospermia were also tested. Human oocytes that failed to fertilized in vitro from infertile patients were used for the sperm-ZP binding test. Control (frozen) spermatozoa were labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate and test (oligozoospermic semen) spermatozoa were labelled with tetramethylrhodamine B isothiocyanate. A mixture of equal numbers of labelled motile control and test spermatozoa were incubated with 4-6 ZP. There was a significantly (p < 0.01) lower number of spermatozoa bound per ZP in oligozoospermic samples (65 +/- 7, mean +/- SEM) than in controls (80 +/- 7). However, there were still large numbers of spermatozoa bound to the ZP for all the oligozoospermic samples. Five subjects had similar numbers of spermatozoa bound to the ZP for both control and oligozoospermic samples. Overall, the ZP-binding ratio of test and control spermatozoa averaged 0.82 (range 0.51-1.13).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Effects of milk proteins on sperm binding to the zona pellucida and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    Coutinho da Silva, Marco A; Seidel, George E; Squires, Edward L; Graham, James K; Carnevale, Elaine M

    2014-11-10

    Objectives were to determine the effects of extracellular Ca(2+) and milk proteins on intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in stallion sperm; and to determine the effects of single caseins on sperm binding to the zona pellucida (ZP). In Experiment I, sperm were incubated in media containing 2 or 4mM Ca(2+) and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was determined after ionomycin treatment and long-term incubation (3h). Extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations (2 compared with 4mM) did not affect baseline intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of sperm. However, incubating sperm in a medium containing 4 compared with 2mM Ca(2+) resulted in greater (P<0.05) influx of Ca(2+) into sperm. In Experiment II, sperm incubated in media containing 1mg/mL of native phosphocaseinate (NP) or sodium caseinate (SC) showed similar baseline intracellular Ca(2+) and influx of Ca(2+) than control (TALP). In Experiment III, sperm-ZP binding assays were performed in TALP medium containing: no additions (TALP); 1mg/mL SC; 1 or 3mg/mL of α-casein; 1 or 3mg/mL of β-casein; and 1 or 3mg/mL of κ-casein. The number of stallion sperm bound to bovine ZP was greatest (P<0.05) when SC was used. Co-incubation in media containing single caseins (α-, β- or κ-casein) resulted in similar results to TALP; however, a dose effect (P<0.05) was observed for β- and κ-caseins. In conclusion, extracellular Ca(2+) concentration and milk proteins did not affect baseline intracellular calcium in stallion sperm. It appears that β- and κ-caseins may be responsible for enhancing sperm binding to ZP, but the mechanism remains unknown. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) Reduces Rotenone Effect on Stallion Sperm-Zona Pellucida Heterologous Binding.

    PubMed

    Plaza Dávila, M; Bucci, D; Galeati, G; Peña, F J; Mari, G; Giaretta, E; Tamanini, C; Spinaci, M

    2015-12-01

    Stallion spermatozoa are highly dependent on oxidative phosphorylation for ATP production to achieve normal sperm function and to fuel the motility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of equine sperm under capacitating conditions to the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone and to test whether epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a natural polyphenol component of green tea, could counteract this effect. After 2-h incubation of stallion spermatozoa in modified Tyrode's medium, rotenone (100 nm, 500 nm and 5 μm) and EGCG (10, 20 and 60 μm), alone or in combination, did not induce any significant difference on the percentage of viable cells, live sperm with active mitochondria and spermatozoa with intact acrosome. The inhibition of complex I of mitochondrial respiratory chain of stallion sperm with rotenone exerted a negative effect on heterologous ZP binding ability. EGCG at the concentrations of 10 and 20 μm (but not of 60 μm) induced a significant increase in the number of sperm bound to the ZP compared with that for control. Moreover, when stallion sperm were treated with rotenone 100 nm, the presence of EGCG at all the concentrations tested (10, 20 and 60 μm) significantly increased the number of sperm bound to the ZP up to control levels, suggesting that this green tea polyphenol is able to reduce the toxicity of rotenone. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Identification of a Novel TGF-β-Binding Site in the Zona Pellucida C-terminal (ZP-C) Domain of TGF-β-Receptor-3 (TGFR-3)

    PubMed Central

    Diestel, Uschi; Resch, Marcus; Meinhardt, Kathrin; Weiler, Sigrid; Hellmann, Tina V.; Mueller, Thomas D.; Nickel, Joachim; Eichler, Jutta; Muller, Yves A.

    2013-01-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) domain is present in extracellular proteins such as the zona pellucida proteins and tectorins and participates in the formation of polymeric protein networks. However, the ZP domain also occurs in the cytokine signaling co-receptor transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor type 3 (TGFR-3, also known as betaglycan) where it contributes to cytokine ligand recognition. Currently it is unclear how the ZP domain architecture enables this dual functionality. Here, we identify a novel major TGF-β-binding site in the FG loop of the C-terminal subdomain of the murine TGFR-3 ZP domain (ZP-C) using protein crystallography, limited proteolysis experiments, surface plasmon resonance measurements and synthetic peptides. In the murine 2.7 Å crystal structure that we are presenting here, the FG-loop is disordered, however, well-ordered in a recently reported homologous rat ZP-C structure. Surprisingly, the adjacent external hydrophobic patch (EHP) segment is registered differently in the rat and murine structures suggesting that this segment only loosely associates with the remaining ZP-C fold. Such a flexible and temporarily-modulated association of the EHP segment with the ZP domain has been proposed to control the polymerization of ZP domain-containing proteins. Our findings suggest that this flexibility also extends to the ZP domain of TGFR-3 and might facilitate co-receptor ligand interaction and presentation via the adjacent FG-loop. This hints that a similar C-terminal region of the ZP domain architecture possibly regulates both the polymerization of extracellular matrix proteins and cytokine ligand recognition of TGFR-3. PMID:23826237

  10. Zona pellucida-binding protein 2 (ZPBP2) and several proteins containing BX7B motifs in human sperm may have hyaluronic acid binding or recognition properties.

    PubMed

    Torabi, F; Bogle, O A; Estanyol, J M; Oliva, R; Miller, D

    2017-12-01

    Are there novel hyaladherins in human sperm? Zona pellucida-binding protein 2 (ZPBP2), containing a Link-like hyaluronic acid (HA)-binding domain, and several other proteins containing BX7B motifs, such as ADAM32 and Midkine, may be novel hyaladherins with HA-binding properties. HA-binding proteins (hyaladherins), which can bind HA surrounding the cumulus-oophorus complex, are distinct from hyases such as PH 20 (SPAM1) and are expressed by mature spermatozoa. Although HABP1 and CD44 are reasonably well characterized hyaladherins and the former has been implicated in sperm-oocyte interactions, the overall significance of sperm hyaladherins for male fertility is still poorly understood. This was a laboratory-based investigation into human sperm hyaladherins undertaken as part of a three year PhD programme sponsored by the EU Marie Curie Training network, Reprotrain. Protein homogenates of sperm obtained from young men of unknown fertility (N = 4) were partitioned into HA-binding and non-binding fractions by a protein affinity 'panning' method; their subsequent characterization was by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) and partitioning behaviour was confirmed by western blotting. Sequences of proteins from both fractions were submitted to PDBsum to look for orthologous entries (PDB codes) and all returned codes were queried against the matching protein using SAS (Sequences Annotated by Structure) looking for structural similarities between them. A systematic search for other common features of hyaladherins was also undertaken. The presence of BX7B sequence motifs found in several well-described hyaladherins including RHAMM was used to assess efficacy of potential hyaladherin partitioning by the HA substrate. The data showed that 50% (14/28) and 34.5% (28/81) of proteins in the bound and unbound fractions, respectively, contained these motifs (one-tailed Z-score = 1.45; P = 0.074), indicating weak discrimination by the substrate. Querying PDBsum

  11. Differences between antigenic determinants of pig and cat zona pellucida proteins.

    PubMed

    Jewgenow, K; Rohleder, M; Wegner, I

    2000-05-01

    Despite many efforts, the control of reproduction in feral cat populations is still a problem in urban regions around the world. Immunocontraception is a promising approach; thus the present study examined the suitability of the widely used pig zona pellucida proteins (pZP) for contraception in feral domestic cats. Purified zona pellucida proteins obtained from pig and cat ovaries were used to produce highly specific antisera in rabbits. Antibodies against pZP raised in rabbits or lions were not effective inhibitors of either in vitro sperm binding (cat spermatozoa to cat oocytes) or in vitro fertilization in cats, whereas antibodies against feline zona pellucida proteins (fZP) raised in rabbits showed a dose-dependent inhibition of in vitro fertilization. Immunoelectrophoresis, ELISA and immunohistology of ovaries confirmed these results, showing crossreactivity of anti-fZP sera to fZP and to a lesser extent to pZP, but no interaction of anti-pZP sera with fZP. It is concluded that cat and pig zonae pellucidae express a very small number of shared antigenic determinants, making the use of pZP vaccine in cats questionable. A contraceptive vaccine based on feline zona pellucida determinants will be a better choice for the control of reproduction in feral cats if immunogenity can be achieved.

  12. Comparison of the frequency of defective sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding and the ZP-induced acrosome reaction between subfertile men with normal and abnormal semen.

    PubMed

    Liu, De Yi; Liu, Ming Li; Garrett, Claire; Baker, H W Gordon

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of defective sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding (DSZPB) and defective ZP-induced acrosome reaction (DZPIAR) in subfertile men (i.e. male partners of infertile couples) with normal and abnormal semen analyses. A total of 1030 subfertile men with normal semen analysis (n=255), oligozoospermia (count<20x10(6)/ml, n=136), severe teratozoospermia (strict normal morphology

  13. Human spermatozoa selected by Percoll gradient or swim-up are equally capable of binding to the human zona pellucida and undergoing the acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Morales, P; Vantman, D; Barros, C; Vigil, P

    1991-03-01

    Several techniques have been used for selecting motile spermatozoa including Percoll and albumin gradients, swim-up, and glass wool filtration. A high yield of motile spermatozoa as well as an enhancement of motility are the most desirable features of a practical method. An equally important consideration is whether or not these techniques select functionally normal spermatozoa. In this study we have compared two methods for separation of motile cells, swim-up and Percoll gradient. Normal semen samples from 12 different men were used in this study. Each sample was simultaneously processed by swim-up and Percoll gradient using modified Tyrode's medium. After the sperm concentration was adjusted to 1 x 10(7) spermatozoa/ml, the suspensions were incubated at 37 degrees C, 5% CO2 in air. In each suspension the percentage of sperm recovery, percentage of motile spermatozoa, percentage of acrosome reacted spermatozoa (either spontaneously or stimulated with human follicular fluid), percentage of zona-free hamster oocytes penetrated, and number of spermatozoa bound to the human zona pellucida were determined. The results obtained indicated that the percentage of sperm recovery was higher with the Percoll gradient than with the swim-up procedure (P less than 0.001). However, no significant differences were found between these two sperm populations in the percentage of motile cells, in the percentage of acrosome reacted spermatozoa, and in the percentage of zona-free hamster oocytes penetrated. In addition, the number of spermatozoa bound per zona pellucida was similar for spermatozoa selected by Percoll or swim-up. We conclude that there were no functional differences between the spermatozoa selected by either method.

  14. The roles of protein disulphide isomerase family A, member 3 (ERp57) and surface thiol/disulphide exchange in human spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Wai; Lam, Kevin K W; Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Yeung, William S B; Zhao, Wei E; Ho, Pak-Chung; Ou, Jian-Ping; Chiu, Philip C N

    2017-04-01

    Are multimeric sperm plasma membrane protein complexes, ERp57 and sperm surface thiol content involved in human spermatozoa-zona pellucida (ZP) interaction? ERp57 is a component of a multimeric spermatozoa-ZP receptor complex involved in regulation of human spermatozoa-ZP binding via up-regulation of sperm surface thiol content. A spermatozoon acquires its fertilization capacity within the female reproductive tract by capacitation. Spermatozoa-ZP receptor is suggested to be a composite structure that is assembled into a functional complex during capacitation. Sperm surface thiol content is elevated during capacitation. ERp57 is a protein disulphide isomerase that modulates the thiol-disulphide status of proteins. The binding ability and components of protein complexes in extracted membrane protein fractions of spermatozoa were studied. The roles of capacitation, thiol-disulphide reagent treatments and ERp57 on sperm functions and sperm surface thiol content were assessed. Spermatozoa were obtained from semen samples from normozoospermic men. Human oocytes were obtained from an assisted reproduction programme. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western ligand blotting and mass spectrometry were used to identify the components of solubilized ZP/ZP3-binding complexes. The localization and expression of sperm surface thiol and ERp57 were studied by immunostaining and sperm surface protein biotinylation followed by western blotting. Sperm functions were assessed by standard assays. Several ZP-binding complexes were isolated from the cell membrane of capacitated spermatozoa. ERp57 was a component of one of these complexes. Capacitation significantly increased the sperm surface thiol content, acrosomal thiol distribution and ERp57 expression on sperm surface. Sperm surface thiol and ERp57 immunoreactivity were localized to the acrosomal region of spermatozoa, a region responsible for ZP-binding. Up-regulation of the surface thiol content or ERp57 surface

  15. Scintigraphy of normal mouse ovaries with monoclonal antibodies to ZP-2, the major zona pellucida protein

    SciTech Connect

    East, I.J.; Keenan, A.M.; Larson, S.M.

    1984-08-31

    The zona pellucida is an extracellular glycocalyx, made of three sulfated glycoproteins, that surrounds mammalian oocytes. Parenterally administered monoclonal antibodies specific for ZP-2, the most abundant zona protein, localize in the zona pellucida. When labeled with iodine-125, these monoclonal antibodies demonstrate a remarkably high target-to-nontarget tissue ratio and provide clear external radioimaging of ovarian tissue.

  16. Human sperm degradation of zona pellucida proteins contributes to fertilization.

    PubMed

    Saldívar-Hernández, Analilia; González-González, María E; Sánchez-Tusié, Ana; Maldonado-Rosas, Israel; López, Pablo; Treviño, Claudia L; Larrea, Fernando; Chirinos, Mayel

    2015-09-02

    The mammalian oocyte extracellular matrix known as the zona pellucida (ZP) acts as a barrier to accomplish sperm fusion with the female gamete. Although penetration of the ZP is a limiting event to achieve fertilization, this is one of the least comprehended stages of gamete interaction. Even though previous studies suggest that proteases of sperm origin contribute to facilitate the passage of sperm through the ZP, in human this process is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of human sperm to degrade recombinant human ZP (rhZPs) proteins and to characterize the proteases involved in this process. Purified rhZP2, rhZP3 and rhZP4 proteins were incubated with capacitated sperm and the proteolytic activity was determined by Western blot analysis. To further characterize the proteases involved, parallel incubations were performed in the presence of the protease inhibitors o-phenanthroline, benzamidine and MG-132 meant to block the activity of metalloproteases, serine proteases and the proteasome, respectively. Additionally, protease inhibitors effect on sperm-ZP binding was evaluated by hemizona assay. The results showed that rhZPs were hydrolyzed in the presence of capacitated sperm. O-phenanthroline inhibited the degradation of rhZP3, MG-132 inhibited the degradation of rhZP4 and benzamidine inhibited the degradation of the three proteins under investigation. Moreover, hemizona assays demonstrated that sperm proteasome inhibition impairs sperm interaction with human native ZP. This study suggests that sperm proteasomes could participate in the degradation of ZP, particularly of the ZP4 protein. Besides, metalloproteases may be involved in specific degradation of ZP3 while serine proteases may contribute to unspecific degradation of the ZP. These findings suggest that localized degradation of ZP proteins by sperm is probably involved in ZP penetration and may be of help in understanding the mechanisms of fertilization in humans.

  17. Viscous forces are predominant in the zona pellucida mechanical resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Maiorana, Alessandro; Douet, Cécile; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Parasassi, Tiziana; Brunelli, Roberto; Goudet, Ghylène; De Spirito, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) is a multilayer glycoprotein spherical shell surrounding mammalian eggs. The ZP's mechanical response plays a crucial role in mammalian fertilization and is a parameter commonly adopted in "in vitro fertilization" to characterize the oocytes quality. While it is assumed that ZP mechanical response is purely elastic, here we prove that dissipative forces cannot be neglected. Physiologically, this evidence implies that an increase in the spermatozoa motility can induce dramatic changes on the ZP reaction force turning ZP shell in an impenetrable barrier leading to fertility impairments.

  18. Mechanics of sperm-egg interaction at the zona pellucida.

    PubMed Central

    Baltz, J M; Katz, D F; Cone, R A

    1988-01-01

    Mammalian sperm traverse several layers of egg vestments before fertilization can occur. The innermost vestment, the zona pellucida, is a glycoprotein shell, which captures and tethers the sperm before they penetrate it. We report here direct measurements of the force required to tether a motile human sperm as well as independent calculations of this force using flagellar beat parameters observed for sperm of several species on their homologous zonae. We have compared these sperm-generated forces with the calculated tensile strength of sperm-zona bonds, and found that a motile sperm can be tethered, at least temporarily, by a single bond. Therefore, sperm can be captured by the first bond formed and tethered permanently by a few. The sperm cannot subsequently penetrate the zona unless the bonds are first eliminated. However, premature elimination would simply allow the sperm to escape. Therefore, not only must the bonds be eliminated, but the timing of this must be regulated so that the sperm is already oriented toward the egg and beginning to penetrate as the bonds are broken. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:3224150

  19. Inhibitors of serine proteases decrease sperm penetration during porcine fertilization in vitro by inhibiting sperm binding to the zona pellucida and acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Beek, J; Nauwynck, H; Appeltant, R; Maes, D; Van Soom, A

    2015-11-01

    Serine proteases are involved in mammalian fertilization. Inhibitors of serine proteases can be applied to investigate at which point these enzymes exert their action. We selected two serine protease inhibitors, 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF, 100 μM) and soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI, 5 μM) from Glycine max, via previous dose-response IVF experiments and sperm toxicity tests. In the present study, we evaluated how these inhibitors affect porcine fertilization in vitro as calculated on total fertilization rate, polyspermy rate, and the sperm number per fertilized oocyte of cumulus-intact, cumulus-free, and zona-free oocytes. In the control group (no inhibitor), these parameters were 86%, 49%, and 2.2 for cumulus-intact oocytes and 77%, 43%, and 2.2 for cumulus-free oocytes (6-hour gamete incubation period, 1.25 × 10(5) spermatozoa/mL). 4-(2-Aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride and STI significantly reduced total fertilization and polyspermy rate in cumulus-intact and cumulus-free oocytes (P < 0.05). Total fertilization rates were respectively 65% and 53% (AEBSF) and 36% and 17% (STI). Inhibition rates were higher in cumulus-free oocytes than in cumulus-intact oocytes, indicating that inhibitors exerted their action after sperm passage through the cumulus. 4-(2-Aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride but not STI reduced sperm binding to the ZP. The acrosome reaction was significantly inhibited by both inhibitors. Only 40.4% (AEBSF) and 11.4% (STI) of spermatozoa completed a calcium-induced acrosome reaction compared to 86.7% of spermatozoa in the control group. There was no effect on sperm binding or fertilization parameters in zona-free oocytes. In conclusion, sperm-zona binding and acrosome reaction were inhibited by serine protease inhibitors during porcine IVF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transfer of bovine demi-embryos with and without the zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Warfield, S J; Seidel, G E; Elsden, R P

    1987-09-01

    Bisected bovine embryos with or without the zona pellucida were transferred to recipients nonsurgically in five field trials. Embryos were collected from superovulated donors 6.5 to 7.5 d after estrus; only embryos of good and excellent quality were bisected. Demi-embryos were transferred either within a zona pellucida, without a zona pellucida, without a zona pellucida, or in the third and fourth trials, without a zona but embedded in 7% gelatin. Pregnancies were diagnosed at 44 to 68 d of gestation. In a preliminary trial, 9/29 zona pellucida-intact demi-embryos developed into fetuses compared with 1/10 zona pellucida-free demi-embryos (P greater than .1). The proportion of zona-free demi-embryos developing to fetuses was not significantly different from the zona-intact group in the second trial either, 24/49 and 5/19, respectively. In trial 3, the proportion of zona pellucida-free demi-embryos developing was 8/25; of zona-enclosed embryos, 29/88; and of zona-free demi-embryos embedded in gelatin, 8/22 (P greater than .1). Similarly, in the fourth trial the rate of development of zona-free demi-embryos to fetuses was 5/12, that of zona-enclosed embryos was 32/81, and that of zona-free demi-embryos embedded in gelatin was 3/12 (P greater than .1). In trial 5, survival of zona-enclosed demi-embryos to fetuses was 40/105, and of zona-free demi-embryos, 46/109 (P greater than .1). Except for trial 2, half of the demi-embryos were twinned, one to each uterine horn; twinning did not significantly affect the proportion developing to fetuses for any of the demi-embryo groups. It is concluded that placing post-compaction demi-embryos into the zona pellucida for transfer does not improve pregnancy rates significantly.

  1. Targeting the zona pellucida for immunocontraception: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Tesarik, J

    1995-12-01

    This minireview summarizes the main data relevant to the development of contraceptive vaccines based on zona pellucida (ZP) antigens, as well as the pros and the cons of this immunocontraceptive strategy. Even though the antifertility efficacy of anti-ZP antibodies in humans is not corroborated by a clear relationship between spontaneous autoimmunization against the ZP and infertility, passive and active immunization studies in laboratory animals have provided convincing results. The contraceptive action of anti-ZP antibodies, targeting events situated upstream of gamete fusion, is devoid of potential ethical concerns related to the destruction of early embryos. The high protein content of the mammalian ZP, knowledge of the complete amino acid sequence of the major ZP proteins, and the high degree of sequence homology between individual species all favour the rapid advancement of anti-ZP vaccine projects. However, certain sequences of ZP proteins, when incorporated into the vaccine construct, activate CD4+ T cells of the recipient organism to direct a cellular immune attack (autoimmune oophoritis) to other functionally relevant ovarian components (primordial follicles, steroidogenic cells). The search for the optimal combination of B cell and T cell epitopes in the vaccine construct will hopefully overcome this problem.

  2. Characterization of oocyte retrieval cycles with empty zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Oride, Aki; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Hara, Tomomi; Ohta, Hiroko; Kyo, Satoru

    2018-01-01

    To identify the factors that characterize cycles with empty zona pellucida (EZP). Thirty-six oocyte retrieval cycles from which EZP were collected and another 36 cycles from which no EZP was collected were compared. The patients were divided into three groups: those with no EZP collected during any cycle, those with EZP collected during all cycles, and those experiencing cycles both with and without EZP. The mean number of oocytes collected per cycle was higher in the cycles with EZP than without EZP. The fertilization rate of the collected oocytes and the rate of good embryo formation were significantly lower in the cycles with EZP. No significant difference was observed between the three groups in terms of age, number of oocytes collected, or hormone levels before and after the oocyte retrieval. The fertilization and pregnancy rates were highest in the patients with no EZP being collected during any cycle, followed by those experiencing cycles both with and without EZP, and then by those with EZP collected during all cycles. The observation of lower fertilization, poor embryo formation, and a low pregnancy rate in the patients with EZP suggests the poor quality of oocytes that were collected with EZP in the same cycle.

  3. Microanatomical diversification of the zona pellucida in aplochelioid killifishes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A W; Furness, A I; Stone, C; Rade, C M; Ortí, G

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates zona pellucida (ZP) ultrastructure in fertilized eggs of annual killifishes (suborder Aplocheiloidei), a group of highly specialized fishes that are able to survive desiccation for several weeks to months before they hatch. Little is known about ZP or chorionic ultrastructure sustaining these life-history modes, so scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to describe this trait in a large number of aplocheiloids with a focus on the family Rivulidae and the genus Hypsolebias. New images of ZP ultrastructure for 52 aplocheiloid species are provided, more than doubling the number characterized thus far. The evolution of chorionic structure within this group is studied using these new data. Characters were coded into a morphological matrix and optimized onto a consensus phylogeny to assess phylogenetic signal and reconstruct ancestral character states. Although ZP characters seem highly homoplastic and exhibit a large amount of structural convergence among lineages, aplocheiloid killifishes have evolved a number of unique structures associated with the chorion. Some annual species seem to have lost long filaments because eggs are deposited in the soil instead of being adhered to aquatic plants. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  4. Effects of porcine zona pellucida immunocontraceptives in zoo felids.

    PubMed

    Harrenstien, Lisa A; Munson, Linda; Chassy, Lisa M; Liu, Irwin K M; Kirkpatrick, Jay F

    2004-09-01

    Methods of contraception are necessary for management of zoo felids; however, the most commonly used contraceptive (melengestrol acetate implant) is associated with serious adverse reactions with long-term use. Porcine zona pellucida (pZP) vaccines are promising as contraceptives, but their safety in zoo felids has not been tested. pZP vaccine was administered to 27 female felids representing 10 species, including African lion (Panthera leo), Asian leopard (P. pardus), jaguar (P. onca), tiger (P. tigris), snow leopard (P. uncia), cougar (Felis concolor), Siberian lynx (F. lynx), Canada lynx (F. canadensis), serval (F. serval), and bobcat (F. rufus), in 15 facilities. Over 6 wk, each animal received three i.m. injections of 65 microg pZP with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant, or carbopol as the adjuvant. Behavioral signs of estrus were seen in 14 of the vaccinated felids. An unacceptably high incidence of adverse reactions was seen including injection site swelling, lameness, limb swelling, or abscessation (or all) in five felids after injection with FCA as the initial adjuvant. Adverse behavioral signs, including increased irritability and aggression, were seen in four felids. Six of the felids were assayed for antibodies against pZP during the 12 mo after vaccination; all showed antibody production. Antibody levels appeared to peak 1-4 mo after vaccination began, although elevated antibody levels persisted in two animals for > 12 mo after the first injection. All vaccinated felids were ovariohysterectomized 3-13 mo after vaccination. Folliculogenesis was present in all treated animals, and there was no histopathologic evidence of inflammatory damage to ovaries. Contraceptive efficacy was not specifically evaluated in this study; however, two of the three felids housed with an intact male became pregnant during the study, one of which gave birth to healthy cubs.

  5. Zinc sparks induce physiochemical changes in the egg zona pellucida that prevent polyspermy

    DOE PAGES

    Que, Emily L.; Duncan, Francesca E.; Bayer, Amanda R.; ...

    2017-01-19

    During fertilization or chemically-induced egg activation, the mouse egg releases billions of zinc atoms in brief bursts known as ‘zinc sparks.’ The zona pellucida (ZP), a glycoprotein matrix surrounding the egg, is the first structure zinc ions encounter as they diffuse away from the plasma membrane. Following fertilization, the ZP undergoes changes described as ‘hardening’, which prevent multiple sperm from fertilizing the egg and thereby establish a block to polyspermy. A major event in zona hardening is cleavage of ZP2 proteins by ovastacin; however, the overall physiochemical changes contributing to zona hardening are not well understood. Using x-ray fluorescence microscopy,more » transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and biological function assays, we tested the hypothesis that zinc release contributes to ZP hardening. We found that the zinc content in the ZP increases by 300% following activation and that zinc exposure modulates the architecture of the ZP matrix. Importantly, zinc-induced structural changes of the ZP have a direct biological consequence; namely, they reduce the ability of sperm to bind to the ZP. These results provide a paradigm-shifting model in which fertilization-induced zinc sparks contribute to the polyspermy block by altering conformations of the ZP matrix. Finally, this adds a previously unrecognized factor, namely zinc, to the process of ZP hardening.« less

  6. Zinc sparks induce physiochemical changes in the egg zona pellucida that prevent polyspermy

    SciTech Connect

    Que, Emily L.; Duncan, Francesca E.; Bayer, Amanda R.

    During fertilization or chemically-induced egg activation, the mouse egg releases billions of zinc atoms in brief bursts known as ‘zinc sparks.’ The zona pellucida (ZP), a glycoprotein matrix surrounding the egg, is the first structure zinc ions encounter as they diffuse away from the plasma membrane. Following fertilization, the ZP undergoes changes described as ‘hardening’, which prevent multiple sperm from fertilizing the egg and thereby establish a block to polyspermy. A major event in zona hardening is cleavage of ZP2 proteins by ovastacin; however, the overall physiochemical changes contributing to zona hardening are not well understood. Using x-ray fluorescence microscopy,more » transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and biological function assays, we tested the hypothesis that zinc release contributes to ZP hardening. We found that the zinc content in the ZP increases by 300% following activation and that zinc exposure modulates the architecture of the ZP matrix. Importantly, zinc-induced structural changes of the ZP have a direct biological consequence; namely, they reduce the ability of sperm to bind to the ZP. These results provide a paradigm-shifting model in which fertilization-induced zinc sparks contribute to the polyspermy block by altering conformations of the ZP matrix. Finally, this adds a previously unrecognized factor, namely zinc, to the process of ZP hardening.« less

  7. Dynamic regulation of sperm interactions with the zona pellucida prior to and after fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Gadella, B M

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings have refined our thinking on sperm interactions with the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) and our understanding of how, at the molecular level, the sperm cell fertilises the oocyte. Proteomic analyses has identified a capacitation-dependent sperm surface reordering that leads to the formation of functional multiprotein complexes involved in zona-cumulus interactions in several mammalian species. During this process, multiple docking of the acrosomal membrane to the plasma membrane takes place. In contrast with the dogma that the acrosome reaction is initiated when spermatozoa bind to the zona pellucida (ZP), it has been established recently that, in mice, the fertilising spermatozoon initiates its acrosome reaction during its voyage through the cumulus before it reaches the ZP. In fact, even acrosome-reacted mouse spermatozoa collected from the perivitelline space can fertilise another ZP-intact oocyte. The oviduct appears to influence the extracellular matrix properties of the spermatozoa as well as the COC. This may influence sperm binding and penetration of the cumulus and ZP, and, in doing so, increase monospermic while decreasing polyspermic fertilisation rates. Structural analysis of the ZP has shed new light on how spermatozoa bind and penetrate this structure and how the cortical reaction blocks sperm-ZP interactions. The current understanding of sperm interactions with the cumulus and ZP layers surrounding the oocyte is reviewed with a special emphasis on the lack of comparative knowledge on this topic in humans, as well as in most farm mammals.

  8. Structural Analysis of Peptide-Analogues of Human Zona Pellucida ZP1 Protein with Amyloidogenic Properties: Insights into Mammalian Zona Pellucida Formation

    PubMed Central

    Louros, Nikolaos N.; Iconomidou, Vassiliki A.; Giannelou, Polina; Hamodrakas, Stavros J.

    2013-01-01

    Zona pellucida (ZP) is an extracellular matrix surrounding and protecting mammalian and fish oocytes, which is responsible for sperm binding. Mammalian ZP consists of three to four glycoproteins, called ZP1, ZP2, ZP3, ZP4. These proteins polymerize into long interconnected filaments, through a common structural unit, known as the ZP domain, which consists of two domains, ZP-N and ZP-C. ZP is related in function to silkmoth chorion and in an evolutionary fashion to the teleostean fish chorion, also fibrous structures protecting the oocyte and embryo, that both have been proven to be functional amyloids. Two peptides were predicted as ‘aggregation-prone’ by our prediction tool, AMYLPRED, from the sequence of the human ZP1-N domain. Here, we present results from transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Congo red staining and attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR), of two synthetic peptide-analogues of these predicted ‘aggregation-prone’ parts of the human ZP1-N domain, that we consider crucial for ZP protein polymerization, showing that they both self-assemble into amyloid-like fibrils. Based on our experimental data, we propose that human ZP (hZP) might be considered as a novel, putative, natural protective amyloid, in close analogy to silkmoth and teleostean fish chorions. Experiments are in progress to verify this proposal. We also attempt to provide insights into ZP formation, proposing a possible model for hZP1-N domain polymerization. PMID:24069181

  9. Intracellular activation of ovastacin mediates pre-fertilization hardening of the zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Körschgen, Hagen; Kuske, Michael; Karmilin, Konstantin; Yiallouros, Irene; Balbach, Melanie; Floehr, Julia; Wachten, Dagmar; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Stöcker, Walter

    2017-09-01

    How and where is pro-ovastacin activated and how does active ovastacin regulate zona pellucida hardening (ZPH) and successful fertilization? Ovastacin is partially active before exocytosis and pre-hardens the zona pellucida (ZP) before fertilization. The metalloproteinase ovastacin is stored in cortical granules, it cleaves zona pellucida protein 2 (ZP2) upon fertilization and thereby destroys the ZP sperm ligand and triggers ZPH. Female mice deficient in the extracellular circulating ovastacin-inhibitor fetuin-B are infertile due to pre-mature ZPH. We isolated oocytes from wild-type and ovastacin-deficient (Astlnull) FVB mice before and after fertilization (in vitro and in vivo) and quantified ovastacin activity and cleavage of ZP2 by immunoblot. We assessed ZPH by measuring ZP digestion time using α-chymotrypsin and by determining ZP2 cleavage. We determined cellular distribution of ovastacin by immunofluorescence using domain-specific ovastacin antibodies. Experiments were performed at least in triplicate with a minimum of 20 oocytes. Data were pre-analyzed using Shapiro-Wilk test. In case of normal distribution, significance was determined via two-sided Student's t-test, whereas in case of non-normal distribution via Mann-Whitney U-test. Metaphase II (MII) oocytes contained both inactive pro-ovastacin and activated ovastacin. Immunoblot and ZP digestion assays revealed a partial cleavage of ZP2 even before fertilization in wild-type mice. Partial cleavage coincided with germinal-vesicle breakdown and MII, despite the presence of fetuin-B protein, an endogenous ovastacin inhibitor, in the follicular and oviductal fluid. Upon exocytosis, part of the C-terminal domain of ovastacin remained attached to the plasmalemma, while the N-terminal active ovastacin domain was secreted. This finding may resolve previously conflicting data showing that ovastacin acts both as an oolemmal receptor termed SAS1B (sperm acrosomal SLLP1 binding protein; SLLP, sperm lysozyme like

  10. [Molecules involved in sperm-zona pellucida interaction in mammals. Role in human fertility].

    PubMed

    Serres, Catherine; Auer, Jana; Petit, François; Patrat, Catherine; Jouannet, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Fertilization in mammals requires an initial interaction of sperm with the oocyte envelope, the zona pellucida (ZP), before it reaches the oocyte. ZP is a highly glycosylated structure, composed of three (mouse) or four (rabbit, boar, bovine, humans...) glycoproteins. The presence of ZP around the oocyte does not allow heterospecific fertilization. This barrier is principally due to the presence of species-specific glycosylations on ZP proteins. Sperm bind ZP by means of membrane receptors which recognize carbohydrate moieties on ZP glycoproteins according to a well-precised sequential process. Upon initial attachment, spermatozoa bind ZP3/ZP4 which induces the sperm acrosome exocytosis followed by a secondary binding of acrosome reacted spermatozoa to ZP2 and by ZP penetration. The sperm receptors are adhesive proteins or integral plasma membrane proteins linked to intraspermatic signalling pathways activating the acrosome reaction. Over the last twenty years, numerous studies have been carried out to identify sperm receptors to ZP in several species, but the data in humans are still incomplete. Work initiated in our research group has identified several proteins interacting with recombinant human ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4, among which are glycolytic enzymes. These enzymes are involved in the gamete interaction by means of their affinity to sugars and not by their catalytic properties. From a clinical point of view, an observed lack or weak expression of some sperm receptors to ZP3 in cases of idiopathic infertility associated with in vitro fertilization failure suggests that knowing the molecular mechanism driving the gamete recognition can be important at the diagnostic level. Furthermore, it has been shown that proteins that mediate gamete recognition diverge rapidly, as a result of positive darwinian selection. A sexual conflict can drive co-evolution of reproductive molecules in both sexes resulting in reproductive isolation and species emergence.

  11. Enhanced contraception of canine zona pellucida 3 DNA vaccine via targeting DEC-205 in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Jinyao; Aipire, Adila; Li, Yijie; Zhang, Fuchun

    2018-06-01

    Zona pellucida 3 (ZP3) is a potential antigen for the development of contraceptive vaccines to control animal population. In this study, we designed a canine ZP3 (CZP3) DNA vaccine through targeting DEC-205 (named as pcD-scFv-CZP3c) and investigated its contraceptive effect in mice. Female BALB/c mice were intramuscularly immunized 3 times at 2 weeks intervals. After immunization, humoral and cellular immune responses were detected by ELISA and flow cytometry. The results showed that pcD-CZP3 and pcD-scFv-CZP3c induced CZP3-specific antibody (Ab) responses both in serum and vaginal secretions compared to pcDNA3.1. Additionally, compared to pcD-CZP3, pcD-scFv-CZP3c increased the levels of CZP3-specific Abs after a third immunization. Abs induced by these two DNA vaccines could bind with mice and dogs oocytes. Moreover, pcD-scFv-CZP3c enhanced the activation of CD4 + T cells characterized by the increased frequencies of CD4 + CD44 + T cells. Finally, the contraceptive effect was evaluated in the immunized mice. These two DNA vaccines significantly decreased a mean litter size of mice compared to pcDNA3.1, but pcD-scFv-CZP3c group showed the smallest mean litter size. The mean litter size of pcD-scFv-CZP3 were 3.2 ± 0.742 and 4.6 ± 1.118 in two mating tests, which were significantly lower than pcDNA3.1(P < 0.001 and P < 0.05). Our results suggest that the CZP3 DNA vaccine targeted with DEC-205 may be a potential strategy for developing a contraceptive DNA vaccine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pronuclear formation by ICSI using chemically activated ovine oocytes and zona pellucida bound sperm.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pichardo, J E; Ducolomb, Y; Romo, S; Kjelland, M E; Fierro, R; Casillas, F; Betancourt, M

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve ICSI, appropiate sperm selection and oocyte activation is necessary. The objective of the present study was to determine the efficiency of fertilization using ICSI with chemically activated ovine oocytes and sperm selected by swim up (SU) or swim up + zona pellucida (SU + ZP) binding. Experiment 1, 4-20 replicates with total 821 in vitro matured oocytes were chemically activated with ethanol, calcium ionophore or ionomycin, to determine oocyte activation (precense of one PN). Treatments showed similar results (54, 47, 42 %, respectively) but statistically differents ( P  < 0.05) than mechanical activated oocytes in sham, ICSI and sham injection (13, 25, 32 %, respectively) (10-17 replicates; n  = 429). Experiment 2: Twelve ejaculates and 28 straws of semen were used (11-19 replicates). Sperm were selected by SU in BSA-TCM 199-H medium. A total of 2,294 fresh sperm and 2,760 from frozen-thawed semen were analyzed after SU or SU + ZP binding. Fresh sperm selected by SU showed acrosome reaction (AR) of 59 %, the sperm selected by SU + ZP binding increased AR to 91 %. In comparison, the AR of frozen-thawed sperm using SU or SU + ZP binding was 77 and 86 %, respectively ( P  < 0.05). Experiment 3: fertilization in 200 mechanical activativated oocytes (17 replicates) was 4 %, but fertilization increased in ethanol activated oocytes after ICSI (12-28 %) (5-6 replicates). When fresh sperm only selected by SU were injected to 123 oocytes, a fertilization rate (28 %) was achieved; in sperm selected by SU + ZP was 25 % (73 oocytes). In comparison, in frozen-thawed sperm selected by SU, fertilization was 13 % (70 oocytes), whereas sperm from SU + ZP binding displayed 12 % (51 oocytes) ( P  > 0.05). Chemical activation induces higher ovine oocyte activation than mechanical activation. Ethanol slightly displays higher oocyte activation than calcium ionophore and ionomicine. Sperm selection with SU

  13. Most fertilizing mouse spermatozoa begin their acrosome reaction before contact with the zona pellucida during in vitro fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Mayuko; Fujiwara, Eiji; Kakiuchi, Yasutaka; Okabe, Masaru; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Baba, Shoji A.; Chiba, Kazuyoshi; Hirohashi, Noritaka

    2011-01-01

    To fuse with oocytes, spermatozoa of eutherian mammals must pass through extracellular coats, the cumulus cell layer, and the zona pellucida (ZP). It is generally believed that the acrosome reaction (AR) of spermatozoa, essential for zona penetration and fusion with oocytes, is triggered by sperm contact with the zona pellucida. Therefore, in most previous studies of sperm–oocyte interactions in the mouse, the cumulus has been removed before insemination to facilitate the examination of sperm–zona interactions. We used transgenic mouse spermatozoa, which enabled us to detect the onset of the acrosome reaction using fluorescence microscopy. We found that the spermatozoa that began the acrosome reaction before reaching the zona were able to penetrate the zona and fused with the oocyte's plasma membrane. In fact, most fertilizing spermatozoa underwent the acrosome reaction before reaching the zona pellucida of cumulus-enclosed oocytes, at least under the experimental conditions we used. The incidence of in vitro fertilization of cumulus-free oocytes was increased by coincubating oocytes with cumulus cells, suggesting an important role for cumulus cells and their matrix in natural fertilization. PMID:21383182

  14. Two subunits of the 55 K porcine zona pellucida glycoprotein family are immunologically distinct

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, M.G.; Yurewicz, E.C.; Sacco, A.G.

    1986-03-01

    The 55K glycoprotein family (ZP3) of the porcine zona pellucida is comprised of two subunits of 46 K and 45 K which can be resolved by endo-..beta..-galactosidase digestion of ZP3 followed by reversed phase HPLC on Vydac C4 resin. Gel electrophoresis revealed that the 46 K component (EBDG..cap alpha..) is approx. 95% pure and the 45 K component (EBGD..beta..) is 100% pure. In the present study, these two subunits were evaluated immunologically by RIA. Under similar reaction protocols (chloramine-T iodination procedure) comparable specific activities were obtained for EBGD..cap alpha.. (33.06 +/- 7.5 ..mu..ci/..mu..gm), EBGD..beta.. (30.45 +/- 1.6) and ZP3 (26.3more » +/- 1.3). Antibody (Ab) titration studies revealed that EBGD..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. are potent immunogens and /sup 125/I-EBGD..cap alpha.. showed minimal cross reactivity to EBGD..beta..-Ab (8% bound at 1:500 dilution), whereas, /sup 125/I-EBGD..beta.. showed a greater degree of cross reactivity to EBGD..cap alpha..-Ab (23% bound at 1:500 dilution). Maximum binding for the two labeled antigens against homologous Abs (1:500) was > 60%. Dose response studies revealed that in the /sup 125/I-EBGD..cap alpha.. vs EBGD..cap alpha.. -Ab system, the 50% intercept was 3.25 +/- 0.32 ng for EBGD..cap alpha.. and 472.43 +/- 30.26 ng for EBGD..beta.. (p < 0.01), whereas, in the /sup 125/I-EBGD..beta.. vs EBGD..beta..-Ab system the 50% intercept was 3.51 +/- 0.58 for EBGD..beta.. and 166.77 +/- 49.20 for EBGD..cap alpha.. (p < 0.01). No significant differences were observed in the slopes of the dose response curves. It is concluded that the two subunits of ZP3 possess distinct immunologic characteristics as evaluated by RIA.« less

  15. Specific antibodies to porcine zona pellucida detected by quantitative radioimmunoassay in both fertile and infertile women

    SciTech Connect

    Kurachi, H.; Wakimoto, H.; Sakumoto, T.

    1984-02-01

    The specific radioimmunoassay system was developed for the titration of the antibodies to porcine zona pellucida (ZP) in human sera by using /sup 125/I-labeled purified porcine ZP as antigen, which is known to have cross-reactivity with human ZP. The antibodies in human sera were detected in 3 of 11 (27%) women with unexplained infertility, in 16 of 48 (33%) amenorrheic patients, in 4 of 12 (33%) fertile women, and in 3 of 10 (30%) men. Moreover, antibody titers in infertile women were no higher than those in fertile women and in men. These results seem to suggest that the antibodiesmore » in human sera that cross-react with porcine ZP may not be an important factor in causing infertility in women.« less

  16. Sperm Proteasomes Degrade Sperm Receptor on the Egg Zona Pellucida during Mammalian Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Shawn W.; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Yi, Young-Joo; Gupta, Satish K.; Sutovsky, Miriam; Odhiambo, John F.; Powell, Michael D.; Miller, David J.; Sutovsky, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanism by which the fertilizing spermatozoon penetrates the mammalian vitelline membrane, the zona pellucida (ZP) remains one of the unexplained fundamental events of human/mammalian development. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the 26S proteasome as a candidate for echinoderm, ascidian and mammalian egg coat lysin. Monitoring ZP protein degradation by sperm during fertilization is nearly impossible because those few spermatozoa that penetrate the ZP leave behind a virtually untraceable residue of degraded proteins. We have overcome this hurdle by designing an experimentally consistent in vitro system in which live boar spermatozoa are co-incubated with ZP-proteins (ZPP) solubilized from porcine oocytes. Using this assay, mimicking sperm-egg interactions, we demonstrate that the sperm-borne proteasomes can degrade the sperm receptor protein ZPC. Upon coincubation with motile spermatozoa, the solubilized ZPP, which appear to be ubiquitinated, adhered to sperm acrosomal caps and induced acrosomal exocytosis/formation of the acrosomal shroud. The degradation of the sperm receptor protein ZPC was assessed by Western blotting band-densitometry and proteomics. A nearly identical pattern of sperm receptor degradation, evident already within the first 5 min of coincubation, was observed when the spermatozoa were replaced with the isolated, enzymatically active, sperm-derived proteasomes. ZPC degradation was blocked by proteasomal inhibitors and accelerated by ubiquitin-aldehyde(UBAL), a modified ubiquitin protein that stimulates proteasomal proteolysis. Such a degradation pattern of ZPC is consistent with in vitro fertilization studies, in which proteasomal inhibitors completely blocked fertilization, and UBAL increased fertilization and polyspermy rates. Preincubation of intact zona-enclosed ova with isolated active sperm proteasomes caused digestion, abrasions and loosening of the exposed zonae, and significantly reduced

  17. Oocytes with a dark zona pellucida demonstrate lower fertilization, implantation and clinical pregnancy rates in IVF/ICSI cycles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Xu, Bo; Wu, Li-Min; Jin, Ren-Tao; Luan, Hong-Bing; Luo, Li-Hua; Zhu, Qing; Johansson, Lars; Liu, Yu-Sheng; Tong, Xian-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The morphological assessment of oocytes is important for embryologists to identify and select MII oocytes in IVF/ICSI cycles. Dysmorphism of oocytes decreases viability and the developmental potential of oocytes as well as the clinical pregnancy rate. Several reports have suggested that oocytes with a dark zona pellucida (DZP) correlate with the outcome of IVF treatment. However, the effect of DZP on oocyte quality, fertilization, implantation, and pregnancy outcome were not investigated in detail. In this study, a retrospective analysis was performed in 268 infertile patients with fallopian tube obstruction and/or male factor infertility. In 204 of these patients, all oocytes were surrounded by a normal zona pellucida (NZP, control group), whereas 46 patients were found to have part of their retrieved oocytes enclosed by NZP and the other by DZP (Group A). In addition, all oocytes enclosed by DZP were retrieved from 18 patients (Group B). No differences were detected between the control and group A. Compared to the control group, the rates of fertilization, good quality embryos, implantation and clinical pregnancy were significantly decreased in group B. Furthermore, mitochondria in oocytes with a DZP in both of the two study groups (A and B) were severely damaged with several ultrastructural alterations, which were associated with an increased density of the zona pellucida and vacuolization. Briefly, oocytes with a DZP affected the clinical outcome in IVF/ICSI cycles and appeared to contain more ultrastructural alterations. Thus, DZP could be used as a potential selective marker for embryologists during daily laboratory work.

  18. Estimating Young's modulus of zona pellucida by micropipette aspiration in combination with theoretical models of ovum

    PubMed Central

    Khalilian, Morteza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh; Chizari, Mahmoud; Yazdi, Poopak Eftekhari

    2010-01-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) is the spherical layer that surrounds the mammalian oocyte. The physical hardness of this layer plays a crucial role in fertilization and is largely unknown because of the lack of appropriate measuring and modelling methods. The aim of this study is to measure the biomechanical properties of the ZP of human/mouse ovum and to test the hypothesis that Young's modulus of the ZP varies with fertilization. Young's moduli of ZP are determined before and after fertilization by using the micropipette aspiration technique, coupled with theoretical models of the oocyte as an elastic incompressible half-space (half-space model), an elastic compressible bilayer (layered model) or an elastic compressible shell (shell model). Comparison of the models shows that incorporation of the layered geometry of the ovum and the compressibility of the ZP in the layered and shell models may provide a means of more accurately characterizing ZP elasticity. Evaluation of results shows that although the results of the models are different, all confirm that the hardening of ZP will increase following fertilization. As can be seen, different choices of models and experimental parameters can affect the interpretation of experimental data and lead to differing mechanical properties. PMID:19828504

  19. A Flexure-Guided Piezo Drill for Penetrating the Zona Pellucida of Mammalian Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wesley; Dai, Changsheng; Liu, Jun; Wang, Xian; Luu, Devin K; Zhang, Zhuoran; Ru, Changhai; Zhou, Chao; Tan, Min; Pu, Huayan; Xie, Shaorong; Peng, Yan; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Mammalian oocytes such as mouse oocytes have a highly elastic outer membrane, zona pellucida (ZP) that cannot be penetrated without significantly deforming the oocyte, even with a sharp micropipette. Piezo drill devices leverage lateral and axial vibration of the micropipette to accomplish ZP penetration with greatly reduced oocyte deformation. However, existing piezo drills all rely on a large lateral micropipette vibration amplitude ( 20 ) and a small axial vibration amplitude (0.1 ). The very large lateral vibration amplitude has been deemed to be necessary for ZP penetration although it also induces larger oocyte deformation and more oocyte damage. This paper reports on a new piezo drill device that uses a flexure guidance mechanism and a systematically designed pulse train with an appropriate base frequency. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that a small lateral vibration amplitude (e.g., 2 ) and an axial vibration amplitude as large as 1.2 were achieved. Besides achieving 100% effectiveness in the penetration of mouse oocytes (n = 45), the new piezo device during ZP penetration induced a small oocyte deformation of 3.4 versus larger than 10 using existing piezo drill devices.

  20. Analysis of ZP1 gene reveals differences in zona pellucida composition in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Moros-Nicolás, C; Leza, A; Chevret, P; Guillén-Martínez, A; González-Brusi, L; Boué, F; Lopez-Bejar, M; Ballesta, J; Avilés, M; Izquierdo-Rico, M J

    2018-01-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) is an extracellular envelope that surrounds mammalian oocytes. This coat participates in the interaction between gametes, induction of the acrosome reaction, block of polyspermy and protection of the oviductal embryo. Previous studies suggested that carnivore ZP was formed by three glycoproteins (ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4), with ZP1 being a pseudogene. However, a recent study in the cat found that all four proteins were expressed. In the present study, in silico and molecular analyses were performed in several carnivores to clarify the ZP composition in this order of mammals. The in silico analysis demonstrated the presence of the ZP1 gene in five carnivores: cheetah, panda, polar bear, tiger and walrus, whereas in the Antarctic fur seal and the Weddell seal there was evidence of pseudogenisation. Molecular analysis showed the presence of four ZP transcripts in ferret ovaries (ZP1, ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4) and three in fox ovaries (ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4). Analysis of the fox ZP1 gene showed the presence of a stop codon. The results strongly suggest that all four ZP genes are expressed in most carnivores, whereas ZP1 pseudogenisation seems to have independently affected three families (Canidae, Otariidae and Phocidae) of the carnivore tree.

  1. Zona pellucida from fertilised human oocytes induces a voltage-dependent calcium influx and the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa, but cannot be penetrated by sperm

    PubMed Central

    Patrat, Catherine; Auer, Jana; Fauque, Patricia; Leandri, Roger L; Jouannet, Pierre; Serres, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Background The functions of three zona glycoproteins, ZP1, ZP2 and ZP3 during the sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) interaction are now well established in mice. The expression of an additional zona glycoprotein, ZPB/4, in humans, led us to reconsider the classical mouse model of gamete interaction. We investigated the various functions of human ZP (hZP) during the interaction of spermatozoa with fertilised and unfertilised oocytes. Results The hZP of fertilised oocytes retained their ability to bind sperm (albeit less strongly than that from unfertilised oocytes), to induce an intraspermatic calcium influx through voltage-dependent channels similar to that observed with hZP from unfertilised oocytes and to promote the acrosome reaction at a rate similar to that induced by the ZP of unfertilised oocytes (61.6 ± 6.2% vs60.7 ± 9.1% respectively). Conversely, the rate of hZP penetrated by sperm was much lower for fertilised than for unfertilised oocytes (19% vs 57% respectively, p < 0.01). We investigated the status of ZP2 in the oocytes used in the functional tests, and demonstrated that sperm binding and acrosome reaction induction, but not ZP penetration, occurred whether or not ZP2 was cleaved. Conclusion The change in ZP function induced by fertilisation could be different in human and mouse species. Our results suggest a zona blocking to polyspermy based at the sperm penetration level in humans. PMID:17147816

  2. Foaling rates in feral horses treated with the immunocontraceptive porcine zona pellucida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, J.I.; Roelle, J.E.; Cade, B.S.; Coates-Markle, L.; Kane, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Locally abundant feral horses (Equus caballus) can rapidly deplete available resources. Fertility control agents present promising nonlethal tools for reducing their population growth rates. We tested the effect of 2 forms of the immunocontraceptive porcine zona pellucida (PZP) on foaling rates in 3 populations of feral horses in the western United States. A liquid form requiring annual boosters was administered at Little Book Cliffs Wild Horse Range, Mesa County (CO), and Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, Bighorn County (WY) and Carbon County (MT), and a time-release pellet form designed to produce 2 yr of infertility was administered at McCullough Peaks Herd Management Area, Park County (WY). Average foaling rates (foals born/mare-yr) from direct observation of untreated and treated female horses (mares), 2004-2008, were 60.1% (n = 153 mare-yr) versus 6.6% (n = 91 mare-yr) at Little Book Cliffs, and 62.8% (n = 129 mare-yr) versus 17.7% (n = 79 mare-yr) at Pryor Mountain, respectively. At McCullough Peaks, mean annual foaling rates from 2006 to 2008 were 75.0% (n = 48 mare-yr) for untreated mares and 31.7% (n = 101 mare-yr) for treated mares. Controlling for age of mares and pretreatment differences in fertility, PZP reduced foaling rates in all 3 herds. The pellets used at McCullough Peaks (produced by cold evaporation) were less effective than pellets used in a previous trial and produced by heat extrusion. Immunocontraception with PZP may be a useful tool in reducing fertility rates in some western United States feral horse herds, but population growth reduction will depend on timely access to mares for inoculation and the proportion of mares that can be successfully treated. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  3. Evaluation of zona pellucida birefringence intensity during in vitro maturation of oocytes from stimulated cycles.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Claudia G; Vagnini, Laura D; Mauri, Ana L; Massaro, Fabiana C; Silva, Liliane F I; Cavagna, Mario; Baruffi, Ricardo L R; Oliveira, Joao B A; Franco, José G

    2011-04-23

    This study evaluated whether there is a relationship between the zona pellucida birefringence (ZP-BF) intensity and the nuclear (NM) and cytoplasmic (CM) in vitro maturation of human oocytes from stimulated cycles. The ZP-BF was evaluated under an inverted microscope with a polarizing optical system and was scored as high/positive (when the ZP image presented a uniform and intense birefringence) or low/negative (when the image presented moderate and heterogeneous birefringence). CM was analyzed by evaluating the distribution of cortical granules (CGs) throughout the ooplasm by immunofluorescence staining. CM was classified as: complete, when CG was localized in the periphery; incomplete, when oocytes presented a cluster of CGs in the center; or in transition, when oocytes had both in clusters throughout cytoplasm and distributed in a layer in the cytoplasm periphery Nuclear maturation: From a total of 83 germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes, 58 of oocytes (69.9%) reached NM at the metaphase II stage. From these 58 oocytes matured in vitro, the high/positively scoring ZP-BF was presented in 82.7% of oocytes at the GV stage, in 75.8% of oocytes when at the metaphase I, and in 82.7% when oocytes reached MII. No relationship was observed between NM and ZP-BF positive/negative scores (P = 0.55). These variables had a low Pearson's correlation coefficient (r = 0.081). Cytoplasmic maturation: A total of 85 in vitro-matured MII oocytes were fixed for CM evaluation. Forty-nine oocytes of them (57.6%) showed the complete CM, 30 (61.2%) presented a high/positively scoring ZP-BF and 19 (38.8%) had a low/negatively scoring ZP-BF. From 36 oocytes (42.3%) with incomplete CM, 18 (50%) presented a high/positively scoring ZPBF and 18 (50%) had a low/negatively scoring ZP-BF. No relationship was observed between CM and ZP-BF positive/negative scores (P = 0.42). These variables had a low Pearson's correlation coefficient (r = 0.11). The current study demonstrated an absence of

  4. Glycoprotein from the liver constitutes the inner layer of the egg envelope (zona pellucida interna) of the fish, Oryzias latipes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamazaki, T.S.; Nagahama, Y.; Iuchi, I.

    1989-05-01

    A glycoprotein from the liver, which shares epitopes with chorion (egg envelope or zona pellucida) glycoproteins, is present only in the spawning female fish, Oryzias latipes, under natural conditions. This spawning female-specific (SF) substance is distinct from vitellogenin but closely resembles a major glycoprotein component, ZI-3, of the inner layer (zona radiata interna) of the ovarian egg envelope with respect to some biochemical and immunochemical characteristics. Here we report that the (/sup 125/I)SF substance, injected into the abdominal cavity of the spawning female fish, was rapidly transported by the blood circulation into the ovary and incorporated into the inner layermore » of egg envelope of the growing oocytes. The result strongly suggests that the SF substance from the liver is a precursor substance of the major component, ZI-3, of the inner layer of egg envelope in the fish.« less

  5. Assessment of Mouse Germinal Vesicle Stage Oocyte Quality by Evaluating the Cumulus Layer, Zona Pellucida, and Perivitelline Space

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying-Lei; Chen, Ying; Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Wu, Sha-Na; Shen, Jiang-Peng; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2014-01-01

    To improve the outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART) for patients with ovulation problems, it is necessary to retrieve and select germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes with high developmental potential. Oocytes with high developmental potential are characterized by their ability to undergo proper maturation, fertilization, and embryo development. In this study, we analyzed morphological traits of GV stage mouse oocytes, including cumulus cell layer thickness, zona pellucida thickness, and perivitelline space width. Then, we assessed the corresponding developmental potential of each of these oocytes and found that it varies across the range measured for each morphological trait. Furthermore, by manipulating these morphological traits in vitro, we were able to determine the influence of morphological variation on oocyte developmental potential. Manually altering the thickness of the cumulus layer showed strong effects on the fertilization and embryo development potentials of oocytes, whereas manipulation of zona pellucida thickness effected the oocyte maturation potential. Our results provide a systematic detailed method for selecting GV stage oocytes based on a morphological assessment approach that would benefit for several downstream ART applications. PMID:25144310

  6. The preclinical evaluation of immunocontraceptive vaccines based on canine zona pellucida 3 (cZP3) in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Yijie; Zhang, Beibei; Zhang, Fuchun

    2018-05-11

    Stray dogs are the reservoirs and carriers of rabies and are definitive hosts of echinococcosis. To control the overpopulation of stray dogs, zona pellucida 3 (ZP3), a primary receptor for sperm, is a potential antigen for developing contraceptive vaccines. To enhance the immune responses and contraceptive effects of canine ZP3 (cZP3), dog gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and a T cell epitope of chicken ovalbumin (OVA) were selected to construct two fusion proteins with cZP3, ovalbumin-GnRH-ZP3 (OGZ) and ovalbumin-ZP3 (OZ), and their contraceptive effects were evaluated in mice. The synthesized DNA sequences of OGZ and OZ were cloned into plasmid pET-28a respectively. The fusion proteins OGZ and OZ were identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Mice were immunized with OGZ, OZ and cZP3, and the infertility rates were monitored. Mice immunized with mouse ZP3 (mZP3) or adjuvant alone were used as positive control and negative control, respectively. cZP3- and GnRH-specific antibodies (Abs) were detected by ELISA. The bindings of the Abs to oocytes were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The paraffin sections of mice ovaries were observed under microscope for analyzing pathological characteristics. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses showed that the two fusion proteins OGZ and OZ were correctly expressed. ELISA results showed that OGZ vaccine induced both cZP3- and GnRH-specific Abs, and OZ vaccine induced cZP3-specific Ab, which lasted for up to 168 days. The levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol (E2) in sera were significantly decreased in OGZ immunized mice. Indirect immunofluorescence results showed that Abs induced by cZP3 and mZP3 could bind to the mouse ZP and dog ZP each other. Compared with the adjuvant group, all vaccine immunized groups significantly decreased the fertility rate and mean litter size. Interestingly, the fertility rate in OGZ-immunized group is the lowest, and only 1 mouse out of 10 mice is fertile

  7. Regulation of acrosomal exocytosis. II. The zona pellucida-induced acrosome reaction of bovine spermatozoa is controlled by extrinsic positive regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Florman, H M; First, N L

    1988-08-01

    The effects of accessory sex gland secretions on the zona pellucida-induced acrosome reaction of bovine spermatozoa were investigated. Soluble extracts of zonae pellucidae initiated exocytosis in ejaculated spermatozoa. This process had an ED50 of 20 ng/microliter zona pellucida protein and saturated at 50 ng/microliter (Florman and First, 1988. Dev. Biol. 128, 453-463). In epididymal sperm this dose-response relationship was shifted toward greater agonist concentrations by at least a factor of 10(3). Reconstitution of high potency agonist response was achieved in vitro by incubation of epididymal sperm with bovine seminal plasma. Reconstitution was dependent on the seminal plasma protein concentration. The ED50 of this process was 62 micrograms protein/10(8) sperm and saturation was observed with 124 micrograms protein/10(8) sperm. Agonist responses in reconstituted epididymal sperm and in ejaculated sperm were indistinguishable with regard to dependence on the zona pellucida protein concentration and the kinetics of induced acrosome reactions. Kinetic studies suggest that reconstitution is due to adsorption of regulatory factors from seminal plasma. In addition to the positive regulatory elements responsible for reconstituting activity, seminal plasma also contains negative regulatory elements which inhibit agonist response. These negative factors are inactivated during sperm capacitation, permitting the expression of positive regulators. Acting together, these regulatory elements could coordinate high affinity agonist response with the availability of eggs in vivo.

  8. Laser-assisted zona pellucida thinning does not facilitate hatching and may disrupt the in vitro hatching process: a morphokinetic study in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Tim; Cohen, Jacques; Saunders, Helen; Alikani, Mina

    2014-12-01

    Does laser-assisted zona thinning of cleavage stage mouse embryos facilitate hatching in vitro? No, unlike laser zona opening, zona thinning does not facilitate embryo hatching. Artificial opening of the zona pellucida facilitates hatching of mouse and human embryos. Laser-assisted zona thinning has also been used for the purpose of assisted hatching of human embryos but it has not been properly investigated in an animal model; thinning methods have produced inconsistent clinical results. Time-lapse microscopy was used to study the hatching process in the mouse after zona opening and zona thinning; a control group of embryos was not zona-manipulated but exposed to the same laser energy. Eight-cell CB6F1/J mouse embryos were pooled and allocated to three groups (n = 56 per group): A control group of embryos that were exposed to a dose of laser energy focused outside the zona pellucida (zona intact); one experimental group of embryos in which the zona pellucida was opened by complete ablation using the same total number of pulses as the control group; a second experimental group of embryos in which the zona pellucida was thinned to establish a smooth lased area using the same number of pulses as used in the other two groups. The width of the zona opening was 25 μm and width of the thinned area was 35 μm. Development was monitored by time-lapse microscopy. Overall treatment differences for continuous variables were analyzed by analysis of variance and pairwise comparisons using the Student t-test allowing for unequal variances, while for categorical data, a standard chi-squared test was utilized for all pairwise comparisons. The frequency of complete hatching was 33.9% in the control group, 94.4% after zona opening, and 39.3% after zona thinning (overall group comparison, P < 0.0001). Overall, 60.7% of the zona-thinned embryos did not complete the hatching process and remained trapped within the zona; when they did hatch, they did not necessarily hatch from the zona

  9. Resveratrol reverses the adverse effects of a diet-induced obese murine model on oocyte quality and zona pellucida softening.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zeyang; Wang, Lining; Li, Hao; Wang, Hongyu; Xu, Dingqi; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Daofu; Feng, Xizeng

    2018-05-23

    Reproductive dysfunction associated with obesity is increasing among women of reproductive age, including infertility and increasing risk of miscarriage. In females, reproductive disorders are linked to declining quality of oocytes. Using a model of diet-induced obesity, we have investigated the possible effects of obesity on oocyte quality, including metabolism, lipid accumulation, ROS levels, meiosis and changes in spindle structure in Metaphase II. Our study showed that obesity induced by a high fat diet can impair oocyte meiosis, destroy spindle assembly, and promote oxidative stress and abnormal mitochondrial distribution. With the addition of resveratrol, the negative impact of diet-induced obesity on the quality of oocytes was alleviated to some extent. In addition, we found that obesity causes mouse oocytes to soften, and resveratrol can restore the zona pellucida of oocytes to the same state as the control group. In conclusion, resveratrol can reverse the adverse effects of obesity on oocytes, which is beneficial for subsequent embryonic development.

  10. A common 'aggregation-prone' interface possibly participates in the self-assembly of human zona pellucida proteins.

    PubMed

    Louros, Nikolaos N; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Baltatzis, Georgios E; Patsouris, Efstratios S; Hamodrakas, Stavros J; Iconomidou, Vassiliki A

    2016-03-01

    Human zona pellucida (ZP) is composed of four glycoproteins, namely ZP1, ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4. ZP proteins form heterodimers, which are incorporated into filaments through a common bipartite polymerizing component, designated as the ZP domain. The latter is composed of two individually folded subdomains, named ZP-N and ZP-C. Here, we have synthesized six 'aggregation-prone' peptides, corresponding to a common interface of human ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4. Experimental results utilizing electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ATR FT-IR spectroscopy and polarizing microscopy indicate that these peptides self-assemble forming fibrils with distinct amyloid-like features. Finally, by performing detailed modeling and docking, we attempt to shed some light in the self-assembly mechanism of human ZP proteins. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Roles of the zona pellucida and functional exposure of the sperm-egg fusion factor 'IZUMO' during in vitro fertilization in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tanihara, Fuminori; Nakai, Michiko; Men, Nguyen Thi; Kato, Noriko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Noguchi, Junko; Otoi, Takeshige; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) is considered to play important roles in the prevention of polyspermy in mammalian oocytes. However, in pigs we have shown that the presence of the ZP accelerates sperm penetration into the ooplasm during in vitro fertilization (IVF). In the present study, we investigated the effects of the ZP on sperm binding, acrosomal status, and functional exposure of IZUMO, a critical factor involved in sperm-egg fusion, during IVF in pigs. We evaluated the numbers and acrosomal statuses of sperm binding to the ZP and oolemma, and being present in the ZP and perivitelline space (PVS) using ZP-intact and ZP-free oocytes. More sperm bound to the ZP than to the oolemma. The average number of sperm present in the PVS was 0.44-0.51 per oocyte, and all sperm had lost their acrosomes. The proportion of sperm that were immunopositive for anti-IZUMO antibody was significantly higher after they were passing or had passed through the ZP. Furthermore, addition of anti-IZUMO antibody to the fertilization medium significantly inhibited the penetration of sperm into ZP-free oocytes. These results suggest that, in pigs, the ZP induces the acrosome reaction, which is associated with the functional exposure of IZUMO, resulting in completion of fertilization. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Surface alterations of the mouse zona pellucida and ovum following in vivo fertilization: correlation with the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jackowski, S.; Dumont, J.N.

    1979-01-01

    The zona pellucida and cell surface of in vivo fertilized mouse ova exhibit time dependent changes which can be detected with the scanning electron microscope. The periods of ovulation, fertilization and first cleavage in superovulated C3D2/F/sub 1/ hybrids were determined and times corresponding to G/sub 1/, S, G/sub 2/, and M were calculated. The zona of a mature unfertilized ovum has a rough texture with deep furrows; at fertilization and thereafter the zona develops a smoother, ropy and seemingly porous surface. The cell surface of the unfertilized ovum is characterized by uniform microvilli, small blebs and rounded, mound-like elevations. Aftermore » fertilization and development to G/sub 1/, the ovum loses its blebs but retains the mound-like elevations and microvilli which are now less uniform. As the ovum progresses toward S, it loses the mound-like elevations but retains microvilli in the same density as found in G/sub 1/. The ovum in G/sub 2/ exhibits smaller but more numerous microvilli which vary considerably in length. Some appear to bifurcate. The fertilized ovum developing through M and G/sub 1/ of the 2 cell stage exhibits a less dense population of relatively uniform microvilli, periodic blebs and, again, rounded elevations. The data are reminiscent of surface changes associated with the cell cycle in tissue culture cells and indicate a cyclic progression of the in vivo fertilized mouse ovum through the first cleavage division to the 2 cell stage.« less

  13. Direct embryo tagging and identification system by attachment of biofunctionalized polysilicon barcodes to the zona pellucida of mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Novo, Sergi; Penon, Oriol; Barrios, Leonardo; Nogués, Carme; Santaló, Josep; Durán, Sara; Gómez-Matínez, Rodrigo; Samitier, Josep; Plaza, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Luisa; Ibáñez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    Is the attachment of biofunctionalized polysilicon barcodes to the outer surface of the zona pellucida an effective approach for the direct tagging and identification of cultured embryos? The results achieved provide a proof of concept for a direct embryo tagging system using biofunctionalized polysilicon barcodes, which could help to minimize the risk of mismatching errors (mix-ups) in human assisted reproduction technologies. Even though the occurrence of mix-ups is rare, several cases have been reported in fertility clinics around the world. Measures to prevent the risk of mix-ups in human assisted reproduction technologies are therefore required. Mouse embryos were tagged with 10 barcodes and the effectiveness of the tagging system was tested during fresh in vitro culture (n=140) and after embryo cryopreservation (n = 84). Finally, the full-term development of tagged embryos was evaluated (n =105). Mouse pronuclear embryos were individually rolled over wheat germ agglutinin-biofunctionalized polysilicon barcodes to distribute them uniformly around the ZONA PELLUCIDA surface. Embryo viability and retention of barcodes were determined during 96 h of culture. The identification of tagged embryos was performed every 24 h in an inverted microscope and without embryo manipulation to simulate an automatic reading procedure. Full-term development of the tagged embryos was assessed after their transfer to pseudo-pregnant females. To test the validity of the embryo tagging system after a cryopreservation process, tagged embryos were frozen at the 2-cell stage using a slow freezing protocol, and followed in culture for 72 h after thawing. Neither the in vitro or in vivo development of tagged embryos was adversely affected. The tagging system also proved effective during an embryo cryopreservation process. Global identification rates higher than 96 and 92% in fresh and frozen-thawed tagged embryos, respectively, were obtained when simulating an automatic barcode reading

  14. MMP2 and acrosin are major proteinases associated with the inner acrosomal membrane and may cooperate in sperm penetration of the zona pellucida during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Marvin; Rodriguez, Hilma; Zara, Lindsay; Yu, Yang; Xu, Wei; Oko, Richard

    2012-09-01

    Sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) penetration during fertilization is a process that most likely involves enzymatic digestion of this extracellular coat by spermatozoa. Since the inner acrosomal membrane (IAM) is the leading edge of spermatozoa during penetration and proteins required for secondary binding of sperm to the zona are present on it, the IAM is the likely location of these enzymes. The objectives of this study were to identify and characterize proteinases present on the IAM, confirm their localization and provide evidence for their role in fertilization. Gelatin zymography of detergent extracts of the IAM revealed bands of enzymatic activity identified as serine and matrix metallo-proteinases (MMPs). Specific inhibitors to MMPs revealed that MMP activity was due to MMP2. Immunoblotting determined that the serine protease activity on the zymogram was due to acrosin and also confirmed the MMP2 activity. Immunogold labeling of spermatozoa at the electron microscope level showed that acrosin and MMP2 were confined to the apical and principal segments of the acrosome in association with the IAM, confirming our IAM isolation technique. Immunohistochemical examination of acrosin and MMP2 during spermiogenesis showed that both proteins originate in the acrosomic granule during the Golgi phase and later redistribute to the acrosomal membrane. Anti-MMP2 antibodies and inhibitors incorporated into in vitro fertilization media significantly decreased fertilization rates. This is the first study to demonstrate that MMP2 and acrosin are associated with the IAM and introduces the possibility of their cooperation in enzymatic digestion of the ZP during penetration.

  15. Rapidly evolving zona pellucida domain proteins are a major component of the vitelline envelope of abalone eggs

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, Jan E.; Yi, Xianhua; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2006-01-01

    Proteins harboring a zona pellucida (ZP) domain are prominent components of vertebrate egg coats. Although less well characterized, the egg coat of the non-vertebrate marine gastropod abalone (Haliotis spp.) is also known to contain a ZP domain protein, raising the possibility of a common molecular basis of metazoan egg coat structures. Egg coat proteins from vertebrate as well as non-vertebrate taxa have been shown to evolve under positive selection. Studied most extensively in the abalone system, coevolution between adaptively diverging egg coat and sperm proteins may contribute to the rapid development of reproductive isolation. Thus, identifying the pattern of evolution among egg coat proteins is important in understanding the role these genes may play in the speciation process. The purpose of the present study is to characterize the constituent proteins of the egg coat [vitelline envelope (VE)] of abalone eggs and to provide preliminary evidence regarding how selection has acted on VE proteins during abalone evolution. A proteomic approach is used to match tandem mass spectra of peptides from purified VE proteins with abalone ovary EST sequences, identifying 9 of 10 ZP domain proteins as components of the VE. Maximum likelihood models of codon evolution suggest positive selection has acted among a subset of amino acids for 6 of these genes. This work provides further evidence of the prominence of ZP proteins as constituents of the egg coat, as well as the prominent role of positive selection in diversification of these reproductive proteins. PMID:17085584

  16. Time-lapse monitoring of zona pellucida-free embryos obtained through in vitro fertilization: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Bodri, Daniel; Kato, Ryutaro; Kondo, Masae; Hosomi, Naoko; Katsumata, Yoshinari; Kawachiya, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tsunekazu

    2015-05-01

    To report time-lapse monitoring of human oocytes in which the damaged zona pellucida was removed, producing zona-free (ZF) oocytes that were cultured until the blastocyst stage in time-lapse incubators. Retrospective case series. Private infertility clinic. Infertile patients (n = 32) undergoing minimal ovarian stimulation or natural cycle IVF treatment between October 2012 and June 2014. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) fertilization of ZF oocytes, prolonged embryo culture in time-lapse incubators, elective vitrification, and subsequent single vitrified-thawed blastocyst transfer (SVBT). Rate of fertilization, cleavage and blastocyst development, live-birth rate per SVBT cycle. In spite of advanced maternal age (39 ± 4.2; range, 30-46 years), good fertilization (94%), cleavage (94%), and blastocyst development rates (38%) were reached after fertilization and culturing of ZF oocytes/embryos. All thawed ZF blastocysts survived, and up to this date seven SVBT transfers were performed, yielding three (43%) term live births with healthy newborns. Time-lapse imagery gives a unique insight into the dynamics of embryo development in ZF embryos. Moreover, our case series demonstrate that an oocyte with a damaged zona pellucida that has been removed could be successfully fertilized with ICSI, cultured until blastocyst stage in a time-lapse incubator and vitrified electively for subsequent use. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fecal 20-oxo-pregnane concentrations in free-ranging African elephants (Loxodonta africana) treated with porcine zona pellucida vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, M J; Ganswindt, A; Münscher, S; Bertschinger, H J

    2012-07-01

    Because of overpopulation of African elephants in South Africa and the consequent threat to biodiversity, the need for a method of population control has become evident. In this regard, the potential use of the porcine zona pellucida (pZP) vaccine as an effective means for population control is explored. While potential effects of pZP treatment on social behavior of African elephants have been investigated, no examination of the influence of pZP vaccination on the endocrine correlates in treated females has been undertaken. In this study, ovarian activity of free-ranging, pZP-treated African elephant females was monitored noninvasively for 1 yr at Thornybush Private Nature Reserve, South Africa, by measuring fecal 5α-pregnan-3β-ol-20-on concentrations via enzyme immunoassay. A total of 719 fecal samples from 19 individuals were collected over the study period, averaging 38 samples collected per individual (minimum, maximum: 16, 52). Simultaneously, behavioral observations were made to record the occurrence of estrous behavior for comparison. Each elephant under study showed 5α-pregnan-3β-ol-20-on concentrations rising above baseline at some period during the study indicating luteal activity. Average 5α-pregnan-3β-ol-20-on concentrations were 1.61 ± 0.46 μg/g (mean ± SD). Within sampled females, 42.9% exhibited estrous cycles within the range reported for captive African elephants, 14.3% had irregular cycles, and 42.9% did not appear to be cycling. Average estrous cycle duration was 14.72 ± 0.85 wk. Estrous behavior coincided with the onset of the luteal phase and a subsequent rise in 5α-pregnan-3β-ol-20-on concentrations. Average 5α-pregnan-3β-ol-20-on levels positively correlated with rainfall. No association between average individual 5α-pregnan-3β-ol-20-on concentrations or cyclicity status with age or parity were detected. Earlier determination of efficacy was established via fecal hormone analysis with no pregnancies determined 22 mo post

  18. Inoculation of female American black bears (Ursus americanus) with partially purified porcine zona pellucidae limits cub production.

    PubMed

    Lane, V M; Liu, I K M; Casey, K; vanLeeuwen, E M G; Flanagan, D R; Murata, K; Munro, C

    2007-01-01

    The present 2-year study investigated the feasibility of using porcine zona pellucidae (pZP) as antigen for immunocontraception in American black bears. Sows, 3-6 years of age, were administered either two doses of 250 microg pZP with Freund's adjuvant (n = 10) or adjuvant alone (n = 5), one in April and one in May, and were kept away from the boars until June. Serum samples were collected before injections and before denning (November). The presence of sows with cubs at side was observed during premature emergence from denning. First-year results indicated that anti-pZP antibody titres in vaccinated sows were 2.5-9.0-fold (range) higher compared with non-vaccinated sows and that the vaccinated sows were threefold less likely to become pregnant (P = 0.167). Control and vaccinated bears produced 1.6 and 0.2 cubs per sow, respectively (P = 0.06). The second-year study investigated the feasibility of using pZP sequestered in a controlled-release pellet and a water-soluble adjuvant (QS-21) to avoid regulatory problems associated with Freund's adjuvant. Sows in the treatment group (n = 22) were administered a single dose of an emulsion of 250 microg pZP and 150 microg QS-21 plus a pellet containing 70-90 microg pZP for delayed release as booster dose. Control sows (n = 5) received the QS-21 adjuvant in pellet alone. Serum samples were collected before inoculations (April) and before denning (November). Seven cubs were born to the five control sows, but none was born to the 22 vaccinated sows (P < 0.001). Anti-pZP antibody mean absorbance ratios in control sows remained at background levels, whereas vaccinated sows had ratios fourfold higher than controls. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunohistochemical localisation confirmed immunoreactivity of sera from inoculated bears. We conclude that cub production in the American black bear can be effectively limited with either two injections of 250 microg pZP or a single inoculation of partially

  19. Do age and extended culture affect the architecture of the zona pellucida of human oocytes and embryos?

    PubMed

    Kilani, Suha S; Cooke, Simon; Kan, Andrew K; Chapman, Michael G

    2006-02-01

    Advanced female age and extended in vitro culture have both been implicated in zona pellucida (ZP) hardening and thickening. This study aimed to determine the influence of (i) the woman's age and (ii) prolonged in vitro culture of embryos on ZP thickness and density using non-invasive polarized light (LC-PolScope) microscopy. ZP thickness and density (measured as retardance) were determined in oocytes, embryos and blastocysts in women undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in two age groups (older, > 38 years; younger, < or = 38 years). A total of 193 oocytes from 29 patients were studied. The younger group contained 100 oocytes and the older group 93 oocytes. The ZP was significantly thicker in metaphase II oocytes in the older group compared with the younger group (mean +/- SD: 24.1 +/- 2.5 microm vs 23.1 +/- 3.3 microm; p = 0.01) but ZP density was equal (2.8 +/- 0.7 nm). By day 2 of culture, embryos from the two groups had similar ZP thickness (22.2 +/- 2.2 microm vs 21.7 +/- 1.6 microm; p = 0.28) and density (2.9 +/- 0.7 nm vs 2.8 +/- 0.8 nm; p = 0.57). For the embryos cultured to blastocyst (older: n = 20; younger: n = 18) ZP thickness was similar in the two groups (19.2 +/- 2.7 microm vs 19.1 +/- 5.0 microm; p = 0.8) but thinner than on day 2. The older group had significantly denser ZP than the younger group (4.2 +/- 0.5 nm vs 3.3 +/- 1.0 nm, p < 0.01). Blastocysts from both groups had significantly denser ZP than their corresponding day 2 embryos (older: 4.2 +/- 0.5 nm vs 2.9 +/- 0.7 nm, p < 0.001; younger: 3.3 +/- 1.0 nm vs 2.8 +/- 0.8 nm, p = 0.013). It is concluded that there is little relationship between ZP thickness and its density as measured by polarized light microscopy. While ZP thickness decreases with extended embryo culturing, the density of the ZP increases. ZP density increases in both age groups with extended culture and, interestingly, more in embryos from older compared with younger women.

  20. Single-treatment porcine zona pellucida immunocontraception associated with reduction of a population of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Rutberg, Allen T; Naugle, Ricky E; Verret, Frank

    2013-12-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated gradual reductions of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations through immunocontraception, with stabilization occurring after 2-4 yr of treatment, and subsequent reductions of 6-10% annually. These studies employed porcine zona pellucida (PZP) vaccines that required two initial treatments and annual retreatments. From 2005 to 2010, 258 adult and yearling female deer on Fripp Island, South Carolina, were treated with one of several PZP preparations designed to produce 2+ yr of effective contraception with a single treatment. These included several preparations of SpayVac and of native PZP-adjuvant emulsion plus PZP and QA-21 in timed-release pellets. Deer were chemically immobilized, ear-tagged, and administered initial treatments by hand in February-March. Some treated deer were boosted remotely with PZP-adjuvant emulsion 1.5 - 4.5 yr after initial treatments. Ground-based distance sampling was used to estimate deer population density at Fripp Island, a resort community, and at a relatively undeveloped neighboring control site, Hunting Island. Most vaccine preparations tested reduced fawning rates by 75% to 95% for at least 1 yr. From 2005 to 2011, deer density on Fripp Island declined by 50%, from 72 deer/km(2) to 36 deer/km(2), an average annual reduction of 11%. In contrast, population density on the Hunting Island control site fluctuated between 2005 and 2011, averaging 23 deer/km(2) (range, 19-28 deer/km(2)). Population declines on Fripp Island were associated with an increase in the proportion of treated females and with a progressive decrease in winter fawn:doe ratios, from 1.21 fawns/doe in 2005 to 0.19 fawns/doe in 2010. Winter fawn:doe ratios averaged 1.36 fawns/doe (range, 0.84 - 1.62 fawns/doe) at the Hunting Island control site. Annual survivorship averaged approximately 79% among ear-tagged females. The rate at which deer populations diminished in association with PZP treatments on Fripp Island was

  1. Zona pellucida gene mRNA expression in human oocytes is related to oocyte maturity, zona inner layer retardance and fertilization competence.

    PubMed

    Canosa, S; Adriaenssens, T; Coucke, W; Dalmasso, P; Revelli, A; Benedetto, C; Smitz, J

    2017-05-01

    Do the mRNA expression levels of zona pellucida (ZP) genes, ZP1, 2, 3 and 4 in oocyte and cumulus cells (CC) reveal relevant information on the oocyte? The ZP mRNA expression in human oocytes is related to oocyte maturity, zona inner layer (IL) retardance and fertilization capacity. ZP structure and birefringence provide useful information on oocyte cytoplasmic maturation, developmental competence for embryonic growth, blastocyst formation and pregnancy. In order to understand the molecular basis of morphological changes in the ZP, in the current study, the polarized light microscopy (PLM) approach was combined with analysis of the expression of the genes encoding ZP1, 2, 3 and 4, both in the oocytes and in the surrounding CC. This is a retrospective study comprising 98 supernumerary human cumulus oocyte complexes (COC) [80 Metaphase II (MII), 10 Metaphase I (MI) and 8 germinal vesicle (GV)] obtained from 39 patients (median age 33.4 years, range 22-42) after controlled ovarian stimulation. Single oocytes and their corresponding CC were analysed. Oocytes were examined using PLM, and quantitative RT-PCR was performed for ZP1, 2, 3 and 4 in these individual oocytes and their CC. Ephrin-B2 (EFNB2) mRNA was measured in CC as a control. Presence of ZP3 protein in CC and oocytes was investigated using immunocytochemistry. Data were analysed using one-parametric and multivariate analysis and were corrected for the potential impact of patient and cycle characteristics. Oocytes contained ZP1/2/3 and 4 mRNA while in CC only ZP3 was quantifiable. Also ZP3 protein was detected in human CC. When comparing mature (MII) and immature oocytes (MI/GV) or their corresponding CC, ZP1/2 and 4 expression was lower in mature oocytes compared to the expression in immature oocytes (all P < 0.05) and ZP3 expression was lower in the CC of mature oocytes compared to the expression in CC of immature oocytes (P < 0.05). This coincided with a significantly smaller IL-ZP area and thickness in

  2. Use of Both Cumulus Cells’ Transcriptomic Markers and Zona Pellucida Birefringence to Select Developmentally Competent Oocytes in Human Assisted Reproductive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Selection of the best oocyte for subsequent steps of fertilization and embryo transfer was shown to be the crucial step in human infertility treatment procedure. Oocyte selection using morphological criteria mainly Zona pellucida (ZP) has been the gold standard method in assisted reproductive technologies (ART) clinics, but this selection approach has limitations in terms of accuracy, objectivity and constancy. Recent studies using OMICs-based approaches have allowed the identification of key molecular markers that quantitatively and non-invasively predict the oocyte quality for higher pregnancy rates and efficient infertility treatment. These biomarkers are a valuable reinforcement of the morphological selection criteria widely used in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. In this context, this study was designed to investigate the relationship between transcriptomic predictors of oocyte quality found by our group and the conventional morphological parameters of oocyte quality mainly the ZP birefringence. Results Microarray data revealed that 48 and 27 differentially expressed candidate genes in cumulus cells (CCs) were respectively overexpressed and underexpressed in the ZGP (Zona Good Pregnant) versus ZBNP (Zona Bad Non Pregnant) groups. More than 70% of previously reported transcriptomic biomarkers of oocyte developmental competence were confirmed in this study. The analysis of possible association between ZP birefringence versus molecular markers approach showed an absence of correlation between them using the current set of markers. Conclusions This study suggested a new integrative approach that matches morphological and molecular approaches used to select developmentally competent oocytes able to lead to successful pregnancy and the delivery of healthy baby. For each ZP birefringence score, oocytes displayed a particular CCs' gene expression pattern. However, no correlations were found between the 7 gene biomarkers of oocyte developmental

  3. Surfing the wave, cycle, life history, and genes/proteins expressed by testicular germ cells. Part 3: developmental changes in spermatid flagellum and cytoplasmic droplet and interaction of sperm with the zona pellucida and egg plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Hermo, Louis; Pelletier, R-Marc; Cyr, Daniel G; Smith, Charles E

    2010-04-01

    Spermiogenesis constitutes the steps involved in the metamorphosis of spermatids into spermatozoa. It involves modification of several organelles in addition to the formation of several structures including the flagellum and cytoplasmic droplet. The flagellum is composed of a neck region and middle, principal, and end pieces. The axoneme composed of nine outer microtubular doublets circularly arranged to form a cylinder around a central pair of microtubules is present throughout the flagellum. The middle and principal pieces each contain specific components such as the mitochondrial sheath and fibrous sheath, respectively, while outer dense fibers are common to both. A plethora of proteins are constituents of each of these structures, with each playing key roles in functions related to the fertility of spermatozoa. At the end of spermiogenesis, a portion of spermatid cytoplasm remains associated with the released spermatozoa, referred to as the cytoplasmic droplet. The latter has as its main feature Golgi saccules, which appear to modify the plasma membrane of spermatozoa as they move down the epididymal duct and hence may be partly involved in male gamete maturation. The end product of spermatogenesis is highly streamlined and motile spermatozoa having a condensed nucleus equipped with an acrosome. Spermatozoa move through the female reproductive tract and eventually penetrate the zona pellucida and bind to the egg plasma membrane. Many proteins have been implicated in the process of fertilization as well as a plethora of proteins involved in the development of spermatids and sperm, and these are high lighted in this review. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Study on the zona pellucida 4 (ZP4) gene sequence and its expression in the ovaries of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meczekalski, B; Nawrot, R; Nowak, W; Czyzyk, A; Kedzia, H; Gozdzicka-Jozefiak, A

    2015-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder of unknown pathology, involving reproductive and metabolic abnormalities. Oocyte-specific genes are a group of genes expressed exclusively in ovarian tissue; therefore, they can play an important role in ovarian pathologies such as PCOS. The zona pellucida 4 (ZP4) gene encodes glycoprotein which is a part of the extracellular matrix of oocyte. We analyzed 87 patients with PCOS, which were divided into four groups depending on their phenotype. In each patient, we performed profound clinical and biochemical analysis, including the measurement of serum androgens. The ovarian tissue samples were used to perform a real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining using anti-ZP4 monoclonal antibodies. The ZP4 gene was sequenced from peripheral lymphocytes. The expression of ZP4 was present in early antral follicles and was stronger in mature follicles. The subgroup of patients with eumenorrhea and without hyperandrogenism presented the highest expression of ZP4 in ovarian tissue. In one case, we found a mutation of the ZP4 gene. No correlations were found between the ZP4 expression level and biochemical or clinical indices. Data from this and animal studies suggest a possible relationship between androgens and ZP4 expression. ZP4 expression is highest among patients with PCOS and a regular cycle, and this is a consequence of the presence of mature follicles in this group. In some patients with PCOS and infertility, ZP4 mutation can be found.

  5. In-vitro developmental potential of individual mouse blastomeres cultured with and without zona pellucida: future implications for human assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Illmensee, K; Kaskar, K; Zavos, P M

    2006-08-01

    This study was designed to compare the developmental potential of individual blastomeres derived from 2-, 4-, 6- and 8-cell mouse embryos cultured with and without zona pellucida (ZP). In the first series, one, three, five and seven blastomeres were biopsied from 2-, 4-, 6- and 8-cell embryos respectively, and inserted individually into empty ZP recipients, leaving the remaining blastomere within its original ZP. In the second series, the same protocol was used except that the biopsied blastomeres were cultured without ZP and compared with the remaining blastomere within its original ZP. For the first series, individual blastomeres derived from 2-, 4-, 6- and 8-cell embryos cultured with ZP showed blastocyst development of 82.4, 68.6, 44.4 and 23.1% respectively, with corresponding hatching rates of 70.6, 60.0, 25.9 and 7.7%. For the second series, individual blastomeres cultured without ZP progressed with blastocyst development of 73.3, 64.5, 35.7 and 22.7% respectively. Blastocyst multiplication was achieved most efficiently when using individual blastomeres from 4- and 6-cell embryos. This is the first report on comparative in-vitro propagation of single blastomeres derived from various cleavage stages in a mammalian species. Blastomere cloning with its multiple applications may be envisaged for human assisted reproductive technologies.

  6. Production of tag-free recombinant fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid and dog zona pellucida glycoprotein-3 for contraceptive vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Shrestha, Abhinav; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Affinity tags can interfere in various physicochemical properties and immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins. In the present study, tag-free recombinant fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid [TT; amino acid (aa) residues 830-844] followed by dilysine linker and dog zona pellucida glycoprotein-3 (ZP3; aa residues 23-348) (TT-KK-ZP3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs), was purified by isolation of IBs, processed to remove host cell proteins, followed by solubilization and refolding. A specific 39 kDa protein including ZP3 was identified by SDS-PAGE. CD spectra showed the presence of α-helices and β-sheets, and fluorescent spectroscopy revealed emission maxima of 265 A.U. at 339 nm for refolded protein and showed red shift in the presence of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Immunization of inbred FvB/J female mice with purified recombinant TT-KK-ZP3 (25 μg/animal) led to generation of high antibody titers against the recombinant protein. The antibodies reacted specifically with ZP matrix surrounding mouse oocytes. Immunized mice showed significant reduction in fertility as compared to the control group. The studies described herein provide a simple method to produce and purify tag-free recombinant protein for the development of a contraceptive vaccine.

  7. Localization of vascular endothelial growth factor in the zona pellucida of developing ovarian follicles in the rat: a possible role in destiny of follicles.

    PubMed

    Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Akkoyunlu, Gokhan; Kayisli, Umit Ali; Arici, Aydin; Demir, Ramazan

    2003-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that in many species angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), may have important roles in folliculogenesis. The aim of this study is to determine the localization of VEGF and its receptors, Flt-1 and KDR, and bFGF expression in the rat ovary and to evaluate their distributions throughout the different follicular stages. Out of 20 virginal female rats, 10 were studied during the natural ovarian cycle without any ovulation induction. The other 10 were superovulated and their ovaries were studied by western analysis and immunohistochemistry. Granulosa cells (GC) and oocytes of primordial follicles were negative for VEGF. In early primary follicles, VEGF was present in the oocyte but its immunoreactivity was weak, while newly developing zona pellucida (ZP) of primary follicles was negative for VEGF. Subsequently, with the commencement of antral spaces between GC of the secondary follicle, ZP of some secondary follicles became strongly positive for VEGF, forming a continuous ring around the oocyte. In preovulatory mature follicles granulosa and theca interna (TI) cells showed a weak immunoreactivity for VEGF. Western blot analyses have also demonstrated that VEGF, a 26-kDa protein, was present in follicles. Moreover, in ovulated cumulus-oocyte complex we observed a halo-like immunoreactivity of VEGF around the fully mature oocyte. The immunoreactivity for Flt-1 and KDR receptors in growing follicles was mostly limited to GC and TI cells. Anti-bFGF did not exhibit any immunoreactivity in ZP of follicles at any stage. Its expression was weak in GC of the follicles at different stages, whereas, it could be localized to some extent in the blood capillaries of TI of antral follicles and in blood vessels localized in the stroma. Interestingly, VEGF immunoreactivity in the ZP of some secondary follicles is very striking. Accordingly, the possibility that VEGF may be an

  8. Hydrogen-rich Water Exerting a Protective Effect on Ovarian Reserve Function in a Mouse Model of Immune Premature Ovarian Failure Induced by Zona Pellucida 3

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Wang, Shu-Yu; Yin, Cheng-Hong; Wang, Tong; Jia, Chan-Wei; Ma, Yan-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background: Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a disease that affects female fertility but has few effective treatments. Ovarian reserve function plays an important role in female fertility. Recent studies have reported that hydrogen can protect male fertility. Therefore, we explored the potential protective effect of hydrogen-rich water on ovarian reserve function through a mouse immune POF model. Methods: To set up immune POF model, fifty female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: Control (mice consumed normal water, n = 10), hydrogen (mice consumed hydrogen-rich water, n = 10), model (mice were immunized with zona pellucida glycoprotein 3 [ZP3] and consumed normal water, n = 15), and model-hydrogen (mice were immunized with ZP3 and consumed hydrogen-rich water, n = 15) groups. After 5 weeks, mice were sacrificed. Serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels, granulosa cell (GC) apoptotic index (AI), B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) expression were examined. Analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) software. Results: Immune POF model, model group exhibited markedly reduced serum AMH levels compared with those of the control group (5.41 ± 0.91 ng/ml vs. 16.23 ± 1.97 ng/ml, P = 0.033) and the hydrogen group (19.65 ± 7.82 ng/ml, P = 0.006). The model-hydrogen group displayed significantly higher AMH concentrations compared with that of the model group (15.03 ± 2.75 ng/ml vs. 5.41 ± 0.91 ng/ml, P = 0.021). The GC AI was significantly higher in the model group (21.30 ± 1.74%) than those in the control (7.06 ± 0.27%), hydrogen (5.17 ± 0.41%), and model-hydrogen groups (11.24 ± 0.58%) (all P < 0.001). The GC AI was significantly higher in the model-hydrogen group compared with that of the hydrogen group (11.24 ± 0.58% vs. 5.17 ± 0.41%, P = 0.021). Compared with those of the model group, ovarian tissue Bcl-2 levels increased (2.18 ± 0.30 vs. 3.01 ± 0.33, P = 0.045) and the Bax

  9. The human is an exception to the evolutionarily-conserved phenomenon of pre-fertilization zona pellucida resistance to proteolysis induced by oviductal fluid.

    PubMed

    Mondéjar, I; Avilés, M; Coy, P

    2013-03-01

    Is zona pellucida (ZP) resistance to proteolysis, induced by oviductal fluid (OF), a mechanism common to species other than the pig and cow? ZP resistance to proteolysis induced by OF was observed in the mouse, rat, hamster, rabbit, sheep, goat, pig and cow, but not in humans. Oviductal ZP resistance to proteolysis occurs in the pig and cow where it influences the incidence of fertilization and polyspermy. The effect is observed after incubation of ZP in OFs from pig (pOF), cow (cOF), rabbit (rOF) and sheep (sOF). Oocytes from nine different species, including ungulates, rodents, lagomorphs and primates were incubated in rOF, sOF, gOF, cOF, pOF and human oviductal fluid (hOF). ZP digestion times for the matured oocytes of these nine species, without any treatment or incubated in 5 (mouse, rat, hamster, rabbit, cow, ewe and goat) or 6 (pig and humans) of the OFs collected were compared using three replicates per treatment and at least three oocytes per replicate. In vivo matured oocytes from rat, hamster, mouse, rabbit and humans, in vitro matured oocytes from cow, goat, ewe and pig and rOF, cOF, gOF, sOF, pOF and human (hOF) were collected and processed for the study. Oocytes from each species were incubated in the different OFs for 30 min. The resistance of the ZP of the oocytes to enzymatic digestion in a pronase solution (0.5% in PBS) was measured and registered as ZP digestion time. rOF increased ZP resistance to proteolytic digestion in the range of between 96 and 720 h for any of the species tested, whereas the corresponding increase in human ZP was only 1 min. OFs from the remaining species also had a significant effect, with variations among the cross-species experiments (P < 0.05). hOF, which was only tested on human and porcine oocytes, had no effect on ZP chemical hardening. Measurements of ZP digestion times are not of extreme accuracy and errors of a few seconds can be assumed in the experimental data. However, when differences are in the range of

  10. [A study on the construction, expression and immunosterility of Lagurus laguru zona pellucida 3 DNA vaccine pVAX1-sig-LTB-lZP3-C3d3].

    PubMed

    Li, Chen-Chen; Yu, Ji-Yun; Jiang, Min; Tu, Yi-Xian; Ma, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2011-09-01

    To enhance the immunocontraceptive effect of Lagurus lagurus zona pellucida 3 DNA vaccine, and to achieve the prospect of application through the pVAX1-sig-LTB-lZP3-C3d3 different immunity pathway. Two adjuvant molecules were constructed into the recombinant plasmid pVAX1-sig-LTB-lZP3-C3d3 as DNA vaccine which contains Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit and the molecular adjuvant 3 copies of C3d. The results of RT-PCR and western blot showed that the DNA vaccine was expressed in mRNA and protein level. The female C57BL/6 mice were immunized by three ways: intramuscular injection, intranasal or oral route.Antibody levels and types were detected by ELISA. ELISA results showed that recombinant plasmid pVAX1-sig-LTB-lZP3-C3d3 immunization induced specific IgG, IgA levels were significantly different comparing with control (P<0.01). Antifertility experiment showed that the experimental group reduced the average fertility significantly different compared with the control group (P<0.01). Restriction analysis, RT-PCR and Western blot showed that the recombinant plasmid constructed correctly and can be the expression of mRNA and protein levels.It resulted that the recombinant plasmid pVAX1-sig-LTB-lZP3-C3d3 can induce the specific immune response efficiently and enhance the immunocontraceptive effects.

  11. Recombinant mouse sperm ZP3-binding protein (ZP3R/sp56) forms a high order oligomer that binds eggs and inhibits mouse fertilization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Buffone, Mariano G; Zhuang, Tiangang; Ord, Teri S; Hui, Ling; Moss, Stuart B; Gerton, George L

    2008-05-02

    Many candidates have been proposed as zona pellucida-binding proteins. Without precluding a role for any of those candidates, we focused on mouse sperm protein ZP3R/sp56, which is localized in the acrosomal matrix. The objective of this study was to analyze the role of ZP3R/sp56 in mouse fertilization. We expressed recombinant ZP3R/sp56 as a secreted protein in HEK293 cells and purified it from serum-free, conditioned medium. In the presence of reducing agents, the recombinant ZP3R/sp56 exhibited a molecular weight similar to that observed for the native ZP3R/sp56. Reminiscent of the native protein, recombinant ZP3R/sp56 formed a high molecular weight, disulfide cross-linked oligomer consisting of six or more monomers under non-reducing conditions. Recombinant ZP3R/sp56 bound to the zona pellucida of unfertilized eggs but not to 2-cell embryos, indicating that the changes that take place in the zona pellucida at fertilization affected the interaction of this protein with the zona pellucida. The extent of in vitro fertilization was reduced in a dose-dependent manner when unfertilized eggs were preincubated with recombinant ZP3R/sp56 (74% drop at the maximum concentrations assayed). Eggs incubated with the recombinant protein showed an absence of or very few sperm in the perivitelline space, suggesting that the reduction in the fertilization rate is caused by the inhibition of sperm binding and/or penetration through the zona pellucida. These results indicate that sperm ZP3R/sp56 is important for sperm-zona interactions during fertilization and support the concept that the acrosomal matrix plays an essential role in mediating the binding of sperm to the zona pellucida.

  12. Zona-free oocyte fertilized with intracytoplasmic sperm injection and underwent further division: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y Y; Chang, C C; Tsai, H D

    2001-09-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) plays a protective role during fertilization and early embryonic development. It is related to sperm binding, the acrosome reaction, prevention of polyspermic fertilization, and holding blastomeres together before the morular stage. Zona-free oocytes are accidentally encountered. If these oocytes are healthy, they can be fertilized normally by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). We reported on a couple with male infertility undergoing oocyte retrieval after ovarian hyperstimulation. Before the ICSI procedure, cumulus cells surrounding the oocytes were removed, which resulted in one oocyte escaping from its ZP. The zona-free oocyte was fertilized normally with ICSI and developed to the 8-cell stage. We observed that the zona-free zygote had the ability to further divide, despite its loose contact. The zona-free embryo was transferred with other zona-intact embryos, but the implantation failed. We conclude that zona-free oocytes can be rescued, fertilized with ICSI, and cultured for further transfer or cryopreservation.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of rat sperm surface antigen 2B1, a glycoprotein implicated in sperm-zona binding.

    PubMed

    Hou, S T; Ma, A; Jones, R; Hall, L

    1996-10-01

    The rat sperm surface antigen, 2B1, that has been proposed to play a key role in sperm adhesion to the zona pellucida, has been cloned and its entire cDNA sequenced. Northern blot analysis indicates that 2B1 is encoded by a 2.2-kb RNA transcript that is abundantly expressed in the testis. The deduced protein sequence contains 512 amino-acid residues with a strong candidate signal sequence and C-terminal transmembrane domain. Data base searches reveal a high degree of sequence similarity to guinea pig, rabbit, monkey, and human PH20 sperm surface antigens, and a lower degree of similarity to honey bee and whiteface hornet venom hyaluronidases. Rat 2B1 antigen also possesses hyaluronidase activity, suggesting that it is a bifunctional protein with putative roles in the dispersion of cumulus oophorus cells as well as zona adhesion. However, while it would appear that 2B1 is the rat homologue of the guinea pig PH20 antigen, they differ in a number of important biochemical respects (including their mode of attachment to the sperm membrane and distribution between soluble and membrane-bound fractions), as well as in their localization on the sperm membrane. Expression of regions of the 2B1 protein in recombinant bacterial cells has allowed a preliminary mapping of the 2B1 epitope, and has provided more definitive information on the endoproteolytic processing of 2B1 during epididymal transit.

  14. Detection of angiotensin II binding to single adrenal zona glomerulosa cells by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Michael J.; Habermann, Timothy J.; Hanke, Craig J.; Adar, Fran; Campbell, William B.; Nithipatikom, Kasem

    1999-04-01

    We developed a confocal Raman microspectroscopic technique to study ligand-receptor bindings in single cells using Raman-labeled ligands and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells were used as a model in this study. ZG cells have a high density of angiotensin II (AII) receptors on the cellular membrane. There are two identified subtypes of AII receptors,namely AT1 and AT2 receptors. AII is a peptidic hormone, which upon binding to its receptors, stimulates the release of aldosterone from ZG cells. The cellular localization of these receptors subtypes was detected in single ZG cells by using immunocomplexation of receptors with specific antibodies and confocal Raman microspectroscopy. In the binding study, we used biotin-labeled AII to bind to its receptors in ZG cells. Then, avidin and Raman-labeled AII. The binding was measure directly on the single ZG cells. The results showed that the binding was displaced with unlabeled AII and specific AII antagonists. This is a rapid and sensitive technique for detection of cellular ligand bindings as well as antagonists screening in drug discovery.

  15. Identification of a ZP3-binding protein on acrosome-intact mouse sperm by photoaffinity crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Bleil, J.D.; Wassarman, P.M.

    1990-07-01

    During the process of fertilization in mammals, sperm bind in a relatively species-specific manner to the zona pellucida (ZP) of ovulated eggs. ZP3, a glycoprotein found in the mouse egg zona pellucida, serves as receptor for sperm during gamete adhesion. We report here that a Mr 56,000 protein found on mouse sperm has properties expected for a sperm component that recognizes and binds to ZP3. This sperm protein is radiolabeled preferentially by a photoactivatable heterobifunctional crosslinker (Denny-Jaffee reagent) covalently linked to purified ZP3, binds very tightly to ZP3-affinity columns, and is localized to heads of acrosome-intact but not acrosome-reacted sperm.more » These and other findings suggest that this protein may be a ZP3-binding protein that, together with the sperm receptor, supports species-specific binding of mouse sperm to unfertilized eggs.« less

  16. Identification of alpha-enolase as a nuclear DNA-binding protein in the zona fasciculata but not the zona reticularis of the human adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiye; Wang, Lishan; Endoh, Akira; Hummelke, Geoffrey; Hawks, Christina L; Hornsby, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    In order to establish whether there are differences in DNA-binding proteins between zona fasciculata (ZF) and zona reticularis (ZR) cells of the human adrenal cortex, we prepared nuclear extracts from separated ZF and ZR cells. The formation of DNA-protein complexes was studied using an element in the first intron of the type I and type II 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase genes (HSD3B1 and HSD3B2). Using the element in the HSD3B2 gene as a probe, a complex (C1) was formed with extracts from ZF cells but was formed only at a low level with ZR cell extracts. Another pair of complexes (C2/C3) was formed with both ZF and ZR cell extracts. The ZF-specific protein forming C1 was enriched by column chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose and carboxymethyl-Sepharose. Oligonucleotide competition analysis on the enriched fraction gave results consistent with those obtained on the unfractionated material. A further enrichment was brought about by passing the protein over an oligonucleotide affinity column based on the HSD3B2 element. The protein bound to the column was identified as alpha-enolase by mass spectrometry. Although alpha-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme, it binds to specific DNA sequences and has been found to be present in nuclei of various cell types. We performed immunohistochemistry on sections of adult human adrenal cortex and found alpha-enolase to be located in nuclei of ZF cells but to be predominantly cytoplasmic in ZR cells. Transfection of an alpha-enolase expression vector into NCI-H295R human adrenocortical cells increased HSD3B2 promoter activity, suggesting a possible functional role for this protein in regulation of HSD3B2 expression.

  17. Sperm Mitochondrial Integrity Is Not Required for Hyperactivated Motility, Zona Binding, or Acrosome Reaction in the Rhesus Macaque1

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Pei-hsuan; Miller, Marion G.; Meyers, Stuart A.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2008-01-01

    Whether the main energy source for sperm motility is from oxidative phosphorylation or glycolysis has been long-debated in the field of reproductive biology. Using the rhesus monkey as a model, we examined the role of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in sperm function by using alpha-chlorohydrin (ACH), a glycolysis inhibitor, and pentachlorophenol (PCP), an oxidative phosphorylation uncoupler. Sperm treated with ACH showed no change in percentage of motile sperm, although sperm motion was impaired. The ACH-treated sperm did not display either hyperactivity- or hyperactivation-associated changes in protein tyrosine phosphorylation. When treated with PCP, sperm motion parameters were affected by the highest level of PCP (200 μM); however, PCP did not cause motility impairments even after chemical activation. Sperm treated with PCP were able to display hyperactivity and tyrosine phosphorylation after chemical activation. In contrast with motility measurements, treatment with either the glycolytic inhibitor or the oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor did not affect sperm-zona binding and zona-induced acrosome reaction. The results suggest glycolysis is essential to support sperm motility, hyperactivity, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation, while energy from oxidative phosphorylation is not necessary for hyperactivated sperm motility, tyrosine phosphorylation, sperm-zona binding, and acrosome reaction in the rhesus macaque. PMID:18480469

  18. Bioactive compounds from Peperomia pellucida.

    PubMed

    Xu, Su; Li, Na; Ning, Meng-Meng; Zhou, Cai-Hong; Yang, Qiao-Rong; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2006-02-01

    Five new compounds (1-5), including two secolignans, two tetrahydrofuran lignans, and one highly methoxylated dihydronaphthalenone, were isolated from the whole plant of Peperomia pellucida. These compounds were accompanied by the known peperomins A, B, C, and E, 7,8-trans-8,8'-trans-7',8'-cis-7,7'-bis(5-methoxy-3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-8-acetoxymethyl-8'-hydroxymethyltetrahydrofuran, 7,8-trans-8,8'-trans-7',8'-cis-7-(5-methoxy-3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-7'-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-8,8'-diacetoxymethyltetrahydrofuran, sesamin, and isoswertisin. New structures were elucidated mainly by NMR and MS techniques, and anticancer activities evaluated in HL-60, MCF-7, and HeLa cell lines. Compound 1 and peperomin E show growth inhibitory effects on the three cancer cell lines with IC(50) values ranging between 1.4 and 9.1 and between 1.8 and 11.1 microM, respectively. Compound 2 has a weak suppressive activity on HL-60 cells (IC(50) = 10.8 microM), while 7,8-trans-8,8'-trans-7',8'-cis-7,7'-bis(5-methoxy-3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-8-acetoxymethyl-8'-hydroxymethyltetrahydrofuran exhibits estrogen-like properties (EC(50) = 3.1 microM) in CV-1 cells transfected with human estrogen receptor (ERalpha).

  19. The practical side of immunocontraception: zona proteins and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, J F; Rowan, A; Lamberski, N; Wallace, R; Frank, K; Lyda, R

    2009-12-01

    With shrinking habitat, the humane control of certain wildlife populations is relevant. The contraceptive vaccine based on native porcine zona pellucida (PZP) has been applied to various wildlife populations for 20 years. Prominent efforts include wild horses, urban deer, zoo animals and African elephants, among others. This approach has been successful in managing entire populations and to date, no significant debilitating short- or long-term health effects have been documented.

  20. Thermal effects in laser-assisted pre-embryo zona drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, Diarmaid H.; Conia, Jerome D.

    2001-04-01

    Diode lasers ((lambda) equals 1480 nm) are used with in vitro fertilization to dissect the zone pellucida (shell) of pre- embryos. A focused laser beam is applied in vitro to form a channel or trench in the zona pellucida. The procedure is used to facilitate biopsy or as a promoter of embryo hatching. We present examples and measurements of zona pellucida ablation using animal models. In using the laser it is vital not to damage pre-embryo cells, e.g., by overheating. In order to define safe regimes we have derived some thermal side effects of zona pellucida removal. The temperature profile in the beam and vicinity is predicted as function of laser pulse duration and power. In a crossed- beam experiment a HeNe laser probe is used to detect the temperature-induced change in the refractive index of an aqueous solution, and estimate local thermal gradient. We find that the diode laser beam produces superheated water approaching 200 degree(s)C on the beam axis. Thermal histories during and following the laser pulse are given for regions in the neighborhood of the beam. We conclude that an optimum regime exists with pulse duration

  1. Antibacterial activity of Hygrophila stricta and Peperomia pellucida.

    PubMed

    Khan, M R; Omoloso, A D

    2002-06-01

    The crude methanolic extracts of Hygrophila scricta and Peperomia pellucida were fractionated into petrol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and butanol. All the crude extracts and the fractions exhibited a very good level of broad spectrum antibacterial activity. The fractions were more active than the crude extracts. The petrol fraction of H. stricta and the butanol fraction of P. pellucida were particularly good. No activity was noticed for the moulds tested.

  2. Pathophysiology of white-tailed deer vaccinated with porcine zona pellucida immunocontraceptive

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, P.D.; Richmond, M.E.; Miller, L.A.; Quimby, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    White-tailed deer (n = 14 treated, n = 7 control) were examined postmortem to identify any possible pathophysiology resulting from PZP immunocontraception vaccination. Deer were treated twice in 1997; given a booster in 1998, with six being revaccinated in September 2000. Granulomas were found at injection sites of most deer, even 2 years post-treatment. Eosinophilic oophoritis occurred in 6 of 8 (75%) deer vaccinated in 1998, and 3 of 6 (50%) revaccinated in 2000. The 2000 revaccinates without oophoritis, had significantly fewer normal secondary follicles than control females (P = 0.03), and deer in the1998 treatment group (P = 0.04). PZP immunocontraceptive vaccine elicited ovarian pathologies in deer similar to those observed in other species. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A role for carbohydrate recognition in mammalian sperm-egg binding

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Gary F., E-mail: clarkgf@health.missouri.edu

    Highlights: • Mammalian sperm-egg binding as a carbohydrate dependent species recognition event. • The role of carbohydrate recognition in human, mouse and pig sperm-egg binding. • Historical perspective and future directions for research focused on gamete binding. - Abstract: Mammalian fertilization usually requires three sequential cell–cell interactions: (i) initial binding of sperm to the specialized extracellular matrix coating the egg known as the zona pellucida (ZP); (ii) binding of sperm to the ZP via the inner acrosomal membrane that is exposed following the induction of acrosomal exocytosis; and (iii) adhesion of acrosome-reacted sperm to the plasma membrane of the eggmore » cell, enabling subsequent fusion of these gametes. The focus of this review is on the initial binding of intact sperm to the mammalian ZP. Evidence collected over the past fifty years has confirmed that this interaction relies primarily on the recognition of carbohydrate sequences presented on the ZP by lectin-like egg binding proteins located on the plasma membrane of sperm. There is also evidence that the same carbohydrate sequences that mediate binding also function as ligands for lectins on lymphocytes that can inactivate immune responses, likely protecting the egg and the developing embryo up to the stage of blastocyst hatching. The literature related to initial sperm-ZP binding in the three major mammalian models (human, mouse and pig) is discussed. Historical perspectives and future directions for research related to this aspect of gamete adhesion are also presented.« less

  4. A dimeric ArC2 compound from Peperomia pellucida.

    PubMed

    Bayma, J D; Arruda, M S; Müller, A H; Arruda, A C; Canto, W C

    2000-12-01

    Pellucidin A, a novel dimeric ArC2 compound, together with dill-apiol have been isolated from the aerial parts of Peperomia pellucida. The structure of pellucidin A was established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy (1H-1H COSY; 1H-13C COSY; DEPT; NOESY and double irradiation) and other spectroscopic techniques. The biogenesis of pellucidin A is also briefly discussed.

  5. ZP Domain Proteins in the Abalone Egg Coat Include a Paralog of VERL under Positive Selection That Binds Lysin and 18-kDa Sperm Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, Jan E.; Vacquier, Victor D.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying fertilization molecules is key to our understanding of reproductive biology, yet only a few examples of interacting sperm and egg proteins are known. One of the best characterized comes from the invertebrate archeogastropod abalone (Haliotis spp.), where sperm lysin mediates passage through the protective egg vitelline envelope (VE) by binding to the VE protein vitelline envelope receptor for lysin (VERL). Rapid adaptive divergence of abalone lysin and VERL are an example of positive selection on interacting fertilization proteins contributing to reproductive isolation. Previously, we characterized a subset of the abalone VE proteins that share a structural feature, the zona pellucida (ZP) domain, which is common to VERL and the egg envelopes of vertebrates. Here, we use additional expressed sequence tag sequencing and shotgun proteomics to characterize this family of proteins in the abalone egg VE. We expand 3-fold the number of known ZP domain proteins present within the VE (now 30 in total) and identify a paralog of VERL (vitelline envelope zona pellucida domain protein [VEZP] 14) that contains a putative lysin-binding motif. We find that, like VERL, the divergence of VEZP14 among abalone species is driven by positive selection on the lysin-binding motif alone and that these paralogous egg VE proteins bind a similar set of sperm proteins including a rapidly evolving 18-kDa paralog of lysin, which may mediate sperm–egg fusion. This work identifies an egg coat paralog of VERL under positive selection and the candidate sperm proteins with which it may interact during abalone fertilization. PMID:19767347

  6. Comparison of pathogenicity of Alternaria pellucida and Curvularia lunata on weed Echinochloa species.

    PubMed

    Reza, Mohammad; Motlagh, Safari

    2015-07-01

    Echinochloa spp. are the most important weeds in rice fields. In this research Curvularia lunata and Alternaria pellucida were isolated from these weeds and their pathogenicity effects were compared on these weeds and five rice cultivars in a completely random design with three replications in greenhouse conditions. Fungi were inoculated on weeds and rice cultivars, using spore suspension consisting of 10' spore ml(-1) of distilled water. Results indicated significant effect of Curvularia lunata and Alternaria pellucida on Echinochloa oryzicola and E. crus-galli. In the present study, effect of C. lunata on fresh weight, dry weight and height of Echinochloa species based on variance analysis table, a significant reaction was observed for height and fresh weight, but for dry weight reaction was not significant. The effect of A. pellucida on fresh weight, dry weight and height of Echinochloa species based on variance analysis table, a significant reaction was observed for all the three traits. Also, rice cultivars did not show any significant reaction to C. lunata and A. pellucida. The results showed that in comparison between effect of Curvularia lunata and Alternaria pellucida on Echinochloa spp., disease rating caused by A. pellucida on E. oryzicola and E. crusalli was more than disease rating caused by C. lunata and these species of weed were more susceptible to A. pellucida. However, A. alternata can be considered as a better promising bioherbicide to control Echinochloa spp.

  7. Deleted in malignant brain tumors-1 protein (DMBT1): a pattern recognition receptor with multiple binding sites.

    PubMed

    Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Karlsson, Niclas G; Veerman, Enno C I

    2010-01-01

    Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 protein (DMBT1), salivary agglutinin (DMBT1(SAG)), and lung glycoprotein-340 (DMBT1(GP340)) are three names for glycoproteins encoded by the same DMBT1 gene. All these proteins belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily of proteins: a superfamily of secreted or membrane-bound proteins with SRCR domains that are highly conserved down to sponges, the most ancient metazoa. In addition to SRCR domains, all DMBT1s contain two CUB domains and one zona pellucida domain. The SRCR domains play a role in the function of DMBT1s, which is the binding of a broad range of pathogens including cariogenic streptococci, Helicobacter pylori and HIV. Mucosal defense proteins like IgA, surfactant proteins and lactoferrin also bind to DMBT1s through their SRCR domains. The binding motif on the SRCR domains comprises an 11-mer peptide in which a few amino acids are essential for binding (GRVEVLYRGSW). Adjacent to each individual SRCR domain are glycosylation domains, where the attached carbohydrate chains play a role in the binding of influenza A virus and Helicobacter pylori. The composition of the carbohydrate chains is not only donor specific, but also varies between different organs. These data demonstrate a role for DMBT1s as pattern recognition molecules containing various peptide and carbohydrate binding motifs.

  8. Proximate composition, nutritional attributes and mineral composition of Peperomia pellucida L. (Ketumpangan Air) grown in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Der-Jiun; Iqbal, Shahid; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-09-17

    This study presents the proximate and mineral composition of Peperomia pellucida L., an underexploited weed plant in Malaysia. Proximate analysis was performed using standard AOAC methods and mineral contents were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicated Peperomia pellucida to be rich in crude protein, carbohydrate and total ash contents. The high amount of total ash (31.22%)suggests a high-value mineral composition comprising potassium, calcium and iron as the main elements. The present study inferred that Peperomia pellucida would serve as a good source of protein and energy as well as micronutrients in the form of a leafy vegetable for human consumption.

  9. Seed germination, phenology, and antiedematogenic activity of Peperomia pellucida (L.) H. B. K.

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima; Oliveira, Ricardo Luiz Barros; Mendes, Sandra Santos; Silva, Paulo de Albuquerque; Antoniolli, Ângelo Roberto; Vilar, Jeane Carvalho; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald

    2002-01-01

    Background Peperomia pellucida is popularly known as coraçãozinho in the Brazilian northeast and is used in the treatment of abscesses, furuncles, and conjunctivitis. Our work aimed to determine the term of the development stages and the species cycle in the four seasons of the year (complete development, beginning of bloom, complete bloom, and seed set), verifying the plant's therapeutic profile during the four distinct development phases in order to detect differences in its potency. Pharmacological tests were performed to observe the anti-inflammatory activity. Results Phenological observations were accessed for a 12 month-period, from the Brazilian summer of 1999/2000 to fall 2000. On average the plantules' emergence occurred 15 days after seeding. All plantules grew in a similar manner up to 25 days after transplantation in all seasons. Starting on the 25th day, we observed faster growth during spring, with plants reaching a height of about 60 cm after 100 days of transplantation, unlike other seasons, in which plants reached heights of 40, 40, and 35 cm during winter, summer, and fall, respectively. The P. pellucida aqueous extract showed significant anti-inflammatory activity during phenophases 1 and 2 of winter and spring. Depending on the plant's phenophase there was variation in the potency of edema inhibition. Conclusion P. pellucida has a phenological cycle of approximately 100 days. It is recommended that the P. pellucida aqueous extract is used as an antiedematogenic only during phenophases 1 and 2 of winter and spring. PMID:12019026

  10. Seed germination, phenology, and antiedematogenic activity of Peperomia pellucida (L.) H. B. K.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima; Oliveira, Ricardo Luiz Barros; Mendes, Sandra Santos; Silva, Paulo de Albuquerque; Antoniolli, Angelo Roberto; Vilar, Jeane Carvalho; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald

    2002-05-09

    Peperomia pellucida is popularly known as coraçãozinho in the Brazilian northeast and is used in the treatment of abscesses, furuncles, and conjunctivitis. Our work aimed to determine the term of the development stages and the species cycle in the four seasons of the year (complete development, beginning of bloom, complete bloom, and seed set), verifying the plant's therapeutic profile during the four distinct development phases in order to detect differences in its potency. Pharmacological tests were performed to observe the anti-inflammatory activity. Phenological observations were accessed for a 12 month-period, from the Brazilian summer of 1999/2000 to fall 2000. On average the plantules' emergence occurred 15 days after seeding. All plantules grew in a similar manner up to 25 days after transplantation in all seasons. Starting on the 25th day, we observed faster growth during spring, with plants reaching a height of about 60 cm after 100 days of transplantation, unlike other seasons, in which plants reached heights of 40, 40, and 35 cm during winter, summer, and fall, respectively. The P. pellucida aqueous extract showed significant anti-inflammatory activity during phenophases 1 and 2 of winter and spring. Depending on the plant's phenophase there was variation in the potency of edema inhibition. P. pellucida has a phenological cycle of approximately 100 days. It is recommended that the P. pellucida aqueous extract is used as an antiedematogenic only during phenophases 1 and 2 of winter and spring.

  11. Antifungal activity of Piper aduncum and Peperomia pellucida leaf ethanol extract against Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastuti, Utami Sri; Ummah, Yunita Putri Irsadul; Khasanah, Henny Nurul

    2017-05-01

    This research was done to 1) examine the effect of Piper aduncum leaf ethanol extract at certain concentrations against Candida albicans colony growth inhibition in vitro; 2) examine the effect of Peperomia pellucida leaf ethanol extract at certain concentrations toward Candida albicans colony growth inhibition in vitro; and 3) determine the most effective concentration of P. aduncum and P. pellucida leaves ethanol extract against C. albicans colony growth inhibition in vitro. These plant extracts were prepared by the maceration technique using 95% ethanol, and then sterile filtered and evaporated to obtain the filtrate. The filtrate was diluted with sterile distilled water at certain concentrations, i.e.: 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 405, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90%. The antifungal effect of each leaf extract concentration was examined by the agar diffusion method on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar medium. The research results are: 1) the P.aduncum leaf ethanol extract at some concentrations has an effect against C. albicans colony growth inhibition in vitro; 2) the P.pellucida leaf ethanol extract at some concentrations has an effect against C. albicans colony growth inhibition in vitro; 3) the P. aduncum leaf ethanol extract at 80% is the most effective for C. albicans colony growth inhibition in vitro; and 4) the P. pellucida leaf ethanol extract at 70% is the most effective for C. albicans colony growth inhibition in vitro.

  12. Automation and Optimization of Multipulse Laser Zona Drilling of Mouse Embryos During Embryo Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher Yee; Mills, James K

    2017-03-01

    Laser zona drilling (LZD) is a required step in many embryonic surgical procedures, for example, assisted hatching and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. LZD involves the ablation of the zona pellucida (ZP) using a laser while minimizing potentially harmful thermal effects on critical internal cell structures. Develop a method for the automation and optimization of multipulse LZD, applied to cleavage-stage embryos. A two-stage optimization is used. The first stage uses computer vision algorithms to identify embryonic structures and determines the optimal ablation zone farthest away from critical structures such as blastomeres. The second stage combines a genetic algorithm with a previously reported thermal analysis of LZD to optimize the combination of laser pulse locations and pulse durations. The goal is to minimize the peak temperature experienced by the blastomeres while creating the desired opening in the ZP. A proof of concept of the proposed LZD automation and optimization method is demonstrated through experiments on mouse embryos with positive results, as adequately sized openings are created. Automation of LZD is feasible and is a viable step toward the automation of embryo biopsy procedures. LZD is a common but delicate procedure performed by human operators using subjective methods to gauge proper LZD procedure. Automation of LZD removes human error to increase the success rate of LZD. Although the proposed methods are developed for cleavage-stage embryos, the same methods may be applied to most types LZD procedures, embryos at different developmental stages, or nonembryonic cells.

  13. Isolation, Identification, and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition Activity of Alkaloid Compound from Peperomia pellucida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fachriyah, E.; Ghifari, M. A.; Anam, K.

    2018-04-01

    The research of the isolation and xanthine oxidation inhibition activity of alkaloid compound from Peperomia pellucida has been carried out. Alkaloid extract is isolated by column chromatography and preparative TLC. Alkaloid isolate is identified spectroscopically by UV-Vis spectrophotometer, FT-IR, and LC-MS/MS. Xanthine oxidase inhibition activity is carried out by in vitro assay. The result showed that the alkaloid isolated probably has piperidine basic structure. The alkaloid isolate has N-H, C-H, C = C, C = O, C-N, C-O-C groups and the aromatic ring. The IC50 values of ethanol and alkaloid extract are 71.6658 ppm and 76.3318 ppm, respectively. Alkaloid extract of Peperomia pellucida showed higher activity than ethanol extract.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of Peperomia pellucida (L.) HBK (Piperaceae).

    PubMed

    de Fátima Arrigoni-Blank, Maria; Dmitrieva, Elena G; Franzotti, Elaine Maria; Antoniolli, Angelo Roberto; Andrade, Márcio Roberto; Marchioro, Murilo

    2004-04-01

    An aqueous extract of the aerial part of Peperomia pellucida (L.) HBK (Piperaceae) was tested for anti-inflammatory (paw edema induced by carrageenin and arachidonic acid) and analgesic activity (abdominal writhes and hot plate) in rats and mice, respectively. Oral administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg of the aqueous extract exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenin test, which was based on interference with prostaglandin synthesis, as confirmed by the arachidonic acid test. In the abdominal writhing test induced by acetic acid, 400 mg/kg of the plant extract had the highest analgesic activity, whereas in the hot-plate test the best dose was 100 mg/kg. The LD(50) showed that Peperomia pellucida (5000 mg/kg) presented low toxicity.

  15. Metaphylogenomic and potential functionality of the limpet Patella pellucida's gastrointestinal tract microbiome.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Magda; Adams, Jessica; Swain, Martin; Hegarty, Matthew; Huws, Sharon; Gallagher, Joe

    2014-10-20

    This study investigated the microbial diversity associated with the digestive tract of the seaweed grazing marine limpet Patella pellucida. Using a modified indirect DNA extraction protocol and performing metagenomic profiling based on specific prokaryotic marker genes, the abundance of bacterial groups was identified from the analyzed metagenome. The members of three significantly abundant phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were characterized through the literature and their predicted functions towards the host, as well as potential applications in the industrial environment assessed.

  16. Ethanol extract of Peperomia pellucida (Piperaceae) promotes fracture healing by an anabolic effect on osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ngueguim, Florence Tsofack; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Donfack, Jean Hubert; Tewari, Deepshikha; Dimo, Theophile; Kamtchouing, Pierre; Maurya, Rakesh; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2013-06-21

    The whole plant or some part of Peperomia pellucida (L.) HBK is used in some parts of Cameroon as a treatment for fracture healing. To evaluate the effect of ethanolic extracts of Peperomia pellucida (L.), a Cameroonian medicinal plant on bone regeneration following bone and marrow injury, and determine the mode of action. Ethanol extract of Peperomia pellucida was administered at 100 and 200mg/kg doses orally to adult female Sprague-Dawley rats having a drill hole injury (0.8mm) in the femur diaphysis. Vehicle (gum-acacia in distilled water) was given to the control group. After 12 days of treatment, animals were euthanized and femur bones collected. Confocal microscopy of calcein labeling at the drill hole site was performed to evaluate bone regeneration. 3-D microarchitecture of drill hole site was analyzed by micorocomputed tomography. Osteogenic effects of the extract were evaluated by assessing mineralized nodule formation of bone marrow stromal cells and expression of osteogenic genes (mRNA level of type-1 collagen, bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteocalcin genes) in the femur. Ethanol extract from Peperomia Pellucida (L.) dose-dependently induced bone regeneration at the fracture site. At 200mg/kg dose, the extract significantly increased mineral deposition compared to controls. The extract also improved microarchitecture of the regenerating bone evident from increased bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, and decreased trabecular separation and structure model index. In addition, the extract increased the formation of mineralized nodules from the bone marrow stromal cells. Furthermore, the extract induced the expression of osteogenic genes in the femur including type 1 collagen, osteocalcin and BMP-2, compared to control. Ethanolic extract of P. pellucid (L.) accelerates fracture repair in rats via stimulatory effects on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, thereby justifying its traditional use. Copyright © 2013

  17. Characterization of anticancer, antimicrobial, antioxidant properties and chemical compositions of Peperomia pellucida leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lee Seong; Wee, Wendy; Siong, Julius Yong Fu; Syamsumir, Desy Fitrya

    2011-01-01

    Peperomia pellucida leaf extract was characterized for its anticancer, antimicrobial, antioxidant activities, and chemical compositions. Anticancer activity of P. pellucida leaf extract was determined through Colorimetric MTT (tetrazolium) assay against human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line and the antimicrobial property of the plant extract was revealed by using two-fold broth micro-dilution method against 10 bacterial isolates. Antioxidant activity of the plant extract was then characterized using α, α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method and the chemical compositions were screened and identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results of present study indicated that P. pellucida leaf extract possessed anticancer activities with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 10.4 ± 0.06 µg/ml. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were ranged from 31.25 to 125 mg/l in which the plant extract was found to inhibit the growth of Edwardsiella tarda, Escherichia coli, Flavobacterium sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae at 31.25 mg/l; Klebsiella sp., Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio alginolyticus at 62.5 mg/l; and it was able to control the growth of Salmonella sp. and Vibrio parahaemolyticus at 125 mg/l. At the concentration of 0.625 ppt, the plant extract was found to inhibit 30% of DPPH, free radical. Phytol (37.88%) was the major compound in the plant extract followed by 2-Naphthalenol, decahydro- (26.20%), Hexadecanoic acid, methyl ester (18.31%) and 9,12-Octadecadienoic acid (Z,Z)-, methyl ester (17.61%). Findings from this study indicated that methanol extract of P. pellucida leaf possessed vast potential as medicinal drug especially in breast cancer treatment.

  18. Melatonin improves the fertilization ability of post-ovulatory aged mouse oocytes by stabilizing ovastacin and Juno to promote sperm binding and fusion.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoxin; Lu, Yajuan; Zhang, Mianqun; Miao, Yilong; Zhou, Changyin; Cui, Zhaokang; Xiong, Bo

    2017-03-01

    What are the underlying mechanisms of the decline in the fertilization ability of post-ovulatory aged oocytes? Melatonin improves the fertilization ability of post-ovulatory aged oocytes by reducing aging-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and inhibiting apoptosis and by maintaining the levels and localization of the fertilization proteins, ovastacin and Juno. Following ovulation, the quality of mammalian metaphase II oocytes irreversibly deteriorates over time with a concomitant loss of fertilization ability. Melatonin has been found to prevent post-ovulatory oocyte aging and extend the window for optimal fertilization in mice. Mouse oocytes were randomly assigned to three groups and aged in vitro for 0, 6, 12 and 24 h, respectively. Increasing concentrations of melatonin (10-9 M, 10-7 M, 10-5 M and 10-3 M) were added to the 24 h aging group. Sperm binding assays, in-vitro fertilization, immunofluorescent staining and western blotting were performed to investigate key regulators and events during fertilization of post-ovulatory aged mouse oocytes. We found that the actin cap which promotes a cortical granule (CG) free domain is disrupted with a re-distribution of CGs in the subcortex of aged oocytes. Ovastacin, a CG metalloendoprotease, is mis-located and prematurely exocytosed in aged oocytes with subsequent cleavage of the zona pellucida protein ZP2. This disrupts the sperm recognition domain and dramatically reduces the number of sperm binding to the zona pellucida. The abundance of Juno, the sperm receptor on the oocyte membrane, also is reduced in aged oocytes. Exposure of aged oocytes to melatonin significantly elevates in-vitro fertilization rates potentially by rescuing the above age-associated defects of fertilization, and reducing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. N/A. We explored the mechanisms of the decline in fertilization ability decline in aged mouse oocytes, in vitro but not in vivo. Our findings may contribute to the development a more

  19. The involvement of beta-1,4-Galactosyltransferase and N-Acetylglucosamine residues in fertilization has been lost in the horse.

    PubMed

    Mugnier, Sylvie; Boittin, Stéphane; Douet, Cécile; Monget, Philippe; Magistrini, Michèle; Goudet, Ghylène

    2008-11-14

    In human and rodents, sperm-zona pellucida binding is mediated by a sperm surface Galactosyltransferase that recognizes N-Acetylglucosamine residues on a glycoprotein ZPC. In large domestic mammals, the role of these molecules remains unclear: in bovine, they are involved in sperm-zona pellucida binding, whereas in porcine, they are not necessary. Our aim was to clarify the role of Galactosyltransferase and N-Acetylglucosamine residues in sperm-zona pellucida binding in ungulates. For this purpose, we analyzed the mechanism of sperm-zona pellucida interaction in a third ungulate: the horse, since the Galactosyltransferase and N-Acetylglucosamine residues have been localized on equine gametes. We masked the Galactosyltransferase and N-Acetylglucosamine residues before the co-incubation of gametes. Galactosyltransferase was masked either with an anti-Galactosyltransferase antibody or with the enzyme substrate, UDP Galactose. N-Acetylglucosamine residues were masked either with a purified Galactosyltransferase or with an anti-ZPC antibody. The number of spermatozoa bound to the zona pellucida did not decrease after the masking of Galactosyltransferase or N-Acetylglucosamine. So, these two molecules may not be necessary in the mechanism of in vitro sperm-zona pellucida interaction in the horse. The involvement of Galactosyltransferase and N-Acetylglucosamine residues in sperm-zona pellucida binding may have been lost during evolution in some ungulates, such as porcine and equine species.

  20. Aqueous extract of Peperomia pellucida (L.) HBK accelerates fracture healing in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Florence, Ngueguim Tsofack; Huguette, Sakouong Talle Suewellyne; Hubert, Donfack Jean; Raceline, Gounoue Kamkumo; Desire, Dzeufiet Djomeni Paul; Pierre, Kamtchouing; Theophile, Dimo

    2017-04-04

    Peperomia pellucida (L.) HBK is consumed as vegetable and used in Cameroonian traditional medicine for the management of diseases and for fracture healing. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the aqueous whole plant extract of Peperomia pellucida on fracture healing in female Wistar rats. A drill hole injury was created by inserting a drill bit inthe diaphysis of the femur. The aqueous extract of the whole plant of Peperomia pellucida was administered orally at the doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg to adult female Wistar rats. The vehicle (distilled water) was given to the control. Besides these rats, one group of rats without fracture received the extract (400 mg/kg). After 14 days of treatment, the rats were sacrificed under anesthesia and the effects of the extract were evaluated on body weight, the relative weights of organs (femurs, uteri and ovaries) and on hematology. Bone (calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase) and serum biochemical parameters (calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase) were also evaluated. Radiological and histological tests were carried out on the femurs. The mineral content of the plant extract was also investigated. The extract induced an increase in body weight at high dose and in WBCs count at low doses. Aqueous extract from Peperomia pellucida increased bone calcium at lowest dose but maintained this parameter at normal range at high dose in fractured rat. Alkaline phophatase and phosphorus concentrations reduced significantly (p < 0.01) at the dose of 400 mg/kg as compared to fractured rats. Moreover, radiological tests revealed a dose dependent formation of callus at the level of the fracture gap, confirmed by the formation of a highly dense and compact fibrocartilagenous callus. The mineral content of the plant extract revealed the presence of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium and potassium. The aqueous extract of P. pellucida accelerates bone healing due partly to the mineral content of the

  1. Correlation study between sperm concentration, hyaluronic acid-binding capacity and sperm aneuploidy in Hungarian patients.

    PubMed

    Mokánszki, Attila; Molnár, Zsuzsanna; Ujfalusi, Anikó; Balogh, Erzsébet; Bazsáné, Zsuzsa Kassai; Varga, Attila; Jakab, Attila; Oláh, Éva

    2012-12-01

    Infertile men with low sperm concentration and/or less motile spermatozoa have an increased risk of producing aneuploid spermatozoa. Selecting spermatozoa by hyaluronic acid (HA) binding may reduce genetic risks such as chromosomal rearrangements and numerical aberrations. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to evaluate the presence of aneuploidies. This study examined spermatozoa of 10 oligozoospermic, 9 asthenozoospermic, 9 oligoasthenozoospermic and 17 normozoospermic men by HA binding and FISH. Mean percentage of HA-bound spermatozoa in the normozoospermic group was 81%, which was significantly higher than in the oligozoospermic (P<0.001), asthenozoospermic (P<0.001) and oligoasthenozoospermic (P<0.001) groups. Disomy of sex chromosomes (P=0.014) and chromosome 17 (P=0.0019), diploidy (P=0.03) and estimated numerical chromosome aberrations (P=0.004) were significantly higher in the oligoasthenozoospermic group compared with the other groups. There were statistically significant relationships (P<0.001) between sperm concentration and HA binding (r=0.658), between sperm concentration and estimated numerical chromosome aberrations (r=-0.668) and between HA binding and estimated numerical chromosome aberrations (r=-0.682). HA binding and aneuploidy studies of spermatozoa in individual cases allow prediction of reproductive prognosis and provision of appropriate genetic counselling. Infertile men with normal karyotypes and low sperm concentrations and/or less motile spermatozoa have significantly increased risks of producing aneuploid (diminished mature) spermatozoa. Selecting spermatozoa by hyaluronic acid (HA) binding, based on a binding between sperm receptors for zona pellucida and HA, may reduce the potential genetic risks such as chromosomal rearrangements and numerical aberrations. In the present study we examined sperm samples of 45 men with different sperm parameters by HA-binding assay and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). Mean

  2. Demi-embryo production from hatching of zona-drilled bovine and rabbit blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Skrzyszowska, M; Smorag, Z; Katska, L

    1997-09-01

    It is known that the pregnancy rate resulting after transfer of bisected embryos is lower than after transfer of whole embryos. The main reason is the reduced cell number in the demi-embryo which is less than 1 2 of that in the intact embryo, since a number of blastomeres is damaged as a result of the procedure used in conventional embryo splitting. The aim of our experiment was to develop a non-invasive procedure which would limit cell losses during microsurgery. The experiment was carried out on bovine IVM-IVF embryos at middle, late and expanded blastocyst stage and rabbit embryos at late blastocyst stage cultured in vitro from in vivo produced zygotes. The zona pellucida of these embryos was drilled on the line between the inner cell mass and the trophoblast using a glass microneedle (

  3. Natural radioactivity determination in samples of Peperomia pellucida commonly used as a medicinal herb.

    PubMed

    Sussa, Fábio V; Damatto, Sandra R; Alencar, Marcos M; Mazzilli, Barbara P; Silva, Paulo S C

    2013-02-01

    The concentration of (238)U, (232)Th, (230)Th, (226)Ra, (228)Ra and (210)Pb were determined in samples of Peperomia pellucida and in the surrounding soil, by alpha spectrometry and gross alpha and beta counting. The radionuclide activity concentrations ranged from 4.3 to 38 Bq kg(-1), 1.7-124 Bq kg(-1), 2.1-38 Bq kg(-1), 8.5-37 Bq kg(-1), 3.2-46 Bq kg(-1), 39-93 Bq kg(-1), respectively. In the plant extractions and infusions as used for consumption, the mean recoveries were from 23% to 60% in maceration and 24-75% in infusion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vitrification of zona-free rabbit expanded or hatching blastocysts: a possible model for human blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Cervera, R P; Garcia-Ximénez, F

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of one two-step (A) and two one-step (B1 and B2) vitrification procedures on denuded expanded or hatching rabbit blastocysts held in standard sealed plastic straws as a possible model for human blastocysts. The effect of blastocyst size was also studied on the basis of three size categories (I: diameter <200 micro m; II: diameter 200-299 micro m; III: diameter >/==" BORDER="0">300 micro m). Rabbit expanded or hatching blastocysts were vitrified at day 4 or 5. Before vitrification, the zona pellucida was removed using acidic phosphate buffered saline. For the two-step procedure, prior to vitrification, blastocysts were pre- equilibrated in a solution containing 10% dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) and 10% ethylene glycol (EG) for 1 min. Different final vitrification solutions were compared: 20% DMSO and 20% EG with (A and B1) or without (B2) 0.5 mol/l sucrose. Of 198 vitrified blastocysts, 181 (91%) survived, regardless of the vitrification procedure applied. Vitrification procedure A showed significantly higher re-expansion (88%), attachment (86%) and trophectoderm outgrowth (80%) rates than the two one-step vitrification procedures, B1 and B2 (46 and 21%, 20 and 33%, and 18 and 23%, respectively). After warming, blastocysts of greater size (II and III) showed significantly higher attachment (54 and 64%) and trophectoderm outgrowth (44 and 58%) rates than smaller blastocysts (I, attachment: 29%; trophectoderm outgrowth: 25%). These result demonstrate that denuded expanded or hatching rabbit blastocysts of greater size can be satisfactorily vitrified by use of a two-step procedure. The similarity of vitrification solutions used in humans could make it feasible to test such a procedure on human denuded blastocysts of different sizes.

  5. Dillapiole, isolated from Peperomia pellucida, shows gastroprotector activity against ethanol-induced gastric lesions in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Martínez, Raúl; Arrieta, Jesús; Cruz-Antonio, Leticia; Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Velázquez-Méndez, Antonio Magdiel; Sánchez-Mendoza, María Elena

    2013-09-13

    Peperomia pellucida is a plant used in traditional medicine to treat gastric ulcers. Although this gastroprotective activity was reported, the active compounds have not been identified. Therefore, the aim herein was to identify the most active compound in the gastroprotective activity of P. pellucida using an ethanol-induced gastric ulcer experimental rat model. A gastroprotective effect was observed when the hexane and dichloromethane extracts were tested, with the higher effect being obtained with the dichloromethane extract (82.3 ± 5.6%) at 100 mg/kg. Dillapiole was identified as the most active compound in this extract. Although there have been previous reports on dillapiole, this is the first on its gastroprotective activity. Rats treated with this compound at 3, 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg showed 23.1, 56.1, 73.2 and 85.5% gastroprotection, respectively. The effect elicited by dillapiole at 100 mg/kg was not attenuated by pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg/kg, s.c.), a prostaglandin synthesis blocker, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (70 mg/kg, i.p.), a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, or N-ethylmaleimide (10 mg/kg, s.c.), a blocker of sulfhydryl groups. This suggests that the gastroprotective mechanism of action of dillapiole does not involve prostaglandins, NO or sulfhydryl groups.

  6. Tissue culture and expression of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit in transgenic Peperomia pellucida.

    PubMed

    Loc, Nguyen Hoang; Bach, Nguyen Hoang; Kim, Tae-Geum; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2010-07-01

    The B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LTB), a non-toxic molecule with potent biological properties, is a powerful mucosal and parenteral adjuvant that induces a strong immune response against co-administered or coupled antigens. We synthesized a gene encoding the LTB adapted to the optimized coding sequences in plants and fused to the endoplasmic reticulum retention signal SEKDEL to enhance its expression level and protein assembly in plants. The synthetic LTB gene was located into a plant expression vector under the control of CaMV 35S promoter and was introduced into Peperomia pellucida by biolistic transformation method. The integration of synthetic LTB gene into genomic DNA of transgenic plants was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR amplification method. The assembly of plant-produced LTB was detected by western blot analysis. The amount of LTB protein produced in transgenic P. pellucida leaves was approximately 0.75% of the total soluble plant protein. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated that plant-synthesized LTB protein bound specifically to GM1-ganglioside, which is receptor for LTB on the cell surface, suggesting that the LTB subunits formed biological active pentamers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bioactive Constituents, Radical Scavenging, and Antibacterial Properties of the Leaves and Stem Essential Oils from Peperomia pellucida (L.) Kunth.

    PubMed

    Okoh, Sunday O; Iweriebor, Benson C; Okoh, Omobola O; Okoh, Anthony I

    2017-10-01

    Peperomia pellucida is an annual herbaceous ethnomedicinal plant used in the treatment of a variety of communicable and noncommunicable diseases in the Amazon region. The study aimed at profiling the bioactive constituents of the leaves and stem essential oils (LEO and SEO) of P. pellucida , their in vitro antibacterial and radical scavenging properties as probable lead constituents in the management of oxidative stress and infectious diseases. Materials and. The EOs were obtained from the leaves and stem P. pellucida using modified Clevenger apparatus and characterized by a high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, while the radicals scavenging and antibacterial effects on four oxidants and six reference bacteria strains were examined by spectrophotometric and agar diffusion techniques, respectively. The EOs exhibited strong antibacterial activities against six bacteria ( Escherichia coli [180], Enterobacter cloacae, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Listeria ivanovii , Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis , and Vibrio paraheamolyticus ) strains. The SEO antibacterial activities were not significantly different ( P < 0.05) from the LEO against most of the test bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentration ranging between 0.15 and 0.20 mg/mL for both EOs. The two oils were bactericidal at 0.20 mg/mL against S. aureus while the minimum bactericidal concentration (0.15 mg/mL) of LEO against L. ivanovii was lower than of SEO (0.20 mg/mL) after 24 h. The LEO IC 50 value (1.67 mg/mL) revealed more radical scavenging activity than the SEO (2.83 mg/mL) and reference compounds against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical. The EOs also scavenged three other different radicals (2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt radical, lipid peroxyl radical, and nitric oxide radical) in concentration-dependent manner. Our results suggest that apart from the indigenous uses of the plant extracts, the EO contains strong bioactive compounds

  8. Bioactive Constituents, Radical Scavenging, and Antibacterial Properties of the Leaves and Stem Essential Oils from Peperomia pellucida (L.) Kunth

    PubMed Central

    Okoh, Sunday O.; Iweriebor, Benson C.; Okoh, Omobola O.; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Peperomia pellucida is an annual herbaceous ethnomedicinal plant used in the treatment of a variety of communicable and noncommunicable diseases in the Amazon region. Objective: The study aimed at profiling the bioactive constituents of the leaves and stem essential oils (LEO and SEO) of P. pellucida, their in vitro antibacterial and radical scavenging properties as probable lead constituents in the management of oxidative stress and infectious diseases. Materials and Methods: The EOs were obtained from the leaves and stem P. pellucida using modified Clevenger apparatus and characterized by a high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, while the radicals scavenging and antibacterial effects on four oxidants and six reference bacteria strains were examined by spectrophotometric and agar diffusion techniques, respectively. Results: The EOs exhibited strong antibacterial activities against six bacteria (Escherichia coli [180], Enterobacter cloacae, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Listeria ivanovii, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, and Vibrio paraheamolyticus) strains. The SEO antibacterial activities were not significantly different (P < 0.05) from the LEO against most of the test bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentration ranging between 0.15 and 0.20 mg/mL for both EOs. The two oils were bactericidal at 0.20 mg/mL against S. aureus while the minimum bactericidal concentration (0.15 mg/mL) of LEO against L. ivanovii was lower than of SEO (0.20 mg/mL) after 24 h. The LEO IC50 value (1.67 mg/mL) revealed more radical scavenging activity than the SEO (2.83 mg/mL) and reference compounds against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical. The EOs also scavenged three other different radicals (2,2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt radical, lipid peroxyl radical, and nitric oxide radical) in concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion: Our results suggest that apart from the indigenous uses of the plant extracts

  9. Peperomia pellucida leaf extract as immunostimulator in controlling motile aeromonad septicemia due to Aeromonas hydrophila in red hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis spp. farming

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. W.; Sim, K. Y.; Wendy, W.; Zulhisyam, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was revealed the potential of Peperomia pellucida leaf extract as an immunostimulator agent in controlling motile aeromonad septicemia due to Aeromonas hydrophila in red hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis sp. Materials and Methods: In the present study, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of P. pellucida leaf extract against A. hydrophila was determined through two-fold microbroth dilution method. The plant extract was screening for its active compound using a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, and the effectiveness of P. pellucida leaf extract as an immunostimulator agent was evaluated. The experimental fish were fed with medicated feed at three different concentrations (25 mg/kg, PP-25; 50 mg/kg, PP-50; and 100 mg/kg, PP-100) of P. pellucida leaf extract for 1 week before they were intraperitoneally exposed to A. hydrophila. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was carried out to determine the value of antibody response to A. hydrophila in fish from a group of fish that received medicated feed, and the percentage of total cumulative mortality of the experimental fish were observed at the end of the experiment. Results: The results showed that the major bioactive compound is phytol (40%), and the MIC value was 31.5 mg/L. The value of antibody response to A. hydrophila in fish from a group of fish which received medicated feed (PP-25, 0.128±0.014 optical density [OD]; PP-50, 0.132±0.003 OD; and PP-100, 0.171±0.02 OD) was found significantly higher (p<0.05) compared to fish did not receive medicated feed (0.00 OD). Whereas, percentage cumulative mortality of fish from all groups of fish received medicated feed (PP-25, 18.0±3.2%; PP-50, 18.2±2.8%; and PP-100, 17.7±1.8%) were found significantly lower (p<0.05) compared to a group of fish did not receive medicated feed (83.2±1.4%). Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicated the huge potential of P. pellucida leaf extract as natural immunostimulator agent for aquaculture uses. PMID

  10. Peperomia pellucida leaf extract as immunostimulator in controlling motile aeromonad septicemia due to Aeromonas hydrophila in red hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis spp. farming.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Sim, K Y; Wendy, W; Zulhisyam, A K

    2016-03-01

    This study was revealed the potential of Peperomia pellucida leaf extract as an immunostimulator agent in controlling motile aeromonad septicemia due to Aeromonas hydrophila in red hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis sp. In the present study, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of P. pellucida leaf extract against A. hydrophila was determined through two-fold microbroth dilution method. The plant extract was screening for its active compound using a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, and the effectiveness of P. pellucida leaf extract as an immunostimulator agent was evaluated. The experimental fish were fed with medicated feed at three different concentrations (25 mg/kg, PP-25; 50 mg/kg, PP-50; and 100 mg/kg, PP-100) of P. pellucida leaf extract for 1 week before they were intraperitoneally exposed to A. hydrophila. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was carried out to determine the value of antibody response to A. hydrophila in fish from a group of fish that received medicated feed, and the percentage of total cumulative mortality of the experimental fish were observed at the end of the experiment. The results showed that the major bioactive compound is phytol (40%), and the MIC value was 31.5 mg/L. The value of antibody response to A. hydrophila in fish from a group of fish which received medicated feed (PP-25, 0.128±0.014 optical density [OD]; PP-50, 0.132±0.003 OD; and PP-100, 0.171±0.02 OD) was found significantly higher (p<0.05) compared to fish did not receive medicated feed (0.00 OD). Whereas, percentage cumulative mortality of fish from all groups of fish received medicated feed (PP-25, 18.0±3.2%; PP-50, 18.2±2.8%; and PP-100, 17.7±1.8%) were found significantly lower (p<0.05) compared to a group of fish did not receive medicated feed (83.2±1.4%). The findings of the present study indicated the huge potential of P. pellucida leaf extract as natural immunostimulator agent for aquaculture uses.

  11. Autoradiographic visualization of the mouse egg's sperm receptor bound to sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Bleil, J.D.; Wassarman, P.M.

    1986-04-01

    The extracellular coat, or zona pellucida, of mammalian eggs contains species-specific receptors to which sperm bind as a prelude to fertilization. In mice, ZP3, one of only three zona pellucida glycoproteins, serves as sperm receptor. Acrosome-intact, but not acrosome-reacted, mouse sperm recognize and interact with specific O-linked oligosaccharides of ZP3 resulting in sperm-egg binding. Binding, in turn, causes sperm to undergo the acrosome reaction; a membrane fusion event that results in loss of plasma membrane at the anterior region of the head and exposure of inner acrosomal membrane with its associated acrosomal contents. Bound, acrosome-reacted sperm are able to penetratemore » the zona pellucida and fuse with the egg's plasma membrane (fertilization). In the present report, we examined binding of radioiodinated, purified, egg ZP3 to both acrosome intact and acrosome reacted sperm by whole-mount autoradiography. Silver grains due to bound 125I-ZP3 were found localized to the acrosomal cap region of heads of acrosome-reacted sperm. Under the same conditions, 125I-fetuin bound at only background levels to heads of both acrosome-intact and -reacted sperm, and 125I-ZP2, another zona pellucida glycoprotein, bound preferentially to acrosome-reacted sperm. These results provide visual evidence that ZP3 binds preferentially and specifically to heads of acrosome intact sperm; properties expected of the mouse egg's sperm receptor.« less

  12. Pig sperm preincubation and gamete coincubation with glutamate enhance sperm-oocyte binding and in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Spinaci, M; Bucci, D; Gadani, B; Porcu, E; Tamanini, C; Galeati, G

    2017-06-01

    As the taste receptor for monosodium glutamate (umami) is expressed in both murine and human spermatozoa and the presence of α-gustducin and α-transducin, G proteins involved in the umami taste signaling, has been described in boar germ cells, the aim of this study was to evaluate if monosodium glutamate (MSG) would exert any effect on sperm-oocyte binding, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and sperm parameters during in vitro induced capacitation. For sperm-zona pellucida binding assay, boar spermatozoa were preincubated for 1 h and then coincubated for 1 h with denuded in vitro matured oocytes in presence of different concentrations of MSG (0, 0.1, 1, 10 mM). MSG 1 and 10 mM significantly (P < 0.05) increased the mean number of sperm bound to ZP compared with control (12.3 ± 9.0, 17.8 ± 11.3, 17.6 ± 10.8, MSG 0, 1 and 10 mM respectively). For in vitro fertilization trials, both sperm preicubation (1 h) and gamete coincubation (1 h) were performed in presence of different concentrations of MSG (0, 0.1, 1, 10 mM). After 19 h of culture in fresh IVF medium, oocytes were fixed. MSG 1 mM significantly (P < 0.05) increased the penetration rate compared with control (53.7 ± 20.4 vs. 36.8 ± 16.2). The addition of MSG during in vitro induced capacitation of boar spermatozoa did not cause any significant difference, compared with control, on the percentage of viable cells, spermatozoa with intact acrosome and the percentage of spermatozoa displaying tyrosine-phosphorylation of sperm tail proteins. In order to evaluate whether the effect elicited by MSG could be due to glutamate uptake in boar spermatozoa, fertilization trials were performed in presence of either 1 mM MSG or 1 mM MSG + 100 μM DL-threo-beta-hydroxyaspartic acid (THA), a non selective inhibitor of glutamate uptake. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in the penetration rate in both MSG and MSG + THA groups compared to control was recorded (39.8 ± 15.7, 53.7 ± 22

  13. Adrenocortical nuclear progesterone-binding protein: Identification by photoaffinity labeling and evidence for deoxyribonucleic acid binding and stimulation by adrenocorticotropin

    SciTech Connect

    Demura, T.; Driscoll, W.J.; Lee, Y.C.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclei of the guinea pig adrenal cortex contain a protein that specifically binds progesterone and that, biochemically, is clearly distinct from the classical progesterone receptor. The adrenocortical nuclear progesterone-binding protein has now been purified more than 2000-fold by steroid-affinity chromatography with a 75% yield. The purified protein preparation demonstrated three major bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel of 79K, 74K, and 50K. To determine which of the three might represent the progesterone-binding protein, steroid photoaffinity labeling was performed which resulted in the specific and exclusive labeling of a 50K band. Thus, the adrenocortical nuclear progesterone-binding protein appears to be distinctmore » from the classical progesterone receptor not only biochemically, but also on the basis of molecular size. To test whether the adrenocortical nuclear progesterone-binding protein can be hormonally stimulated, guinea pigs were treated with ACTH. The chronic administration of ACTH caused a 4- to 6-fold increase in the specific progesterone binding capacity without a change in the binding affinity. There appeared to be no significant difference in nuclear progesterone binding between the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis. This finding suggests a mediating role for the progesterone-binding protein in ACTH action. In addition, the nuclear progesterone-binding protein bound to nonspecific DNA sequences, further suggesting a possible transcriptional regulatory role.« less

  14. Structural and Optical Analysis of the Bio-mineralized Photonic Structures in the Shell of the Blue- Rayed Limpet Ansates Pellucida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolle, Mathias; Li, Ling; Kolle, Stefan; Weaver, James; Ortiz, Christine; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Many terrestrial biological organisms have evolved a variety of micro- and nanostructures that provide unique optical signatures including distinctive, dynamic coloration, high reflectivity or superior whiteness. Recently, photonic structures have also been found in the shells or spines of marine animals. Life under water imposes very distinct constraints on organisms relying on visual communication and on the designs and the materials involved in aquatic photonic structures. Here, we present a bio-mineralized calcium carbonate - based crystalline photonic system buried in the shell of the blue-rayed limpet Ansates pellucida. The structure consists of a layered stack of calcite lamellae with uniform thickness and inter-lamella spacing. This arrangement lies at the origin of the blue-green iridescence of the organism's characteristic stripes, which is caused by multilayer interference. The multilayer is supported by a disordered array of spherical particles with an average diameter of 300nm, likely serving to enhance the contrast of the blue stripes. We present a full structural and optical characterization of this bio-mineralised marine photonic system, supported by optical FDTD modeling. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award No. FA9550-09-1-0669-DOD35CAP. M. Kolle is grateful for support from the Alexander von Humboldt - Foundation.

  15. Swallowing Quality of Life After Zona Incerta Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sundstedt, Stina; Nordh, Erik; Linder, Jan; Hedström, Johanna; Finizia, Caterina; Olofsson, Katarina

    2017-02-01

    The management of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been improved, but management of signs like swallowing problems is still challenging. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) alleviates the cardinal motor symptoms and improves quality of life, but its effect on swallowing is not fully explored. The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported swallowing-specific quality of life before and after caudal zona incerta DBS (cZI DBS) in comparison with a control group. Nine PD patients (2 women and 7 men) completed the self-report Swallowing Quality of Life questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) before and 12 months after cZI DBS surgery. The postoperative data were compared to 9 controls. Median ages were 53 years (range, 40-70 years) for patients and 54 years (range, 42-72 years) for controls. No significant differences were found between the pre- or postoperative scores. The SWAL-QOL total scores did not differ significantly between PD patients and controls. The PD patients reported significantly lower scores in the burden subscale and the symptom scale. Patients with PD selected for cZI DBS showed good self-reported swallowing-specific quality of life, in many aspects equal to controls. The cZI DBS did not negatively affect swallowing-specific quality of life in this study.

  16. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  17. The anatomy of the caudal zona incerta in rodents and primates

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Charles; Lind, Christopher R P; Thomas, Meghan G

    2014-01-01

    The caudal zona incerta is the target of a recent modification of established procedures for deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease and tremor. The caudal zona incerta contains a number of neuronal populations that are distinct in terms of their cytoarchitecture, connections, and pattern of immunomarkers and is located at a position where a number of major tracts converge before turning toward their final destination in the forebrain. However, it is not clear which of the anatomical features of the region are related to its value as a target for DBS. This paper has tried to identify features that distinguish the caudal zona incerta of rodents (mouse and rat) and primates (marmoset, rhesus monkey, and human) from the remainder of the zona incerta. We studied cytoarchitecture, anatomical relationships, the pattern of immunomarkers, and gene expression in both of these areas. We found that the caudal zona incerta has a number of histological and gene expression characteristics that distinguish it from the other subdivisions of the zona incerta. Of particular note are the sparse population of GABA neurons and the small but distinctive population of calbindin neurons. We hope that a clearer appreciation of the anatomy of the region will in the end assist the interpretation of cases in which DBS is used in human patients. PMID:24138151

  18. The formation of zona radiata in Pseudosciaena crocea revealed by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Xin; Zhu, Jun-Quan; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2012-02-01

    The egg envelope is an essential structure occurring during oogenesis. It plays an important role during the process of fertilization in the large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea. Elucidation of egg envelope formation helps us to understand fertilization mechanisms in teleosts. In the present work, we studied the formation of egg envelope in P. crocea by light microscopy, as well as by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Four layers exist outside the oocyte plasmalemma, i.e., theca cell layer, basal membrane, granulosa cell layer and zona radiata. According to our observation, zona radiata is a multilaminar structure just like the same structure reported in teleosts, but the origin of this structure is a little different. Before it is formed, a peripheral space filled with different density of vesicles is the place where zona radiata is formed. Zona radiata (Z1) is secreted only by oocyte itself, it belongs to the primary envelope; zona radiata 2 (Z2) and zona radiata 3 (Z3) belong to the secondary envelope, because the two layers are formed after granulosa cells appear, and microvilli participate this process. It is very interesting that Z2 and Z3 are situated between Z1 and the granulosa cell first, but they translocate to the other side of Z1. This microanatomy difference may due to the participation of microvilli. The new finding about egg envelope formation in P. crocea will help us to do further investigation on fertilization mechanisms and will make artificial breeding possible which may contribute to the resource recovery of this species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Laser assisted zona hatching does not lead to immediate impairment in human embryo quality and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Uppangala, Shubhashree; D'Souza, Fiona; Pudakalakatti, Shivanand; Atreya, Hanudatta S; Raval, Keyur; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Laser assisted zona hatching (LAH) is a routinely used therapeutic intervention in assisted reproductive technology for patients with poor prognosis. However, results are not conclusive in demonstrating the benefits of zona hatching in improving the pregnancy rate. Recent observations on LAH induced genetic instability in animal embryos prompted us to look into the effects of laser assisted zona hatching on the human preimplantation embryo quality and metabolic uptake using high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. This experimental prospective study included fifty embryos from twenty-five patients undergoing intra cytoplasmic sperm injection. Embryo quality assessment followed by profiling of spent media for the non-invasive evaluation of metabolites was performed using NMR spectroscopy 24 hours after laser treatment and compared with that of non-treated sibling embryos. Both cell number and embryo quality on day 3 of development did not vary significantly between the two groups at 24 hours post laser treatment interval. Time lapse monitoring of the embryos for 24 hours did not reveal blastomere fragmentation adjacent to the point of laser treatment. Similarly, principal component analysis of metabolites did not demonstrate any variation across the groups. These results suggest that laser assisted zona hatching does not affect human preimplantation embryo morphology and metabolism at least until 24 hours post laser assisted zona hatching. However, studies are required to elucidate laser induced metabolic and developmental changes at extended time periods. AH: assisted hatching; ART: assisted reproductive technology; DNA: deoxy-ribo nucleic acid; LAH: laser assisted hatching; MHz: megahertz; NMR: nuclear magnetic resonance; PCA: principal component analysis; PGD: preimplantation genetic diagnosis; TLM: time lapse monitoring.

  20. Fine structure and morphogenesis of spironolactone bodies in the zona glomerulosa of the human adrenal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, K.; Horvath, E.; Singer, W.

    1973-01-01

    Numerous spironolactone bodies have been detected in the zona glomerulosa cells of the adrenal cortex of a 36-year-old spironolactone-treated woman whose non-tumorous right adrenal gland was removed surgically because of primary hyperaldosteronism. Electron microscopy revealed spherical laminated whorls which consisted of a central core composed of an amorphous electron-dense material surrounded by numerous smooth-walled concentric membranes. Continuous with and deriving from the endoplasmic reticulum, they were present in viable cells and were not associated with ultrastructural features indicating cellular injury. Cytoplasmic inclusions similar to spironolactone bodies can be detected in other organs after the administration of various compounds. Thus, they can be regarded as neither specific to spironolactone treatment nor exclusively inducible in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex. Images PMID:4131694

  1. Lhx6-positive GABA-releasing neurons of the zona incerta promote sleep

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Kim, Juhyun; Kim, Dong Won; Zhang, Yi Stephanie; Bao, Hechen; Denaxa, Myrto; Lim, Szu-Aun; Kim, Eileen; Liu, Chang; Wickersham, Ian R.; Pachnis, Vassilis; Hattar, Samer; Song, Juan; Brown, Solange P.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Multiple populations of wake-promoting neurons have been characterized in mammals, but few sleep-promoting neurons have been identified1. Wake-promoting cell types include hypocretin and GABA (γ-aminobutyric-acid)-releasing neurons of the lateral hypothalamus, which promote the transition to wakefulness from non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep2,3. Here we show that a subset of GABAergic neurons in the mouse ventral zona incerta, which express the LIM homeodomain factor Lhx6 and are activated by sleep pressure, both directly inhibit wake-active hypocretin and GABAergic cells in the lateral hypothalamus and receive inputs from multiple sleep–wake-regulating neurons. Conditional deletion of Lhx6 from the developing diencephalon leads to decreases in both NREM and REM sleep. Furthermore, selective activation and inhibition of Lhx6-positive neurons in the ventral zona incerta bidirectionally regulate sleep time in adult mice, in part through hypocretin-dependent mechanisms. These studies identify a GABAergic subpopulation of neurons in the ventral zona incerta that promote sleep. PMID:28847002

  2. Application of a 1.48-microm diode laser for bisecting oocytes into two identical hemizonae for the hemizona assay.

    PubMed

    Edenfeld, J; Schöpper, B; Sturm, R; Diedrich, K; Al-Hasani, S

    2002-04-01

    Laser systems are very promising new technical tools in assisted reproduction. It was investigated if laser radiation can replace the mechanical cutting procedure via micromanipulator in the hemizona assay (HZA), a commonly used bioassay to determine the sperm-zona pellucida binding capacity. An oocyte was bisected precisely into two identical hemizonae with approximately 20 laser pulses (pulse length 30 msec) using a 1.48-microm diode laser. Compared with the conventional method using microscalpels for zona bisection, laser treated hemizonae showed equivalent sperm-binding and within the two groups there was no detectable difference between matching hemizonae in their capacity for tight sperm-binding. To evaluate whether laser radiation affects the outcome of the HZA when effects of certain substances are investigated, the spermatozoa were preincubated with human follicular fluid (hFF), which inhibits the binding of spermatozoa to zona pellucida in vitro. Supplementation with follicular fluid exerted an inhibitory effect in both groups. The hemizona index (HZI) showed no statistical differences between the two methods. Therefore, the 1.48-microm diode laser is a suitable new instrument for generating equally sized hemizonae. There is no use for holding pipettes and microscalpels, on the contrary, for performing the HZA the laser is a precise, very quick and easy to use new working tool.

  3. Pentoxifylline increases sperm penetration into zona-free hamster oocytes without increasing the acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Morales, P; Llanos, M; Yovich, J L; Cummins, J M; Vigil, P

    1993-01-01

    Several drugs have been used to stimulate human sperm motility, including 3-deoxy-adenosine, caffeine, and pentoxifylline. Pentoxifylline is an inhibitor of the phosphodiesterase and may stimulate sperm motility by increasing the intracellular levels of cAMP. In this study we have evaluated the effect of pentoxifylline in the outcome of the sperm penetration assay into zona-free hamster oocytes. Twenty-seven semen samples, obtained for diagnostic purposes, were used. After the motile sperm were selected by the swim-up technique, the samples were divided into two aliquots. One aliquot was incubated with 1 mg ml-1 of pentoxifylline at 37 degrees C, 5% CO2 for 30 min. The control aliquot was incubated with culture medium. The samples were then washed and resuspended in fresh, pentoxifylline-free medium, at a sperm concentration of 10 x 10(6) cells ml-1. One hundred microlitres of each sperm suspension was then deposited under oil and 30-40 zona-free hamster oocytes were added. After 6 h of gamete coincubation, the percentage of penetrated oocytes and the number of decondensed sperm heads were evaluated. The percentage of acrosome-reacted sperm was evaluated using the Pisum sativum lectin. The percentage of zona-free hamster oocytes penetrated was increased after pentoxifylline-treatment. The percentage of acrosome reacted sperm and the number of decondensed sperm heads per egg were not different between the control and the pentoxifylline-treated groups. The results suggest that the beneficial effect of pentoxifylline upon the sperm cells is not mediated by stimulation of the acrosome reaction.

  4. Functional TASK-3-Like Channels in Mitochondria of Aldosterone-Producing Zona Glomerulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junlan; McHedlishvili, David; McIntire, William E; Guagliardo, Nick A; Erisir, Alev; Coburn, Craig A; Santarelli, Vincent P; Bayliss, Douglas A; Barrett, Paula Q

    2017-08-01

    Ca 2+ drives aldosterone synthesis in the cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments of the adrenal zona glomerulosa cell. Membrane potential across each of these compartments regulates the amplitude of the Ca 2+ signal; yet, only plasma membrane ion channels and their role in regulating cell membrane potential have garnered investigative attention as pathological causes of human hyperaldosteronism. Previously, we reported that genetic deletion of TASK-3 channels (tandem pore domain acid-sensitive K + channels) from mice produces aldosterone excess in the absence of a change in the cell membrane potential of zona glomerulosa cells. Here, we report using yeast 2-hybrid, immunoprecipitation, and electron microscopic analyses that TASK-3 channels are resident in mitochondria, where they regulate mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial membrane potential, and aldosterone production. This study provides proof of principle that mitochondrial K + channels, by modulating inner mitochondrial membrane morphology and mitochondrial membrane potential, have the ability to play a pathological role in aldosterone dysregulation in steroidogenic cells. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Mouse SLLP1, a sperm lysozyme-like protein involved in sperm-egg binding and fertilization.

    PubMed

    Herrero, María Belén; Mandal, Arabinda; Digilio, Laura C; Coonrod, Scott A; Maier, Bernhard; Herr, John C

    2005-08-01

    This study demonstrates the retention of mouse sperm lysozyme-like protein (mSLLP1) in the equatorial segment of spermatozoa following the acrosome reaction and a role for mSLLP1 in sperm-egg binding and fertilization. Treatment of cumulus intact oocytes with either recmSLLP1 or its antiserum resulted in a significant (P < or = 0.05) inhibition of fertilization. Co-incubation of zona-free mouse oocytes with capacitated mouse spermatozoa in the presence of varying concentrations of anti-recmSLLP1 serum or recmSLLP1 also inhibited sperm-oolemma binding. A complete inhibition of binding and fusion of spermatozoa to the oocyte occurred at 12.5 muM concentration of recmSLLP1, while conventional chicken and human lysozymes did not block sperm-egg binding. mSLLP1 showed receptor sites in the perivitelline space as well as on the microvillar region of the egg plasma membrane. The retention of mSLLP1 in the equatorial segment of acrosome-reacted sperm, the inhibitory effects of both recmSLLP1 and antibodies to SLLP1 on in vitro fertilization with both cumulus intact and zona-free eggs, and the definition of complementary SLLP1-binding sites on the egg plasma membrane together support the hypothesis that a c lysozyme-like protein is involved in the binding of spermatozoa to the egg plasma membrane during fertilization.

  6. Rapid binge-like eating and body weight gain driven by zona incerta GABA neuron activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaobing; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2017-05-26

    The neuronal substrate for binge eating, which can at times lead to obesity, is not clear. We find that optogenetic stimulation of mouse zona incerta (ZI) γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons or their axonal projections to paraventricular thalamus (PVT) excitatory neurons immediately (in 2 to 3 seconds) evoked binge-like eating. Minimal intermittent stimulation led to body weight gain; ZI GABA neuron ablation reduced weight. ZI stimulation generated 35% of normal 24-hour food intake in just 10 minutes. The ZI cells were excited by food deprivation and the gut hunger signal ghrelin. In contrast, stimulation of excitatory axons from the parasubthalamic nucleus to PVT or direct stimulation of PVT glutamate neurons reduced food intake. These data suggest an unexpected robust orexigenic potential for the ZI GABA neurons. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Tiger, Bengal and Domestic Cat Embryos Produced by Homospecific and Interspecific Zona-Free Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Moro, L N; Jarazo, J; Buemo, C; Hiriart, M I; Sestelo, A; Salamone, D F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate three different cloning strategies in the domestic cat (Felis silvestris) and to use the most efficient to generate wild felid embryos by interspecific cloning (iSCNT) using Bengal (a hybrid formed by the cross of Felis silvestris and Prionailurus bengalensis) and tiger (Panthera tigris) donor cells. In experiment 1, zona-free (ZP-free) cloning resulted in higher fusion and expanded blastocyst rates with respect to zona included cloning techniques that involved fusion or injection of the donor cell. In experiment 2, ZP-free iSCNT and embryo aggregation (2X) were assessed. Division velocity and blastocyst rates were increased by embryo aggregation in the three species. Despite fewer tiger embryos than Bengal and cat embryos reached the blastocyst stage, Tiger 2X group increased the percentage of blastocysts with respect to Tiger 1X group (3.2% vs 12.1%, respectively). Moreover, blastocyst cell number was almost duplicated in aggregated embryos with respect to non-aggregated ones within Bengal and tiger groups (278.3 ± 61.9 vs 516.8 ± 103.6 for Bengal 1X and Bengal 2X groups, respectively; 41 vs 220 ± 60 for Tiger 1X and Tiger 2X groups, respectively). OCT4 analysis also revealed that tiger blastocysts had higher proportion of OCT4-positive cells with respect to Bengal blastocysts and cat intracytoplasmic sperm injection blastocysts. In conclusion, ZP-free cloning has improved the quality of cat embryos with respect to the other cloning techniques evaluated and was successfully applied in iSCNT complemented with embryo aggregation. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Pitch Variability in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; van Doorn, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) pitch characteristics of connected speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The authors evaluated 16 patients preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Eight…

  9. INDUCTION OF ZONA RADIATA PROTEINS AND VITELLOGENINS IN ESTRADIOL AND NONYLPHENOL EXPOSED MALE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knoebl, Iris, Michael J. Hemmer and Nancy D. Denslow. 2004. Induction of Zona Radiata Proteins and Vitellogenins in Estradiol and Nonylphenol Exposed Male Sheepshead Minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). Mar. Environ. Res. 58(2-5):547-551. (ERL,GB X1059).

    Several genes normall...

  10. Is vitronectin the velcro that binds the gametes together?

    PubMed

    Fusi, F M; Bernocchi, N; Ferrari, A; Bronson, R A

    1996-11-01

    Evidence has been presented that the adhesion of human spermatozoa to the oolemma is mediated by integrins recognizing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence (RGD). Fibronectin and vitronectin, glycoproteins that contain functional RGD sequences, are both present on human spermatozoa, and integrins that recognize these ligands have been detected on spermatozoa and eggs. In this work, we studied the effects of oligopeptides specifically designed to block fibronectin or vitronectin receptors on the interaction of human spermatozoa with zona-free hamster oocytes. GRGDdSP, a peptide blocking cell attachment to fibronectin, was without effect, while GdRGDSP, which blocks both fibronectin and vitronectin receptors, significantly inhibited the binding of human spermatozoa to the oolemma of zona-free hamster eggs, in a concentration-dependent manner, over a range 1-100 microM. As these experiments suggested that a vitronectin receptor plays a role in sperm-oolemmal adhesion, we performed a series of experiments studying the effects of exogenous vitronectin, when added to spermatozoa and oocytes, on gamete interactions. Sperm-oolemmal adherence, as well as sperm aggregation, was promoted by vitronectin, over range of 2.2 nM to 1 microM, but only in the presence of calcium ions. We propose that vitronectin released during the sperm acrosome reaction is recognized by both gametes and plays a role in their adhesion.

  11. Influence of freeze-thawing on hyaluronic acid binding of human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Nijs, Martine; Creemers, Eva; Cox, Annemie; Janssen, Mia; Vanheusden, Elke; Castro-Sanchez, Yovanna; Thijs, Herbert; Ombelet, Willem

    2009-08-01

    Mature human spermatozoa have at least three specific hyaluronic acid (HA) binding proteins present on their sperm membrane. These receptors play a role in the acrosome reaction, hyaluronidase activity, hyaluronan-mediated motility and sperm-zona and sperm-oolemmal binding. Cryopreservation of spermatozoa can cause ultrastructural and even molecular damage. The aim of this study was to investigate if HA binding receptors of human spermatozoa remain functional after freeze-thawing. Forty patients were enrolled in the study. Semen samples were analysed before and after cryopreservation. Parameters analysed included concentration, motility, morphology and hyaluronan binding. Samples were frozen in CBS straws using a glycerol-glucose-based cryoprotectant. HA binding was studied using the sperm-hyaluronan binding assay. Freeze-thawing resulted in a significant decline in motility: the percentage of motile spermatozoa reduced from 50.6 to 30.3% (P < 0.001). HA binding properties of frozen-thawed spermatozoa remained unchanged after the freeze-thawing process: 68.5 +/- 17.1% spermatozoa of the neat sample were bound to HA, as were 71.3 +/- 20.4 of the frozen-thawed sample. This study indicates that freeze-thawing did not alter the functional hyaluronan binding sites of mature motile spermatozoa, and therefore will not alter their fertilizing potential.

  12. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  13. Mapping the potential beverage quality of coffee produced in the Zona da Mata, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Samuel de Assis; de Queiroz, Daniel Marçal; Ferreira, Williams Pinto Marques; Corrêa, Paulo Cesar; Rufino, José Luis Dos Santos

    2016-07-01

    Detailed knowledge of coffee production systems enables optimization of crop management, harvesting and post-harvest techniques. In this study, coffee quality is mapped as a function of coffee variety, altitude and terrain aspect attributes. The work was performed in the Zona da Mata, Minas Gerais, Brazil. A large range of coffee quality grades was observed for the Red Catuai variety. For the Yellow Catuai variety, no quality grades lower than 70 were observed. Regarding the terrain aspect, samples from the southeast-facing slope (SEFS) and the northwest-facing slope (NWFS) exhibited distinct behaviors. The SEFS samples had a greater range of quality grades than did the NWFS samples. The highest grade was obtained from an NWFS point. The lowest quality values and the largest range of grades were observed at lower altitudes. The extracts from the highest-altitude samples did not produce any low-quality coffee. The production site's position and altitude are the primary variables that influenced the coffee quality. The study area has micro-regions with grades ranging from 80 to 94. These areas have the potential for producing specialty coffees. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Population genetic structure of Attalea vitrivir Zona (Arecaceae) in fragmented areas of southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, R R M; Cavallari, M M; Pimenta, M A S; Abreu, A G; Costa, M R; Guedes, M L

    2015-06-11

    Attalea vitrivir Zona (synonym Orbignya oleifera) is one of the six species of Arecaceae known as "babassu". This species is used to make cosmetics, food, and detergents due to the high concentration of oil in the seeds. It is found only in fragmented areas of southern Bahia State and northern Minas Gerais State, southeast Brazil, and this fragmentation has affected both its ecological and genetic characteristics. We evaluated the genetic diversity and population genetic structure of A. vitrivir in six areas of two different regions at the extremes of its geographical range, in order to gain a better understanding of the factors that affect the distribution and partitioning of its diversity. Nine inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers amplified 74 polymorphic bands, resulting in large diversity values (Shannon diversity index, 0.37-0.47; intrapopulation genetic diversity, 0.25-0.34). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed considerable differentiation between sampling sites (30.03%) and regions (12.08%), although most of the diversity was observed within sampling sites (69%). Further differentiation between sampling sites was noted more in the northern region than in the southern region, highlighting the genetic connectivity between the sampling sites within Rio Pandeiros Environmental Protection Area (southern region). The identification of two distinct genetic clusters (K = 2) corresponded to the northern and southern regions, and corroborated the AMOVA results. We suggest that the northern area, outside Rio Pandeiros Environmental Protection Area, must be included in future management plans for this species.

  15. Capital social de los padres de escolares de una zona vulnerable.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Susana; Herrera, Ariel; Hilas, Elena; Gigena, Y Pablo

    2018-01-01

    El capital social supone importantes inversiones materiales, simbólicas y de esfuerzos. Conocer el capital social de una comunidad puede facilitar la comprensión del beneficio de las relaciones comunitarias para la promoción de salud. Con el objetivo de reconocer los componentes del capital social de padres de escolares atendiendo una escuela en una zona vulnerable de la ciudad de Córdoba, Argentina, indagamos a través de grupos focales acerca de elementos esenciales del capital social. La asintonía socio-cultural entre los pobladores originarios y los reubicados, la estigmatización policial y el clientelismo político han generado desconfianza del uno hacia el otro en diferentes aspectos convivenciales, siendo la familia la única red de apoyo. La escuela se reconoce como espacio adonde la gente espontáneamente se organiza para invertir en redes sociales, presentándose así con potencialidad para la promoción de conductas saludables, por el lugar simbólico que ocupa para los padres.

  16. Phosphorylation of zona occludens-2 by protein kinase C epsilon regulates its nuclear exportation.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, David; Alarcón, Lourdes; Ponce, Arturo; Tapia, Rocio; González-Aguilar, Héctor; Robles-Flores, Martha; Mejía-Castillo, Teresa; Segovia, José; Bandala, Yamir; Juaristi, Eusebio; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2009-09-01

    Here, we have analyzed the subcellular destiny of newly synthesized tight junction protein zona occludens (ZO)-2. After transfection in sparse cells, 74% of cells exhibit ZO-2 at the nucleus, and after 18 h the value decreases to 17%. The mutation S369A located within the nuclear exportation signal 1 of ZO-2 impairs the nuclear export of the protein. Because Ser369 represents a putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation site, we tested the effect of PKC inhibition and stimulation on the nuclear export of ZO-2. Our results strongly suggest that the departure of ZO-2 from the nucleus is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser369 by novel PKCepsilon. To test the route taken by ZO-2 from synthesis to the plasma membrane, we devised a novel nuclear microinjection assay in which the nucleus served as a reservoir for anti-ZO-2 antibody. Through this assay, we demonstrate that a significant amount of newly synthesized ZO-2 goes into the nucleus and is later relocated to the plasma membrane. These results constitute novel information for understanding the mechanisms that regulate the intracellular fate of ZO-2.

  17. Orexin Gene Transfer into Zona Incerta Neurons Suppresses Muscle Paralysis in Narcoleptic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng; Konadhode, RodaRani; Begum, Suraiya; Pelluru, Dheeraj; Gerashchenko, Dmitry; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; van den Pol, Anthony N.

    2011-01-01

    Cataplexy, a sudden unexpected muscle paralysis, is a debilitating symptom of the neurodegenerative sleep disorder, narcolepsy. During these attacks, the person is paralyzed, but fully conscious and aware of their surroundings. To identify potential neurons that might serve as surrogate orexin neurons to suppress such attacks, the gene for orexin (hypocretin), a peptide lost in most human narcoleptics, was delivered into the brains of the orexin-ataxin-3 transgenic mouse model of human narcolepsy. Three weeks after the recombinant adenoassociated virus (rAAV)-mediated orexin gene transfer, sleep–wake behavior was assessed. rAAV-orexin gene delivery into neurons of the zona incerta (ZI), or the lateral hypothalamus (LH) blocked cataplexy. Orexin gene transfer into the striatum or in the melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the ZI or LH had no such effect, indicating site specificity. In transgenic mice lacking orexin neurons but given rAAV-orexin, detectable levels of orexin-A were evident in the CSF, indicating release of the peptide from the surrogate neurons. Retrograde tracer studies showed that the amygdala innervates the ZI consistent with evidence that strong emotions trigger cataplexy. In turn, the ZI projects to the locus ceruleus, indicating that the ZI is part of a circuit that stabilizes motor tone. Our results indicate that these neurons might also be recruited to block the muscle paralysis in narcolepsy. PMID:21508228

  18. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  19. 77 FR 33766 - Notice of Public Meeting; Wyoming Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... the BLM's wild horse partnership with Friends of a Legacy and Marathon Oil, water projects, porcine zona pellucida and the overall wild horse program; a RAC business session; and a presentation on fire...

  20. Outcomes from stimulation of the caudal zona incerta and pedunculopontine nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sadaquate; Mooney, Lucy; Plaha, Puneet; Javed, Shazia; White, Paul; Whone, Alan L; Gill, Steven S

    2011-04-01

    Axial symptoms including postural instability, falls and failure of gait initiation are some of the most disabling motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). We performed bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) in combination with the caudal zona incerta (cZi) in order to determine their efficacy in alleviating these symptoms. Seven patients with predominant axial symptoms in both the 'on' and 'off' medication states underwent bilateral cZi and PPN DBS. Motor outcomes were assessed using the motor component of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS 3) and a composite axial subscore was derived from items 27, 28, 29 and 30 (arising from chair, posture, gait and postural stability). Quality of life was measured using the PDQ39. Comparisons were made between scores obtained at baseline and those at a mean follow-up of 12 months. In both the off and on medication states, a statistically significant improvement in the UPDRS part 3 score was achieved by stimulation of the PPN, cZi and both in combination. In the off medication state, our composite axial subscore of the UPDRS part 3 improved with stimulation of the PPN, cZi and both in combination. The composite axial subscore, in the 'on' medication state, however, only showed a statistically significant improvement when a combination of cZi and PPN stimulation was used. This study provides evidence that a combination of PPN and cZi stimulation can achieve a significant improvement in the hitherto untreatable 'on' medication axial symptoms of PD.

  1. Effects of acrolein on aldosterone release from zona glomerulosa cells in male rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Lee; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chou, Jou-Chun; Weng, Ting-Chun; Hu, Sindy; Lieu, Fu-Kong; Lai, Wei-Ho; Idova, Galina; Wang, Paulus S; Wang, Shyi-Wu

    2016-07-01

    A positive correlation between smoking and hypertension has been well established. Acrolein is a major toxic volatile compound found in cigarette smoke. Human exposure to low levels of acrolein is unavoidable due to its production in daily activities, such as smoke from industrial, hot oil cooking vapors, and exhaust fumes from vehicles. The toxicity and the action mechanism of acrolein to induce apoptosis have been extensively studied, but the effects of acrolein on hypertension are still unknown. The present study aimed to examine the effects of acrolein on aldosterone release both in vivo and in vitro. Male rats were divided into three groups, and intraperitoneally injected with normal saline, or acrolein (2mg/kg) for 1 (group A-1) or 3 (group A-3) days, respectively. After sacrificing, rat blood samples were obtained to measure plasma aldosterone and angiotensin II (Ang II) levels. Zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells were prepared from rat adrenal cortex, and were incubated with or without stimulants. We found that the serum aldosterone was increased by 1.2-fold (p<0.05) in A-3 group as compared to control group. Basal aldosterone release from ZG cells in A-3 group was also increased significantly. Moreover, acrolein enhanced the stimulatory effects of Ang II and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP on aldosterone secretion from ZG cells prepared in both A-1 and A-3 groups. Furthermore, the enzyme activity of P450scc, the rate-limiting step of aldosterone synthesis, was elevated after acrolein injection. Plasma level of Ang II was increased in both A-1 and A-3 groups. These results suggested that acrolein exposure increased aldosterone production, at least in part, through elevating the level of plasma Ang II and stimulating steroidogenesis pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Send Us Your Feedback ... As Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin TeBG Formal Name Sex Hormone Binding Globulin This article was last reviewed ...

  3. How Proteins Bind Macrocycles

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Elizabeth A.; Beglov, Dmitri; Chennamadhavuni, Spandan; Porco, John A.; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Whitty, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The potential utility of synthetic macrocycles as drugs, particularly against low druggability targets such as protein-protein interactions, has been widely discussed. There is little information, however, to guide the design of macrocycles for good target protein-binding activity or bioavailability. To address this knowledge gap we analyze the binding modes of a representative set of macrocycle-protein complexes. The results, combined with consideration of the physicochemical properties of approved macrocyclic drugs, allow us to propose specific guidelines for the design of synthetic macrocycles libraries possessing structural and physicochemical features likely to favor strong binding to protein targets and also good bioavailability. We additionally provide evidence that large, natural product derived macrocycles can bind to targets that are not druggable by conventional, drug-like compounds, supporting the notion that natural product inspired synthetic macrocycles can expand the number of proteins that are druggable by synthetic small molecules. PMID:25038790

  4. Progesterone Accelerates the Completion of Sperm Capacitation and Activates CatSper Channel in Spermatozoa from the Rhesus Macaque1

    PubMed Central

    Sumigama, Shiho; Mansell, Steven; Miller, Melissa; Lishko, Polina V.; Cherr, Gary N.; Meyers, Stuart A.; Tollner, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    During transit through the female reproductive tract, mammalian spermatozoa are exposed to increasing concentrations of progesterone (P4) released by the cumulus oophorus. P4 triggers massive calcium influx into human sperm through activation of the sperm-specific calcium channel CatSper. These properties of human spermatozoa are thought to be unique since CatSper is not progesterone sensitive in rodent sperm. Here, by performing patch clamp recording from spermatozoa from rhesus macaque for the first time, we report that they express P4-sensitive CatSper channel identically to human sperm and react to P4 by inducing responsiveness to zona pellucida, unlike human sperm, which respond directly to P4. We have also determined the physiologic levels of P4 capable of inducing capacitation-associated changes in macaque sperm. Progesterone (1 μM) induced up to a 3-fold increase in the percentage of sperm undergoing the zona pellucida-induced acrosome reaction with the lowest threshold as low as 10 nM of P4. Submicromolar levels of P4 induced a dose-dependent increase in curvilinear velocity and lateral head displacement, while sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation was not altered. Macaque spermatozoa exposed to 10 μM of P4 developed fully hyperactivated motility. Similar to human sperm, on approaching cumulus mass and binding to zona pellucida, macaque spermatozoa display hyperactivation and undergo an acrosome reaction that coincides with the rise in the sperm intracellular calcium. Taken together, these data indicate that P4 accelerates the completion of capacitation and provides evidence of spermatozoa “priming” as they move into a gradient of progesterone in search for the oocyte. PMID:26490839

  5. Aluminum binding by humus

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, M.F.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W. van

    The need for qualitative and quantitative description of the chemical speciation of Al, in particular and other metal ions in general, is stressed by the increased mobilization of metal ions in water and soils due to acid rain deposition. In this paper we present new data of Al binding to two humic acids. These new data sets and the some previously published data will be analyzed with the NICA-Donnan model using one set of parameters to describe the Al binding to the different humic substances. Once the experimental data is described with the NICA-Donnan approach, we will show the effectmore » of Ca on Al binding and surface speciation as well as the effect of Al on the charge of the humic particles. The parameters derived from the laboratory experiments will be used to describe the variation of the field based Al partition coefficient.« less

  6. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  7. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  8. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  9. Cysteine protects rabbit spermatozoa against reactive oxygen species-induced damages

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoteng; Pan, Yang; Lv, Shan; Pan, Chuanying; Lei, Anmin

    2017-01-01

    The process of cryopreservation results in over-production of reactive oxygen species, which is extremely detrimental to spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of cysteine to freezing extender would facilitate the cryosurvival of rabbit spermatozoa, and if so, how cysteine protects spermatozoa from cryodamages. Freshly ejaculated semen was diluted with Tris-citrate-glucose extender supplemented with different concentrations of cysteine. The motility, intact acrosomes, membrane integrity, mitochondrial potentials, 8-hydroxyguanosine level and sperm-zona pellucida binding capacity were examined. Furthermore, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione content (GSH), and level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydrogen peroxide of spermatozoa were analyzed. The values of motility, intact acrosomes, membrane integrity, mitochondrial potentials and sperm-zona pellucida binding capacity of the frozen-thawed spermatozoa in the treatment of cysteine were significantly higher than those of the control. Addition of cysteine to extenders improved the GPx activity and GSH content of spermatozoa, while lowered the ROS, DNA oxidative alterations and lipid peroxidation level, which makes spermatozoa avoid ROS to attack DNA, the plasma membrane and mitochondria. In conclusion, cysteine protects spermatozoa against ROS-induced damages during cryopreservation and post-thaw incubation. Addition of cysteine is recommended to facilitate the improvement of semen preservation for the rabbit breeding industry. PMID:28700739

  10. GABA release in the zona incerta of the sheep in response to the sight and ingestion of food and salt.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, K M; Hinton, M R; Baldwin, B A

    1991-05-31

    In order to establish which neurotransmitters may influence the activity of zona incerta neurones in the sheep which respond selectively to the sight or ingestion of food, we have measured the release of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters from this region using microdialysis sampling. Co-ordinates for the placement of microdialysis probes in regions of the zona incerta where cells respond to the sight or ingestion of food were first established by making single-unit extracellular recordings. When animals were food-deprived results showed that release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was increased in response to the sight and ingestion of food but not of aspartate, glutamate, taurine, noradrenaline, dopamine or serotonin. This release of GABA was absent when the animals were shown non-food objects or saw or ingested salt solutions. When the same animals were physiologically sodium-depleted GABA release was evoked by the sight and ingestion of salt solutions and release following the sight and ingestion of food was significantly reduced. These results provide further evidence that GABA is an important neurotransmitter in neural circuits controlling the regulation of food intake.

  11. Incentivos para atraer y retener personal de salud de zonas rurales del Perú: un estudio cualitativo

    PubMed Central

    Huicho, Luis; Canseco, Francisco Díez; Lema, Claudia; Miranda, J. Jaime; Lescano, Andrés G.

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo fue identificar incentivos de atracción y retención en zonas rurales y distantes de Ayacucho, Perú. Fueron realizadas entrevistas en profundidad con 80 médicos, enfermeras, obstetras y técnicos (20 por grupo) de las zonas más pobres y con 11 funcionarios. No existen políticas sistemáticas de atracción y retención de personal de salud en Ayacucho. Los principales incentivos, en orden de importancia, fueron mejoras salariales, oportunidades de formación y capacitación, estabilidad laboral y nombramiento, mejoras en infraestructura y equipos, e incremento del personal. Se mencionaron también mejoras en la vivienda y alimentación, mayor cercanía con la familia y reconocimiento por el sistema de salud. Existen coincidencias y singularidades entre los distintos grupos sobre los incentivos clave para estimular el trabajo rural, que deben considerarse al diseñar políticas públicas. Las iniciativas del Estado deben comprender procesos rigurosos de monitoreo y evaluación, para asegurar que las mismas tengan el impacto deseado. PMID:22488318

  12. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  13. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  14. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories-episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  15. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Quantitative autoradiography of the binding sites for ( sup 125 I) iodoglyburide, a novel high-affinity ligand for ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Gackenheimer, S.L.; Mais, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    We have developed a high specific activity ligand for localization of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the brain. When brain sections were incubated with ({sup 125}I)iodoglyburide (N-(2-((((cyclohexylamino)carbonyl)amino)sulfonyl)ethyl)-5-{sup 125}I-2- methoxybenzamide), the ligand bound to a single site with a KD of 495 pM and a maximum binding site density of 176 fmol/mg of tissue. Glyburide was the most potent inhibitor of specific ({sup 125}I)iodoglyburide binding to rat forebrain sections whereas iodoglyburide and glipizide were slightly less potent. The binding was also sensitive to ATP which completely inhibited binding at concentrations of 10 mM. Autoradiographic localization of ({sup 125}I)iodoglyburide binding indicated a broadmore » distribution of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel in the brain. The highest levels of binding were seen in the globus pallidus and ventral pallidum followed by the septohippocampal nucleus, anterior pituitary, the CA2 and CA3 region of the hippocampus, ventral pallidum, the molecular layer of the cerebellum and substantia nigra zona reticulata. The hilus and dorsal subiculum of the hippocampus, molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, cerebral cortex, lateral olfactory tract nucleus, olfactory tubercle and the zona incerta contained relatively high levels of binding. A lower level of binding (approximately 3- to 4-fold) was found throughout the remainder of the brain. These results indicate that the ATP-sensitive potassium channel has a broad presence in the rat brain and that a few select brain regions are enriched in this subtype of neuronal potassium channels.« less

  17. Characterization and possible function of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-spermatogenic protein GAPDHS in mammalian sperm.

    PubMed

    Margaryan, Hasmik; Dorosh, Andriy; Capkova, Jana; Manaskova-Postlerova, Pavla; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozak, Pavel; Peknicova, Jana

    2015-03-08

    Sperm proteins are important for the sperm cell function in fertilization. Some of them are involved in the binding of sperm to the egg. We characterized the acrosomal sperm protein detected by a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (Hs-8) that was prepared in our laboratory by immunization of BALB/c mice with human ejaculated sperms and we tested the possible role of this protein in the binding assay. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling, gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and protein sequencing were used for Hs-8 antigen characterization. Functional analysis of GAPDHS from the sperm acrosome was performed in the boar model using sperm/zona pellucida binding assay. Monoclonal antibody Hs-8 is an anti-human sperm antibody that cross-reacts with the Hs-8-related protein in spermatozoa of other mammalian species (boar, mouse). In the immunofluorescence test, Hs-8 antibody recognized the protein localized in the acrosomal part of the sperm head and in the principal piece of the sperm flagellum. In immunoblotting test, MoAb Hs-8 labelled a protein of 45 kDa in the extract of human sperm. Sequence analysis identified protein Hs-8 as GAPDHS (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrohenase-spermatogenic). For this reason, commercial mouse anti-GAPDHS MoAb was applied in control tests. Both antibodies showed similar staining patterns in immunofluorescence tests, in electron microscopy and in immunoblot analysis. Moreover, both Hs-8 and anti-GAPDHS antibodies blocked sperm/zona pellucida binding. GAPDHS is a sperm-specific glycolytic enzyme involved in energy production during spermatogenesis and sperm motility; its role in the sperm head is unknown. In this study, we identified the antigen with Hs8 antibody and confirmed its localization in the apical part of the sperm head in addition to the principal piece of the flagellum. In an indirect binding assay, we confirmed the potential role of GAPDHS as a binding protein that is involved in the secondary sperm

  18. Library Binding Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakhanpal, S. K.

    This procedural manual is designed to be used in bindery sections in public, university and special libraries. It briefly discusses these general matters: administrative control; selection of a binder; when and what to bind; conventional binding; routines; missing issues; schedule for shipments; temporary binding; rare books, maps and newspapers;…

  19. Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; van Doorn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease. Method: Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and…

  20. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the brominemore » form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are

  1. SLXL1, a novel acrosomal protein, interacts with DKKL1 and is involved in fertilization in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xin-jie; Hou, Xiao-jun; Liao, Shang-Ying; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Cooke, Howard J; Zhang, Ming; Han, Chunsheng

    2011-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex cellular developmental process which involves diverse families of genes. The Xlr (X-linked, lymphocyte regulated) family includes multiple members, only a few of which have reported functions in meiosis, post-meiotic maturation, and fertilization of germ cells. Slx-like1 (Slxl1) is a member of the Xlr family, whose expression and function in spermatogenesis need to be elucidated. The mRNA and protein expression and localization of Slxl1 were investigated by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry in different tissues and at different stages of spermatogenesis. The interacting partner of SLXL1 was examined by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization. Assessment of the role of SLXL1 in capacitation, acrosome reaction, zona pellucida binding/penetration, and fertilization was carried out in vitro using blocking antisera. The results showed that Slxl1 mRNA and protein were specifically expressed in the testis. SLXL1 was exclusively located in the acrosome of post-meiotic germ cells and interacts with DKKL1 (Dickkopf-like1), which is an acrosome-associated protein and plays an important role in fertilization. The rates of zona pellucida binding/penetration and fertilization were significantly reduced by the anti-SLXL1 polyclonal antiserum. SLXL1 is the first identified member of the XLR family that is associated with acrosome and is involved in zona pellucid binding/penetration and subsequent fertilization. These results, together with previous studies, suggest that Xlr family members participate in diverse processes from meiosis to fertilization during spermatogenesis.

  2. [Effects of infrasound on activities of 3beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and acid phosphatase of polygonal cells in adrenal cortex zona fasciculate in mice].

    PubMed

    Dang, Wei-min; Wang, Sheng; Tian, Shi-xiu; Chen, Bing; Sun, Fei; Li, Wei; Jiao, Yan; He, Li-hua

    2007-02-01

    To explore the biological effects of infrasound on the polygonal cells in adrenal cortex zona fasciculation in mice. The biological effects of infrasound on the activities of 3beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3-betaHSDH) and acid phosphatase(ACP) of the polygonal cells in adrenal cortex zona fasciculate were observed when exposure to 8 and 16 Hz infrasound at 80, 90, 100, 110, 120 and 130 dB for 1 day, 7 days and 14 days or 14 days after the exposure. When exposure to 8 Hz infrasound, the enzyme activities of 3-betaHSDH increase as the sound pressure levels increase. Only when the sound pressure levels reach 130 dB, the enzyme activities began to decrease exceptionally. When exposure to 16 Hz, 80 dB infrasound, no significant difference between the treatment and control group in the activities of 3-betaHSDH could be observed, but the injury of the polygonal cells had appeared. When exposure to 16 Hz, 100 dB infrasound, the activities of 3-betaHSDH started to increase. The cell injury still existed. When exposed to 16 Hz, 120 dB infrasound, the local tissue damage represented. Fourteen days after the mice exposure to 8 Hz, 90 dB and 130 dB infrasound for 14 days continuously, the local tissue injury of the adrenal cortex zona fasciculation began to recover at certain extent, but the higher the exposure sound pressure level, the poorer the tissue recovery. The biological effects of infrasound on the polygonal cells in adrenal cortex zona fasciculation response to the frequency of the infrasound are found at certain action strength range, but this characteristic usually is covered by the severe tissue injury. When exposure to infrasound is stopped for a period of time, the local tissue injury of the adrenal cortex zona fasciculation could recovers at certain extent, but the higher the exposure sound pressure level, the more poorer the tissue recovery.

  3. Identification of ZASP, a novel protein associated to Zona occludens-2.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Susana; Alarcón, Lourdes; Solano, Jesús; Huerta, Miriam; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2010-11-15

    With the aim of discovering new molecular interactions of the tight junction protein ZO-2, a two-hybrid screen was performed on a human kidney cDNA library using as bait the middle segment of ZO-2. Through this assay we identified a 24-kDa novel protein herein named ZASP for ZO-2 associated speckle protein. ZO-2/ZASP interaction further confirmed by pull down and immunoprecipitation experiments, requires the presence of the intact PDZ binding motif SQV of ZASP and the third PDZ domain of ZO-2. ZASP mRNA and protein are present in the kidney and in several epithelial cell lines. Endogenous ZASP is expressed primarily in nuclear speckles in co-localization with splicing factor SC-35. Nocodazole treatment and wash out reveals that ZASP disappears from the nucleus during mitosis in accordance with speckle disassembly during metaphase. ZASP amino acid sequence exhibits a canonical nuclear exportation signal and in agreement the protein exits the nucleus through a process mediated by exportin/CRM1. ZASP over-expression blocks the inhibitory activity of ZO-2 on cyclin D1 gene transcription and protein expression. The identification of ZASP helps to unfold the complex nuclear molecular arrays that form on ZO-2 scaffolds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Involvement of adenosine monophosphate activated kinase in interleukin-6 regulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme in the bovine zona fasciculata and zona reticularis.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Matharage S I; Dayton, Adam W; Rhoten, Lance R; Mallett, John W; Reese, Jared C; Squires, Mathieu D; Dalley, Andrew P; Porter, James P; Judd, Allan M

    2018-06-01

    In bovine adrenal zona fasciculata (ZF) and NCI-H295R cells, interleukin-6 (IL-6) increases cortisol release, increases expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) (increases steroidogenic proteins), and decreases the expression of adrenal hypoplasia congenita-like protein (DAX-1) (inhibits steroidogenic proteins). In contrast, IL-6 decreases bovine adrenal zona reticularis (ZR) androgen release, StAR, P450scc, and SF-1 expression, and increases DAX-1 expression. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) activated kinase (AMPK) regulates steroidogenesis, but its role in IL-6 regulation of adrenal steroidogenesis is unknown. In the present study, an AMPK activator (AICAR) increased (P < 0.01) NCI-H295R StAR promoter activity, StAR and P450scc expression, and the phosphorylation of AMPK (PAMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (PACC) (indexes of AMPK activity). In ZR (decreased StAR, P450scc, SF-1, increased DAX-1) (P < 0.01) and ZF tissues (increased StAR, P450scc, SF-1, decreased DAX-1) (P < 0.01), AICAR modified StAR, P450scc, SF-1 and DAX-1 mRNAs/proteins similar to the effects of IL-6. The activity (increased PAMPK and PACC) (P < 0.01) of AMPK in the ZF and ZR was increased by AICAR and IL-6. In support of an AMPK role in IL-6 ZF and ZR effects, the AMPK inhibitor compound C blocked (P < 0.01) the effects of IL-6 on the expression of StAR, P450scc, SF-1, and DAX-1. Therefore, IL-6 modification of the expression of StAR and P450scc in the ZF and ZR may involve activation of AMPK and these changes may be related to changes in the expression of SF-1 and DAX-1. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Binding Energy and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David E.; Raines, Ronald T.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the fundamental role that the favorable free energy of binding of the rate-determining transition state plays in catalysis. The principle that all of the catalytic factors discussed are realized by the use of this binding energy is reviewed. (CW)

  6. Managing a Library Binding Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill-Oldham, Jan

    Library binding is one of the activities typically included in newly created preservation departments, but librarians continue to discover that transforming a traditional binding program into one that better meets preservation objectives requires considerable investment of time. This resource guide is intended to help libraries review their…

  7. Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP) and their role in mammalian fertilization.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Débora J; Maldera, Julieta A; Weigel Muñoz, Mariana; Ernesto, Juan I; Vasen, Gustavo; Cuasnicu, Patricia S

    2011-01-01

    Epididymal protein CRISPI is a member of the CRISP (Cysteine-RIch Secretory proteins) family and is involved in sperm-egg fusion through its interaction with complementary sites on the egg surface. Results from our laboratory have shown that this binding ability resides in a 12-amino-acid region corresponding to a highly conserved motif of the CRISP family, named Signature 2 (S2). In addition to this, our results revealed that CRISP1 could also be involved in the previous step of sperm binding to the zona pellucida, identifying a novel role for this protein in fertilization. As another approach to elucidate the participation of CRISP1 in fertilization, a mouse line containing a targeted disruption of CRISP1 was generated. Although CRISP1-deficient mice exhibited normal fertility, CRISP1-defficient sperm presented a decreased level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation, and an impaired ability to fertilize both zona-intact and zona-free eggs in vitro, confirming the proposed roles for the protein in fertilization. Evidence obtained in our laboratory indicated that testicular CRISP2 would also be involved in sperm-egg fusion. Competition assays between CRISP1 and CRISP2, as well as the comparison of their corresponding S2 regions, suggest that both proteins bind to common complementary sites in the egg. Together, these results suggest a functional cooperation between CRISP1 and CRISP2 to ensure the success of fertilization.

  8. Conserved developmental expression of Fezf in chordates and Drosophila and the origin of the Zona Limitans Intrathalamica (ZLI) brain organizer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI) and the isthmus organizer (IsO) are two major secondary organizers of vertebrate brain development. These organizers are located at the interface of the expression domains of key patterning genes (Fezf-Irx and Otx-Gbx, respectively). To gain insights into the evolutionary origin of the ZLI, we studied Fezf in bilaterians. Results In this paper, we identified a conserved sequence motif (Fezf box) in all bilaterians. We report the expression pattern of Fezf in amphioxus and Drosophila and compare it with those of Gbx, Otx and Irx. We found that the relative expression patterns of these genes in vertebrates are fully conserved in amphioxus and flies, indicating that the genetic subdivisions defining the location of both secondary organizers in early vertebrate brain development were probably present in the last common ancestor of extant bilaterians. However, in contrast to vertebrates, we found that Irx-defective flies do not show an affected Fezf expression pattern. Conclusions The absence of expression of the corresponding morphogens from cells at these conserved genetic boundaries in invertebrates suggests that the organizing properties might have evolved specifically in the vertebrate lineage by the recruitment of key morphogens to these conserved genetic locations. PMID:20849572

  9. Inhibition of endothelin- and phorbol ester-stimulated tyrosine kinase activity by corticotrophin in the rat adrenal zona glomerulosa.

    PubMed Central

    Kapas, S; Hinson, J P

    1996-01-01

    1. The experiments described in this study were carried out to investigate the role of tyrosine kinase in the acute adrenal response to peptide hormone stimulation, and to determine whether the activity of this kinase may be subject to regulation by other intracellular signalling mechanisms in the adrenal zona glomerulosa. 2. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that angiotensin II stimulates tyrosine kinase activity in the rat adrenal cortex. This study has shown, for the first time, that endothelin-1 also stimulates tyrosine kinase activity in this tissue. 3. Using the specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC) activity, Ro 31-8220, we have shown that stimulation of tyrosine kinase activity, in response to endothelin-1, angiotensin II or the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, is at least partly dependent on increased PKC activity. 4. The data presented also provide further evidence of cross-talk between signalling systems in the adrenal cortex. Corticotrophin and its intracellular second messenger, cyclic AMP, significantly attenuate the increment in tyrosine kinase activity seen in response to each of the effectors used. 5. The results of this study provide important new evidence for the regulation of protein kinases by other intracellular second messenger systems. PMID:8611168

  10. Pertussis toxin treatment does not block inhibition by atrial natriuretic factor of aldosterone secretion in cultured bovine zona glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    De Lean, A.; Cantin, M.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) potently inhibits PGE or forskolin-stimulation aldosterone secretion in bovine zona glomerulosa (ZG) by acting through specific high affinity receptors. In order to evaluate the functional role of the regulatory protein N/sub i/ and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity (AC) in ZG, the authors have studied the effect of treatment with PT on inhibition by ANF of aldosterone production. Primary cultures of ZG were treated for 18 hours in serum-free F12 medium with (0-100 ng/ml PT). No effect of PT pretreatment was observed either on basal, PGE-stimulated or ANF-inhibited levelsmore » of steroidogenesis. When membranes prepared from control ZG were ADP-ribosylated with (/sup 32/P) NAD in the presence of PT, two toxin-specific bands with 39 Kd and 41 Kd were documented on SDS gel. Cell pretreatment with as low as 1 ng/ml drastically reduced further labelling of these two bands while higher doses completely abolished them. Since PT treatment covalently modifies completely the toxin substrate without altering ANF inhibition of adrenal steroidogenesis, the authors conclude that N/sub i/ is not involved in the mode of action of ANF on aldosterone production.« less

  11. Detecting cis-regulatory binding sites for cooperatively binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Cornelis, Pierre; Van Delm, Wouter; De Ridder, Fedor; De Moor, Bart; Moreau, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Several methods are available to predict cis-regulatory modules in DNA based on position weight matrices. However, the performance of these methods generally depends on a number of additional parameters that cannot be derived from sequences and are difficult to estimate because they have no physical meaning. As the best way to detect cis-regulatory modules is the way in which the proteins recognize them, we developed a new scoring method that utilizes the underlying physical binding model. This method requires no additional parameter to account for multiple binding sites; and the only necessary parameters to model homotypic cooperative interactions are the distances between adjacent protein binding sites in basepairs, and the corresponding cooperative binding constants. The heterotypic cooperative binding model requires one more parameter per cooperatively binding protein, which is the concentration multiplied by the partition function of this protein. In a case study on the bacterial ferric uptake regulator, we show that our scoring method for homotypic cooperatively binding proteins significantly outperforms other PWM-based methods where biophysical cooperativity is not taken into account. PMID:18400778

  12. Survival of sheep demi-embryos in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shelton, J N; Szell, A

    1988-01-01

    Sheep embryos (morulae and blastocysts) were bisected either by microscalpel or by microneedle after dissolving the zona pellucida with acidified Tyrode's solution. Fourteen and 11 cryopreserved demi-embryos failed to develop when transferred to recipients or placed in culture, respectively. When fresh demi-embryos were cultured in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (DPBS) plus fetal calf serum (FCS) or Whitten's medium, the survival rate was 26% compared to 68% for whole embryos (P<0.01), and there was a suggestion that the presence of a zona pellucida was beneficial to survival. When two demi-embryos each within a zona pellucida were transferred into each of 10 ewes, six of them lambed to produce a total of eight lambs, including two sets of identical twins. Of 10 ewes receiving two demi-embryos without zonae pellucidae, three lambed to produce a total of four lambs, including one set of identical twins. Of 10 ewes that each received two whole embryos, 10 lambed to produce a total of 16 lambs. There was a suggestion that the zona pellucida might enhance the survival of demi-morulae but not demi-blastocysts.

  13. Determination of the reactivity of cytotoxic immune cells with preimplantation mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Ewoldsen, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cytotoxic immune cells were used in an assay, MELIA (mixed embryo leukocyte interaction assay) to test the ability of the cells to kill blastocyst stage embryos. The cytotoxic immune cells generated for use in this study, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), natural killer (NK) cells, and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells were shown to have phenotypic and cytolytic characteristics similar to those reported by other investigators. The lysis of the blastocysts in the MELIA was determined by measuring the inhibition of blastocoel retention and/or by the inhibition of incorporation of tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) into embryonic DNA. Blastocysts which possess ormore » lack their zonae pellucidae were tested to determine whether the zona pellucida plays an immunoprotective role in preimplantation development. The results indicated that CTLs only lysed embryonic cells when the zona pellucida was absent, but NK and LAK cells lysed embryonic cells whether the zona pellucida was present or absent. The results suggest that the zona pellucida may protect the preimplantation mouse embryo from lysis by CTLs but what protects the embryo from lysis by NK and LAK cells is unclear.« less

  14. Uncontacted Waorani in the Yasuní Biosphere Reserve: Geographical Validation of the Zona Intangible Tagaeri Taromenane (ZITT)

    PubMed Central

    Pappalardo, Salvatore Eugenio; De Marchi, Massimo; Ferrarese, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The Tagaeri Taromenane People are two indigenous groups belonging to the Waorani first nation living in voluntary isolation within the Napo region of the western Amazon rainforest. To protect their territory the Ecuadorean State has declared and geographically defined, by Decrees, the Zona Intangible Tagaeri Taromenane (ZITT). This zone is located within the UNESCO Yasuní Biosphere Reserve (1989), one of the most biodiverse areas in the world. Due to several hydrocarbon reserve exploitation projects running in the area and the advancing of a large-scale deforestation front, the survival of these groups is presently at risk. The general aim was to validate the ZITT boundary using the geographical references included in the Decree 2187 (2007) by analyzing the geomorphological characteristics of the area. Remote sensing data such as Digital Elevation Models (DEM), Landsat imagery, topographic cartography of IGM-Ecuador, and fieldwork geographical data have been integrated and processed by Geographical Information System (GIS). The ZITT presents two levels of geographic inconsistencies. The first dimension is about the serious cartographical weaknesses in the perimeter delimitation related to the impossibility of linking two rivers belonging to different basins while the second deals with the perimeter line not respecting the hydrographic network. The GIS analysis results clearly show that ZITT boundary is cartographically nonsense due to the impossibility of mapping out the perimeter. Furthermore, GIS analysis of anthropological data shows presence of Tagaeri Taromenane clans outside the ZITT perimeter, within oil production areas and in nearby farmer settlements, reflecting the limits of protection policies for non-contacted indigenous territory. The delimitation of the ZITT followed a traditional pattern of geometric boundary not taking into account the nomadic characteristic of Tagaeri Taromenane: it is necessary to adopt geographical approaches to recognize the

  15. Uncontacted Waorani in the Yasuní Biosphere Reserve: Geographical Validation of the Zona Intangible Tagaeri Taromenane (ZITT).

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Salvatore Eugenio; De Marchi, Massimo; Ferrarese, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The Tagaeri Taromenane People are two indigenous groups belonging to the Waorani first nation living in voluntary isolation within the Napo region of the western Amazon rainforest. To protect their territory the Ecuadorean State has declared and geographically defined, by Decrees, the Zona Intangible Tagaeri Taromenane (ZITT). This zone is located within the UNESCO Yasuní Biosphere Reserve (1989), one of the most biodiverse areas in the world. Due to several hydrocarbon reserve exploitation projects running in the area and the advancing of a large-scale deforestation front, the survival of these groups is presently at risk. The general aim was to validate the ZITT boundary using the geographical references included in the Decree 2187 (2007) by analyzing the geomorphological characteristics of the area. Remote sensing data such as Digital Elevation Models (DEM), Landsat imagery, topographic cartography of IGM-Ecuador, and fieldwork geographical data have been integrated and processed by Geographical Information System (GIS). The ZITT presents two levels of geographic inconsistencies. The first dimension is about the serious cartographical weaknesses in the perimeter delimitation related to the impossibility of linking two rivers belonging to different basins while the second deals with the perimeter line not respecting the hydrographic network. The GIS analysis results clearly show that ZITT boundary is cartographically nonsense due to the impossibility of mapping out the perimeter. Furthermore, GIS analysis of anthropological data shows presence of Tagaeri Taromenane clans outside the ZITT perimeter, within oil production areas and in nearby farmer settlements, reflecting the limits of protection policies for non-contacted indigenous territory. The delimitation of the ZITT followed a traditional pattern of geometric boundary not taking into account the nomadic characteristic of Tagaeri Taromenane: it is necessary to adopt geographical approaches to recognize the

  16. Voice Tremor Outcomes of Subthalamic Nucleus and Zona Incerta Deep Brain Stimulation in Patients With Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Malinova, Elin; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik

    2018-01-17

    We aimed to study the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and caudal zona incerta (cZi) on level of perceived voice tremor in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). This is a prospective nonrandomized design with consecutive patients. Perceived voice tremor was assessed in patients with PD having received either STN-DBS (8 patients, 5 bilateral and 3 unilateral, aged 43.1-73.6 years; median = 61.2 years) or cZi-DBS (14 bilateral patients, aged 39.0-71.9 years; median = 56.6 years) 12 months before the assessment. Sustained vowels that were produced OFF and ON stimulation (with simultaneous l-DOPA medication) were assessed perceptually in terms of voice tremor by two raters on a four-point rating scale. The assessments were repeated five times per sample and rated in a blinded and randomized procedure. Three out of the 22 patients (13%) were concluded to have voice tremor OFF stimulation. Patients with PD with STN-DBS showed mild levels of perceived voice tremor OFF stimulation and a group level improvement. Patients with moderate/severe perceived voice tremor and cZi-DBS showed marked improvements, but there was no overall group effect. Six patients with cZi-DBS showed small increases in perceived voice tremor severity. STN-DBS decreased perceived voice tremor on a group level. cZi-DBS decreased perceived voice tremor in patients with PD with moderate to severe preoperative levels of the symptom. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. To bind or not to bind? Different temporal binding effects from voluntary pressing and releasing actions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Yan, Wen-Jing; Fu, Xiaolan

    2013-01-01

    Binding effect refers to the perceptual attraction between an action and an outcome leading to a subjective compression of time. Most studies investigating binding effects exclusively employ the "pressing" action without exploring other types of actions. The present study addresses this issue by introducing another action, releasing action or the voluntary lifting of the finger/wrist, to investigate the differences between voluntary pressing and releasing actions. Results reveal that releasing actions led to robust yet short-lived temporal binding effects, whereas pressing condition had steady temporal binding effects up to super-seconds. The two actions also differ in sensitivity to changes in temporal contiguity and contingency, which could be attributed to the difference in awareness of action. Extending upon current models of "willed action," our results provide insights from a temporal point of view and support the concept of a dual system consisting of predictive motor control and top-down mechanisms.

  19. Sex-hormone-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D C

    1974-01-01

    A review was made to understand how plasma binding protein might influence sex-hormone action in target tissues. Steroids are predominately bound to plasma proteins and only unbound steroids enter the cells. Sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) binds to both the main circulating steroid T and E2 but changes in SHBG concentrations exert significant results. Increased SHBG levels increase estrogen production and decreases T activity; whereas, increased androgens increase T action and inhibit SHBG production. These disturbances in hormone maintenance may lead to abnormal adult sex differentiation such as hirsutism and forms of hynaecomastia. By developing SHBG concentration measurement methods-responses of hirsutism to glucocorticoid or estrogem may be assessed. In addition, the effect of thyroid hormones on SHBG may also have therapeutic implications in endocrine disease.

  20. Water binding in legume seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The physical status of water in seeds has a pivotal role in determining the physiological reactions that can take place in the dry state. Using water sorption isotherms from cotyledon and axis tissue of five leguminous seeds, the strength of water binding and the numbers of binding sites have been estimated using van't Hoff analyses and the D'Arcy/Watt equation. These parameters of water sorption are calculated for each of the three regions of water binding and for a range of temperatures. Water sorption characteristics are reflective of the chemical composition of the biological materials as well as the temperature at which hydration takes place. Changes in the sorption characteristics with temperature and hydration level may suggest hydration-induced structural changes in cellular components.

  1. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  2. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  3. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Clinical assessment of the male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Khatun, Amena; Rahman, Md Saidur

    2018-01-01

    The evaluation of infertility in males consists of physical examination and semen analyses. Standardized semen analyses depend on the descriptive analysis of sperm motility, morphology, and concentration, with a threshold level that must be surpassed to be considered a fertile spermatozoon. Nonetheless, these conventional parameters are not satisfactory for clinicians since 25% of infertility cases worldwide remain unexplained. Therefore, newer tests methods have been established to investigate sperm physiology and functions by monitoring characteristics such as motility, capacitation, the acrosome reaction, reactive oxygen species, sperm DNA damage, chromatin structure, zona pellucida binding, and sperm-oocyte fusion. After the introduction of intracytoplasmic sperm injection technique, sperm maturity, morphology, and aneuploidy conditions have gotten more attention for investigating unexplained male infertility. In the present article, recent advancements in research regarding the utilization of male fertility prediction tests and their role and accuracy are reviewed. PMID:29564308

  5. Current concepts of molecular events during bovine and porcine spermatozoa capacitation.

    PubMed

    Vadnais, Melissa L; Galantino-Homer, Hannah L; Althouse, Gary C

    2007-01-01

    Spermatozoa are required to undergo the processes of capacitation before they obtain fertilizing ability. The molecular changes of capacitation are still not fully understood. However, it is accepted that capacitation is a sequential process involving numerous physiological changes including destabilization of the plasma membrane, alterations of intracellular ion concentrations and membrane potential, and protein phosphorylation. There are no known morphological changes that occur to the spermatozoon during capacitation. The purpose of this review is to summarize current evidence on the molecular aspects of capacitation both in vivo and in vitro in bovine and porcine spermatozoa. For the purpose of this review, the process of sperm capacitation will encompass maturational events that occur following ejaculation up to binding to the zona pellucida, that triggers acrosomal exocytosis and initiates fertilization.

  6. Análisis de los determinantes socioeconómicos del gasto de bolsillo en medicamentos en seis zonas geográficas de Panamá.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Ballesteros, Victor H; Castro, Franz; Gómez, Beatriz

    2018-04-27

    Caracterizar el gasto de bolsillo privado en medicamentos en función de los determinantes sociodemográficos y socioeconómicos. MATERIALES Y MéTODOS: La fuente de datos es la Encuesta de Gasto de Bolsillo en Medicamentos de 2014. Se caracterizó el gasto de bolsillo privado mediante variables explicativas sociodemográficas (SOD) y socioeconómicas (SES). Se hizo análisis factorial por componentes principales, regresión logística y lineal simple. Los Odds Ratio demuestran que la educación y la zona geográfica son determinantes fundamentales que inciden en el gasto de bolsillo. Los medicamentos son productos necesarios, en adición a que el gasto de bolsillo aumenta a un promedio del 2% por cada año de vida cronológica adicional. Existe mayor vulnerabilidad en las zonas más pauperizadas respecto del acceso a medicamentos, en especial en las indígenas e implica un mayor riesgo de gasto catastrófico a menor ingreso ante la mayor prevalencia de enfermedades crónicas. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Angio-OCT de la zona avascular foveal en ojos con oclusión venosa de la retina.

    PubMed

    Wons, Juliana; Pfau, Maximilian; Wirth, Magdalena A; Freiberg, Florentina J; Becker, Matthias D; Michels, Stephan

    2017-07-11

    Objetivo: El objetivo del estudio comprendía visualizar y cuantificar las alteraciones patológicas de la zona avascular foveal (ZAF) mediante angio-OCT en ojos con oclusión venosa de la retina (OVR) en comparación con el ojo contralateral sano. Procedimientos: La angio-OCT se llevó a cabo mediante el sistema Avanti® RTVue 100 XR (Optovue Inc., Fremont, Calif., EE. UU.). Los bordes de la capa vascular superficial (CVS) se definieron como 3 μm por debajo de la membrana limitante interna y 15 μm por debajo de la capa plexiforme interna y, para la capa vascular profunda (CVP), como 15 y 70 μm por debajo de la membrana limitante interna y de la capa plexiforme interna, respectivamente. La longitud de la ZAF horizontal, vertical y máxima de la CVS y la CVP en cada ojo se midió de forma manual. Además, se midió el ángulo entre el diámetro máximo de la ZAF y el plano papilomacular. Resultados: La angio-OCT representó los defectos dentro de la vasculatura en el área perifoveal en ojos con oclusión de rama venosa de la retina (ORVR; n = 11) y con oclusión de la vena central de la retina (OVCR; n = 8). Esto resultó en un crecimiento del diámetro máximo de la ZAF en ojos con OVR (n = 19) en comparación con el ojo contralateral (n = 19; 921 ± 213 frente a 724 ± 145 µm; p = 0,008). Además, se observó una correlación significativa entre la mejor agudeza visual corregida (MAVC) y el diámetro máximo de la ZAF en la CVP (ρ de Spearman = -0,423, p < 0,01). Por último, en los ojos con OVR, el ángulo entre el plano papilomacular y el diámetro máximo de la ZAF se dio tan solo en el 21,05% (CVS) y en el 15,79% (CVP) de los casos a 0 ± 15 ó 90 ± 15°, respectivamente. En ojos sanos, estos ángulos (que supuestamente representan una configuración de la ZAF regular) fueron más prevalentes (CVS 68,42 frente a 21,05%, p = 0,003; CVP 73,68 frente a 15,79%, p < 0,001). Conclusiones: La angio-OCT muestra alteraciones morfológicas de la ZAF en ojos con

  8. A structural view of egg coat architecture and function in fertilization.

    PubMed

    Monné, Magnus; Jovine, Luca

    2011-10-01

    Species-restricted interaction between gametes at the beginning of fertilization is mediated by the extracellular coat of the egg, a matrix of cross-linked glycoprotein filaments called the zona pellucida (ZP) in mammals and the vitelline envelope in nonmammals. All egg coat subunits contain a conserved protein-protein interaction module-the "ZP domain"-that allows them to polymerize upon dissociation of a C-terminal propeptide containing an external hydrophobic patch (EHP). Recently, the first crystal structures of a ZP domain protein, sperm receptor ZP subunit zona pellucida glycoprotein 3 (ZP3), have been reported, giving a glimpse of the structural organization of the ZP at the atomic level and the molecular basis of gamete recognition in vertebrates. The ZP module is divided in two related immunoglobulin-like domains, ZP-N and ZP-C, that contain characteristic disulfide bond patterns and, in the case of ZP-C, also incorporate the EHP. This segment lies at the interface between the two domains, which are connected by a long loop carrying a conserved O-glycan important for binding to sperm in vitro. The structures explain several apparently contradictory observations by reconciling the variable disulfide bond patterns found in different homologues of ZP3 as well as the multiple ZP3 determinants alternatively involved in gamete interaction. These findings have implications for our understanding of ZP subunit biogenesis; egg coat assembly, architecture, and interaction with sperm; structural rearrangements leading to postfertilization hardening of the ZP and the block to sperm binding; and the evolutionary origin of egg coats.

  9. Migration of the guinea pig sperm membrane protein PH-20 from one localized surface domain to another does not occur by a simple diffusion-trapping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cowan, A E; Myles, D G; Koppel, D E

    1991-03-01

    The redistribution of membrane proteins on the surface of cells is a prevalent feature of differentiation in a variety of cells. In most cases the mechanism responsible for such redistribution is poorly understood. Two potential mechanisms for the redistribution of surface proteins are: (1) passive diffusion coupled with trapping, and (2) active translocation. We have studied the process of membrane protein redistribution for the PH-20 protein of guinea pig sperm, a surface protein required for sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida (P. Primakoff, H. Hyatt, and D. G. Myles (1985). J. Cell Biol. 101, 2239-2244). PH-20 protein is localized to the posterior head plasma menbrane of the mature sperm cell. Following the exocytotic acrosome reaction, PH-20 protein moves into the newly incorporated inner acrosomal membrane (IAM), placing it in a position favorable for a role in binding sperm to the egg zona pellucida (D. G. Myles, and P. Primakoff (1984), J. Cell Biol. 99, 1634-1641). To analyze the mechanistic basis for this protein migration, we have used fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing to characterize PH-20 protein migration in individual cells. PH-20 protein was observed to move against a concentration gradient in the posterior head plasma membrane. This result argues strongly against a model of passive diffusion followed by trapping in the IAM, and instead suggests that an active process serves to concentrate PH-20 protein toward the boundary separating the posterior head and IAM regions. A transient gradient of PH-20 concentration observed in the IAM suggests that once PH-20 protein reaches the IAM, it is freely diffusing. Additionally, we observed that migration of PH-20 protein was calcium dependent.

  10. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  11. Carbohydrate recognition: A minimalistic approach to binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubik, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Synthetic receptors with properties resembling those of carbohydrate-binding proteins are known, but they are structurally rather complex. Elaborate structures are, however, not always required to bind carbohydrates in water -- much simpler compounds can be just as effective.

  12. Neuroscience: toward unbinding the binding problem.

    PubMed

    Whitney, David

    2009-03-24

    How the brain 'binds' information to create a coherent perceptual experience is an enduring question. Recent research in the psychophysics of perceptual binding and developments in fMRI analysis techniques are bringing us closer to an understanding of how the brain solves the binding problem.

  13. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  14. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  15. Feature-Based Binding and Phase Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Current theories of binding cannot provide a uniform account for many facts associated with the distribution of anaphors, such as long-distance binding effects and the subject-orientation of monomorphemic anaphors. Further, traditional binding theory is incompatible with minimalist assumptions. In this dissertation I propose an analysis of…

  16. Possible mechanism of polyspermy block in human oocytes observed by time-lapse cinematography.

    PubMed

    Mio, Yasuyuki; Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Kai, Yoshiteru; Sargant, Haruka C; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Ueda, Minako; Tsuchie, Yuka; Imajo, Akifumi; Iba, Yumiko; Nishikori, Kyoko

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the fertilization process related to polyspermy block in human oocytes using an in vitro culturing system for time-lapse cinematography. We had 122 oocytes donated for this study from couples that provided informed consent. We recorded human oocytes at 2,000 to 2,800 frames every 10 s during the fertilization process and thereafter every 2 min using a new in vitro culture system originally developed by the authors for time-lapse cinematography. We displayed 30 frames per second for analysis of the polyspermy block during fertilization. Three oocytes showed the leading and following sperm within the zona pellucida in the same microscopic field. The dynamic images obtained during the fertilization process using this new system revealed that once a leading sperm penetrated the zona pellucida and attached to the oocyte membrane, a following sperm was arrested from further penetration into the zona pellucida within 10 s. The present results strongly suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of polyspermy block that takes place at the zona pellucida immediately after fertilization. These findings are clearly different from previous mechanisms describing polyspermy block as the oocyte membrane block to sperm penetration and the zona reaction. The finding presented herein thus represents a novel discovery about the highly complicated polyspermy block mechanism occurring in human oocytes.

  17. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Glass, John D [Shoreham, NY

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  18. NEFM (Neurofilament Medium) Polypeptide, a Marker for Zona Glomerulosa Cells in Human Adrenal, Inhibits D1R (Dopamine D1 Receptor)-Mediated Secretion of Aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Maniero, Carmela; Garg, Sumedha; Zhao, Wanfeng; Johnson, Timothy Isaac; Zhou, Junhua; Gurnell, Mark; Brown, Morris J

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneity among aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) has been highlighted by the discovery of somatic mutations. KCNJ5 mutations predominate in large zona fasciculata (ZF)-like APAs; mutations in CACNA1D , ATP1A1, ATP2B3 , and CTNNB1 are more likely to be found in small zona glomerulosa (ZG)-like APAs. Microarray comparison of KCNJ5 mutant versus wild-type APAs revealed significant differences in transcriptomes. NEFM , encoding a neurofilament subunit which is a D1R (dopamine D1 receptor)-interacting protein, was 4-fold upregulated in ZG-like versus ZF-like APAs and 14-fold more highly expressed in normal ZG versus ZF. Immunohistochemistry confirmed selective expression of NEFM (neurofilament medium) polypeptide in ZG and in ZG-like APAs. Silencing NEFM in adrenocortical H295R cells increased basal aldosterone secretion and cell proliferation; silencing also amplified aldosterone stimulation by the D1R agonist, fenoldopam, and inhibition by the D1R antagonist, SCH23390. NEFM coimmunoprecipitated with D1R, and its expression was stimulated by fenoldopam. Immunohistochemistry for D1R was mainly intracellular in ZG-like APAs but membranous in ZF-like APAs. Aldosterone secretion in response to fenoldopam in primary cells from ZF-like APAs was higher than in cells from ZG-like APAs. Transfection of mutant KCNJ5 caused a large reduction in NEFM expression in H295R cells. We conclude that NEFM is a negative regulator of aldosterone production and cell proliferation, in part by facilitating D1R internalization from the plasma membrane. Downregulation of NEFM in ZF-like APAs may contribute to a D1R/D2R imbalance underlying variable pharmacological responses to dopaminergic drugs among patients with APAs. Finally, taken together, our data point to the possibility that ZF-like APAs are in fact ZG in origin. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Leptospira interrogans Binds to Cadherins

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Karen; Franco, Ricardo; Schwab, Andrew; Coburn, Jenifer

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira, is the most widespread zoonosis and has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. The adhesion of pathogenic Leptospira to host cells, and to extracellular matrix (ECM) components, is likely to be necessary for the ability of leptospires to penetrate, disseminate and persist in mammalian host tissues. Previous work demonstrated that pathogenic L. interrogans binds to host cells more efficiently than to ECM. Using two independent screening methods, mass spectrometry and protein arrays, members of the cadherin family were identified as potential L. interrogans receptors on mammalian host surfaces. We focused our investigation on vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, which is widely expressed on endothelia and is primarily responsible for endothelial cell-cell adhesion. Monolayers of EA.hy926 and HMEC-1 endothelial cells produce VE-cadherin, bind L. interrogans in vitro, and are disrupted upon incubation with the bacteria, which may reflect the endothelial damage seen in vivo. Dose-dependent and saturable binding of L. interrogans to the purified VE-cadherin receptor was demonstrated and pretreatment of purified receptor or endothelial cells with function-blocking antibody against VE-cadherin significantly inhibited bacterial attachment. The contribution of VE-cadherin to leptospiral adherence to host endothelial cell surfaces is biologically significant because VE-cadherin plays an important role in maintaining the barrier properties of the vasculature. Attachment of L. interrogans to the vasculature via VE-cadherin may result in vascular damage, facilitating the escape of the pathogen from the bloodstream into different tissues during disseminated infection, and may contribute to the hemorrhagic manifestations of leptospirosis. This work is first to describe a mammalian cell surface protein as a receptor for L. interrogans. PMID:24498454

  20. Optical binding with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máximo, C. E.; Bachelard, R.; Kaiser, R.

    2018-04-01

    Optical binding is a form of light-mediated forces between elements of matter which emerge in response to the collective scattering of light. Such a phenomenon has been studied mainly in the context of the equilibrium stability of dielectric sphere arrays which move amid dissipative media. In this article, we demonstrate that optically bounded states of a pair of cold atoms can exist, in the absence of nonradiative damping. We study the scaling laws for the unstable-stable phase transition at negative detuning and the unstable-metastable one for positive detuning. In addition, we show that angular momentum can lead to dynamical stabilization with infinite-range scaling.

  1. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    et al., "Biomimetic synthesis and patterning of silver nanoparticles ," Nat. Mater. 1(3), 169-172 (2002). [5] Van Dorst, B., et al., "Phage display...34Sequestration of zinc oxide by fimbrial designer chelators," Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66(1), 10-14 (2000). [26] Hnilova, M., et al., "Peptide-directed co...biomaterial synthesis . Peptides have been developed that bind to a variety of inorganic materials, including metals1-6, oxides7, 8, alloys9, metal salts10

  2. An alternate binding site for PPARγ ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Travis S.; Giri, Pankaj Kumar; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Marciano, David P.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Shin, Youseung; Blayo, Anne-Laure; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Burris, Thomas P.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    PPARγ is a target for insulin sensitizing drugs such as glitazones, which improve plasma glucose maintenance in patients with diabetes. Synthetic ligands have been designed to mimic endogenous ligand binding to a canonical ligand-binding pocket to hyperactivate PPARγ. Here we reveal that synthetic PPARγ ligands also bind to an alternate site, leading to unique receptor conformational changes that impact coregulator binding, transactivation and target gene expression. Using structure-function studies we show that alternate site binding occurs at pharmacologically relevant ligand concentrations, and is neither blocked by covalently bound synthetic antagonists nor by endogenous ligands indicating non-overlapping binding with the canonical pocket. Alternate site binding likely contributes to PPARγ hyperactivation in vivo, perhaps explaining why PPARγ full and partial or weak agonists display similar adverse effects. These findings expand our understanding of PPARγ activation by ligands and suggest that allosteric modulators could be designed to fine tune PPARγ activity without competing with endogenous ligands. PMID:24705063

  3. Comparative Sperm Proteomics in Mouse Species with Divergent Mating Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vicens, Alberto; Borziak, Kirill; Karr, Timothy L.; Roldan, Eduardo R.S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sexual selection is the pervasive force underlying the dramatic divergence of sperm form and function. Although it has been demonstrated that testis gene expression evolves rapidly, exploration of the proteomic basis of sperm diversity is in its infancy. We have employed a whole-cell proteomics approach to characterize sperm divergence among closely related Mus species that experience different sperm competition regimes and exhibit pronounced variation in sperm energetics, motility and fertilization capacity. Interspecific comparisons revealed significant abundance differences amongst proteins involved in fertilization capacity, including those that govern sperm-zona pellucida interactions, axoneme components and metabolic proteins. Ancestral reconstruction of relative testis size suggests that the reduction of zona pellucida binding proteins and heavy-chain dyneins was associated with a relaxation in sperm competition in the M. musculus lineage. Additionally, the decreased reliance on ATP derived from glycolysis in high sperm competition species was reflected in abundance decreases in glycolytic proteins of the principle piece in M. spretus and M. spicilegus. Comparison of protein abundance and stage-specific testis expression revealed a significant correlation during spermatid development when dynamic morphological changes occur. Proteins underlying sperm diversification were also more likely to be subject to translational repression, suggesting that sperm composition is influenced by the evolution of translation control mechanisms. The identification of functionally coherent classes of proteins relating to sperm competition highlights the utility of evolutionary proteomic analyses and reveals that both intensified and relaxed sperm competition can have a pronounced impact on the molecular composition of the male gamete. PMID:28333336

  4. A Recurrent Missense Mutation in ZP3 Causes Empty Follicle Syndrome and Female Infertility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tailai; Bian, Yuehong; Liu, Xiaoman; Zhao, Shigang; Wu, Keliang; Yan, Lei; Li, Mei; Yang, Zhenglin; Liu, Hongbin; Zhao, Han; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2017-09-07

    Empty follicle syndrome (EFS) is defined as the failure to aspirate oocytes from mature ovarian follicles during in vitro fertilization. Except for some cases caused by pharmacological or iatrogenic problems, the etiology of EFS remains enigmatic. In the present study, we describe a large family with a dominant inheritance pattern of female infertility characterized by recurrent EFS. Genome-wide linkage analyses and whole-exome sequencing revealed a paternally transmitted heterozygous missense mutation of c.400 G>A (p.Ala134Thr) in zona pellucida glycoprotein 3 (ZP3). The same mutation was identified in an unrelated EFS pedigree. Haplotype analysis revealed that the disease allele of these two families came from different origins. Furthermore, in a cohort of 21 cases of EFS, two were also found to have the ZP3 c.400 G>A mutation. Immunofluorescence and histological analysis indicated that the oocytes of the EFS female had degenerated and lacked the zona pellucida (ZP). ZP3 is a major component of the ZP filament. When mutant ZP3 was co-expressed with wild-type ZP3, the interaction between wild-type ZP3 and ZP2 was markedly decreased as a result of the binding of wild-type ZP3 and mutant ZP3, via dominant negative inhibition. As a result, the assembly of ZP was impeded and the communication between cumulus cells and the oocyte was prevented, resulting in oocyte degeneration. These results identified a genetic basis for EFS and oocyte degeneration and, moreover, might pave the way for genetic diagnosis of infertile females with this phenotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA.

  6. Gamma Oscillations and Visual Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter A.; Kim, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    At the root of visual perception is the mechanism the brain uses to analyze features in a scene and bind related ones together. Experiments show this process is linked to oscillations of brain activity in the 30-100 Hz gamma band. Oscillations at different sites have correlation functions (CFs) that often peak at zero lag, implying simultaneous firing, even when conduction delays are large. CFs are strongest between cells stimulated by related features. Gamma oscillations are studied here by modeling mm-scale patchy interconnections in the visual cortex. Resulting predictions for gamma responses to stimuli account for numerous experimental findings, including why oscillations and zero-lag synchrony are associated, observed connections with feature preferences, the shape of the zero-lag peak, and variations of CFs with attention. Gamma waves are found to obey the Schroedinger equation, opening the possibility of cortical analogs of quantum phenomena. Gamma instabilities are tied to observations of gamma activity linked to seizures and hallucinations.

  7. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  8. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Otto G.; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction-diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general.

  9. Participation of cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP) in mammalian sperm-egg interaction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Débora J; Busso, Dolores; Da Ros, Vanina; Ellerman, Diego A; Maldera, Julieta A; Goldweic, Nadia; Cuasnicu, Patricia S

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian fertilization is a complex multi-step process mediated by different molecules present on both gametes. CRISP1 (cysteine-rich secretory protein 1) is an epididymal protein thought to participate in gamete fusion through its binding to egg-complementary sites. Structure-function studies using recombinant fragments of CRISP1 as well as synthetic peptides reveal that its egg-binding ability resides in a 12 amino acid region corresponding to an evolutionary conserved motif of the CRISP family, named Signature 2 (S2). Further experiments analyzing both the ability of other CRISP proteins to bind to the rat egg and the amino acid sequence of their S2 regions show that the amino acid sequence of the S2 is needed for CRISP1 to interact with the egg. CRISP1 appears to be involved in the first step of sperm binding to the zona pellucida, identifying a novel role for this protein in fertilization. The observation that sperm testicular CRISP2 is also able to bind to the egg surface suggests a role for this protein in gamete fusion. Subsequent experiments confirmed the participation of CRISP2 in this step of fertilization and revealed that CRISP1 and CRISP2 interact with common egg surface binding sites. Together, these results suggest a functional cooperation between CRISP1 and CRISP2 to ensure the success of fertilization. These observations contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying mammalian fertilization.

  10. Cd-binding to model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geszner, R.; Saibene, S.; Butz, T.; Lerf, A.

    1990-08-01

    The binding of Cd2+ to the model membranes Di-myristoyl L-α-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) and Di-myristoyl L-α-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) was studied by time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) on111mCd, via its nuclear quadrupole interaction. Whereas Cd2+ does not bind to the neutral DMPC, it binds to charged DMPA up to a 0.8∶1 Cd/lipid ratio.

  11. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  12. Conformational selection in protein binding and function

    PubMed Central

    Weikl, Thomas R; Paul, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Protein binding and function often involves conformational changes. Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments indicate that these conformational changes can occur in the absence of ligand molecules (or with bound ligands), and that the ligands may “select” protein conformations for binding (or unbinding). In this review, we argue that this conformational selection requires transition times for ligand binding and unbinding that are small compared to the dwell times of proteins in different conformations, which is plausible for small ligand molecules. Such a separation of timescales leads to a decoupling and temporal ordering of binding/unbinding events and conformational changes. We propose that conformational-selection and induced-change processes (such as induced fit) are two sides of the same coin, because the temporal ordering is reversed in binding and unbinding direction. Conformational-selection processes can be characterized by a conformational excitation that occurs prior to a binding or unbinding event, while induced-change processes exhibit a characteristic conformational relaxation that occurs after a binding or unbinding event. We discuss how the ordering of events can be determined from relaxation rates and effective on- and off-rates determined in mixing experiments, and from the conformational exchange rates measured in advanced NMR or single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. For larger ligand molecules such as peptides, conformational changes and binding events can be intricately coupled and exhibit aspects of conformational-selection and induced-change processes in both binding and unbinding direction. PMID:25155241

  13. Fundamental considerations in ski binding analysis.

    PubMed

    Mote, C D; Hull, M L

    1976-01-01

    1. The static adjustment of a ski binding by hand or by available machines is only an adjustment and is neither a static nor a dynamic evaluation of the binding design. Bindings of different design with identical static adjustments will perform differently in environments in which the forces are static or dynamic. 2. The concept of binding release force is a useful measure of binding adjustment, but it is inappropriate as a criterion for binding evaluation. First, it does not direct attention toward the injury causing mechanism, strain, or displacement in the leg. Second, it is only part of the evaluation in dynamic problems. 3. The binding release decision in present bindings is displacement controlled. The relative displacement of the boot and ski is the system variable. For any specified relative displacement the binding force can be any of an infinite number of possibilities determined by the loading path. 4. The response of the leg-ski system to external impulses applied to the ski is independent of the boot-ski relative motion as long as the boot recenters quickly in the binding. Response is dependent upon the external impulse plus system inertia, damping and stiffness. 5. When tested under half sinusoidal forces applied to a test ski, all bindings will demonstrate static and impulse loading regions. In the static region the force drives the binding to a relative release displacement. In the impulse region the initial velocity of the ski drives the binding to a release displacement. 6. The transition between the static and impulse loading regions is determined by the binding's capacity to store and dissipate energy along the principal loading path. Increased energy capacity necessitates larger external impulses to produce release. 7. In all bindings examined to date, the transmitted leg displacement or strain at release under static loading exceeds leg strain under dynamic or impact loading. Because static loading is responsible for many injuries, a skier

  14. Engineered proteins as specific binding reagents.

    PubMed

    Binz, H Kaspar; Plückthun, Andreas

    2005-08-01

    Over the past 30 years, monoclonal antibodies have become the standard binding proteins and currently find applications in research, diagnostics and therapy. Yet, monoclonal antibodies now face strong competition from synthetic antibody libraries in combination with powerful library selection technologies. More recently, an increased understanding of other natural binding proteins together with advances in protein engineering, selection and evolution technologies has also triggered the exploration of numerous other protein architectures for the generation of designed binding molecules. Valuable protein-binding scaffolds have been obtained and represent promising alternatives to antibodies for biotechnological and, potentially, clinical applications.

  15. [Polarized light microscopy for evaluation of oocytes as a prognostic factor in the evolution of a cycle in assisted reproduction].

    PubMed

    González-Ortega, C; Cancino-Villarreal, P; Alonzo-Torres, V E; Martínez-Robles, I; Pérez-Peña, E; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, A M

    2016-04-01

    Identification of the best embryos to transfer is a key element for success in assisted reproduction. In the last decade, several morphological criteria of oocytes and embryos were evaluated with regard to their potential for predicting embryo viability. The introduction of polarization light microscopy systems has allowed the visualization of the meiotic spindle and the different layers of the zona pellucida in human oocytes on the basis of birefringence in a non-destructive way. Conflicting results have been reported regarding the predictive value in ICSI cycles. To assess the predictive ability of meiotic spindle and zona pellucida of human oocytes to implant by polarized microscopy in ICSI cycles. Prospective and observational clinical study. 903 oocytes from 94 ICSI cycles were analyzed with polarized microscopy. Meiotic spindle visualization and zona pellucida birefringence values by polarized microscopy were correlated with ICSI cycles results. Meiotic spindle visualization and birefringence values of zona pellucida decreased in a direct basis with increasing age. In patients aged over the 35 years, the percentage of a visible spindle and mean zona pellucida birefringence was lower than in younger patients. Fertilization rate were higher in oocytes with visible meiotic spindle (81.3% vs. 64%; p < 0.0001), as well as embryo quality (47.4% vs. 39%; p=0.01). Fertilization rate was higher in oocytes with positive values of birefringence (77.5 % vs. 68.5% p=0.005) with similar embryo quality. Conception cycles showed oocytes with higher mean value of zona birefringence and visible spindle vs. no-conception cycles (p<0.05). Polarized light microscopy improves oocyte selection, which significantly impacts in the development of embryos with greater implantation potential. The use of polarized light microscopy with sperm selection methods, blastocyst culture and deferred embryo transfers will contribute to transfer fewer embryos without diminishing rates of live

  16. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  17. Binding of corroded ions to human saliva.

    PubMed

    Mueller, H J

    1985-05-01

    Employing equilibrium dialysis, the binding abilities of Cu, Al, Co and Cr ions from corroded Cu-Al and Co-Cr dental casting alloys towards human saliva and two of its gel chromatographic fractions were determined. Results indicate that both Cu and Co bind to human saliva i.e. 0.045 and 0.027 mg/mg protein, respectively. Besides possessing the largest binding ability, Cu also possessed the largest binding capacity. The saturation of Cu binding was not reached up to the limit of 0.35 mg protein/ml employed in the tests, while Co reached full saturation at about 0.2 mg protein/ml. Chromium showed absolutely no binding to human saliva while Al ions did not pass through the dialysis membranes. Compared to the binding with solutions that were synthetically made up to contain added salivary-type proteins, it is shown that the binding to human saliva is about 1 order of magnitude larger, at least for Cu ions.

  18. Glycosylation of Cblns attenuates their receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yongqi; Bansal, Parmil K; Wei, Peng; Guo, Hong; Correia, Kristen; Parris, Jennifer; Morgan, James I

    2018-05-18

    Cbln1 is the prototype of a family (Cbln1-Cbln4) of secreted glycoproteins and is essential for normal synapse structure and function in cerebellum by bridging presynaptic Nrxn to postsynaptic Grid2. Here we report the effects of glycosylation on the in vitro receptor binding properties of Cblns. Cbln1, 2 and 4 harbor two N-linked glycosylation sites, one at the N-terminus is in a region implicated in Nrxn binding and the second is in the C1q domain, a region involved in Grid2 binding. Mutation (asparagine to glutamine) of the N-terminal site, increased neurexin binding whereas mutation of the C1q site markedly increased Grid2 binding. These mutations did not influence subunit composition of Cbln trimeric complexes (mediated through the C1q domain) nor their assembly into hexamers (mediated by the N-terminal region). Therefore, glycosylation likely masks the receptor binding interfaces of Cblns. As Cbln4 has undetectable Grid2 binding in vitro we assessed whether transgenic expression of wild type Cbln4 or its glycosylation mutants rescued the Cbln1-null phenotype in vivo. Cbln4 partially rescued and both glycosylation mutants completely rescued ataxia in cbln1-null mice. Thus Cbln4 has intrinsic Grid2 binding that is attenuated by glycosylation, and glycosylation mutants exhibit gain of function in vivo. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of glucose binding sites on insulin.

    PubMed

    Zoete, Vincent; Meuwly, Markus; Karplus, Martin

    2004-05-15

    Possible insulin binding sites for D-glucose have been investigated theoretically by docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two different docking programs for small molecules were used; Multiple Copy Simultaneous Search (MCSS) and Solvation Energy for Exhaustive Docking (SEED) programs. The configurations resulting from the MCSS search were evaluated with a scoring function developed to estimate the binding free energy. SEED calculations were performed using various values for the dielectric constant of the solute. It is found that scores emphasizing non-polar interactions gave a preferential binding site in agreement with that inferred from recent fluorescence and NMR NOESY experiments. The calculated binding affinity of -1.4 to -3.5 kcal/mol is within the measured range of -2.0 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol. The validity of the binding site is suggested by the dynamical stability of the bound glucose when examined with MD simulations with explicit solvent. Alternative binding sites were found in the simulations and their relative stabilities were estimated. The motions of the bound glucose during molecular dynamics simulations are correlated with the motions of the insulin side chains that are in contact with it and with larger scale insulin motions. These results raise the question of whether glucose binding to insulin could play a role in its activity. The results establish the complementarity of molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analyses with the search for binding sites proposed with small molecule docking programs. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Designing ligands to bind proteins

    PubMed Central

    Whitesides, George M.; Krishnamurthy, Vijay M.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to design drugs (so-called ‘rational drug design’) has been one of the long-term objectives of chemistry for 50 years. It is an exceptionally difficult problem, and many of its parts lie outside the expertise of chemistry. The much more limited problem – how to design tight-binding ligands (rational ligand design) – would seem to be one that chemistry could solve, but has also proved remarkably recalcitrant. The question is ‘Why is it so difficult?’ and the answer is ‘We still don't entirely know’. This perspective discusses some of the technical issues – potential functions, protein plasticity, enthalpy/entropy compensation, and others – that contribute, and suggests areas where fundamental understanding of protein–ligand interactions falls short of what is needed. It surveys recent technological developments (in particular, isothermal titration calorimetry) that will, hopefully, make now the time for serious progress in this area. It concludes with the calorimetric examination of the association of a series of systematically varied ligands with a model protein. The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein–ligand association is challenging. PMID:16817982

  1. CALCIUM BINDING TO INTESTINAL MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Oschman, James L.; Wall, Betty J.

    1972-01-01

    Flame photometry reveals that glutaraldehyde and buffer solutions in routine use for electron microscopy contain varying amounts of calcium. The presence of electron-opaque deposits adjacent to membranes in a variety of tissues can be correlated with the presence of calcium in the fixative. In insect intestine (midgut), deposits occur adjacent to apical and lateral plasma membranes. The deposits are particularly evident in tissues fixed in glutaraldehyde without postosmication. They are also observed in osmicated tissue if calcium is added to wash and osmium solutions. Deposits are absent when calcium-free fixatives are used, but are present when traces of CaCl2 (as low as 5 x 10-5 M) are added. The deposits occur at regular intervals along junctional membranes, providing images strikingly similar to those obtained by other workers who have used pyroantimonate in an effort to localize sodium. Other divalent cations (Mg++, Sr++, Ba++, Mn++, Fe++) appear to substitute for calcium, while sodium, potassium, lanthanum, and mercury do not. After postfixing with osmium with calcium added, the deposits can be resolved as patches along the inner leaflet of apical and lateral plasma membranes. The dense regions may thus localize membrane constituents that bind calcium. The results are discussed in relation to the role of calcium in control of cell-to-cell communication, intestinal calcium uptake, and the pyroantimonate technique for ion localization. PMID:4569411

  2. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  3. Characterization of chlorophyll binding to LIL3.

    PubMed

    Mork-Jansson, Astrid Elisabeth; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The light harvesting like protein 3 (LIL 3) from higher plants, has been linked to functions in chlorophyll and tocopherol biosynthesis, photo-protection and chlorophyll transfer. However, the binding of chlorophyll to LIL3 is unclear. We present a reconstitution protocol for chlorophyll binding to LIL3 in DDM micelles. It is shown in the absence of lipids and carotenoids that reconstitution of chlorophyll binding to in vitro expressed LIL3 requires pre-incubation of reaction partners at room temperature. We show chlorophyll a but not chlorophyll b binding to LIL3 at a molar ratio of 1:1. Neither dynamic light scattering nor native PAGE, enabled a discrimination between binding of chlorophyll a and/or b to LIL3.

  4. Characterization of chlorophyll binding to LIL3

    PubMed Central

    Mork-Jansson, Astrid Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    The light harvesting like protein 3 (LIL 3) from higher plants, has been linked to functions in chlorophyll and tocopherol biosynthesis, photo-protection and chlorophyll transfer. However, the binding of chlorophyll to LIL3 is unclear. We present a reconstitution protocol for chlorophyll binding to LIL3 in DDM micelles. It is shown in the absence of lipids and carotenoids that reconstitution of chlorophyll binding to in vitro expressed LIL3 requires pre-incubation of reaction partners at room temperature. We show chlorophyll a but not chlorophyll b binding to LIL3 at a molar ratio of 1:1. Neither dynamic light scattering nor native PAGE, enabled a discrimination between binding of chlorophyll a and/or b to LIL3. PMID:29390011

  5. BIND: the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Gary D.; Betel, Doron; Hogue, Christopher W. V.

    2003-01-01

    The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database (BIND: http://bind.ca) archives biomolecular interaction, complex and pathway information. A web-based system is available to query, view and submit records. BIND continues to grow with the addition of individual submissions as well as interaction data from the PDB and a number of large-scale interaction and complex mapping experiments using yeast two hybrid, mass spectrometry, genetic interactions and phage display. We have developed a new graphical analysis tool that provides users with a view of the domain composition of proteins in interaction and complex records to help relate functional domains to protein interactions. An interaction network clustering tool has also been developed to help focus on regions of interest. Continued input from users has helped further mature the BIND data specification, which now includes the ability to store detailed information about genetic interactions. The BIND data specification is available as ASN.1 and XML DTD. PMID:12519993

  6. Plasma sex steroid binding in Chiroptera.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, G G; Damassa, D A; Gustafson, A W; Armao, M E

    1987-04-01

    Plasma steroid binding was examined in samples obtained from seven species of bats representing four different families. A specific sex steroid-binding protein (SBP) was identified by steady-state polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in representatives of two families, the phyllostomids and the vespertilionids. In these species, as in primates, SBP not only exhibited high affinity for the androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), but also for estradiol. A specific SBP was not identified in the tropical American vampire bat or in the two species of pteropodids examined. In all species examined, except for the vampire bat, a specific corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) was also identified. In addition to binding glucocorticoids, CBG in these species appeared to bind androgens as well.

  7. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M.; Sisler, E.C.

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by applemore » tissue.« less

  8. Relationship between visual binding, reentry and awareness.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Mika; Silvanto, Juha

    2011-12-01

    Visual feature binding has been suggested to depend on reentrant processing. We addressed the relationship between binding, reentry, and visual awareness by asking the participants to discriminate the color and orientation of a colored bar (presented either alone or simultaneously with a white distractor bar) and to report their phenomenal awareness of the target features. The success of reentry was manipulated with object substitution masking and backward masking. The results showed that late reentrant processes are necessary for successful binding but not for phenomenal awareness of the bound features. Binding errors were accompanied by phenomenal awareness of the misbound feature conjunctions, demonstrating that they were experienced as real properties of the stimuli (i.e., illusory conjunctions). Our results suggest that early preattentive binding and local recurrent processing enable features to reach phenomenal awareness, while later attention-related reentrant iterations modulate the way in which the features are bound and experienced in awareness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanism of Sulfide Binding by Ferric Hemeproteins.

    PubMed

    Boubeta, Fernando M; Bieza, Silvina A; Bringas, Mauro; Estrin, Darío A; Boechi, Leonardo; Bari, Sara E

    2018-06-19

    The reaction of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) with hemeproteins is a key physiological reaction; still, its mechanism and implications are not completely understood. In this work, we propose a combination of experimental and theoretical tools to shed light on the reaction in model system microperoxidase 11 (MP11-Fe III ) and myoglobin (Mb-Fe III ), from the estimation of the intrinsic binding constants of the species H 2 S and hydrosulfide (HS - ), and the computational description of the overall binding process. Our results show that H 2 S and HS - are the main reactive species in Mb-Fe III and MP11-Fe III , respectively, and that the magnitude of their intrinsic binding constants are similar to most of the binding constants reported so far for hemeproteins systems and model compounds. However, while the binding of HS - to Mb-Fe III was negligible, the binding of H 2 S to MP11-Fe III was significant, providing a frame for a discriminated analysis of both species and revealing differential mechanistic aspects. A joint inspection of the kinetic data and the free energy profiles of the binding processes suggests that a dissociative mechanism with the release of a coordinated water molecule as rate limiting step is operative in the binding of H 2 S to Mb-Fe III and that the binding of HS - is prevented in the access to the protein matrix. For the MP11-Fe III case, where no access restrictions for the ligands are present, an associative component in the mechanism seems to be operative. Overall, the results suggest that if accessing the active site then both H 2 S and HS - are capable of binding a ferric heme moiety.

  10. [Sexuality and STD/AIDS prevention: social representations by rural men in a county in the Zona da Mata region in Pernambuco, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Alves, Maria de Fátima Paz

    2003-01-01

    This study analyzes the concepts displayed by rural men in the Zona da Mata region in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, concerning their sexual practices and STD/AIDS prevention. The study adopts a qualitative methodology, having interviewed 22 men According to the interviews, their first sexual intercourse is characterized as a learning experience and is sometimes marked by violence. They make a distinction between the "woman at home" and "street women"; they acknowledge women's sexual desire and value reciprocity in sexual relations, differentiating between the kinds of sex they have with different categories of women. Seven men report homoerotic experiences during adolescence, which they ascribe to immaturity, not affecting their heterosexual identity. Condom use, perceived in a negative light, is inconstant and irregular, inversely proportional to knowing the female partner. STDs in general inspire little fear, while AIDS is associated with death; the interviewees do not see themselves at risk of acquiring HIV. Ambiguities in the men's discourse, together with a basically ineffective approach by health services and preventive campaigns, reveal a high level of exposure to the risk of contracting STDs/AIDS among the interviewees and their female or male partners.

  11. Caudal Zona Incerta/VOP Radiofrequency Lesioning Guided by Combined Stereotactic MRI and Microelectrode Recording for Posttraumatic Midbrain Resting-Kinetic Tremor.

    PubMed

    Contreras Lopez, William Omar; Azevedo, Angelo R; Cury, Rubens G; Alencar, Francisco; Neville, Iuri S; Reis, Paul R; Navarro, Jessie; Monaco, Bernardo; da Silva, Fabio E Fernandes; Teixeira, Manoel J; Fonoff, Erich T

    2016-02-01

    Reporting the outcome of two patients who underwent unilateral ablative stereotactic surgery to treat pharmacologic resistant posttraumatic tremor (PTT). We present two patients (31 and 47 years old) with refractory PTT severely affecting their quality of life. Under stereotactic guidance, refined by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and double-channel multiunit microelectrode recording (MER), three sequential radiofrequency lesions were performed in the caudal zona incerta (cZi) up to the base of thalamus (VOP). Effects of cZi/VOP lesion were prospectively rated with a tremor rating scale. Both patients demonstrated intraoperative tremor suppression with sustained results up to 18 months follow-up, with improvement of 92% and 84%, respectively, on the tremor rating scale. Tremor improvement was associated with enhancement functionality and quality of life for the patients. The patients returned to their work after the procedure. No adverse effects were observed up to the last follow-up. Radiofrequency lesion of the cZi/VOP target was effective for posttraumatic tremor in both cases. The use of T2-weighted images and MER was found helpful in increasing the precision and safety of the procedure, because it leads the RF probe by relying on neighbor structures based on thalamus and subthalamic nucleus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The structure of binding curves and practical identifiability of equilibrium ligand-binding parameters

    PubMed Central

    Middendorf, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    A critical but often overlooked question in the study of ligands binding to proteins is whether the parameters obtained from analyzing binding data are practically identifiable (PI), i.e., whether the estimates obtained from fitting models to noisy data are accurate and unique. Here we report a general approach to assess and understand binding parameter identifiability, which provides a toolkit to assist experimentalists in the design of binding studies and in the analysis of binding data. The partial fraction (PF) expansion technique is used to decompose binding curves for proteins with n ligand-binding sites exactly and uniquely into n components, each of which has the form of a one-site binding curve. The association constants of the PF component curves, being the roots of an n-th order polynomial, may be real or complex. We demonstrate a fundamental connection between binding parameter identifiability and the nature of these one-site association constants: all binding parameters are identifiable if the constants are all real and distinct; otherwise, at least some of the parameters are not identifiable. The theory is used to construct identifiability maps from which the practical identifiability of binding parameters for any two-, three-, or four-site binding curve can be assessed. Instructions for extending the method to generate identifiability maps for proteins with more than four binding sites are also given. Further analysis of the identifiability maps leads to the simple rule that the maximum number of structurally identifiable binding parameters (shown in the previous paper to be equal to n) will also be PI only if the binding curve line shape contains n resolved components. PMID:27993951

  13. Binding of Radioactive Benzylpenicillin to Sporulating Bacillus Cultures: Chemistry and Fluctuations in Specific Binding Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Paul J.; Rogolsky, Marvin; Hanh, Vo Thi

    1971-01-01

    The chemistry of the binding of 14C-benzylpenicillin to sporulating cultures of Bacillus megaterium and B. subtilis is similar to that in a 4-hr vegetative culture of Staphylococcus aureus. Unlabeled penicillins prevent the binding of 14C-benzylpenicillin, but benzylpenicilloic acid and benzylpenilloic acid do not. Bound antibiotic can be removed from cells with neutral hydroxylamine at 25 C. Sporulating cultures display two intervals of enhanced binding, whereas binding to stationaryphase S. aureus cells remains constant. The first period of increased binding activity occurs during formation of the spore septum or cell wall primordium development, and the second coincides with cortex biosynthesis. PMID:4942758

  14. Remodeling of the plasma membrane in preparation for sperm–egg recognition: roles of acrosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tanphaichitr, Nongnuj; Kongmanas, Kessiri; Kruevaisayawan, Hathairat; Saewu, Arpornrad; Sugeng, Clarissa; Fernandes, Jason; Souda, Puneet; Angel, Jonathan B; Faull, Kym F; Aitken, R John; Whitelegge, Julian; Hardy, Daniel; Berger, Trish; Baker, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of sperm with the egg's extracellular matrix, the zona pellucida (ZP) is the first step of the union between male and female gametes. The molecular mechanisms of this process have been studied for the past six decades with the results obtained being both interesting and confusing. In this article, we describe our recent work, which attempts to address two lines of questions from previous studies. First, because there are numerous ZP binding proteins reported by various researchers, how do these proteins act together in sperm–ZP interaction? Second, why do a number of acrosomal proteins have ZP affinity? Are they involved mainly in the initial sperm–ZP binding or rather in anchoring acrosome reacting/reacted spermatozoa to the ZP? Our studies reveal that a number of ZP binding proteins and chaperones, extracted from the anterior sperm head plasma membrane, coexist as high molecular weight (HMW) complexes, and that these complexes in capacitated spermatozoa have preferential ability to bind to the ZP. Zonadhesin (ZAN), known as an acrosomal protein with ZP affinity, is one of these proteins in the HMW complexes. Immunoprecipitation indicates that ZAN interacts with other acrosomal proteins, proacrosin/acrosin and sp32 (ACRBP), also present in the HMW complexes. Immunodetection of ZAN and proacrosin/acrosin on spermatozoa further indicates that both proteins traffic to the sperm head surface during capacitation where the sperm acrosomal matrix is still intact, and therefore they are likely involved in the initial sperm–ZP binding step. PMID:25994642

  15. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which oftenmore » takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.« less

  16. Comparative CYP-dependent binding of the adrenocortical toxicants 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE and o,p'-DDD in Y-1 adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Hermansson, Veronica; Asp, Vendela; Bergman, Ake; Bergström, Ulrika; Brandt, Ingvar

    2007-11-01

    The environmental pollutant 3-MeSO(2)-DDE [2-(3-methylsulfonyl-4-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethene] is an adrenocortical toxicant in mice, specifically in the glucocorticoid-producing zona fasciculata, due to a cytochrome P450 11B1 (CYP11B1)-catalysed bioactivation and formation of covalently bound protein adducts. o,p'-DDD [2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane] is toxic and inhibits steroidogenesis in the human adrenal cortex after bioactivation by unidentified CYPs, but does not exert any toxic effects on the mouse adrenal. As a step towards determining in vitro/in vivo relationships for the CYP-catalysed binding and toxicity of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE and o,p'-DDD, we have investigated the irreversible protein binding of these two toxicants in the murine adrenocortical cell line Y-1. The irreversible binding of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE previously demonstrated in vivo was successfully reproduced and could be inhibited by the CYP-inhibitors etomidate, ketoconazole and metyrapone. Surprisingly, o,p'-DDD reached similar levels of binding as 3-MeSO(2)-DDE. The binding of o,p'-DDD was sensitive to etomidate and ketoconazole, but not to metyrapone. Moreover, GSH depletion increased the binding of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE, but not of o,p'-DDD, indicating an important role of GSH conjugation in the detoxification of the 3-MeSO(2)-DDE-derived reactive metabolite. In addition, the specificity of CYP11B1 in activating 3-MeSO(2)-DDE was investigated using structurally analogous compounds. None of the analogues produced histopathological lesions in the mouse adrenal in vivo following a single i.p. injection of 100 mg/kg body weight, but two of the compounds were able to decrease the irreversible binding of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE to Y-1 cells. These results indicate that the bioactivation of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE by CYP11B1 is highly structure-dependent. In conclusion, both 3-MeSO(2)-DDE and o,p'-DDD bind irreversibly to Y-1 cells despite differences in binding and adrenotoxicity in mice

  17. Binding of perlecan to transthyretin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Smeland, S; Kolset, S O; Lyon, M; Norum, K R; Blomhoff, R

    1997-01-01

    Transthyretin is one of two specific proteins involved in the transport of thyroid hormones in plasma; it possesses two binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein. In the present study we demonstrate that transthyretin also interacts in vitro with [35S]sulphate-labelled material from the medium of HepG2 cells. By using the same strategy as for purifying serum retinol-binding protein, [35S]sulphate-labelled medium was specifically eluted from a transthyretin-affinity column. Ion-exchange chromatography showed that the material was highly polyanionic, and its size and alkali susceptibility suggested that it was a proteoglycan. Structural analyses with chondroitinase ABC lyase and nitrous acid revealed that approx. 20% was chondroitin sulphate and 80% heparan sulphate. Immunoprecipitation showed that the [35S]sulphate-labelled material contained perlecan. Further analysis by binding studies revealed specific and saturable binding of 125I-transthyretin to perlecan-enriched Matrigel. Because inhibition of sulphation by treating HepG2 cells with sodium chlorate increased the affinity of the perlecan for transthyretin, and [3H]heparin was not retained by the transthyretin affinity column, the binding is probably mediated by the core protein and is not a protein-glycosaminoglycan interaction. Because perlecan is released from transthyretin in water, the binding might be due to hydrophobic interactions. PMID:9307034

  18. Cooperative Allosteric Ligand Binding in Calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj

    Conformational dynamics is often essential for a protein's function. For example, proteins are able to communicate the effect of binding at one site to a distal region of the molecule through changes in its conformational dynamics. This so called allosteric coupling fine tunes the sensitivity of ligand binding to changes in concentration. A conformational change between a "closed" (apo) and an "open" (holo) conformation upon ligation often produces this coupling between binding sites. Enhanced sensitivity between the unbound and bound ensembles leads to a sharper binding curve. There are two basic conceptual frameworks that guide our visualization about ligand binding mechanisms. First, a ligand can stabilize the unstable "open" state from a dynamic ensemble of conformations within the unbound basin. This binding mechanism is called conformational selection. Second, a ligand can weakly bind to the low-affinity "closed" state followed by a conformational transition to the "open" state. In this dissertation, I focus on molecular dynamics simulations to understand microscopic origins of ligand binding cooperativity. A minimal model of allosteric binding transitions must include ligand binding/unbinding events, while capturing the transition mechanism between two distinct meta-stable free energy basins. Due in part to computational timescales limitations, work in this dissertation describes large-scale conformational transitions through a simplified, coarse-grained model based on the energy basins defined by the open and closed conformations of the protein Calmodulin (CaM). CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein consisting of two structurally similar globular domains connected by a flexible linker. The two domains of CaM, N-terminal domain (nCaM) and C-terminal domain (cCaM) consists of two helix-loop-helix motifs (the EF-hands) connected by a flexible linker. Each domain of CaM consists of two binding loops and binds 2 calcium ions each. The intact domain binds

  19. Increased thyrotropin binding in hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Müller-Gärtner, H W; Schneider, C; Bay, V; Tadt, A; Rehpenning, W; de Heer, K; Jessel, M

    1987-08-01

    The object of this study was to investigate TSH receptors in hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules (HFN). In HFN, obtained from seven patients, 125-I-TSH binding as determined by equilibrium binding analysis on particulate membrane preparations, was found to be significantly increased as compared with normal thyroid tissues (five patients; P less than 0.001). Scatchard analysis of TSH-binding revealed two kinds of binding sites for both normal thyroid tissue and HFN, and displayed significantly increased association constants of high- and low-affinity binding sites in HFN (Ka = 11.75 +/- 6.8 10(9) M-1, P less than 0.001 and Ka = 2.1 +/- 1.0 10(7) M-1, P less than 0.025; x +/- SEM) as compared with normal thyroid tissue (Ka = 0.25 +/- 0.06 10(9) M-1, Ka = 0.14 +/- 0.03 10(7) M-1; x +/- SEM). The capacity of the high-affinity binding sites in HFN was found to be decreased (1.8 +/- 1.1 pmol/mg protein, x +/- SEM) in comparison with normal thyroid tissue (4.26 +/- 1.27 pmol/mg protein; x +/- SEM). TSH-receptor autoradiography applied to cryostatic tissue sections confirmed increased TSH binding of the follicular epithelium in HFN. These data suggest that an increased affinity of TSH-receptor sites in HFN in iodine deficient areas may be an important event in thyroid autonomy.

  20. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1984-05-30

    The invention relates to a method of measuring binding assays carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also a known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The binding reactant is the same as the binding reactant present in the sample. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number and strength of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating. (LEW)

  1. Functions of Intracellular Retinoid Binding-Proteins.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Joseph L

    Multiple binding and transport proteins facilitate many aspects of retinoid biology through effects on retinoid transport, cellular uptake, metabolism, and nuclear delivery. These include the serum retinol binding protein sRBP (aka Rbp4), the plasma membrane sRBP receptor Stra6, and the intracellular retinoid binding-proteins such as cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBP) and cellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP). sRBP transports the highly lipophilic retinol through an aqueous medium. The major intracellular retinol-binding protein, CRBP1, likely enhances efficient retinoid use by providing a sink to facilitate retinol uptake from sRBP through the plasma membrane or via Stra6, delivering retinol or retinal to select enzymes that generate retinyl esters or retinoic acid, and protecting retinol/retinal from excess catabolism or opportunistic metabolism. Intracellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP1 and 2, and FABP5) seem to have more diverse functions distinctive to each, such as directing retinoic acid to catabolism, delivering retinoic acid to specific nuclear receptors, and generating non-canonical actions. Gene ablation of intracellular retinoid binding-proteins does not cause embryonic lethality or gross morphological defects. Metabolic and functional defects manifested in knockouts of CRBP1, CRBP2 and CRBP3, however, illustrate their essentiality to health, and in the case of CRBP2, to survival during limited dietary vitamin A. Future studies should continue to address the specific molecular interactions that occur between retinoid binding-proteins and their targets and their precise physiologic contributions to retinoid homeostasis and function.

  2. Clinical role of protein binding of quinolones.

    PubMed

    Bergogne-Bérézin, Eugénie

    2002-01-01

    Protein binding of antibacterials in plasma and tissues has long been considered a component of their pharmacokinetic parameters, playing a potential role in distribution, excretion and therapeutic effectiveness. Since the beginning of the 'antibacterial era', this factor has been extensively analysed for all antibacterial classes, showing that wide variations of the degree of protein binding occur even in the same antibacterial class, as with beta-lactams. As the understanding of protein binding grew, the complexity of the binding system was increasingly perceived and its dynamic character described. Studies of protein binding of the fluoroquinolones have shown that the great majority of these drugs exhibit low protein binding, ranging from approximately 20 to 40% in plasma, and that they are bound predominantly to albumin. The potential role in pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics of binding of fluoroquinolones to plasma, tissue and intracellular proteins has been analysed, but it has not been established that protein binding has any significant direct or indirect impact on therapeutic effectiveness. Regarding the factors influencing the tissue distribution of antibacterials, physicochemical characteristics and the small molecular size of fluoroquinolones permit a rapid penetration into extravascular sites and intracellularly, with a rapid equilibrium being established between intravascular and extravascular compartments. The high concentrations of these drugs achieved in tissues, body fluids and intracellularly, in addition to their wide antibacterial spectrum, mean that fluoroquinolones have therapeutic effectiveness in a large variety of infections. The tolerability of quinolones has generally been reported as good, based upon long experience in using pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin in clinical practice. Among more recently developed molecules, good tolerability has been reported for levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, but certain other new

  3. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  4. BINDING, SPATIAL ATTENTION AND PERCEPTUAL AWARENESS

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Lynn C.

    2012-01-01

    The world is experienced as a unified whole, but sensory systems do not deliver it to the brain in this way. Signals from different sensory modalities are initially registered in separate brain areas —even within a modality, features of the sensory mosaic such as colour, size, shape and motion are fragmented and registered in specialized areas of the cortex. How does this information become bound together in experience? Findings from the study of abnormal binding — for example, after stroke — and unusual binding — as in synaesthesia — might help us to understand the cognitive and neural mechanisms that contribute to solving this ‘binding problem’. PMID:12563280

  5. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  6. Two nucleotide binding sites modulate ( sup 3 H) glyburide binding to rat cortex membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Gopalakrishnan, M.; Triggle, D.J.

    1991-03-11

    The effects of nucleotides on the binding of the ATP-dependent K{sup +}-channel antagonist ({sup 3}H)glyburide (GLB) to rat cortex membranes were examined. Nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) and nucleotide diphosphate (NDPs) inhibited the binding of GLB. This effect was dependent on the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). Inhibition of binding by NTPs, with the exception of ATP{gamma}S, was dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. GLB binding showed a biphasic response to ADP: up to 3 mM, ADP inhibited binding, and above this concentration GLB binding increased rapidly, and was restored to normal levels by 10 mM ADP. In the presence of Mg{supmore » 2+}, ADP did not stimulate binding. Saturation analysis in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and increasing concentrations of ADP showed that ADP results primarily in a change of the B{sub max} for GLB binding. The differential effects of NTPS and NDPs indicate that two nucleotide binding sites regulate GLB binding.« less

  7. Nuclear binding of progesterone in hen oviduct. Binding to multiple sites in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pikler, G M; Webster, R A; Spelsberg, T C

    1976-01-01

    Steroid hormones, including progesterone, are known to bind with high affinity (Kd approximately 1x10(-10)M) to receptor proteins once they enter target cells. This complex (the progesterone-receptor) then undergoes a temperature-and/or salt-dependent activation which allows it to migrate to the cell nucleus and to bind to the deoxyribonucleoproteins. The present studies demonstrate that binding the hormone-receptor complex in vitro to isolated nuclei from the oviducts of laying hens required the same conditions as do other studies of bbinding in vitro reported previously, e.g. the hormone must be complexed to intact and activated receptor. The assay of the nuclear binding by using multiple concentrations of progesterone receptor reveals the presence of more than one class of binding site in the oviduct nuclei. The affinity of each of these classes of binding sites range from Kd approximately 1x10(-9)-1x10(-8)M. Assays using free steroid (not complexed with receptor) show no binding to these sites. The binding to each of the classes of sites, displays a differential stability to increasing ionic concentrations, suggesting primarily an ionic-type interaction for all classes. Only the highest-affinity class of binding site is capable of binding progesterone receptor under physioligical-saline conditions. This class represent 6000-10000 sites per cell nucleus and resembles the sites detected in vivo (Spelsberg, 1976, Biochem. J. 156, 391-398) which cause maximal transcriptional response when saturated with the progesterone receptor. The multiple binding sites for the progesterone receptor either are not present or are found in limited numbers in the nuclei of non-target organs. Differences in extent of binding to the nuclear material between a target tissue (oviduct) and other tissues (spleen or erythrocyte) are markedly dependent on the ionic conditions, and are probably due to binding to different classes of sites in the nuclei. PMID:182147

  8. Microheater as an alternative to lasers for in-vitro fertilization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel V.; Turovets, Igor; Glazer, Rima; Reubinoff, Benjamin E.; Hilman, Dalia; Lewis, Aaron

    1999-06-01

    During the last decade various lasers have been applied to drilling of the micrometer-sized holes in the zona pellucida of oocytes for in-vitro fertilization applications. In this paper we describe an alternative approach to laser instrumentation based on microfabricated device capable of precise drilling of uniform holes in the zona pellucida of oocytes. This device consists of a thin (1 micrometer) film microheater built on the tip of glass capillary with a diameter varying between a few to a few tens of micrometers. Duration of the pulse of heat produced by this microheater determines the spatial confinement of the heat wave in the surrounding liquid medium. We have demonstrated that gradual microdrilling of the zona pellucida can be accomplished using a series of pulses with duration of about 300 microseconds when the microheater was held in contact with the zona pellucida. Pulse energy applied to 20 micrometer tip was about 4 (mu) J. In vitro development and hatching of 127 micromanipulated embryos was compared to 103 non-drilled control embryos. The technique was found to be highly efficient in creating round, uniform, well defined holes with a smooth wall surface, matching the size of the heating source. The architecture of the surrounding zona pellucida was unaffected by the drilling, as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. Micromanipulated embryos presented no signs of thermal damage under light microscopy. The rate of blastocyst formation and hatching was similar in the micromanipulated and control groups. Following further testing in animal models, this methodology may be used as a cost- effective alternative to laser-based instrumentation in clinical applications such as assisted hatching and embryo biopsy.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: inherited thyroxine-binding globulin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions Inherited thyroxine-binding globulin deficiency Inherited thyroxine-binding globulin deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Inherited thyroxine-binding globulin deficiency is a genetic condition that ...

  10. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  11. Universal binding energy relations in metallic adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Scaling relations which map metallic adhesive binding energy onto a single universal binding energy curve are discussed in relation to adhesion, friction, and wear in metals. The scaling involved normalizing the energy to the maximum binding energy and normalizing distances by a suitable combination of Thomas-Fermi screening lengths. The universal curve was found to be accurately represented by E*(A*)= -(1+beta A) exp (-Beta A*) where E* is the normalized binding energy, A* is the normalized separation, and beta is the normalized decay constant. The calculated cohesive energies of potassium, barium, copper, molybdenum, and samarium were also found to scale by similar relations, suggesting that the universal relation may be more general than for the simple free electron metals.

  12. Structure and Function of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ralf R.; Leong, Steven R.; Flaggs, Gail W.; Gray, Patrick W.; Wright, Samuel D.; Mathison, John C.; Tobias, Peter S.; Ulevitch, Richard J.

    1990-09-01

    The primary structure of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), a trace plasma protein that binds to the lipid A moiety of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), was deduced by sequencing cloned complementary DNA. LBP shares sequence identity with another LPS binding protein found in granulocytes, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, and with cholesterol ester transport protein of the plasma. LBP may control the response to LPS under physiologic conditions by forming high-affinity complexes with LPS that bind to monocytes and macrophages, which then secrete tumor necrosis factor. The identification of this pathway for LPS-induced monocyte stimulation may aid in the development of treatments for diseases in which Gram-negative sepsis or endotoxemia are involved.

  13. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  14. The Identity-Location Binding Problem.

    PubMed

    Howe, Piers D L; Ferguson, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The binding problem is fundamental to visual perception. It is the problem of associating an object's visual properties with itself and not with some other object. The problem is made particular difficult because different properties of an object, such as its color, shape, size, and motion, are often processed independently, sometimes in different cortical areas. The results of these separate analyses have to be combined before the object can be seen as a single coherent entity as opposed to a collection of unconnected features. Visual bindings are typically initiated and updated in a serial fashion, one object at a time. Here, we show that one type of binding, location-identity bindings, can be updated in parallel. We do this by using two complementary techniques, the simultaneous-sequential paradigm and systems factorial technology. These techniques make different assumptions and rely on different behavioral measures, yet both came to the same conclusion. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  15. Antifreeze Protein Binds Irreversibly to Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braslavsky, I.; Pertaya, N.; di Prinzio, C. L.; Wilen, L.; Thomson, E.; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Marshall, C. B.; Davies, P. L.

    2006-03-01

    Many organisms are protected from freezing by antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which bind to ice and prevent its growth by a mechanism not completely understood. Although it has been postulated that AFPs would have to bind irreversibly to arrest the growth of an ice crystal bathed in excess liquid water, the binding forces seem insufficient to support such a tight interaction. By putting a fluorescent tag on a fish AFP, we were able to visualize AFP binding to ice and demonstrate, by lack of recovery after photo-bleaching, that it is indeed irreversible. Because even the most avid protein/ligand interactions exhibit reversibility, this finding is key to understanding the mechanism of antifreeze proteins, which are becoming increasingly valuable in cryopreservation and improving the frost tolerance of crops.

  16. Bilirubin Binding Capacity in the Preterm Neonate.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sanjiv B

    2016-06-01

    Total serum/plasma bilirubin (TB), the biochemical measure currently used to evaluate and manage hyperbilirubinemia, is not a useful predictor of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants. Altered bilirubin-albumin binding in premature infants limits the usefulness of TB in premature infants. In this article, bilirubin-albumin binding, a modifying factor for bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity, in premature infants is reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bairen; Chen, Xi; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) feature prominent excitonic natures. Here we report an experimental approach to measuring the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 with linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE). TP-PLE measurements show the exciton binding energy of 0.71 ± 0.01 eV around K valley in the Brillouin zone. PMID:25783023

  18. The complexity of minocycline serum protein binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Tran, Brian T; Tam, Vincent H

    2017-06-01

    Serum protein binding is critical for understanding the pharmacology of antimicrobial agents. Tigecycline and eravacycline were previously reported to have atypical non-linear protein binding; the percentage of free fraction decreased with increasing total concentration. In this study, we extended the investigation to other tetracyclines and examined the factors that might impact protein binding. Different minocycline concentrations (0.5-50 mg/L) and perfusion media (saline, 0.1 M HEPES buffer and 0.1 and 1 M PBS) were examined by in vitro microdialysis. After equilibration, two dialysate samples were taken from each experiment and the respective antimicrobial agent concentrations were analysed by validated LC-MS/MS methods. For comparison, the serum protein bindings of doxycycline and levofloxacin were also determined. The free fraction of minocycline decreased with increasing total concentration, and the results depended on the perfusion media used. The trends of minocycline protein binding in mouse and human sera were similar. In addition, serum protein binding of doxycycline showed the same concentration-dependent trend as minocycline, while the results of levofloxacin were concentration independent. The serum protein bindings of minocycline and doxycycline are negatively correlated with their total concentrations. It is possible that all tetracyclines share the same pharmacological property. Moreover, the specific perfusion media used could also impact the results of microdialysis. Additional studies are warranted to understand the mechanism(s) and clinical implications of serum protein binding of tetracyclines. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Hyaluronate-binding proteins of murine brain.

    PubMed

    Marks, M S; Chi-Rosso, G; Toole, B P

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of hyaluronate-binding activity was determined in the soluble and membrane fractions derived from adult mouse brain by sonication in low-ionic-strength buffer. Approximately 60% of the total activity was recovered in the soluble fraction and 33% in membrane fractions. In both cases, the hyaluronate-binding activities were found to be of high affinity (KD = 10(-9) M), specific for hyaluronate, and glycoprotein in nature. Most of the hyaluronate-binding activity from the soluble fraction chromatographed in the void volume of Sepharose CL-4B and CL-6B. Approximately 50% of this activity was highly negatively charged, eluting from diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose in 0.5 M NaCl, and contained chondroitin sulfate chains. This latter material also reacted with antibodies raised against cartilage link protein and the core protein of cartilage proteoglycan. Thus, the binding and physical characteristics of this hyaluronate-binding activity are consistent with those of a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan aggregate similar to that found in cartilage. A 500-fold purification of this proteoglycan-like, hyaluronate-binding material was achieved by wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography, molecular sieve chromatography on Sepharose CL-6B, and ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Another class of hyaluronate-binding material (25-50% of that recovered) eluted from DEAE with 0.24 M NaCl; this material had the properties of a complex glycoprotein, did not contain chondroitin sulfate, and did not react with the antibodies against cartilage link protein and proteoglycan. Thus, adult mouse brain contains at least three different forms of hyaluronate-binding macromolecules. Two of these have properties similar to the link protein and proteoglycan of cartilage proteoglycan aggregates; the third is distinguishable from these entities.

  20. Bilirubin Binding Capacity in the Preterm Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sanjiv B

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Total serum/plasma bilirubin (TB), the biochemical measure currently used to evaluate and manage hyperbilirubinemia, is not a useful predictor of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants. Altered bilirubin-albumin binding in premature infants limits the usefulness of TB in premature infants. In this article, bilirubin-albumin binding, a modifying factor for bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity, in premature infants is reviewed. PMID:27235205

  1. Effects of weak/non-complement-binding HLA antibodies on C1q-binding.

    PubMed

    Hönger, G; Amico, P; Arnold, M-L; Spriewald, B M; Schaub, S

    2017-08-01

    It is unknown under what conditions and to what extent weak/non-complement (C)-binding IgG subclasses (IgG2/IgG4) can block C1q-binding triggered by C-binding IgG subclasses (IgG1/IgG3). Therefore, we investigated in vitro C1q-binding induced by IgG subclass mixtures targeting the same HLA epitope. Various mixtures of HLA class II specific monoclonal antibodies of different IgG subclasses but identical V-region were incubated with HLA DRB1*07:01 beads and monitored for C1q-binding. The lowest concentration to achieve maximum C1q-binding was measured for IgG3, followed by IgG1, while IgG2 and IgG4 did not show appreciable C1q-binding. C1q-binding occurred only after a critical amount of IgG1/3 has bound and sharply increased thereafter. When both, C-binding and weak/non-C-binding IgG subclasses were mixed, C1q-binding was diminished proportionally to the fraction of IgG2/4. A 2- to 4-fold excess of IgG2/4 inhibited C1q-binding by 50%. Very high levels (10-fold excess) almost completely abrogated C1q-binding even in the presence of significant IgG1/3 levels that would usually lead to strong C1q-binding. In sensitized renal allograft recipients, IgG subclass constellations with ≥ 2-fold excess of IgG2/4 over IgG1/3 were present in 23/66 patients (34.8%) and overall revealed slightly decreased C1q signals. However, spiking of patient sera with IgG2 targeting a different epitope than the patient's IgG1/3 synergistically increased C1q-binding. In conclusion, if targeting the same epitope, an excess of IgG2/4 is repressing the extent of IgG1/3 triggered C1q-binding in vitro. Such IgG subclass constellations are present in about a third of sensitized patients and their net effect on C1q-binding is slightly inhibitory. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Enantioselective binding of L, D-phenylalanine to ct DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijin; Xu, Jianhua; Huang, Yan; Min, Shungeng

    2009-10-01

    The enantioselective binding of L, D-phenylalanine to calf thymus DNA was studied by absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence quenching, viscosity, salt effect and emission experiments. The results obtained from absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence quenching and viscosity experiments excluded the intercalative binding and salt effect experiments did not support electrostatic binding. So the binding of L, D-phenylalanine to ct DNA should be groove binding. Furthermore, the emission spectra revealed that the binding is enantioselective.

  3. Enantioselective binding of L,D-phenylalanine to ct DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijin; Xu, Jianhua; Huang, Yan; Min, Shungeng

    2009-10-15

    The enantioselective binding of L,D-phenylalanine to calf thymus DNA was studied by absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence quenching, viscosity, salt effect and emission experiments. The results obtained from absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence quenching and viscosity experiments excluded the intercalative binding and salt effect experiments did not support electrostatic binding. So the binding of l,d-phenylalanine to ct DNA should be groove binding. Furthermore, the emission spectra revealed that the binding is enantioselective.

  4. Evaluation of tight junction protein 1 encoding zona occludens 1 as a candidate gene for albuminuria in a Mexican American population.

    PubMed

    Lehman, D M; Leach, R J; Johnson-Pais, T; Hamlington, J; Fowler, S; Almasy, L; Duggirala, R; Stern, M P; Abboud, H E

    2006-09-01

    Albuminuria, a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy, has been shown to be significantly heritable in multiple studies. Therefore, the identification of genes that affect susceptibility to albuminuria may lead to novel avenues of intervention. Current evidence suggests that the podocyte and slit diaphragm play a key role in controlling the selective sieve of the glomerular filtration barrier, and podocyte-specific genes have been identified that are necessary for maintaining its integrity. We therefore investigated the role of gene variants of tight junction protein (TJP1) which encodes another slit diaphragm-associated protein zona occludens 1 as risk factors for albuminuria in the San Antonio Family Diabetes/Gallbladder Study (SAFDGS), which consists of extended Mexican-American families with a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Albuminuria, defined as an albumin (mg/dl) to creatinine (mg/dl) ratio (ACR) of 0.03, which is approximately equivalent to a urinary albumin excretion (UAE) >30 mg/day, was present in a total of 14.9% of participants, and 31% had type 2 diabetes. The TJP1 exons, flanking intronic sequence, and putative proximal promoter regions were investigated in this population. Twentynine polymorphisms, including 7 nonsynonymous SNPs, were identified and genotyped in all subjects of this study for association analysis. Three sets of correlated SNPs, which include 3 exonic SNPs, were nominally associated with ACR (p value range 0.007-0.049); however, the association with the discrete trait albuminuria was not significant (p value range 0.094-0.338). We conclude that these variants in TJP1 do not appear to be major determinants for albuminuria in the SAFDGS; however, they may play a minor role in its severity in this Mexican-American population. Further examination of the TJP1 gene region in this and other cohorts will be useful to determine whether ZO-1 plays a significant role in glomerular permselectivity.

  5. DNA-aptamers binding aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Nadia; Strehlitz, Beate

    2014-02-21

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  6. Electrostatically Biased Binding of Kinesin to Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenjun; Alonso, Maria; Huber, Gary; Dlugosz, Maciej; McCammon, J. Andrew; Cross, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK) in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules. PMID:22140358

  7. Kinetics of Binding of Caldesmon to Actin*

    PubMed Central

    Chalovich, Joseph M.; Chen, Yi-der; Dudek, Ronald; Luo, Hai

    2005-01-01

    The time course of interaction of caldesmon with actin may be monitored by fluorescence changes that occur upon the binding of 12-(N-methyl-N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-l,3-diazol-4-yl))-labeled caldesmon to actin or to acrylodan actin. The concentration dependence of the observed rate of caldesmon-actin binding was analyzed to a first approximation as a single-step reaction using a Monte Carlo simulation. The derived association and dissociation rates were 107 m−1 s−1 and 18.2 s−1, respectively. Smooth muscle tropomyosin enhances the binding of caldesmon to actin, and this was found to be due to a reduction in the rate of dissociation to 6.3 s −1. There is no evidence from this study for a different mechanism of binding in the presence of tropomyosin. The fluorescence changes that occurred with the binding of 12-(N-methyl-N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-l,3-diazol-4-yl))-labeled caldesmon to actin or actin-tropomyosin were reversed by the addition of myosin subfragment 1 as predicted by a competitive binding mechanism. PMID:7730374

  8. Interaction entropy for protein-protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaoxi; Yan, Yu N.; Yang, Maoyou; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the heart of signal transduction and are central to the function of protein machine in biology. The highly specific protein-protein binding is quantitatively characterized by the binding free energy whose accurate calculation from the first principle is a grand challenge in computational biology. In this paper, we show how the interaction entropy approach, which was recently proposed for protein-ligand binding free energy calculation, can be applied to computing the entropic contribution to the protein-protein binding free energy. Explicit theoretical derivation of the interaction entropy approach for protein-protein interaction system is given in detail from the basic definition. Extensive computational studies for a dozen realistic protein-protein interaction systems are carried out using the present approach and comparisons of the results for these protein-protein systems with those from the standard normal mode method are presented. Analysis of the present method for application in protein-protein binding as well as the limitation of the method in numerical computation is discussed. Our study and analysis of the results provided useful information for extracting correct entropic contribution in protein-protein binding from molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Interaction entropy for protein-protein binding.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoxi; Yan, Yu N; Yang, Maoyou; Zhang, John Z H

    2017-03-28

    Protein-protein interactions are at the heart of signal transduction and are central to the function of protein machine in biology. The highly specific protein-protein binding is quantitatively characterized by the binding free energy whose accurate calculation from the first principle is a grand challenge in computational biology. In this paper, we show how the interactionentropy approach, which was recently proposed for protein-ligand binding free energy calculation, can be applied to computing the entropic contribution to the protein-protein binding free energy. Explicit theoretical derivation of the interactionentropy approach for protein-protein interaction system is given in detail from the basic definition. Extensive computational studies for a dozen realistic protein-protein interaction systems are carried out using the present approach and comparisons of the results for these protein-protein systems with those from the standard normal mode method are presented. Analysis of the present method for application in protein-protein binding as well as the limitation of the method in numerical computation is discussed. Our study and analysis of the results provided useful information for extracting correct entropic contribution in protein-protein binding from molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. Singular features of fertilization and their impact on the male reproductive system in eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Bedford, J Michael

    2014-02-01

    Therian (marsupial and eutherian) mammals have evolved a suite of novel reproductive features - seen variously in their gametes, the steps of fertilization and the male reproductive tract - whose adaptive significance remains unclear. Present evidence for the better-understood eutherian mammals suggests that the 'prime mover' in their evolution has been the character of the egg coat, with other such features being adaptations to the consequences of this. Its elastic thickness allows the zona pellucida to stretch to a variable degree and yet remain around the blastocyst during much or all of its expansion before implantation, but its character represents an unusual challenge for spermatozoa. Novel aspects of the acrosome related to this challenge enable it to maintain a relatively prolonged binding after the onset of the acrosome reaction, and the structure, shape and behaviour of the sperm head point to physical thrust as a major element of zona penetration - with the unique configuration of gamete fusion as a sequela of this strategy. In the male, such adaptations are reflected in sperm head formation in the testis and in sperm maturation in the epididymis involving at least the sperm head's structure, plasmalemma and acrosome. This complexity allied to a slow epididymal sperm transport, a relatively modest sperm production and the brief life span of mature spermatozoa kept above the cauda epididymidis could account for the evolution of the sperm storage function - a development seemingly linked, in turn, to the need for sperm capacitation and scrotal evolution.

  11. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantlymore » reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.« less

  12. Binding Site Turnover Produces Pervasive Quantitative Changes in Transcription Factor Binding between Closely Related Drosophila Species

    PubMed Central

    Trapnell, Cole; Davidson, Stuart; Pachter, Lior; Chu, Hou Cheng; Tonkin, Leath A.; Biggin, Mark D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in gene expression play an important role in evolution, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory evolution are poorly understood. Here we compare genome-wide binding of the six transcription factors that initiate segmentation along the anterior-posterior axis in embryos of two closely related species: Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila yakuba. Where we observe binding by a factor in one species, we almost always observe binding by that factor to the orthologous sequence in the other species. Levels of binding, however, vary considerably. The magnitude and direction of the interspecies differences in binding levels of all six factors are strongly correlated, suggesting a role for chromatin or other factor-independent forces in mediating the divergence of transcription factor binding. Nonetheless, factor-specific quantitative variation in binding is common, and we show that it is driven to a large extent by the gain and loss of cognate recognition sequences for the given factor. We find only a weak correlation between binding variation and regulatory function. These data provide the first genome-wide picture of how modest levels of sequence divergence between highly morphologically similar species affect a system of coordinately acting transcription factors during animal development, and highlight the dominant role of quantitative variation in transcription factor binding over short evolutionary distances. PMID:20351773

  13. Crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin type G binding domain: insight into cell surface binding.

    PubMed

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R; Stevens, Raymond C

    2010-04-16

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-A X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  15. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  16. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein-ligand binding affinities and structures.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D; Clark, Jordan J; Dunbar, James B; Carlson, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein-ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23,269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein–ligand binding affinities and structures

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D.; Clark, Jordan J.; Dunbar, James B.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein–ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23 269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. PMID:25378330

  18. Lactoferrin-binding proteins in Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed Central

    Tigyi, Z; Kishore, A R; Maeland, J A; Forsgren, A; Naidu, A S

    1992-01-01

    The ability of Shigella flexneri to interact with lactoferrin (Lf) was examined with a 125I-labeled protein-binding assay. The percent binding of human lactoferrin (HLf) and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) to 45 S. flexneri strains was 19 +/- 3 and 21 +/- 3 (mean +/- standard error of the mean), respectively. 125I-labeled HLf and BLf binding to strain M90T reached an equilibrium within 2 h. Unlabeled HLf and BLf displaced the 125I-HLf-bacteria interaction in a dose-dependent manner. The Lf-bacterium complex was uncoupled by KSCN or urea, but not by NaCl. The interaction was specific, and approximately 4,800 HLf binding sites (affinity constant [Ka], 690 nM) or approximately 5,700 BLf binding sites (Ka, 104 nM) per cell were estimated in strain M90T by a Scatchard plot analysis. The native cell envelope (CE) and outer membrane (OM) did not reveal Lf-binding components in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. However, after being boiled, the CE and OM preparations showed three distinct horseradish peroxidase-Lf reactive bands of about 39, 22, and 16 kDa. The 39-kDa component was also reactive to a monoclonal antibody specific for porin (PoI) proteins of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The Lf-binding protein pattern was similar with BLf or HLf, for Crb+ and Crb- strains. The protein-Lf complex was dissociable by KSCN or urea and was stable after treatment with NaCl. Variation (loss) in the O chain of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly enhanced the Lf-binding capacity in the isogenic rough strain SFL1070-15 compared with its smooth parent strain, SFL1070. These data establish that Lf binds to specific components in the bacterial OM; the heat-modifiable, anti-PoI-reactive, and LPS-associated properties suggested that the Lf-binding proteins are porins in S. flexneri. Images PMID:1319403

  19. Expression and putative function of fibronectin and its receptor (integrin alpha(5)beta(1)) in male and female gametes during bovine fertilization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Thys, Mirjan; Nauwynck, Hans; Maes, Dominiek; Hoogewijs, Maarten; Vercauteren, Dries; Rijsselaere, Tom; Favoreel, Herman; Van Soom, Ann

    2009-09-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a 440 kDa glycoprotein assumed to participate in sperm-egg interaction in human. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Fn--when present during bovine IVF--strongly inhibits sperm penetration. The present study was conducted firstly to evaluate the expression of Fn and its integrin receptor (alpha(5)beta(1)) on male and female bovine gametes using indirect immunofluorescence and secondly, to determine the function of Fn during bovine IVF. Endogenous Fn was detected underneath the zona pellucida (ZP) and integrin alpha(5) on the oolemma of cumulus-denuded oocytes. Bovine spermatozoa displayed integrin alpha(5) at their equatorial segment after acrosome reaction. We established that the main inhibitory effect of exogenously supplemented Fn was located at the sperm-oolemma binding, with a (concurrent) effect on fusion, and this can probably be attributed to the binding of Fn to spermatozoa at the equatorial segment, as shown by means of Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated Fn. Combining these results, the inhibitory effect of exogenously supplemented Fn seemed to be exerted on the male gamete by binding to the exposed integrin alpha(5)beta(1) receptor after acrosome reaction. The presence of endogenous Fn underneath the ZP together with integrin alpha(5) expression on oolemma and acrosome-reacted (AR) sperm cell surface suggests a 'velcro' interaction between the endogenous Fn ligand and corresponding receptors on both (AR) sperm cell and oolemma, initiating sperm-egg binding.

  20. Dissociation of binding and learning processes.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Birte; Frings, Christian

    2017-11-01

    A single encounter of a stimulus together with a response can result in a short-lived association between the stimulus and the response [sometimes called an event file, see Hommel, Müsseler, Aschersleben, & Prinz, (2001) Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24, 910-926]. The repetition of stimulus-response pairings typically results in longer lasting learning effects indicating stimulus-response associations (e.g., Logan & Etherton, (1994) Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 20, 1022-1050]. An important question is whether or not what has been described as stimulus-response binding in action control research is actually identical with an early stage of incidental learning (e.g., binding might be seen as single-trial learning). Here, we present evidence that short-lived binding effects can be distinguished from learning of longer lasting stimulus-response associations. In two experiments, participants always responded to centrally presented target letters that were flanked by response irrelevant distractor letters. Experiment 1 varied whether distractors flanked targets on the horizontal or vertical axis. Binding effects were larger for a horizontal than for a vertical distractor-target configuration, while stimulus configuration did not influence incidental learning of longer lasting stimulus-response associations. In Experiment 2, the duration of the interval between response n - 1 and presentation of display n (500 ms vs. 2000 ms) had opposing influences on binding and learning effects. Both experiments indicate that modulating factors influence stimulus-response binding and incidental learning effects in different ways. We conclude that distinct underlying processes should be assumed for binding and incidental learning effects.

  1. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca 2+ -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, G. C.

    1984-05-01

    A method of measuring binding assays is carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating.

  3. Binding in agrammatic aphasia: Processing to comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Janet Choy, Jungwon; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Theories of comprehension deficits in Broca’s aphasia have largely been based on the pattern of deficit found with movement constructions. However, some studies have found comprehension deficits with binding constructions, which do not involve movement. Aims This study investigates online processing and offline comprehension of binding constructions, such as reflexive (e.g., himself) and pronoun (e.g., him) constructions in unimpaired and aphasic individuals in an attempt to evaluate theories of agrammatic comprehension. Methods & Procedures Participants were eight individuals with agrammatic Broca’s aphasia and eight age-matched unimpaired individuals. We used eyetracking to examine online processing of binding constructions while participants listened to stories. Offline comprehension was also tested. Outcomes & Results The eye movement data showed that individuals with Broca’s aphasia were able to automatically process the correct antecedent of reflexives and pronouns. In addition, their syntactic processing of binding was not delayed compared to normal controls. Nevertheless, offline comprehension of both pronouns and reflexives was significantly impaired compared to the control participants. This comprehension failure was reflected in the aphasic participants’ eye movements at sentence end, where fixations to the competitor increased. Conclusions These data suggest that comprehension difficulties with binding constructions seen in agrammatic aphasic patients are not due to a deficit in automatic syntactic processing or delayed processing. Rather, they point to a possible deficit in lexical integration. PMID:20535243

  4. Computational search for aflatoxin binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    Aflatoxin is one of the mycotoxins that contaminate various food products. Among various aflatoxin types (B1, B2, G1, G2 and M1), aflatoxin B1 is the most important and the most toxic one. In this study, through computational screening, we found that several proteins may bind specifically with different type of aflatoxins. Combination of theoretical methods including target fishing, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, MM/PBSA calculation were utilized to search for new aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. A recently developed method for calculating entropic contribution to binding free energy called interaction entropy (IE) was employed to compute the binding free energy between the protein and aflatoxin B1. Through comprehensive comparison, three proteins, namely, trihydroxynaphthalene reductase, GSK-3b, and Pim-1 were eventually selected as potent aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. GSK-3b and Pim-1 are drug targets of cancers or neurological diseases. GSK-3b is the strongest binder for aflatoxin B1.

  5. Binding of Dissolved Strontium by Micrococcus luteus

    PubMed Central

    Faison, Brendlyn D.; Cancel, Carmen A.; Lewis, Susan N.; Adler, Howard I.

    1990-01-01

    Resting cells of Micrococcus luteus have been shown to remove strontium (Sr) from dilute aqueous solutions of SrCl2 at pH 7. Loadings of 25 mg of Sr per g of cell dry weight were achieved by cells exposed to a solution containing 50 ppm (mg/liter) of Sr. Sr binding occurred in the absence of nutrients and did not require metabolic activity. Initial binding was quite rapid (<0.5 h), although a slow, spontaneous release of Sr was observed over time. Sr binding was inhibited in the presence of polyvalent cations but not monovalent cations. Ca and Sr were bound preferentially over all other cations tested. Sr-binding activity was localized on the cell envelope and was sensitive to various chemical and physical pretreatments. Bound Sr was displaced by divalent ions or by H+. Other monovalent ions were less effective. Bound Sr was also removed by various chelating agents. It was concluded that Sr binding by M. luteus is a reversible equilibrium process. Both ion exchange mediated by acidic cell surface components and intracellular uptake may be involved in this activity. PMID:16348370

  6. New Mechanisms of Mercury Binding to Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, K. L.; Manceau, A.; Gasper, J. D.; Ryan, J. N.; Aiken, G. R.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury can be immobilized in the aquatic environment by binding to peat, a solid form of natural organic matter. Binding mechanisms can vary in strength and reversibility, and therefore will control concentrations of bioreactive mercury, may explain rates of mercury methylation, and are important for designing approaches to improve water quality using natural wetlands or engineered phytoremediation schemes. In addition, strong binding between mercury and peat is likely to result in the fixation of mercury that ultimately resides in coal. The mechanisms by which aqueous mercury at low concentrations reacts with both dissolved and solid natural organic matter remain incompletely understood, despite recent efforts. We have identified three distinct binding mechanisms of divalent cationic mercury to solid peats from the Florida Everglades using EXAFS spectroscopic data (FAME beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF)) obtained on experimental samples as compared to relevant references including mercury-bearing solids and mercury bound to various organic molecules. The proportions of the three molecular configurations vary with Hg concentration, and two new configurations that involve sulfur ligands occur at Hg concentrations up to about 4000 ppm. The binding mechanism at the lowest experimental Hg concentration (60-80 ppm) elucidates published reports on the inhibition of metacinnabar formation in the presence of Hg-bearing solutions and dissolved natural organic matter, and also, the differences in extent of mercury methylation in distinct areas of the Florida Everglades.

  7. Protein Binding Capacity of Different Forages Tannin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusiati, L. M.; Kurniawati, A.; Hanim, C.; Anas, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    Eight forages of tannin sources(Leucaena leucocephala, Arachis hypogaea, Mimosa pudica, Morus alba L, Swietenia mahagoni, Manihot esculenta, Gliricidia sepium, and Bauhinia purpurea)were evaluated their tannin content and protein binding capacity. The protein binding capacity of tannin were determined using precipitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Swietenia mahagonihas higest total tannin level and condensed tannin (CT) compared with other forages (P<0.01). The Leucaena leucocephala has highest hydrolysable tannin (HT) level (P<0.01). The total and condensed tannin content of Swietenia mahagoni were 11.928±0.04 mg/100 mg and 9.241±0.02mg/100mg dry matter (DM) of leaves. The hydrolysable tannin content of Leucaena leucocephala was 5.338±0.03 mg/100 mg DM of leaves. Binding capacity was highest in Swietenia mahagoni and Leucaena leucocephala compared to the other forages (P<0.01). The optimum binding of BSA to tannin in Leucaena leucocephala and Swietenia mahagoniwere1.181±0.44 and 1.217±0.60mg/mg dry matter of leaves. The present study reports that Swietenia mahagoni has highest of tannin content and Leucaena leucocephala and Swietenia mahagoni capacity of protein binding.

  8. Human serum albumin binding of certain antimalarials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Olivera S.; Cvijetić, Ilija N.; Zlatović, Mario V.; Opsenica, Igor M.; Konstantinović, Jelena M.; Terzić Jovanović, Nataša V.; Šolaja, Bogdan A.; Verbić, Tatjana Ž.

    2018-03-01

    Interactions between eight in-house synthesized aminoquinolines, along with well-known chloroquine, and human serum albumin (HSA) have been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The synthesized aminoquinolines, despite being structurally diverse, were found to be very potent antimalarials. Fluorescence measurements indicate that three compounds having additional thiophene or benzothiophene substructure bind more strongly to HSA than other studied compounds. Competitive binding experiments indicate that these three compounds bind significantly stronger to warfarin compared to diazepam binding site. Fluorescence quenching at three temperatures (20, 25, and 37 °C) was analyzed using classical Stern-Volmer equation, and a static quenching mechanism was proposed. The enthalpy and entropy changes upon sulphur-containing compound-HSA interactions were calculated using Van't Hoff equation. Positive values of enthalpy and entropy changes indicate that non-specific, hydrophobic interactions are the main contributors to HSA-compound interaction. Molecular docking and calculated lipophilicity descriptors indicate the same, pointing out that the increased lipophilicity of sulphur-containing compounds might be a reason for their better binding to HSA. Obtained results might contribute to design of novel derivatives with improved pharmacokinetic properties and drug efficacy.

  9. Phage display of engineered binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Levisson, Mark; Spruijt, Ruud B; Winkel, Ingrid Nolla; Kengen, Servé W M; van der Oost, John

    2014-01-01

    In current purification processes optimization of the capture step generally has a large impact on cost reduction. At present, valuable biomolecules are often produced in relatively low concentrations and, consequently, the eventual selective separation from complex mixtures can be rather inefficient. A separation technology based on a very selective high-affinity binding may overcome these problems. Proteins in their natural environment manifest functionality by interacting specifically and often with relatively high affinity with other molecules, such as substrates, inhibitors, activators, or other proteins. At present, antibodies are the most commonly used binding proteins in numerous applications. However, antibodies do have limitations, such as high production costs, low stability, and a complex patent landscape. A novel approach is therefore to use non-immunoglobulin engineered binding proteins in affinity purification. In order to obtain engineered binders with a desired specificity, a large mutant library of the new to-be-developed binding protein has to be created and screened for potential binders. A powerful technique to screen and select for proteins with desired properties from a large pool of variants is phage display. Here, we indicate several criteria for potential binding protein scaffolds and explain the principle of M13 phage display. In addition, we describe experimental protocols for the initial steps in setting up a M13 phage display system based on the pComb3X vector, including construction of the phagemid vector, production of phages displaying the protein of interest, and confirmation of display on the M13 phage.

  10. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention.

  11. C60 fullerene binding to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes have attracted considerable attention in various areas of science and technology. Owing to their exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, they have many applications, particularly in cosmetic and medical products. Using the Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic surface densities, we determine the binding energies of a C60 fullerene with respect to both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules. We assume that all configurations are in a vacuum and that the C60 fullerene is initially at rest. Double integrals are performed to determine the interaction energy of the system. We find that the C60 fullerene binds to the double-strand DNA molecule, at either the major or minor grooves, with binding energies of -4.7 eV or -2.3 eV, respectively, and that the C60 molecule binds to the single-strand DNA molecule with a binding energy of -1.6 eV. Our results suggest that the C60 molecule is most likely to be linked to the major groove of the dsDNA molecule.

  12. Structural changes in calcium-binding allergens: use of circular dichroism to study binding characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hebenstreit, D; Ferreira, F

    2005-09-01

    Several studies showed that calcium-binding proteins have a fixed place in the spectrum of allergenic substances. Often the binding of a calcium ion induces conformational changes and affects immunoglobulin E-binding to the allergen. Hence, the quantitative characterization of the binding to calcium is of importance to understand both the biologic and allergenic activity of these proteins. In the present study we describe a procedure for determining the stoichiometry and dissociation constant (K(D)) of calcium-binding allergens using circular dichroism (CD) techniques. For the experiments, we used recombinant Bet v 4, a two EF-hand allergen from birch pollen. Solutions of Bet v 4 were titrated with calcium and the change in molar ellipticity at 222 nm was monitored with a CD spectropolarimeter. The determination of the binding stoichiometry as well as of the K(D) for one EF-hand (4 microM) demonstrated the applicability of the method. CD-monitored calcium-titration of protein solutions represents a fast and easy method for determining the binding characteristics of calcium-binding allergens.

  13. Effect of solid surface charge on the binding behaviour of a metal-binding peptide

    PubMed Central

    Donatan, Senem; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan; Urgen, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, solid-binding peptides have been increasingly used as molecular building blocks coupling bio- and nanotechnology. Despite considerable research being invested in this field, the effects of many surface-related parameters that define the binding of peptide to solids are still unknown. In the quest to control biological molecules at solid interfaces and, thereby, tailoring the binding characteristics of the peptides, the use of surface charge of the solid surface may probably play an important role, which then can be used as a potential tuning parameter of peptide adsorption. Here, we report quantitative investigation on the viscoelastic properties and binding kinetics of an engineered gold-binding peptide, 3RGBP1, adsorbed onto the gold surface at different surface charge densities. The experiments were performed in aqueous solutions using an electrochemical dissipative quartz crystal microbalance system. Hydrodynamic mass, hydration state and surface coverage of the adsorbed peptide films were determined as a function of surface charge density of the gold metal substrate. Under each charged condition, binding of 3rGBP1 displayed quantitative differences in terms of adsorbed peptide amount, surface coverage ratio and hydration state. Based on the intrinsically disordered structure of the peptide, we propose a possible mechanism for binding of the peptide that can be used for tuning surface adsorption in further studies. Controlled alteration of peptide binding on solid surfaces, as shown here, may provide novel methods for surface functionalization used for bioenabled processing and fabrication of future micro- and nanodevices. PMID:22491974

  14. Molecular simulations of multimodal ligand-protein binding: elucidation of binding sites and correlation with experiments.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alexander S; Garde, Shekhar; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-11-17

    Multimodal chromatography, which employs more than one mode of interaction between ligands and proteins, has been shown to have unique selectivity and high efficacy for protein purification. To test the ability of free solution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water to identify binding regions on the protein surface and to shed light on the "pseudo affinity" nature of multimodal interactions, we performed MD simulations of a model protein ubiquitin in aqueous solution of free ligands. Comparisons of MD with NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin mutants in solutions of free ligands show a good agreement between the two with regard to the preferred binding region on the surface of the protein and several binding sites. MD simulations also identify additional binding sites that were not observed in the NMR experiments. "Bound" ligands were found to be sufficiently flexible and to access a number of favorable conformations, suggesting only a moderate loss of ligand entropy in the "pseudo affinity" binding of these multimodal ligands. Analysis of locations of chemical subunits of the ligand on the protein surface indicated that electrostatic interaction units were located on the periphery of the preferred binding region on the protein. The analysis of the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity maps, and the binding of both acetate and benzene probes were used to further study the localization of individual ligand moieties. These results suggest that water-mediated electrostatic interactions help the localization and orientation of the MM ligand to the binding region with additional stability provided by nonspecific hydrophobic interactions.

  15. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the promiscuous binding and transport properties of L-FABP, we investigated structure and dynamics of human L-FABP with and without bound ligands by means of heteronuclear NMR. The overall conformation of human L-FABP shows the typical β-clam motif. Binding of two oleic acid (OA) molecules does not alter the protein conformation substantially, but perturbs the chemical shift of certain backbone and side-chain protons that are involved in OA binding according to the structure of the human L-FABP/OA complex. Comparison of the human apo and holo L-FABP structures revealed no evidence for an “open-cap” conformation or a “swivel-back” mechanism of the K90 side chain upon ligand binding, as proposed for rat L-FABP. Instead, we postulate that the lipid binding process in L-FABP is associated with backbone dynamics. PMID:22713574

  16. Tighter Ligand Binding Can Compensate for Impaired Stability of an RNA-Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Christopher P; Richman, Tara R; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Rackham, Oliver

    2018-06-15

    It has been widely shown that ligand-binding residues, by virtue of their orientation, charge, and solvent exposure, often have a net destabilizing effect on proteins that is offset by stability conferring residues elsewhere in the protein. This structure-function trade-off can constrain possible adaptive evolutionary changes of function and may hamper protein engineering efforts to design proteins with new functions. Here, we present evidence from a large randomized mutant library screen that, in the case of PUF RNA-binding proteins, this structural relationship may be inverted and that active-site mutations that increase protein activity are also able to compensate for impaired stability. We show that certain mutations in RNA-protein binding residues are not necessarily destabilizing and that increased ligand-binding can rescue an insoluble, unstable PUF protein. We hypothesize that these mutations restabilize the protein via thermodynamic coupling of protein folding and RNA binding.

  17. Mannose-binding lectin binds to a range of clinically relevant microorganisms and promotes complement deposition.

    PubMed

    Neth, O; Jack, D L; Dodds, A W; Holzel, H; Klein, N J; Turner, M W

    2000-02-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a collagenous serum lectin believed to be of importance in innate immunity. Genetically determined low levels of the protein are known to predispose to infections. In this study the binding of purified MBL to pathogens isolated from immunocompromised children was investigated by flow cytometry. Diverse Candida species, Aspergillus fumigatus, Staphylococcus aureus, and beta-hemolytic group A streptococci exhibited strong binding of MBL, whereas Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species, and Haemophilus influenzae type b were characterized by heterogeneous binding patterns. In contrast, beta-hemolytic group B streptococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus epidermidis showed low levels of binding. Bound MBL was able to promote C4 deposition in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that MBL may be of importance in first-line immune defense against several important pathogens.

  18. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines.

  19. Flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, George C.

    1987-01-01

    A method of measuring the result of a binding assay that does not require separation of fluorescent smaller particles is disclosed. In a competitive binding assay the smaller fluorescent particles coated with antigen compete with antigen in the sample being analyzed for available binding sites on larger particles. In a sandwich assay, the smaller, fluorescent spheres coated with antibody attach themselves to molecules containing antigen that are attached to larger spheres coated with the same antibody. The separation of unattached, fluorescent smaller particles is made unnecessary by only counting the fluorescent events triggered by the laser of a flow cytometer when the event is caused by a particle with a light scatter measurement within a certain range corresponding to the presence of larger particles.

  20. Potential of goat probiotic to bind mutagens.

    PubMed

    Apás, Ana Lidia; González, Silvia Nelina; Arena, Mario Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    The mutagen binding ability of the goat probiotics (Lactobacillus reuteri DDL 19, Lactobacillus alimentarius DDL 48, Enterococcus faecium DDE 39, and Bifidobacterium bifidum DDBA) was evaluated. The oral administration of these probiotics reduced fecal mutagens and intestinal cancer markers in goats. Secondly, the effects of probiotics against the mutagenesis induced by sodium azide (SA), and Benzopyrene (B[α]P) by performing the modified Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 was investigated. The capacity to bind benzopyrene and the stability of the bacterial-mutagen complex was analyzed by HPLC. The dismutagenic potential against both mutagens was proportional to probiotic concentration. Results showed that probiotic antimutagenic capacity against SA was ranging from 13 to 78%. The mixture of four goat probiotics (MGP) displayed higher antimutagenic activity against SA than any individual strains at the same cell concentration. This study shows that the highest diminution of mutagenicity in presence of B[α]P (74%) was observed in presence of MGP. The antimutagenic activity of nearly all the individual probiotic and the MGP were in concordance with the B[α]P binding determined by HPLC. According to our results, the B[α]P binding to probiotic was irreversible still after being washed with DMSO solution. The stability of the toxic compounds-bacterial cell binding is a key consideration when probiotic antimutagenic property is evaluated. MGP exhibits the ability to bind and detoxify potent mutagens, and this property can be useful in supplemented foods for goats since it can lead to the removal of potent mutagens and protect and enhance ruminal health and hence food safety of consumers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G; Butler, Mark S; Montgomery, A Bruce; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  3. New Binding Mode to TNF-Alpha Revealed by Ubiquitin-Based Artificial Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Andreas; Kovermann, Michael; Lilie, Hauke; Fiedler, Markus; Balbach, Jochen; Rudolph, Rainer; Pfeifer, Sven

    2012-01-01

    A variety of approaches have been employed to generate binding proteins from non-antibody scaffolds. Utilizing a beta-sheet of the human ubiquitin for paratope creation we obtained binding proteins against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. The bioactive form of this validated pharmacological target protein is a non-covalently linked homo-trimer. This structural feature leads to the observation of a certain heterogeneity concerning the binding mode of TNF-alpha binding molecules, for instance in terms of monomer/trimer specificity. We analyzed a ubiquitin-based TNF-alpha binder, selected by ribosome display, with a particular focus on its mode of interaction. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, specific binding to TNF-alpha with nanomolar affinity was observed. In isothermal titration calorimetry we obtained comparable results regarding the affinity and detected an exothermic reaction with one ubiquitin-derived binding molecule binding one TNF-alpha trimer. Using NMR spectroscopy and other analytical methods the 1∶3 stoichiometry could be confirmed. Detailed binding analysis showed that the interaction is affected by the detergent Tween-20. Previously, this phenomenon was reported only for one other type of alternative scaffold-derived binding proteins – designed ankyrin repeat proteins – without further investigation. As demonstrated by size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy, the presence of the detergent increases the association rate significantly. Since the special architecture of TNF-alpha is known to be modulated by detergents, the access to the recognized epitope is indicated to be restricted by conformational transitions within the target protein. Our results suggest that the ubiquitin-derived binding protein targets a new epitope on TNF-alpha, which differs from the epitopes recognized by TNF-alpha neutralizing antibodies. PMID:22363609

  4. Quantification of arrestin-rhodopsin binding stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Lally, Ciara C M; Sommer, Martha E

    2015-01-01

    We have developed several methods to quantify arrestin-1 binding to rhodopsin in the native rod disk membrane. These methods can be applied to study arrestin interactions with all functional forms of rhodopsin, including dark-state rhodopsin, light-activated metarhodopsin II (Meta II), and the products of Meta II decay, opsin and all-trans-retinal. When used in parallel, these methods report both the actual amount of arrestin bound to the membrane surface and the functional aspects of arrestin binding, such as which arrestin loops are engaged and whether Meta II is stabilized. Most of these methods can also be applied to recombinant receptor reconstituted into liposomes, bicelles, and nanodisks.

  5. Binding of actin to lens alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Actin has been coupled to a cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column, then tested for binding to alpha, beta, and gamma crystallin preparations from the bovine lens. Alpha, but not beta or gamma, crystallins bound to the actin affinity column in a time dependent and saturable manner. Subfractionation of the alpha crystallin preparation into the alpha-A and alpha-B species, followed by incubation with the affinity column, demonstrated that both species bound approximately the same. Together, these studies demonstrate a specific and saturable binding of lens alpha-A and alpha-B with actin.

  6. Tight-Binding study of Boron structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrady, Joseph W.; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Mehl, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    We have performed Linearized Augmented Plane Wave (LAPW) calculations for five crystal structures (alpha, dhcp, sc, fcc, bcc) of Boron which we then fitted to a non-orthogonal tight-binding model following the Naval Research Laboratory Tight-Binding (NRL-TB) method. The predictions of the NRL-TB approach for complicated Boron structures such as R105 (or β-rhombohedral) and T190 are in agreement with recent first-principles calculations. Fully utilizing the computational speed of the NRL-TB method we calculated the energy differences of various structures, including those containing vacancies using supercells with up to 5000 atoms.

  7. Feature binding, attention and object perception.

    PubMed Central

    Treisman, A

    1998-01-01

    The seemingly effortless ability to perceive meaningful objects in an integrated scene actually depends on complex visual processes. The 'binding problem' concerns the way in which we select and integrate the separate features of objects in the correct combinations. Experiments suggest that attention plays a central role in solving this problem. Some neurological patients show a dramatic breakdown in the ability to see several objects; their deficits suggest a role for the parietal cortex in the binding process. However, indirect measures of priming and interference suggest that more information may be implicitly available than we can consciously access. PMID:9770223

  8. Ice-Binding Proteins and Their Function.

    PubMed

    Bar Dolev, Maya; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2016-06-02

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are a diverse class of proteins that assist organism survival in the presence of ice in cold climates. They have different origins in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, diatoms, plants, insects, and fish. This review covers the gamut of IBP structures and functions and the common features they use to bind ice. We discuss mechanisms by which IBPs adsorb to ice and interfere with its growth, evidence for their irreversible association with ice, and methods for enhancing the activity of IBPs. The applications of IBPs in the food industry, in cryopreservation, and in other technologies are vast, and we chart out some possibilities.

  9. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM) to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM) to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after adding a large concentration of

  10. Binding Sites Analyser (BiSA): Software for Genomic Binding Sites Archiving and Overlap Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khushi, Matloob; Liddle, Christopher; Clarke, Christine L.; Graham, J. Dinny

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding and histone modification reveals complex patterns of interactions. Identifying overlaps in binding patterns by different factors is a major objective of genomic studies, but existing methods to archive large numbers of datasets in a personalised database lack sophistication and utility. Therefore we have developed transcription factor DNA binding site analyser software (BiSA), for archiving of binding regions and easy identification of overlap with or proximity to other regions of interest. Analysis results can be restricted by chromosome or base pair overlap between regions or maximum distance between binding peaks. BiSA is capable of reporting overlapping regions that share common base pairs; regions that are nearby; regions that are not overlapping; and average region sizes. BiSA can identify genes located near binding regions of interest, genomic features near a gene or locus of interest and statistical significance of overlapping regions can also be reported. Overlapping results can be visualized as Venn diagrams. A major strength of BiSA is that it is supported by a comprehensive database of publicly available transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications, which can be directly compared to user data. The documentation and source code are available on http://bisa.sourceforge.net PMID:24533055

  11. The Case against Binding Interest Arbitration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecker, Charles I.

    1984-01-01

    The author contends that districts should reject binding interest arbitration as a means of resolving an impasse in contract negotiations, charging that it hampers good faith bargaining, adversely affects fiscal and operational management of the school system, and diminishes the governing role of the board of education. (MJL)

  12. The Cultural Bind on the American Male

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenoweth, Gene

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the cultural bind on the American male. The process starts with conception. If the spermatozoid that fertilizes the egg contains only X chromosomes a girl will be produced. If a single Y chromosome out of the 24 produced by the father is included, the baby will be a boy. From this point on the girls have a…

  13. Ada To X-Window Bindings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souleles, Dean

    1993-01-01

    Ada to X-Window Bindings computer program developed to provide Ada programmers with complete interfaces to Xt Intrinsics and OSF Motif toolkits. Provides "Ada view" of some mostly C-language programming libraries. Package of software written in Ada and C languages.

  14. Cross-Modal Binding in Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Manon W.; Branigan, Holly P.; Parra, Mario A.; Logie, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to learn visual-phonological associations is a unique predictor of word reading, and individuals with developmental dyslexia show impaired ability in learning these associations. In this study, we compared developmentally dyslexic and nondyslexic adults on their ability to form cross-modal associations (or "bindings") based…

  15. The Binding Properties of Quechua Suffixes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, David

    This paper sketches an explicitly non-lexicalist application of grammatical theory to Huallaga (Huanuco) Quechua (HgQ). The advantages of applying binding theory to many suffixes that have previously been treated only as objects of the morphology are demonstrated. After an introduction, section 2 outlines basic assumptions about the nature of HgQ…

  16. Universal binding energy relations in metallic adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rose, Smith, and Ferrante have discovered scaling relations which map the adhesive binding energy calculated by Ferrante and Smith onto a single universal binding energy curve. These binding energies are calculated for all combinations of Al(111), Zn(0001), Mg(0001), and Na(110) in contact. The scaling involves normalizing the energy by the maximum binding energy and normalizing distances by a suitable combination of Thomas-Fermi screening lengths. Rose et al. have also found that the calculated cohesive energies of K, Ba, Cu, Mo, and Sm scale by similar simple relations, suggesting the universal relation may be more general than for the simple free electron metals for which it was derived. In addition, the scaling length was defined more generally in order to relate it to measurable physical properties. Further this universality can be extended to chemisorption. A simple and yet quite accurate prediction of a zero temperature equation of state (volume as a function of pressure for metals and alloys) is presented. Thermal expansion coefficients and melting temperatures are predicted by simple, analytic expressions, and results compare favorably with experiment for a broad range of metals.

  17. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressinmore » binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.« less

  18. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  19. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  20. Overlearned responses hinder S-R binding.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Birte; Frings, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Two mechanisms that are important for human action control are the integration of individual action plans (see Hommel, Müsseler, Aschersleben, & Prinz, 2001) and the automatization of overlearned actions to familiar stimuli (see Logan, 1988). In the present study, we analyzed the influence of automatization on action plan integration. Integration with pronunciation responses were compared for response incompatible word and nonword stimuli. Stimulus-response binding effects were observed for nonwords. In contrast, words that automatically triggered an overlearned pronunciation response were not integrated with pronunciation of a different word. That is, automatized response retrieval hindered binding effects regarding the retrieving stimulus and a new response. The results are a first indication of the way that binding and learning processes interact, and might also be a first step to understanding the more complex interdependency of the processes responsible for stimulus-response binding in action control and stimulus-response associations in learning research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. The Double Bind: The next Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcom, Lindsey E.; Malcom, Shirley M.

    2011-01-01

    In this foreword, Shirley Malcom and Lindsey Malcom speak to the history and current status of women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. As the author of the seminal report "The Double Bind: The Price of Being a Minority Woman in Science", Shirley Malcom is uniquely poised to give us an insightful…

  2. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  3. Tension-induced binding of semiflexible biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetatos, Panayotis; von der Heydt, Alice; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the effect of polymer tension on the collective behaviour of reversible cross-links. We use a model of two parallel-aligned, weakly-bending wormlike chains with a regularly spaced sequence of binding sites subjected to a tensile force. Reversible cross-links attach and detach at the binding sites with an affinity controlled by a chemical potential. In a mean-field approach, we calculate the free energy of the system and we show the emergence of a free energy barrier which controls the reversible (un)binding. The tension affects the conformational entropy of the chains which competes with the binding energy of the cross-links. This competition gives rise to a sudden increase in the fraction of bound sites as the polymer tension increases. The force-induced first-order transition in the number of cross-links implies a sudden force-induced stiffening of the effective stretching modulus of the polymers. This mechanism may be relevant to the formation and stress-induced strengthening of stress fibers in the cytoskeleton. We acknowledge support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) via grant SFB-937/A1.

  4. Plant ice-binding (antifreeze) proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proteins that determine the temperature at which ice crystals will form in water-based solutions in cells and tissues, that bind to growing ice crystals, thus affecting their size, and that impact ice re-crystallization have been widely-documented and studied in many plant, bacterial, fungal, insect...

  5. Modeling Conformational Transitions and Energetics of Ligand Binding with the Glutamate Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnikova, Maria

    2009-03-01

    Understanding of protein motion and energetics of conformational transitions is crucial to understanding protein function. The glutamate receptor ligand binding domain (GluR2 S1S2) is a two lobe protein, which binds ligand at the interface of two lobes and undergoes conformational transition. The cleft closure conformational transition of S1S2 has been implicated in gating of the ion channel formed by the transmembrane domain of the receptor. In this study we present a composite multi-faceted theoretical analysis of the detailed mechanism of this conformational transition based on rigid cluster decomposition of the protein structure [1] and identifying hydrogen bonds that are responsible for stabilizing the closed conformation [2]. Free energy of the protein reorganization upon ligand binding was calculated using combined Thermodynamic Integration (TI) and Umbrella Sampling (US) simulations [3]. Ligand -- protein interactions in the binding cleft were analyzed using Molecular Dynamics, continuum electrostatics and QM/MM models [4]. All model calculations compare well with corresponding experimental measurements. [4pt] [1] Protein Flexibility using Constraints from Molecular Dynamics Simulations T. Mamonova, B. Hespenheide, R. Straub, M. F. Thorpe, M. G. Kurnikova , Phys. Biol., 2, S137 (2005)[0pt] [2] Theoretical Study of the Glutamate Receptor Ligand Binding Domain Flexibility and Conformational Reorganization T. Mamonova, K. Speranskiy, and M. Kurnikova , Prot.: Struct., Func., Bioinf., 73,656 (2008)[0pt] [3] Energetics of the cleft closing transition and glutamate binding in the Glutamate Receptor ligand Binding Domain T. Mamonova, M. Yonkunas, and M. Kurnikova Biochemistry 47, 11077 (2008)[0pt] [4] On the Binding Determinants of the Glutamate Agonist with the Glutamate Receptor Ligand Binding Domain K. Speranskiy and M. Kurnikova Biochemistry 44, 11208 (2005)

  6. Neurosteroid binding to the amino terminal and glutamate binding domains of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara; Bartle, Emily; Roark, Ryan; Fanelli, David; Pham, Melissa; Pollard, Beth; Borkowski, Brian; Rhoads, Sarah; Kim, Joon; Rocha, Monica; Kahlson, Martha; Kangala, Melinda; Gentile, Lisa

    2012-06-01

    The endogenous neurosteroids, pregnenolone sulfate (PS) and 3α-hydroxy-5β-pregnan-20-one sulfate (PREGAS), have been shown to differentially regulate the ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) family of ligand-gated ion channels. Upon binding to these receptors, PREGAS decreases current flow through the channels. Upon binding to non-NMDA or NMDA receptors containing an GluN2C or GluN2D subunit, PS also decreases current flow through the channels, however, upon binding to NMDA receptors containing an GluN2A or GluN2B subunit, flow through the channels increases. To begin to understand this differential regulation, we have cloned the S1S2 and amino terminal domains (ATD) of the NMDA GluN2B and GluN2D and AMPA GluA2 subunits. Here we present results that show that PS and PREGAS bind to different sites in the ATD of the GluA2 subunit, which when combined with previous results from our lab, now identifies two binding domains for each neurosteroid. We also show both neurosteroids bind only to the ATD of the GluN2D subunit, suggesting that this binding is distinct from that of the AMPA GluA2 subunit, with both leading to iGluR inhibition. Finally, we provide evidence that both PS and PREGAS bind to the S1S2 domain of the NMDA GluN2B subunit. Neurosteroid binding to the S1S2 domain of NMDA subunits responsible for potentiation of iGluRs and to the ATD of NMDA subunits responsible for inhibition of iGluRs, provides an interesting option for therapeutic design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. On the binding determinants of the glutamate agonist with the glutamate receptor ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Speranskiy, Kirill; Kurnikova, Maria

    2005-08-30

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are ligand-gated membrane channel proteins found in the central neural system that mediate a fast excitatory response of neurons. In this paper, we report theoretical analysis of the ligand-protein interactions in the binding pocket of the S1S2 (ligand binding) domain of the GluR2 receptor in the closed conformation. By utilizing several theoretical methods ranging from continuum electrostatics to all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations, we were able to characterize in detail glutamate agonist binding to the wild-type and E705D mutant proteins. A theoretical model of the protein-ligand interactions is validated via direct comparison of theoretical and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured frequency shifts of the ligand's carboxylate group vibrations [Jayaraman et al. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 8693-8697; Cheng et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 1602-1608]. A detailed picture of the interactions in the binding site is inferred by analyzing contributions to vibrational frequencies produced by protein residues forming the ligand-binding pocket. The role of mobility and hydrogen-bonding network of water in the ligand-binding pocket and the contribution of protein residues exposed in the binding pocket to the binding and selectivity of the ligand are discussed. It is demonstrated that the molecular surface of the protein in the ligand-free state has mainly positive electrostatic potential attractive to the negatively charged ligand, and the potential produced by the protein in the ligand-binding pocket in the closed state is complementary to the distribution of the electrostatic potential produced by the ligand itself. Such charge complementarity ensures specificity to the unique charge distribution of the ligand.

  8. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  9. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J; Hogle, James M

    2016-01-13

    Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Sulfogalactosylglycerolipid is involved in human gamete interaction.

    PubMed

    Weerachatyanukul, W; Rattanachaiyanont, M; Carmona, E; Furimsky, A; Mai, A; Shoushtarian, A; Sirichotiyakul, S; Ballakier, H; Leader, A; Tanphaichitr, N

    2001-12-01

    Recent results from our laboratory have revealed the role of sulfogalactosylglycerolipid (SGG) in mouse sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding. In this report, we demonstrated the presence of SGG in Percoll-gradient centrifuged (PGC) human sperm by high performance thin layer chromatography with orcinol and Azure A staining, specific for glycolipids and sulfolipids, respectively. SGG in human PGC sperm was quantified by its affinity to Azure A to be 12-15 mol% of sperm lipids. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that SGG existed on both live and aldehyde fixed human sperm in the head region. Pretreatment of human PGC sperm with affinity purified antiSGG Fab markedly inhibited sperm binding to the ZP in a concentration dependent manner, without any changes in the spontaneous acrosome rate or sperm motility parameters. Fluorescently labeled SGG liposomes also bound uniformly to isolated human ZP, while fluorescently labeled galactosylglycerolipid (GG, SGG's parental lipid) or phosphatidylserine (PS, negatively charged like SGG) liposomes did not. All of these results suggested the role of human sperm SGG in ZP binding. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. STARD4 Membrane Interactions and Sterol Binding

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain family is defined by a conserved 210-amino acid sequence that folds into an α/β helix-grip structure. Members of this protein family bind a variety of ligands, including cholesterol, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and bile acids, with putative roles in nonvesicular lipid transport, metabolism, and cell signaling. Among the soluble START proteins, STARD4 is expressed in most tissues and has previously been shown to transfer sterol, but the molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction and sterol binding remain unclear. In this work, we use biochemical techniques to characterize regions of STARD4 and determine their role in membrane interaction and sterol binding. Our results show that STARD4 interacts with anionic membranes through a surface-exposed basic patch and that introducing a mutation (L124D) into the Omega-1 (Ω1) loop, which covers the sterol binding pocket, attenuates sterol transfer activity. To gain insight into the attenuating mechanism of the L124D mutation, we conducted structural and biophysical studies of wild-type and L124D STARD4. These studies show that the L124D mutation reduces the conformational flexibility of the protein, resulting in a diminished level of membrane interaction and sterol transfer. These studies also reveal that the C-terminal α-helix, and not the Ω1 loop, partitions into the membrane bilayer. On the basis of these observations, we propose a model of STARD4 membrane interaction and sterol binding and release that requires dynamic movement of both the Ω1 loop and membrane insertion of the C-terminal α-helix. PMID:26168008

  12. Rate Constants and Mechanisms of Protein–Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Whereas protein–ligand binding affinities have long-established prominence, binding rate constants and binding mechanisms have gained increasing attention in recent years. Both new computational methods and new experimental techniques have been developed to characterize the latter properties. It is now realized that binding mechanisms, like binding rate constants, can and should be quantitatively determined. In this review, we summarize studies and synthesize ideas on several topics in the hope of providing a coherent picture of and physical insight into binding kinetics. The topics include microscopic formulation of the kinetic problem and its reduction to simple rate equations; computation of binding rate constants; quantitative determination of binding mechanisms; and elucidation of physical factors that control binding rate constants and mechanisms. PMID:28375732

  13. Metal binding stoichiometry and isotherm choice in biosorption

    SciTech Connect

    Schiewer, S.; Wong, M.H.

    1999-11-01

    Seaweeds that possess a high metal binding capacity may be used as biosorbents for the removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewater. The binding of Cu and Ni by three brown algae (Sargassum, Colpomenia, Petalonia) and one green alga (Ulva) was investigated at pH 4.0 and pH 3.0. The greater binding strength of Cu is reflected in a binding constant that is about 10 times as high as that of Ni. The extent of metal binding followed the order Petalonia {approximately} Sargassum > Colpomenia > Ulva. This was caused by a decreasing number of binding sites and by much lowermore » metal binding constants for Ulva as compared to the brown algae. Three different stoichiometric assumptions are compared for describing the metal binding, which assume either that each metal ion M binds to one binding site B forming a BM complex or that a divalent metal ion M binds to two monovalent sites B forming BM{sub 0.5} or B{sub 2}M complexes, respectively. Stoichiometry plots are proposed as tools to discern the relevant binding stoichiometry. The pH effect in metal binding and the change in proton binding were well predicted for the B{sub 2}M or BM{sub 0.5} stoichiometries with the former being better for Cu and the latter preferable for Ni. Overall, the BM{sub 0.5} model is recommended because it avoids iterations.« less

  14. Structural analysis of ibuprofen binding to human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4).

    PubMed

    González, Javier M; Fisher, S Zoë

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition of human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4) has been proposed as a treatment for type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis. However, FABP4 displays a naturally low selectivity towards hydrophobic ligands, leading to the possibility of side effects arising from cross-inhibition of other FABP isoforms. In a search for structural determinants of ligand-binding selectivity, the binding of FABP4 towards a group of small molecules structurally related to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen was analyzed through X-ray crystallography. Several specific hydrophobic interactions are shown to enhance the binding affinities of these compounds, whereas an aromatic edge-to-face interaction is proposed to determine the conformation of bound ligands, highlighting the importance of aromatic interactions in hydrophobic environments.

  15. Is there a link between selectivity and binding thermodynamics profiles?

    PubMed

    Tarcsay, Ákos; Keserű, György M

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamics of ligand binding is influenced by the interplay between enthalpy and entropy contributions of the binding event. The impact of these binding free energy components, however, is not limited to the primary target only. Here, we investigate the relationship between binding thermodynamics and selectivity profiles by combining publicly available data from broad off-target assay profiling and the corresponding thermodynamics measurements. Our analysis indicates that compounds binding their primary targets with higher entropy contributions tend to hit more off-targets compared with those ligands that demonstrated enthalpy-driven binding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of Ethylene Receptors: Ethylene-Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Binder, Brad M; Schaller, G Eric

    2017-01-01

    Plant ethylene receptors bind ethylene with high affinity. Most of the characterization of ethylene binding to the receptors has been carried out using a radioligand-binding assay on functional receptors expressed in yeast. In this chapter, we describe methods for expressing ethylene receptors in yeast and conducting ethylene-binding assays on intact yeast and yeast membranes. The ethylene-binding assays can be modified to analyze ethylene binding to intact plants and other organisms as well as membranes isolated from any biological source.

  17. Sugar-Binding Profiles of Chitin-Binding Lectins from the Hevein Family: A Comprehensive Study

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Yoko; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Kominami, Junko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Chitin-binding lectins form the hevein family in plants, which are defined by the presence of single or multiple structurally conserved GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine)-binding domains. Although they have been used as probes for chito-oligosaccharides, their detailed specificities remain to be investigated. In this study, we analyzed six chitin-binding lectins, DSA, LEL, PWM, STL, UDA, and WGA, by quantitative frontal affinity chromatography. Some novel features were evident: WGA showed almost comparable affinity for pyridylaminated chitotriose and chitotetraose, while LEL and UDA showed much weaker affinity, and DSA, PWM, and STL had no substantial affinity for the former. WGA showed selective affinity for hybrid-type N-glycans harboring a bisecting GlcNAc residue. UDA showed extensive binding to high-mannose type N-glycans, with affinity increasing with the number of Man residues. DSA showed the highest affinity for highly branched N-glycans consisting of type II LacNAc (N-acetyllactosamine). Further, multivalent features of these lectins were investigated by using glycoconjugate and lectin microarrays. The lectins showed substantial binding to immobilized LacNAc as well as chito-oligosaccharides, although the extents to which they bound varied among them. WGA showed strong binding to heavily sialylated glycoproteins. The above observations will help interpret lectin-glycoprotein interactions in histochemical studies and glyco-biomarker investigations. PMID:28556796

  18. Human sex hormone-binding globulin binding affinities of 125 structurally diverse chemicals and comparison with their binding to androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, and α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Ng, Hui Wen; Moland, Carrie L; Dial, Stacey L; Fang, Hong; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2015-02-01

    One endocrine disruption mechanism is through binding to nuclear receptors such as the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of a chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors, which is regulated by the serum proteins. Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the major transport protein in serum that can bind androgens and estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability to enter the target cells. Sequestration of an androgen or estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical elicited AR- and ER-mediated responses. To better understand the chemical-induced endocrine activity, we developed a competitive binding assay using human pregnancy plasma and measured the binding to the human SHBG for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which were known to bind AR and ER. Eighty seven chemicals were able to bind the human SHBG in the assay, whereas 38 chemicals were nonbinders. Binding data for human SHBG are compared with that for rat α-fetoprotein, ER and AR. Knowing the binding profiles between serum and nuclear receptors will improve assessment of a chemical's potential for endocrine disruption. The SHBG binding data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for human SHBG binding. Utilization of the SHBG binding data with AR and ER binding data could enable better evaluation of endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals through AR- and ER-mediated responses since sequestration in serum could be considered. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Phosphoinositide-binding proteins in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Lystad, Alf Håkon; Simonsen, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Phosphoinositides represent a very small fraction of membrane phospholipids, having fast turnover rates and unique subcellular distributions, which make them perfect for initiating local temporal effects. Seven different phosphoinositide species are generated through reversible phosphorylation of the inositol ring of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns). The negative charge generated by the phosphates provides specificity for interaction with various protein domains that commonly contain a cluster of basic residues. Examples of domains that bind phosphoinositides include PH domains, WD40 repeats, PX domains, and FYVE domains. Such domains often display specificity toward a certain species or subset of phosphoinositides. Here we will review the current literature of different phosphoinositide-binding proteins involved in autophagy. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Direct DNA binding by Brca1.

    PubMed

    Paull, T T; Cortez, D; Bowers, B; Elledge, S J; Gellert, M

    2001-05-22

    The tumor suppressor Brca1 plays an important role in protecting mammalian cells against genomic instability, but little is known about its modes of action. In this work we demonstrate that recombinant human Brca1 protein binds strongly to DNA, an activity conferred by a domain in the center of the Brca1 polypeptide. As a result of this binding, Brca1 inhibits the nucleolytic activities of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, an enzyme implicated in numerous aspects of double-strand break repair. Brca1 displays a preference for branched DNA structures and forms protein-DNA complexes cooperatively between multiple DNA strands, but without DNA sequence specificity. This fundamental property of Brca1 may be an important part of its role in DNA repair and transcription.

  1. Single molecule junction conductance and binding geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetska, Maria

    This Thesis addresses the fundamental problem of controlling transport through a metal-organic interface by studying electronic and mechanical properties of single organic molecule-metal junctions. Using a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) we image, probe energy-level alignment and perform STM-based break junction (BJ) measurements on molecules bound to a gold surface. Using Scanning Tunneling Microscope-based break-junction (STM-BJ) techniques, we explore the effect of binding geometry on single-molecule conductance by varying the structure of the molecules, metal-molecule binding chemistry and by applying sub-nanometer manipulation control to the junction. These experiments are performed both in ambient conditions and in ultra high vacuum (UHV) at cryogenic temperatures. First, using STM imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements we explore binding configurations and electronic properties of an amine-terminated benzene derivative on gold. We find that details of metal-molecule binding affect energy-level alignment at the interface. Next, using the STM-BJ technique, we form and rupture metal-molecule-metal junctions ˜104 times to obtain conductance-vs-extension curves and extract most likely conductance values for each molecule. With these measurements, we demonstrated that the control of junction conductance is possible through a choice of metal-molecule binding chemistry and sub-nanometer positioning. First, we show that molecules terminated with amines, sulfides and phosphines bind selectively on gold and therefore demonstrate constant conductance levels even as the junction is elongated and the metal-molecule attachment point is modified. Such well-defined conductance is also obtained with paracyclophane molecules which bind to gold directly through the pi system. Next, we are able to create metal-molecule-metal junctions with more than one reproducible conductance signatures that can be accessed by changing junction geometry. In the

  2. Penicillin-binding proteins in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Makover, S D; Wright, R; Telep, E

    1981-01-01

    The penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of Haemophilus influenzae were studied by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Eight major PBPs, ranging in molecular weights from 90,000 to 27,000, were detected. The pattern of molecular weights was different from that determined fro Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A study on the binding of several beta-lactam antibodies to the PBPs at their minimal inhibitory concentrations and at lower and higher concentrations revealed that all had highest affinity for PBP 2. Amdinocillin (mecillinam) was an exception; it had highest affinity for PBP 3. The morphological effects of several penicillins, cephalosporins, and amdinocillin on H. influenzae were similar to those reported for E. coli. Images PMID:6972731

  3. Oxygen binding to partially nitrosylated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Fago, Angela; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Hendrich, Michael P; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim; Henkens, Robert; Bonaventura, Celia

    2013-09-01

    Reactions of nitric oxide (NO) with hemoglobin (Hb) are important elements in protection against nitrosative damage. NO in the vasculature is depleted by the oxidative reaction with oxy Hb or by binding to deoxy Hb to generate partially nitrosylated Hb (Hb-NO). Many aspects of the formation and persistence of Hb-NO are yet to be clarified. In this study, we used a combination of EPR and visible absorption spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of partially nitrosylated Hb with O2. Partially nitrosylated Hb samples had predominantly hexacoordinate NO-heme geometry and resisted oxidation when exposed to O2 in the absence of anionic allosteric effectors. Faster oxidation occurred in the presence of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) or inositol hexaphosphate (IHP), where the NO-heme derivatives had higher levels of pentacoordinate heme geometry. The anion-dependence of the NO-heme geometry also affected O2 binding equilibria. O2-binding curves of partially nitrosylated Hb in the absence of anions were left-shifted at low saturations, indicating destabilization of the low O2 affinity T-state of the Hb by increasing percentages of NO-heme, much as occurs with increasing levels of CO-heme. Samples containing IHP showed small decreases in O2 affinity, indicating shifts toward the low-affinity T-state and formation of inert α-NO/β-met tetramers. Most remarkably, O2-equilibria in the presence of the physiological effector DPG were essentially unchanged by up to 30% NO-heme in the samples. As will be discussed, under physiological conditions the interactions of Hb with NO provide protection against nitrosative damage without impairing O2 transport by Hb's unoccupied heme sites. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting protein-binding RNA nucleotides with consideration of binding partners.

    PubMed

    Tuvshinjargal, Narankhuu; Lee, Wook; Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2015-06-01

    In recent years several computational methods have been developed to predict RNA-binding sites in protein. Most of these methods do not consider interacting partners of a protein, so they predict the same RNA-binding sites for a given protein sequence even if the protein binds to different RNAs. Unlike the problem of predicting RNA-binding sites in protein, the problem of predicting protein-binding sites in RNA has received little attention mainly because it is much more difficult and shows a lower accuracy on average. In our previous study, we developed a method that predicts protein-binding nucleotides from an RNA sequence. In an effort to improve the prediction accuracy and usefulness of the previous method, we developed a new method that uses both RNA and protein sequence data. In this study, we identified effective features of RNA and protein molecules and developed a new support vector machine (SVM) model to predict protein-binding nucleotides from RNA and protein sequence data. The new model that used both protein and RNA sequence data achieved a sensitivity of 86.5%, a specificity of 86.2%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 72.6%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 93.8% and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.69 in a 10-fold cross validation; it achieved a sensitivity of 58.8%, a specificity of 87.4%, a PPV of 65.1%, a NPV of 84.2% and MCC of 0.48 in independent testing. For comparative purpose, we built another prediction model that used RNA sequence data alone and ran it on the same dataset. In a 10 fold-cross validation it achieved a sensitivity of 85.7%, a specificity of 80.5%, a PPV of 67.7%, a NPV of 92.2% and MCC of 0.63; in independent testing it achieved a sensitivity of 67.7%, a specificity of 78.8%, a PPV of 57.6%, a NPV of 85.2% and MCC of 0.45. In both cross-validations and independent testing, the new model that used both RNA and protein sequences showed a better performance than the model that used RNA sequence data alone in

  5. Epididymal protein CRISP1 plays different roles during the fertilization process.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Débora J; Maldera, Julieta A; Vasen, Gustavo; Ernesto, Juan I; Muñoz, Mariana Weigel; Battistone, María A; Cuasnicú, Patricia S

    2011-01-01

    Rat epididymal CRISP1, the first described member of the evolutionarily conserved Cysteine-RIch Secretory Protein (CRISP) family, is expressed in the proximal regions of the epididymis and associates with the sperm during epididymal transit. Evidence indicates the existence of 2 populations of CRISP1 in spermatozoa: a major one, loosely bound, which is released during capacitation and, therefore, proposed as a decapacitating factor; and a minor one, strongly associated with spermatozoa that remains on the cells after capacitation and is proposed to participate in gamete interaction. Originally localized to the dorsal region of capacitated sperm, CRISP1 migrates to the equatorial segment with capacitation and acrosome reaction. Consistent with these localizations, in vitro fertilization experiments support the involvement of CRISP1 in the first step of sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) interaction and subsequent gamete fusion through its interaction with egg-complementary sites. The potential roles of CRISP1 in capacitation and fertilization have been further supported by the finding that capacitated spermatozoa from CRISP1 "knockout" animals exhibit low levels of protein tyrosine phosphorylation and have an impaired ability to fertilize zona-intact and zona-free eggs in vitro. Moreover, recent evidence from mutant spermatozoa reveals that CRISP1 mediates the stage of sperm binding to the ZP. Altogether, these observations support the view that CRISP1 is a multifunctional protein playing different roles during fertilization through its different associations with and localizations on spermatozoa. We believe these results contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in both the fertilization process and the acquisition of sperm-fertilizing ability that occurs during epididymal maturation.

  6. Mechanistic events underlying odorant binding protein chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Golebiowski, Jérôme; Antonczak, Serge; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Cabrol-Bass, Daniel

    2007-05-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBP's) are small hydrophilic proteins, belonging to the lipocalin family dedicated to bind and transport small hydrophobic ligands. Despite many works, the mechanism of ligand binding, together with the functional role of these proteins remains a topic of debate and little is known at the atomic level. The present work reports a computational study of odorants capture and release by an OBP, using both constrained and unconstrained simulations, giving a glimpse on the molecular mechanism of chemoreception. The residues at the origin of the regulation of the protein door opening are identified and a tyrosine amino-acid together with other nearby residues appear to play a crucial role in allowing this event to occur. The simulations reveal that this tyrosine and the protein's L5 loop are implicated in the ligand contact with the protein and act as an anchoring point for the ligand. The protein structural features required for the ligand entry are highly conserved among many transport proteins, suggesting that this mechanism could somewhat be extended to some members of the larger family of lipocalin. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Solid-Binding Peptides in Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Care, Andrew; Bergquist, Peter L; Sunna, Anwar

    2017-01-01

    Some peptides are able to bind to inorganic materials such as silica and gold. Over the past decade, Solid-binding peptides (SBPs) have been used increasingly as molecular building blocks in nanobiotechnology. These peptides show selectivity and bind with high affinity to a diverse range of inorganic surfaces e.g. metals, metal oxides, metal compounds, magnetic materials, semiconductors, carbon materials, polymers and minerals. They can be used in applications such as protein purification and synthesis, assembly and the functionalization of nanomaterials. They offer simple and versatile bioconjugation methods that can increase biocompatibility and also direct the immobilization and orientation of nanoscale entities onto solid supports without impeding their functionality. SBPs have been employed in numerous nanobiotechnological applications such as the controlled synthesis of nanomaterials and nanostructures, formation of hybrid biomaterials, immobilization of functional proteins and improved nanomaterial biocompatibility. With advances in nanotechnology, a multitude of novel nanomaterials have been designed and synthesized for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. New approaches have been developed recently to exert a greater control over bioconjugation and eventually, over the optimal and functional display of biomolecules on the surfaces of many types of solid materials. In this chapter we describe SBPs and highlight some selected examples of their potential applications in biomedicine.

  8. Computation of pH-Dependent Binding Free Energies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M. Olivia; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding accompanies changes in the surrounding electrostatic environments of the two binding partners and may lead to changes in protonation upon binding. In cases where the complex formation results in a net transfer of protons, the binding process is pH-dependent. However, conventional free energy computations or molecular docking protocols typically employ fixed protonation states for the titratable groups in both binding partners set a priori, which are identical for the free and bound states. In this review, we draw attention to these important yet largely ignored binding-induced protonation changes in protein-ligand association by outlining physical origins and prevalence of the protonation changes upon binding. Following a summary of various theoretical methods for pKa prediction, we discuss the theoretical framework to examine the pH dependence of protein-ligand binding processes. PMID:26202905

  9. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Jay M.; Cura, Anthony J.; Lloyd, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites—the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis. PMID:25715702

  10. A novel substance P binding site in rat brain regions modulates TRH receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Sharif, N A

    1990-10-01

    Binding sites for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were labelled with [3H](2-Me-His3)TRH ([3H]MeTRH) on membranes from rat brain regions at 0 degrees C for 5 h. Amygdaloid membranes bound [3H]MeTRH with high-affinity (Kd = 3.1 +/- 0.5 nM (n = 4)). Five TRH analogs competed for this binding with the same rank order and with affinities that matched the pharmacological specificity of pituitary TRH receptors. Substance P (SP) and its C-terminal fragments reduced amygdaloid TRH receptor binding in a concentration dependent manner (IC50 for SP = 65 microM). The rank order of potency of SP analogs at inhibiting TRH receptor binding was: SP greater than nonapeptide (3-11) greater than hexapeptide (6-11) greater than heptapeptide (5-11) greater than pentapeptide (7-11). However, other tachykinins were inactive in this system. SP was a potent inhibitor of [3H]MeTRH binding in hippocampus greater than spinal cord greater than retina greater than n. accumbens greater than hypothalamus greater than amygdaloid greater than olfactory bulb greater than or equal to pituitary greater than pons/medulla in parallel assays. In amygdaloid membranes SP (50 microM) reduced the apparent maximum receptor density by 39% (p less than 0.01) without altering the binding affinity, and 100 microM SP induced a biphasic dissociation of [3H]MeTRH with kinetics faster than those induced by both TRH (10 microM) and serotonin (100 microM). In contrast, other neuropeptides such as neurotensin, proctolin, angiotensin II, bombesin and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone did not significantly inhibit [3H]MeTRH binding to amygdaloid membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Fractionating the Binding Process: Neuropsychological Evidence from Reversed Search Efficiencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Glyn W.; Hodsoll, John; Riddoch, M. Jane

    2009-01-01

    The authors present neuropsychological evidence distinguishing binding between form, color, and size (cross-domain binding) and binding between form elements. They contrasted conjunctive search with difficult feature search using control participants and patients with unilateral parietal or fronto/temporal lesions. To rule out effects of task…

  12. Binding of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Features in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecker, Ullrich K. H.; Maybery, Murray; Zimmer, Hubert D.

    2013-01-01

    There is ongoing debate concerning the mechanisms of feature binding in working memory. In particular, there is controversy regarding the extent to which these binding processes are automatic. The present article demonstrates that binding mechanisms differ depending on whether the to-be-integrated features are perceived as forming a coherent…

  13. Function and culture requirements of snow leopard (Panthera uncia) spermatozoa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Roth, T L; Howard, J G; Donoghue, A M; Swanson, W F; Wildt, D E

    1994-08-01

    Electroejaculates from eight snow leopards were used to determine how the motility of spermatozoa was influenced by (i) type of media (Ham's F10, PBS, human tubal fluid or RPMI-1640); (ii) holding temperature (23 degrees C versus 37 degrees C); (iii) washing of spermatozoa and (iv) a sperm metabolic enhancer, pentoxifylline. The duration of sperm motility was assessed by evaluating samples in each treatment every hour for 6 h and a sperm motility index (a value combining percentage sperm motility and rate of forward progression) calculated. Spermatozoa from the Ham's F10, PBS and PBS plus pentoxifylline treatments were also co-incubated with zona-intact, domestic cat eggs that were fixed and evaluated for spermatozoa bound to the zona pellucida, penetrating the outer and inner layers of the zona pellucida and within the perivitelline space. During the 6 h co-incubation, the sperm motility index in PBS with pentoxifylline was greater (P < 0.05) than in PBS alone which, in turn, was greater (P < 0.05) than in the other three test media. Washing the spermatozoa enhanced (P < 0.05) motility in both PBS and PBS plus pentoxifylline relative to unwashed samples, but there was no effect (P > 0.05) of holding temperature. Pentoxifylline supplementation enhanced (P < 0.05) the proportion of cat eggs with bound, but not penetrated, snow leopard spermatozoa in the inner layer of the zona pellucida, and there were no spermatozoa in the perivitelline space.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Isolation from genomic DNA of sequences binding specific regulatory proteins by the acceleration of protein electrophoretic mobility upon DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, S; Cronan, J E

    1999-01-21

    We report an efficient and flexible in vitro method for the isolation of genomic DNA sequences that are the binding targets of a given DNA binding protein. This method takes advantage of the fact that binding of a protein to a DNA molecule generally increases the rate of migration of the protein in nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. By the use of a radioactively labeled DNA-binding protein and nonradioactive DNA coupled with PCR amplification from gel slices, we show that specific binding sites can be isolated from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. We have applied this method to isolate a binding site for FadR, a global regulator of fatty acid metabolism in E. coli. We have also isolated a second binding site for BirA, the biotin operon repressor/biotin ligase, from the E. coli genome that has a very low binding efficiency compared with the bio operator region.

  15. MODELING THE BINDING OF THE METABOLITES OF SOME POLYCYCLIC AROMTIC HYDROCARBONS TO THE LIGAND BINDING DOMAIN OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the binding of the metabolites of some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor
    James Rabinowitz, Stephen Little, Katrina Brown, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC; Un...

  16. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was foundmore » to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.« less

  17. Unusual binding of ursodeoxycholic acid to ileal bile acid binding protein: role in activation of FXRα.

    PubMed

    Fang, Changming; Filipp, Fabian V; Smith, Jeffrey W

    2012-04-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, ursodiol) is used to prevent damage to the liver in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The drug also prevents the progression of colorectal cancer and the recurrence of high-grade colonic dysplasia. However, the molecular mechanism by which UDCA elicits its beneficial effects is not entirely understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) has a role in mediating the effects of UDCA. We find that UDCA binds to a single site on IBABP and increases the affinity for major human bile acids at a second binding site. As UDCA occupies one of the bile acid binding sites on IBABP, it reduces the cooperative binding that is often observed for the major human bile acids. Furthermore, IBABP is necessary for the full activation of farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα) by bile acids, including UDCA. These observations suggest that IBABP may have a role in mediating some of the intestinal effects of UDCA.

  18. Human mRNA polyadenylate binding protein: evolutionary conservation of a nucleic acid binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Grange, T; de Sa, C M; Oddos, J; Pictet, R

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated a full length cDNA (cDNA) coding for the human poly(A) binding protein. The cDNA derived 73 kd basic translation product has the same Mr, isoelectric point and peptidic map as the poly(A) binding protein. DNA sequence analysis reveals a 70,244 dalton protein. The N terminal part, highly homologous to the yeast poly(A) binding protein, is sufficient for poly(A) binding activity. This domain consists of a four-fold repeated unit of approximately 80 amino acids present in other nucleic acid binding proteins. In the C terminal part there is, as in the yeast protein, a sequence of approximately 150 amino acids, rich in proline, alanine and glutamine which together account for 48% of the residues. A 2,9 kb mRNA corresponding to this cDNA has been detected in several vertebrate cell types and in Drosophila melanogaster at every developmental stage including oogenesis. Images PMID:2885805

  19. Behind the scenes of vitamin D binding protein: more than vitamin D binding.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Speeckaert, Marijn M

    2015-10-01

    Although being discovered in 1959, the number of published papers in recent years reveals that vitamin D binding protein (DBP), a member of the albuminoid superfamily, is a hot research topic. Besides the three major phenotypes (DBP1F, DBP1S and DBP2), more than 120 unique variants have been described of this polymorphic protein. The presence of DBP has been demonstrated in different body fluids (serum, urine, breast milk, ascitic fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva and seminal fluid) and organs (brain, heart, lungs, kidneys, placenta, spleen, testes and uterus). Although the major function is binding, solubilization and transport of vitamin D and its metabolites, the name of this glycoprotein hides numerous other important biological functions. In this review, we will focus on the analytical aspects of the determination of DBP and discuss in detail the multifunctional capacity [actin scavenging, binding of fatty acids, chemotaxis, binding of endotoxins, influence on T cell response and influence of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) on bone metabolism and cancer] of this abundant plasma protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative in vivo receptor binding. III. Tracer kinetic modeling of muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.A.; Hichwa, R.D.; Ehrenkaufer, R.L.

    1985-10-01

    A tracer kinetic method is developed for the in vivo estimation of high-affinity radioligand binding to central nervous system receptors. Ligand is considered to exist in three brain pools corresponding to free, nonspecifically bound, and specifically bound tracer. These environments, in addition to that of intravascular tracer, are interrelated by a compartmental model of in vivo ligand distribution. A mathematical description of the model is derived, which allows determination of regional blood-brain barrier permeability, nonspecific binding, the rate of receptor-ligand association, and the rate of dissociation of bound ligand, from the time courses of arterial blood and tissue tracer concentrations.more » The term ''free receptor density'' is introduced to describe the receptor population measured by this method. The technique is applied to the in vivo determination of regional muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the rat, with the use of (TH)scopolamine. Kinetic estimates of free muscarinic receptor density are in general agreement with binding capacities obtained from previous in vivo and in vitro equilibrium binding studies. In the striatum, however, kinetic estimates of free receptor density are less than those in the neocortex--a reversal of the rank ordering of these regions derived from equilibrium determinations. A simplified model is presented that is applicable to tracers that do not readily dissociate from specific binding sites during the experimental period.« less

  1. Nickel binding to NikA: an additional binding site reconciles spectroscopy, calorimetry and crystallography.

    PubMed

    Addy, Christine; Ohara, Masato; Kawai, Fumihiro; Kidera, Akinori; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Fuchigami, Sotaro; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H; Heddle, Jonathan G

    2007-02-01

    Intracellular nickel is required by Escherichia coli as a cofactor for a number of enzymes and is necessary for anaerobic respiration. However, high concentrations of nickel are toxic, so both import and export systems have evolved to control the cellular level of the metal. The nik operon in E. coli encodes a nickel-uptake system that includes the periplasmic nickel-binding protein NikA. The crystal structures of wild-type NikA both bound to nickel and in the apo form have been solved previously. The liganded structure appeared to show an unusual interaction between the nickel and the protein in which no direct bonds are formed. The highly unusual nickel coordination suggested by the crystal structure contrasted strongly with earlier X-ray spectroscopic studies. The known nickel-binding site has been probed by extensive mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry and it has been found that even large numbers of disruptive mutations appear to have little effect on the nickel affinity. The crystal structure of a binding-site mutant with nickel bound has been solved and it is found that nickel is bound to two histidine residues at a position distant from the previously characterized binding site. This novel site immediately resolves the conflict between the crystal structures and other biophysical analyses. The physiological relevance of the two binding sites is discussed.

  2. Substrate-Triggered Exosite Binding: Synergistic Dendrimer/Folic Acid Action for Achieving Specific, Tight-Binding to Folate Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junjie; van Dongen, Mallory A; Merzel, Rachel L; Dougherty, Casey A; Orr, Bradford G; Kanduluru, Ananda Kumar; Low, Philip S; Marsh, E Neil G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2016-03-14

    Polymer-ligand conjugates are designed to bind proteins for applications as drugs, imaging agents, and transport scaffolds. In this work, we demonstrate a folic acid (FA)-triggered exosite binding of a generation five poly(amidoamine) (G5 PAMAM) dendrimer scaffold to bovine folate binding protein (bFBP). The protein exosite is a secondary binding site on the protein surface, separate from the FA binding pocket, to which the dendrimer binds. Exosite binding is required to achieve the greatly enhanced binding constants and protein structural change observed in this study. The G5Ac-COG-FA1.0 conjugate bound tightly to bFBP, was not displaced by a 28-fold excess of FA, and quenched roughly 80% of the initial fluorescence. Two-step binding kinetics were measured using the intrinsic fluorescence of the FBP tryptophan residues to give a KD in the low nanomolar range for formation of the initial G5Ac-COG-FA1.0/FBP* complex, and a slow conversion to the tight complex formed between the dendrimer and the FBP exosite. The extent of quenching was sensitive to the choice of FA-dendrimer linker chemistry. Direct amide conjugation of FA to G5-PAMAM resulted in roughly 50% fluorescence quenching of the FBP. The G5Ac-COG-FA, which has a longer linker containing a 1,2,3-triazole ring, exhibited an ∼80% fluorescence quenching. The binding of the G5Ac-COG-FA1.0 conjugate was compared to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugates of FA (PEGn-FA). PEG2k-FA had a binding strength similar to that of FA, whereas other PEG conjugates with higher molecular weight showed weaker binding. However, no PEG conjugates gave an increased degree of total fluorescence quenching.

  3. Spatial Analysis and Quantification of the Thermodynamic Driving Forces in Protein-Ligand Binding: Binding Site Variability

    PubMed Central

    Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provides an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both non-polar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the “hydrophobic effect”. Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. Notable is the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  4. LHRH-pituitary plasma membrane binding: the presence of specific binding sites in other tissues.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J C; Shakespear, R A; Odell, W D

    1976-11-01

    Two specific binding sites for LHRH are present on plasma membranes prepared from rat and bovine anterior pituitary glands. One site is of high affinity (K = 2X108 1/MOL) and the second is of lower affinity (8-5X105 1/mol) and much greater capacity. Studies on membrane fractions prepared from other tissues showed the presence of a single specific site for LHRH. The kinetics and specificity of this site were similar to those of the lower affinity pituitary receptor. These results indicate that only pituitary membranes possess the higher affinity binding site and suggest that the low affinity site is not of physiological importance in the regulation of gonadotrophin secretion. After dissociation from membranes of non-pituitary tissues 125I-LHRH rebound to pituitary membrane preparations. Thus receptor binding per se does not result in degradation of LHRH and the function of these peripheral receptors remains obscure.

  5. Periplasmic Binding Protein Dimer Has a Second Allosteric Event Tied to Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Le; Ghimire-Rijal, Sudipa; Lucas, Sarah L.

    Here, the ligand-induced conformational changes of periplasmic binding proteins (PBP) play a key role in the acquisition of metabolites in ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport systems. This conformational change allows for differential recognition of the ligand occupancy of the PBP by the ABC transporter. This minimizes futile ATP hydrolysis in the transporter, a phenomenon in which ATP hydrolysis is not coupled to metabolite transport. In many systems, the PBP conformational change is insufficient at eliminating futile ATP hydrolysis. Here we identify an additional state of the PBP that is also allosterically regulated by the ligand. Ligand binding to the homodimericmore » apo PBP leads to a tightening of the interface alpha-helices so that the hydrogen bonding pattern shifts to that of a 3 10 helix, in-turn altering the contacts and the dynamics of the protein interface so that the monomer exists in the presence of ligand.« less

  6. Periplasmic Binding Protein Dimer Has a Second Allosteric Event Tied to Ligand Binding

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Le; Ghimire-Rijal, Sudipa; Lucas, Sarah L.; ...

    2017-09-06

    Here, the ligand-induced conformational changes of periplasmic binding proteins (PBP) play a key role in the acquisition of metabolites in ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport systems. This conformational change allows for differential recognition of the ligand occupancy of the PBP by the ABC transporter. This minimizes futile ATP hydrolysis in the transporter, a phenomenon in which ATP hydrolysis is not coupled to metabolite transport. In many systems, the PBP conformational change is insufficient at eliminating futile ATP hydrolysis. Here we identify an additional state of the PBP that is also allosterically regulated by the ligand. Ligand binding to the homodimericmore » apo PBP leads to a tightening of the interface alpha-helices so that the hydrogen bonding pattern shifts to that of a 3 10 helix, in-turn altering the contacts and the dynamics of the protein interface so that the monomer exists in the presence of ligand.« less

  7. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  8. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  9. Selective Activation of Transcription by a Novel CCAAT Binding Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sankar N.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Karsenty, Gerard; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    1988-07-01

    A novel CCAAT binding factor (CBF) composed of two different subunits has been extensively purified from rat liver. Both subunits are needed for specific binding to DNA. Addition of this purified protein to nuclear extracts of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stimulates transcription from several promoters including the α 2(I) collagen, the α 1(I) collagen, the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (RSV-LTR), and the adenovirus major late promoter. Point mutations in the CCAAT motif that show either no binding or a decreased binding of CBF likewise abolish or reduce activation of transcription by CBF. Activation of transcription requires, therefore, the specific binding of CBF to its recognition sites.

  10. How Arousal Affects Younger and Older Adults' Memory Binding

    PubMed Central

    Nashiro, Kaoru; Mather, Mara

    2009-01-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that associative memory for within-item features is enhanced for emotionally arousing items, whereas arousal-enhanced binding is not seen for associations between distinct items (for a review see Mather, 2007). The costs and benefits of arousal in memory binding have been examined for younger adults but not for older adults. The present experiment examined whether arousal would enhance younger and older adults' within-item and between-item memory binding. The results revealed that arousal improved younger adults' within-item memory binding but not that of older adults. Arousal worsened both groups' between-item memory binding. PMID:21240821

  11. Probing the binding of flavonoids to catalase by molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingfeng; Zhang, Xia; Li, Daojin; Jin, Jing

    2007-10-01

    The binding of flavonoids (quercetin and myricetin) to catalase was investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) techniques under physiological conditions. The binding parameters and binding mode between flavonoids and catalase were determined, and the results of synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD indicated a conformational change of catalase with addition of flavonoids. The effect of both Cu 2+ and vitamin C on the binding constant of flavonoid-catalase was also examined. The experiment data show that the difference of the structure characteristics of quercetin and myricetin has a significant effect on their binding affinity for catalase.

  12. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  13. Calcium binding to Procambarus clarkii sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein splice variants.

    PubMed

    Rohrback, Suzanne E; Wheatly, Michele G; Gillen, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein (SCP) is a high-affinity calcium buffering protein expressed in muscle of crayfish and other invertebrates. In previous work, we identified three splice variants of Procambarus clarkii SCP (pcSCP1a, pcSCP1b, and pcSCP1c) that differ in a 37 amino acid region that lies mainly between the 2nd and 3ed EF-hand calcium binding domain. To evaluate the function of the proteins encoded by the pcSCP1 transcripts, we produced recombinant pcSCP1 and used tryptophan fluorescence to characterize calcium binding. Tryptophan fluorescence of pcSCP1a decreased in response to increased calcium, while tryptophan fluorescence of the pcSCP1b and pcSCP1c variants increased. We estimated calcium binding constants and Hill coefficients with two different equations: the standard Hill equation and a modified Hill equation that accounts for contributions from two different tryptophans. The approaches gave similar results. Steady-state calcium binding constants (Kd) ranged from 2.7±0.7×10(-8)M to 5.6±0.1×10(-7)M, consistent with previous work. Variants displayed significantly different apparent calcium affinities, which were decreased in the presence of magnesium. Calcium Kd was lowest for pcSCP1a and highest for pcSCP1c. Site-directed mutagenesis of pcSCP1c residues to the amino acids of pcSCP1b decreased the calcium Kd, identifying residues outside the EF-hand domains that contribute to calcium binding in crayfish SCP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Protein-Binding RNA Aptamers Affect Molecular Interactions Distantly from Their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A.; Behrens, Manja A.; Dam, Karen; Sørensen, Hans P.; Pedersen, Jan S.; Ploug, Michael; Jensen, Jan K.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site. PMID:25793507

  15. Structural basis for PECAM-1 homophilic binding

    SciTech Connect

    Paddock, C.; Zhou, D.; Lertkiatmongkol, P.

    2015-12-23

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily (IgSF) that is present on the surface of circulating platelets and leukocytes, and highly expressed at the junctions of confluent endothelial cell monolayers. PECAM-1–mediated homophilic interactions, known to be mediated by its 2 amino-terminal immunoglobulin homology domains, are essential for concentrating PECAM-1 at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions to facilitate diapedesis, maintain vascular integrity, and transmit survival signals into the cell. Given the importance of PECAM-1–mediated homophilic interactions in mediating each of these cell physiological events, and to reveal the nature and orientationmore » of the PECAM-1–PECAM-1 homophilic-binding interface, we undertook studies aimed at determining the crystal structure of the PECAM-1 homophilic-binding domain, which is composed of amino-terminal immunoglobulin homology domains 1 and 2 (IgD1 and IgD2). The crystal structure revealed that both IgD1 and IgD2 exhibit a classical IgSF fold, having a β-sandwich topology formed by 2 sheets of antiparallel β strands stabilized by the hallmark disulfide bond between the B and F strands. Interestingly, despite previous assignment to the C2 class of immunoglobulin-like domains, the structure of IgD1 reveals that it actually belongs to the I2 set of IgSF folds. Both IgD1 and IgD2 participate importantly in the formation of the trans homophilic-binding interface, with a total buried interface area of >2300 Å 2. These and other unique structural features of PECAM-1 allow for the development of an atomic-level model of the interactions that PECAM-1 forms during assembly of endothelial cell intercellular junctions.« less

  16. A Crayfish Insulin-like-binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Ohad; Weil, Simy; Manor, Rivka; Roth, Ziv; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Across the animal kingdom, the involvement of insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling in sex-related differentiation processes is attracting increasing attention. Recently, a gender-specific ILP was identified as the androgenic sex hormone in Crustacea. However, moieties modulating the actions of this androgenic insulin-like growth factor were yet to be revealed. Through molecular screening of an androgenic gland (AG) cDNA library prepared from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, we have identified a novel insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) termed Cq-IGFBP. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the deduced Cq-IGFBP was shown to share high sequence homology with IGFBP family members from both invertebrates and vertebrates. The protein also includes a sequence determinant proven crucial for ligand binding, which according to three-dimensional modeling is assigned to the exposed outer surface of the protein. Recombinant Cq-IGFBP (rCq-IGFBP) protein was produced and, using a “pulldown” methodology, was shown to specifically interact with the insulin-like AG hormone of the crayfish (Cq-IAG). Particularly, using both mass spectral analysis and an immunological tool, rCq-IGFBP was shown to bind the Cq-IAG prohormone. Furthermore, a peptide corresponding to residues 23–38 of the Cq-IAG A-chain was found sufficient for in vitro recognition by rCq-IGFBP. Cq-IGFBP is the first IGFBP family member shown to specifically interact with a gender-specific ILP. Unlike their ILP ligands, IGFBPs are highly conserved across evolution, from ancient arthropods, like crustaceans, to humans. Such conservation places ILP signaling at the center of sex-related phenomena in early animal development. PMID:23775079

  17. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  18. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  19. RNA Helicases at work: binding and rearranging

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2010-01-01

    RNA helicases are ubiquitous, highly conserved enzymes that participate in nearly all aspects of RNA metabolism. These proteins bind or remodel RNA or RNA–protein complexes in an ATP-dependent fashion. How RNA helicases physically perform their cellular tasks has been a longstanding question, but in recent years, intriguing models have started to link structure, mechanism and biological function for some RNA helicases. This review outlines our current view on major structural and mechanistic themes of RNA helicase function, and on emerging physical models for cellular roles of these enzymes. PMID:20813532

  20. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  1. Zinc binding groups for histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Qixiao; Zhang, Li; Song, Weiguo

    2018-12-01

    Zinc binding groups (ZBGs) play a crucial role in targeting histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) to the active site of histone deacetylases (HDACs), thus determining the potency of HDACIs. Due to the high affinity to the zinc ion, hydroxamic acid is the most commonly used ZBG in the structure of HDACs. An alternative ZBG is benzamide group, which features excellent inhibitory selectivity for class I HDACs. Various ZBGs have been designed and tested to improve the activity and selectivity of HDACIs, and to overcome the pharmacokinetic limitations of current HDACIs. Herein, different kinds of ZBGs are reviewed and their features have been discussed for further design of HDACIs.

  2. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  3. Energetics of Glutamate Binding to an Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Alvin; Lau, Albert Y

    2017-11-22

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that are responsible for the majority of excitatory transmission at the synaptic cleft. Mechanically speaking, agonist binding to the ligand binding domain (LBD) activates the receptor by triggering a conformational change that is transmitted to the transmembrane region, opening the ion channel pore. We use fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the binding process in the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor, an iGluR subtype. The string method with swarms of trajectories was applied to calculate the possible pathways glutamate traverses during ligand binding. Residues peripheral to the binding cleft are found to metastably bind the ligand prior to ligand entry into the binding pocket. Umbrella sampling simulations were performed to compute the free energy barriers along the binding pathways. The calculated free energy profiles demonstrate that metastable interactions contribute substantially to the energetics of ligand binding and form local minima in the overall free energy landscape. Protein-ligand interactions at sites outside of the orthosteric agonist-binding site may serve to lower the transition barriers of the binding process.

  4. Prophase I Mouse Oocytes Are Deficient in the Ability to Respond to Fertilization by Decreasing Membrane Receptivity to Sperm and Establishing a Membrane Block to Polyspermy1

    PubMed Central

    Kryzak, Cassie A.; Moraine, Maia M.; Kyle, Diane D.; Lee, Hyo J.; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Robinson, Douglas N.; Evans, Janice P.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Changes occurring as the prophase I oocyte matures to metaphase II are critical for the acquisition of competence for normal egg activation and early embryogenesis. A prophase I oocyte cannot respond to a fertilizing sperm as a metaphase II egg does, including the ability to prevent polyspermic fertilization. Studies here demonstrate that the competence for the membrane block to polyspermy is deficient in prophase I mouse oocytes. In vitro fertilization experiments using identical insemination conditions result in monospermy in 87% of zona pellucida (ZP)-free metaphase II eggs, while 92% of ZP-free prophase I oocytes have four or more fused sperm. The membrane block is associated with a postfertilization reduction in the capacity to support sperm binding, but this reduction in sperm-binding capacity is both less robust and slower to develop in fertilized prophase I oocytes. Fertilization of oocytes is dependent on the tetraspanin CD9, but little to no release of CD9 from the oocyte membrane is detected, suggesting that release of CD9-containing vesicles is not essential for fertilization. The deficiency in membrane block establishment in prophase I oocytes correlates with abnormalities in two postfertilization cytoskeletal changes: sperm-induced cortical remodeling that results in fertilization cone formation and a postfertilization increase in effective cortical tension. These data indicate that cortical maturation is a component of cytoplasmic maturation during the oocyte-to-egg transition and that the egg cortex has to be appropriately primed and tuned to be responsive to a fertilizing sperm. PMID:23863404

  5. Low physiological levels of prostaglandins E2 and F2α improve human sperm functions.

    PubMed

    Rios, Mariana; Carreño, Daniela V; Oses, Carolina; Barrera, Nelson; Kerr, Bredford; Villalón, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) have been reported to be present in the seminal fluid and cervical mucus, affecting different stages of sperm maturation from spermatogenesis to the acrosome reaction. This study assessed the effects of low physiological PGE2 and PGF2α concentrations on human sperm motility and on the ability of the spermatozoa to bind to the zona pellucida (ZP). Human spermatozoa were isolated from seminal samples with normal concentration and motility parameters and incubated with 1μM PGE2, 1μM PGF2α or control solution to determine sperm motility and the ability to bind to human ZP. The effects of both PGs on intracellular calcium levels were determined. Incubation for 2 or 18h with PGE2 or PGF2α resulted in a significant (P<0.05) increase in the percentage of spermatozoa with progressive motility. In contrast with PGF2α, PGE2 alone induced an increase in sperm intracellular calcium levels; however, the percentage of sperm bound to the human ZP was doubled for both PGs. These results indicate that incubation of human spermatozoa with low physiological levels of PGE2 or PGF2α increases sperm functions and could improve conditions for assisted reproduction protocols.

  6. Pyrrole-Based Macrocyclic Small-Molecule Inhibitors That Target Oocyte Maturation.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Pethaiah; Lee, So-Rim; Jeong, Seung-Min; Kwon, Jeong-Woo; Takei, Toshiki; Asahina, Yuya; Bang, Geul; Kim, Seongnyeon; Ahn, Mija; Ryu, Eun Kyung; Kim, Hak Nam; Nam, Ki-Yub; Shin, Song Yub; Hojo, Hironobu; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Bang, Jeong Kyu

    2017-04-20

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) plays crucial roles in various stages of oocyte maturation. Recently, we reported that the peptidomimetic compound AB103-8, which targets the polo box domain (PBD) of PLK1, affects oocyte meiotic maturation and the resumption of meiosis. However, to overcome the drawbacks of peptidic compounds, we designed and synthesized a series of pyrrole-based small-molecule inhibitors and tested them for their effects on the rates of porcine oocyte maturation. Among them, the macrocyclic compound (E/Z)-3-(2,16-dioxo-19-(4-phenylbutyl)-3,19-diazabicyclo[15.2.1]icosa-1(20),6,17-trien-3-yl)propyl dihydrogen phosphate (4) showed the highest inhibitory activity with enhanced inhibition against embryonic blastocyst formation. Furthermore, the addition of this compound to culture media efficiently blocked the maturation of porcine and mouse oocytes, indicating its ability to penetrate the zona pellucida and cell membrane. We investigated mouse oocytes treated with compound 4, and the resulting impairment of spindle formation confirmed PLK1 inhibition. Finally, molecular modeling studies with PLK1 PBD also confirmed the presence of significant interactions between compound 4 and PLK1 PBD binding pocket residues, including those in the phosphate, tyrosine-rich, and pyrrolidine binding pockets. Collectively, these results suggest that the macrocyclic compound 4 may serve as a promising template for the development of novel contraceptive agents. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effects of advanced selection methods on sperm quality and ART outcome.

    PubMed

    Yetunde, I; Vasiliki, M

    2013-10-01

    In assisted reproductive technology (ART), the role of spermatozoa has evolved over the years. In the past, early methods of selecting sperm for ART only focused on selecting motile and morphologically normal appearing sperm. It has become evident that these methods are inefficient in identifying the most suitable sperm for fertilization. Novel methods have thus been created to identify highly motile, morphologically normal, viable non-apoptotic spermatozoa with intact membranes and high DNA integrity for use in ART. These advanced methods of selection utilize our knowledge of unique characteristics of sperm, such as sperm surface charge, the presence of hyaluronic acid binding sites on sperm, sperm ultramorphology, markers of apoptosis and zona pellucida binding on sperm. These methods have shown potential promise in improving ART outcomes. Future developments may include Raman spectroscopy, confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy, and polarization microscopy. While these novel techniques have potential, they come with a cost burden and further studies are required to demonstrate their impact on ART outcomes. Furthermore, clinicians and human reproductive scientists need to continue to gather knowledge about human fertilization and determine the most physiological methods of sperm selection.

  8. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  9. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to human vitamin D-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, E A; Dame, M C; Bouillon, R; Van Baelen, H; DeLuca, H F

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to vitamin D-binding protein isolated from human serum have been produced. The antibodies obtained have been shown to be specific for human vitamin D-binding protein by three independent assays. The antibodies recognize human vitamin D-binding protein specifically in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Human vitamin D-binding protein is detected specifically in both pure and crude samples by a radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) and by an immunoprecipitation assay. The anti-human vitamin D-binding protein antibodies cross-react with monkey and pig vitamin D-binding protein, but not with vitamin D-binding protein from rat, mouse, or chicken, as determined by the RISA and immunoprecipitation assays. Images PMID:3936035

  11. Autoradiographic localization of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.D.; Springall, D.R.; Wharton, J.

    Autoradiographic techniques and {sup 125}I-labeled endothelin-1 were used to study the distribution of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin. Specific endothelin-1 binding sites were localized to blood vessels (capillaries, deep cutaneous vascular plexus, arteries, and arterioles), the deep dermal and connective tissue sheath of hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, and arrector pili muscle. Specific binding was inhibited by endothelin-2 and endothelin-3 as well as endothelin-1. Non-specific binding was found in the epidermis and the medulla of hair follicles. No binding was found in connective tissue or fat. These vascular binding sites may represent endothelin receptors, in keeping with themore » known cutaneous vasoconstrictor actions of the peptide. If all binding sites are receptors, the results suggest that endothelin could also regulate the function of sweat glands and may have trophic effects in the skin.« less

  12. Lost time: Bindings do not represent temporal order information.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Birte; Frings, Christian

    2018-06-04

    Many accounts of human action control assume bindings between features of stimuli and responses of individual events. One widely accepted assumption about these bindings is that they do not contain temporal-order representations regarding the integrated elements. Even though several theories either explicitly or implicitly include it, this assumption has never been tested directly. One reason for this lack of evidence is likely that typical stimulus-response binding paradigms are inapt for such a test. Adapting a new paradigm of response-response binding to include order switches between response integration and retrieval, we were able to analyze possible representation of order information in bindings for the first time. Binding effects were identical for intact and switched response orders, indicating that bindings indeed include no temporal-order information.

  13. Binding of Diphtheria Toxin to Phospholipids in Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alving, Carl R.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Urban, Katharine A.; Moss, Joel; Richards, Roberta L.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1980-04-01

    Diphtheria toxin bound to the phosphate portion of some, but not all, phospholipids in liposomes. Liposomes consisting of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not bind toxin. Addition of 20 mol% (compared to dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine) of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid, dicetyl phosphate, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, cardiolipin, or phosphatidylserine in the liposomes resulted in substantial binding of toxin. Inclusion of phosphatidylinositol in dimyristol phosphatidylcholine / cholesterol liposomes did not result in toxin binding. The calcium salt of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was more effective than the sodium salt, and the highest level of binding occurred with liposomes consisting only of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (calcium salt) and cholesterol. Binding of toxin to liposomes was dependent on pH, and the pattern of pH dependence varied with liposomes having different compositions. Incubation of diphtheria toxin with liposomes containing dicetyl phosphate resulted in maximal binding at pH 3.6, whereas binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphate was maximal above pH 7. Toxin did not bind to liposomes containing 20 mol% of a free fatty acid (palmitic acid) or a sulfated lipid (3-sulfogalactosylceramide). Toxin binding to dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidylinositol phosphate was inhibited by UTP, ATP, phosphocholine, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not by uracil. We conclude that (a) diphtheria toxin binds specifically to the phosphate portion of certain phospholipids, (b) binding to phospholipids in liposomes is dependent on pH, but is not due only to electrostatic interaction, and (c) binding may be strongly influenced by the composition of adjacent phospholipids that do not bind toxin. We propose that a minor membrane phospholipid (such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate or phosphatidic acid), or that some other phosphorylated membrane molecule (such as a phosphoprotein) may be important in the initial binding of

  14. Knowledge-based Fragment Binding Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Grace W.; Altman, Russ B.

    2014-01-01

    Target-based drug discovery must assess many drug-like compounds for potential activity. Focusing on low-molecular-weight compounds (fragments) can dramatically reduce the chemical search space. However, approaches for determining protein-fragment interactions have limitations. Experimental assays are time-consuming, expensive, and not always applicable. At the same time, computational approaches using physics-based methods have limited accuracy. With increasing high-resolution structural data for protein-ligand complexes, there is now an opportunity for data-driven approaches to fragment binding prediction. We present FragFEATURE, a machine learning approach to predict small molecule fragments preferred by a target protein structure. We first create a knowledge base of protein structural environments annotated with the small molecule substructures they bind. These substructures have low-molecular weight and serve as a proxy for fragments. FragFEATURE then compares the structural environments within a target protein to those in the knowledge base to retrieve statistically preferred fragments. It merges information across diverse ligands with shared substructures to generate predictions. Our results demonstrate FragFEATURE's ability to rediscover fragments corresponding to the ligand bound with 74% precision and 82% recall on average. For many protein targets, it identifies high scoring fragments that are substructures of known inhibitors. FragFEATURE thus predicts fragments that can serve as inputs to fragment-based drug design or serve as refinement criteria for creating target-specific compound libraries for experimental or computational screening. PMID:24762971

  15. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of themore » enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.« less

  16. Genuine binding energy of the hydrated electron

    PubMed Central

    Luckhaus, David; Yamamoto, Yo-ichi; Suzuki, Toshinori; Signorell, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    The unknown influence of inelastic and elastic scattering of slow electrons in water has made it difficult to clarify the role of the solvated electron in radiation chemistry and biology. We combine accurate scattering simulations with experimental photoemission spectroscopy of the hydrated electron in a liquid water microjet, with the aim of resolving ambiguities regarding the influence of electron scattering on binding energy spectra, photoelectron angular distributions, and probing depths. The scattering parameters used in the simulations are retrieved from independent photoemission experiments of water droplets. For the ground-state hydrated electron, we report genuine values devoid of scattering contributions for the vertical binding energy and the anisotropy parameter of 3.7 ± 0.1 eV and 0.6 ± 0.2, respectively. Our probing depths suggest that even vacuum ultraviolet probing is not particularly surface-selective. Our work demonstrates the importance of quantitative scattering simulations for a detailed analysis of key properties of the hydrated electron. PMID:28508051

  17. Knowledge-based fragment binding prediction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace W; Altman, Russ B

    2014-04-01

    Target-based drug discovery must assess many drug-like compounds for potential activity. Focusing on low-molecular-weight compounds (fragments) can dramatically reduce the chemical search space. However, approaches for determining protein-fragment interactions have limitations. Experimental assays are time-consuming, expensive, and not always applicable. At the same time, computational approaches using physics-based methods have limited accuracy. With increasing high-resolution structural data for protein-ligand complexes, there is now an opportunity for data-driven approaches to fragment binding prediction. We present FragFEATURE, a machine learning approach to predict small molecule fragments preferred by a target protein structure. We first create a knowledge base of protein structural environments annotated with the small molecule substructures they bind. These substructures have low-molecular weight and serve as a proxy for fragments. FragFEATURE then compares the structural environments within a target protein to those in the knowledge base to retrieve statistically preferred fragments. It merges information across diverse ligands with shared substructures to generate predictions. Our results demonstrate FragFEATURE's ability to rediscover fragments corresponding to the ligand bound with 74% precision and 82% recall on average. For many protein targets, it identifies high scoring fragments that are substructures of known inhibitors. FragFEATURE thus predicts fragments that can serve as inputs to fragment-based drug design or serve as refinement criteria for creating target-specific compound libraries for experimental or computational screening.

  18. Ice-Binding Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bredow, Melissa; Walker, Virginia K.

    2017-01-01

    Sub-zero temperatures put plants at risk of damage associated with the formation of ice crystals in the apoplast. Some freeze-tolerant plants mitigate this risk by expressing ice-binding proteins (IBPs), that adsorb to ice crystals and modify their growth. IBPs are found across several biological kingdoms, with their ice-binding activity and function uniquely suited to the lifestyle they have evolved to protect, be it in fishes, insects or plants. While IBPs from freeze-avoidant species significantly depress the freezing point, plant IBPs typically have a reduced ability to lower the freezing temperature. Nevertheless, they have a superior ability to inhibit the recrystallization of formed ice. This latter activity prevents ice crystals from growing larger at temperatures close to melting. Attempts to engineer frost-hardy plants by the controlled transfer of IBPs from freeze-avoiding fish and insects have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, the expression of recombinant IBP sequences from freeze-tolerant plants significantly reduced electrolyte leakage and enhanced freezing survival in freeze-sensitive plants. These promising results have spurred additional investigations into plant IBP localization and post-translational modifications, as well as a re-evaluation of IBPs as part of the anti-stress and anti-pathogen axis of freeze-tolerant plants. Here we present an overview of plant freezing stress and adaptation mechanisms and discuss the potential utility of IBPs for the generation of freeze-tolerant crops. PMID:29312400

  19. Calculation of protein-ligand binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Michael K; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Accurate methods of computing the affinity of a small molecule with a protein are needed to speed the discovery of new medications and biological probes. This paper reviews physics-based models of binding, beginning with a summary of the changes in potential energy, solvation energy, and configurational entropy that influence affinity, and a theoretical overview to frame the discussion of specific computational approaches. Important advances are reported in modeling protein-ligand energetics, such as the incorporation of electronic polarization and the use of quantum mechanical methods. Recent calculations suggest that changes in configurational entropy strongly oppose binding and must be included if accurate affinities are to be obtained. The linear interaction energy (LIE) and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) methods are analyzed, as are free energy pathway methods, which show promise and may be ready for more extensive testing. Ultimately, major improvements in modeling accuracy will likely require advances on multiple fronts, as well as continued validation against experiment.

  20. Ice-Binding Proteins in Plants.

    PubMed

    Bredow, Melissa; Walker, Virginia K

    2017-01-01

    Sub-zero temperatures put plants at risk of damage associated with the formation of ice crystals in the apoplast. Some freeze-tolerant plants mitigate this risk by expressing ice-binding proteins (IBPs), that adsorb to ice crystals and modify their growth. IBPs are found across several biological kingdoms, with their ice-binding activity and function uniquely suited to the lifestyle they have evolved to protect, be it in fishes, insects or plants. While IBPs from freeze-avoidant species significantly depress the freezing point, plant IBPs typically have a reduced ability to lower the freezing temperature. Nevertheless, they have a superior ability to inhibit the recrystallization of formed ice. This latter activity prevents ice crystals from growing larger at temperatures close to melting. Attempts to engineer frost-hardy plants by the controlled transfer of IBPs from freeze-avoiding fish and insects have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, the expression of recombinant IBP sequences from freeze-tolerant plants significantly reduced electrolyte leakage and enhanced freezing survival in freeze-sensitive plants. These promising results have spurred additional investigations into plant IBP localization and post-translational modifications, as well as a re-evaluation of IBPs as part of the anti-stress and anti-pathogen axis of freeze-tolerant plants. Here we present an overview of plant freezing stress and adaptation mechanisms and discuss the potential utility of IBPs for the generation of freeze-tolerant crops.

  1. Resistance of bromelain to SDS binding.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Reema; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2009-04-01

    Interaction of the plant cysteine protease bromelain with SDS has been studied using CD spectroscopy, intrinsic fluorescence emission, extrinsic fluorescence probe pyrene, isothermal calorimetric (ITC) investigations and inhibition of hydrolyzing activity. Results exhibit number of synchronous transitions when plotted against the total SDS concentration. SDS at submicellar level caused conformation change of bromelain leading to a stable entity. ITC and pyrene experiments suggest that the structural modifications below 5 mM, the cmc(app) of SDS solutions containing bromelain, are the result of alterations of solvent hydrophobicity or non-specific weak binding and/or adsorption of SDS monomers. Melting temperature (T(m)) and the free energy change for thermal unfolding (DeltaG(unf)) of the SDS induced conformers was decreased by 5 degrees C and 0.5 kcal/mol respectively, compared to native bromelain. Below 5 mM, SDS caused large decrease in V(max) without affecting K(m) for the substrate Z-Arg-Arg-NHMec. Analysis of kinetic data imply that SDS acts as a partial non-competitive inhibitor since even at 100 mM, the residual activity of bromelain was retained by 3%. Inhibition studies show an IC(50) of 0.55 mM and a high K(i) of 0.145 mM. These demonstrate that bromelain is resistant to SDS binding and denaturation, a property known for beta-sheet rich kinetically stable proteins.

  2. Penicillin-binding proteins in Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Because some Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are β-lactam-producing bacteria, they have to have some self-resistant mechanism. The β-lactam biosynthetic gene clusters include genes for β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), suggesting that these are involved in self-resistance. However, direct evidence for the involvement of β-lactamases does not exist at the present time. Instead, phylogenetic analysis revealed that PBPs in Streptomyces are distinct in that Streptomyces species have much more PBPs than other Actinobacteria, and that two to three pairs of similar PBPs are present in most Streptomyces species examined. Some of these PBPs bind benzylpenicillin with very low affinity and are highly similar in their amino-acid sequences. Furthermore, other low-affinity PBPs such as SCLAV_4179 in Streptomyces clavuligerus, a β-lactam-producing Actinobacterium, may strengthen further the self-resistance against β-lactams. This review discusses the role of PBPs in resistance to benzylpenicillin in Streptomyces belonging to Actinobacteria.

  3. Characterization of nicotine binding in mouse brain and comparison with the binding of alpha-bungarotoxin and quinuclidinyl benzilate

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C.

    1982-11-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)nicotine to mouse brain has been measured and subsequently compared with the binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) and L-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). The binding of nicotine was saturable, reversible, and stereospecific. The average KD and Bmax were 59 nM and 88 fmoles/mg of protein, respectively. Although the rates of association and dissociation of nicotine were temperature-dependent, the incubation temperature had no effect on either KD or Bmax. When measured at 20 degrees or 37 degrees, nicotine appeared to bind to a single class of binding sites, but a second, very low-affinity, binding site was observed atmore » 4 degrees. Nicotine binding was unaffected by the addition of NaCl, KCl, CaCl/sub 2/, or MgSO/sub 4/ to the incubation medium. Nicotinic cholinergic agonists were potent inhibitors of nicotine binding; however, nicotinic antagonists were poor inhibitors. The regional distribution of binding was not uniform: midbrain and striatum contained the highest number of receptors, whereas cerebellum had the fewest. Differences in site densities, regional distribution, inhibitor potencies, and thermal denaturation indicated that nicotine binding was not the same as either QNB or alpha-BTX binding, and therefore that receptors for nicotine may represent a unique population of cholinergic receptors.« less

  4. Imparting albumin-binding affinity to a human protein by mimicking the contact surface of a bacterial binding protein.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Satoshi; Honda, Shinya

    2014-04-18

    Attachment of a bacterial albumin-binding protein module is an attractive strategy for extending the plasma residence time of protein therapeutics. However, a protein fused with such a bacterial module could induce unfavorable immune reactions. To address this, we designed an alternative binding protein by imparting albumin-binding affinity to a human protein using molecular surface grafting. The result was a series of human-derived 6 helix-bundle proteins, one of which specifically binds to human serum albumin (HSA) with adequate affinity (KD = 100 nM). The proteins were designed by transferring key binding residues of a bacterial albumin-binding module, Finegoldia magna protein G-related albumin-binding domain (GA) module, onto the human protein scaffold. Despite 13-15 mutations, the designed proteins maintain the original secondary structure by virtue of careful grafting based on structural informatics. Competitive binding assays and thermodynamic analyses of the best binders show that the binding mode resembles that of the GA module, suggesting that the contacting surface of the GA module is mimicked well on the designed protein. These results indicate that the designed protein may act as an alternative low-risk binding module to HSA. Furthermore, molecular surface grafting in combination with structural informatics is an effective approach for avoiding deleterious mutations on a target protein and for imparting the binding function of one protein onto another.

  5. Calcyclin Binding Protein/Siah-1 Interacting Protein Is a Hsp90 Binding Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Góral, Agnieszka; Bieganowski, Paweł; Prus, Wiktor; Krzemień-Ojak, Łucja; Kądziołka, Beata; Fabczak, Hanna; Filipek, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone activity is tightly regulated by interaction with many co-chaperones. Since CacyBP/SIP shares some sequence homology with a known Hsp90 co-chaperone, Sgt1, in this work we performed a set of experiments in order to verify whether CacyBP/SIP can interact with Hsp90. By applying the immunoprecipitation assay we have found that CacyBP/SIP binds to Hsp90 and that the middle (M) domain of Hsp90 is responsible for this binding. Furthermore, the proximity ligation assay (PLA) performed on HEp-2 cells has shown that the CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 complexes are mainly localized in the cytoplasm of these cells. Using purified proteins and applying an ELISA we have shown that Hsp90 interacts directly with CacyBP/SIP and that the latter protein does not compete with Sgt1 for the binding to Hsp90. Moreover, inhibitors of Hsp90 do not perturb CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 binding. Luciferase renaturation assay and citrate synthase aggregation assay with the use of recombinant proteins have revealed that CacyBP/SIP exhibits chaperone properties. Also, CacyBP/SIP-3xFLAG expression in HEp-2 cells results in the appearance of more basic Hsp90 forms in 2D electrophoresis, which may indicate that CacyBP/SIP dephosphorylates Hsp90. Altogether, the obtained results suggest that CacyBP/SIP is involved in regulation of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery. PMID:27249023

  6. To Bind or Not To Bind: Pros & Cons of Maintaining Paper Periodicals in the Library's Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Iris W.

    1999-01-01

    Explores controversial questions related to libraries' decision-making on paper journals and electronic journals. Notes that the critical mass of scholarly publishing is still in print. Discusses benefits and drawbacks of electronic journals and paper journals. Presents comments on the pros and cons to binding paper periodicals gathered from an…

  7. A dye-binding assay for measurement of the binding of Cu(II) to proteins.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson-White, Lorna E; Easterbrook-Smith, Simon B

    2008-10-01

    We analysed the theory of the coupled equilibria between a metal ion, a metal ion-binding dye and a metal ion-binding protein in order to develop a procedure for estimating the apparent affinity constant of a metal ion:protein complex. This can be done by analysing from measurements of the change in the concentration of the metal ion:dye complex with variation in the concentration of either the metal ion or the protein. Using experimentally determined values for the affinity constant of Cu(II) for the dye, 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylaxo)-5-(N-propyl-N-sulfopropylamino) aniline (5-Br-PSAA), this procedure was used to estimate the apparent affinity constants for formation of Cu(II):transthyretin, yielding values which were in agreement with literature values. An apparent affinity constant for Cu(II) binding to alpha-synuclein of approximately 1 x 10(9)M(-1) was obtained from measurements of tyrosine fluorescence quenching by Cu(II). This value was in good agreement with that obtained using 5-Br-PSAA. Our analysis and data therefore show that measurement of changes in the equilibria between Cu(II) and 5-Br-PSAA by Cu(II)-binding proteins provides a general procedure for estimating the affinities of proteins for Cu(II).

  8. Identification of actin binding protein, ABP-280, as a binding partner of human Lnk adaptor protein.

    PubMed

    He, X; Li, Y; Schembri-King, J; Jakes, S; Hayashi, J

    2000-08-01

    Human Lnk (hLnk) is an adaptor protein with multiple functional domains that regulates T cell activation signaling. In order to identify cellular Lnk binding partners, a yeast two-hybrid screening of human spleen cDNA library was carried out using human hLnk as bait. A polypeptide sequence identical to the C-terminal segment of the actin binding protein (ABP-280) was identified as a hLnk binding protein. The expressed hLnk and the FLAG tagged C-terminal 673 amino acid residues of ABP-280 or the endogenous ABP-280 in COS-7 cells could be co-immunoprecipitated using antibodies either to hLnk, FLAG or ABP-280, respectively. Furthermore, immunofluorescence confocal microscope showed that hLnk and ABP-280 co-localized at the plasma membrane and at juxtanuclear region of COS-7 cells. In Jurkat cells, the endogenous hLnk also associates with the endogenous ABP-280 indicating that the association of these two proteins is physiological. The interacting domains of both proteins were mapped using yeast two-hybrid assays. Our results indicate that hLnk binds to the residues 2006-2454 (repeats 19-23C) of ABP-280. The domain in hLnk that associates with ABP-280 was mapped to an interdomain region of 56 amino acids between pleckstrin homology and Src homology 2 domains. These results suggest that hLnk may exert its regulatory role through its association with ABP-280.

  9. Conformational and dynamics changes induced by bile acids binding to chicken liver bile acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Eberini, Ivano; Guerini Rocco, Alessandro; Ientile, Anna Rita; Baptista, António M; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Tomaselli, Simona; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2008-06-01

    The correlation between protein motions and function is a central problem in protein science. Several studies have demonstrated that ligand binding and protein dynamics are strongly correlated in intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs), in which the high degree of flexibility, principally occurring at the level of helix-II, CD, and EF loops (the so-called portal area), is significantly reduced upon ligand binding. We have recently investigated by NMR the dynamic properties of a member of the iLBP family, chicken liver bile acid binding protein (cL-BABP), in its apo and holo form, as a complex with two bile salts molecules. Binding was found to be regulated by a dynamic process and a conformational rearrangement was associated with this event. We report here the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on apo and holo cL-BABP with the aim of further characterizing the protein regions involved in motion propagation and of evaluating the main molecular interactions stabilizing bound ligands. Upon binding, the root mean square fluctuation values substantially decrease for CD and EF loops while increase for the helix-loop-helix region, thus indicating that the portal area is the region mostly affected by complex formation. These results nicely correlate with backbone dynamics data derived from NMR experiments. Essential dynamics analysis of the MD trajectories indicates that the major concerted motions involve the three contiguous structural elements of the portal area, which however are dynamically coupled in different ways whether in the presence or in the absence of the ligands. Motions of the EF loop and of the helical region are part of the essential space of both apo and holo-BABP and sample a much wider conformational space in the apo form. Together with NMR results, these data support the view that, in the apo protein, the flexible EF loop visits many conformational states including those typical of the holo state and that the ligand acts

  10. Binding Modes of Ligands Using Enhanced Sampling (BLUES): Rapid Decorrelation of Ligand Binding Modes via Nonequilibrium Candidate Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Gill, Samuel C; Lim, Nathan M; Grinaway, Patrick B; Rustenburg, Ariën S; Fass, Josh; Ross, Gregory A; Chodera, John D; Mobley, David L

    2018-05-31

    Accurately predicting protein-ligand binding affinities and binding modes is a major goal in computational chemistry, but even the prediction of ligand binding modes in proteins poses major challenges. Here, we focus on solving the binding mode prediction problem for rigid fragments. That is, we focus on computing the dominant placement, conformation, and orientations of a relatively rigid, fragment-like ligand in a receptor, and the populations of the multiple binding modes which may be relevant. This problem is important in its own right, but is even more timely given the recent success of alchemical free energy calculations. Alchemical calculations are increasingly used to predict binding free energies of ligands to receptors. However, the accuracy of these calculations is dependent on proper sampling of the relevant ligand binding modes. Unfortunately, ligand binding modes may often be uncertain, hard to predict, and/or slow to interconvert on simulation time scales, so proper sampling with current techniques can require prohibitively long simulations. We need new methods which dramatically improve sampling of ligand binding modes. Here, we develop and apply a nonequilibrium candidate Monte Carlo (NCMC) method to improve sampling of ligand binding modes. In this technique, the ligand is rotated and subsequently allowed to relax in its new position through alchemical perturbation before accepting or rejecting the rotation and relaxation as a nonequilibrium Monte Carlo move. When applied to a T4 lysozyme model binding system, this NCMC method shows over 2 orders of magnitude improvement in binding mode sampling efficiency compared to a brute force molecular dynamics simulation. This is a first step toward applying this methodology to pharmaceutically relevant binding of fragments and, eventually, drug-like molecules. We are making this approach available via our new Binding modes of ligands using enhanced sampling (BLUES) package which is freely available on GitHub.

  11. RNA binding and replication by the poliovirus RNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Oberste, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    RNA binding and RNA synthesis by the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were studied in vitro using purified polymerase. Templates for binding and RNA synthesis studies were natural RNAs, homopolymeric RNAs, or subgenomic poliovirus-specific RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNA clones using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerases. The binding of the purified polymerase to poliovirion and other RNAs was studied using a protein-RNA nitrocellulose filter binding assay. A cellular poly(A)-binding protein was found in the viral polymerase preparations, but was easily separated from the polymerase by chromatography on poly(A) Sepharose. The binding of purified polymerase to {sup 32}P-labeled ribohomopolymeric RNAs wasmore » examined, and the order of binding observed was poly(G) >>> poly(U) > poly(C) > poly(A). The K{sub a} for polymerase binding to poliovirion RNA and to a full-length negative strand transcript was about 1 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1}. The polymerase binds to a subgenomic RNAs which contain the 3{prime} end of the genome with a K{sub a} similar to that for virion RNA, but binds less well to 18S rRNA, globin mRNA, and subgenomic RNAs which lack portions of the 3{prime} noncoding region.« less

  12. Minimized virus binding for tests of barrier materials.

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, C D; Routson, L B

    1995-01-01

    Viruses are used to test the barrier properties of materials. Binding of virus particles during passage through holes in the material may yield misleading test results. The choices of challenge virus and suspending medium may be important for minimizing confounding effects that might arise from such binding. In this study, different surrogate viruses, as well as different support media, were evaluated to determine optimal test parameters. Two membranes with high-binding properties (nitrocellulose and cationic polysulfone) were used as filters to compare binding activities of different surrogate challenge viruses (MS2, phi X174, T7, PRD1, and phi 6) in different media. The media consisted of buffered saline with surfactants, serum, or culture broth as additives. In addition, elution rates of viruses that bound to the membranes were determined. The results suggest that viruses can bind by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, with phi X174 displaying the lowest level of binding by either process. The nonionic detergents Triton X-100 and Tween 80 (0.1%) equally minimized hydrophobic interactions. Neither anionic nor cationic surfactants were as effective at nontoxic levels. Serum was effective at reducing both hydrophobic and electrostatic binding, with 2% being sufficient for eliminating binding under our test conditions. Thus, phi X174 remains the best choice as a surrogate virus to test barrier materials, and Triton X-100 (0.1%) remains a good choice for reducing hydrophobic binding. In addition, binding of viruses by barrier materials is unlikely to prevent passage of blood-borne pathogens. PMID:7574603

  13. A novel substance P binding site in bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, D P; Livett, B G; Rogerson, F M; Burcher, E

    1990-05-04

    Radioligand binding techniques were used to characterize the substance P (SP) binding site on membranes prepared from bovine adrenal medullae. 125I-labelled Bolton-Hunter substance P (BHSP), which recognises the C-terminally directed, SP-preferring NK1 receptor, showed no specific binding. In contrast, binding of [3H]SP was saturable (at 6 nM) and reversible, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) 1.46 +/- 0.73 nM, Bmax 0.73 +/- 0.06 pmol/g wet weight and Hill coefficient 0.98 +/- 0.01. Specific binding of [3H]SP was displaced by SP greater than neurokinin A (NKA) greater than SP(3-11) approximately SP(1-9) greater than SP(1-7) approximately SP(1-4) approximately SP(1-6), with neurokinin B (NKB) and SP(1-3) very weak competitors and SP(5-11), SP(7-11) and SP(9-11) causing negligible inhibition (up to 10 microM). This potency order is quite distinct from that seen with binding to an NK1 site, a conclusion confirmed by the lack of BHSP binding. It appears that Lys3 and/or Pro4 are critical for binding, suggesting an anionic binding site. These data suggest the existence of an unusual binding site which may represent a novel SP receptor. This site appears to require the entire sequence of the SP molecule for full recognition.

  14. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry,more » we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.« less

  15. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F

    2017-09-15

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes , Culex , and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary "long" D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10 R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  16. Cation binding at the node of Ranvier: I. Localization of binding sites during development.

    PubMed

    Zagoren, J C; Raine, C S; Suzuki, K

    1982-06-17

    Cations are known to bind to the node of Ranvier and the paranodal regions of myelinated fibers. The integrity of these specialized structures is essential for normal conduction. Sites of cation binding can be microscopically identified by the electrondense histochemical reaction product formed by the precipitate of copper sulfate/potassium ferrocyanide. This technique was used to study the distribution of cation binding during normal development of myelinating fibers. Sciatic nerves of C57B1 mice, at 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 16, 18, 24 and 30 days of age, were prepared for electron microscopy following fixation in phosphate-buffered 2.5% glutaraldehyde and 1% osmic acid, microdissection and incubation in phosphate-buffered 0.1 M cupric sulfate followed by 0.1 M potassium ferrocyanide. Localization of reaction product was studied by light and electron microscopy. By light microscopy, no reaction product was observed prior to 9 days of age. At 13 days, a few nodes and paranodes exhibited reaction product. This increased in frequency and intensity up to 30 days when almost all nodes or paranodes exhibited reaction product. Ultrastructurally, diffuse reaction product was first observed at 3 days of age in the axoplasm of the node, in the paranodal extracellular space of the terminal loops, in the Schwann cell proper and in the terminal loops of Schwann cell cytoplasm. When myelinated axons fulfilled the criteria for mature nodes, reaction product was no longer observed in the Schwann cell cytoplasm, while the intensity of reaction product in the nodal axoplasm and paranodal extracellular space of the terminal loops increased. Reaction product in the latter site appeared to be interrupted by the transverse bands. These results suggest that cation binding accompanies nodal maturity and that the Schwann cell may play a role in production or storage of the cation binding substance during myelinogenesis and development.

  17. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lightstone, Felice C.

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a ‘funnel’ that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  18. Binding biological motion and visual features in working memory.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaowei; Zhao, Yangfan; Wu, Fan; Lu, Xiqian; Gao, Zaifeng; Shen, Mowei

    2015-06-01

    Working memory mechanisms for binding have been examined extensively in the last decade, yet few studies have explored bindings relating to human biological motion (BM). Human BM is the most salient and biologically significant kinetic information encountered in everyday life and is stored independently from other visual features (e.g., colors). The current study explored 3 critical issues of BM-related binding in working memory: (a) how many BM binding units can be retained in working memory, (b) whether involuntarily object-based binding occurs during BM binding, and (c) whether the maintenance of BM bindings in working memory requires attention above and beyond that needed to maintain the constituent dimensions. We isolated motion signals of human BM from non-BM sources by using point-light displays as to-be-memorized BM and presented the participants colored BM in a change detection task. We found that working memory capacity for BM-color bindings is rather low; only 1 or 2 BM-color bindings could be retained in working memory regardless of the presentation manners (Experiments 1-3). Furthermore, no object-based encoding took place for colored BM stimuli regardless of the processed dimensions (Experiments 4 and 5). Central executive attention contributes to the maintenance of BM-color bindings, yet maintaining BM bindings in working memory did not require more central attention than did maintaining the constituent dimensions in working memory (Experiment 6). Overall, these results suggest that keeping BM bindings in working memory is a fairly resource-demanding process, yet central executive attention does not play a special role in this cross-module binding. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Detection of antisperm antibodies: their localization to human sperm antigens that are transferred to the surface of zona-free hamster oocytes during the sperm penetration assay.

    PubMed

    Wiley, L M; Obasaju, M F; Overstreet, J W; Cross, N L; Hanson, F W; Chang, R J

    1987-08-01

    The authors have developed an extension of the sperm penetration assay for detecting serum immunoglobulins to sperm antigens that are transferred to the plasma membrane of a sperm-penetrated hamster oocyte. After the hamster oocytes have been scored for sperm penetration by observing for the presence of swollen sperm heads, they are incubated in serum followed by either a 20-minute treatment with rhodamine-conjugated protein A (which binds to most subclasses of IgA, IgG, and IgM) or a 2-hour incubation in guinea pig serum (complement). Positive fluorescence indicates that the serum contains antibodies to sperm antigens that were transferred to the surface of an oocyte during gamete fusion. Complement-mediated lysis indicates that the immunoglobulin that is bound can also fix complement. The advantages of this assay for detection of serum antisperm antibodies are that it is an extension of a widely used assay, is rapid and requires readily available reagents and equipment, can detect most subclasses of IgA, IgG, and IgM, detects antibodies to those sperm antigens that may be transferred to the oocyte during fertilization, and indicates whether the detected antisperm antibodies can mediate complement-dependent lysis of the fertilized oocyte.

  20. Cofilin is correlated with sperm quality and influences sperm fertilizing capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Chen, S M; Chen, X M; Lu, Y L; Liu, B; Jiang, M; Ma, Y X

    2016-11-01

    Spermatozoa should undergo a series of biochemical modifications in female reproduction tract, which is collectively called sperm capacitation. The capacitated spermatozoa can bind to the egg zona pellucida, resulting in the occurrence of acrosome reaction which enabled spermatozoa penetrate into the egg. The formation of actin plays an important role in these processes. Actin polymerized during sperm capacitation, but the polymers dispersed before acrosome reaction. In this study, we take our focus on actin-binding protein, cofilin. Our results showed that the % and intensity of sperm expressing cofilin in normal sperm were significantly higher than in abnormal sperm, and the sperm expressing cofilin was correlated with sperm quality. Furthermore, treatment with anti-cofilin antibody increased the percentage of sperm capacitation and inhibited progesterone- or A23187- induced acrosome reaction in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of 100 ng/mL anti-cofilin antibodies markedly blocked the sperm penetration of zona-free hamster eggs. Besides, immunofluorescence results revealed that cofilin was colocalized with F-actin in the midpiece of spermatozoa; however, phospho-cofilin was expressed in the tail rather than in the midpiece of spermatozoa, which was not colocalized with F-actin in spermatozoa. Moreover, western blot revealed that phospho-cofilin increased in sperm capacitation, and the total cofilin and cofilin in insoluble fraction increased in acrosome reaction; immunofluorescence results showed that the amount of cofilin in acrosome increased in sperm capacitation. In conclusion, our study revealed that cofilin expression in human sperm is correlated with sperm quality and the alterations of cofilin and phospho-cofilin in fertilization affects sperm capacitation, acrosome reaction, and spermatozoa-oocyte fusion. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  1. Gaussian polarizable-ion tight binding.

    PubMed

    Boleininger, Max; Guilbert, Anne Ay; Horsfield, Andrew P

    2016-10-14

    To interpret ultrafast dynamics experiments on large molecules, computer simulation is required due to the complex response to the laser field. We present a method capable of efficiently computing the static electronic response of large systems to external electric fields. This is achieved by extending the density-functional tight binding method to include larger basis sets and by multipole expansion of the charge density into electrostatically interacting Gaussian distributions. Polarizabilities for a range of hydrocarbon molecules are computed for a multipole expansion up to quadrupole order, giving excellent agreement with experimental values, with average errors similar to those from density functional theory, but at a small fraction of the cost. We apply the model in conjunction with the polarizable-point-dipoles model to estimate the internal fields in amorphous poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl).

  2. Gaussian polarizable-ion tight binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boleininger, Max; Guilbert, Anne AY; Horsfield, Andrew P.

    2016-10-01

    To interpret ultrafast dynamics experiments on large molecules, computer simulation is required due to the complex response to the laser field. We present a method capable of efficiently computing the static electronic response of large systems to external electric fields. This is achieved by extending the density-functional tight binding method to include larger basis sets and by multipole expansion of the charge density into electrostatically interacting Gaussian distributions. Polarizabilities for a range of hydrocarbon molecules are computed for a multipole expansion up to quadrupole order, giving excellent agreement with experimental values, with average errors similar to those from density functional theory, but at a small fraction of the cost. We apply the model in conjunction with the polarizable-point-dipoles model to estimate the internal fields in amorphous poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl).

  3. Updating of working memory: lingering bindings.

    PubMed

    Oberauer, Klaus; Vockenberg, Kerstin

    2009-05-01

    Three experiments investigated proactive interference and proactive facilitation in a memory-updating paradigm. Participants remembered several letters or spatial patterns, distinguished by their spatial positions, and updated them by new stimuli up to 20 times per trial. Self-paced updating times were shorter when an item previously remembered and then replaced reappeared in the same location than when it reappeared in a different location. This effect demonstrates residual memory for no-longer-relevant bindings of items to locations. The effect increased with the number of items to be remembered. With one exception, updating times did not increase, and recall of final values did not decrease, over successive updating steps, thus providing little evidence for proactive interference building up cumulatively.

  4. Method And Apparatus For Detecting Chemical Binding

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2005-02-22

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  5. Method and apparatus for detecting chemical binding

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P [Los Alamos, NM; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos, NM; Miller, Thomasin C [Los Alamos, NM; Wells, Cyndi A [Los Alamos, NM

    2007-07-10

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  6. Surface Passivation in Empirical Tight Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Tan, Yaohua; Jiang, Zhengping; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Kubis, Tillmann

    2016-03-01

    Empirical Tight Binding (TB) methods are widely used in atomistic device simulations. Existing TB methods to passivate dangling bonds fall into two categories: 1) Method that explicitly includes passivation atoms is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules only. 2) Method that implicitly incorporates passivation does not distinguish passivation atom types. This work introduces an implicit passivation method that is applicable to any passivation scenario with appropriate parameters. This method is applied to a Si quantum well and a Si ultra-thin body transistor oxidized with SiO2 in several oxidation configurations. Comparison with ab-initio results and experiments verifies the presented method. Oxidation configurations that severely hamper the transistor performance are identified. It is also shown that the commonly used implicit H atom passivation overestimates the transistor performance.

  7. Cation specific binding with protein surface charges

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Biological organization depends on a sensitive balance of noncovalent interactions, in particular also those involving interactions between ions. Ion-pairing is qualitatively described by the law of “matching water affinities.” This law predicts that cations and anions (with equal valence) form stable contact ion pairs if their sizes match. We show that this simple physical model fails to describe the interaction of cations with (molecular) anions of weak carboxylic acids, which are present on the surfaces of many intra- and extracellular proteins. We performed molecular simulations with quantitatively accurate models and observed that the order K+ < Na+ < Li+ of increasing binding affinity with carboxylate ions is caused by a stronger preference for forming weak solvent-shared ion pairs. The relative insignificance of contact pair interactions with protein surfaces indicates that thermodynamic stability and interactions between proteins in alkali salt solutions is governed by interactions mediated through hydration water molecules. PMID:19666545

  8. The Baculovirus-Expressed Binding Region of Plasmodium falciparum EBA-140 Ligand and Its Glycophorin C Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Rydzak, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Radoslaw; Czerwinski, Marcin; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Szewczyk, Boguslaw; Jaskiewicz, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte binding ligand 140 (EBA-140) is a member of the Plasmodium falciparum DBL family of erythrocyte binding proteins, which are considered as prospective candidates for malaria vaccine development. The EBA-140 ligand is a paralogue of the well-characterized P. falciparum EBA-175 protein. They share homology of domain structure, including Region II, which consists of two homologous F1 and F2 domains and is responsible for ligand-erythrocyte receptor interaction during invasion. In this report we describe, for the first time, the glycophorin C specificity of the recombinant, baculovirus-expressed binding region (Region II) of P. falciparum EBA-140 ligand. It was found that the recombinant EBA-140 Region II binds to the endogenous and recombinant glycophorin C, but does not bind to Gerbich-type glycophorin C, neither normal nor recombinant, which lacks amino acid residues 36–63 of its polypeptide chain. Our results emphasize the crucial role of this glycophorin C region in EBA-140 ligand binding. Moreover, the EBA-140 Region II did not bind either to glycophorin D, the truncated form of glycophorin C lacking the N-glycan or to desialylated GPC. These results draw attention to the role of glycophorin C glycans in EBA-140 binding. The full identification of the EBA-140 binding site on glycophorin C molecule, consisting most likely of its glycans and peptide backbone, may help to design therapeutics or vaccines that target the erythrocyte binding merozoite ligands. PMID:25588042

  9. DNABP: Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins Based on Feature Selection Using a Random Forest and Predicting Binding Residues.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Guo, Jing; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins are fundamentally important in cellular processes. Several computational-based methods have been developed to improve the prediction of DNA-binding proteins in previous years. However, insufficient work has been done on the prediction of DNA-binding proteins from protein sequence information. In this paper, a novel predictor, DNABP (DNA-binding proteins), was designed to predict DNA-binding proteins using the random forest (RF) classifier with a hybrid feature. The hybrid feature contains two types of novel sequence features, which reflect information about the conservation of physicochemical properties of the amino acids, and the binding propensity of DNA-binding residues and non-binding propensities of non-binding residues. The comparisons with each feature demonstrated that these two novel features contributed most to the improvement in predictive ability. Furthermore, to improve the prediction performance of the DNABP model, feature selection using the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) method combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was carried out during the model construction. The results showed that the DNABP model could achieve 86.90% accuracy, 83.76% sensitivity, 90.03% specificity and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.727. High prediction accuracy and performance comparisons with previous research suggested that DNABP could be a useful approach to identify DNA-binding proteins from sequence information. The DNABP web server system is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/DNABP/.

  10. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon.

    PubMed

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner; Tumen, Fikret

    2009-05-30

    Sorption of Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni(2+)>Cd(2+)>Cu(2+)>Pb(2+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(3+). The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb(2+)>Cu(2+)>Ni(2+)>Cd(2+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(3+). The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol(-1) for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The DeltaG degrees and DeltaH degrees values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low DeltaH degrees values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  11. Phosphatidic acid binding proteins display differential binding as a function of membrane curvature stress and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Putta, Priya; Rankenberg, Johanna; Korver, Ruud A; van Wijk, Ringo; Munnik, Teun; Testerink, Christa; Kooijman, Edgar E

    2016-11-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a crucial membrane phospholipid involved in de novo lipid synthesis and numerous intracellular signaling cascades. The signaling function of PA is mediated by peripheral membrane proteins that specifically recognize PA. While numerous PA-binding proteins are known, much less is known about what drives specificity of PA-protein binding. Previously, we have described the ionization properties of PA, summarized in the electrostatic-hydrogen bond switch, as one aspect that drives the specific binding of PA by PA-binding proteins. Here we focus on membrane curvature stress induced by phosphatidylethanolamine and show that many PA-binding proteins display enhanced binding as a function of negative curvature stress. This result is corroborated by the observation that positive curvature stress, induced by lyso phosphatidylcholine, abolishes PA binding of target proteins. We show, for the first time, that a novel plant PA-binding protein, Arabidopsis Epsin-like Clathrin Adaptor 1 (ECA1) displays curvature-dependence in its binding to PA. Other established PA targets examined in this study include, the plant proteins TGD2, and PDK1, the yeast proteins Opi1 and Spo20, and, the mammalian protein Raf-1 kinase and the C2 domain of the mammalian phosphatidylserine binding protein Lact as control. Based on our observations, we propose that liposome binding assays are the preferred method to investigate lipid binding compared to the popular lipid overlay assays where membrane environment is lost. The use of complex lipid mixtures is important to elucidate further aspects of PA binding proteins. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Multivalent DNA-binding properties of the HMG-1 proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, J F; Nathans, D

    1996-01-01

    HMG-I proteins are DNA-binding proteins thought to affect the formation and function of transcription complexes. Each protein contains three DNA-binding motifs, known as AT-hooks, that bind in the minor groove of AT tracts in DNA. Multiple AT-hooks within a polypeptide chain should contact multiple AT tracts, but the rules governing these interactions have not been defined. In this study, we demonstrate that high-affinity binding uses two or three appropriately spaced AT tracts as a single multivalent binding site. These principles have implications for binding to regulatory elements such as the interferon beta enhancer, TATA boxes, and serum response elements. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692884

  13. Concentration-dependent Cu(II) binding to prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2008-03-01

    The prion protein plays a causative role in several neurodegenerative diseases, including mad cow disease in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The normal function of the prion protein is unknown, but it has been linked to its ability to bind copper ions. Experimental evidence suggests that copper can be bound in three distinct modes depending on its concentration, but only one of those binding modes has been fully characterized experimentally. Using a newly developed hybrid DFT/DFT method [1], which combines Kohn-Sham DFT with orbital-free DFT, we have examined all the binding modes and obtained their detailed binding geometries and copper ion binding energies. Our results also provide explanation for experiments, which have found that when the copper concentration increases the copper binding mode changes, surprisingly, from a stronger to a weaker one. Overall, our results indicate that prion protein can function as a copper buffer. 1. Hodak, Lu, Bernholc, JCP, in press.

  14. [Modification of retinal photoreceptor membranes and Ca ion binding].

    PubMed

    Korchagin, V P; Berman, A L; Shukoliukov, S A; Rychkova, M P; Etingof, R N

    1978-10-01

    Calcium binding by modified photoreceptor membranes of cattle retina has been studied. Ca2+-binding the membranes significantly changes after C-phospholipase treatment, displaying the initial growth (less than 65% of lipid phosphorus removed) with subsequent decrease (more than 65% of phosphorus removed). Liposomes of the photoreceptor membranes lipids were found to bind more calcium than do the native photoreceptor membranes. Proteolytic enzymes (papaine, pronase) splitting some rhodopsin fragments do not affect the ability of the membrane to bind Ca2+. The increase of light-induced Ca-binding is observed only after the outer segments preincubation under conditions providing for rhodopsin phosphorylation. This effect was observed also after the splitting of the rhodopsin fragment by papaine. It is concluded that calcium binding in the photoreceptor membranes is mainly due to the phosphate groups of phospholipids.

  15. Hardware device to physical structure binding and authentication

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Stein, David J.; Bauer, Todd M.

    2013-08-20

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a binding of the hardware device and a physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generate an internal PUF value. Binding logic is coupled to receive the internal PUF value, as well as an external PUF value associated with the physical structure, and generates a binding PUF value, which represents the binding of the hardware device and the physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit also includes a cryptographic unit that uses the binding PUF value to allow a challenger to authenticate the binding.

  16. Caffeine delays oocyte aging and maintains the quality of aged oocytes safely in mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Li; Wu, Dan-Ya; Nie, Zheng-Wen; Gao, Ying-Ying; Miao, Yi-Liang

    2017-03-28

    Caffeine, as an oocyte aging inhibitor, was used in many different species to control or delay oocyte aging. However, the safety of caffeine and developmental competence of aged oocytes inhibited by caffeine has not been studied systematically. So we detected the spindle morphology, distribution of cortical granules, zona pellucida hardening and pronucleus formation to assess oocyte quality of caffeine treated oocytes. We found that aged oocytes treated by caffeine maintained weak susceptibility to activating stimuli and regained normal competent after aged further 6 hr. Caffeine maintained the spindle morphology, changed cortical granules distribution of aged oocytes and could not prevent zona pellucida hardening. Furthermore, caffeine increased pronucleus formation of aged oocytes and decreased fragmentation after fertilization. These results suggested that caffeine could maintain the quality of aged oocytes safely in mouse.

  17. Conformational Transitions and Convergence of Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM) is employed to compute the standard binding free energies of a series of ligands to a FK506 binding protein (FKBP12) with implicit solvation. Binding free energy estimates are in reasonably good agreement with experimental affinities. The conformations of the complexes identified by the simulations are in good agreement with crystallographic data, which was not used to restrain ligand orientations. The BEDAM method is based on λ -hopping Hamiltonian parallel Replica Exchange (HREM) molecular dynamics conformational sampling, the OPLS-AA/AGBNP2 effective potential, and multi-state free energy estimators (MBAR). Achieving converged and accurate results depends on all of these elements of the calculation. Convergence of the binding free energy is tied to the level of convergence of binding energy distributions at critical intermediate states where bound and unbound states are at equilibrium, and where the rate of binding/unbinding conformational transitions is maximal. This finding mirrors similar observations in the context of order/disorder transitions as for example in protein folding. Insights concerning the physical mechanism of ligand binding and unbinding are obtained. Convergence for the largest FK506 ligand is achieved only after imposing strict conformational restraints, which however require accurate prior structural knowledge of the structure of the complex. The analytical AGBNP2 model is found to underestimate the magnitude of the hydrophobic driving force towards binding in these systems characterized by loosely packed protein-ligand binding interfaces. Rescoring of the binding energies using a numerical surface area model corrects this deficiency. This study illustrates the complex interplay between energy models, exploration of conformational space, and free energy estimators needed to obtain robust estimates from binding free energy calculations. PMID:22368530

  18. Equilibrium binding behavior of magnesium to wall teichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kieth J; Rice, Charles V

    2015-10-01

    Peptidoglycan and teichoic acids are the major cell wall components of Gram-positive bacteria that obtain and sequester metal ions required for biochemical processes. The delivery of metals to the cytoplasmic membrane is aided by anionic binding sites within the peptidoglycan and along the phosphodiester polymer of teichoic acid. The interaction with metals is a delicate balance between the need for attraction and ion diffusion to the membrane. Likewise, metal chelation from the extracellular fluid must initially have strong binding energetics that weaken within the cell wall to enable ion release. We employed atomic absorption and equilibrium dialysis to measure the metal binding capacity and metal binding affinity of wall teichoic acid and Mg2+. Data show that Mg2+ binds to WTA with a 1:2Mg2+ to phosphate ratio with a binding capacity of 1.27 μmol/mg. The affinity of Mg2+ to WTA was also found to be 41×10(3) M(-1) at low metal concentrations and 1.3×10(3) M(-1) at higher Mg2+ concentrations due to weakening electrostatic effects. These values are lower than the values describing Mg2+ interactions with peptidoglycan. However, the binding capacity of WTA is 4 times larger than peptidoglycan. External WTA initially binds metals with positive cooperativity, but metal binding switches to negative cooperativity, whereas interior WTA binds metals with only negative cooperativity. The relevance of this work is to describe changes in metal binding behavior depending on environment. When metals are sparse, chelation is strong to ensure survival yet the binding weakens when essential minerals are abundant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms. PMID:26055114

  20. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, M. E.; Altenberg, G. A.

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we usedmore » luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation.« less

  1. Optimization of reverse chemical ecology method: false positive binding of Aenasius bambawalei odorant binding protein 1 caused by uncertain binding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Q L; Yi, S C; Li, D Z; Nie, X P; Li, S Q; Wang, M-Q; Zhou, A M

    2018-06-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are considered as the core molecular targets in reverse chemical ecology, which is a convenient and efficient method by which to screen potential semiochemicals. Herein, we identified a classic OBP, AbamOBP1 from Aenasius bambawalei, which showed high mRNA expression in male antennae. Fluorescence competitive binding assay (FCBA) results demonstrated that AbamOBP1 has higher binding affinity with ligands at acid pH, suggesting the physiologically inconsistent binding affinity of this protein. Amongst the four compounds with the highest binding affinities at acid pH, 2, 4, 4-trimethyl-2-pentene and 1-octen-3-one were shown to have attractant activity for male adults, whereas (-)-limonene and an analogue of 1-octen-3-ol exhibited nonbehavioural activity. Further homology modelling and fluorescence quenching experiments demonstrated that the stoichiometry of the binding of this protein to these ligands was not 1: 1, suggesting that the results of FCBA were false. In contrast, the apparent association constants (Ka) of fluorescence quenching experiments seemed to be more reliable, because 2, 4, 4-trimethyl-2-pentene and 1-octen-3-one had observably higher Ka than (-)-limonene and 1-octen-3-ol at neutral pH. Based on the characteristics of different OBPs, various approaches should be applied to study their binding affinities with ligands, which could modify and complement the results of FCBA and contribute to the application of reverse chemical ecology. © 2018 The Royal Entomological Society.

  2. Implicit ligand theory for relative binding free energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Minh, David D. L.

    2018-03-01

    Implicit ligand theory enables noncovalent binding free energies to be calculated based on an exponential average of the binding potential of mean force (BPMF)—the binding free energy between a flexible ligand and rigid receptor—over a precomputed ensemble of receptor configurations. In the original formalism, receptor configurations were drawn from or reweighted to the apo ensemble. Here we show that BPMFs averaged over a holo ensemble yield binding free energies relative to the reference ligand that specifies the ensemble. When using receptor snapshots from an alchemical simulation with a single ligand, the new statistical estimator outperforms the original.

  3. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L.

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner;more » however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.« less

  4. A look at ligand binding thermodynamics in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Claveria-Gimeno, Rafael; Vega, Sonia; Abian, Olga; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    Drug discovery is a challenging endeavor requiring the interplay of many different research areas. Gathering information on ligand binding thermodynamics may help considerably in reducing the risk within a high uncertainty scenario, allowing early rejection of flawed compounds and pushing forward optimal candidates. In particular, the free energy, the enthalpy, and the entropy of binding provide fundamental information on the intermolecular forces driving such interaction. Areas covered: The authors review the current status and recent developments in the application of ligand binding thermodynamics in drug discovery. The thermodynamic binding profile (Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding) can be used for lead selection and optimization (binding enthalpy, selectivity, and adaptability). Expert opinion: Binding thermodynamics provides fundamental information on the forces driving the formation of the drug-target complex. It has been widely accepted that binding thermodynamics may be used as a decision criterion along the ligand optimization process in drug discovery and development. In particular, the binding enthalpy may be used as a guide when selecting and optimizing compounds over a set of potential candidates. However, this has been recently called into question by arguing certain difficulties and in the light of certain experimental examples.

  5. Cognitive binding in schizophrenia: weakened integration of temporal intersensory information.

    PubMed

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Bergomi, Claudia

    2011-09-01

    Cognitive functioning is based on binding processes, by which different features and elements of neurocognition are integrated and coordinated. Binding is an essential ingredient of, for instance, Gestalt perception. We have implemented a paradigm of causality perception based on the work of Albert Michotte, in which 2 identical discs move from opposite sides of a monitor, steadily toward, and then past one another. Their coincidence generates an ambiguous percept of either "streaming" or "bouncing," which the subjects (34 schizophrenia spectrum patients and 34 controls with mean age 27.9 y) were instructed to report. The latter perception is a marker of the binding processes underlying perceived causality (type I binding). In addition to this visual task, acoustic stimuli were presented at different times during the task (150 ms before and after visual coincidence), which can modulate perceived causality. This modulation by intersensory and temporally delayed stimuli is viewed as a different type of binding (type II). We show here, using a mixed-effects hierarchical analysis, that type II binding distinguishes schizophrenia spectrum patients from healthy controls, whereas type I binding does not. Type I binding may even be excessive in some patients, especially those with positive symptoms; Type II binding, however, was generally attenuated in patients. The present findings point to ways in which the disconnection (or Gestalt) hypothesis of schizophrenia can be refined, suggesting more specific markers of neurocognitive functioning and potential targets of treatment.

  6. Predicting MHC-II binding affinity using multiple instance regression

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2011-01-01

    Reliably predicting the ability of antigen peptides to bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules is an essential step in developing new vaccines. Uncovering the amino acid sequence correlates of the binding affinity of MHC-II binding peptides is important for understanding pathogenesis and immune response. The task of predicting MHC-II binding peptides is complicated by the significant variability in their length. Most existing computational methods for predicting MHC-II binding peptides focus on identifying a nine amino acids core region in each binding peptide. We formulate the problems of qualitatively and quantitatively predicting flexible length MHC-II peptides as multiple instance learning and multiple instance regression problems, respectively. Based on this formulation, we introduce MHCMIR, a novel method for predicting MHC-II binding affinity using multiple instance regression. We present results of experiments using several benchmark datasets that show that MHCMIR is competitive with the state-of-the-art methods for predicting MHC-II binding peptides. An online web server that implements the MHCMIR method for MHC-II binding affinity prediction is freely accessible at http://ailab.cs.iastate.edu/mhcmir. PMID:20855923

  7. DNA Mismatch Binding and Antiproliferative Activity of Rhodium Metalloinsertors

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Russell J.; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2009-01-01

    Deficiencies in mismatch repair (MMR) are associated with carcinogenesis. Rhodium metalloinsertors bind to DNA base mismatches with high specificity and inhibit cellular proliferation preferentially in MMR-deficient cells versus MMR-proficient cells. A family of chrysenequinone diimine complexes of rhodium with varying ancillary ligands that serve as DNA metalloinsertors has been synthesized, and both DNA mismatch binding affinities and antiproliferative activities against the human colorectal carcinoma cell lines HCT116N and HCT116O, an isogenic model system for MMR deficiency, have been determined. DNA photocleavage experiments reveal that all complexes bind to the mismatch sites with high specificities; DNA binding affinities to oligonucleotides containing single base CA and CC mismatches, obtained through photocleavage titration or competition, vary from 104 to 108 M−1 for the series of complexes. Significantly, binding affinities are found to be inversely related to ancillary ligand size and directly related to differential inhibition of the HCT116 cell lines. The observed trend in binding affinity is consistent with the metalloinsertion mode where the complex binds from the minor groove with ejection of mismatched base pairs. The correlation between binding affinity and targeting of the MMR-deficient cell line suggests that rhodium metalloinsertors exert their selective biological effects on MMR-deficient cells through mismatch binding in vivo. PMID:19175313

  8. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, L.; Lee, Y.; Schwarz, U.

    The binding of /sup 35/S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cell envelope obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. Experiments distinguishing the effect of pH on penicillin binding by PBP 5/6 from its effect on beta-lactamase activity indicated that although substantial binding occurred at the lowest pH, the amount of binding increased with pH, reaching a maximum at pH 10. Based on earlier studies, it is proposed that the binding at high pH involves the formation of a covalent bond between the C-7 of penicillin and freemore » epsilon amino groups of the PBPs. At pHs ranging from 4 to 8, position 1 of penicillin, occupied by sulfur, is considered to be the site that establishes a covalent bond with the sulfhydryl groups of PBP 5. The use of specific blockers of free epsilon amino groups or sulfhydryl groups indicated that wherever the presence of each had little or no effect on the binding of penicillin by PBP 5, the presence of both completely prevented binding. The specific blocker of the hydroxyl group of serine did not affect the binding of penicillin.« less

  9. Odorant-Binding Protein: Localization to Nasal Glands and Secretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevsner, Jonathan; Sklar, Pamela B.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1986-07-01

    An odorant-binding protein (OBP) was isolated from bovine olfactory and respiratory mucosa. We have produced polyclonal antisera to this protein and report its immunohistochemical localization to mucus-secreting glands of the olfactory and respiratory mucosa. Although OBP was originally isolated as a pyrazine binding protein, both rat and bovine OBP also bind the odorants [3H]methyldihydrojasmonate and 3,7-dimethyl-octan-1-ol as well as 2-isobutyl-3-[3H]methoxypyrazine. We detect substantial odorant-binding activity attributable to OBP in secreted rat nasal mucus and tears but not in saliva, suggesting a role for OBP in transporting or concentrating odorants.

  10. Allosteric binding sites in Rab11 for potential drug candidates

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Rab11 is an important protein subfamily in the RabGTPase family. These proteins physiologically function as key regulators of intracellular membrane trafficking processes. Pathologically, Rab11 proteins are implicated in many diseases including cancers, neurodegenerative diseases and type 2 diabetes. Although they are medically important, no previous study has found Rab11 allosteric binding sites where potential drug candidates can bind to. In this study, by employing multiple clustering approaches integrating principal component analysis, independent component analysis and locally linear embedding, we performed structural analyses of Rab11 and identified eight representative structures. Using these representatives to perform binding site mapping and virtual screening, we identified two novel binding sites in Rab11 and small molecules that can preferentially bind to different conformations of these sites with high affinities. After identifying the binding sites and the residue interaction networks in the representatives, we computationally showed that these binding sites may allosterically regulate Rab11, as these sites communicate with switch 2 region that binds to GTP/GDP. These two allosteric binding sites in Rab11 are also similar to two allosteric pockets in Ras that we discovered previously. PMID:29874286

  11. The binding cavity of mouse major urinary protein is optimised for a variety of ligand binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Ferrari, Elena; Casali, Emanuela

    2009-12-25

    {sup 15}N and {sup 1}HN chemical shift data and {sup 15}N relaxation studies have been used to characterise the binding of N-phenyl-naphthylamine (NPN) to mouse major urinary protein (MUP). NPN binds in the {beta}-barrel cavity of MUP, hydrogen bonding to Tyr120 and making extensive non-bonded contacts with hydrophobic side chains. In contrast to the natural pheromone 2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole, NPN binding gives no change to the overall mobility of the protein backbone of MUP. Comparison with 11 different ligands that bind to MUP shows a range of binding modes involving 16 different residues in the {beta}-barrel cavity. These finding justify why MUPmore » is able to adapt to allow for many successful binding partners.« less

  12. Effects of nucleoside analog incorporation on DNA binding to the DNA binding domain of the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Omichinski, J G; Stahl, S; Maloney, D; West, J; Schweitzer, B I

    1999-02-05

    We investigate here the effects of the incorporation of the nucleoside analogs araC (1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine) and ganciclovir (9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl] guanine) into the DNA binding recognition sequence for the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor. A 10-fold decrease in binding affinity was observed for the ganciclovir-substituted DNA complex in comparison to an unmodified DNA of the same sequence composition. AraC substitution did not result in any changes in binding affinity. 1H-15N HSQC and NOESY NMR experiments revealed a number of chemical shift changes in both DNA and protein in the ganciclovir-modified DNA-protein complex when compared to the unmodified DNA-protein complex. These changes in chemical shift and binding affinity suggest a change in the binding mode of the complex when ganciclovir is incorporated into the GATA DNA binding site.

  13. Oligosaccharyltransferase directly binds to ribosome at a location near the translocon-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Y.; Li, H.; Li, Hua

    2009-04-28

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OT) transfers high mannose-type glycans to the nascent polypeptides that are translated by the membrane-bound ribosome and translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum through the Sec61 translocon complex. In this article, we show that purified ribosomes and OT can form a binary complex with a stoichiometry of {approx}1 to 1 in the presence of detergent. We present evidence that OT may bind to the large ribosomal subunit near the site where nascent polypeptides exit. We further show that OT and the Sec61 complex can simultaneously bind to ribosomes in vitro. Based on existing data and our findings,more » we propose that cotranslational translocation and N-glycosylation of nascent polypeptides are mediated by a ternary supramolecular complex consisting of OT, the Sec61 complex, and ribosomes.« less

  14. Oligosaccharyltransferase directly binds to ribosome at a location near the translocon-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yoichiro; Li, Hua; Li, Huilin; Lennarz, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OT) transfers high mannose-type glycans to the nascent polypeptides that are translated by the membrane-bound ribosome and translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum through the Sec61 translocon complex. In this article, we show that purified ribosomes and OT can form a binary complex with a stoichiometry of ≈1 to 1 in the presence of detergent. We present evidence that OT may bind to the large ribosomal subunit near the site where nascent polypeptides exit. We further show that OT and the Sec61 complex can simultaneously bind to ribosomes in vitro. Based on existing data and our findings, we propose that cotranslational translocation and N-glycosylation of nascent polypeptides are mediated by a ternary supramolecular complex consisting of OT, the Sec61 complex, and ribosomes. PMID:19365066

  15. Discover binding pathways using the sliding binding-box docking approach: application to binding pathways of oseltamivir to avian influenza H5N1 neuraminidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Diem-Trang T.; Le, Ly T.; Truong, Thanh N.

    2013-08-01

    Drug binding and unbinding are transient processes which are hardly observed by experiment and difficult to analyze by computational techniques. In this paper, we employed a cost-effective method called "pathway docking" in which molecular docking was used to screen ligand-receptor binding free energy surface to reveal possible paths of ligand approaching protein binding pocket. A case study was applied on oseltamivir, the key drug against influenza a virus. The equilibrium pathways identified by this method are found to be similar to those identified in prior studies using highly expensive computational approaches.

  16. Comprehensive Human Transcription Factor Binding Site Map for Combinatory Binding Motifs Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Molina, Arnoldo J.; Schöler, Hans R.; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.

    2012-01-01

    To know the map between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%–20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs) have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory “DNA words.” From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%—far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of “DNA words,” newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters. PMID:23209563

  17. Resolving protein structure-function-binding site relationships from a binding site similarity network perspective.

    PubMed

    Mudgal, Richa; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2017-07-01

    Functional annotation is seldom straightforward with complexities arising due to functional divergence in protein families or functional convergence between non-homologous protein families, leading to mis-annotations. An enzyme may contain multiple domains and not all domains may be involved in a given function, adding to the complexity in function annotation. To address this, we use binding site information from bound cognate ligands and catalytic residues, since it can help in resolving fold-function relationships at a finer level and with higher confidence. A comprehensive database of 2,020 fold-function-binding site relationships has been systematically generated. A network-based approach is employed to capture the complexity in these relationships, from which different types of associations are deciphered, that identify versatile protein folds performing diverse functions, same function associated with multiple folds and one-to-one relationships. Binding site similarity networks integrated with fold, function, and ligand similarity information are generated to understand the depth of these relationships. Apart from the observed continuity in the functional site space, network properties of these revealed versatile families with topologically different or dissimilar binding sites and structural families that perform very similar functions. As a case study, subtle changes in the active site of a set of evolutionarily related superfamilies are studied using these networks. Tracing of such similarities in evolutionarily related proteins provide clues into the transition and evolution of protein functions. Insights from this study will be helpful in accurate and reliable functional annotations of uncharacterized proteins, poly-pharmacology, and designing enzymes with new functional capabilities. Proteins 2017; 85:1319-1335. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    PubMed

    Müller-Molina, Arnoldo J; Schöler, Hans R; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J

    2012-01-01

    To know the map between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs) have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  19. Conserved Receptor-Binding Domains of Lake Victoria Marburgvirus and Zaire Ebolavirus Bind a Shared Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-14

    virion, because of the functional importance of and limited variation in this region (44, 45). In some cases, such as murine and feline leukemia viruses ...murine leukemia virus ; PBS, phos- phate-buffered saline; RBD, receptor-binding domain; SARS, severe acute respiratory syndrome; VSV, vesicular stomatitis...entryofpseudotypedret- roviruses. A Moloney murine leukemia virus vector expressing GFP was pseudotyped with the GP1,2 of MARV-Mus (MARV/MLV), a mucin-like

  20. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  1. Magnesium-binding architectures in RNA crystal structures: validation, binding preferences, classification and motif detection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Heping; Shabalin, Ivan G.; Handing, Katarzyna B.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Minor, Wladek

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of magnesium ions in RNA has long been recognized as a key factor governing RNA folding, and is crucial for many diverse functions of RNA molecules. In this work, Mg2+-binding architectures in RNA were systematically studied using a database of RNA crystal structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Due to the abundance of poorly modeled or incorrectly identified Mg2+ ions, the set of all sites was comprehensively validated and filtered to identify a benchmark dataset of 15 334 ‘reliable’ RNA-bound Mg2+ sites. The normalized frequencies by which specific RNA atoms coordinate Mg2+ were derived for both the inner and outer coordination spheres. A hierarchical classification system of Mg2+ sites in RNA structures was designed and applied to the benchmark dataset, yielding a set of 41 types of inner-sphere and 95 types of outer-sphere coordinating patterns. This classification system has also been applied to describe six previously reported Mg2+-binding motifs and detect them in new RNA structures. Investigation of the most populous site types resulted in the identification of seven novel Mg2+-binding motifs, and all RNA structures in the PDB were screened for the presence of these motifs. PMID:25800744

  2. Force spectroscopy of multivalent binding of riboflavin-conjugated dendrimers to riboflavin binding protein.

    PubMed

    Leistra, Abigail N; Han, Jong Hyun; Tang, Shengzhuang; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Choi, Seok Ki; Sinniah, Kumar

    2015-05-07

    Putative riboflavin receptors are considered as biomarkers due to their overexpression in breast and prostate cancers. Hence, these receptors can be potentially exploited for use in targeted drug delivery systems where dendrimer nanoparticles with multivalent ligand attachments can lead to greater specificity in cellular interactions. In this study, the single molecule force spectroscopy technique was used to assess the physical strength of multivalent interactions by employing a riboflavin (RF)-conjugated generation 5 PAMAM dendrimer G5(RF)n nanoparticle. By varying the average RF ligand valency (n = 0, 3, 5), the rupture force was measured between G5(RF)n and the riboflavin binding protein (RFBP). The rupture force increased when the valency of RF increased. We observed at the higher valency (n = 5) three binding events that increased in rupture force with increasing loading rate. Assuming a single energy barrier, the Bell-Evans model was used to determine the kinetic off-rate and barrier width for all binding interactions. The analysis of our results appears to indicate that multivalent interactions are resulting in changes to rupture force and kinetic off-rates.

  3. An approach to successful freezing of demi-embryos derived from day-7 bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Niemann, H; Brem, G; Sacher, B; Smidt, D; Kräusslich, H

    1986-04-01

    The developmental capacity of frozen/thawed bisected embryos (n = 33) derived from day-7 bovine embryos was investigated and compared to ordinary embryos after freezing and thawing (n = 28) and to freshly bisected embryos (n = 19). The freezing and thawing protocol was identical for ordinary and demi-embryos. The percentage of intact embryos classified as excellent, good, or poor after thawing was 92.9 and 96.3% for ordinary and demi-embryos, respectively. Pregnancy rates of 53.8 (8 15 ), 46.2 (6 13 ), and 47.5% (9 19 ) were obtained when frozen/thawed ordinary embryos and frozen/thawed demi-embryos classified as excellent or good and sealed with an additional zona pellucida from hatched pig blastocysts or freshly bisected embryos were transferred. One pair of identical twins resulted from the transfer of frozen/thawed demi-embryos sealed with an additional zona pellucida. Transfer of four frozen/thawed demi-embryos without an additional zona pellucida led to one pregnancy. In contrast, demi-embryos derived from frozen/thawed ordinary embryos (n = 8) as well as frozen/thawed demi-embryos classified as poor (n = 6) did not result in any pregnancies although two halves were transferred per recipient. It is concluded that sealing the punctured zona pellucida improves the developmental capacity of frozen/thawed demi-embryos derived from day-7 bovine embryos, and freezing demi-embryos is more efficient compared to the splitting of frozen/thawed ordinary embryos.

  4. Dynamics of biomolecules, ligand binding & biological functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Myunggi

    Proteins are flexible and dynamic. One static structure alone does not often completely explain biological functions of the protein, and some proteins do not even have high resolution structures. In order to provide better understanding to the biological functions of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, Diphtheria toxin repressor and M2 proton channel, the dynamics of these proteins are investigated using molecular modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. With absence of high resolution structure of alpha7 receptor, the homology models of apo and cobra toxin bound forms have been built. From the MD simulations of these model structures, we observed one subunit of apo simulation moved away from other four subunits. With local movement of flexible loop regions, the whole subunit tilted clockwise. These conformational changes occurred spontaneously, and were strongly correlated with the conformational change when the channel is activated by agonists. Unlike other computational studies, we directly compared our model of open conformation with the experimental data. However, the subunits of toxin bound form were stable, and conformational change is restricted by the bound cobra toxin. These results provide activation and inhibition mechanisms of alpha7 receptors and a possible explanation for intermediate conductance of the channel. Intramolecular complex of SH3-like domain with a proline-rich (Pr) peptide segment in Diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is stabilized in inactive state. Upon activation of DtxR by transition metal binding, this intramolecular complex should be dissociated. The dynamics of this intramolecular complex is investigated using MD simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We observed spontaneous opening and closing motions of the Pr segment binding pockets in both Pr-SH3 and SH3 simulations. The MD simulation results and NMR relaxation data suggest that the Pr segment exhibits a binding ↔ unbinding equilibrium. Despite a wealth of experimental

  5. Binding mode of cytochalasin B to F-actin is altered by lateral binding of regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Mihashi, K

    1991-01-01

    The binding of cytochalasin B (CB) to F-actin was studied using a trace amount of [3H]-cytochalasin B. F-Actin-bound CB was separated from free CB by ultracentrifugation and the amount of F-actin-bound CB was determined by comparing the radioactivity both in the supernatant and in the precipitate. A filament of pure F-actin possessed one high-affinity binding site for CB (Kd = 5.0 nM) at the B-end. When the filament was bound to native tropomyosin (complex of tropomyosin and troponin), two low-affinity binding sites for CB (Kd = 230 nM) were created, while the high-affinity binding site was reserved (Kd = 3.4 nM). It was concluded that the creation of low-affinity binding sites was primarily due to binding of tropomyosin to F-actin, as judged from the following two observations: (1) a filament of F-actin/tropomyosin complex possessed one high-affinity binding site (Kd = 3.9 nM) plus two low-affinity binding sites (Kd = 550 nM); (2) the Ca2(+)-receptive state of troponin C in F-actin/native tropomyosin complex did not affect CB binding.

  6. Fungal-type carbohydrate binding modules from the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi show binding affinity to cellulose and chitin

    PubMed Central

    Rooijakkers, Bart J. M.

    2018-01-01

    Six fungal-type cellulose binding domains were found in the genome of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi and cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequence comparison indicate high similarity to fungal cellulose binding domains, raising the question of why these domains exist in coccolithophores. The proteins were tested for binding with cellulose and chitin as ligands, which resulted in the identification of two functional carbohydrate binding modules: EHUX2 and EHUX4. Compared to benchmark fungal cellulose binding domain Cel7A-CBM1 from Trichoderma reesei, these proteins showed slightly lower binding to birch and bacterial cellulose, but were more efficient chitin binders. Finally, a set of cellulose binding domains was created based on the shuffling of one well-functioning and one non-functional domain. These were characterized in order to get more information of the binding domain’s sequence–function relationship, indicating characteristic differences between the molecular basis of cellulose versus chitin recognition. As previous reports have showed the presence of cellulose in coccoliths and here we find functional cellulose binding modules, a possible connection is discussed. PMID:29782536

  7. Fungal-type carbohydrate binding modules from the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi show binding affinity to cellulose and chitin.

    PubMed

    Rooijakkers, Bart J M; Ikonen, Martina S; Linder, Markus B

    2018-01-01

    Six fungal-type cellulose binding domains were found in the genome of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi and cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequence comparison indicate high similarity to fungal cellulose binding domains, raising the question of why these domains exist in coccolithophores. The proteins were tested for binding with cellulose and chitin as ligands, which resulted in the identification of two functional carbohydrate binding modules: EHUX2 and EHUX4. Compared to benchmark fungal cellulose binding domain Cel7A-CBM1 from Trichoderma reesei, these proteins showed slightly lower binding to birch and bacterial cellulose, but were more efficient chitin binders. Finally, a set of cellulose binding domains was created based on the shuffling of one well-functioning and one non-functional domain. These were characterized in order to get more information of the binding domain's sequence-function relationship, indicating characteristic differences between the molecular basis of cellulose versus chitin recognition. As previous reports have showed the presence of cellulose in coccoliths and here we find functional cellulose binding modules, a possible connection is discussed.

  8. Kinetics of phloretin binding to phosphatidylcholine vesicle membranes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The submillisecond kinetics for phloretin binding to unilamellar phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles was investigated using the temperature-jump technique. Spectrophotometric studies of the equilibrium binding performed at 328 nm demonstrated that phloretin binds to a single set of independent, equivalent sites on the vesicle with a dissociation constant of 8.0 microM and a lipid/site ratio of 4.0. The temperature of the phloretin-vesicle solution was jumped by 4 degrees C within 4 microseconds producing a monoexponential, concentration-dependent relaxation process with time constants in the 30--200-microseconds time range. An analysis of the concentration dependence of relaxation time constants at pH 7.30 and 24 degrees C yielded a binding rate constant of 2.7 X 10(8) M-1 s-1 and an unbinding constant of 2,900 s-1; approximately 66 percent of total binding sites are exposed at the outer vesicle surface. The value of the binding rate constant and three additional observations suggest that the binding kinetics are diffusion limited. The phloretin analogue, naringenin, which has a diffusion coefficient similar to phloretin yet a dissociation constant equal to 24 microM, bound to PC vesicle with the same rate constant as phloretin did. In addition, the phloretin-PC system was studied in buffers made one to six times more viscous than water by addition of sucrose or glycerol to the differ. The equilibrium affinity for phloretin binding to PC vesicles is independent of viscosity, yet the binding rate constant decreases with the expected dependence (kappa binding alpha 1/viscosity) for diffusion-limited processes. Thus, the binding rate constant is not altered by differences in binding affinity, yet depends upon the diffusion coefficient in buffer. Finally, studies of the pH dependence of the binding rate constant showed a dependence (kappa binding alpha [1 + 10pH-pK]) consistent with the diffusion-limited binding of a weak acid. PMID:7391812

  9. Evolution of Metal(Loid) Binding Sites in Transcriptional Regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonez, E.; Thiyagarajan, S.; Cook, J.D.

    2009-05-22

    Expression of the genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of small metalloregulatory proteins respond to transition metals, heavy metals, and metalloids, including As(III), Sb(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). These homodimeric repressors bind to DNA in the absence of inducing metal(loid) ion and dissociate from the DNA when inducer is bound. The regulatory sites are often three- or four-coordinate metal binding sites composed of cysteine thiolates. Surprisingly, in two different As(III)-responsive regulators, the metalloid binding sites were in different locations in the repressor, andmore » the Cd(II) binding sites were in two different locations in two Cd(II)-responsive regulators. We hypothesize that ArsR/SmtB repressors have a common backbone structure, that of a winged helix DNA-binding protein, but have considerable plasticity in the location of inducer binding sites. Here we show that an As(III)-responsive member of the family, CgArsR1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, binds As(III) to a cysteine triad composed of Cys{sup 15}, Cys{sup 16}, and Cys{sup 55}. This binding site is clearly unrelated to the binding sites of other characterized ArsR/SmtB family members. This is consistent with our hypothesis that metal(loid) binding sites in DNA binding proteins evolve convergently in response to persistent environmental pressures.« less

  10. Muscarinic binding sites in cultured bovine pulmonary arterial endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aronstam, R.S.; Catravas, J.D.; Ryan, U.S.

    The authors have previously reported a) the presence of muscarinic binding sites on cultured bovine pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (BPAE; 2,000 sites/cell) and b) that acetylcholine inhibits the release of thromboxane B/sub 2/ fro BPAE. Since the authors findings could reflect muscarinic receptors (mAChR) on BPAE, they have further investigated the nature of BPAE muscarinic binding sites and contrast them to those of known functional mAChR. Muscarinic binding sites on BPAE resembled mAChR in that a) the binding of 3 nM /sup 3/H QNB was inhibited by muscarinic agonists and antagonists; b) /sup 3/H QNB binding was 30 times moremore » sensitive to R(-)- than to S(+)-QNB; c) carbamylcholine binding was resolved into high and low affinity components (IC50's = 0.04 and 2 ..mu..M; d) 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (100 ..mu..M) shifted agonist binding curves to the right by a factor of 3; 4) the atropine-sensitive binding of /sup 3/H oxotremorine-M (/sup 3/H-OXO-M) was depressed by the guanine nucleotide (IC50 + 60 ..mu..M). However, although gallamine allosterically regulates mAChR binding in other tissues, it did not affect the rates of dissociation of /sup 3/H QNB, /sup 3/H methylscopolamine or /sup 3/H OXO-M from BPAE binding sites. Thus, BPAE muscarinic binding sites posses many but not all of the properties associated with functional mAChR.« less

  11. Synthesis and binding affinity of neuropeptide Y at opiate receptors.

    PubMed

    Kiddle, James J; McCreery, Heather J; Soles, Sonia

    2003-03-24

    Neuropeptide Y and several metabolic fragments were synthesized and evaluated for binding affinity at non-selective opiate receptors. Neuropeptide Y and several C-terminal fragments were shown to bind to non-selective opiate receptors with an affinity similar to that of Leu-enkephalin.

  12. Biosensors engineered from conditionally stable ligand-binding domains

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Feng, Justin; Mandell, Daniel J.; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Jester, Benjamin Ward; Tinberg, Christine Elaine

    2017-09-19

    Disclosed is a biosensor engineered to conditionally respond to the presence of specific small molecules, the biosensors including conditionally stable ligand-binding domains (LBDs) which respond to the presence of specific small molecules, wherein readout of binding is provided by reporter genes or transcription factors (TFs) fused to the LBDs.

  13. Methyl group reorientation under ligand binding probed by pseudocontact shifts.

    PubMed

    Lescanne, Mathilde; Ahuja, Puneet; Blok, Anneloes; Timmer, Monika; Akerud, Tomas; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2018-06-02

    Liquid-state NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique to elucidate binding properties of ligands on proteins. Ligands binding in hydrophobic pockets are often in close proximity to methyl groups and binding can lead to subtle displacements of methyl containing side chains to accommodate the ligand. To establish whether pseudocontact shifts can be used to characterize ligand binding and the effects on methyl groups, the N-terminal domain of HSP90 was tagged with caged lanthanoid NMR probe 5 at three positions and titrated with a ligand. Binding was monitored using the resonances of leucine and valine methyl groups. The pseudocontact shifts (PCS) caused by ytterbium result in enhanced dispersion of the methyl spectrum, allowing more resonances to be observed. The effects of tag attachment on the spectrum and ligand binding are small. Significant changes in PCS were observed upon ligand binding, indicating displacements of several methyl groups. By determining the cross-section of PCS iso-surfaces generated by two or three paramagnetic centers, the new position of a methyl group can be estimated, showing displacements in the range of 1-3 Å for methyl groups in the binding site. The information about such subtle but significant changes may be used to improve docking studies and can find application in fragment-based drug discovery.

  14. Identifying the binding mode of a molecular scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chema, Doron; Eren, Doron; Yayon, Avner; Goldblum, Amiram; Zaliani, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    We describe a method for docking of a scaffold-based series and present its advantages over docking of individual ligands, for determining the binding mode of a molecular scaffold in a binding site. The method has been applied to eight different scaffolds of protein kinase inhibitors (PKI). A single analog of each of these eight scaffolds was previously crystallized with different protein kinases. We have used FlexX to dock a set of molecules that share the same scaffold, rather than docking a single molecule. The main mode of binding is determined by the mode of binding of the largest cluster among the docked molecules that share a scaffold. Clustering is based on our `nearest single neighbor' method [J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci., 43 (2003) 208-217]. Additional criteria are applied in those cases in which more than one significant binding mode is found. Using the proposed method, most of the crystallographic binding modes of these scaffolds were reconstructed. Alternative modes, that have not been detected yet by experiments, could also be identified. The method was applied to predict the binding mode of an additional molecular scaffold that was not yet reported and the predicted binding mode has been found to be very similar to experimental results for a closely related scaffold. We suggest that this approach be used as a virtual screening tool for scaffold-based design processes.

  15. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin.more » This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.« less

  16. Binding Phenomena within a Reductionist Theory of Grammatical Dependencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the implications of binding phenomena for the development of a reductionist theory of grammatical dependencies. The starting point is the analysis of binding and control in Hornstein (2001, 2009). A number of revisions are made to this framework in order to develop a simpler and empirically more successful account of…

  17. Specific binding of trivalent metal ions to λ-carrageenan.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yiping; Li, Shugang; Fang, Yapeng; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Phillips, Glyn O; Lerbret, Adrien; Assifaoui, Ali

    2018-04-01

    Carrageenans are a family of sulphated cell wall polysaccharides extracted from seaweeds and are widely used in different industrial sectors. Relative to κ-carrageenan (κ-car) and ι-carrageenan (ι-car), the ionic binding behavior of λ-carrageenan (λ-car) is far less studied. In this work, the interaction and binding behavior between λ-car and metal ions of different valency (Na + , K + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ , Al 3+ , Cr 3+ ) have been investigated. In contrast to the non-specific interaction of the monovalent and divalent cations, specific binding has been identified between λ-car and Fe 3+ /Al 3+ . The specific binding could lead to either precipitation or gelation of λ-car, depending on the way of introducing Fe 3+ /Al 3+ ions. Fe 3+ and Al 3+ exhibit the same binding stoichiometry of [M 3+ ]/[repeating unit] = 1.0, with the former having a relatively larger binding constant. Cr 3+ , though having very similar physical properties with Fe 3+ /Al 3+ , is incapable of binding specifically to Cr 3+ . The phenomena could not be interpreted in terms of counterion condensation, and are rather attributable to a mechanism in which hexa-coordination of Fe 3+ /Al 3+ and entropy-driven cation dehydration play crucial roles in driving the binding of the trivalent metal ions to λ-car. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Aspects of Protein, Chemistry, Part II: Oxygen-Binding Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Compares differences in function and behavior of two oxygen-binding proteins, myoglobin found in muscle and hemoglobin found in blood. Describes the mechanism of oxygen-binding and allosteric effect in hemoglobin; also describes the effect of pH on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. (CS)

  19. The Audiovisual Temporal Binding Window Narrows in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewkowicz, David J.; Flom, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Binding is key in multisensory perception. This study investigated the audio-visual (A-V) temporal binding window in 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old children (total N = 120). Children watched a person uttering a syllable whose auditory and visual components were either temporally synchronized or desynchronized by 366, 500, or 666 ms. They were asked…

  20. Cation Binding to Xanthorhodopsin: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Magnetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Smolensky Koganov, Elena; Leitus, Gregory; Rozin, Rinat; Weiner, Lev; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai

    2017-05-04

    Xanthorhodopsin (xR) is a member of the retinal protein family and acts as a proton pump in the cell membranes of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Salinibacter ruber. In addition to the retinal chromophore, xR contains a carotenoid, which acts as a light-harvesting antenna as it transfers 40% of the quanta it absorbs to the retinal. Our previous studies have shown that the CD and absorption spectra of xR are dramatically affected due to the protonation of two different residues. It is still unclear whether xR can bind cations. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy used in the present study revealed that xR can bind divalent cations, such as Mn 2+ and Ca 2+ , to deionized xR (DI-xR). We also demonstrate that xR can bind 1 equiv of Mn 2+ to a high-affinity binding site followed by binding of ∼40 equiv in cooperative manner and ∼100 equiv of Mn 2+ that are weakly bound. SQUID magnetic studies suggest that the high cooperative binding of Mn 2+ cations to xR is due to the formation of Mn 2+ clusters. Our data demonstrate that Ca 2+ cations bind to DI-xR with a lower affinity than Mn 2+ , supporting the assumption that binding of Mn 2+ occurs through cluster formation, because Ca 2+ cations cannot form clusters in contrast to Mn 2+ .

  1. Unique carbohydrate binding platforms employed by the glucan phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    MEEKINS, David A.; GENTRY, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a family of enzymes that are functionally conserved at the enzymatic level in animals and plants. These enzymes bind and dephosphorylate glycogen in animals and starch in plants. While the enzymatic function is conserved, the glucan phosphatases employ distinct mechanisms to bind and dephosphorylate glycogen or starch. The founding member of the family is a bimodular human protein called laforin that is comprised of a carbohydrate binding module 20 (CBM20) followed by a dual specificity phosphatase domain. Plants contain two glucan phosphatases: Starch EXcess4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2). SEX4 contains a chloroplast targeting peptide, dual specificity phosphatase (DSP) domain, a CBM45, and a carboxy-terminal motif. LSF2 is comprised of simply a chloroplast targeting peptide, DSP domain, and carboxy-terminal motif. SEX4 employs an integrated DSP-CBM glucan-binding platform to engage and dephosphorylate starch. LSF2 lacks a CBM and instead utilizes two surface binding sites to bind and dephosphorylate starch. Laforin is a dimeric protein in solution and it utilizes a tetramodular architecture and cooperativity to bind and dephosphorylate glycogen. This chapter describes the biological role of glucan phosphatases in glycogen and starch metabolism and compares and contrasts their ability to bind and dephosphorylate glucans. PMID:27147465

  2. Expanding RNA binding specificity and affinity of engineered PUF domains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Jue; Li, Hai-Tao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Zefeng; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Specific manipulation of RNA is necessary for the research in biotechnology and medicine. The RNA-binding domains of Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factors (PUF domains) are programmable RNA binding scaffolds used to engineer artificial proteins that specifically modulate RNAs. However, the native PUF domains generally recognize 8-nt RNAs, limiting their applications. Here, we modify the PUF domain of human Pumilio1 to engineer PUFs that recognize RNA targets of different length. The engineered PUFs bind to their RNA targets specifically and PUFs with more repeats have higher binding affinity than the canonical eight-repeat domains; however, the binding affinity reaches the peak at those with 9 and 10 repeats. Structural analysis on PUF with nine repeats reveals a higher degree of curvature, and the RNA binding unexpectedly and dramatically opens the curved structure. Investigation of the residues positioned in between two RNA bases demonstrates that tyrosine and arginine have favored stacking interactions. Further tests on the availability of the engineered PUFs in vitro and in splicing function assays indicate that our engineered PUFs bind RNA targets with high affinity in a programmable way. PMID:29490074

  3. Expanding RNA binding specificity and affinity of engineered PUF domains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang-Yang; Mao, Miao-Wei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Jue; Li, Hai-Tao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Zefeng; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2018-05-18

    Specific manipulation of RNA is necessary for the research in biotechnology and medicine. The RNA-binding domains of Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factors (PUF domains) are programmable RNA binding scaffolds used to engineer artificial proteins that specifically modulate RNAs. However, the native PUF domains generally recognize 8-nt RNAs, limiting their applications. Here, we modify the PUF domain of human Pumilio1 to engineer PUFs that recognize RNA targets of different length. The engineered PUFs bind to their RNA targets specifically and PUFs with more repeats have higher binding affinity than the canonical eight-repeat domains; however, the binding affinity reaches the peak at those with 9 and 10 repeats. Structural analysis on PUF with nine repeats reveals a higher degree of curvature, and the RNA binding<