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Sample records for zone center optical

  1. Optical design of soft multifocal contact lens with uniform optical power in center-distance zone with optimized NURBS.

    PubMed

    Vu, Lien T; Chen, Chao-Chang A; Yu, Chia-Wei

    2018-02-05

    This study aims to develop a new optical design method of soft multifocal contact lens (CLs) to obtain uniform optical power in large center-distance zone with optimized Non-Uniform Rational B-spline (NURBS). For the anterior surface profiles of CLs, the NURBS design curves are optimized to match given optical power distributions. Then, the NURBS in the center-distance zones are fitted in the corresponding spherical/aspheric curves for both data points and their centers of curvature to achieve the uniform power. Four cases of soft CLs have been manufactured by casting in shell molds by injection molding and then measured to verify the design specifications. Results of power profiles of these CLs are concord with the given clinical requirements of uniform powers in larger center-distance zone. The developed optical design method has been verified for multifocal CLs design and can be further applied for production of soft multifocal CLs.

  2. Experimental evidence of zone-center optical phonon softening by accumulating holes in thin Ge

    SciT

    Kabuyanagi, Shoichi; Nishimura, Tomonori; Yajima, Takeaki

    2016-01-15

    We discuss the impact of free carriers on the zone-center optical phonon frequency in germanium (Ge). By taking advantage of the Ge-on-insulator structure, we measured the Raman spectroscopy by applying back-gate bias. Phonon softening by accumulating holes in Ge film was clearly observed. This fact strongly suggests that the phonon softening in heavily-doped Ge is mainly attributed to the free carrier effect rather than the dopant atom counterpart. Furthermore, we propose that the free carrier effect on phonon softening is simply understandable from the viewpoint of covalent bonding modification by free carriers.

  3. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center home Contact Us Director: Claire Max Office: Room 205, Center for Adaptive Optics Phone: (831) 459-2049 Fax: (831 ) 459-5717 Email: max@ucolick.org Associate Director: Donald Gavel Office: Room 209, Center for Adaptive

  4. Center for Adaptive Optics | Home

    Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center home Directions to The Center for Adaptive Optics Building Directions to the Center for Adaptive Optics Building * Seaway Inn * West Cliff Inn Last Modified: Apr 3, 2012 Center for Adaptive Optics | Search | The Center

  5. Center for Adaptive Optics | Home

    Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center Adaptive distortions in optical systems ... Announcements: The CfAO Summer School on Adaptive Optics 2018 will be held mission of the UC Center for Adaptive Optics is to develop, apply, and disseminate adaptive optics science

  6. Center for Adaptive Optics | Publications

    Text-Only Version Adaptive Optics, Center for Home Page CfAO Logo Search The Center Adaptive Optics for Adaptive Optics | Search | Sitemap | The Center | Adaptive Optics | Research | Education/HR

  7. Center for Adaptive Optics | Software

    Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center home Adaptive Optics Software The Center for Adaptive Optics acts as a clearing house for distributing Software to Institutes it gives specialists in Adaptive Optics a place to distribute their software. All software is

  8. Center for Adaptive Optics | Search

    Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center home Search CfAO Google Search search: CfAO All of UCOLick.org Whole Web Search for recent Adaptive Optics news at GoogleNews! Last Modified: Sep 21, 2010 Center for Adaptive Optics | Search | The Center | Adaptive Optics

  9. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in postdocs. E-mail: cfao@ucolick.org Institutions: University of California, Berkeley Astronomy Department Retinal Imaging Laboratory Eye Center University of California, Irvine Department of Physics and Astronomy

  10. Economics of data center optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Traffic to and from data centers is now reaching Zettabytes/year. Even the smallest of businesses now rely on data centers for revenue generation. And, the largest data centers today are orders of magnitude larger than the supercomputing centers of a few years ago. Until quite recently, for most data center managers, optical data centers were nice to dream about, but not really essential. Today, the all-optical data center - perhaps even an all-single mode fiber (SMF) data center is something that even managers of medium-sized data centers should be considering. Economical transceivers are the key to increased adoption of data center optics. An analysis of current and near future data center optics economics will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Center for Adaptive Optics | Events

    Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center home 2015 AO Adaptive Optics and Wavefront Control in Microscopy and Ophthalmology Paris, France October 25-25 CfAO Adaptive Optics Institute for Scientist and Engineer Educators Members Calendar of Events Publications

  12. Optical Measurement Center Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, H.; Abercromby, K.; Mulrooney, M.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, an optical measurement center (OMC) was created to measure the photometric signatures of debris pieces. Initially, the OMC was equipped with a 300 W xenon arc lamp, a SBIG 512 x 512 ST8X MEI CCD camera with standard Johnson filters, and a Lynx 6 robotic arm with five degrees of freedom. As research progressed, modifications were made to the equipment. A customized rotary table was built to overcome the robot s limitation of 180 degree wrist rotation and provide complete 360 degree rotation with little human interaction. This change allowed an initial phase angle (source-object-camera angle) of roughly 5 degrees to be adjusted to 7, 10, 15, 18, 20, 25, or 28 degrees. Additionally, the Johnson R and I CCD filters were replaced with the standard astronomical filters suite (Bessell R,I). In an effort to reduce object saturation, the two generic aperture stops were replaced with neutral density filters. Initially data were taken with aluminum debris pieces from the European Space Operations Centre ESOC2 ground test and more recently with samples from a thermal multi-layered insulation (MLI) commonly used on rocket bodies and satellites. The ESOC2 data provided light curve analysis for one type of material but many different shapes, including flat, bent, curled, folded, and torn. The MLI samples are roughly the same size and shape, but have different surfaces that give rise to interesting photometric light curves. In addition, filter photometry was conducted on the MLI pieces, a process that also will be used on the ESOC2 samples. While obtaining light curve data an anomalous drop in intensity was observed when the table revolved through the second 180 degree rotation. Investigation revealed that the robot s wrist rotation is not reliable past 80 degrees, thus the object may be at slightly different angles at the 180 degree transition. To limit this effect, the initial rotation position begins with the object s minimal surface area facing the camera.

  13. Center for Adaptive Optics | News

    * Methane Clouds Observed Near Titan's Equator May Explain Presence of Riverbeds on the Surface * 'Dark Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center home AO of Cosmic Time * Celebration of Science and Technology Centers Class of 2000 AO Headlines 2009

  14. Functional optical zone of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Juan; Klyce, Stephen D; Sarver, Edwin J; Artal, Pablo

    2007-03-01

    When keratorefractive surgery is used to treat a central corneal diameter smaller than the resting pupil, visual symptoms of polyopia, ghosting, blur, haloes, and glare can be experienced. Progress has been made to enlarge the area of surgical treatment to extend beyond the photopic pupil; however, geometric limitations can pose restrictions to extend the treatment beyond the mesopic pupil diameter and can lead to impediments in night vision. The size of the treated area that has achieved good optical performance has been defined as the functional optical zone (FOZ). In this study the authors developed three objective methods to measure the FOZ. Corneal topography examination results from 1 eye of 34 unoperated normal eyes and 32 myopic eyes corrected by laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) were evaluated in three ways. First, a uniform axial power method (FOZ(A)) assessed the area of the postoperative cornea that was within a +/-0.5-D window centered on the mathematical mode. Second, FOZ was determined based on the corneal wavefront true RMS error as a function of the simulated pupil size (FOZ(R)). Third, FOZ was determined from the radial MTF, established at the retinal plane as a function of pupil size (FOZ(M)). Means for each of the FOZ methods (FOZ(A), FOZ(R), and FOZ(M)) were 7.6, 9.1, and 7.7 mm, respectively, for normal eyes. For LASIK-corrected eyes, these means were 6.0, 6.9, and 6.0 mm. Overall, an average decrease of 1.8 mm in the functional optical zone was found after the LASIK procedure. Correlations between the FOZ methods after LASIK showed acceptable and statistically significant values (R = 0.71, 0.70, and 0.61; P < 0.01). These methods will be useful to more fully characterize corneal treatment profiles after keratorefractive surgery. Because of its ease of implementation, direct spatial correspondence to corneal topography, and good correlation to the other more computationally intensive methods, the semiempiric uniform axial power method (FOZ

  15. Center for Adaptive Optics | AO Summer School

    School on Adaptive Optics Sponsored by: Center for Adaptive Optics The AO Summer School instruction is Adaptive Optics and their implementation. Our Summer School is intended to facilitate and encourage previous summer school web pages. Please contact us, if you would like more information on AO Summer School

  16. Center for Adaptive Optics | Links

    extraterrestrische Physik, Infrared/Submillimeter Astronomy MMT Adaptive Optics Mount Wilson Observatory National Astronomical Observatory of Japan National Solar Observatory National Optical Astronomy Observatories, AO Astronomy Observatoire de Paris Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri Padua Observatory Palomar Observatory

  17. Center for Adaptive Optics | Jobs

    , 2015 University of Geneva Adaptive Optics Scientist or Engineer March 16, 2015 NRC-Herzberg Astronomy Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) Post-doctoral Fellowships in High-angular Resolution

  18. Optics at langley research center.

    PubMed

    Crumbly, K H

    1970-02-01

    The specialized tools of optics have played an important part in Langley's history of aeronautical and space research. Schlieren systems for photographing aeronautics and space models in wind-tunnel investigations have contributed to the available knowledge of aerodynamics. Optics continues to be an important part of Langley's research program, including new techniques for measuring the sensitivity of photomultiplier tubes, spectrographic techniques for radiation measurements of wind-tunnel models, research into large orbiting telescopes, horizon definition by ir radiation measurements, spectra of natural and artificial meteors, measurement of clear air turbulence utilizing lasers, and many others.

  19. Optical multicast system for data center networks.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Payman; Gupta, Varun; Xu, Junjie; Wang, Howard; Zussman, Gil; Bergman, Keren

    2015-08-24

    We present the design and experimental evaluation of an Optical Multicast System for Data Center Networks, a hardware-software system architecture that uniquely integrates passive optical splitters in a hybrid network architecture for faster and simpler delivery of multicast traffic flows. An application-driven control plane manages the integrated optical and electronic switched traffic routing in the data plane layer. The control plane includes a resource allocation algorithm to optimally assign optical splitters to the flows. The hardware architecture is built on a hybrid network with both Electronic Packet Switching (EPS) and Optical Circuit Switching (OCS) networks to aggregate Top-of-Rack switches. The OCS is also the connectivity substrate of splitters to the optical network. The optical multicast system implementation requires only commodity optical components. We built a prototype and developed a simulation environment to evaluate the performance of the system for bulk multicasting. Experimental and numerical results show simultaneous delivery of multicast flows to all receivers with steady throughput. Compared to IP multicast that is the electronic counterpart, optical multicast performs with less protocol complexity and reduced energy consumption. Compared to peer-to-peer multicast methods, it achieves at minimum an order of magnitude higher throughput for flows under 250 MB with significantly less connection overheads. Furthermore, for delivering 20 TB of data containing only 15% multicast flows, it reduces the total delivery energy consumption by 50% and improves latency by 55% compared to a data center with a sole non-blocking EPS network.

  20. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  1. Linear optical pulse compression based on temporal zone plates.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Ming; Lou, Shuqin; Azaña, José

    2013-07-15

    We propose and demonstrate time-domain equivalents of spatial zone plates, namely temporal zone plates, as alternatives to conventional time lenses. Both temporal intensity zone plates, based on intensity-only temporal modulation, and temporal phase zone plates, based on phase-only temporal modulation, are introduced and studied. Temporal zone plates do not exhibit the limiting tradeoff between temporal aperture and frequency bandwidth (temporal resolution) of conventional linear time lenses. As a result, these zone plates can be ideally designed to offer a time-bandwidth product (TBP) as large as desired, practically limited by the achievable temporal modulation bandwidth (limiting the temporal resolution) and the amount of dispersion needed in the target processing systems (limiting the temporal aperture). We numerically and experimentally demonstrate linear optical pulse compression by using temporal zone plates based on linear electro-optic temporal modulation followed by fiber-optics dispersion. In the pulse-compression experiment based on temporal phase zone plates, we achieve a resolution of ~25.5 ps over a temporal aperture of ~5.77 ns, representing an experimental TBP larger than 226 using a phase-modulation amplitude of only ~0.8π rad. We also numerically study the potential of these devices to achieve temporal imaging of optical waveforms and present a comparative analysis on the performance of different temporal intensity and phase zone plates.

  2. Fresnel zone plate with apodized aperture for hard X-ray Gaussian beam optics.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio; Itabashi, Seiichi; Oda, Masatoshi

    2017-05-01

    Fresnel zone plates with apodized apertures [apodization FZPs (A-FZPs)] have been developed to realise Gaussian beam optics in the hard X-ray region. The designed zone depth of A-FZPs gradually decreases from the center to peripheral regions. Such a zone structure forms a Gaussian-like smooth-shouldered aperture function which optically behaves as an apodization filter and produces a Gaussian-like focusing spot profile. Optical properties of two types of A-FZP, i.e. a circular type and a one-dimensional type, have been evaluated by using a microbeam knife-edge scan test, and have been carefully compared with those of normal FZP optics. Advantages of using A-FZPs are introduced.

  3. Optical metrology at the Optical Sciences Center: an historical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine; Parks, Robert E.

    2014-10-01

    The Optical Sciences Center (OSC) begun as a graduate-level applied optics teaching institution to support the US space effort. The making of optics representative of those used in other space programs was deemed essential. This led to the need for optical metrology: at first Hartmann tests, but almost immediately to interferometric tests using the newly invented HeNe laser. Not only were new types of interferometers needed, but the whole infrastructure that went with testing, fringe location methods, aberration removal software and contour map generation to aid the opticians during polishing needed to be developed. Over the last half century more rapid and precise methods of interferogram data reduction, surface roughness measurement, and methods of instrument calibration to separate errors from those in the optic have been pioneered at OSC. Other areas of research included null lens design and the writing of lens design software that led into the design of computer generated holograms for asphere testing. More recently work has been done on the reduction of speckle noise in interferograms, methods to test large convex aspheres, and a return to slope measuring tests to increase the dynamic range of the types of aspheric surfaces amenable to optical testing including free-form surfaces. This paper documents the history of the development of optical testing projects at OSC and highlights the contributions some of the individuals associated with new methods of testing and the infrastructure needed to support the testing. We conclude with comments about the future trends optical metrology.

  4. Optical wireless communication in data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2018-01-01

    In the last decade data centers have become a crucial element in modern human society. However, to keep pace with internet data rate growth, new technologies supporting data center should develop. Integration of optical wireless communication (OWC) in data centers is one of the proposed technologies as augmented technology to the fiber network. One implementation of the OWC technology is deployment of optical wireless transceiver on top of the existing cable/fiber network as extension to the top of rack (TOR) switch; in this way, a dynamic and flexible network is created. Optical wireless communication could reduce energy consumption, increase the data rate, reduce the communication latency, increase flexibility and scalability, and reduce maintenance time and cost, in comparison to extra fiber network deployment. In this paper we review up to date literature in the field, propose an implementation scheme of OWC network, discuss ways to reduce energy consumption by parallel link communication and report preliminary measurement result of university data center environment.

  5. Optical comparison of multizone and single-zone photorefractive keratectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Cirre, Xochitl; Manns, Fabrice; Rol, Pascal O.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose is to calculate and compare the point-spread function and the central ablation depth (CAD) of a paraxial eye model after photo-refractive keratectomy (PRK), with single and multizone treatments. A modified Le Grand-El Hage paraxial eye model, with a pupil diameter ranging from 2 to 8 mm was used. Ray-tracing was performed for initial myopia ranging from 1 to 10D; after single zone PRK; after double zone PRK; and after tripe zone PRK. The ray-tracing of a parallel incident beam was calculated by using the paraxial matrix method. At equal CAD, the optical image quality is better after single zone treatments. Multizone treatments do not seem to be advantageous optically.

  6. A method which can enhance the optical-centering accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-min; Zhang, Xue-jun; Dai, Yi-dan; Yu, Tao; Duan, Jia-you; Li, Hua

    2014-09-01

    Optical alignment machining is an effective method to ensure the co-axiality of optical system. The co-axiality accuracy is determined by optical-centering accuracy of single optical unit, which is determined by the rotating accuracy of lathe and the optical-centering judgment accuracy. When the rotating accuracy of 0.2um can be achieved, the leading error can be ignored. An axis-determination tool which is based on the principle of auto-collimation can be used to determine the only position of centerscope is designed. The only position is the position where the optical axis of centerscope is coincided with the rotating axis of the lathe. Also a new optical-centering judgment method is presented. A system which includes the axis-determination tool and the new optical-centering judgment method can enhance the optical-centering accuracy to 0.003mm.

  7. Corneal Power Distribution and Functional Optical Zone Following Small Incision Lenticule Extraction for Myopia.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yishan; Huang, Jia; Zhou, Xingtao; Hanna, Rewais Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate corneal power distribution using the ray tracing method (corneal power) in eyes undergoing small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) surgery and compare the functional optical zone with two lenticular sizes. This retrospective study evaluated 128 patients who underwent SMILE for the correction of myopia and astigmatism with a lenticular diameter of 6.5 mm (the 6.5-mm group) and 6.2 mm (the 6.2-mm group). The data include refraction, correction, and corneal power obtained via a Scheimpflug camera from the pupil center to 8 mm. The surgically induced changes in corneal power (Δcorneal power) were compared to correction and Δrefraction. The functional optical zone was defined as the largest ring diameter when the difference between the ring power and the pupil center power was 1.50 diopters or less. The functional optical zone was compared between two lenticular diameter groups. Corneal power distribution was measured by the ray tracing method. In the 6.5-mm group (n=100), Δcorneal power at 5 mm showed the smallest difference from Δrefraction and Δcorneal power at 0 mm exhibited the smallest difference from correction. In the 6.2-mm group (n=28), Δcorneal power at 2 mm displayed the lowest dissimilarity from Δrefraction and Δcorneal power at 4 mm demonstrated the lowest dissimilarity from correction. There was no significant difference between the mean postoperative functional optical zones in either group when their spherical equivalents were matched. Total corneal refactive power can be used in the evaluation of surgically induced changes following SMILE. A lenticular diameter of 6.2 mm should be recommended for patients with high myopia because there is no functional difference in the optical zone. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Mapping air quality zones for coastal urban centers.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Brian; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Thé, Jesse; Munshed, Mohammad; Faisal, Shah; Abdullah, Meshal; Al Aseed, Athari

    2017-05-01

    This study presents a new method that incorporates modern air dispersion models allowing local terrain and land-sea breeze effects to be considered along with political and natural boundaries for more accurate mapping of air quality zones (AQZs) for coastal urban centers. This method uses local coastal wind patterns and key urban air pollution sources in each zone to more accurately calculate air pollutant concentration statistics. The new approach distributes virtual air pollution sources within each small grid cell of an area of interest and analyzes a puff dispersion model for a full year's worth of 1-hr prognostic weather data. The difference of wind patterns in coastal and inland areas creates significantly different skewness (S) and kurtosis (K) statistics for the annually averaged pollutant concentrations at ground level receptor points for each grid cell. Plotting the S-K data highlights grouping of sources predominantly impacted by coastal winds versus inland winds. The application of the new method is demonstrated through a case study for the nation of Kuwait by developing new AQZs to support local air management programs. The zone boundaries established by the S-K method were validated by comparing MM5 and WRF prognostic meteorological weather data used in the air dispersion modeling, a support vector machine classifier was trained to compare results with the graphical classification method, and final zones were compared with data collected from Earth observation satellites to confirm locations of high-exposure-risk areas. The resulting AQZs are more accurate and support efficient management strategies for air quality compliance targets effected by local coastal microclimates. A novel method to determine air quality zones in coastal urban areas is introduced using skewness (S) and kurtosis (K) statistics calculated from grid concentrations results of air dispersion models. The method identifies land-sea breeze effects that can be used to manage local air

  9. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeff; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature Si02 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  10. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeff; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature SiO2 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  11. Effect of Number of Zones on Subjective Vision in Concentric Bifocal Optics.

    PubMed

    Legras, Richard; Rio, David

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of the number of concentric zones of a center-near bifocal optics on the subjective quality of vision. Twenty-two subjects scored with a five-item continuous grading scale the quality of vision of calculated images (i.e., three high-contrast 20/50 letters) viewed through their best sphero-cylindrical correction and a 3-mm pupil to limit the impact of their aberrations. Through-focus images were calculated from -4 to +2 diopters (D), each 0.25 D, in the presence of center-near bifocal optics (Add 2.5 D) varying by their number of concentric zones (from 2 to 20). To compare the results obtained with these profiles, we calculated the area under the (through-focus) curve (AUC) higher than 2 out of 5 (i.e., limit between a poor and a fair image quality, considered as the limit of acceptability). This value was normalized by the naked eye condition and divided into distance, intermediate, and near AUC. The results showed large interindividual variations. Distance AUC remained quite similar whatever the profile, near AUC decreased with the number of concentric zones, and intermediate AUC rose with the number of concentric zones. With 10 and 20 concentric zones, diffraction phenomenon induced constructive interferences at intermediate proximities and destructive interferences at distance and near proximities. To balance distance, intermediate, and near quality of vision, a number of zones between 8 and 10 should be chosen. If the subject does not need intermediate quality of vision, then a profile with two to five zones should be favored.

  12. Color Fundus Photography versus Fluorescein Angiography in Identification of the Macular Center and Zone in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir N.; Klufas, Michael A.; Ryan, Michael C.; Jonas, Karyn E.; Ostmo, Susan; Martinez-Castellanos, Maria Ana; Berrocal, Audina M.; Chiang, Michael F.; Chan, R.V. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the utility of fluorescein angiography (FA) in identification of the macular center and the diagnosis of zone in patients with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Design Validity and reliability analysis of diagnostic tools Methods 32 sets (16 color fundus photographs; 16 color fundus photographs paired with the corresponding FA) of wide-angle retinal images obtained from 16 eyes of eight infants with ROP were compiled on a secure web site. 9 ROP experts (3 pediatric ophthalmologists; 6 vitreoretinal surgeons) participated in the study. For each image set, experts identified the macular center and provided a diagnosis of zone. Main Outcome Measures (1) Sensitivity and specificity of zone diagnosis (2) “Computer facilitated diagnosis of zone,” based on precise measurement of the macular center, optic disc center, and peripheral ROP. Results Computer facilitated diagnosis of zone agreed with the expert’s diagnosis of zone in 28/45 (62%) cases using color fundus photographs and in 31/45 (69%) cases using FA. Mean (95% CI) sensitivity for detection of zone I by experts as compared to a consensus reference standard diagnosis when interpreting the color fundus images alone versus interpreting the color fundus photographs and FA was 47% (35.3% – 59.3%) and 61.1% (48.9% – 72.4%), respectively, (t(9) ≥ (2.063), p = 0.073). Conclusions There is a marginally significant difference in zone diagnosis when using color fundus photographs compared to using color fundus photographs and the corresponding fluorescein angiograms. There is inconsistency between traditional zone diagnosis (based on ophthalmoscopic exam and image review) compared to a computer-facilitated diagnosis of zone. PMID:25637180

  13. Color fundus photography versus fluorescein angiography in identification of the macular center and zone in retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Samir N; Klufas, Michael A; Ryan, Michael C; Jonas, Karyn E; Ostmo, Susan; Martinez-Castellanos, Maria Ana; Berrocal, Audina M; Chiang, Michael F; Chan, R V Paul

    2015-05-01

    To examine the usefulness of fluorescein angiography (FA) in identifying the macular center and diagnosis of zone in patients with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Validity and reliability analysis of diagnostic tools. Thirty-two sets (16 color fundus photographs and 16 color fundus photographs paired with the corresponding FA images) of wide-angle retinal images obtained from 16 eyes of 8 infants with ROP were compiled on a secure web site. Nine ROP experts (3 pediatric ophthalmologists and 6 vitreoretinal surgeons) participated in the study. For each image set, experts identified the macular center and provided a diagnosis of zone. (1) Sensitivity and specificity of zone diagnosis and (2) computer-facilitated diagnosis of zone, based on precise measurement of the macular center, optic disc center, and peripheral ROP. Computer-facilitated diagnosis of zone agreed with the expert's diagnosis of zone in 28 (62%) of 45 cases using color fundus photographs and in 31 (69%) of 45 cases using FA images. Mean (95% confidence interval) sensitivity for detection of zone I by experts compared with a consensus reference standard diagnosis when interpreting the color fundus images alone versus interpreting the color fundus photographs and FA images was 47% (range, 35.3% to 59.3%) and 61.1% (range, 48.9% to 72.4%), respectively (t(9) ≥ (2.063); P = .073). There is a marginally significant difference in zone diagnosis when using color fundus photographs compared with using color fundus photographs and the corresponding FA images. There is inconsistency between traditional zone diagnosis (based on ophthalmoscopic examination and image review) compared with a computer-facilitated diagnosis of zone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. RCOP: Research Center for Optical Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabibi, Bagher M. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    During the five years since its inception, Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) has excelled in the goals stated in the original proposal: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, there have been 16 Bachelors degrees and 9 Masters degrees awarded to African American students working in RCOP during the last five years. RCOP has also provided research experience to undergraduate and high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been instrumental in the development of the Ph.D. program in physics which is in its fourth year at Hampton. There are currently over 40 graduate students in the program and 9 African American graduate students, working in RCOP, that have satisfied all of the requirements for Ph.D. candidancy and are working on their dissertation research. At least three of these students will be awarded their doctoral degrees during 1997. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. During the first five years of existence, RCOP researchers have generated well over $3 M in research funding that directly supports the Center. Close ties with NASA Langley and NASA Lewis have been established, and collaborations with NASA scientists, URC's and other universities as well as with industry have been developed. This success is evidenced by the rate of publishing research results in refereed journals, which now exceeds that of the goals in the original proposal (approx. 2 publications per faculty per year). Also, two patents have been awarded to RCOP scientists.

  15. Impact of contact lens zone geometry and ocular optics on bifocal retinal image quality

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Arthur; Nam, Jayoung; Xu, Renfeng; Harman, Leslie; Thibos, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the separate and combined influences of zone geometry, pupil size, diffraction, apodisation and spherical aberration on the optical performance of concentric zonal bifocals. Methods Zonal bifocal pupil functions representing eye + ophthalmic correction were defined by interleaving wavefronts from separate optical zones of the bifocal. A two-zone design (a central circular inner zone surrounded by an annular outer-zone which is bounded by the pupil) and a five-zone design (a central small circular zone surrounded by four concentric annuli) were configured with programmable zone geometry, wavefront phase and pupil transmission characteristics. Using computational methods, we examined the effects of diffraction, Stiles Crawford apodisation, pupil size and spherical aberration on optical transfer functions for different target distances. Results Apodisation alters the relative weighting of each zone, and thus the balance of near and distance optical quality. When spherical aberration is included, the effective distance correction, add power and image quality depend on zone-geometry and Stiles Crawford Effect apodisation. When the outer zone width is narrow, diffraction limits the available image contrast when focused, but as pupil dilates and outer zone width increases, aberrations will limit the best achievable image quality. With two-zone designs, balancing near and distance image quality is not achieved with equal area inner and outer zones. With significant levels of spherical aberration, multi-zone designs effectively become multifocals. Conclusion Wave optics and pupil varying ocular optics significantly affect the imaging capabilities of different optical zones of concentric bifocals. With two-zone bifocal designs, diffraction, pupil apodisation spherical aberration, and zone size influence both the effective add power and the pupil size required to balance near and distance image quality. Five-zone bifocal designs achieve a high degree of

  16. Center for the Integration of Optical Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-15

    medium-high-speed two- beam coupling that could be used in systems as an all- optical interconnect. The basis of our studies was the fact that operating at...to investigate near-band edge photorefractivity for optical interconnects, at least when used at small beam ratio or in phase conjugate resonators. I...field pattern a mess. Their poor beam quality makes laser diode arrays ill suited for many applications, such as launching intense light into single

  17. Theoretical Communities of Praxis: The University Writing Center as Cultural Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monty, Randall William

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental purpose of "Theoretical Communities of Praxis: The University Writing Center as Cultural Contact Zone" is to investigate the situatedness of Writing Center Studies, defining it as an autonomous (sub)discipline and interdisciplinary contact zone within the larger discipline of Rhetoric and Composition. In order to meet…

  18. 33 CFR 165.1121 - Security Zone: Fleet Supply Center Industrial Pier, San Diego, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Center Industrial Pier, San Diego, CA. 165.1121 Section 165.1121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.1121 Security Zone: Fleet Supply Center Industrial Pier, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The following area is a security zone: the waters of San Diego Bay extending approximately 100...

  19. Digital optical computers at the optoelectronic computing systems center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.

    1991-01-01

    The Digital Optical Computing Program within the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Opto-electronic Computing Systems has as its specific goal research on optical computing architectures suitable for use at the highest possible speeds. The program can be targeted toward exploiting the time domain because other programs in the Center are pursuing research on parallel optical systems, exploiting optical interconnection and optical devices and materials. Using a general purpose computing architecture as the focus, we are developing design techniques, tools and architecture for operation at the speed of light limit. Experimental work is being done with the somewhat low speed components currently available but with architectures which will scale up in speed as faster devices are developed. The design algorithms and tools developed for a general purpose, stored program computer are being applied to other systems such as optimally controlled optical communication networks.

  20. Realization of arbitrarily long focus-depth optical vortices with spiral area-varying zone plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chenglong; Zang, Huaping; Du, Yanli; Tian, Yongzhi; Ji, Ziwen; Zhang, Jing; Fan, Quanping; Wang, Chuanke; Cao, Leifeng; Liang, Erjun

    2018-05-01

    We provide a methodology to realize an optical vortex with arbitrarily long focus-depth. With a technique of varying each zone area of a phase spiral zone plate one can obtain optics capable of generating ultra-long focus-depth optical vortex from a plane wave. The focal property of such optics was analysed using the Fresnel diffraction theory, and an experimental demonstration was performed to verify its effectiveness. Such optics may bring new opportunity and benefits for optical vortex application such as optical manipulation and lithography.

  1. The center of curvature optical assembly for the JWST primary mirror cryogenic optical test: optical verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Merle, Cormic; Dey, Tom; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Wick, Eric; Peer, Aaron

    2010-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, allreflective, three-mirror anastigmat. The 18-segment primary mirror (PM) presents unique and challenging assembly, integration, alignment and testing requirements. A full aperture center of curvature optical test is performed in cryogenic vacuum conditions at the integrated observatory level to verify PM performance requirements. The Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA), designed and being built by ITT satisfies the requirements for this test. The CoCOA contains a multi wave interferometer, patented reflective null lens, actuation for alignment, full in situ calibration capability, coarse and fine alignment sensing systems, as well as a system for monitoring changes in the PM to CoCOA distance. Two wave front calibration tests are utilized to verify the low and Mid/High spatial frequencies, overcoming the limitations of the standard null/hologram configuration in its ability to resolve mid and high spatial frequencies. This paper will introduce the systems level architecture and optical test layout for the CoCOA.

  2. Microplate and shear zone models for oceanic spreading center reorganizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engeln, Joseph F.; Stein, Seth; Werner, John; Gordon, Richard

    1988-01-01

    The kinematics of rift propagation and the resulting goemetries of various tectonic elements for two plates is reviewed with no overlap zone. The formation and evolution of overlap regions using schematic models is discussed. The models are scaled in space and time to approximate the Easter plate, but are simplified to emphasize key elements. The tectonic evolution of overlap regions which act as rigid microplates and shear zones is discussed, and the use of relative motion and structural data to discriminate between the two types of models is investigated. The effect of propagation rate and rise time on the size, shape, and deformation of the overlap region is demonstrated.

  3. 76 FR 1521 - Security Zone: Fleet Industrial Supply Center Pier, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2010-0423] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone: Fleet Industrial Supply Center Pier, San Diego, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is removing a security zone on the navigable waters of San Diego...

  4. Process science development at the Center for Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollicove, Harvey M.; Moore, Duncan T.; Golini, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM) has organized a volunteer Process Science Committee that will cooperate in advancing the optical manufacturing sciences. The objective is to develop technical information and processes that improve manufacturing capability, especially in grinding and polishing technology. Chaired by Donald Golini of Litton Itek Optical Systems, the committee members are volunteers from several American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association (APOMA) companies and institutions. Many of the companies are also funding project elements. The committee will accelerate industry progress by integrating the research and development activities of cooperating APOMA companies and institutions involved in both COM and independent programs. In the short term, the effort concentrates on grinding and polishing process innovation. In later phases, the effort will aid in the design future generations of machines and processes. While the developments are directly adaptable to COM's OPTICAM program, the results will influence a wide range of innovation and application in all methods of optical fabrication. Several leaders in the field are participating in the research and development effort--Boston University, Eastman Kodak Company, Hughes Leitz Optical Technologies, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Litton Itek Optical Systems, Melles Griot, Optical Components Inc., Precision Optical, Rank Pneumo, Schott Glass Technologies, Solution Technology, Texas Instruments, Tropel, and the universities of Arizona and Rochester. Other APOMA member companies will participate as resource needs grow. The collaboration is unique in the industry's history.

  5. The Robert E. Hopkins Center for Optical Design and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavislan, James M.; Brown, Thomas G.

    2008-08-01

    In 1929, a grant from Eastman Kodak and Bausch and Lomb established The Institute of Optics as the nation's first academic institution devoted to training optical scientists and engineers. The mission was 'to study light in all its phases', and the curriculum was designed to educate students in the fundamentals of optical science and build essential skills in applied optics and optical engineering. Indeed, our historic strength has been a balance between optical science and engineering--we have alumni who are carrying out prize-winning research in optical physics, alumni who are innovative optical engineers, and still other alumni who are leaders in the business community. Faculty who are top-notch optical engineers are an important resource to optical physics research groups -- likewise, teaching and modeling excellent optical science provides a strong underpinning for students on the applied/engineering end of the spectrum. This model -an undergraduate and graduate program that balances fundamental optics, applied optics, and optical engineering- has served us well. The impressive and diverse range of opportunities for our BS graduates has withstood economic cycles, and the students graduate with a healthy dose of practical experience. Undergraduate advisors, with considerable initiative from the program coordinator, are very aggressive in pointing students toward summer research and engineering opportunities. The vast majority of our undergraduate students graduate with at least one summer of experience in a company or a research laboratory. For example, 95% of the class of 2008 spent the summer of 2007 at companies and/or research laboratories: These include Zygo, NRL, Bausch and Lomb, The University of Rochester(The Institute of Optics, Medical Center, and Laboratory for Laser Energetics), QED, ARL Night Vision laboratories, JPL, Kollsman, OptiMax, Northrup Grumman, and at least two other companies. It is an impressive list, and bodes well for the career

  6. Second Annual Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, Frank (Editor); Temple, Doyle (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) held its Second Annual Forum on September 23-24, 1994. The forum consisted of two days of technical sessions with invited talks, submitted talks, and a student poster session. Participants in the technical sessions included students and researchers from CCNY/CUNY, Fisk University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Hampton University, University of Maryland, the Univeristy of Michigan, NASA Langley Research Center, North Caroline A and T University, Steven's Institute of Technology, and NAWC-Warminster. Topics included chaotic lasers, pumped optical filters, nonlinear responses in polythiophene and thiophene based thin films, crystal growth and spectroscopy, laser-induced photochromic centers, raman scattering in phorphyrin, superradiance, doped fluoride crystals, luminescence of terbium in silicate glass, and radiative and nonradiative transitions in rare-earth ions.

  7. Optical properties of implanted Xe color centers in diamond

    DOE PAGES

    Sandstrom, Russell; Ke, Li; Martin, Aiden; ...

    2017-12-20

    Optical properties of color centers in diamond have been the subject of intense research due to their promising applications in quantum photonics. Here in this work we study the optical properties of Xe related color centers implanted into nitrogen rich (type IIA) and an ultrapure, electronic grade diamond. The Xe defect has two zero phonon lines at 794 nm and 811 nm, which can be effectively excited using both green and red excitation, however, its emission in the nitrogen rich diamond is brighter. Near resonant excitation is performed at cryogenic temperatures and luminescence is probed under strong magnetic field. Finally,more » our results are important towards the understanding of the Xe related defect and other near infrared color centers in diamond.« less

  8. Optical properties of implanted Xe color centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, Russell; Ke, Li; Martin, Aiden; Wang, Ziyu; Kianinia, Mehran; Green, Ben; Gao, Wei-bo; Aharonovich, Igor

    2018-03-01

    Optical properties of color centers in diamond have been the subject of intense research due to their promising applications in quantum photonics. In this work we study the optical properties of Xe related color centers implanted into nitrogen rich (type IIA) and an ultrapure, electronic grade diamond. The Xe defect has two zero phonon lines at ∼794 nm and 811 nm, which can be effectively excited using both green and red excitation, however, its emission in the nitrogen rich diamond is brighter. Near resonant excitation is performed at cryogenic temperatures and luminescence is probed under strong magnetic field. Our results are important towards the understanding of the Xe related defect and other near infrared color centers in diamond.

  9. Optical properties of implanted Xe color centers in diamond

    SciT

    Sandstrom, Russell; Ke, Li; Martin, Aiden

    Optical properties of color centers in diamond have been the subject of intense research due to their promising applications in quantum photonics. Here in this work we study the optical properties of Xe related color centers implanted into nitrogen rich (type IIA) and an ultrapure, electronic grade diamond. The Xe defect has two zero phonon lines at 794 nm and 811 nm, which can be effectively excited using both green and red excitation, however, its emission in the nitrogen rich diamond is brighter. Near resonant excitation is performed at cryogenic temperatures and luminescence is probed under strong magnetic field. Finally,more » our results are important towards the understanding of the Xe related defect and other near infrared color centers in diamond.« less

  10. Review of optical wireless communications for data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2017-10-01

    A data center (DC) is a facility either physical or virtual, for running applications, searching, storage, management and dissemination of information known as cloud computing, which consume a huge amount of energy. A DC includes thousands of servers, communication and storage equipment and a support system including an air conditioning system, security, monitoring equipment and electricity regulator units. Data center operators face the challenges of meeting exponentially increasing demands for network bandwidth without unreasonable increases in operation and infrastructure cost. In order to meet the requirements of moderate increase in operation and infrastructure cost technology, a revolution is required. One way to overcome the shortcomings of traditional static (wired) data center architectures is use of a hybrid network based on fiber and optical wireless communication (OWC) or free space optics (FSO). The OWC link could be deployed on top of the existing cable/fiber network layer, so that live migration could be done easily and dynamically. In that case the network topology is flexible and adapts quickly to changes in traffic, heat distribution, power consumption and characteristics of the applications. In addition, OWC could provide an easy way to maintain and scale up data centers. As a result total cost of ownership could be reduced and the return on investment could be increased. In this talk we will review the main OWC technologies applicable for data centers, indicate how energy could be saved using OWC multichannel communication and discuss the issue of OWC pointing accuracy for data center scenario.

  11. Next-generation optical wireless communications for data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2015-01-01

    Data centers collect and process information with a capacity that has been increasing from year to year at an almost exponential pace. Traditional fiber/cable data center network interconnections suffer from bandwidth overload, as well as flexibility and scalability issues. Therefore, a technology-shift from the fiber and cable to wireless has already been initiated in order to meet the required data-rate, flexibility and scalability demands for next-generation data center network interconnects. In addition, the shift to wireless reduces the volume allocated to the cabling/fiber and increases the cooling efficiency. Optical wireless communication (OWC), or free space optics (FSO), is one of the most effective wireless technologies that could be used in future data centers and could provide ultra-high capacity, very high cyber security and minimum latency, due to the low index of refraction of air in comparison to fiber technologies. In this paper we review the main concepts and configurations for next generation OWC for data centers. Two families of technologies are reviewed: the first technology regards interconnects between rack units in the same rack and the second technology regards the data center network that connects the server top of rack (TOR) to the switch. A comparison between different network technologies is presented.

  12. SimZones: An Organizational Innovation for Simulation Programs and Centers.

    PubMed

    Roussin, Christopher J; Weinstock, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The complexity and volume of simulation-based learning programs have increased dramatically over the last decade, presenting several major challenges for those who lead and manage simulation programs and centers. The authors present five major issues affecting the organization of simulation programs: (1) supporting both single- and double-loop learning experiences; (2) managing the training of simulation teaching faculty; (3) optimizing the participant mix, including individuals, professional groups, teams, and other role-players, to ensure learning; (4) balancing in situ, node-based, and center-based simulation delivery; and (5) organizing simulation research and measuring value. They then introduce the SimZones innovation, a system of organization for simulation-based learning, and explain how it can alleviate the problems associated with these five issues.Simulations are divided into four zones (Zones 0-3). Zone 0 simulations include autofeedback exercises typically practiced by solitary learners, often using virtual simulation technology. Zone 1 simulations include hands-on instruction of foundational clinical skills. Zone 2 simulations include acute situational instruction, such as clinical mock codes. Zone 3 simulations involve authentic, native teams of participants and facilitate team and system development.The authors also discuss the translation of debriefing methods from Zone 3 simulations to real patient care settings (Zone 4), and they illustrate how the SimZones approach can enable the development of longitudinal learning systems in both teaching and nonteaching hospitals. The SimZones approach was initially developed in the context of the Boston Children's Hospital Simulator Program, which the authors use to illustrate this innovation in action.

  13. 77 FR 75016 - Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and... final rule establishing a safety zone around the Gilmerton Bridge center span barge. Inadvertently, this... Gilmerton Bridge center span barge (77 FR 73541). Inadvertently, this rule included an error in the...

  14. 77 FR 44544 - Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-In, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-In, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and... withdrawing its proposed rule concerning the Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in and bridge construction of... ``Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Chesapeake...

  15. 10 CFR 100.11 - Determination of exclusion area, low population zone, and population center distance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... population center distance. 100.11 Section 100.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REACTOR SITE CRITERIA Evaluation Factors for Stationary Power Reactor Site Applications Before January 10, 1997 and for Testing Reactors § 100.11 Determination of exclusion area, low population zone, and population...

  16. 10 CFR 100.11 - Determination of exclusion area, low population zone, and population center distance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... population center distance. 100.11 Section 100.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REACTOR SITE CRITERIA Evaluation Factors for Stationary Power Reactor Site Applications Before January 10, 1997 and for Testing Reactors § 100.11 Determination of exclusion area, low population zone, and population...

  17. FireFly: reconfigurable optical wireless networking data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehrad, Mohsen; Deng, Peng; Gupta, H.; Longtin, J.; Das, S. R.; Sekar, V.

    2017-01-01

    We explore a novel, free-space optics based approach for building data center interconnects. Data centers (DCs) are a critical piece of today's networked applications in both private and public sectors. The key factors that have driven this trend are economies of scale, reduced management costs, better utilization of hardware via statistical multiplexing, and the ability to elastically scale applications in response to changing workload patterns. A robust DC network fabric is fundamental to the success of DCs and to ensure that the network does not become a bottleneck for high-performance applications. In this context, DC network design must satisfy several goals: high performance (e.g., high throughput and low latency), low equipment and management cost, robustness to dynamic traffic patterns, incremental expandability to add new servers or racks, and other practical concerns such as cabling complexity, and power and cooling costs. Current DC network architectures do not seem to provide a satisfactory solution, with respect to the above requirements. In particular, traditional static (wired) networks are either overprovisioned or oversubscribed. Recent works have tried to overcome the above limitations by augmenting a static (wired) "core" with some flexible links (RF-wireless or optical). These augmented architectures show promise, but offer only incremental improvement in performance. Specifically, RFwireless based augmented solutions also offer only limited performance improvement, due to inherent interference and range constraints of RF links. This paper explores an alternative design point—a fully flexible and all-wireless DC interrack network based on free-space optical (FSO) links. We call this FireFly as in; Free-space optical Inter-Rack nEtwork with high FLexibilitY. We will present our designs and tests using various configurations that can help the performance and reliability of the FSO links.

  18. 77 FR 73541 - Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and... Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float- in and bridge construction of span placement. This action is intended to... rulemaking (NPRM) proposing a safety zone in the Gilmerton Bridge Area (77 FR 43557) on September 5-9, 2012...

  19. Interlaced zone plate optics for hard X-ray imaging in the 10 nm range

    DOE PAGES

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Rosner, Benedikt; ...

    2017-03-08

    Multi-keV X-ray microscopy has been particularly successful in bridging the resolution gap between optical and electron microscopy. However, resolutions below 20 nm are still considered challenging, as high throughput direct imaging methods are limited by the availability of suitable optical elements. In order to bridge this gap, we present a new type of Fresnel zone plate lenses aimed at the sub-20 and the sub-10 nm resolution range. By extending the concept of double-sided zone plate stacking, we demonstrate the doubling of the effective line density and thus the resolution and provide large aperture, single- chip optical devices with 15 andmore » 7 nm smallest zone widths. The detailed characterization of these lenses shows excellent optical properties with focal spots down to 7.8 nm. Furthermore, beyond wave front characterization, the zone plates also excel in typical imaging scenarios, verifying their resolution close to their diffraction limited optical performance.« less

  20. Interlaced zone plate optics for hard X-ray imaging in the 10 nm range

    SciT

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Rosner, Benedikt

    Multi-keV X-ray microscopy has been particularly successful in bridging the resolution gap between optical and electron microscopy. However, resolutions below 20 nm are still considered challenging, as high throughput direct imaging methods are limited by the availability of suitable optical elements. In order to bridge this gap, we present a new type of Fresnel zone plate lenses aimed at the sub-20 and the sub-10 nm resolution range. By extending the concept of double-sided zone plate stacking, we demonstrate the doubling of the effective line density and thus the resolution and provide large aperture, single- chip optical devices with 15 andmore » 7 nm smallest zone widths. The detailed characterization of these lenses shows excellent optical properties with focal spots down to 7.8 nm. Furthermore, beyond wave front characterization, the zone plates also excel in typical imaging scenarios, verifying their resolution close to their diffraction limited optical performance.« less

  1. Assessing controls on perched saturated zones beneath the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Perkins, Kim S.; Nimmo, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Waste byproducts associated with operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) have the potential to contaminate the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Recharge to the ESRP aquifer is controlled largely by the alternating stratigraphy of fractured volcanic rocks and sedimentary interbeds within the overlying vadose zone and by the availability of water at the surface. Beneath the INTEC facilities, localized zones of saturation perched on the sedimentary interbeds are of particular concern because they may facilitate accelerated transport of contaminants. The sources and timing of natural and anthropogenic recharge to the perched zones are poorly understood. Simple approaches for quantitative characterization of this complex, variably saturated flow system are needed to assess potential scenarios for contaminant transport under alternative remediation strategies. During 2009-2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, employed data analysis and numerical simulations with a recently developed model of preferential flow to evaluate the sources and quantity of recharge to the perched zones. Piezometer, tensiometer, temperature, precipitation, and stream-discharge data were analyzed, with particular focus on the possibility of contributions to the perched zones from snowmelt and flow in the neighboring Big Lost River (BLR). Analysis of the timing and magnitude of subsurface dynamics indicate that streamflow provides local recharge to the shallow, intermediate, and deep perched saturated zones within 150 m of the BLR; at greater distances from the BLR the influence of streamflow on recharge is unclear. Perched water-level dynamics in most wells analyzed are consistent with findings from previous geochemical analyses, which suggest that a combination of annual snowmelt and anthropogenic sources (for example, leaky pipes and drainage ditches) contribute to recharge of shallow and

  2. X-Ray Optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Broadway, David M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; hide

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engages in research, development, design, fabrication, coating, assembly, and testing of grazing-incidence optics (primarily) for x-ray telescope systems. Over the past two decades, MSFC has refined processes for electroformed-nickel replication of grazing-incidence optics, in order to produce high-strength, thin-walled, full-cylinder x-ray mirrors. In recent years, MSFC has used this technology to fabricate numerous x-ray mirror assemblies for several flight (balloon, rocket, and satellite) programs. Additionally, MSFC has demonstrated the suitability of this technology for ground-based laboratory applications-namely, x-ray microscopes and cold-neutron microscopes and concentrators. This mature technology enables the production, at moderately low cost, of reasonably lightweight x-ray telescopes with good (15-30 arcsecond) angular resolution. However, achieving arcsecond imaging for a lightweight x-ray telescope likely requires development of other technologies. Accordingly, MSFC is conducting a multi-faceted research program toward enabling cost-effective production of lightweight high-resolution x-ray mirror assemblies. Relevant research topics currently under investigation include differential deposition for post-fabrication figure correction, in-situ monitoring and control of coating stress, and direct fabrication of thin-walled full-cylinder grazing-incidence mirrors.

  3. [Study on the change of optical zone after femtosecond laser assisted laser in situ keratomileusis].

    PubMed

    Li, H; Chen, M; Tian, L; Li, D W; Peng, Y S; Zhang, F F

    2018-01-11

    Objective: To explore the change of optical zone after femtosecond laser assisted laser in sitn keratomileusis(FS-LASIK) so as to provide the reference for measurement and design of clinical optical zone. Methods: This retrospective case series study covers 41 eyes of 24 patients (7 males and 17 females, aged from 18 to 42 years old) with myopia and myopic astigmatism who have received FS-LASIK surgery at Corneal Refractive Department of Qingdao Eye Hospital and completed over 6 months of clinical follow-up. Pentacam system (with the application of 6 corneal topographic map modes including: the pure axial curvature topographic map, the pure tangential curvature topographic map, the axial curvature difference topographic map, the tangential curvature difference topographic map, the postoperative front elevation map and the corneal thickness difference topographic map), combined with transparent concentric software (a system independently developed by Qingdao Eye Hospital) was used to measure the optical zone at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively, the optical zone diameters measurement results among different follow-up times in group were analyzed with the repeated measures analysis of variance, and the actual measured values and the theoretical design values of the optical zone were analyzed with independent-samples t-testing. Spearman correlation coefficient ( r(s) ) have been applied to evaluate the relationship between postoperative optical zone measurement values and the potential influencing factors. Results: The optical zone diameters measured by pure axial curvature topographic map at 1, 3 and 6 months after FS-LASIK showed (6.55±0.50)mm, (6.50±0.53)mm and (6.48±0.53)mm respectively. The differences between values are of no statistical significance ( F= 1.60, P= 0.21), the optical zone diameter measured by pure tangential curvature topographic map at 1, 3 and 6 months after FS-LASIK showed (5.44±0.46)mm, (5.46±0.52)mm and (5.44±0.50)mm respectively, the

  4. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. 334.1130 Section 334.1130 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB... Point Arguello, unless prior permission is obtained from the Commander, Western Space and Missile Center...

  5. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. 334.1130 Section 334.1130 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB... Point Arguello, unless prior permission is obtained from the Commander, Western Space and Missile Center...

  6. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. 334.1130 Section 334.1130 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB... Point Arguello, unless prior permission is obtained from the Commander, Western Space and Missile Center...

  7. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. 334.1130 Section 334.1130 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB... Point Arguello, unless prior permission is obtained from the Commander, Western Space and Missile Center...

  8. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. 334.1130 Section 334.1130 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB... Point Arguello, unless prior permission is obtained from the Commander, Western Space and Missile Center...

  9. 77 FR 35900 - Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and... navigable waters during the Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float- in and bridge construction of span placement... the existing bascule spans from the Gilmerton Bridge, transport the new center span from the Eastern...

  10. Center for Applied Optics Studies: an investment in Indiana's future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Delbert J., II; Khorana, Brij M.

    1992-05-01

    To understand the involvement of the State of Indiana with the Center for Applied Optics at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, it is best to start with an explanation of the Indiana Corporation for Science and Technology (CST), its basic charter and its programs. Established in 1982 as a private not-for-profit corporation, CST was formed to promote economic development within the State of Indiana. Two programs that were initially a part of CST's charter and supported with state dollars were a seed capital investment program, aimed at developing new products and processes, and the establishment of university centers of technology development. The former was conceived to create jobs and new, technologically advanced industries in Indiana. The latter was an attempt to encourage technology transfer from the research laboratories of the state universities to the production lines of Indiana industry. Recently, CST has undergone a name change to the Indiana Business Modernization and Technology Corporation (BMT) and adopted an added responsibility of proactive assistance to small- and medium-sized businesses in order to enhance the state's industrial competitiveness.

  11. Comparability of clinical wear measurements by optical 3D laser scanning in two different centers.

    PubMed

    Stober, Thomas; Heuschmid, Navina; Zellweger, Gaby; Rousson, Valentin; Rues, Stefan; Heintze, Siegward D

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the use of different variables to measure the clinical wear of two denture tooth materials in two analysis centers. Twelve edentulous patients were provided with full dentures. Two different denture tooth materials (experimental material and control) were placed randomly in accordance with the split-mouth design. For wear measurements, impressions were made after an adjustment phase of 1-2 weeks and after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The occlusal wear of the posterior denture teeth of 11 subjects was assessed in two study centers by use of plaster replicas and 3D laser-scanning methods. In both centers sequential scans of the occlusal surfaces were digitized and superimposed. Wear was described by use of four different variables. Statistical analysis was performed after log-transformation of the wear data by use of the Pearson and Lin correlation and by use of a mixed linear model. Mean occlusal vertical wear of the denture teeth after 24 months was between 120μm and 212μm, depending on wear variable and material. For three of the four variables, wear of the experimental material was statistically significantly less than that of the control. Comparison of the two study centers, however, revealed correlation of the wear variables was only moderate whereas strong correlation was observed among the different wear variables evaluated by each center. Moderate correlation was observed for clinical wear measurements by optical 3D laser scanning in two different study centers. For the two denture tooth materials, wear measurements limited to the attrition zones led to the same qualitative assessment. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of dead zone sources in a closed-loop fiber optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Chong, Kyoung-Ho; Choi, Woo-Seok; Chong, Kil-To

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the dead zone is among the intensive studies in a closed-loop fiber optic gyroscope. In a dead zone, a gyroscope cannot detect any rotation and produces a zero bias. In this study, an analysis of dead zone sources is performed in simulation and experiments. In general, the problem is mainly due to electrical cross coupling and phase modulation drift. Electrical cross coupling is caused by interference between modulation voltage and the photodetector. The cross-coupled signal produces spurious gyro bias and leads to a dead zone if it is larger than the input rate. Phase modulation drift as another dead zone source is due to the electrode contamination, the piezoelectric effect of the LiNbO3 substrate, or to organic fouling. This modulation drift lasts for a short or long period of time like a lead-lag filter response and produces gyro bias error, noise spikes, or dead zone. For a more detailed analysis, the cross-coupling effect and modulation phase drift are modeled as a filter and are simulated in both the open-loop and closed-loop modes. The sources of dead zone are more clearly analyzed in the simulation and experimental results.

  13. Zoning in On Parents’ Needs: Understanding parents’ perspectives in order to provide person-centered care

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jana E.; Kessler-Jones, Alanna; Thompson, Mary K.; Young, Kate; Anderson, Amelia J.; Strand, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In order to develop a theoretical framework for person-centered care models for children with epilepsy and their parents, we conducted a qualitative study to explore and understand parents’ needs, values, and preferences to ultimately reduce barriers that may be impeding parents from accessing and obtaining help for the child’s co-occurring problems. Methods A qualitative grounded theory study design was utilized to understand parents’ perspectives. The participants were 22 parents of children with epilepsy who ranged in age from 31-53 years. Interviews were conducted using open ended semi-structured questions to facilitate conversation. Transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory guidelines. Results In order to understand the different perspectives parents had about their child, we devised a theory composed of three zones (Zones 1, 2, 3) that can be used to conceptualize parents’ viewpoints. Zone location was based on parents’ perspectives of their child’s comorbidities in the context of epilepsy. These zones were developed to help identify distinctions between parents’ perspectives and to provide a framework within which to understand parents’ readiness to access and implement interventions to address the child’s struggles. These zones of understanding describe parents’ perspectives of their child’s struggles at a particular point in time. This is the perspective from which parents address their child’s needs. This theoretical perspective provides a structure in which to discuss parents’ perspectives on conceptualizing or comprehending the child’s struggles in the context of epilepsy. The zones are based on how the parents a) describe their concerns about the child’s struggles, b) their understanding of the struggles, and c) the parent’s view of the child’s future. Conclusions Clinicians working with individuals and families with epilepsy are aware that epilepsy is a complex and unpredictable disorder. The zones help

  14. Thermal lens elimination by gradient-reduced zone coupling of optical beams

    DOEpatents

    Page, Ralph H.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal gradient-reduced-zone laser includes a laser medium and an optically transparent plate with an index of refraction that is less than the index of refraction of the laser medium. The pump face of the laser medium is bonded to a surface of the optically transparent member. Pump light is directed through the transparent plate to optically pump the solid state laser medium. Heat conduction is mainly through the surface of the laser medium where the heat is introduced by the pump light. Heat flows in a direction opposite to that of the pump light because the side of the laser medium that is opposite to that of the pump face is not in thermal contact with a conductor and thus there is no heat flux (and hence, no temperature gradient), thus producing a thermal gradient-reduced zone. A laser cavity is formed around the laser medium such that laser light oscillating within the laser cavity reflects by total-internal-reflection from the interface between the pump face and the optically transparent plate and enters and exits through a thermal gradient-reduced zone.

  15. Applications of Optical Scanners in an Academic Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinari, Carol; Tannenbaum, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes optical scanners, including how the technology works; applications in data management and research; development of instructional materials; and providing community services. Discussion includes the three basic types of optical scanners: optical character recognition (OCR), optical mark readers (OMR), and graphic scanners. A sidebar…

  16. Zone-boundary optimization for direct laser writing of continuous-relief diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Korolkov, Victor P; Nasyrov, Ruslan K; Shimansky, Ruslan V

    2006-01-01

    Enhancing the diffraction efficiency of continuous-relief diffractive optical elements fabricated by direct laser writing is discussed. A new method of zone-boundary optimization is proposed to correct exposure data only in narrow areas along the boundaries of diffractive zones. The optimization decreases the loss of diffraction efficiency related to convolution of a desired phase profile with a writing-beam intensity distribution. A simplified stepped transition function that describes optimized exposure data near zone boundaries can be made universal for a wide range of zone periods. The approach permits a similar increase in the diffraction efficiency as an individual-pixel optimization but with fewer computation efforts. Computer simulations demonstrated that the zone-boundary optimization for a 6 microm period grating increases the efficiency by 7% and 14.5% for 0.6 microm and 1.65 microm writing-spot diameters, respectively. The diffraction efficiency of as much as 65%-90% for 4-10 microm zone periods was obtained experimentally with this method.

  17. Interlaced zone plate optics for hard X-ray imaging in the 10 nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Rösner, Benedikt; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Guzenko, Vitaliy A.; McNulty, Ian; Winarski, Robert; Holt, Martin V.; David, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Multi-keV X-ray microscopy has been particularly successful in bridging the resolution gap between optical and electron microscopy. However, resolutions below 20 nm are still considered challenging, as high throughput direct imaging methods are limited by the availability of suitable optical elements. In order to bridge this gap, we present a new type of Fresnel zone plate lenses aimed at the sub-20 and the sub-10 nm resolution range. By extending the concept of double-sided zone plate stacking, we demonstrate the doubling of the effective line density and thus the resolution and provide large aperture, singlechip optical devices with 15 and 7 nm smallest zone widths. The detailed characterization of these lenses shows excellent optical properties with focal spots down to 7.8 nm. Beyond wave front characterization, the zone plates also excel in typical imaging scenarios, verifying their resolution close to their diffraction limited optical performance.

  18. Interlaced zone plate optics for hard X-ray imaging in the 10 nm range

    PubMed Central

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Rösner, Benedikt; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Guzenko, Vitaliy A.; McNulty, Ian; Winarski, Robert; Holt, Martin V.; David, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Multi-keV X-ray microscopy has been particularly successful in bridging the resolution gap between optical and electron microscopy. However, resolutions below 20 nm are still considered challenging, as high throughput direct imaging methods are limited by the availability of suitable optical elements. In order to bridge this gap, we present a new type of Fresnel zone plate lenses aimed at the sub-20 and the sub-10 nm resolution range. By extending the concept of double-sided zone plate stacking, we demonstrate the doubling of the effective line density and thus the resolution and provide large aperture, singlechip optical devices with 15 and 7 nm smallest zone widths. The detailed characterization of these lenses shows excellent optical properties with focal spots down to 7.8 nm. Beyond wave front characterization, the zone plates also excel in typical imaging scenarios, verifying their resolution close to their diffraction limited optical performance.

  19. Feasibility study of an integrated optic switching center. [satellite tracking application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design of a high data rate switching center for a satellite tracking station is discussed. The feasibility of a switching network using an integrated switching matrix is assessed. The preferred integrated optical switching scheme was found to be an electro-optic Bragg diffraction switch. To ascertain the advantages of the integrated optics switching center, its properties are compared to those of opto-electronic and to electronics switching networks.

  20. 77 FR 43557 - Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and... during the Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float- in and bridge construction of span placement. This action... Construction, INC will facilitate removal of the existing bascule spans from the Gilmerton Bridge, transport of...

  1. Optical information processing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Bualat, Maria G.; Cho, Young C.; Downie, John D.; Gary, Charles K.; Ma, Paul W.; Ozcan, Meric; Pryor, Anna H.; Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    The combination of analog optical processors with digital electronic systems offers the potential of tera-OPS computational performance, while often requiring less power and weight relative to all-digital systems. NASA is working to develop and demonstrate optical processing techniques for on-board, real time science and mission applications. Current research areas and applications under investigation include optical matrix processing for space structure vibration control and the analysis of Space Shuttle Main Engine plume spectra, optical correlation-based autonomous vision for robotic vehicles, analog computation for robotic path planning, free-space optical interconnections for information transfer within digital electronic computers, and multiplexed arrays of fiber optic interferometric sensors for acoustic and vibration measurements.

  2. Influence of the corneal optical zone on the point-spread function of the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rol, Pascal O.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    1992-08-01

    In refractive surgery, a number of surgical techniques have been developed to correct ametropia (refractive defaults) of the eye by changing the exterior shape of the cornea. Because the air-cornea interface makes up for about two thirds of the refractive power of the eye, a refractive correction can be obtained by a suitable reshaping of the cornea. Postoperatively, it is usually observed that the corneal region consists of two or more zones which are characterized by different optical parameters exhibiting in particular different focal distances. Under normal circumstances, only the central area of the cornea is involved in the formation of the retinal image. However, if part of the light entering the eye through peripheral portions of the cornea with refractive properties different from the central area can pass the pupil, an out-of-focus `ghost' image may be overlaid on the retina causing a blur. In such a case the resolution, and the contrast performance of the eye which is expected from a successful operation, may be reduced. This study is an attempt to quantify the vision blur as a function of the diameter of the central zone, i.e., the optical zone which is of importance for vision.

  3. Continuous wave protocol for simultaneous polarization and optical detection of P1-center electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, E. J.; Carvajal, B.; Samarth, N.

    2018-01-01

    The ready optical detection and manipulation of bright nitrogen vacancy center spins in diamond plays a key role in contemporary quantum information science and quantum metrology. Other optically dark defects such as substitutional nitrogen atoms (`P1 centers') could also become potentially useful in this context if they could be as easily optically detected and manipulated. We develop a relatively straightforward continuous wave protocol that takes advantage of the dipolar coupling between nitrogen vacancy and P1 centers in type 1b diamond to detect and polarize the dark P1 spins. By combining mutual spin flip transitions with radio frequency driving, we demonstrate the simultaneous optical polarization and detection of the electron spin resonance of the P1 center. This technique should be applicable to detecting and manipulating a broad range of dark spin populations that couple to the nitrogen vacancy center via dipolar fields, allowing for quantum metrology using these spin populations.

  4. Comparisons Between Histology and Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of the Periarterial Capillary-Free Zone.

    PubMed

    Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; An, Dong; Sakurada, Yoichi; Lee, Cecilia S; Lee, Aaron Y; McAllister, Ian L; Freund, K Bailey; Sarunic, Marinko; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2018-05-01

    To use the capillary-free zone along retinal arteries, a physiologic area of superficial avascularization, as an anatomic paradigm to investigate the reliability of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) for visualizing the deep retinal circulation. Validity analysis and laboratory investigation. Five normal human donor eyes (mean age 69.8 years) were perfusion-labeled with endothelial antibodies and the capillary networks of the perifovea were visualized using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Regions of the capillary-free zone along the retinal artery were imaged using OCTA in 16 normal subjects (age range 24-51 years). Then, 3 × 3-mm scans were acquired using the RTVue XR Avanti (ver. 2016.1.0.26; Optovue, Inc, Fremont, California, USA), PLEX Elite 9000 (ver. 1.5.0.15909; Zeiss Meditec, Inc, Dublin, California, USA), Heidelberg Spectralis OCT2 (Family acquisition module 6.7.21.0; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany), and DRI-OCT Triton (Ver. 1.1.1; Topcon Corp, Tokyo, Japan). Images of the superficial plexus, deep vascular plexus, and a slab containing all vascular plexuses were generated using manufacturer-recommended default settings. Comparisons between histology and OCTA were performed. Histologic analysis revealed that the capillary-free zone along the retinal artery was confined to the plane of the superficial capillary plexus and did not include the intermediate and deep capillary plexuses. Images derived from OCTA instruments demonstrated a prominent capillary-free zone along the retinal artery in slabs of the superficial plexus, deep plexus, and all capillary plexuses. The number of deep retinal capillaries seen in the capillary-free zone was significantly greater on histology than on OCTA (P < .001). Using the capillary-free zone as an anatomic paradigm, we show that the deep vascular beds of the retina are not completely visualized using OCTA. This may be a limitation of current OCTA techniques. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All

  5. Recent advancements in robotic micro-optical assembly at the Lockheed Martin Optical Payload Center of Excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, David; Larson, Thomas M.

    2017-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company Optical Payloads Center of Excellence is in process of standing up the Robotic Optical Assembly System (ROAS) capability at Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies in Colorado. This currently implemented Robotic Optical Assembly has enabled Lockheed Martin to create world-leading, ultra-lowSWAP photonic devices using a closed-loop control robot to precisely position and align micro-optics with a potential fill factor of >25 optics per square inch. This paper will discuss the anticipated applications and optical capability when ROAS is fully operational, as well as challenge the audience to update their "rules of thumb" and best practices when designing low-SWAP optical-mechanical systems that take advantage of Lockheed Martin's ROAS capability. This paper will reveal demonstrated optical pointing and stability performance achievable with ROAS and why we believe these optical specifications are relevant for the majority of anticipated applications. After a high level overview of the ROAS current state, this paper will focus in on recent results of the "Reworkable Micro-Optics Mounting IRAD". Results from this IRAD will correlate to the anticipated optical specifications required for relevant applications.

  6. Light comfort zones of mesopelagic acoustic scattering layers in two contrasting optical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røstad, Anders; Kaartvedt, Stein; Aksnes, Dag L.

    2016-07-01

    We make a comparison of the mesopelagic sound scattering layers (SLs) in two contrasting optical environments; the clear Red Sea and in murkier coastal waters of Norway (Masfjorden). The depth distributions of the SL in Masfjorden are shallower and narrower than those of the Red Sea. This difference in depth distribution is consistent with the hypothesis that the organisms of the SL distribute according to similar light comfort zones (LCZ) in the two environments. Our study suggest that surface and underwater light measurements ranging more than 10 orders of magnitude is required to assess the controlling effects of light on SL structure and dynamics.

  7. The evolution of electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurran, W. R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A history is presented of the major electronic tracking, optical, telemetry, and command systems used at ETR in support of Apollo-Saturn and its forerunner vehicles launched under the jurisdiction of the Kennedy Space Center and its forerunner organizations.

  8. En-face imaging of the ellipsoid zone in the retina from optical coherence tomography B-scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, T.; Larkin, S.; Downing, M.; Csaky, K.

    2015-03-01

    It is generally believed that photoreceptor integrity is related to the ellipsoid zone appearance in optical coherence tomography (OCT) B-scans. Algorithms and software were developed for viewing and analyzing the ellipsoid zone. The software performs the following: (a), automated ellipsoid zone isolation in the B-scans, (b), en-face view of the ellipsoid-zone reflectance, (c), alignment and overlay of (b) onto reflectance images of the retina, and (d), alignment and overlay of (c) with microperimetry sensitivity points. Dataset groups were compared from normal and dry age related macular degeneration (DAMD) subjects. Scalar measurements for correlation against condition included the mean and standard deviation of the ellipsoid zone's reflectance. The imageprocessing techniques for automatically finding the ellipsoid zone are based upon a calculation of optical flow which tracks the edges of laminated structures across an image. Statistical significance was shown in T-tests of these measurements with the population pools separated as normal and DAMD subjects. A display of en-face ellipsoid-zone reflectance shows a clear and recognizable difference between any of the normal and DAMD subjects in that they show generally uniform and nonuniform reflectance, respectively, over the region near the macula. Regions surrounding points of low microperimetry (μP) sensitivity have nonregular and lower levels of ellipsoid-zone reflectance nearby. These findings support the idea that the photoreceptor integrity could be affecting both the ellipsoid-zone reflectance and the sensitivity measurements.

  9. Defect center characteristics of silica optical fiber material by gamma ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wenyun; Xiao, Zhongyin; Wen, Jianxiang; Yin, Jianchong; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Zihua; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-12-01

    Defect centers play a major role in the radiation-induced transmission loss for silica optical fibers. We have investigated characteristics of the best known defect centers E' in silica optical fiber material irradiated with γ ray at room temperature, and measured by using electron spin resonance (ESR) and spectrophotometer. The results show that the defect concentrations increase linearly with radiation doses from 1kGy to 50kGy. We have established the mechanism models of radiation induced defect centers' formation. We have also studied the influences of thermal annealing on defect centers. The radiation induced defect centers can be efficiently decreased by thermal annealing. Particularly, the defect concentration is less than the initial one when the temperature of thermal annealing is over 500°C for our silica samples. These phenomena can also be explained by the optical absorption spectra we have obtained.

  10. Relationship of Optical Anomalies, Zoning, and Microtopography in Vesuvianite from Jeffrey Mine, Asbestos, Quebec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Varina Campbell

    The role of growth steps in inducing disequilibrium is investigated in crystals of vesuvianite from the Jeffrey mine, Asbestos, Quebec, using optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The selective uptake of elements Fe and Al by asymmetric growth-steps on three crystallographic forms, {100}, {110}, and {121}, is documented. The prisms {100} and {110} show hillocks that display kinetically controlled oscillatory zoning along growth steps parallel to <010> and <11¯1>, but not on vicinal faces defined by [001] steps. Sector-specific zoning of extinction angles and 2V angles indicate different degrees of optical dissymmetrization in crystals spanning a range of growth habits. Unit-cell parameters and the presence of violating reflections confirm sectoral deviations from P4/nnc symmetry in the prismatic sectors. The partial loss of three glide planes follows the pattern expected from order of the cations Al and Fe induced by tangential selectivity at the edge of non-equivalent steps during layer-by-layer growth.

  11. Demonstration of fully enabled data center subsystem with embedded optical interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitwon, Richard; Worrall, Alex; Stevens, Paul; Miller, Allen; Wang, Kai; Schmidtke, Katharine

    2014-03-01

    The evolution of data storage communication protocols and corresponding in-system bandwidth densities is set to impose prohibitive cost and performance constraints on future data storage system designs, fuelling proposals for hybrid electronic and optical architectures in data centers. The migration of optical interconnect into the system enclosure itself can substantially mitigate the communications bottlenecks resulting from both the increase in data rate and internal interconnect link lengths. In order to assess the viability of embedding optical links within prevailing data storage architectures, we present the design and assembly of a fully operational data storage array platform, in which all internal high speed links have been implemented optically. This required the deployment of mid-board optical transceivers, an electro-optical midplane and proprietary pluggable optical connectors for storage devices. We present the design of a high density optical layout to accommodate the midplane interconnect requirements of a data storage enclosure with support for 24 Small Form Factor (SFF) solid state or rotating disk drives and the design of a proprietary optical connector and interface cards, enabling standard drives to be plugged into an electro-optical midplane. Crucially, we have also modified the platform to accommodate longer optical interconnect lengths up to 50 meters in order to investigate future datacenter architectures based on disaggregation of modular subsystems. The optically enabled data storage system has been fully validated for both 6 Gb/s and 12 Gb/s SAS data traffic conveyed along internal optical links.

  12. Experimental demonstration of software defined data center optical networks with Tbps end-to-end tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hui; Wang, Huitao; Ge, Chao

    2015-10-01

    The end-to-end tunability is important to provision elastic channel for the burst traffic of data center optical networks. Then, how to complete the end-to-end tunability based on elastic optical networks? Software defined networking (SDN) based end-to-end tunability solution is proposed for software defined data center optical networks, and the protocol extension and implementation procedure are designed accordingly. For the first time, the flexible grid all optical networks with Tbps end-to-end tunable transport and switch system have been online demonstrated for data center interconnection, which are controlled by OpenDayLight (ODL) based controller. The performance of the end-to-end tunable transport and switch system has been evaluated with wavelength number tuning, bit rate tuning, and transmit power tuning procedure.

  13. Optical depth localization of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond with nanometer accuracy.

    PubMed

    Häußler, Andreas J; Heller, Pascal; McGuinness, Liam P; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2014-12-01

    Precise positioning of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers is crucial for their application in sensing and quantum information. Here we present a new purely optical technique enabling determination of the NV position with nanometer resolution. We use a confocal microscope to determine the position of individual emitters along the optical axis. Using two separate detection channels, it is possible to simultaneously measure reflected light from the diamond surface and fluorescent light from the NV center and statistically evaluate both signals. An accuracy of 2.6 nm for shallow NV centers was achieved and is consistent with other techniques for depth determination.

  14. Quality of family planning services in primary health centers of Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tafese, Fikru; Woldie, Mirkuzie; Megerssa, Berhane

    2013-11-01

    Good quality of care in family planning (FP) services help individuals and couples to meet their reproductive health needs safely and effectively. Therefore, assessment and improvement of the quality of family planning services could enhance family planning services utilization. This study was thus conducted to assess the quality of family planning services in primary health centers of Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. A cross-sectional facility based study was conducted from March 1(st)-25(th), 2011 among family planning clients of government primary health care centers in southwest Ethiopia. Exit interview of 301 family planning clients identified through systematic random sampling technique was carried out using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Availability of resources was checked using provider interview and inventory checklist. Moreover, a total of 150 consultation sessions were observed using checklist. Descriptive statistics and linear regression coefficients were generated to meet the objective of the study. There was a shortage of some medical equipment, trained staffs, and information education and communication materials (IEC) in all of the family planning clinics. The mean waiting time at the service delivery points and consultation duration were 16.4 and 10.5 minutes, respectively. The providers used at least one information education and communication material in 33.3% of the consultation sessions. The overall satisfaction score was 8.64. Clients' perception on adequacy of information during consultation (β=0.24; ( 95%CI=0.02-0.16) ease of getting the clinic site, short waiting time (β=0.17; 95%CI=0.15-029) and educational level (β=0.09; 95%CI =0.09-0.29) were significantly associated with overall satisfaction. The findings of this study showed that there was lack of critical resources for the provision of quality family planning services in all of the primary health care centers included in the study. This has affected important aspects of

  15. The Influence of the Aspheric Profiles for Transition Zone on Optical Performance of Human Eye After Conventional Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.

    2014-12-01

    The analysis in the impact of transition zone on the optical performance of human eye after laser refractive surgery is important for improving visual correction technology. By designing the ablation profiles of aspheric transition zone and creating the ablation profile for conventional refractive surgery in optical zone, the influence of aspheric transition zone on residual aberrations was studied. The results indicated that the ablation profiles of transition zone had a significant influence on the residual wavefront aberrations. For a hyperopia correction, the profile #9 shows a larger induced coma and spherical aberration when the translation of the centre of pupil remains constant. However, for a myopia astigmatism correction, the induced coma and spherical aberration in profile #1 shows relatively larger RMS values than those in other profiles. Therefore, the residual higher order aberrations may be decreased by optimizing ablation profiles of transition zone, but they cannot be eliminated. In order to achieve the best visual performance, the design of ablation pattern of transition zone played a crucial role.

  16. The quantitative measurements of foveal avascular zone using optical coherence tomography angiography in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Fariba; Mirshahi, Reza; Bazvand, Fatemeh; Fadakar, Kaveh; Faghihi, Houshang; Sabour, Siamak

    2017-12-01

    To provide normative data of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) and thickness. In this cross-sectional study both eyes of each normal subject were scanned with optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) for foveal superficial and deep avascular zone (FAZ) and central foveal thickness (CFT) and parafoveal thickness (PFT). Out of a total of 224 eyes of 112 volunteers with a mean age of 37.03 (12-67) years, the mean superficial FAZ area was 0.27 mm 2 , and deep FAZ area was 0.35 mm 2 ( P  < 0.001), with no difference between both eyes. Females had a larger superficial (0.32 ± 0.11 mm 2 versus 0.23 ± 0.09 mm 2 ) and deep FAZ (0.40 ± 0.14 mm 2 versus 0.31 ± 0.10 mm 2 ) ( P  < 0.001) than males. By multivariate linear regression analysis, in normal eyes, superficial FAZ area varied significantly with the gender, CFT, and deep FAZ. Deep FAZ varied with the gender and CFT. The gender and CFT influence the size of normal superficial and deep FAZ of capillary network.

  17. Sensitive zone parameters and curvature radius evaluation for polymer optical fiber curvature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Junior, Arnaldo G.; Frizera, Anselmo; José Pontes, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POFs) are suitable for applications such as curvature sensors, strain, temperature, liquid level, among others. However, for enhancing sensitivity, many polymer optical fiber curvature sensors based on intensity variation require a lateral section. Lateral section length, depth, and surface roughness have great influence on the sensor sensitivity, hysteresis, and linearity. Moreover, the sensor curvature radius increase the stress on the fiber, which leads on variation of the sensor behavior. This paper presents the analysis relating the curvature radius and lateral section length, depth and surface roughness with the sensor sensitivity, hysteresis and linearity for a POF curvature sensor. Results show a strong correlation between the decision parameters behavior and the performance for sensor applications based on intensity variation. Furthermore, there is a trade-off among the sensitive zone length, depth, surface roughness, and curvature radius with the sensor desired performance parameters, which are minimum hysteresis, maximum sensitivity, and maximum linearity. The optimization of these parameters is applied to obtain a sensor with sensitivity of 20.9 mV/°, linearity of 0.9992 and hysteresis below 1%, which represent a better performance of the sensor when compared with the sensor without the optimization.

  18. Energy-efficient virtual optical network mapping approaches over converged flexible bandwidth optical networks and data centers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bowen; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we develop a virtual link priority mapping (LPM) approach and a virtual node priority mapping (NPM) approach to improve the energy efficiency and to reduce the spectrum usage over the converged flexible bandwidth optical networks and data centers. For comparison, the lower bound of the virtual optical network mapping is used for the benchmark solutions. Simulation results show that the LPM approach achieves the better performance in terms of power consumption, energy efficiency, spectrum usage, and the number of regenerators compared to the NPM approach.

  19. Excitation mechanisms of Er optical centers in GaN epilayers

    SciT

    George, D. K.; Hawkins, M. D.; McLaren, M.

    2015-10-26

    We report direct evidence of two mechanisms responsible for the excitation of optically active Er{sup 3+} ions in GaN epilayers grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. These mechanisms, resonant excitation via the higher-lying inner 4f shell transitions and band-to-band excitation of the semiconductor host, lead to narrow emission lines from isolated and the defect-related Er optical centers. However, these centers have different photoluminescence spectra, local defect environments, decay dynamics, and excitation cross sections. The photoluminescence at 1.54 μm from the isolated Er optical center which can be excited by either mechanism has the same decay dynamics, but possesses a much highermore » excitation cross-section under band-to-band excitation. In contrast, the photoluminescence at 1.54 μm from the defect-related Er optical center can only be observed through band-to-band excitation but has the largest excitation cross-section. These results explain the difficulty in achieving gain in Er doped GaN and indicate approaches for realization of optical amplification, and possibly lasing, at room temperature.« less

  20. Super-resolution optical imaging and magnetometry using NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Trifonov, Alexei; Glenn, David; Bar-Gill, Nir; Walsworth, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    We report progress done on the development and application of depletion-based techniques for super-resolution (nanoscale) optical imaging and magnetometry using NV centers in diamond. In particulare we are integrating stimulated emission depletion (STED) and ground state depletion (GSD) imaging techniques with advanced pulsed sequences for AC magnetometry. NV centers in diamond do not bleach under optical excitation, have long-lived electronic spin coherence and spin-state-dependent fluorescence, and are not biotoxic. Thus NV-diamond has great potential in quantum science and as a nanoscale magnetic biosensor.

  1. Rapid conversion of an oceanic spreading center to a subduction zone inferred from high-precision geochronology.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Timothy E; Encarnación, John; Buchwaldt, Robert; Fernandez, Dan; Mattinson, James; Rasoazanamparany, Christine; Luetkemeyer, P Benjamin

    2016-11-22

    Where and how subduction zones initiate is a fundamental tectonic problem, yet there are few well-constrained geologic tests that address the tectonic settings and dynamics of the process. Numerical modeling has shown that oceanic spreading centers are some of the weakest parts of the plate tectonic system [Gurnis M, Hall C, Lavier L (2004) Geochem Geophys Geosys 5:Q07001], but previous studies have not favored them for subduction initiation because of the positive buoyancy of young lithosphere. Instead, other weak zones, such as fracture zones, have been invoked. Because these models differ in terms of the ages of crust that are juxtaposed at the site of subduction initiation, they can be tested by dating the protoliths of metamorphosed oceanic crust that is formed by underthrusting at the beginning of subduction and comparing that age with the age of the overlying lithosphere and the timing of subduction initiation itself. In the western Philippines, we find that oceanic crust was less than ∼1 My old when it was underthrust and metamorphosed at the onset of subduction in Palawan, Philippines, implying forced subduction initiation at a spreading center. This result shows that young and positively buoyant, but weak, lithosphere was the preferred site for subduction nucleation despite the proximity of other potential weak zones with older, denser lithosphere and that plate motion rapidly changed from divergence to convergence.

  2. Rapid conversion of an oceanic spreading center to a subduction zone inferred from high-precision geochronology

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Timothy E.; Encarnación, John; Buchwaldt, Robert; Fernandez, Dan; Mattinson, James; Rasoazanamparany, Christine; Luetkemeyer, P. Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Where and how subduction zones initiate is a fundamental tectonic problem, yet there are few well-constrained geologic tests that address the tectonic settings and dynamics of the process. Numerical modeling has shown that oceanic spreading centers are some of the weakest parts of the plate tectonic system [Gurnis M, Hall C, Lavier L (2004) Geochem Geophys Geosys 5:Q07001], but previous studies have not favored them for subduction initiation because of the positive buoyancy of young lithosphere. Instead, other weak zones, such as fracture zones, have been invoked. Because these models differ in terms of the ages of crust that are juxtaposed at the site of subduction initiation, they can be tested by dating the protoliths of metamorphosed oceanic crust that is formed by underthrusting at the beginning of subduction and comparing that age with the age of the overlying lithosphere and the timing of subduction initiation itself. In the western Philippines, we find that oceanic crust was less than ∼1 My old when it was underthrust and metamorphosed at the onset of subduction in Palawan, Philippines, implying forced subduction initiation at a spreading center. This result shows that young and positively buoyant, but weak, lithosphere was the preferred site for subduction nucleation despite the proximity of other potential weak zones with older, denser lithosphere and that plate motion rapidly changed from divergence to convergence. PMID:27821756

  3. Basin-centered asperities in great subduction zone earthquakes: A link between slip, subsidence, and subduction erosion?

    Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Sugiyama, Y.; Scholl, D. W.; Dinterman, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    Published areas of high coseismic slip, or asperities, for 29 of the largest Circum-Pacific megathrust earthquakes are compared to forearc structure revealed by satellite free-air gravity, bathymetry, and seismic profiling. On average, 71% of an earthquake's seismic moment and 79% of its asperity area occur beneath the prominent gravity low outlining the deep-sea terrace; 57% of an earthquake's asperity area, on average, occurs beneath the forearc basins that lie within the deep-sea terrace. In SW Japan, slip in the 1923, 1944, 1946, and 1968 earthquakes was largely centered beneath five forearc basins whose landward edge overlies the 350??C isotherm on the plate boundary, the inferred downdip limit of the locked zone. Basin-centered coseismic slip also occurred along the Aleutian, Mexico, Peru, and Chile subduction zones but was ambiguous for the great 1964 Alaska earthquake. Beneath intrabasin structural highs, seismic slip tends to be lower, possibly due to higher temperatures and fluid pressures. Kilometers of late Cenozoic subsidence and crustal thinning above some of the source zones are indicated by seismic profiling and drilling and are thought to be caused by basal subduction erosion. The deep-sea terraces and basins may evolve not just by growth of the outer arc high but also by interseismic subsidence not recovered during earthquakes. Basin-centered asperities could indicate a link between subsidence, subduction erosion, and seismogenesis. Whatever the cause, forearc basins may be useful indicators of long-term seismic moment release. The source zone for Cascadia's 1700 A.D. earthquake contains five large, basin-centered gravity lows that may indicate potential asperities at depth. The gravity gradient marking the inferred downdip limit to large coseismic slip lies offshore, except in northwestern Washington, where the low extends landward beneath the coast. Transverse gravity highs between the basins suggest that the margin is seismically segmented and

  4. Correlation and squeezing for optical transistor and intensity router applications in diamond NV center.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Noor; Khan, Ghulam Abbas; Wang, Ruimin; Hou, Jingru; Gong, Rui; Yang, Lingmeng; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2017-05-01

    We study an optical transistor (switch and amplifier) and router by spontaneous parametric four-wave mixing and fluorescence in diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center. The routing results from three peaks of fluorescence signal in the time domain, while the switching and amplification are realized by correlation and squeezing. The intensity switching speed is about 17 ns. The optical transistor and router are controlled by the power of incident beams. Our experimental results provide that the advance technique of peak division and channel equalization ratio of about 90% are applicable to all optical switching and routing.

  5. Optical Characteristics of the Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Adams, M.; Smith, S.; Hraba, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the UV, a sounding rocket payload is being developed. This paper will discuss: (1) the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, (2) how the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines CIV (1550 Angstroms) and MgII (2800 Angstroms), and (3) the optical, reflectance, transmission and polarization measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirror and polarimeter.

  6. Polymer waveguides for electro-optical integration in data centers and high-performance computers.

    PubMed

    Dangel, Roger; Hofrichter, Jens; Horst, Folkert; Jubin, Daniel; La Porta, Antonio; Meier, Norbert; Soganci, Ibrahim Murat; Weiss, Jonas; Offrein, Bert Jan

    2015-02-23

    To satisfy the intra- and inter-system bandwidth requirements of future data centers and high-performance computers, low-cost low-power high-throughput optical interconnects will become a key enabling technology. To tightly integrate optics with the computing hardware, particularly in the context of CMOS-compatible silicon photonics, optical printed circuit boards using polymer waveguides are considered as a formidable platform. IBM Research has already demonstrated the essential silicon photonics and interconnection building blocks. A remaining challenge is electro-optical packaging, i.e., the connection of the silicon photonics chips with the system. In this paper, we present a new single-mode polymer waveguide technology and a scalable method for building the optical interface between silicon photonics chips and single-mode polymer waveguides.

  7. CLASSIFICATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF GEOGRAPHIC ATROPHY JUNCTIONAL ZONE USING SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jinfeng; Velaga, Swetha Bindu; Hariri, Amir H; Nittala, Muneeswar Gupta; Sadda, Srinivas

    2017-08-22

    The junctional zone at the border of areas of geographic atrophy (GA) in eyes with nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration is an important target region for future therapeutic strategies. The goal of this study was to perform a detailed classification and quantitative characterization of the junctional zone using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography volume cube scans (Spectralis OCT, 1024 × 37, Automatic Real Time > 9) were obtained from 15 eyes of 11 patients with GA because of nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration. Volume optical coherence tomography data were imported into previously described validated grading software (3D-OCTOR), and manual segmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor layers was performed on all B-scans (total of 555). Retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor defect maps were produced for each case. The borders of the photoreceptor defect area and RPE defect area were delineated individually on separate annotation layers. The two outlines were then superimposed to compare the areas of overlap and nonoverlap. The perimeter of the RPE defect area was calculated by the software in pixels. The superimposed outline of the photoreceptor defect area and the RPE defect area was scrutinized to classify the overlap configuration of the junctional zone into one of three categories: Type 0, exact correspondence between the edge of the RPE defect and photoreceptor defect; Type 1, loss of photoreceptors outside and beyond the edge of the RPE defect; Type 2, preservation of photoreceptors beyond the edge of the RPE defect. The relative proportion of the various border configurations was expressed as a percentage of the perimeter of the RPE defect. Each configuration was then classified into four subgroups according to irregularity of the RPE band and the presence of debris. Fifteen eyes of 11 patients (mean age: 79.3 ± 4.3 years; range: 79-94 years) were

  8. Software-defined optical network for metro-scale geographically distributed data centers.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Payman; Wen, Ke; Xu, Junjie; Bergman, Keren

    2016-05-30

    The emergence of cloud computing and big data has rapidly increased the deployment of small and mid-sized data centers. Enterprises and cloud providers require an agile network among these data centers to empower application reliability and flexible scalability. We present a software-defined inter data center network to enable on-demand scale out of data centers on a metro-scale optical network. The architecture consists of a combined space/wavelength switching platform and a Software-Defined Networking (SDN) control plane equipped with a wavelength and routing assignment module. It enables establishing transparent and bandwidth-selective connections from L2/L3 switches, on-demand. The architecture is evaluated in a testbed consisting of 3 data centers, 5-25 km apart. We successfully demonstrated end-to-end bulk data transfer and Virtual Machine (VM) migrations across data centers with less than 100 ms connection setup time and close to full link capacity utilization.

  9. Earth resources programs at the Langley Research Center. Part 2: Coastal zone oceanography program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressette, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    The approaches used to develop the coastal zone oceanic research program are outlined, and activities in the areas of satellite application, estuaries, continental shelf and environmental modeling are briefly described.

  10. Research on fabrication of aspheres at the Center of Optics Technology (University of Applied Science in Aalen); Techical Digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerret, Rainer; Burger, Jochen; Bich, Andreas; Gall, Christoph; Hellmuth, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    The Center of Optics Technology at the University of Applied Science, founded in 2003, is part of the School of Optics and Mechatronics. It completes the existing optical engineering department with a full optical fabrication and metrology chain and serves in parallel as a technology transfer center, to provide area industries with the most up-to-date technology in optical fabrication and engineering. Two examples of research work will be presented. The first example is the optimizing of the grinding process for high precision aspheres, the other is generating and polishing of a freeform optical element which is used as a phase plate.

  11. Research on fabrication of aspheres at the Center of Optics Technology (University of Applied Science in Aalen); Techical Digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerret, Rainer; Burger, Jochen; Bich, Andreas; Gall, Christoph; Hellmuth, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    The Center of Optics Technology at the University of Applied Science, founded in 2003, is part of the School of Optics & Mechatronics. It completes the existing optical engineering department with a full optical fabrication and metrology chain and serves in parallel as a technology transfer center, to provide area industries with the most up-to-date technology in optical fabrication and engineering. Two examples of research work will be presented. The first example is the optimizing of the grinding process for high precision aspheres, the other is generating and polishing of a freeform optical element which is used as a phase plate.

  12. Review of ultra-high density optical storage technologies for big data center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ruan; Liu, Jie

    2016-10-01

    In big data center, optical storage technologies have many advantages, such as energy saving and long lifetime. However, how to improve the storage density of optical storage is still a huge challenge. Maybe the multilayer optical storage technology is the good candidate for big data center in the years to come. Due to the number of layers is primarily limited by transmission of each layer, the largest capacities of the multilayer disc are around 1 TB/disc and 10 TB/ cartridge. Holographic data storage (HDS) is a volumetric approach, but its storage capacity is also strictly limited by the diffractive nature of light. For a holographic disc with total thickness of 1.5mm, its potential capacities are not more than 4TB/disc and 40TB/ cartridge. In recent years, the development of super resolution optical storage technology has attracted more attentions. Super-resolution photoinduction-inhibition nanolithography (SPIN) technology with 9 nm feature size and 52nm two-line resolution was reported 3 years ago. However, turning this exciting principle into a real storage system is a huge challenge. It can be expected that in the future, the capacities of 10TB/disc and 100TB/cartridge can be achieved. More importantly, due to breaking the diffraction limit of light, SPIN technology will open the door to improve the optical storage capacity steadily to meet the need of the developing big data center.

  13. Simulation and experimental study of aspect ratio limitation in Fresnel zone plates for hard-x-ray optics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianpeng; Shao, Jinhai; Zhang, Sichao; Ma, Yaqi; Taksatorn, Nit; Mao, Chengwen; Chen, Yifang; Deng, Biao; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2015-11-10

    For acquiring high-contrast and high-brightness images in hard-x-ray optics, Fresnel zone plates with high aspect ratios (zone height/zone width) have been constantly pursued. However, knowledge of aspect ratio limits remains limited. This work explores the achievable aspect ratio limit in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) by electron-beam lithography (EBL) under 100 keV, and investigates the lithographic factors for this limitation. Both Monte Carlo simulation and EBL on thick PMMA are applied to investigate the profile evolution with exposure doses over 100 nm wide dense zones. A high-resolution scanning electron microscope at low acceleration mode for charging free is applied to characterize the resultant zone profiles. It was discovered for what we believe is the first time that the primary electron-beam spreading in PMMA and the proximity effect due to extra exposure from neighboring areas could be the major causes of limiting the aspect ratio. Using the optimized lithography condition, a 100 nm zone plate with aspect ratio of 15/1 was fabricated and its focusing property was characterized at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The aspect ratio limit found in this work should be extremely useful for guiding further technical development in nanofabrication of high-quality Fresnel zone plates.

  14. A low-latency high-port count optical switch with optical delay line buffering for disaggregated data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moralis-Pegios, M.; Terzenidis, N.; Mourgias-Alexandris, G.; Vyrsokinos, K.; Pleros, N.

    2018-02-01

    Disaggregated Data Centers (DCs) have emerged as a powerful architectural framework towards increasing resource utilization and system power efficiency, requiring, however, a networking infrastructure that can ensure low-latency and high-bandwidth connectivity between a high-number of interconnected nodes. This reality has been the driving force towards high-port count and low-latency optical switching platforms, with recent efforts concluding that the use of distributed control architectures as offered by Broadcast-and-Select (BS) layouts can lead to sub-μsec latencies. However, almost all high-port count optical switch designs proposed so far rely either on electronic buffering and associated SerDes circuitry for resolving contention or on buffer-less designs with packet drop and re-transmit procedures, unavoidably increasing latency or limiting throughput. In this article, we demonstrate a 256x256 optical switch architecture for disaggregated DCs that employs small-size optical delay line buffering in a distributed control scheme, exploiting FPGA-based header processing over a hybrid BS/Wavelength routing topology that is implemented by a 16x16 BS design and a 16x16 AWGR. Simulation-based performance analysis reveals that even the use of a 2- packet optical buffer can yield <620nsec latency with >85% throughput for up to 100% loads. The switch has been experimentally validated with 10Gb/s optical data packets using 1:16 optical splitting and a SOA-MZI wavelength converter (WC) along with fiber delay lines for the 2-packet buffer implementation at every BS outgoing port, followed by an additional SOA-MZI tunable WC and the 16x16 AWGR. Error-free performance in all different switch input/output combinations has been obtained with a power penalty of <2.5dB.

  15. Application-oriented integrated control center (AICC) for heterogeneous optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Xuping; Wang, Dajiang; Wu, Koubo; Cai, Yinxiang; Gu, Wanyi

    2011-12-01

    Various broad bandwidth services have being swallowing the bandwidth resource of optical networks, such as the data center application and cloud computation. There are still some challenges for future optical networks although the available bandwidth is increasing with the development of transmission technologies. The relationship between upper application layer and lower network resource layer is necessary to be researched further. In order to improve the efficiency of network resources and capability of service provisioning, heterogeneous optical networks resource can be abstracted as unified Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) which can be open to various upper applications through Application-oriented Integrated Control Center (AICC) proposed in the paper. A novel Openflow-based unified control architecture is proposed for the optimization of cross layer resources. Numeric results show good performance of AICC through simulation experiments.

  16. Copper Disk Manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This king-size copper disk, manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center (SOMTC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), is a special mold for making high resolution monitor screens. This master mold will be used to make several other molds, each capable of forming hundreds of screens that have a type of lens called a Fresnel lens. Weighing much less than conventional optics, Fresnel lenses have multiple concentric grooves, each formed to a precise angle, that together create the curvature needed to focus and project images. MSFC leads NASA's space optics manufacturing technology development as a technology leader for diamond turning. The machine used to manufacture this mold is among many one-of-a-kind pieces of equipment of MSFC's SOMTC.

  17. Direct imaging of exoplanets in the habitable zone with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Guyon, Olivier; Morzinski, Katie; Puglisi, Alfio; Hinz, Philip; Follette, Katherine B.; Monnier, John D.; Tolls, Volker; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Alycia; Boss, Alan; Kopon, Derek; Wu, Ya-lin; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Pinna, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    One of the primary goals of exoplanet science is to find and characterize habitable planets, and direct imaging will play a key role in this effort. Though imaging a true Earth analog is likely out of reach from the ground, the coming generation of giant telescopes will find and characterize many planets in and near the habitable zones (HZs) of nearby stars. Radial velocity and transit searches indicate that such planets are common, but imaging them will require achieving extreme contrasts at very small angular separations, posing many challenges for adaptive optics (AO) system design. Giant planets in the HZ may even be within reach with the latest generation of high-contrast imagers for a handful of very nearby stars. Here we will review the definition of the HZ, and the characteristics of detectable planets there. We then review some of the ways that direct imaging in the HZ will be different from the typical exoplanet imaging survey today. Finally, we present preliminary results from our observations of the HZ of α Centauri A with the Magellan AO system's VisAO and Clio2 cameras.

  18. Probing Subsurface and Stream Particle Composition Through Optical Analysis at the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, A.; Thurnhoffer, B. M.; Bishop, J. K. B.; Kim, H.

    2014-12-01

    Particles constitute a significant portion of the flux weathered material from continents to ocean basins but little is understood about their seasonal dynamics particularly in subsurface and headwater stream environments. At the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory, located near the headwaters of the South Fork Eel River in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve (Northern California), groundwater from weathered bedrock and stream waters are sampled at a frequency of one to three days from three wells (Well 1 down-slope, Well 3 mid-slope, Well 10 upper-slope) and Elder Creek. Approximately one thousand samples collected by automated ISCO Gravity Filtration System (GFS; Kim et al. 2012, EST) since 2011 have been filtered through 0.45 μm 25 mm diameter Supor filters. Filters imaged under controlled lighting are analyzed for red, green, and blue optical density (OD) to enable rapid assessment of sample loading and color as a prelude to and selection aid for more labor-intensive ICP-MS and Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis. For example, samples with lower red OD relative to green and blue may correspond to samples high in Mn/Fe oxides. Optical imaging of the loaded filters provides a time-series over three years and color anomalies in these filters along with chemical analysis of dissolved and particulate filtrate is used to establish a method for calibrating optical data to interpret chemical composition of water and particles. Results are interpreted within a framework of environmental data such as rainfall, stream discharge and turbidity, and water table depth measured at the heavily monitored forested hillslope. Data from the four locations range up to 0.6 OD units with a typical detection limit of better than 0.01 OD units. At Well 10, wet season filter samples exhibit highest particle loading (OD ~ 0.3) with values rapidly decreasing during the dry season (OD < D.L.) water table recession. At Well 1, particle loads instantaneously reflect intense rain events

  19. A NEW PERSPECTIVE OF THE RADIO BRIGHT ZONE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: FEEDBACK FROM NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES

    SciT

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M., E-mail: jzhao@cfa.harvard.edu

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13′ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam{sup −1}, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radiomore » continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2′ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H ii region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.′3 × 3.′2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ∼2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the

  20. A New Perspective of the Radio Bright Zone at The Galactic Center: Feedback from Nuclear Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13‧ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam-1, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radio continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2‧ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H II region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.‧3 × 3.‧2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ˜2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the ionized wind or

  1. Note: Measurement of synchrotron radiation phase-space beam properties to verify astigmatism compensation in Fresnel zone plate focusing optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagoshima, Yasushi; Miyagawa, Takamasa; Kagawa, Saki; Takeda, Shingo; Takano, Hidekazu

    2017-08-01

    The intensity distribution in phase space of an X-ray synchrotron radiation beamline was measured using a pinhole camera method, in order to verify astigmatism compensation by a Fresnel zone plate focusing optical system. The beamline is equipped with a silicon double crystal monochromator. The beam size and divergence at an arbitrary distance were estimated. It was found that the virtual source point was largely different between the vertical and horizontal directions, which is probably caused by thermal distortion of the monochromator crystal. The result is consistent with our astigmatism compensation by inclining a Fresnel zone plate.

  2. Incidence and Outcomes of Optical Zone Enlargement and Recentration After Previous Myopic LASIK by Topography-Guided Custom Ablation.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Archer, Timothy J; Carp, Glenn I; Stuart, Alastair J; Rowe, Elizabeth L; Nesbit, Andrew; Moore, Tara

    2018-02-01

    To report the incidence, visual and refractive outcomes, optical zone enlargement, and recentration using topography-guided CRS-Master TOSCA II software with the MEL 80 excimer laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany) after primary myopic laser refractive surgery. Retrospective analysis of 73 eyes (40 patients) with complaints of night vision disturbances due to either a decentration or small optical zone following a primary myopic laser refractive surgery procedure using the MEL 80 laser. Multiple ATLAS topography scans were imported into the CRS-Master software for topography-guided ablation planning. The topography-guided re-treatment procedure was performed as either a LASIK flap lift, a new LASIK flap, a side cut only, or photorefractive keratectomy. Axial curvature maps were analyzed using a fixed grid and set of concentric circles superimposed to measure the topographic optical zone diameter and centration. Follow-up was 12 months. The incidence of use in the population of myopic treatments during the study period was 0.79% (73 of 9,249). The optical zone diameter was increased by 11% from a mean of 5.65 to 6.32 mm, with a maximum change of 2 mm in one case. Topographic decentration was reduced by 64% from a mean of 0.58 to 0.21 mm. There was a 44% reduction in spherical aberration, 53% reduction in coma, and 39% reduction in total higher order aberrations. A subjective improvement in night vision symptoms was reported by 93%. Regarding efficacy, 82% of eyes reached 20/20 and 100% reached 20/32 (preoperative CDVA was 20/20 or better in 90%). Regarding safety, no eyes lost two lines of CDVA and 27% gained one line. Regarding predictability, 71% of re-treatments were within ±0.50 diopters. Topography-guided ablation was effective in enlarging the optical zone, recentering the optical zone, and reducing higher order aberrations. Topography-guided custom ablation appears to be an effective method for re-treatment procedures of symptomatic patients after

  3. 75 FR 69032 - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Potomac River, Dahlgren, VA; Danger Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... hazardous operations such as firing large and small caliber guns and projectiles, aerial bombing, use of... protect the public from hazardous operations such as firing large and small caliber guns and projectiles... zone to include firing of large or small caliber guns and projectiles, aerial bombing, use of directed...

  4. Elastic all-optical multi-hop interconnection in data centers with adaptive spectrum allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yuanyuan; Hong, Xuezhi; Chen, Jiajia; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel flex-grid all-optical interconnect scheme that supports transparent multi-hop connections in data centers is proposed. An inter-rack all-optical multi-hop connection is realized with an optical loop employed at flex-grid wavelength selective switches (WSSs) in an intermediate rack rather than by relaying through optical-electric-optical (O-E-O) conversions. Compared with the conventional O-E-O based approach, the proposed all-optical scheme is able to off-load the traffic at intermediate racks, leading to a reduction of the power consumption and cost. The transmission performance of the proposed flex-grid multi-hop all-optical interconnect scheme with various modulation formats, including both coherently detected and directly detected approaches, are investigated by Monte-Carlo simulations. To enhance the spectrum efficiency (SE), number-of-hop adaptive bandwidth allocation is introduced. Numerical results show that the SE can be improved by up to 33.3% at 40 Gbps, and by up to 25% at 100 Gbps. The impact of parameters, such as targeted bit error rate (BER) level and insertion loss of components, on the transmission performance of the proposed approach are also explored. The results show that the maximum SE improvement of the adaptive approach over the non-adaptive one is enhanced with the decrease of the targeted BER levels and the component insertion loss.

  5. TLR4 signaling augments B lymphocyte migration and overcomes the restriction that limits access to germinal center dark zones

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Il-Young; Park, Chung; Harrison, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    B lymphocyte–intrinsic Toll-like receptor (TLR) signals amplify humoral immunity and can exacerbate autoimmune diseases. We identify a new mechanism by which TLR signals may contribute to autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. We show that TLR4 signaling enhances B lymphocyte trafficking into lymph nodes (LNs), induces B lymphocyte clustering and interactions within LN follicles, leads to sustained in vivo B cell proliferation, overcomes the restriction that limits the access of nonantigen-activated B cells to germinal center dark zones, and enhances the generation of memory and plasma cells. Intravital microscopy and in vivo tracking studies of B cells transferred to recipient mice revealed that TLR4-activated, but not nonstimulated, B cells accumulated within the dark zones of preexisting germinal centers even when transferred with antigen-specific B cells. The TLR4-activated cells persist much better than nonstimulated cells, expanding both within the memory and plasma cell compartments. TLR-mediated activation of B cells may help to feed and stabilize the spontaneous and ectopic germinal centers that are so commonly found in autoimmune individuals and that accompany chronic inflammation. PMID:19917774

  6. Micro-Fresnel Zone Plate Optical Devices Using Densely Accumulated Ray Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An embodiment generally relates to an optical device suitable for use with an optical medium for the storage and retrieval of data. The optical device includes an illumination means for providing a beam of optical radiation of wavelength .lamda. and an optical path that the beam of optical radiation follows. The optical device also includes a diffractive optical element defined by a plurality of annular sections. The plurality of annular sections having a first material alternately disposed with a plurality of annular sections comprising a second material. The diffractive optical element generates a plurality of focal points and densely accumulated ray points with phase contrast phenomena and the optical medium is positioned at a selected focal point or ray point of the diffractive optical element.

  7. Lahar hazard zones for eruption-generated lahars in the Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    Robinson, Joel E.; Clynne, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Lahar deposits are found in drainages that head on or near Lassen Peak in northern California, demonstrating that these valleys are susceptible to future lahars. In general, lahars are uncommon in the Lassen region. Lassen Peak's lack of large perennial snowfields and glaciers limits its potential for lahar development, with the winter snowpack being the largest source of water for lahar generation. The most extensive lahar deposits are related to the May 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak, and evidence for pre-1915 lahars is sparse and spatially limited. The May 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak was a small-volume eruption that generated a snow and hot-rock avalanche, a pyroclastic flow, and two large and four smaller lahars. The two large lahars were generated on May 19 and 22 and inundated sections of Lost and Hat Creeks. We use 80 years of snow depth measurements from Lassen Peak to calculate average and maximum liquid water depths, 2.02 meters (m) and 3.90 m respectively, for the month of May as estimates of the 1915 lahars. These depths are multiplied by the areal extents of the eruptive deposits to calculate a water volume range, 7.05-13.6x106 cubic meters (m3). We assume the lahars were a 50/50 mix of water and sediment and double the water volumes to provide an estimate of the 1915 lahars, 13.2-19.8x106 m3. We use a representative volume of 15x106 m3 in the software program LAHARZ to calculate cross-sectional and planimetric areas for the 1915 lahars. The resultant lahar inundation zone reasonably portrays both of the May 1915 lahars. We use this same technique to calculate the potential for future lahars in basins that head on or near Lassen Peak. LAHARZ assumes that the total lahar volume does not change after leaving the potential energy, H/L, cone (the height of the edifice, H, down to the approximate break in slope at its base, L); therefore, all water available to initiate a lahar is contained inside this cone. Because snow is the primary source of water for

  8. Bio-optical profile data report coastal transition zone program, R/V Point Sur, June 15-28, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Curtiss O.; Rhea, W. Joseph

    1990-01-01

    Twenty vertical profiles of the bio-optical properties of the ocean were made during a research cruise on the R/V Point Sur, June 15 to 28, 1987, as part of the Coastal Transition Zone Program off Point Arena, California. Extracted chlorophyll values were also measured at some stations to provide calibration data for the in situ fluorometer. This summary provides investigators with an overview of the data collected. The entire data set is available in digital form.

  9. Bio-optical profile data report coastal transition zone program, R/V Thomas Washington, June 24 - July 21, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Curtiss O.; Rhea, W. Joseph

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-three vertical profiles of the bio-optical properties of the ocean were made during a research cruise on the R/V Thomas Washington, June 24 to July 21, 1988, as part of the Coastal Transition Zone Program off Point Arena, California. A summary is given, to provide investigators with an overview of the data collected. The entire data set is available in digital form for interested researchers.

  10. Statistical mapping of zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Slater, Lee D.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) increasingly is used to map zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange (GWSWE). Previous studies of GWSWE using FO-DTS involved identification of zones of focused GWSWE based on arbitrary cutoffs of FO-DTS time-series statistics (e.g., variance, cross-correlation between temperature and stage, or spectral power). New approaches are needed to extract more quantitative information from large, complex FO-DTS data sets while concurrently providing an assessment of uncertainty associated with mapping zones of focused GSWSE. Toward this end, we present a strategy combining discriminant analysis (DA) and spectral analysis (SA). We demonstrate the approach using field experimental data from a reach of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area site. Results of the combined SA/DA approach are shown to be superior to previous results from qualitative interpretation of FO-DTS spectra alone.

  11. Beta-zone parapapillary atrophy and multifocal visual evoked potentials in eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Ketner, Scott; Teng, Christopher C; Ehrlich, Joshua R; Raza, Ali S; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C

    2011-08-01

    We investigated changes in multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) responses due to beta-zone parapapillary atrophy (ßPPA). Patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) with or without standard achromatic perimetry (SAP) abnormalities were referred for mfVEP testing during a 2-year period. Eyes with good quality optic disc stereophotographs and reliable SAP results were included. The mfVEP monocular mean latency delays (ms) and amplitudes (SNR) were analyzed. Age, SAP mean deviation (MD), pattern standard deviation (PSD), and spherical equivalent (SE) were analyzed in the multivariate model. Generalized estimated equations were used for comparisons between groups after adjusting for inter-eye associations. Of 394 eyes of 200 patients, 223 (57%) had ßPPA. The ßPPA eyes were older (59.6 ± 13.7 vs. 56.5 ± 13.7 year, P = 0.02), more myopic (-4.0 ± 3.5 vs. -1.3 ± 3.5 D, P < 0.01), and had poorer SAP scores (MD: -4.9 ± 5.2 vs. -2.6 ± 5.2 dB, P < 0.01; PSD: 4.3 ± 2.9 vs. 2.5 ± 3.0 dB, P < 0.01). By univariate analysis, mean latencies were longer in ßPPA eyes (6.1 ± 5.3 vs. 4.0 ± 5.5 ms, P < 0.01). After adjusting for differences in SE, age, and SAP MD, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.09). ßPPA eyes had lower amplitude log SNR (0.49 ± 0.16 vs. 0.56 ± 0.15, P < 0.01), which lost significance (P = 0.51) after adjusting for MD and PSD. Although eyes with ßPPA had significantly lower amplitudes and prolonged latencies than eyes without ßPPA, these differences were attributable to differences in SAP severity, age, and refractive error. Thus, ßPPA does not appear to be an independent factor affecting mfVEP responses in eyes with GON.

  12. Beta-zone parapapillary atrophy and multifocal visual evoked potentials in eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ketner, Scott; Teng, Christopher C.; Ehrlich, Joshua R.; Raza, Ali S.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated changes in multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) responses due to beta-zone parapapillary atrophy (βPPA). Patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) with or without standard achromatic perimetry (SAP) abnormalities were referred for mfVEP testing during a 2-year period. Eyes with good quality optic disc stereophotographs and reliable SAP results were included. The mfVEP monocular mean latency delays (ms) and amplitudes (SNR) were analyzed. Age, SAP mean deviation (MD), pattern standard deviation (PSD), and spherical equivalent (SE) were analyzed in the multivariate model. Generalized estimated equations were used for comparisons between groups after adjusting for inter-eye associations. Of 394 eyes of 200 patients, 223 (57%) had βPPA. The βPPA eyes were older (59.6 ± 13.7 vs. 56.5 ± 13.7 year, P = 0.02), more myopic (−4.0 ± 3.5 vs. −1.3 ± 3.5 D, P < 0.01), and had poorer SAP scores (MD: −4.9 ± 5.2 vs. −2.6 ± 5.2 dB, P < 0.01; PSD: 4.3 ± 2.9 vs. 2.5 ± 3.0 dB, P < 0.01). By univariate analysis, mean latencies were longer in βPPA eyes (6.1 ± 5.3 vs. 4.0 ± 5.5 ms, P < 0.01). After adjusting for differences in SE, age, and SAP MD, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.09). βPPA eyes had lower amplitude log SNR (0.49 ± 0.16 vs. 0.56 ± 0.15, P < 0.01), which lost significance (P = 0.51) after adjusting for MD and PSD. Although eyes with βPPA had significantly lower amplitudes and prolonged latencies than eyes without βPPA, these differences were attributable to differences in SAP severity, age, and refractive error. Thus, βPPA does not appear to be an independent factor affecting mfVEP responses in eyes with GON. PMID:21735265

  13. Coherent control of a single nitrogen-vacancy center spin in optically levitated nanodiamond

    DOE PAGES

    Pettit, Robert M.; Neukirch, Levi Patrick; Zhang, Yi; ...

    2017-05-12

    Here, we report the first observation, to the best of our knowledge, of electron spin transients in single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV -) centers, contained within optically trapped nanodiamonds, in both atmospheric pressure and low vacuum. It is shown that, after an initial exposure to low vacuum, the trapped nanodiamonds remain at temperatures near room temperature even in low vacuum. Furthermore, the transverse coherence time of the NV - center spin, measured to be T 2=101.4 ns, is robust over the range of trapping powers considered in this study.

  14. Fully programmable and scalable optical switching fabric for petabyte data center.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhonghua; Zhong, Shan; Chen, Li; Chen, Kai

    2015-02-09

    We present a converged EPS and OCS switching fabric for data center networks (DCNs) based on a distributed optical switching architecture leveraging both WDM & SDM technologies. The architecture is topology adaptive, well suited to dynamic and diverse *-cast traffic patterns. Compared to a typical folded-Clos network, the new architecture is more readily scalable to future multi-Petabyte data centers with 1000 + racks while providing a higher link bandwidth, reducing transceiver count by 50%, and improving cabling efficiency by more than 90%.

  15. On investigation of optical and spin properties of NV centers in aggregates of detonation nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshedvorskii, S. V.; Vorobyov, V. V.; Soshenko, V. V.; Zeleneev, A.; Sorokin, V. N.; Smolyaninov, A. N.; Akimov, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    Quickly developing application of nitrogen-vacancy color centers in diamond sets demands on cheap and high optical and spin properties nanodiamonds. Among other types, detonation nanodiamonds are easiest for production but often show no NV color centers inside. In this work we show, that aggregates of detonation nanodiamonds could be as good, or even better in terms of brightness and spin properties, than more expensive single crystal nanodiamonds. This way aggregates of detonation nanodiamonds could efficiently serve as cheap and bright source of single photon radiation or sensitive element of biocompatible sensor.

  16. Little bits of diamond: Optically detected magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haimei; Belvin, Carina; Li, Wanyi; Wang, Jennifer; Wainwright, Julia; Berg, Robbie; Bridger, Joshua

    2018-03-01

    We give instructions for the construction and operation of a simple apparatus for performing optically detected magnetic resonance measurements on diamond samples containing high concentrations of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. Each NV center has a spin degree of freedom that can be manipulated and monitored by a combination of visible and microwave radiation. We observe Zeeman shifts in the presence of small external magnetic fields and describe a simple method to optically measure magnetic field strengths with a spatial resolution of several microns. The activities described are suitable for use in an advanced undergraduate lab course, powerfully connecting core quantum concepts to cutting edge applications. An even simpler setup, appropriate for use in more introductory settings, is also presented.

  17. Loading an Optical Trap with Diamond Nanocrystals Containing Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers from a Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple and effective method of loading particles into an optical trap. Our primary application of this method is loading photoluminescent material, such as diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, for coupling the mechanical motion of the trapped crystal with the spin of the NV centers. Highly absorptive material at the trapping laser frequency, such as tartrazine dye, is used as media to attach nanodiamonds and burn into a cloud of air-borne particles as the material is swept near the trapping laser focus on a glass slide. Particles are then trapped with the laser used for burning or transferred to a second laser trap at a different wavelength. Evidence of successful loading diamond nanocrystals into the trap presented includes high sensitivity of the photoluminecscence (PL) to the excitation laser and the PL spectra of the optically trapped particles

  18. Electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Viva R.; Alemán, Benjamín J.; Christle, David J.; Cleland, Andrew N.; Awschalom, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Using an optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous readout of ground-state electron-spin resonance (ESR) transitions in an ensemble of diamond nitrogen-vacancy color centers. Despite the motion and random orientation of nitrogen-vacancy centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the measured ESR spectra qualitatively similar to the same measurement in bulk. Accounting for the random dynamics, we model the ESR spectra observed in an externally applied magnetic field to enable dc magnetometry in solution. We estimate the dc magnetic field sensitivity based on variations in ESR line shapes to be approximately . This technique may provide a pathway for spin-based magnetic, electric, and thermal sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques. PMID:22869706

  19. Improved Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey; Haight, Harlan; Hogue, William; Carpenter, Jay; Siler, Richard; Wright, Ernie; Eng, Ron; Baker, Mark; McCracken, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray & Cryogenic Test Facility (XRCF) has been performing optical wavefront testing and thermal structural deformation testing at subliquid nitrogen cryogenic temperatures since 1999. Recent modifications have been made to the facility in support of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program. The test article envelope and the chamber's refrigeration capacity have both been increased. A new larger helium-cooled enclosure has been added to the existing enclosure increasing both the cross-sectional area and the length. This new enclosure is capable of supporting six JWST Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies. A second helium refrigeration system has been installed essentially doubling the cooling capacity available at the facility. Modifications have also been made to the optical instrumentation area. Improved access is now available for both the installation and operation of optical instrumentation outside the vacuum chamber. Chamber configuration, specifications, and performance data will be presented.

  20. A single-stage optical load-balanced switch for data centers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qirui; Yeo, Yong-Kee; Zhou, Luying

    2012-10-22

    Load balancing is an attractive technique to achieve maximum throughput and optimal resource utilization in large-scale switching systems. However current electronic load-balanced switches suffer from severe problems in implementation cost, power consumption and scaling. To overcome these problems, in this paper we propose a single-stage optical load-balanced switch architecture based on an arrayed waveguide grating router (AWGR) in conjunction with fast tunable lasers. By reuse of the fast tunable lasers, the switch achieves both functions of load balancing and switching through the AWGR. With this architecture, proof-of-concept experiments have been conducted to investigate the feasibility of the optical load-balanced switch and to examine its physical performance. Compared to three-stage load-balanced switches, the reported switch needs only half of optical devices such as tunable lasers and AWGRs, which can provide a cost-effective solution for future data centers.

  1. Contribution of Optical Zone Decentration and Pupil Dilation on the Change of Optical Quality After Myopic Photorefractive Keratectomy in a Cat Model

    PubMed Central

    Bühren, Jens; Yoon, Geunyoung; MacRae, Scott; Huxlin, Krystel

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To simulate the simultaneous contribution of optical zone decentration and pupil dilation on retinal image quality using wavefront error data from a myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) cat model. METHODS Wavefront error differences were obtained from five cat eyes 19±7 weeks (range: 12 to 24 weeks) after spherical myopic PRK for −6.00 diopters (D) (three eyes) and −10.00 D (two eyes). A computer model was used to simulate decentration of a 6-mm sub-aperture relative to the measured wavefront error difference. Changes in image quality (visual Strehl ratio based on the optical transfer function [VSOTF]) were computed for simulated decentrations from 0 to 1500 μm over pupil diameters of 3.5 to 6.0 mm in 0.5-mm steps. For each eye, a bivariate regression model was applied to calculate the simultaneous contribution of pupil dilation and decentration on the pre- to postoperative change of the log VSOTF. RESULTS Pupil diameter and decentration explained up to 95% of the variance of VSOTF change (adjusted R2=0.95). Pupil diameter had a higher impact on VSOTF (median β=−0.88, P<.001) than decentration (median β= −0.45, P<.001). If decentration-induced lower order aberrations were corrected, the impact of decentration further decreased (β= −0.26) compared to the influence of pupil dilation (β= −0.95). CONCLUSIONS Both pupil dilation and decentration of the optical zone affected the change of retinal image quality (VSOTF) after myopic PRK with decentration exerting a lower impact on VSOTF change. Thus, under physiological conditions pupil dilation is likely to have more effect on VSOTF change after PRK than optical zone decentration. PMID:20229950

  2. Contribution of optical zone decentration and pupil dilation on the change of optical quality after myopic photorefractive keratectomy in a cat model.

    PubMed

    Bühren, Jens; Yoon, Geunyoung; MacRae, Scott; Huxlin, Krystel

    2010-03-01

    To simulate the simultaneous contribution of optical zone decentration and pupil dilation on retinal image quality using wavefront error data from a myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) cat model. Wavefront error differences were obtained from five cat eyes 19+/-7 weeks (range: 12 to 24 weeks) after spherical myopic PRK for -6.00 diopters (D) (three eyes) and -10.00 D (two eyes). A computer model was used to simulate decentration of a 6-mm sub-aperture relative to the measured wavefront error difference. Changes in image quality (visual Strehl ratio based on the optical transfer function [VSOTF]) were computed for simulated decentrations from 0 to 1500 mum over pupil diameters of 3.5 to 6.0 mm in 0.5-mm steps. For each eye, a bivariate regression model was applied to calculate the simultaneous contribution of pupil dilation and decentration on the pre- to postoperative change of the log VSOTF. Pupil diameter and decentration explained up to 95% of the variance of VSOTF change (adjusted R(2)=0.95). Pupil diameter had a higher impact on VSOTF (median beta=-0.88, P<.001) than decentration (median beta=-0.45, P<.001). If decentration-induced lower order aberrations were corrected, the impact of decentration further decreased (beta=-0.26) compared to the influence of pupil dilation (beta=-0.95). Both pupil dilation and decentration of the optical zone affected the change of retinal image quality (VSOTF) after myopic PRK with decentration exerting a lower impact on VSOTF change. Thus, under physiological conditions pupil dilation is likely to have more effect on VSOTF change after PRK than optical zone decentration. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Analysis of Loss of Ignition of Root Zone of Bioretention Units at the Edison Environmental Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six bioretention units (widths 7.1 m) at USEPA’s Edison Environmental Center were constructed to evaluate sizing of surface area to watershed area. Three sizes were tested in duplicate with changes in aspect ratio of length from inlet (northern) wall by doubling successive ...

  4. Operation of a wet near-field scanning optical microscope in stable zones by minimizing the resonance change of tuning forks.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Park, Doo Jae; Lee, Seung Gol; Choi, Geunchang; Kim, Dai-Sik; Byeon, Clare Chisu; Choi, Soo Bong; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2014-02-21

    A resonant shift and a decrease of resonance quality of a tuning fork attached to a conventional fiber optic probe in the vicinity of liquid is monitored systematically while varying the protrusion length and immersion depth of the probe. Stable zones where the resonance modification as a function of immersion depth is minimized are observed. A wet near-field scanning optical microscope (wet-NSOM) is operated for a sample within water by using such a stable zone.

  5. Vibronic effects in the 1.4-eV optical center in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakoubovskii, Konstantin; Davies, Gordon

    2004-12-01

    We report optical absorption and luminescence measurements on the 1.4-eV center in diamond. We show that the zero-phonon lines have a temperature-dependent Ni-isotope shift, that the isotopic shifts induced by carbon and nickel are opposite in sign, and that a local vibronic mode is present in the absorption spectrum but not in luminescence. The microscopic properties of the center are successfully analyzed with the Ludwig-Woodbury theory (LWT), revealing that the Ni+ ion in the 1.4-eV center only weakly interacts with the diamond lattice. The importance of vibronic effects in the LWT analysis is experimentally demonstrated. It is believed that similar effects can account for the discrepancies previously encountered in modeling other 3d9 impurities in semiconductors.

  6. Evaluation of data from test application of optical speed bars to highway work zones

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-08-01

    The proximity of traffic and workers in highway work zones demand that safety be a high priority. : The issue of traffic speeds in highway work zones has long been an issue receiving much attention. Over the : past three decades, many different measu...

  7. Cooperative effects between color centers in diamond: applications to optical tweezers and optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradac, Carlo; Prasanna Venkatesh, B.; Besga, Benjamin; Johnsson, Mattias; Brennen, Gavin; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel; Volz, Thomas; Juan, Mathieu L.

    2017-08-01

    Since the early work by Ashkin in 1970,1 optical trapping has become one of the most powerful tools for manipulating small particles, such as micron sized beads2 or single atoms.3 Interestingly, both an atom and a lump of dielectric material can be manipulated through the same mechanism: the interaction energy of a dipole and the electric field of the laser light. In the case of atom trapping, the dominant contribution typically comes from the allowed optical transition closest to the laser wavelength while it is given by the bulk polarisability for mesoscopic particles. This difference lead to two very different contexts of applications: one being the trapping of small objects mainly in biological settings,4 the other one being dipole traps for individual neutral atoms5 in the field of quantum optics. In this context, solid state artificial atoms present the interesting opportunity to combine these two aspects of optical manipulation. We are particularly interested in nanodiamonds as they constitute a bulk dielectric object by themselves, but also contain artificial atoms such as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) or silicon-vacancy (SiV) colour centers. With this system, both regimes of optical trapping can be observed at the same time even at room temperature. In this work, we demonstrate that the resonant force from the optical transition of NV centres at 637 nm can be measured in a nanodiamond trapped in water. This additional contribution to the total force is significant, reaching up to 10%. In addition, due to the very large density of NV centres in a sub-wavelength crystal, collective effects between centres have an important effect on the magnitude of the resonant force.6 The possibility to observe such cooperatively enhanced optical force at room temperature is also theoretically confirmed.7 This approach may enable the study of cooperativity in various nanoscale solid-state systems and the use of atomic physics techniques in the field of nano-manipulation and opto-mechanics.

  8. Thermal and Optical Characteristics of Defect Centers in Irradiated TLD-100 Dosimeters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi-Zamani, Hossein

    Sensitivity loss of a sensitized LiF:Mg,Ti,Al (TLD-100) dosimeter subject to repeated standard 673 K thermal treatments has been a major problem in radiation dosimetry. The cause for this loss in radiation response of the dosimeters has not been understood. If a used TLD is not annealed at an elevated temperature prior to reuse, there are residual deep electron trap centers still present in the dosimeter. These defect centers will interact with new incoming radiation and produce thermoluminescent trap centers. This will introduce a significant error in low dose measurements. In this research, first, thermal and optical characteristics of various defect centers produced in an irradiated TLD-100 single crystal were investigated and then an improved pre-irradiation isothermal/optical treatment process was introduced to bleach the TLD dosimeters prior to reuse and reduce the loss of sensitivity of sensitized dosimeter. Thermoluminescent materials were irradiated by gamma-rays from Co-60 source to produce sufficient concentration of various defect centers, then the crystals were heated or exposed to UV light at different temperature to change the concentration of various defect centers. The change in concentration of each trap center was determined by measuring the change in absorbance of light at a fixed photon energy as a function of temperature. The thermal activation energy and the frequency factor for each trap center were evaluated assuming a first order kinetic model over a specified temperature range. The value of activation energy and the frequency factor for Z_2 ^', Z_2, Z_3, and F trap centers in TLD-100 single crystals were found to be 1.49 +/- 0.04 eV, 4.76 times 10 ^{15} sec^{ -1}, 2.23 +/- 0.02 eV, 1.65 times 10^{23 } sec^{-1}; 3.01 +/- 0.02 eV, 2.90 times 10^{17} sec ^{-1}; and 2.81 +/- 0.08 eV, 5.43 times 10 ^{17} sec^{ -1}; respectively. After a correlation was made between the trap centers and TL glow peaks, kinetic parameters obtained from absorption

  9. Evaluation of center-cut separations applying simulated moving bed chromatography with 8 zones.

    PubMed

    Santos da Silva, Francisco Vitor; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2016-07-22

    Different multi-column options to perform continuous chromatographic separations of ternary mixtures have been proposed in order to overcome limitations of batch chromatography. One attractive option is given by simulated moving bed chromatography (SMB) with 8 zones, a process that offers uninterrupted production, and, potentially, improved economy. As in other established ternary separation processes, the separation sequence is crucial for the performance of the process. This problem is addressed here by computing and comparing optimal performances of the two possibilities assuming linear adsorption isotherms. The conclusions are presented in a decision tree which can be used to guide the selection of system configuration and operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Copper Disk Manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photograph shows Wes Brown, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) lead diamond tuner, an expert in the science of using diamond-tipped tools to cut metal, inspecting the mold's physical characteristics to ensure the uniformity of its more than 6,000 grooves. This king-size copper disk, manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center (SOMTC) at MSFC, is a special mold for making high resolution monitor screens. This master mold will be used to make several other molds, each capable of forming hundreds of screens that have a type of lens called a fresnel lens. Weighing much less than conventional optics, fresnel lenses have multiple concentric grooves, each formed to a precise angle, that together create the curvature needed to focus and project images. The MSFC leads NASA's space optics manufacturing technology development as a technology leader for diamond turning. The machine used to manufacture this mold is among many one-of-a-kind pieces of equipment of MSFC's SOMTC.

  11. Electron Spin Resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies of manganese centers in aluminium lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    SivaRamaiah, G; LakshmanaRao, J

    2012-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and optical absorption studies of 5Al(2)O(3)+75H(3)BO(3)+(20-x)PbO+xMnSO(4) (where x=0.5, 1,1.5 and 2 mol% of MnSO(4)) glasses at room temperature have been studied. The ESR spectrum of all the glasses exhibits resonance signals with effective isotropic g values at ≈2.0, 3.3 and 4.3. The ESR resonance signal at isotropic g≈2.0 has been attributed to Mn(2+) centers in an octahedral symmetry. The ESR resonance signals at isotropic g≈3.3 and 4.3 have been attributed to the rhombic symmetry of the Mn(2+) ions. The zero-field splitting parameter (zfs) has been calculated from the intensities of the allowed hyperfine lines. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits an intense band in the visible region and it has been attributed to (5)E(g)→(5)T(2g) transition of Mn(3+)centers in an octahedral environment. The optical band gap and the Urbach energies have been calculated from the ultraviolet absorption edges. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Wnt Signaling Specifies Anteroposterior Progenitor Zone Identity in the Drosophila Visual Center.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takumi; Trush, Olena; Yasugi, Tetsuo; Takayama, Rie; Sato, Makoto

    2016-06-15

    During brain development, various types of neuronal populations are produced from different progenitor pools to produce neuronal diversity that is sufficient to establish functional neuronal circuits. However, the molecular mechanisms that specify the identity of each progenitor pool remain obscure. Here, we show that Wnt signaling is essential for the specification of the identity of posterior progenitor pools in the Drosophila visual center. In the medulla, the largest component of the visual center, different types of neurons are produced from two progenitor pools: the outer proliferation center (OPC) and glial precursor cells (GPCs; also known as tips of the OPC). We found that OPC-type neurons are produced from the GPCs at the expense of GPC-type neurons when Wnt signaling is suppressed in the GPCs. In contrast, GPC-type neurons are ectopically induced when Wnt signaling is ectopically activated in the OPC. These results suggest that Wnt signaling is necessary and sufficient for the specification of the progenitor pool identity. We also found that Homothorax (Hth), which is temporally expressed in the OPC, is ectopically induced in the GPCs by suppression of Wnt signaling and that ectopic induction of Hth phenocopies the suppression of Wnt signaling in the GPCs. Thus, Wnt signaling is involved in regionalization of the fly visual center through the specification of the progenitor pool located posterior to the medulla by suppressing Hth expression. Brain consists of considerably diverse neurons of different origins. In mammalian brain, excitatory and inhibitory neurons derive from the dorsal and ventral telencephalon, respectively. Multiple progenitor pools also contribute to the neuronal diversity in fly brain. However, it has been unclear how differences between these progenitor pools are established. Here, we show that Wnt signaling, an evolutionarily conserved signaling, is involved in the process that establishes the differences between these progenitor

  13. Optical treatment strategies to slow myopia progression: Effects of the visual extent of the optical treatment zone

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Earl L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop effective optical treatment strategies for myopia, it is important to understand how visual experience influences refractive development. Beginning with the discovery of the phenomenon of form deprivation myopia, research involving many animal species has demonstrated that refractive development is regulated by visual feedback. In particular, animal studies have shown that optically imposed myopic defocus slows axial elongation, that the effects of vision are dominated by local retinal mechanisms, and that peripheral vision can dominate central refractive development. In this review, the results obtained from clinical trials of traditional optical treatment strategies employed in efforts to slow myopia progression in children are interpreted in light of the results from animal studies and are compared to the emerging results from preliminary clinical studies of optical treatment strategies that manipulate the effective focus of the peripheral retina. Overall, the results suggest that imposed myopic defocus can slow myopia progression in children and that the effectiveness of an optical treatment strategy in reducing myopia progression is influenced by the extent of the visual field that is manipulated. PMID:23290590

  14. Single-Pixel Optical Fluctuation Analysis of Calcium Channel Function in Active Zones of Motor Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fujun; Dittrich, Markus; Stiles, Joel R.; Meriney, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    We used high-resolution fluorescence imaging and single-pixel optical fluctuation analysis to estimate the opening probability of individual voltage-gated calcium (Ca2+) channels during an action potential and the number of such Ca2+ channels within active zones of frog neuromuscular junctions. Analysis revealed ~36 Ca2+ channels within each active zone, similar to the number of docked synaptic vesicles but far less than the total number of transmembrane particles reported based on freeze-fracture analysis (~200–250). The probability that each channel opened during an action potential was only ~0.2. These results suggest why each active zone averages only one quantal release event during every other action potential, despite a substantial number of docked vesicles. With sparse Ca2+ channels and low opening probability, triggering of fusion for each vesicle is primarily controlled by Ca2+ influx through individual Ca2+ channels. In contrast, the entire synapse is highly reliable because it contains hundreds of active zones. PMID:21813687

  15. Optical rotation compensation for a holographic 3D display with a 360 degree horizontal viewing zone.

    PubMed

    Sando, Yusuke; Barada, Daisuke; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2016-10-20

    A method for a continuous optical rotation compensation in a time-division-based holographic three-dimensional (3D) display with a rotating mirror is presented. Since the coordinate system of wavefronts after the mirror reflection rotates about the optical axis along with the rotation angle, compensation or cancellation is absolutely necessary to fix the reconstructed 3D object. In this study, we address this problem by introducing an optical image rotator based on a right-angle prism that rotates synchronously with the rotating mirror. The optical and continuous compensation reduces the occurrence of duplicate images, which leads to the improvement of the quality of reconstructed images. The effect of the optical rotation compensation is experimentally verified and a demonstration of holographic 3D display with the optical rotation compensation is presented.

  16. Biomedical optics centers: forty years of multidisciplinary clinical translation for improving human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromberg, Bruce J.; Anderson, R. Rox; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf; Berns, Michael W.; Parrish, John A.; Apiou-Sbirlea, Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    Despite widespread government and public interest, there are significant barriers to translating basic science discoveries into clinical practice. Biophotonics and biomedical optics technologies can be used to overcome many of these hurdles, due, in part, to offering new portable, bedside, and accessible devices. The current JBO special issue highlights promising activities and examples of translational biophotonics from leading laboratories around the world. We identify common essential features of successful clinical translation by examining the origins and activities of three major international academic affiliated centers with beginnings traceable to the mid-late 1970s: The Wellman Center for Photomedicine (Mass General Hospital, USA), the Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (University of California, Irvine, USA), and the Medical Laser Center Lübeck at the University of Lübeck, Germany. Major factors driving the success of these programs include visionary founders and leadership, multidisciplinary research and training activities in light-based therapies and diagnostics, diverse funding portfolios, and a thriving entrepreneurial culture that tolerates risk. We provide a brief review of how these three programs emerged and highlight critical phases and lessons learned. Based on these observations, we identify pathways for encouraging the growth and formation of similar programs in order to more rapidly and effectively expand the impact of biophotonics and biomedical optics on human health.

  17. Biomedical optics centers: forty years of multidisciplinary clinical translation for improving human health.

    PubMed

    Tromberg, Bruce J; Anderson, R Rox; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf; Berns, Michael W; Parrish, John A; Apiou-Sbirlea, Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    Despite widespread government and public interest, there are significant barriers to translating basic science discoveries into clinical practice. Biophotonics and biomedical optics technologies can be used to overcome many of these hurdles, due, in part, to offering new portable, bedside, and accessible devices. The current JBO special issue highlights promising activities and examples of translational biophotonics from leading laboratories around the world. We identify common essential features of successful clinical translation by examining the origins and activities of three major international academic affiliated centers with beginnings traceable to the mid-late 1970s: The Wellman Center for Photomedicine (Mass General Hospital, USA), the Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (University of California, Irvine, USA), and the Medical Laser Center Lübeck at the University of Lübeck, Germany. Major factors driving the success of these programs include visionary founders and leadership, multidisciplinary research and training activities in light-based therapies and diagnostics, diverse funding portfolios, and a thriving entrepreneurial culture that tolerates risk. We provide a brief review of how these three programs emerged and highlight critical phases and lessons learned. Based on these observations, we identify pathways for encouraging the growth and formation of similar programs in order to more rapidly and effectively expand the impact of biophotonics and biomedical optics on human health.

  18. Optical Fiber Assemblies for Space Flight from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Photonics Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Thoma, William Joe; LaRocca, Frank; Chuska, Richard; Switzer, Robert; Day, Lance

    2009-01-01

    The Photonics Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in the Electrical Engineering Division of the Advanced Engineering and Technologies Directorate has been involved in the design, development, characterization, qualification, manufacturing, integration and anomaly analysis of optical fiber subsystems for over a decade. The group supports a variety of instrumentation across NASA and outside entities that build flight systems. Among the projects currently supported are: The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, the Mars Science Laboratory, the James Webb Space Telescope, the Express Logistics Carrier for the International Space Station and the NASA Electronic Parts. and Packaging Program. A collection of the most pertinent information gathered during project support over the past year in regards to space flight performance of optical fiber components is presented here. The objective is to provide guidance for future space flight designs of instrumentation and communication systems.

  19. Axial length variation impacts on retinal vessel density and foveal avascular zone area measurement using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Danuta M.; Gong, Peijun; An, Di; Menghini, Moreno; Hansen, Alex; Mackey, David A.; Sampson, David D.; Chen, Fred K.

    2017-04-01

    We examined the impact of axial length on superficial retinal vessel density (SRVD) and foveal avascular zone area (FAZA) measurement using optical coherence tomography angiography. The SRVD and FAZA were quantified before and after correction for magnification error associated with axial length variation. Although SRVD did not differ before and after correction for magnification error in the parafoveal region, change in foveal SRVD and FAZA were significant. This has implications for clinical trials outcome in diseased eyes where significant capillary dropout may occur in the parafovea.

  20. Optical Benson: Following the Impact of Melt Season Progression Using Landsat and Sentinel 2 - Snow Zone Formation Imaged

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, M. A.; Shuman, C. A.; Alley, K. E.

    2017-12-01

    Snow pit observations on a glaciologically-focussed surface traverse in Greenland allowed Benson [1962, SIPRE (now CRREL) Research Report 70] to define a series of snow zones based on the extent of post-depositional diagenesis of the snowpack. At high elevations, Benson found fine-grained "dry snow" where melt (at that time) was absent year-round, followed down-elevation by a "percolation zone" where surface melt penetrated the snowpack, then a "wet snow zone" where firn became saturated during the peak of the melt season, and finally "superimposed ice" and "bare ice" zones where refrozen surface melt and glacier ice were exposed in the melt season. These snow zones can be discriminated in winter synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery of the ice sheet (e.g. Fahnestock et al. 2001), but summer melt reduces radar backscatter and makes it difficult to follow the progression of diagenesis beyond the initial indications of surface melting. While some of the impacts of surface melt (especially bands of blue water-saturated firn) are observed from time to time in optical satellite imagery, it has only become possible to map effects of melt over the course of a summer season with the advent of large-data analysis tools such as Google Earth Engine and the inclusion of Landsat and Sentinel-2 data streams in these tools. A map of the maximum extent of this blue saturated zone through the 2016 melt season is shown in the figure. This image is a true color (RGB) composite, but each pixel in the image shows the color of the surface when the "blueness" of the pixel was at a maximum. This means each pixel can be from a different satellite image acquisition than adjacent pixels - but it also means that the maximum extent of the saturated firn (Benson's wet snow zone) is visible. Also visible are percolation, superimposed and bare ice zones. This analysis, using Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager data, was performed using Google Earth Engine to access and analyze the entire melt

  1. Self-Balancing, Optical-Center-Pivot, Fast-Steering Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James D.; Carson, Johnathan W.

    2011-01-01

    A complete, self-contained fast-steering- mirror (FSM) mechanism is reported consisting of a housing, a mirror and mirror-mounting cell, three PZT (piezoelectric) actuators, and a counterbalance mass. Basically, it is a comparatively stiff, two-axis (tip-tilt), self-balanced FSM. The present invention requires only three (or three pairs for flight redundancy) actuators. If a PZT actuator degrades, the inherent balance remains, and compensation for degraded stroke is made by simply increasing the voltage to the PZT. Prior designs typically do not pivot at the mirror optical center, creating unacceptable beam shear.

  2. Arbitrary-detuning asynchronous optical sampling pump-probe spectroscopy of bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Laura; Bonvalet, Adeline; Solinas, Xavier; Jones, Michael R; Vos, Marten H; Joffre, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    A recently reported variant of asynchronous optical sampling compatible with arbitrary unstabilized laser repetition rates is applied to pump-probe spectroscopy. This makes possible the use of a 5.1 MHz chirped pulse oscillator as the pump laser, thus extending the available time window to almost 200 ns with a time resolution as good as about 320 fs. The method is illustrated with the measurement in a single experiment of the complete charge transfer dynamics of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

  3. Adaptive Optics Images of the Galactic Center: Using Empirical Noise-maps to Optimize Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Saundra; Witzel, Gunther; Meyer, Leo; Sitarski, Breann; Boehle, Anna; Ghez, Andrea M.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Optics images are one of the most important tools in studying our Galactic Center. In-depth knowledge of the noise characteristics is crucial to optimally analyze this data. Empirical noise estimates - often represented by a constant value for the entire image - can be greatly improved by computing the local detector properties and photon noise contributions pixel by pixel. To comprehensively determine the noise, we create a noise model for each image using the three main contributors—photon noise of stellar sources, sky noise, and dark noise. We propagate the uncertainties through all reduction steps and analyze the resulting map using Starfinder. The estimation of local noise properties helps to eliminate fake detections while improving the detection limit of fainter sources. We predict that a rigorous understanding of noise allows a more robust investigation of the stellar dynamics in the center of our Galaxy.

  4. Reading Center Characterization of Central Retinal Vein Occlusion Using Optical Coherence Tomography During the COPERNICUS Trial.

    PubMed

    Decroos, Francis Char; Stinnett, Sandra S; Heydary, Cynthia S; Burns, Russell E; Jaffe, Glenn J

    2013-11-01

    To determine the impact of segmentation error correction and precision of standardized grading of time domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans obtained during an interventional study for macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). A reading center team of two readers and a senior reader evaluated 1199 OCT scans. Manual segmentation error correction (SEC) was performed. The frequency of SEC, resulting change in central retinal thickness after SEC, and reproducibility of SEC were quantified. Optical coherence tomography characteristics associated with the need for SECs were determined. Reading center teams graded all scans, and the reproducibility of this evaluation for scan quality at the fovea and cystoid macular edema was determined on 97 scans. Segmentation errors were observed in 360 (30.0%) scans, of which 312 were interpretable. On these 312 scans, the mean machine-generated central subfield thickness (CST) was 507.4 ± 208.5 μm compared to 583.0 ± 266.2 μm after SEC. Segmentation error correction resulted in a mean absolute CST correction of 81.3 ± 162.0 μm from baseline uncorrected CST. Segmentation error correction was highly reproducible (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.99-1.00). Epiretinal membrane (odds ratio [OR] = 2.3, P < 0.0001), subretinal fluid (OR = 2.1, P = 0.0005), and increasing CST (OR = 1.6 per 100-μm increase, P < 0.001) were associated with need for SEC. Reading center teams reproducibly graded scan quality at the fovea (87% agreement, kappa = 0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45-0.82) and cystoid macular edema (92% agreement, kappa = 0.84, 95% CI 0.74-0.94). Optical coherence tomography images obtained during an interventional CRVO treatment trial can be reproducibly graded. Segmentation errors can cause clinically meaningful deviation in central retinal thickness measurements; however, these errors can be corrected reproducibly in a reading center setting. Segmentation errors are common

  5. Silicon with an increased content of monoatomic sulfur centers: Sample fabrication and optical spectroscopy

    SciT

    Astrov, Yu. A., E-mail: yuri.astrov@mail.ioffe.ru; Lynch, S. A.; Shuman, V. B.

    2013-02-15

    The effect of the high-temperature heating (at 1340 Degree-Sign C) of sulfur-doped silicon samples and their subsequent quenching is studied. The results of such a treatment are analyzed on the basis of Hall-effect data obtained in the temperature range T = 78-500 K. It is shown that the heating duration strongly affects the relative concentrations of different types of deep sulfur-related centers. At comparatively short heating durations of t = 2-10 min, the concentration of quasi-molecular S{sub 2} centers and S{sub X} complexes substantially decreases, whereas the density of monoatomic S{sub 1} centers grows. At the same time, the heatingmore » of a sample is accompanied by a monotonic decrease in the total concentration of electrically active sulfur over time. The results obtained make it possible to give recommendations concerning the optimal conditions for the fabrication of samples with a high concentration of S{sub 1} centers. The absorption spectra of the samples show that the method is promising for the observation of a number of quantum-optical effects involving deep S{sub 1} donors in silicon.« less

  6. Burst switching without guard interval in all-optical software-define star intra-data center network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Philip N.; Wang, Ting

    2014-02-01

    Optical switching has been introduced in intra-data center networks (DCNs) to increase capacity and to reduce power consumption. Recently we proposed a star MIMO OFDM-based all-optical DCN with burst switching and software-defined networking. Here, we introduce the control procedure for the star DCN in detail for the first time. The timing, signaling, and operation are described for each step to achieve efficient bandwidth resource utilization. Furthermore, the guidelines for the burst assembling period selection that allows burst switching without guard interval are discussed. The star all-optical DCN offers flexible and efficient control for next-generation data center application.

  7. Performance evaluation of data center service localization based on virtual resource migration in software defined elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Tan, Yuanlong; Lin, Yi; Han, Jianrui; Lee, Young

    2015-09-07

    Data center interconnection with elastic optical network is a promising scenario to meet the high burstiness and high-bandwidth requirements of data center services. In our previous work, we implemented cross stratum optimization of optical network and application stratums resources that allows to accommodate data center services. In view of this, this study extends the data center resources to user side to enhance the end-to-end quality of service. We propose a novel data center service localization (DCSL) architecture based on virtual resource migration in software defined elastic data center optical network. A migration evaluation scheme (MES) is introduced for DCSL based on the proposed architecture. The DCSL can enhance the responsiveness to the dynamic end-to-end data center demands, and effectively reduce the blocking probability to globally optimize optical network and application resources. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture are experimentally verified on the control plane of our OpenFlow-based enhanced SDN testbed. The performance of MES scheme under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated based on DCSL architecture in terms of path blocking probability, provisioning latency and resource utilization, compared with other provisioning scheme.

  8. Thermal, spectroscopic and laser properties of Nd3+ in gadolinium scandium gallium garnet crystal produced by optical floating zone method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Li; Wang, Shuxian; Wu, Kui; Wang, Baolin; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Cai, Huaqiang; Huang, Hui

    2013-12-01

    A neodymium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd:GSGG) single crystal with dimensions of Φ 5 × 20 mm2 has been grown by means of optical floating zone (OFZ). X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) result shows that the as-grown Nd:GSGG crystal possesses a cubic structure with space group Ia3d and a cell parameter of a = 1.2561 nm. Effective elemental segregation coefficients of the Nd:GSGG as-grown crystal were calculated by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The thermal properties of the Nd:GSGG crystal were systematically studied by measuring the specific heat, thermal expansion and thermal diffusion coefficient, and the thermal conductivity of this crystal was calculated. The absorption and luminescence spectra of Nd:GSGG were measured at room temperature (RT). By using the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory, the theoretical radiative lifetime was calculated and compared with the experimental result. Continuous wave (CW) laser performance was achieved with the Nd:GSGG at the wavelength of 1062 nm when it was pumped by a laser diode (LD). A maximum output power of 0.792 W at 1062 nm was obtained with a slope efficiency of 11.89% under a pump power of 7.36 W, and an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 11.72%.

  9. Performance evaluation of time-aware enhanced software defined networking (TeSDN) for elastic data center optical interconnection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hui; Lin, Yi; Li, Gang; Han, Jianrui; Lee, Young; Ma, Teng

    2014-07-28

    Data center interconnection with elastic optical networks is a promising scenario to meet the high burstiness and high-bandwidth requirements of data center services. We previously implemented enhanced software defined networking over elastic optical network for data center application [Opt. Express 21, 26990 (2013)]. On the basis of it, this study extends to consider the time-aware data center service scheduling with elastic service time and service bandwidth according to the various time sensitivity requirements. A novel time-aware enhanced software defined networking (TeSDN) architecture for elastic data center optical interconnection has been proposed in this paper, by introducing a time-aware resources scheduling (TaRS) scheme. The TeSDN can accommodate the data center services with required QoS considering the time dimensionality, and enhance cross stratum optimization of application and elastic optical network stratums resources based on spectrum elasticity, application elasticity and time elasticity. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture is experimentally verified on our OpenFlow-based testbed. The performance of TaRS scheme under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated based on TeSDN architecture in terms of blocking probability and resource occupation rate.

  10. All-optical nanoscale thermometry with silicon-vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Christian T.; Evans, Ruffin E.; Sipahigil, Alp; Bhaskar, Mihir K.; Sukachev, Denis D.; Agafonov, Viatcheslav N.; Davydov, Valery A.; Kulikova, Liudmila F.; Jelezko, Fedor; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical thermometer based on an ensemble of silicon-vacancy centers (SiVs) in diamond by utilizing the sensitivity of the zero-phonon line wavelength to temperature, Δλ/ΔT =0.0124 (2 ) nm K-1 [6.8(1) GHz K-1]. Using SiVs in bulk diamond, we achieve 70 mK precision at room temperature with a temperature uncertainty σT=360 mK/√{H z } . Finally, we use SiVs in 200 nm nanodiamonds as local temperature probes with 521 mK/ √{H z } uncertainty and achieve sub-Kelvin precision. These properties deviate by less than 1% between nanodiamonds, enabling calibration-free thermometry for sensing and control of complex nanoscale systems.

  11. The assessment of the stability of the corneal structure after LASIK correction of myopia by different optical zone diameters.

    PubMed

    Milivojević, Milorad; Petrović, Vladimir; Vukosavljević, Miroslav; Marjanović, Ivan; Resan, Mirko

    2016-06-01

    Enlargement of optical zone (OZ) diameter during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) correction of myopia postoperatively improves the optical outcome, however, it also leads to the increased stroma tissue consumption--progressive corneal thinning. The aim of this investigation was to present the possibility of safe OZ enlargement without impairing the structural stability of the cornea, while obtaining an improved optical outcome with LASIK treatment of short-sightedness. Preoperative assessment of the cornea structure and prediction of the ablated stroma tissue consumption was conducted in 37 patients (74 eyes) treated for short-sightedness by means of the LASIK method. With the eyes that, according to their cornea structure, had the capacity for OZ diameter enlargement of 0.5 mm, LASIK treatment was performed within the wider OZ diameter of 7.0 mm compared to the standard 6.5 mm. The following two groups were formed, depending on the diameter of the utilized OZ: the group I (the eyes treated with the OZ 6.5 mm, n = 37) and the group II (the eyes treated with the OZ 7.0 mm, n = 37). No significant difference in the observed structural parameters of the cornea was detected between the groups of patients treated with different OZ diameters. The values of all the parameters were significantly bellow the threshold values for the development of postoperative ectasia. Diameter enlargement of the treated OZ, if there is a preoperative cornea capacity for such enlargement, will not impair the postoperative stability of the cornea structure, and will significantly improve the optical outcome.

  12. Coupling a single nitrogen-vacancy center with a superconducting qubit via the electro-optic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Hao; Li, Peng-Bo

    2018-05-01

    We propose an efficient scheme for transferring quantum states and generating entangled states between two qubits of different nature. The hybrid system consists of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center and a superconducting (SC) qubit, which couple to an optical cavity and a microwave resonator, respectively. Meanwhile, the optical cavity and the microwave resonator are coupled via the electro-optic effect. By adjusting the relative parameters, we can achieve high-fidelity quantum state transfer as well as highly entangled states between the NV center and the SC qubit. This protocol is within the reach of currently available techniques, and may provide interesting applications in quantum communication and computation with single NV centers and SC qubits.

  13. The dynamics of the optically driven Lambda transition of the 15N-V- center in diamond.

    PubMed

    González, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael N

    2010-07-09

    Recent experimental results demonstrate the possibility of writing quantum information in the ground state triplet of the (15)N-V(-) center in diamond by means of an optically driven spin non-conserving two-photon Lambda transition in the presence of a strong applied electric field. Our calculations show that the hyperfine interaction in the (15)N-V(-) center is capable of mediating such a transition. We use a density matrix approach to describe the exact dynamics for the allowed optical spin non-conserving transitions between two sublevels of the ground state triplet. This approach allows us to calculate the Rabi oscillations, by means of which we obtain a Rabi frequency with an upper bound determined by the hyperfine interaction. This result is crucial for the success of implementing optically driven quantum information processing with the N-V center in diamond.

  14. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder mirror dynamics using the center of curvature optical assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, 18 segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  15. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder Mirror Dynamics Using the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 meter clear aperture, 18-segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  16. Microphysical and optical properties of aerosol particles in urban zone during ESCOMPTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Roger, J. C.; Despiau, S.; Dubovik, O.; Putaud, J. P.

    2003-10-01

    Microphysical and optical properties of the main aerosol species on a peri-urban site have been investigated during the ESCOMPTE experiment. Ammonium sulfate (AS), nitrate (N), black carbon (BC), particulate organic matter (POM), sea salt (SS) and mineral aerosol (D) size distributions have been used, associated with their refractive index, to compute, from the Mie theory, the key radiative aerosol properties as the extinction coefficient Kext, the mass extinction efficiencies σext, the single scattering albedo ω0 and the asymmetry parameter g at the wavelength of 550 nm. Optical computations show that 90% of the light extinction is due to anthropogenic aerosol and only 10% is due to natural aerosol (SS and D). 44±6% of the extinction is due to (AS) and 40±6% to carbonaceous particles (20±4% to BC and 21±4% to POM). Nitrate aerosol has a weak contribution of 5±2%. Computations of the mass extinction efficiencies σext, single scattering albedo ω0 and asymmetry parameter g indicate that the optical properties of the anthropogenic aerosol are often quite different from those yet published and generally used in global models. For example, the (AS) mean specific mass extinction presents a large difference with the value classically adopted at low relative humidity ( h<60%) (2.6±0.5 instead of 6 m 2 g -1 at 550 nm). The optical properties of the total aerosol layer, including all the aerosol species, indicate a mean observed single-scattering albedo ω0=0.85±0.05, leading to an important absorption of the solar radiation and an asymmetry parameter g=0.59±0.05 which are in a reasonably good agreements with the AERONET retrieval of ω0 (=0.86±0.05) and g (=0.64±0.05) at this wavelength.

  17. RGB Recombination Zone Tuning to Improve Optical Characteristics of White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Song, Wook; Meng, Mei; Cheah, KokWai; Zhu, Fu Rong; Kim, WooYoung

    2015-05-01

    White organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) were fabricated using blue, green and red emitting layers (EMLs). The device has a structure of ITO/NPB/EML/Alq3/Liq/Al. Here, to control the white color balance, the location of the blue EML in the WOLEDs was fixed and only the thickness of blue EML was changed while both thickness and position of the green and red EMLs were adjusted. When adjusting the thickness of blue EML, the occurrence area of recombination zone was changed to influence the green luminescence. When adjusting the location and thickness of red EML, it could be found that the current density is more sensitive to the location of red EML than its thickness. Furthermore, it was discovered that light was emitted due to the Förster energy transfer even if it was apart from the recombination zone. WOLEDs with a maximum luminance of 17,740 cd/m,2 an external quantum efficiency of 2.12% at 100 cd/m,2 CIE coordinates of (0.328,0.301) and a color temperature of 6,185 K were obtained.

  18. The World Optical Depth Research and Calibration Center (WORCC) quality assurance and quality control of GAW-PFR AOD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Kouremeti, Natalia; Nyeki, Stephan; Gröbner, Julian; Wehrli, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    The World Optical Depth Research Calibration Center (WORCC) is a section within the World Radiation Center at Physikalisches-Meteorologisches Observatorium (PMOD/WRC), Davos, Switzerland, established after the recommendations of the World Meteorological Organization for calibration of aerosol optical depth (AOD)-related Sun photometers. WORCC is mandated to develop new methods for instrument calibration, to initiate homogenization activities among different AOD networks and to run a network (GAW-PFR) of Sun photometers. In this work we describe the calibration hierarchy and methods used under WORCC and the basic procedures, tests and processing techniques in order to ensure the quality assurance and quality control of the AOD-retrieved data.

  19. Linking optical properties of dissolved organic matter to multiple processes at the coastal plume zone in the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yulin; Zhao, Jianfu; Li, Penghui; Huang, Qinghui

    2016-10-12

    Because of the significance in photosynthesis, nutrient dynamics, trophodynamics and biological activity, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is important to the microbial community in the coastal plume zone. In this study, we investigated the hydrodynamic processes, photodegradation and biodegradation of DOM at the Yangtze River plume in the East China Sea through analyzing water quality and optical properties of DOM. Surface water samples were collected to examine water quality and fluorescence properties of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM). The results indicated that dilution was the key factor in the multiple processes, and the mixing process gradually increased from nearshore to offshore in coastal water. Four components of FDOM representing humic-like substances (C1 & C4) and protein-like substances (C2 & C3) were identified, and all components showed nearly conservative behaviors. Protein-like substances were more mutable compared to humic-like substances. The photodegradation of humic-like substances caused brown algae blooms to some extent. The molecular weight of humic substances gradually decreased along the mixing process. FDOM in the plume zone was both of terrigenous and autochthonous origins, and the characteristic of terrigenous origin was obvious compared to that of autochthonous origin.

  20. Report of the Interagency Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2, NASA Ames Research Center, September 12-14, 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 (ONT2), held on September 12-14, 2005, was cosponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE/SC) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in cooperation with the Joint Engineering Team (JET) of the Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program's Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group. The ONT2 workshop was a follow-on to an August 2004 Workshop on Optical Network Testbeds (ONT1). ONT1 recommended actions by the Federal agencies to assure timely development and implementation of optical networking technologies and infrastructure. Hosted by the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, the ONT2 workshop brought together representatives of the U.S. advanced research and education (R&E) networks, regional optical networks (RONs), service providers, international networking organizations, and senior engineering and R&D managers from Federal agencies and national research laboratories. Its purpose was to develop a common vision of the optical network technologies, services, infrastructure, and organizations needed to enable widespread use of optical networks; recommend activities for transitioning the optical networking research community and its current infrastructure to leading-edge optical networks over the next three to five years; and present information enabling commercial network infrastructure providers to plan for and use leading-edge optical network services in that time frame.

  1. Optical image encryption using fresnel zone plate mask based on fast walsh hadamard transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Mehak; Singh, Hukum

    2018-05-01

    A new symmetric encryption technique using Fresnel Zone Plate (FZP) based on Fast Walsh Hadamard Transform (FWHT) is proposed for security enhancement. In this technique, bits of plain image is randomized by shuffling the bits randomly. The obtained scrambled image is then masked with FZP using symmetric encryption in FWHT domain to obtain final encrypted image. FWHT has been used in the cryptosystem so as to protect image data from the quantization error and for reconstructing the image perfectly. The FZP used in proposed scheme increases the key space and makes it robust to many traditional attacks. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed cryptosystem has been analyzed on the basis of various parameters by simulating on MATLAB 8.1.0 (R2012b). The experimental results are provided to highlight suitability of the proposed cryptosystem and prove that the system is secure.

  2. Brillouin zone grid refinement for highly resolved ab initio THz optical properties of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmbier, Robert; Quandt, Alexander

    2018-07-01

    Optical spectra of materials can in principle be calculated within numerical frameworks based on Density Functional Theory. The huge numerical effort involved in these methods severely constraints the accuracy achievable in practice. In the case of the THz spectrum of graphene the primary limitation lays in the density of the reciprocal space sampling. In this letter we have developed a non-uniform sampling using grid refinement to achieve a high local sampling density with only moderate numerical effort. The resulting THz electron energy loss spectrum shows a plasmon signal below 50 meV with a ω(q) ∝√{ q } dispersion relation.

  3. The aerosol optical properties and PM2.5 components over the world's largest industrial zone in Tangshan, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kequan; Ma, Yongjing; Xin, Jinyuan; Liu, Zirui; Ma, Yining; Gao, Dongdong; Wu, Junsong; Zhang, Wenyu; Wang, Yuesi; Shen, Pengke

    2018-03-01

    To achieve an in-depth understanding of the aerosol optical properties in the highly-industrial region of Tangshan, we provided systematic aerosol optical properties analysis in this largest industrial zone for the first time. The aerosol optical datasets (2013.05-2015.04) and chemical component data of PM2.5 (2014-2015) obtained from the Tangshan site of the campaign on atmospheric aerosol research (CARE-China) network were analyzed. The results showed that the Tangshan region was seriously affected by fine-mode industrial aerosols all year, which would promote the accumulation of pollutants and influence the atmospheric circulation through changing the vertical temperature gradient. The annual average aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångstrӧm exponent (α) were 0.80 ± 0.26 and 1.05 ± 0.10, respectively. The aerosol optical properties revealed significant seasonal characteristics. The maximum seasonal average AOD (1.03 ± 0.62) and α (1.12 ± 0.19) accompanied the highest seasonal secondary inorganic aerosol concentrations (SIA: SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+), 53.33 μg/m3, occurred in summer, and this phenomenon was attributed to the photochemical reactions favored by the high temperature and humidity. During the spring, frequent dust events led to the maximum Ca2 + concentration of 6.57 μg/m3 and the lowest seasonal α of 0.98 ± 0.31. Coal was used for generating heat in winter, resulting in the highest levels of pollutant emissions (Cl-, Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC)). The aerosol type classifications showed that the industrial aerosols were the main controls in the summer and fall, representing 56%-58% of the total aerosols. While for spring and winter, mixed aerosols represented 53%-54% of the total aerosols. Hygroscopic growth effect of aerosols existed all year, which could enhance the negative radiative forcing and eventually cool the earth-atmosphere system. The classification Wing for Tangshan data showed high AOD values (> 0.70) were mainly

  4. Obtaining optic disc center and pixel region by automatic thresholding methods on morphologically processed fundus images.

    PubMed

    Marin, Diego; Gegundez-Arias, Manuel E; Suero, Angel; Bravo, Jose M

    2015-02-01

    Development of automatic retinal disease diagnosis systems based on retinal image computer analysis can provide remarkably quicker screening programs for early detection. Such systems are mainly focused on the detection of the earliest ophthalmic signs of illness and require previous identification of fundal landmark features such as optic disc (OD), fovea or blood vessels. A methodology for accurate center-position location and OD retinal region segmentation on digital fundus images is presented in this paper. The methodology performs a set of iterative opening-closing morphological operations on the original retinography intensity channel to produce a bright region-enhanced image. Taking blood vessel confluence at the OD into account, a 2-step automatic thresholding procedure is then applied to obtain a reduced region of interest, where the center and the OD pixel region are finally obtained by performing the circular Hough transform on a set of OD boundary candidates generated through the application of the Prewitt edge detector. The methodology was evaluated on 1200 and 1748 fundus images from the publicly available MESSIDOR and MESSIDOR-2 databases, acquired from diabetic patients and thus being clinical cases of interest within the framework of automated diagnosis of retinal diseases associated to diabetes mellitus. This methodology proved highly accurate in OD-center location: average Euclidean distance between the methodology-provided and actual OD-center position was 6.08, 9.22 and 9.72 pixels for retinas of 910, 1380 and 1455 pixels in size, respectively. On the other hand, OD segmentation evaluation was performed in terms of Jaccard and Dice coefficients, as well as the mean average distance between estimated and actual OD boundaries. Comparison with the results reported by other reviewed OD segmentation methodologies shows our proposal renders better overall performance. Its effectiveness and robustness make this proposed automated OD location and

  5. Broadband, large-area microwave antenna for optically detected magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    SciT

    Sasaki, Kento; Monnai, Yasuaki; Saijo, Soya

    2016-05-15

    We report on a microwave planar ring antenna specifically designed for optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. It has the resonance frequency at around 2.87 GHz with the bandwidth of 400 MHz, ensuring that ODMR can be observed under external magnetic fields up to 100 G without the need of adjustment of the resonance frequency. It is also spatially uniform within the 1-mm-diameter center hole, enabling the magnetic-field imaging in the wide spatial range. These features facilitate the experiments on quantum sensing and imaging using NV centers at room temperature.

  6. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-Curvature Optical Metrology System during Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST primary mirror consists of 18 1.5 m hexagonal segments, each with 6-DoF and RoC adjustment. The telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. The testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The performance of these metrology systems, including hardware, software, procedures, was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC, using the JWST Pathfinder telescope. This paper describes the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance.

  7. ENLARGEMENT OF FOVEAL AVASCULAR ZONE IN DIABETIC EYES EVALUATED BY EN FACE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Takase, Noriaki; Nozaki, Miho; Kato, Aki; Ozeki, Hironori; Yoshida, Munenori; Ogura, Yuichiro

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the area of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) detected by en face OCTA (AngioVue, Avanti OCT; Optovue) in healthy and diabetic eyes. Retrospective chart review of patients who underwent fundus examination including en face OCTA. Eyes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and history of laser photocoagulation were excluded. The FAZ area in the superficial and deep plexus layers were measured and evaluated using ImageJ software. The FAZ area in the superficial layer was 0.25 ± 0.06 mm² in healthy eyes (n = 19), whereas it was 0.37 ± 0.07 mm² in diabetic eyes without retinopathy (n = 24) and 0.38 ± 0.11 mm² in eyes with diabetic retinopathy (n = 20). Diabetic eyes showed statistically significant FAZ enlargement compared with healthy eyes, regardless of the presence of retinopathy (P < 0.01). The FAZ area in the deep plexus layer was also significantly larger in diabetic eyes than in healthy eyes (P < 0.01). Our data suggest that diabetic eyes show retinal microcirculation impairment in the macula even before retinopathy develops. En face OCTA is a useful noninvasive screening tool for detecting early microcirculatory disturbance in patients with diabetes.

  8. Compensating additional optical power in the central zone of a multifocal contact lens forminimization of the shrinkage error of the shell mold in the injection molding process.

    PubMed

    Vu, Lien T; Chen, Chao-Chang A; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Yu, Chia-Wei

    2018-04-20

    This study aims to develop a compensating method to minimize the shrinkage error of the shell mold (SM) in the injection molding (IM) process to obtain uniform optical power in the central optical zone of soft axial symmetric multifocal contact lenses (CL). The Z-shrinkage error along the Z axis or axial axis of the anterior SM corresponding to the anterior surface of a dry contact lens in the IM process can be minimized by optimizing IM process parameters and then by compensating for additional (Add) powers in the central zone of the original lens design. First, the shrinkage error is minimized by optimizing three levels of four IM parameters, including mold temperature, injection velocity, packing pressure, and cooling time in 18 IM simulations based on an orthogonal array L 18 (2 1 ×3 4 ). Then, based on the Z-shrinkage error from IM simulation, three new contact lens designs are obtained by increasing the Add power in the central zone of the original multifocal CL design to compensate for the optical power errors. Results obtained from IM process simulations and the optical simulations show that the new CL design with 0.1 D increasing in Add power has the closest shrinkage profile to the original anterior SM profile with percentage of reduction in absolute Z-shrinkage error of 55% and more uniform power in the central zone than in the other two cases. Moreover, actual experiments of IM of SM for casting soft multifocal CLs have been performed. The final product of wet CLs has been completed for the original design and the new design. Results of the optical performance have verified the improvement of the compensated design of CLs. The feasibility of this compensating method has been proven based on the measurement results of the produced soft multifocal CLs of the new design. Results of this study can be further applied to predict or compensate for the total optical power errors of the soft multifocal CLs.

  9. Dissolved oxygen concentration profiles in the hyporheic zone through the use of a high density fiber optic measurement network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, W. J.; Quick, A. M.; Farrell, T. B.; Benner, S. G.; Feris, K. P.; Tonina, D.

    2013-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is a potentially important source of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O); stream processes may account for up to 10% of global anthropogenic N2O emissions. However, mechanistic understanding and predictive quantification of this gas flux is hampered by complex temporally and spatially variable interactions between flow dynamics and biogeochemical processes. Reactive inorganic nitrogen (Nr) is typically present at low concentrations in natural stream waters, but many rural and urban streams suffer from an excess of Nr, typically in the form of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). These reactive species are either assimilated by living biomass or transformed by microbial processes. The two primary microbial transformations of Nr are nitrification (NH4+ to NO3-) and denitrification (NO3- to N2). Denitrification, which occurs almost exclusively in the anoxic zone of the HZ, permanently removes between 30-70% of all Nr entering streams, other mechanisms may retain nitrogen. The mass transport of reactive species (i.e. O2, NO3- and N2O) by hyporheic flow strongly influences reaction rates, residence times, and subsequent N2O flux. By extension, stream flow and channel morphology presumably control, and may be effective predictors of, N2O generation rates. By recreating the stream processes in the University of Idaho flume, we are able to control the bed morphology, fluxes and residence times through the HZ and concentrations of Nr from exogenous (stream water) and endogenous (organic material in the streambed) sources. For the present experiment, the flume was divided into three streams, each with different morphologies (3, 6 and 9cm dunes) and all using the same source water. Stream water for this first experimental phase had no significant loading of Nr. As such, all reaction products were the result of endogenous sources of Nr. To measure dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations we deployed 120 channels of a novel, fiber-optic optode

  10. Large (9 mm) Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty with Clearance of a 6-mm Optical Zone Optimizes Outcomes of Keratoconus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Busin, Massimo; Leon, Pia; Nahum, Yoav; Scorcia, Vincenzo

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of a 9-mm deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) with removal of the deep stroma limited to the central 6-mm optical zone. Prospective, noncomparative, interventional case series. A total of 80 consecutive keratoconic eyes without deep stromal scarring, with at least 1 postoperative examination 1 month after complete suture removal. A standardized DALK was performed, including (1) deep trephination of the recipient bed 450 to 550 μm in depth and 9 mm in diameter; (2) pneumatic dissection; (3) debulking of approximately 80% of the anterior stroma; (4) removal of the deep stroma (bubble roof) from a central 6-mm optical zone; and (5) transplantation of a 9-mm anterior corneal lamella cut by microkeratome-assisted dissection (400-μm head) and sutured with a double running 10-0 nylon suture. Success rate and type of pneumatic dissection obtained; best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), refractive astigmatism (RA), and topographic astigmatism (TA), central corneal thickness (CCT) and endothelial cell density 12 months postoperatively; and intraoperative and postoperative complications. Pneumatic dissection created a "big bubble" in 67 of 80 eyes (83.7%), all of them but 1 (1.5%) being of type 1 according to the classification by Dua et al. After complete suture removal, BSCVA averaged 0.09±0.72 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) and was ≥20/20 in 28 eyes (35%), ≥20/25 in 54 eyes (67.5%), and ≥20/40 in 76 eyes (95%); RA averaged 3.10±1.30 diopters (D), with 73 eyes (91%) within 4.5 D and none above 6 D; regular TA was detected in 72 eyes (90%); mean CCT was 492±62.10 μm; postoperative endothelial cell density averaged 2026±397cells/mm 2 with a mean cell loss of 11.2%. Intraoperative complications included loss of suction (n = 1) and perforation (n = 4). No conversion to penetrating keratoplasty was necessary. After surgery, double anterior chamber was observed in 2 cases (2.5%), both managed

  11. High-port low-latency optical switch architecture with optical feed-forward buffering for 256-node disaggregated data centers.

    PubMed

    Terzenidis, Nikos; Moralis-Pegios, Miltiadis; Mourgias-Alexandris, George; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Pleros, Nikos

    2018-04-02

    Departing from traditional server-centric data center architectures towards disaggregated systems that can offer increased resource utilization at reduced cost and energy envelopes, the use of high-port switching with highly stringent latency and bandwidth requirements becomes a necessity. We present an optical switch architecture exploiting a hybrid broadcast-and-select/wavelength routing scheme with small-scale optical feedforward buffering. The architecture is experimentally demonstrated at 10Gb/s, reporting error-free performance with a power penalty of <2.5dB. Moreover, network simulations for a 256-node system, revealed low-latency values of only 605nsec, at throughput values reaching 80% when employing 2-packet-size optical buffers, while multi-rack network performance was also investigated.

  12. Assessment of β-zone peripapillary atrophy by optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy imaging in glaucoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Seidensticker, Florian; Reznicek, Lukas; Mann, Thomas; Hübert, Irene; Kampik, Anselm; Ulbig, Michael; Hirneiss, Christoph; Neubauer, Aljoscha S; Kernt, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess β-zone peripapillary atrophy (β-PPA) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) imaging in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma with advanced glaucomatous visual field defects. Methods A consecutive, prospective series of 82 study eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma were included in this study. All study participants underwent a full ophthalmic examination followed by SD-OCT, wide-field SLO, and FAF imaging of the optic nerve head and the peripapillary region. Results Eighty-four glaucomatous eyes were included in our prospective study. Correlation analyses for horizontally and vertically obtained β-PPA for all three imaging modalities (color SLO, FAF, and SD-OCT) revealed highest correlations between FAF and color SLO (Pearson correlation coefficient: 0.904 [P<0.001] for horizontal β-PPA and 0.786 [P<0.001] for vertical β-PPA). Bland–Altman plotting revealed highest agreements between color SLO and FAF, with −2.1 pixels ±1.96 standard deviation (SD) for horizontal β-PPA, SD: 10.5 pixels and 2.4 pixels ±1.96 SD for vertical β-PPA. Conclusion β-PPA can be assessed using en-face SLO and cross-sectional SD-OCT imaging. Correlation analyses revealed highest correlations between color SLO and FAF imaging, while correlations between SLO and SD-OCT were weak. A more precise structural definition of β-PPA is needed. PMID:25061270

  13. GaN Nanowire Arrays for Efficient Optical Read-Out and Optoelectronic Control of NV Centers in Diamond.

    PubMed

    Hetzl, Martin; Wierzbowski, Jakob; Hoffmann, Theresa; Kraut, Max; Zuerbig, Verena; Nebel, Christoph E; Müller, Kai; Finley, Jonathan J; Stutzmann, Martin

    2018-06-13

    Solid-state quantum emitters embedded in a semiconductor crystal environment are potentially scalable platforms for quantum optical networks operated at room temperature. Prominent representatives are nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond showing coherent entanglement and interference with each other. However, these emitters suffer from inefficient optical outcoupling from the diamond and from fluctuations of their charge state. Here, we demonstrate the implementation of regular n-type gallium nitride nanowire arrays on diamond as photonic waveguides to tailor the emission direction of surface-near NV centers and to electrically control their charge state in a p-i-n nanodiode. We show that the electrical excitation of single NV centers in such a diode can efficiently replace optical pumping. By the engineering of the array parameters, we find an optical read-out efficiency enhanced by a factor of 10 and predict a lateral NV-NV coupling 3 orders of magnitude stronger through evanescently coupled nanowire antennas compared to planar diamond not covered by nanowires, which opens up new possibilities for large-scale on-chip quantum-computing applications.

  14. Optical Characteristics of the Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Porter, Jason; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific objectives of the MSFC SUMI project and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the UV, a sounding rocket payload is being developed, This paper will describe the optical measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirrors and polarization optics.

  15. Some new features of ionospheric plasma depletions over the Indian zone using all sky optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, H. S. S.; Raizada, S.

    2000-08-01

    An all sky optical imaging system was operated from Sriharikota rocket range (SHAR) (14° N, 80° E, 5.5° N dip latitude) during January-March, 1993 to observe ionospheric plasma depletions through 630 nm and 777.4 nm night glow emissions. Strong plasma depletions were observed only on four nights viz., 14, 17, 19 and 21 February, 1993. Except the 17 February, which was a magnetically disturbed day, all the other nights pertained to magnetically quiet period. A number of plasma depletion parameters such as, degree of depletion, east-west extent, tilt with respect to the geomagnetic field, inter-depletion distance, drift velocity and plasma enhancements or brightness patterns were estimated. Some of the important results are: (a) It was found that the east-west extent of plasma depletions varied with the degree of depletion; for the 630 nm images the degree of depletion ranged between 6-9% per 100 km east-west extent and for 777.4 nm images it was 3% per 100 km east-west extent, (b) The average inter-depletion distance (IDD) was in the range of 1500±100 km during the magnetically disturbed period and 740±60 km during quiet periods. This is suggestive of gravity wave modulation of the bottom side of the F-region. While the large scale gravity waves (1500±100 km) of auroral origin could be responsible during magnetically disturbed period, smaller scale gravity waves (740±60 km) having their origin in the lower atmosphere could produce initial perturbation in the bottom side of the F-region, (c) Plasma depletions are observed to have an eastward tilt in the range of 10-15° with respect to the geomagnetic field. It has been suggested here that these tilts are associated with the variation of plasma drift with altitude, (d) plasma depletions are observed to be moving eastwards with drift velocities in the range of 40-190 ms-1, and (e) Strong plasma enhancements or brightness patterns were observed on three nights. The degree of enhancement was by a factor of 1

  16. Direct optical transitions at K- and H-point of Brillouin zone in bulk MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopaczek, J.; Polak, M. P.; Scharoch, P.; Wu, K.; Chen, B.; Tongay, S.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-06-01

    Modulated reflectance (contactless electroreflectance (CER), photoreflectance (PR), and piezoreflectance (PzR)) has been applied to study direct optical transitions in bulk MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2. In order to interpret optical transitions observed in CER, PR, and PzR spectra, the electronic band structure for the four crystals has been calculated from the first principles within the density functional theory for various points of Brillouin zone including K and H points. It is clearly shown that the electronic band structure at H point of Brillouin zone is very symmetric and similar to the electronic band structure at K point, and therefore, direct optical transitions at H point should be expected in modulated reflectance spectra besides the direct optical transitions at the K point of Brillouin zone. This prediction is confirmed by experimental studies of the electronic band structure of MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 crystals by CER, PR, and PzR spectroscopy, i.e., techniques which are very sensitive to critical points of Brillouin zone. For the four crystals besides the A transition at K point, an AH transition at H point has been observed in CER, PR, and PzR spectra a few tens of meV above the A transition. The spectral difference between A and AH transition has been found to be in a very good agreement with theoretical predictions. The second transition at the H point of Brillouin zone (BH transition) overlaps spectrally with the B transition at K point because of small energy differences in the valence (conduction) band positions at H and K points. Therefore, an extra resonance which could be related to the BH transition is not resolved in modulated reflectance spectra at room temperature for the four crystals.

  17. Reliability-centered maintenance for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Formentin, F.; Rampini, F.

    2014-07-01

    In the last years, EIE GROUP has been more and more involved in large optical telescopes and radio antennas array projects. In this frame, the paper describes a fundamental aspect of the Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) process, that is the application of the Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodology for the generation of maintenance plans for ground-based large optical telescopes and radio antennas arrays. This helps maintenance engineers to make sure that the telescopes continue to work properly, doing what their users require them to do in their present operating conditions. The main objective of the RCM process is to establish the complete maintenance regime, with the safe minimum required maintenance, carried out without any risk to personnel, telescope and subsystems. At the same time, a correct application of the RCM allows to increase the cost effectiveness, telescope uptime and items availability, and to provide greater understanding of the level of risk that the organization is managing. At the same time, engineers shall make a great effort since the initial phase of the project to obtain a telescope requiring easy maintenance activities and simple replacement of the major assemblies, taking special care on the accesses design and items location, implementation and design of special lifting equipment and handling devices for the heavy items. This maintenance engineering framework is based on seven points, which lead to the main steps of the RCM program. The initial steps of the RCM process consist of: system selection and data collection (MTBF, MTTR, etc.), definition of system boundaries and operating context, telescope description with the use of functional block diagrams, and the running of a FMECA to address the dominant causes of equipment failure and to lay down the Critical Items List. In the second part of the process the RCM logic is applied, which helps to determine the appropriate maintenance tasks for each identified failure mode. Once

  18. Axial Length Variation Impacts on Superficial Retinal Vessel Density and Foveal Avascular Zone Area Measurements Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Danuta M; Gong, Peijun; An, Di; Menghini, Moreno; Hansen, Alex; Mackey, David A; Sampson, David D; Chen, Fred K

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of image magnification correction on superficial retinal vessel density (SRVD) and foveal avascular zone area (FAZA) measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Participants with healthy retinas were recruited for ocular biometry, refraction, and RTVue XR Avanti OCTA imaging with the 3 × 3-mm protocol. The foveal and parafoveal SRVD and FAZA were quantified with custom software before and after correction for magnification error using the Littman and the modified Bennett formulae. Relative changes between corrected and uncorrected SRVD and FAZA were calculated. Forty subjects were enrolled and the median (range) age of the participants was 30 (18-74) years. The mean (range) spherical equivalent refractive error was -1.65 (-8.00 to +4.88) diopters and mean (range) axial length was 24.42 mm (21.27-28.85). Images from 13 eyes were excluded due to poor image quality leaving 67 for analysis. Relative changes in foveal and parafoveal SRVD and FAZA after correction ranged from -20% to +10%, -3% to +2%, and -20% to +51%, respectively. Image size correction in measurements of foveal SRVD and FAZA was greater than 5% in 51% and 74% of eyes, respectively. In contrast, 100% of eyes had less than 5% correction in measurements of parafoveal SRVD. Ocular biometry should be performed with OCTA to correct image magnification error induced by axial length variation. We advise caution when interpreting interocular and interindividual comparisons of SRVD and FAZA derived from OCTA without image size correction.

  19. Fiber-Optic Magnetometry and Thermometry Using Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance With Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakley, Sean Michael

    Nitrogen--vacancy diamond (NVD) quantum sensors are an emerging technology that has shown great promise in areas like high-resolution thermometry and magnetometry. Optical fibers provide attractive new application paradigms for NVD technology. A detailed description of the fabrication processes associated with the development of novel fiber-optic NVD probes are presented in this work. The demonstrated probes are tested on paradigmatic model systems designed to ascertain their suitability for use in challenging biological environments. Methods employing optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) are used to accurately measure and map temperature distributions of small objects and to demonstrate emergent temperature-dependent phenomena in genetically modified living organisms. These methods are also used to create detailed high resolution spatial maps of both magnetic scalar and magnetic vector field distributions of spatially localized weak field features in the presence of a noisy, high-field background.

  20. The creation and early implementation of a high speed fiber optic network for a university health sciences center.

    PubMed Central

    Schueler, J. D.; Mitchell, J. A.; Forbes, S. M.; Neely, R. C.; Goodman, R. J.; Branson, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    In late 1989 the University of Missouri Health Sciences Center began the process of creating an extensive fiber optic network throughout its facilities, with the intent to provide networked computer access to anyone in the Center desiring such access, regardless of geographic location or organizational affiliation. A committee representing all disciplines within the Center produced and, in conjunction with independent consultants, approved a comprehensive design for the network. Installation of network backbone components commenced in the second half of 1990 and was completed in early 1991. As the network entered its initial phases of operation, the first realities of this important new resource began to manifest themselves as enhanced functional capacity in the Health Sciences Center. This paper describes the development of the network, with emphasis on its design criteria, installation, early operation, and management. Also included are discussions on its organizational impact and its evolving significance as a medical community resource. PMID:1807660

  1. Source Apportionment of PM2.5 Mass and Optical Attenuation Over an Ecologically Sensitive Zone in Central India by Positive Matrix Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmalkar, J.; Raman, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Ambient PM2.5 samples (N=366) were collected over an ecologically sensitive zone (Van Vihar National Park) in Bhopal, Central India for two years (01 January, 2012 to 31 December, 2013). Samples were collected using three co-located Mini-Vol® samplers on Teflon, Nylon, and Quartz filter substrates. The aerosol was then chemically characterized for water-soluble inorganic ions, elements, and carbon fractions (elemental carbon and organic carbon) using ion chromatography, ED-XRF, and thermal-optical EC/OC analyzer, respectively. The optical attenuation (at 370 nm and 800 nm) of PM2.5 aerosols was also determined by optical transmissometry (OT-21). The application of Positive matrix factorization (PMF) to a combination of PM2.5 mass, its ions, elements, carbon fractions, and optical attenuation and its outcomes will be discussed.

  2. The Frequency of Optical Coherence Tomography Testing in Glaucoma at a Single Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Joseph F; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2016-03-01

    To determine the frequency of optical coherence tomography (OCT) examinations compared with clinical examinations and visual field (VF) tests in patients with 5 types of glaucoma. A retrospective, longitudinal cohort study was conducted of 5154 patients treated between 2003 and 2010 at a single academic medical center. Patients were classified using billing records as having primary open-angle glaucoma, low-tension open-angle glaucoma (NTG), pigmentary open-angle glaucoma, chronic angle-closure glaucoma, or pseudoexfoliation glaucoma. Analysis of variance, χ test, and exact χ test were performed to identify associations between glaucoma type and test frequency. Pigmentary open-angle glaucoma and NTG patients had a higher rate of undergoing at least 2 VFs (94.4%, 94.9%), and chronic angle-closure glaucoma patients had a lower rate of undergoing at least 2 OCTs (25.3%) than all other glaucoma types. NTG patients also had the highest rate of undergoing at least 2 OCTs and at least 2 VFs (36.6%). Overall, the rate of clinical examinations (2.68 examinations/y) exceeded the rates of OCTs (1.39 examinations/y), which exceeded the rate of VF tests (1.24 tests/y). There were no differences in OCT frequency between glaucoma types (0.91 to 1.63 OCTs/y). Within each glaucoma diagnosis, patients had clinical examinations more frequently than OCTs and clinical examinations more frequently than VFs. Primary open-angle glaucoma and pseudoexfoliation glaucoma patients also had OCTs more frequently than VFs. More patients had at least 2 VF tests than at least 2 OCTs (4481 vs. 1679). The relative use of clinical examinations, VF testing, and OCT imaging varies among glaucoma diagnoses.

  3. Optical synthesizer for a large quadrant-array CCD camera: Center director's discretionary fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, Mona J.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this program was to design and develop an optical device, an optical synthesizer, that focuses four contiguous quadrants of a solar image on four spatially separated CCD arrays that are part of a unique CCD camera system. This camera and the optical synthesizer will be part of the new NASA-Marshall Experimental Vector Magnetograph, and instrument developed to measure the Sun's magnetic field as accurately as present technology allows. The tasks undertaken in the program are outlined and the final detailed optical design is presented.

  4. Excitons at the center of the Brillouin zone in CuB{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetoelectric

    SciT

    Menshenin, V. V., E-mail: menshenin@imp.uran.ru

    2017-02-15

    The possibility of exciton excitation in CuB{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetoelectric at point Γ(0, 0, 0) of the Brillouin zone has been analyzed using group theory. All possible orientations of the electric and magnetic fields that permit the excitation of these excitons have been determined.

  5. An inherent-optical-property-centered approach to correct the angular effects in water-leaving radiance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zhong Ping; Du, Keping; Voss, Kenneth J; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Lubac, Bertrand; Arnone, Robert; Weidemann, Alan

    2011-07-01

    Remote-sensing reflectance (R(rs)), which is defined as the ratio of water-leaving radiance (L(w)) to downwelling irradiance just above the surface (E(d)(0⁺)), varies with both water constituents (including bottom properties of optically-shallow waters) and angular geometry. L(w) is commonly measured in the field or by satellite sensors at convenient angles, while E(d)(0⁺) can be measured in the field or estimated based on atmospheric properties. To isolate the variations of R(rs) (or L(w)) resulting from a change of water constituents, the angular effects of R(rs) (or L(w)) need to be removed. This is also a necessity for the calibration and validation of satellite ocean color measurements. To reach this objective, for optically-deep waters where bottom contribution is negligible, we present a system centered on water's inherent optical properties (IOPs). It can be used to derive IOPs from angular Rrs and offers an alternative to the system centered on the concentration of chlorophyll. This system is applicable to oceanic and coastal waters as well as to multiband and hyperspectral sensors. This IOP-centered system is applied to both numerically simulated data and in situ measurements to test and evaluate its performance. The good results obtained suggest that the system can be applied to angular R(rs) to retrieve IOPs and to remove the angular variation of R(rs).

  6. High-performance flat data center network architecture based on scalable and flow-controlled optical switching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretta, Nicola; Miao, Wang; Dorren, Harm

    2016-03-01

    Traffic in data centers networks (DCNs) is steadily growing to support various applications and virtualization technologies. Multi-tenancy enabling efficient resource utilization is considered as a key requirement for the next generation DCs resulting from the growing demands for services and applications. Virtualization mechanisms and technologies can leverage statistical multiplexing and fast switch reconfiguration to further extend the DC efficiency and agility. We present a novel high performance flat DCN employing bufferless and distributed fast (sub-microsecond) optical switches with wavelength, space, and time switching operation. The fast optical switches can enhance the performance of the DCNs by providing large-capacity switching capability and efficiently sharing the data plane resources by exploiting statistical multiplexing. Benefiting from the Software-Defined Networking (SDN) control of the optical switches, virtual DCNs can be flexibly created and reconfigured by the DCN provider. Numerical and experimental investigations of the DCN based on the fast optical switches show the successful setup of virtual network slices for intra-data center interconnections. Experimental results to assess the DCN performance in terms of latency and packet loss show less than 10^-5 packet loss and 640ns end-to-end latency with 0.4 load and 16- packet size buffer. Numerical investigation on the performance of the systems when the port number of the optical switch is scaled to 32x32 system indicate that more than 1000 ToRs each with Terabit/s interface can be interconnected providing a Petabit/s capacity. The roadmap to photonic integration of large port optical switches will be also presented.

  7. Glaucoma Diagnostic Capabilities of Foveal Avascular Zone Parameters Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography According to Visual Field Defect Location.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junki; Choi, Jaewan; Shin, Joong Won; Lee, Jiyun; Kook, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    To assess the diagnostic ability of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) parameters to discriminate glaucomatous eyes with visual field defects (VFDs) in different locations (central vs. peripheral) from normal eyes. Totally, 125 participants were separated into 3 groups: normal (n=45), glaucoma with peripheral VFD (PVFD, n=45), and glaucoma with central VFD (CVFD, n=35). The FAZ area, perimeter, and circularity and parafoveal vessel density were calculated from optical coherence tomography angiography images. The diagnostic ability of the FAZ parameters and other structural parameters was determined according to glaucomatous VFD location. Associations between the FAZ parameters and central visual function were evaluated. A larger FAZ area and longer FAZ perimeter were observed in the CVFD group than in the PVFD and normal groups. The FAZ area, perimeter, and circularity were better in differentiating glaucomatous eyes with CVFDs from normal eyes [areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC), 0.78 to 0.88] than in differentiating PVFDs from normal eyes (AUC, 0.51 to 0.64). The FAZ perimeter had a similar AUC value to the circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer and macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness for differentiating eyes with CVFDs from normal eyes (all P>0.05, the DeLong test). The FAZ area was significantly correlated with central visual function (β=-112.7, P=0.035, multivariate linear regression). The FAZ perimeter had good diagnostic capability in differentiating glaucomatous eyes with CVFDs from normal eyes, and may be a potential diagnostic biomarker for detecting glaucomatous patients with CVFDs.

  8. Evaluation of Automatically Quantified Foveal Avascular Zone Metrics for Diagnosis of Diabetic Retinopathy Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yansha; Simonett, Joseph M; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Miao; Hwang, Thomas; Hagag, Ahmed M; Huang, David; Li, Dengwang; Jia, Yali

    2018-05-01

    To describe an automated algorithm to quantify the foveal avascular zone (FAZ), using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), and to compare its performance for diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and association with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) to that of extrafoveal avascular area (EAA). We obtained 3 × 3-mm macular OCTA scans in diabetic patients with various levels of DR and healthy controls. An algorithm based on a generalized gradient vector flow (GGVF) snake model detected the FAZ, and metrics assessing FAZ size and irregularity were calculated. We compared the automated FAZ segmentation to manual delineation and tested the within-visit repeatability of FAZ metrics. The correlations of two conventional FAZ metrics, two novel FAZ metrics, and EAA with DR severity and BCVA, as determined by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) charts, were assessed. Sixty-six eyes from 66 diabetic patients and 19 control eyes from 19 healthy participants were included. The agreement between manual and automated FAZ delineation had a Jaccard index > 0.82, and the repeatability of automated FAZ detection was excellent in eyes at all levels of DR severity. FAZ metrics that incorporated both FAZ size and shape irregularity had the strongest correlation with clinical DR grade and BCVA. Of all the tested OCTA metrics, EAA had the greatest sensitivity in differentiating diabetic eyes without clinical evidence of retinopathy, mild to moderate nonproliferative DR (NPDR), and severe NPDR to proliferative DR from healthy controls. The GGVF snake algorithm tested in this study can accurately and reliably detect the FAZ, using OCTA data at all DR severity grades, and may be used to obtain clinically useful information from OCTA data regarding macular ischemia in patients with diabetes. While FAZ metrics can provide clinically useful information regarding macular ischemia, and possibly visual acuity potential, EAA measurements may be a better biomarker for

  9. Replication of self-centering optical fiber alignment structures using hot embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Wissmann, Markus; Barié, Nicole; Guttmann, Markus; Schneider, Marc; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    With the demand for broadband connectivity on the rise due to various services like video-on-demand and cloud computing becoming more popular, the need for better connectivity infrastructure is high. The only future- proof option to supply this infrastructure is to deploy "fiber to the home" (FTTH) networks. One of the main difficulties with the deployment of FTTH is the vast amount of single-mode fiber (SMF) connections that need to be made. Hence there is a strong need for components which enable high performance, robust and easy-to- use SMF connectors. Since large-scale deployment is the goal, these components should be mass-producible at low cost. We discuss a rapid prototyping process on the basis of hot embossing replication of a self-centering alignment system (SCAS) based on three micro-springs, which can position a SMF independently of its diameter. This is beneficial since there is a fabrication tolerance of up to +/-1 μm on a standard G.652 SMF's diameter that can lead to losses if the outer diameter is used as a reference for alignment. The SCAS is first prototyped with deep proton writing (DPW) in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) after which it is glued to a copper substrate with an adhesive. Using an electroforming process, a nickel block is grown over the PMMA prototype followed by mechanical finishing to fabricate a structured nickel mould insert. Even though the mould insert shows non- ideal and rounded features it is used to create PMMA replicas of the SCAS by means of hot embossing. The SCAS possesses a central opening in which a bare SMF can be clamped, which is designed with a diameter of 121 μm. PMMA replicas are dimensionally characterized using a multisensor coordinate measurement machine and show a central opening diameter of 128.3 +/- 2.8 μm. This should be compared to the central opening diameter of the DPW prototype used for mould formation which was measured to be 120.5 μm. This shows that the electroforming and subsequent replication

  10. Design and prototyping of self-centering optical single-mode fiber alignment structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Gao, Fei; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The European Commission’s goal of providing each European household with at least a 30 Mb s-1 Internet connection by 2020 would be facilitated by a widespread deployment of fibre-to-the-home, which would in turn be sped up by the development of connector essential components, such as high-precision alignment features. Currently, the performance of state-of-the-art physical contact optical fiber connectors is limited by the tolerance on the cladding of standard telecom-grade single-mode fiber (SMF), which is typically smaller than  ±1 μm. We propose to overcome this limit by developing micro-spring-based self-centering alignment structures (SCAS) for SMF-connectors. We design these alignment structures with robustness and low-cost replication in mind, allowing for large-scale deployment. Both theoretical and finite element analysis (FEA) models are used to determine the optimal dimensions of the beams of which the micro-springs of the SCAS are comprised. Two topologies of the SCAS, consisting of three and four micro-springs respectively, are investigated for two materials: polysulfone (PSU) and polyetherimide (PEI). These materials hold great potential for high-performance fiber connectors while being compatible with low-cost production and with the harsh environmental operation conditions of those connectors. The theory and FEA agree well (<3% difference) for a simple micro-spring. When including a pedestal on the micro-spring (to bring it further away from the fiber) and for shorter spring lengths the agreement worsens. This is due to spring compression effects not being taken into account in our theoretical model. Prototypes are successfully fabricated using deep proton writing and subsequently characterized. The controlled insertion of an SMF in the SCAS is investigated and we determine that a force of 0.11 N is required. The fiber insertion also causes an out-of-plane deformation of the micro-springs in the SCAS of about 7 μm, which is no problem for

  11. Optical memory based on quantized atomic center-of-mass motion.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J P; de Almeida, A J F; Felinto, D; Tabosa, J W R

    2017-11-01

    We report a new type of optical memory using a pure two-level system of cesium atoms cooled by the magnetically assisted Sisyphus effect. The optical information of a probe field is stored in the coherence between quantized vibrational levels of the atoms in the potential wells of a 1-D optical lattice. The retrieved pulse shows Rabi oscillations with a frequency determined by the reading beam intensity and are qualitatively understood in terms of a simple theoretical model. The exploration of the external degrees of freedom of an atom may add another capability in the design of quantum-information protocols using light.

  12. Practice Patterns Analysis of Ocular Proton Therapy Centers: The International OPTIC Survey

    SciT

    Hrbacek, Jan, E-mail: Jan.hrbacek@psi.ch; Mishra, Kavita K.; Kacperek, Andrzej

    Purpose: To assess the planning, treatment, and follow-up strategies worldwide in dedicated proton therapy ocular programs. Methods and Materials: Ten centers from 7 countries completed a questionnaire survey with 109 queries on the eye treatment planning system (TPS), hardware/software equipment, image acquisition/registration, patient positioning, eye surveillance, beam delivery, quality assurance (QA), clinical management, and workflow. Results: Worldwide, 28,891 eye patients were treated with protons at the 10 centers as of the end of 2014. Most centers treated a vast number of ocular patients (1729 to 6369). Three centers treated fewer than 200 ocular patients. Most commonly, the centers treated uvealmore » melanoma (UM) and other primary ocular malignancies, benign ocular tumors, conjunctival lesions, choroidal metastases, and retinoblastomas. The UM dose fractionation was generally within a standard range, whereas dosing for other ocular conditions was not standardized. The majority (80%) of centers used in common a specific ocular TPS. Variability existed in imaging registration, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rarely being used in routine planning (20%). Increased patient to full-time equivalent ratios were observed by higher accruing centers (P=.0161). Generally, ophthalmologists followed up the post–radiation therapy patients, though in 40% of centers radiation oncologists also followed up the patients. Seven centers had a prospective outcomes database. All centers used a cyclotron to accelerate protons with dedicated horizontal beam lines only. QA checks (range, modulation) varied substantially across centers. Conclusions: The first worldwide multi-institutional ophthalmic proton therapy survey of the clinical and technical approach shows areas of substantial overlap and areas of progress needed to achieve sustainable and systematic management. Future international efforts include research and development for imaging and planning software

  13. Practice Patterns Analysis of Ocular Proton Therapy Centers: The International OPTIC Survey.

    PubMed

    Hrbacek, Jan; Mishra, Kavita K; Kacperek, Andrzej; Dendale, Remi; Nauraye, Catherine; Auger, Michel; Herault, Joel; Daftari, Inder K; Trofimov, Alexei V; Shih, Helen A; Chen, Yen-Lin E; Denker, Andrea; Heufelder, Jens; Horwacik, Tomasz; Swakoń, Jan; Hoehr, Cornelia; Duzenli, Cheryl; Pica, Alessia; Goudjil, Farid; Mazal, Alejandro; Thariat, Juliette; Weber, Damien C

    2016-05-01

    To assess the planning, treatment, and follow-up strategies worldwide in dedicated proton therapy ocular programs. Ten centers from 7 countries completed a questionnaire survey with 109 queries on the eye treatment planning system (TPS), hardware/software equipment, image acquisition/registration, patient positioning, eye surveillance, beam delivery, quality assurance (QA), clinical management, and workflow. Worldwide, 28,891 eye patients were treated with protons at the 10 centers as of the end of 2014. Most centers treated a vast number of ocular patients (1729 to 6369). Three centers treated fewer than 200 ocular patients. Most commonly, the centers treated uveal melanoma (UM) and other primary ocular malignancies, benign ocular tumors, conjunctival lesions, choroidal metastases, and retinoblastomas. The UM dose fractionation was generally within a standard range, whereas dosing for other ocular conditions was not standardized. The majority (80%) of centers used in common a specific ocular TPS. Variability existed in imaging registration, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rarely being used in routine planning (20%). Increased patient to full-time equivalent ratios were observed by higher accruing centers (P=.0161). Generally, ophthalmologists followed up the post-radiation therapy patients, though in 40% of centers radiation oncologists also followed up the patients. Seven centers had a prospective outcomes database. All centers used a cyclotron to accelerate protons with dedicated horizontal beam lines only. QA checks (range, modulation) varied substantially across centers. The first worldwide multi-institutional ophthalmic proton therapy survey of the clinical and technical approach shows areas of substantial overlap and areas of progress needed to achieve sustainable and systematic management. Future international efforts include research and development for imaging and planning software upgrades, increased use of MRI, development of clinical protocols

  14. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) Fiber Optic Sensing System (FOSS) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick; Hamory, Phil; Pena, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Attached is a power point presentation created to assist the Tech Transfer Office and the FOSS project team members in responding to inquiries from the public about the capabilities of the Fiber Optic Sensing System.

  15. Optical Trap Methods to Determine the Viscoelastic Properties of Biological Materials | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees and/or co-development partners for methods that provide significant improvements in examining clinically relevant tissue samples, by improving spatial resolution and tissue depth using optical trapping. 

  16. Numerical and experimental study of a high port-density WDM optical packet switch architecture for data centers.

    PubMed

    Di Lucente, S; Luo, J; Centelles, R Pueyo; Rohit, A; Zou, S; Williams, K A; Dorren, H J S; Calabretta, N

    2013-01-14

    Data centers have to sustain the rapid growth of data traffic due to the increasing demand of bandwidth-hungry internet services. The current intra-data center fat tree topology causes communication bottlenecks in the server interaction process, power-hungry O-E-O conversions that limit the minimum latency and the power efficiency of these systems. In this paper we numerically and experimentally investigate an optical packet switch architecture with modular structure and highly distributed control that allow configuration times in the order of nanoseconds. Numerical results indicate that the candidate architecture scaled over 4000 ports, provides an overall throughput over 50 Tb/s and a packet loss rate below 10(-6) while assuring sub-microsecond latency. We present experimental results that demonstrate the feasibility of a 16x16 optical packet switch based on parallel 1x4 integrated optical cross-connect modules. Error-free operations can be achieved with 4 dB penalty while the overall energy consumption is of 66 pJ/b. Based on those results, we discuss feasibility to scale the architecture to a much larger port count.

  17. Integrated nonlinear optical imaging microscope for on-axis crystal detection and centering at a synchrotron beamline

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Jeremy T.; Toth, Scott J.; Dettmar, Christopher M.; Newman, Justin A.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Hedderich, Hartmut G.; Everly, R. Michael; Becker, Michael; Ronau, Judith A.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Cherezov, Vadim; Morrow, Marie E.; Xu, Shenglan; Ferguson, Dale; Makarov, Oleg; Das, Chittaranjan; Fischetti, Robert; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) instrumentation has been integrated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) for combined single-platform analysis, initially targeting applications for automated crystal centering. Second-harmonic-generation microscopy and two-photon-excited ultraviolet fluorescence microscopy were evaluated for crystal detection and assessed by X-ray raster scanning. Two optical designs were constructed and characterized; one positioned downstream of the sample and one integrated into the upstream optical path of the diffractometer. Both instruments enabled protein crystal identification with integration times between 80 and 150 µs per pixel, representing a ∼103–104-fold reduction in the per-pixel exposure time relative to X-ray raster scanning. Quantitative centering and analysis of phenylalanine hydroxylase from Chromobacterium violaceum cPAH, Trichinella spiralis deubiquitinating enzyme TsUCH37, human κ-opioid receptor complex kOR-T4L produced in lipidic cubic phase (LCP), intimin prepared in LCP, and α-cellulose samples were performed by collecting multiple NLO images. The crystalline samples were characterized by single-crystal diffraction patterns, while α-cellulose was characterized by fiber diffraction. Good agreement was observed between the sample positions identified by NLO and XRD raster measurements for all samples studied. PMID:23765294

  18. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-curvature Optical Metrology System During Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius-of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse & fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment & phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development & spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software & procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate & efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  19. Performance of the primary mirror center-of-curvature optical metrology system during cryogenic testing of the JWST Pathfinder telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse and fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment and phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development and spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software and procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate and efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  20. Hot-embossing replication of self-centering optical fiber alignment structures prototyped by deep proton writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Wissmann, Markus; Guttmann, Markus; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Barié, Nicole; Schneider, Marc; Hofmann, Andreas; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the hot-embossing replication of self-centering fiber alignment structures for high-precision, single-mode optical fiber connectors. To this end, a metal mold insert was fabricated by electroforming a polymer prototype patterned by means of deep proton writing (DPW). To achieve through-hole structures, we developed a postembossing process step to remove the residual layer inherently present in hot-embossed structures. The geometrical characteristics of the hot-embossed replicas are compared, before and after removal of the residual layer, with the DPW prototypes. Initial measurements on the optical performance of the replicas are performed. The successful replication of these components paves the way toward low-cost mass replication of DPW-fabricated prototypes in a variety of high-tech plastics.

  1. Palo Alto Research Center - Smart Embedded Network of Sensors with an Optical Readout

    Raghavan, Ajay; Sahu, Saroj; Bringans, Ross; Johnson, Noble; Kiesel, Peter; Saha, Bhaskar

    2018-05-18

    PARC is developing new fiber optic sensors that would be embedded into batteries to monitor and measure key internal parameters during charge and discharge cycles. Two significant problems with today's best batteries are their lack of internal monitoring capabilities and their design oversizing. The lack of monitoring interferes with the ability to identify and manage performance or safety issues as they arise, which are presently managed by very conservative design oversizing and protection approaches that result in cost inefficiencies. PARC's design combines low-cost, embedded optical battery sensors and smart algorithms to overcome challenges faced by today's best battery management systems. These advanced fiber optic sensing technologies have the potential to dramatically improve the safety, performance, and life-time of energy storage systems.

  2. Report of the Interagency Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 September 12-14, 2006 NASA Ames Research Center

    SciT

    Joe Mambretti Richard desJardins

    2006-05-01

    A new generation of optical networking services and technologies is rapidly changing the world of communications. National and international networks are implementing optical services to supplement traditional packet routed services. On September 12-14, 2005, the Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 (ONT2), an invitation-only forum hosted by the NASA Research and Engineering Network (NREN) and co-sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), was held at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. The aim of ONT2 was to help the Federal Large Scale Networking Coordination Group (LSN) and its Joint Engineering Team (JET) to coordinate testbed and network roadmaps describingmore » agency and partner organization views and activities for moving toward next generation communication services based on leading edge optical networks in the 3-5 year time frame. ONT2 was conceived and organized as a sequel to the first Optical Network Testbeds Workshop (ONT1, August 2004, www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). ONT1 resulted in a series of recommendations to LSN. ONT2 was designed to move beyond recommendations to agree on a series of “actionable objectives” that would proactively help federal and partner optical network testbeds and advanced research and education (R&E) networks to begin incorporating technologies and services representing the next generation of advanced optical networks in the next 1-3 years. Participants in ONT2 included representatives from innovative prototype networks (Panel A), basic optical network research testbeds (Panel B), and production R&D networks (Panels C and D), including “JETnets,” selected regional optical networks (RONs), international R&D networks, commercial network technology and service providers (Panel F), and senior engineering and R&D managers from LSN agencies and partner organizations. The overall goal of ONT2 was to identify and coordinate short and medium term activities and milestones for researching, developing

  3. The manifestation of optical centers in UV-Vis absorption and luminescence spectra of white blood human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terent'yeva, Yu G.; Yashchuk, V. M.; Zaika, L. A.; Snitserova, O. M.; Losytsky, M. Yu

    2016-12-01

    A white blood human cells spectral investigation is presented. The aim of this series of experiments was to obtain and analyze the absorption and luminescence (fluorescence and phosphorescence) spectra at room temperature and at 78 K of newly isolated white blood human cells and their organelles. As a result the optical centers and possible biochemical components that form the studied spectra where identified. Also the differences between the spectra of abnormal cells (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia BCLL) and normal ones were studied for the whole cells and individual organelles.

  4. Application of quantum-dot multi-wavelength lasers and silicon photonic ring resonators to data-center optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckett, Douglas J. S.; Hickey, Ryan; Logan, Dylan F.; Knights, Andrew P.; Chen, Rong; Cao, Bin; Wheeldon, Jeffery F.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum dot comb sources integrated with silicon photonic ring-resonator filters and modulators enable the realization of optical sub-components and modules for both inter- and intra-data-center applications. Low-noise, multi-wavelength, single-chip, laser sources, PAM4 modulation and direct detection allow a practical, scalable, architecture for applications beyond 400 Gb/s. Multi-wavelength, single-chip light sources are essential for reducing power dissipation, space and cost, while silicon photonic ring resonators offer high-performance with space and power efficiency.

  5. Prevalence of hookworm infection and its association with anemia among patients visiting Fenan Medical Center, East Wollega Zone, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Dori, Geme Urge; Tullu, Kassu Desta; Ali, Ibrahim; Hirko, Abera; Mekuria, Getahun

    2011-07-01

    Data was obtained from all study subjects and blood and fecal specimen were collected from all subjects who apparently volunteer to take part in the study. To determine prevalence of hookworm infection and its association with anemia. METHODS.: A cross-sectional study was conducted from February to April 2007 in Diga District, East Wollega Zone. Hematocrit test was done on all blood samples. All stool specimens were processed with a Kato-thick method and examined for parasites and the density of parasites was determined as eggs per gram of stool (epg). Frequencies and proportions were used for the descriptive analysis of the data and Pearson Chi-square test was used to assess the associations between the demographic characteristics of the study subjects and the findings of the test samples. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 64.9% Hookworm was the predominant (49.7%) intestinal parasite identified among the study participants. The density of hookworm egg ranged from 48 epg to 11,520 epg with mean and median values of 685 and 288 epg respectively. The observed result for hematocrit ranged from 12% to 50% with mean (SD) and median values of 34.6% (4.7) and 36% respectively. The prevalence of anemia is 65.5% among study participants. Among those subjects with hookworm, 83.9% were anemic. On the contrary only 41 (22.5%) study subjects who appeared negative for hookworm on stool examination were anemic. The prevalence of hookworm is higher and it is associated with anemia in East Wollega zone. Therefore intervention strategies should consider the concomitance of hookworm and anemia in the implementations of appropriate prevention and control strategies.

  6. Development of Multilayer Coatings for Hard X-Ray Optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurgew, Danielle N.; Broadway, David M.; Ramsey, Brian; Gregory, Don

    2017-01-01

    Broadband X-ray multilayer coatings are under development at NASA MSFC for use on future astronomical X-ray telescopes. Multilayer coatings deposited onto the reflecting surfaces of X-ray optics can provide a large bandpass enabling observations of higher energy astrophysical objects and phenomena.

  7. Optical Products in American and European Libraries and Information Centers: Similarities, Differences, and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ching-chih; Raitt, David

    1990-01-01

    Describes use studies of CD-ROM products in American and western European academic, public, and special libraries. Comparative results of the surveys are reported, including effect of CD-ROMs on library use of online databases, difficulties with different vendors' search techniques, and desired subjects of optical products. (10 references) (LRW)

  8. Scalability analysis methodology for passive optical interconnects in data center networks using PAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.; Szczerba, Krzysztof; Agrell, Erik; Wosinska, Lena; Tang, M.; Liu, D.; Chen, J.

    2017-11-01

    A framework is developed for modeling the fundamental impairments in optical datacenter interconnects, i.e., the power loss and the receiver noises. This framework makes it possible, to analyze the trade-offs between data rates, modulation order, and number of ports that can be supported in optical interconnect architectures, while guaranteeing that the required signal-to-noise ratios are satisfied. To the best of our knowledge, this important assessment methodology is not yet available. As a case study, the trade-offs are investigated for three coupler-based top-of-rack interconnect architectures, which suffer from serious insertion loss. The results show that using single-port transceivers with 10 GHz bandwidth, avalanche photodiode detectors, and quadratical pulse amplitude modulation, more than 500 ports can be supported.

  9. Nonlinear optical response in a zincblende GaN cylindrical quantum dot with donor impurity center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Jaime H.; Correa, J. D.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Duque, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the nonlinear optical absorption coefficient of a cylindrical zincblende GaN-based quantum dot. For this purpose, we consider Coulomb interactions between electrons and an impurity ionized donor atom. The electron-donor-impurity spectrum and the associated quantum states are calculated using the effective mass approximation with a parabolic potential energy model describing both the radial and axial electron confinement. We also include the effects of the hydrostatic pressure and external electrostatic fields. The energy spectrum is obtained through an expansion of the eigenstates as a linear combination of Gaussian-type functions which reduces the computational effort since all the matrix elements are obtained analytically. Therefore, the numerical problem is reduced to the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. The obtained energies are used in the evaluation of the dielectric susceptibility and the nonlinear optical absorption coefficient within a modified two-level approach in a rotating wave approximation. This quantity is investigated as a function of the quantum dot dimensions, the impurity position, the external electric field intensity and the hydrostatic pressure. The results of this research could be important in the design and fabrication of zincblende GaN-quantum-dot-based electro-optical devices.

  10. Controlled reshaping of the front surface of the cornea through its full-area ablation outside of the optical zone with a Gaussian ArF excimer laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchishen, A. V.; Semchishen, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied in vitro the response of the topography of the cornea to its full-area laser ablation (the laser beam spot diameter is commensurable with the size of the interface) outside of the central zone with an excimer laser having a Gaussian fluence distribution across the beam. Subject to investigation were the topographically controlled surface changes of the anterior cornea in 60 porcine eyes with a 5 ± 1.25-diopter artificially induced astigmatism, the changes being caused by laser ablation of the stromal collagen in two 3.5-mm-dia. circular areas along the weaker astigmatism axis. Experimental relationships are presented between the actual astigmatism correction and the expected correction for the intact optical zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm in diameter. The data for each zone were approximated by the least-squares method with the function d = a + bx. The coefficient b is given with the root-mean-square error. The statistical processing of the data yielded the following results: d = (0.14 ± 0.037)x for the 1-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.10 ± 0.036)x for the 2-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.04 ± 0.020)x for the 3-mm-dia. optical zone, and (0.55 ± 0.04)x for the 4-mm-dia. optical zone. Full astigmatism correction was achieved with ablation effected outside of the 3-mm-dia. optical zone. The surface changes of the cornea are shown to be due not only to the removal of the corneal tissue, but also to the biomechanical topographic response of the cornea to its strain caused by the formation of a dense pseudomembrane in the ablation area.

  11. Specific CT 3D rendering of the treatment zone after Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in a pig liver model: the “Chebyshev Center Concept” to define the maximum treatable tumor size

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Size and shape of the treatment zone after Irreversible electroporation (IRE) can be difficult to depict due to the use of multiple applicators with complex spatial configuration. Exact geometrical definition of the treatment zone, however, is mandatory for acute treatment control since incomplete tumor coverage results in limited oncological outcome. In this study, the “Chebyshev Center Concept” was introduced for CT 3d rendering to assess size and position of the maximum treatable tumor at a specific safety margin. Methods In seven pig livers, three different IRE protocols were applied to create treatment zones of different size and shape: Protocol 1 (n = 5 IREs), Protocol 2 (n = 5 IREs), and Protocol 3 (n = 5 IREs). Contrast-enhanced CT was used to assess the treatment zones. Technique A consisted of a semi-automated software prototype for CT 3d rendering with the “Chebyshev Center Concept” implemented (the “Chebyshev Center” is the center of the largest inscribed sphere within the treatment zone) with automated definition of parameters for size, shape and position. Technique B consisted of standard CT 3d analysis with manual definition of the same parameters but position. Results For Protocol 1 and 2, short diameter of the treatment zone and diameter of the largest inscribed sphere within the treatment zone were not significantly different between Technique A and B. For Protocol 3, short diameter of the treatment zone and diameter of the largest inscribed sphere within the treatment zone were significantly smaller for Technique A compared with Technique B (41.1 ± 13.1 mm versus 53.8 ± 1.1 mm and 39.0 ± 8.4 mm versus 53.8 ± 1.1 mm; p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). For Protocol 1, 2 and 3, sphericity of the treatment zone was significantly larger for Technique A compared with B. Conclusions Regarding size and shape of the treatment zone after IRE, CT 3d rendering with the “Chebyshev Center Concept” implemented provides

  12. WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: OPTICAL FABRICATION LABORATORY - FITZSIMMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) program, RREL has taken the initiative to merge the experience and resources of the EPA with other Federal agencies. At the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center (FAMC) in Aurora, Colorado, the Army and the EPA cooperated ...

  13. Hard X-ray Optics Technology Development for Astronomy at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Kilaru, Kiranmayee

    2009-01-01

    Grazing-incidence telescopes based on Wolter 1 geometry have delivered impressive advances in astrophysics at soft-x-ray wavelengths, while the hard xray region remains relatively unexplored at fine angular resolution and high sensitivities. The ability to perform ground-breaking science in the hard-x-ray energy range had been the motivation for technology developments aimed at fabricating low-cost, light-weight, high-quality x-ray mirrors. Grazing-incidence x-ray optics for high-energy astrophysical applications is being developed at MSFC using the electroform-nickel replication process.

  14. Hybrid quantum gates between flying photon and diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers assisted by optical microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Lu Long, Gui

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid quantum gates hold great promise for quantum information processing since they preserve the advantages of different quantum systems. Here we present compact quantum circuits to deterministically implement controlled-NOT, Toffoli, and Fredkin gates between a flying photon qubit and diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers assisted by microcavities. The target qubits of these universal quantum gates are encoded on the spins of the electrons associated with the diamond NV centers and they have long coherence time for storing information, and the control qubit is encoded on the polarizations of the flying photon and can be easily manipulated. Our quantum circuits are compact, economic, and simple. Moreover, they do not require additional qubits. The complexity of our schemes for universal three-qubit gates is much reduced, compared to the synthesis with two-qubit entangling gates. These schemes have high fidelities and efficiencies, and they are feasible in experiment. PMID:26271899

  15. Optical magnetometry of superconductors using nitrogen - vacancy centers in diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, K. R.; Nusran, N. M.; Cho, Kyuil; Tanatar, M. A.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Prozorov, R.

    Spin-dependent fluorescence of nitrogen - vacancy (NV) centers in diamond has emerged as a promising tool for non-invasive sensitive magnetometry with excellent sensitivity. In this work, we employ ensembles of NV centers implanted at the surface of a diamond film to study magnetic induction as the function of position, magnetic field and temperature in superconductors after different cooling/heating protocols and magnetic history. One of the motivations of our work is to study the structure of the Meissner expulsion upon field cooling, where we observe significant deviations from the simple, textbook example. Another is to determine the lower superconducting critical field, Hc1. Conventional Nb is compared with borocarbides (LuNi2B2C) and iron-pnictides(CaKFe4As4). Supported by the USDOE/Office of Science BES Materials Science and Engineering Division under contract DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  16. Research Center for Optical Physics: Education and Technology for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    During the past eleven years since its inception, RCOP has excelled in its two primary goals: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, as of May 2003, RCOP produced 36 Bachelors degrees, 25 Masters degrees, and 13 Doctoral degrees. Of these, all 36 Bachelors degrees, 16 of the Masters degrees and 9 of the Doctoral degrees were awarded to African Americans. Four of the Doctoral graduates and one of the Masters graduates are working at NASA Field Centers. RCOP has also provided research experiences to 130 undergraduate students and 22 high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been crucial to the development of the Ph.D. program in physics at Hampton University by providing high quality research training and technical electives required for a Doctoral degree in physics. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. Since 1992, RCOP researchers have leveraged over 8 million dollars in additional research funding, published 152 papers in refereed journals and proceedings, and given 125 presentations at refereed international conferences in the United States and eight other countries. RCOP also developed numerous collaborations with other research centers, universities and industries. In recognition of this outstanding work, RCOP is the first research center in the United States invited to join the Joint Open Laboratory for Laser Crystals and Precise Laser Systems headed by Dr. Alexander Kaminiskii of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  17. All-Optical Nanoscale Thermometry using Silicon-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Christian; Evans, Ruffin; Sipahigil, Alp; Bhaskar, Mihir; Sukachev, Denis; Lukin, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    Accurate thermometry at the nanoscale is a difficult challenge, but building such a thermometer would be a powerful tool for discovering and understanding new processes in biology, chemistry and physics. Applications include cell-selective treatment of disease, engineering of more efficient integrated circuits, or even the development of new chemical and biological reactions. In this work, we study how the bulk properties of the Silicon Vacancy center (SiV) in diamond depend on temperature, and use them to measure temperature with 100mK accuracy. Using SiVs in 200 nm nanodiamonds, we measure the temperature with 100 nm spatial resolution over a 10 μm area.

  18. Microwave-Assisted Cross-Polarization of Nuclear Spin Ensembles from Optically Pumped Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond.

    PubMed

    Shagieva, F; Zaiser, S; Neumann, P; Dasari, D B R; Stöhr, R; Denisenko, A; Reuter, R; Meriles, C A; Wrachtrup, J

    2018-06-13

    The ability to optically initialize the electronic spin of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has long been considered a valuable resource to enhance the polarization of neighboring nuclei, but efficient polarization transfer to spin species outside the diamond crystal has proven challenging. Here we demonstrate variable-magnetic-field, microwave-enabled cross-polarization from the NV electronic spin to protons in a model viscous fluid in contact with the diamond surface. Further, slight changes in the cross-relaxation rate as a function of the wait time between successive repetitions of the transfer protocol suggest slower molecular dynamics near the diamond surface compared to that in bulk. This observation is consistent with present models of the microscopic structure of a fluid and can be exploited to estimate the diffusion coefficient near a solid-liquid interface, of importance in colloid science.

  19. Social Science at the Center for Adaptive Optics: Synergistic Systems of Program Evaluation, Applied Research, Educational Assessment, and Pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goza, B. K.; Hunter, L.; Shaw, J. M.; Metevier, A. J.; Raschke, L.; Espinoza, E.; Geaney, E. R.; Reyes, G.; Rothman, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction of four elements of social science as they have evolved in concert with the Center for Adaptive Optics Professional Development Program (CfAO PDP). We hope these examples persuade early-career scientists and engineers to include social science activities as they develop grant proposals and carry out their research. To frame our discussion we use a metaphor from astronomy. At the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), the CfAO PDP and the Educational Partnership Center (EPC) are two young stars in the process of forming a solar system. Together, they are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust made up of program evaluation, applied research, educational assessment, and pedagogy. An idea from the 2001 PDP intensive workshops program evaluation developed into the Assessing Scientific Inquiry and Leadership Skills (AScILS) applied research project. In iterative cycles, AScILS researchers participated in subsequent PDP intensive workshops, teaching social science while piloting AScILS measurement strategies. Subsequent "orbits" of the PDP program evaluation gathered ideas from the applied research and pedagogy. The denser regions of this disk of social science are in the process of forming new protoplanets as tools for research and teaching are developed. These tools include problem-solving exercises or simulations of adaptive optics explanations and scientific reasoning; rubrics to evaluate the scientific reasoning simulation responses, knowledge regarding inclusive science education, and student explanations of science/engineering inquiry investigations; and a scientific reasoning curriculum. Another applied research project is forming with the design of a study regarding how to assess engineering explanations. To illustrate the mutual shaping of the cross-disciplinary, intergenerational group of educational researchers and their projects, the paper ends with a description of the professional trajectories of some of the

  20. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  1. Satellite observation of bio-optical indicators related to North-Western Black Sea coastal zone changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria

    Satellite remote sensing provides a means for locating, identifying and mapping certain coastal zone features and assessing of spatio-temporal changes.The Romanian coastal zone of the Black Sea is a mosaic of complex, interacting ecosystems, exposed to dramatic changes due to natural and anthropogenic causes (increase in the nutrient and pollutant load of rivers input, industrial and municipal wastewater pollution along the coast, and dumping on the open sea). This study focuses on the assessment of coastal zone land cover changes based on the fusion of satellite remote sensing data.The evaluation of coastal zone landscapes is based upon different sub-functions which refer to landscape features such as water, soil, land-use, buildings, groundwater, biotope types. Mixed pixels result when the sensor's instantaneous field-of-view includes more than one land cover class on the ground. Based on different satellite data (Landsat TM, ETM, SAR ERS, IKONOS, Quickbird, and MODIS) was performed object recognition for North-Western Black Sea coastal zone. Preliminary results show significant coastline position changes of North Western Black Sea during the period of 1987-2007 and urban growth of Constantza town. Also the change in the position of the coastline is examined and linked to the urban expansion in order to determine if the changes are natural or anthropogenic. A distinction is made between landfill/sedimentation processes on the one hand and dredging/erosion processes on the other. Waves play an important role for shoreline configuration. Wave pattern could induce erosion and sedimentation. A quasi-linear model was used to model the rate of shoreline change. The vectors of shoreline were used to compare with wave spectra model in order to examine the accuracy of the coastal erosion model. The shoreline rate modeled from vectors data of SAR ERS-1 has a good correlation with a quasi-linear model. Wave refraction patterns are a good index for shoreline erosion. A coast

  2. Performance evaluation of multi-stratum resources integration based on network function virtualization in software defined elastic data center optical interconnect.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Tian, Rui; Han, Jianrui; Lee, Young

    2015-11-30

    Data center interconnect with elastic optical network is a promising scenario to meet the high burstiness and high-bandwidth requirements of data center services. In our previous work, we implemented multi-stratum resilience between IP and elastic optical networks that allows to accommodate data center services. In view of this, this study extends to consider the resource integration by breaking the limit of network device, which can enhance the resource utilization. We propose a novel multi-stratum resources integration (MSRI) architecture based on network function virtualization in software defined elastic data center optical interconnect. A resource integrated mapping (RIM) scheme for MSRI is introduced in the proposed architecture. The MSRI can accommodate the data center services with resources integration when the single function or resource is relatively scarce to provision the services, and enhance globally integrated optimization of optical network and application resources. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture are experimentally verified on the control plane of OpenFlow-based enhanced software defined networking (eSDN) testbed. The performance of RIM scheme under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated based on MSRI architecture in terms of path blocking probability, provisioning latency and resource utilization, compared with other provisioning schemes.

  3. Knowledge about Danger Signs of Obstetric Complications and Associated Factors among Postnatal Mothers of Mechekel District Health Centers, East Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Amenu, Gedefa; Mulaw, Zerfu; Seyoum, Tewodros; Bayu, Hinsermu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Developing countries like Ethiopia contributed highest level of maternal mortality due to obstetric complications. Women awareness of obstetric danger sign to recognize complications to seek medical care early is the first intervention in an effort to decrease maternal death. Objective. To assess knowledge about danger signs of obstetric complications and associated factors among postnatal mothers at Mechekel district health centers, East Gojjam zone, Northwest Ethiopia, 2014. Methods. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October, 2014, in Mechekel district health centers. Systematic random sampling was used to select four hundred eleven study participants. A pretested structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were entered to Epi Info version 3.5.3 and exported to SPSS 20.0 for further analysis. Descriptive and summary statistics were done. Logistic regression analyses were used to see the association of different variables. Odds ratios and 95% confidence interval were computed to determine the presence and strength of association. Results. According to this study, 55.1% participants were knowledgeable about danger signs of obstetric complications. Maternal and husband educational level ((AOR = 1.977, 95% CI: 1.052, 3.716) and (AOR = 3.163, 95% CI: 1.860, 5.3770), resp.), family monthly income ≥ 1500 (AOR = 2.954, 95% CI: 1.289, 6.770), being multipara (AOR = 7.463, 95% CI: 1.301, 12.800), ANC follow-up during last pregnancy (AOR = 2.184, 95% CI: 1.137, 4.196), and place of last delivery (AOR = 1.955, 95% CI: 1.214, 3.150) were variables found to be significantly associated with women's knowledge on danger signs of obstetric complications. Conclusion. Significant proportion of respondents were not knowledgeable about obstetric danger signs and factors like educational status, place of last delivery, and antenatal follow-up were found to be associated.

  4. Survival status and predictors of mortality among severely acute malnourished children <5 years of age admitted to stabilization centers in Gedeo Zone: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Girum, Tadele; Kote, Mesfin; Tariku, Befikadu; Bekele, Henok

    2017-01-01

    Despite the existence of standard protocol, many stabilization centers (SCs) continue to experience high mortality of children receiving treatment for severe acute malnutrition. Assessing treatment outcomes and identifying predictors may help to overcome this problem. Therefore, a 30-month retrospective cohort study was conducted among 545 randomly selected medical records of children <5 years of age admitted to SCs in Gedeo Zone. Data was entered by Epi Info version 7 and analyzed by STATA version 11. Cox proportional hazards model was built by forward stepwise procedure and compared by the likelihood ratio test and Harrell's concordance, and fitness was checked by Cox-Snell residual plot. During follow-up, 51 (9.3%) children had died, and 414 (76%) and 26 (4.8%) children had recovered and defaulted (missed follow-up for 2 consecutive days), respectively. The survival rates at the end of the first, second and third weeks were 95.3%, 90% and 85%, respectively, and the overall mean survival time was 79.6 days. Age <24 months (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] =2.841, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.101-7.329), altered pulse rate (AHR =3.926, 95% CI =1.579-9.763), altered temperature (AHR =7.173, 95% CI =3.05-16.867), shock (AHR =3.805, 95% CI =1.829-7.919), anemia (AHR =2.618, 95% CI =1.148-5.97), nasogastric tube feeding (AHR =3.181, 95% CI =1.18-8.575), hypoglycemia (AHR =2.74, 95% CI =1.279-5.87) and treatment at hospital stabilization center (AHR =4.772, 95% CI =1.638-13.9) were independent predictors of mortality. The treatment outcomes and incidence of death were in the acceptable ranges of national and international standards. Intervention to further reduce deaths has to focus on young children with comorbidities and altered general conditions.

  5. Growth, and magnetic study of Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3 single crystal grown by optical floating zone technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Anhua; Zhao, Xiangyang; Man, Peiwen; Su, Liangbi; Kalashnikova, A. M.; Pisarev, R. V.

    2018-03-01

    Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3 single crystals were successfully grown by optical floating zone method; high quality samples with various orientations were manufactured. Based on these samples, Magnetic property of Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3 single crystals were investigated systemically by means of the temperature dependence of magnetization. It indicated that compositional variations not only alter the spin reorientation temperature, but also the compensation temperature of the orthoferrites. Unlike single rare earth orthoferrites, the reversal transition temperature point of Sm0.4Er0.6FeO3 increases as magnetic field increases, which is positive for designing novel spin switching or magnetic sensor device.

  6. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FOVEAL AVASCULAR ZONE AREA, VESSEL DENSITY, AND CYSTOID CHANGES IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, AN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY STUDY.

    PubMed

    Tarassoly, Kia; Miraftabi, Arezoo; Soltan Sanjari, Mostafa; Parvaresh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-06-29

    To measure the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) areas and vessel densities of patients with diabetic retinopathy and to study their relationship with diabetic cystoid changes and retinal thickness. Prospective case series of 51 eyes of 31 patients with diabetic retinopathy. The eyes were grouped based on the presence or absence of cystoid edema and evaluated using optical coherence tomography angiography. The FAZ areas and vessel density were compared. The FAZ area at the superficial capillary plexus level was equal between the eyes with and without cystoid edema. Vessel density did not differ as well. There was no correlation with retinal thickness. In eyes with cystoid changes, FAZ area changes at the deep capillary plexus level were difficult to interpret. The FAZ area and vessel density at the superficial capillary plexus level are reproducible and independent of the presence of cystoid edema.

  7. Dike zones on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.; Sukhanov, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Venusian dike zone structures were identified from Venera 15 and 16 radar images. These include: a zone of subparallel rows centered at 30 deg N, 7 deg E; a system of intersecting bands centered at 67 deg N, 284 deg E; polygonal systems in lavas covering the structural base uplift centered at 47 deg N, 200 deg E; a system of light bands in the region of the ring structure centered at 43 deg N, 13 deg E; and a dike band centered at 27 deg N, 36 deg E.

  8. CCR6 Defines Memory B Cell Precursors in Mouse and Human Germinal Centers, Revealing Light-Zone Location and Predominant Low Antigen Affinity.

    PubMed

    Suan, Dan; Kräutler, Nike J; Maag, Jesper L V; Butt, Danyal; Bourne, Katherine; Hermes, Jana R; Avery, Danielle T; Young, Clara; Statham, Aaron; Elliott, Michael; Dinger, Marcel E; Basten, Antony; Tangye, Stuart G; Brink, Robert

    2017-12-19

    Memory B cells (MBCs) and plasma cells (PCs) constitute the two cellular outputs of germinal center (GC) responses that together facilitate long-term humoral immunity. Although expression of the transcription factor BLIMP-1 identifies cells undergoing PC differentiation, no such marker exists for cells committed to the MBC lineage. Here, we report that the chemokine receptor CCR6 uniquely marks MBC precursors in both mouse and human GCs. CCR6 + GC B cells were highly enriched within the GC light zone (LZ), were the most quiescent of all GC B cells, exhibited a cell-surface phenotype and gene expression signature indicative of an MBC transition, and possessed the augmented response characteristics of MBCs. MBC precursors within the GC LZ predominantly possessed a low affinity for antigen but also included cells from within the high-affinity pool. These data indicate a fundamental dichotomy between the processes that drive MBC and PC differentiation during GC responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influences of the Tonga Subduction Zone on seafloor massive sulfide deposits along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Guy N.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Wheat, C. Geoff

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the morphology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits from six back-arc hydrothermal vent fields along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the context of endmember vent fluid chemistry and proximity to the Tonga Subduction Zone. To complement deposit geochemistry, vent fluid analyses of Cu, Zn, Ba, Pb and H2,(aq) were completed to supplement existing data and enable thermodynamic calculations of mineral saturation states at in situ conditions. Results document southward increases in the abundance of mantle-incompatible elements in hydrothermal fluids (Ba and Pb) and SMS deposits (Ba, Pb, As, and Sb), which is also expressed in the abundance of barite (BaSO4) and galena (PbS) in SMS deposits. These increases correspond to a decrease in distance between the ELSC/VFR and the Tonga Subduction Zone that correlates with a change in crustal lithology from back-arc basin basalt in the north to mixed andesite, rhyolite, and dacite in the south. Barite influences deposit morphology, contributing to the formation of horizontal flanges and squat terraces. Results are also consistent with a regional-scale lowering of hydrothermal reaction zone temperatures from north to south (except at the southernmost Mariner vent field) that leads to lower-temperature, higher-pH vent fluids relative to mid-ocean ridges of similar spreading rates (Mottl et al., 2011). These fluids are Cu- and Zn-poor and the deposits formed from these fluids are Cu-poor but Zn-rich. In contrast, at the Mariner vent field, higher-temperature and lower pH vent fluids are hypothesized to result from higher reaction zone temperatures and the localized addition of acidic magmatic volatiles (Mottl et al., 2011). The Mariner fluids are Cu- and Zn-rich and vent from SMS deposits that are rich in Cu but poor in Zn with moderate amounts of Pb. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the contrasting metal contents of vent fluids

  10. Know Your Enemy - Implementation of Bioremediation within a Suspected DNAPL Source Zone Following High-Resolution Site Characterization at Contractors Road Heavy Equipment Area, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrest, Anne; Daprato, Rebecca; Burcham, Michael; Johnson, Jill

    2018-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Kennedy Space Center (KSC), has adopted high-resolution site characterization (HRSC) sampling techniques during baseline sampling prior to implementation of remedies to confirm and refine the conceptual site model (CSM). HRSC sampling was performed at Contractors Road Heavy Equipment Area (CRHE) prior to bioremediation implementation to verify the extent of the trichloroethene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source area (defined as the area with TCE concentrations above 1% solubility) and its daughter product dissolved plume that had been identified during previous HRSC events. The results of HRSC pre-bioremediation implementation sampling suggested that the TCE source area was larger than originally identified during initial site characterization activities, leading to a design refinement to improve electron donor distribution and increase the likelihood of achieving remedial objectives. Approach/Activities: HRSC was conducted from 2009 through 2014 to delineate the vertical and horizontal extent of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) in the groundwater. Approximately 2,340 samples were collected from 363 locations using direct push technology (DPT) groundwater sampling techniques. Samples were collected from up to 14 depth intervals at each location using a 4-foot sampling screen. This HRSC approach identified a narrow (approx. 5 to 30 feet wide), approximately 3,000 square foot TCE DNAPL source area (maximum detected TCE concentration of 160,000 micrograms per liter [micro-g/L] at DPT sampling location DPT0225). Prior to implementation of a bioremediation interim measure, HRSC baseline sampling was conducted using DPT groundwater sampling techniques. Concentrations of TCE were an order of magnitude lower than previous reported (12,000 micro-g/L maximum at DPT sampling location DPT0225) at locations sampled adjacent to previous sampling locations. To further evaluate the variability

  11. Quantifying the Evolution of Melt Ponds in the Marginal Ice Zone Using High Resolution Optical Imagery and Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M.; Pinales, J. C.; Graber, H. C.; Wilkinson, J.; Lund, B.

    2016-02-01

    Melt ponds on sea ice play a significant and complex role on the thermodynamics in the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ). Ponding reduces the sea ice's ability to reflect sunlight, and in consequence, exacerbates the albedo positive feedback cycle. In order to understand how melt ponds work and their effect on the heat uptake of sea ice, we must quantify ponds through their seasonal evolution first. A semi-supervised neural network three-class learning scheme using a gradient descent with momentum and adaptive learning rate backpropagation function is applied to classify melt ponds/melt areas in the Beaufort Sea region. The network uses high resolution panchromatic satellite images from the MEDEA program, which are collocated with autonomous platform arrays from the Marginal Ice Zone Program, including ice mass-balance buoys, arctic weather stations and wave buoys. The goal of the study is to capture the spatial variation of melt onset and freeze-up of the ponds within the MIZ, and gather ponding statistics such as size and concentration. The innovation of this work comes from training the neural network as the melt ponds evolve over time; making the machine learning algorithm time-dependent, which has not been previously done. We will achieve this by analyzing the image histograms through quantification of the minima and maxima intensity changes as well as linking textural variation information of the imagery. We will compare the evolution of the melt ponds against several different array sites on the sea ice to explore if there are spatial differences among the separated platforms in the MIZ.

  12. Efficiency of generation of optical centers in KS-4V and KU-1 quartz glasses at neutron and gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islamov, A. Kh.; Salikhbaev, U. S.; Ibragimova, E. M.; Nuritdinov, I.; Fayzullaev, B. S.; Vukolov, K. Yu.; Orlovskiy, I.

    2013-11-01

    Pure quartz glasses of KS-4V and KU-1 types are candidates for optical plasma diagnostic system in ITER. The purpose of experiment was to study the efficiency of defect production in these glasses under irradiation with 60Со γ-quanta (5.7 Gy/s) dose range of 102-107 Gy and the fission reactor neutrons in the fluency range of 1020-1023 n/m2 and gammas simulating the plasma influence. In KU-1 (1000 ppm OH) the accumulation kinetics of E‧-(5.75 eV) and NBO-(1.9 eV) centers at γ-doses⩾5×105 Gy and neutron fluencies <1021 n/m2 is faster, than that in KS-4V glasses (<0.1 ppm OH) that is caused by rupture of hydrogen bonds. At fluencies >1021 n/m2 the NBO accumulation kinetics is slower in KU-1 than in KS-4B, because highly mobile hydrogen atoms access to the generated NBO centers. In KS-4V irradiated to γ-doses102-5 × 103 Gy a new unstable absorption band at 1.8 eV was found, which is caused by the glass synthesis conditions and alkali metal impurities. The transparency at 3.5-6.2 eV at fluencies 1020-5 × 1021 n/m2 is higher in KS-4V than KU-1. However at fluencies >1021 n/m2 in KS-4V the photoluminescence band at 2.7 eV is more intensive and distorts a diagnosed signal. The transparency in 3.5-1.2 eV at fluencies >1021 n/m2 is higher in KU-1 than KS-4V.

  13. Spatially-resolved study of the Meissner effect in superconductors using NV-centers-in-diamond optical magnetometry

    DOE PAGES

    Nusran, N. M.; Joshi, K. R.; Cho, K.; ...

    2018-04-12

    Non-invasive magnetic field sensing using optically-detected magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond was used to study spatial distribution of the magnetic induction upon penetration and expulsion of weak magnetic fields in several representative superconductors. Vector magnetic fields were measured on the surface of conventional, elemental Pb and Nb, and compound LuNi 2B 2C and unconventional iron-based superconductors Ba 1-xK xFe 2As 2 (x = 0.34 optimal hole doping), Ba(Fe 1-xCo x)2As2 (x = 0.07 optimal electron doping), and stoichiometric CaKFe 4As 4, using variable-temperature confocal system with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. Magnetic induction profiles across the crystal edges were measuredmore » in zero-field-cooled and field-cooled conditions. While all superconductors show nearly perfect screening of magnetic fields applied after cooling to temperatures well below the superconducting transition, T c, a range of very different behaviors was observed for Meissner expulsion upon cooling in static magnetic field from above T c. Substantial conventional Meissner expulsion is found in LuNi 2B 2C, paramagnetic Meissner effect is found in Nb, and virtually no expulsion is observed in iron-based superconductors. In all cases, good correlation with macroscopic measurements of total magnetic moment is found.« less

  14. Spatially-resolved study of the Meissner effect in superconductors using NV-centers-in-diamond optical magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusran, N. M.; Joshi, K. R.; Cho, K.; Tanatar, M. A.; Meier, W. R.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Liu, Y.; Lograsso, T. A.; Prozorov, R.

    2018-04-01

    Non-invasive magnetic field sensing using optically-detected magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond was used to study spatial distribution of the magnetic induction upon penetration and expulsion of weak magnetic fields in several representative superconductors. Vector magnetic fields were measured on the surface of conventional, elemental Pb and Nb, and compound LuNi2B2C and unconventional iron-based superconductors Ba1‑x K x Fe2As2 (x = 0.34 optimal hole doping), Ba(Fe1‑x Co x )2As2 (x = 0.07 optimal electron doping), and stoichiometric CaKFe4As4, using variable-temperature confocal system with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. Magnetic induction profiles across the crystal edges were measured in zero-field-cooled and field-cooled conditions. While all superconductors show nearly perfect screening of magnetic fields applied after cooling to temperatures well below the superconducting transition, T c, a range of very different behaviors was observed for Meissner expulsion upon cooling in static magnetic field from above T c. Substantial conventional Meissner expulsion is found in LuNi2B2C, paramagnetic Meissner effect is found in Nb, and virtually no expulsion is observed in iron-based superconductors. In all cases, good correlation with macroscopic measurements of total magnetic moment is found.

  15. Spatially-resolved study of the Meissner effect in superconductors using NV-centers-in-diamond optical magnetometry

    SciT

    Nusran, N. M.; Joshi, K. R.; Cho, K.

    Non-invasive magnetic field sensing using optically-detected magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond was used to study spatial distribution of the magnetic induction upon penetration and expulsion of weak magnetic fields in several representative superconductors. Vector magnetic fields were measured on the surface of conventional, elemental Pb and Nb, and compound LuNi 2B 2C and unconventional iron-based superconductors Ba 1-xK xFe 2As 2 (x = 0.34 optimal hole doping), Ba(Fe 1-xCo x)2As2 (x = 0.07 optimal electron doping), and stoichiometric CaKFe 4As 4, using variable-temperature confocal system with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. Magnetic induction profiles across the crystal edges were measuredmore » in zero-field-cooled and field-cooled conditions. While all superconductors show nearly perfect screening of magnetic fields applied after cooling to temperatures well below the superconducting transition, T c, a range of very different behaviors was observed for Meissner expulsion upon cooling in static magnetic field from above T c. Substantial conventional Meissner expulsion is found in LuNi 2B 2C, paramagnetic Meissner effect is found in Nb, and virtually no expulsion is observed in iron-based superconductors. In all cases, good correlation with macroscopic measurements of total magnetic moment is found.« less

  16. Fibonacci-like zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shubo; Liu, Mengsi; Xia, Tian; Tao, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    We present a new family of diffractive lenses, Fibonacci-like zone plates, generated with a modified Fibonacci sequence. The focusing properties and the evolution of transverse diffraction pattern for the Fibonacci-like zone plates have been analytically investigated both theoretically and experimentally and compared with the corresponding Fresnel zone plates of the same resolution. The results demonstrate that the Fibonacci-like zone plates possess the self-similar property and the multifocal behavior. Furthermore, the Fibonacci-like zone plate beams are found to possess the self-reconstruction property, and would be promising for 3D optical tweezers, laser machining, and optical imaging.

  17. Research on the optical spectra, g factors and defect structures for two tetragonal Y²+ centers in the irradiated CaF₂: Y crystal.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen-Chen; Mei, Yang; Yang, Yu-Guang; Liu, Hong-Gang

    2012-11-01

    Based on the defect models that the tetragonal Y(2+) (1) center in the irradiated CaF(2): Y crystal is due to Y(2+) at Ca(2+) site associated with a nearest interstitial F(-) ion along C(4) axis and the tetragonal Y(2+) (2) center is Y(2+) at Ca(2+) site where the tetragonal distortion is caused by the static Jahn-Teller effect, the two optical spectral bands and anisotropic g factors for both tetragonal Y(2+) centers are calculated. The calculations are made by using two methods based on the cluster approach, one is the complete diagonalization (of energy matrix) method (CDM) and another is the perturbation theory method (PTM). The calculated results for each Y(2+) center from CDM and PTM coincide and show reasonable agreement with the experimental values. The calculated isotropic g factor for Y(2+) (2) center at higher temperature owing to the dynamical Jahn-Teller effect is also consistent with the observed value. The defect structures (i.e., tetragonal distortion) of the two Y(2+) centers are obtained from the calculation. It appears that both theoretical methods can be applied to explain the optical and EPR data, to study the defect model and to determine the defect structures for d(1) ions in crystals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Foveated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Kyle R.

    2016-05-01

    Foveated imaging can deliver two different resolutions on a single focal plane, which might inexpensively allow more capability for military systems. The following design study results provide starting examples, lessons learned, and helpful setup equations and pointers to aid the lens designer in any foveated lens design effort. Our goal is to put robust sensor in a small package with no moving parts, but still be able to perform some of the functions of a sensor in a moving gimbal. All of the elegant solutions are out (for various reasons). This study is an attempt to see if lens designs can solve this problem and realize some gains in performance versus cost for airborne sensors. We determined a series of design concepts to simultaneously deliver wide field of view and high foveal resolution without scanning or gimbals. Separate sensors for each field of view are easy and relatively inexpensive, but lead to bulky detectors and electronics. Folding and beam-combining of separate optical channels reduces sensor footprint, but induces image inversions and reduced transmission. Entirely common optics provide good resolution, but cannot provide a significant magnification increase in the foveal region. Offsetting the foveal region from the wide field center may not be physically realizable, but may be required for some applications. The design study revealed good general guidance for foveated optics designs with a cold stop. Key lessons learned involve managing distortion, telecentric imagers, matching image inversions and numerical apertures between channels, reimaging lenses, and creating clean resolution zone splits near internal focal planes.

  19. Experimental quantification of solute transport through the vadose zone under dynamic boundary conditions with dye tracers and optical methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2017-04-01

    transport through the material interface which differs between the stationary (unilateral) and dynamic cases (bilateral). This qualitative observation is confirmed by breakthrough curves for dynamic experiments which generally show the trend of faster initial breakthrough and increased tailing when compared to stationary infiltration results. Literature Cremer, C.J.M., I. Neuweiler, M. Bechtold, J. Vanderborght (2016): Solute Transport in Heterogeneous Soil with Time-Dependent Boundary Conditions, Vadose Zone Journal 15 (6) DOI: 10.2136/vzj2015.11.0144

  20. Modifications of the Relation Between Cosmic Ray Ionization Rate ζ and H_{3}^{+} Column Density in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi

    2017-06-01

    In deriving the simple formula, ζL=2k_eN(H_{3}^{+})(n_C/n_H)_SVR/f(H_{2}), used to estimate cosmic ray H_{2} ionization rate ζ from observed H_3^+ column density N(H_3^+) in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Galactic center (GC), the following two effects were neglected: (1) the charge exchange reaction H_2^+ + H → H_2 + H^+ which significantly reduces H_3^+ production rate if the fraction of molecular hydrogen f(H_2) is much lower than 1, and (2) the production of electrons from ionization of H_2 and H which greatly increases the H_3^+ destruction rate if ζ is much higher than 10^{-15} s^{-1}. (Only electrons from VUV first ionization of C atoms had been considered). Recent more extensive analysis using the Meudon PDR code by Le Petit et al. has indicated that these effects are not negligible in the CMZ. While an extensive chemical model calculation is beyond the scope of our analysis, we have attempted to use our simple model considering only hydrogenic species and electrons to take these two effects into account. When (1) is introduced, the rate of H_3^+ production is approximated to be ζn_H[f(H_2)]^2, which is ˜ 3 times lower than the previous value for f(H_2) = 0.6 reported by Le Petit et al.^{c} When (2) is taken into account, the electron number density is approximated to be n_e = n_CR + ζn_H/[2k_en(H_3^+)] where the first and second term represents electrons from the C atoms and those from H_2 and H, respectively. The first term (in which R represents the increase of metallicity from the solar vicinity to the GC, R ≥ 3) has the electron fraction x_e = 5 × 10^{-4} and the second term becomes significant at ζ ˜ 10^{-15} s^{-1}. This introduces a non-linearity between ζ and N(H_3^+) and the latter reaches a maximum at ζ ˜ 10^{-14} s^{-1} and decreases as ζ increases further. Application of the results to the observed N(H_3^+) will be discussed. Oka, T., Geballe, T. R., Goto, M., Usuda, T., McCall, B. J. 2005, ApJ, 632, 882 Indriolo, N

  1. Tuberculosis infection control practices and associated factors among health care workers in health centers of West Gojjam zone, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Kassahun; Wasie, Belaynew; Azage, Muluken

    2016-08-08

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem. The emerging epidemic of multi- and extensively drug-resistant (M/XDR) TB further imperils health workers, patients and public health. Health facilities with inadequate infection control are risky environments for the emergence and transmission of TB. There was no study that presented data on infection control practices of health care workers. This study aimed to assess tuberculosis infection control practices and associated factors among health care workers in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia. Institution based quantitative cross-sectional study triangulated with qualitative observation and key informant interview was conducted. Six hundred sixty two health care workers were selected by multistage random sampling method. Self-administered structured questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data. Observation checklists and key informant interview guides were used to collect qualitative data. Quantitative data were entered in to Epi Info version 3.5.3 and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Odds ratio with 95 % confidence interval was used to identify factors associated with TB infection control practice of health care workers. Qualitative data were translated, transcribed, analyzed and triangulated with the quantitative findings. The proportion of proper TB infection control (TBIC) practices was 38 %. Qualitative data showed that administrative, environmental and personal respiratory protection control measures were not practiced well. Knowledge on the presence of TBIC plan [AOR = 4.25, 95 % CI: 2.46 - 7.35], knowledge on the presence of national guideline [AOR = 8.95, 95 % CI: 4.35 - 18.40] and working department of the health care workers were independent predictors of TBIC practices. The proportion of proper TBIC practices of health care workers was low. TBIC practices were determined by knowing the presence of TBIC plan and national guideline and working department. Hence, supportive

  2. Teaching lens, optical systems, and opto-mechanical systems design at the Irvine Center for Applied Competitive Technologies (CACT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doushkina, Valentina V.; Silberman, Donn M.

    2007-09-01

    For well over a decade, the Laser Electro-Optics Technology (LET) program has been teaching introductory laser and optics classes at Irvine Valley College (IVC). At the beginning of the telecom boom, the Irvine CACT was established to teach optics fabrication to support the many optics fabrication businesses in Southern California. In the past few years, these two programs have merged - with some help from the Optics Institute of Southern California (OISC) - and grown under the newly established Advanced Technology and Education Park (ATEP). IVC and ATEP are both operated by the South Orange County Community College District (SOCCCD). This year a new program of three courses was established to teach, in sequence, lens, optical systems and optomechanical systems design. This paper reviews the reasons for establishing these courses and their content, the students' motivations for taking them and their employers' incentives for encouraging the students.

  3. Growth parameter dependent structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures on Si substrate by a two-zone thermal CVD.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Kwan; Yu, Jae Su

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the effect of growth parameters on the structural and optical properties of the ZnO nanostructures (NSs) grown on Au-coated Si substrate by a two-zone thermal chemical vapor deposition. The morphologies of ZnO NSs were controlled by various growth parameters, such as growth temperature, O2 flow rate, and working pressure, for different thicknesses of Au layer. The nanorod-like ZnO NSs were formed at 915 degrees C and the growth of two-dimensional structures, i.e., nanosheets, was enhanced with the increase of growth temperature up to 965 degrees C. It was found that the low working pressure contributed to improvement in vertical alignment and uniformity of ZnO NSs. The Zn/O atomic % ratio, which plays a key role in the growth mechanism of ZnO NSs, was changed by the growth parameters. The Zn/O atomic % ratio was increased with increasing the growth temperature, while it was decreased with increasing the working pressure. Under proper O2 flow rate, the ZnO nanorods with good crystallinity were fabricated with a Zn/O atomic % ratio of -0.9. For various growth parameters, the photoluminescence emission was slightly shifted with the ultraviolet emission related to the near band edge transition.

  4. A compact "water-window" microscope with 60-nm spatial resolution based on a double stream gas-puff target and Fresnel zone plate optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Torrisi, Alfio; Nawaz, Muhammad F.; Adjei, Daniel; Bartnik, Andrzej; Kostecki, Jerzy; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Vondrová, Šárka; Turňová, Jana; Fok, Tomasz; Jančarek, Alexandr; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-05-01

    Radiation with shorter illumination wavelength allows for extension of the diffraction limit towards nanometer scale, which is a straightforward way to significantly improve a spatial resolution in photon based microscopes. Soft X-ray (SXR) radiation, from the so called "water window" spectral range, λ=2.3-4.4 nm, which is particularly suitable for biological imaging due to natural optical contrast, providing much better spatial resolution than one obtained with visible light microscopes. The high contrast is obtained because of selective absorption of radiation by carbon and water, being constituents of the biological samples. We present a desk-top system, capable of resolving 60 nm features in few seconds exposure time. We exploit the advantages of a compact, laser-plasma SXR source, based on a double stream nitrogen gas puff target, developed at the Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology. The source, emitting quasi-monochromatic, incoherent radiation, in the "water widow" spectral range at λ = 2.88 nm, is coupled with ellipsoidal, grazing incidence condenser and Fresnel zone plate objective. The construction of the microscope with some recent images of test and real samples will be presented and discussed.

  5. First measurements of ambient aerosol over an ecologically sensitive zone in Central India: Relationships between PM2.5 mass, its optical properties, and meteorology.

    PubMed

    Sunder Raman, Ramya; Kumar, Samresh

    2016-04-15

    PM2.5 mass and its optical properties were measured over an ecologically sensitive zone in Central India between January and December, 2012. Meteorological parameters including temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, and barometric pressure were also monitored. During the study period, the PM2.5 (fine PM) concentration ranged between 3.2μgm(-3) and 193.9μgm(-3) with a median concentration of 31.4μgm(-3). The attenuation coefficients, βATN at 370nm, 550nm, and 880nm had median values of 104.5Mm(-1), 79.2Mm(-1), and 59.8Mm(-1), respectively. Further, the dry scattering coefficient, βSCAT at 550nm had a median value of 17.1Mm(-1) while the absorption coefficient βABS at 550nm had a median value of 61.2Mm(-1). The relationship between fine PM mass and attenuation coefficients showed pronounced seasonality. Scattering, absorption, and attenuation coefficient at different wavelengths were all well correlated with fine PM mass only during the post-monsoon season (October, November, and December). The highest correlation (r(2)=0.81) was between fine PM mass and βSCAT at 550nm during post-monsoon season. During this season, the mass scattering efficiency (σSCAT) was 1.44m(2)g(-1). Thus, monitoring optical properties all year round, as a surrogate for fine PM mass was found unsuitable for the study location. In order to assess the relationships between fine PM mass and its optical properties and meteorological parameters, multiple linear regression (MLR) models were fitted for each season, with fine PM mass as the dependent variable. Such a model fitted for the post-monsoon season explained over 88% of the variability in fine PM mass. However, the MLR models were able to explain only 31 and 32% of the variability in fine PM during pre-monsoon (March, April, and May) and monsoon (June, July, August, and September) seasons, respectively. During the winter (January and February) season, the MLR model explained 54% of the PM2.5 variability. Copyright

  6. Optical properties of body-centered tetragonal C4: Insights from many-body perturbation and time-dependent density functional theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarighi Ahmadpour, Mahdi; Rostamnejadi, Ali; Hashemifar, S. Javad

    2018-04-01

    We study the electronic structure and optical properties of a body-centered tetragonal phase of carbon (bct-C4) within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory and Bethe-Salpeter equation. The results indicate that the optical properties of bct-C4 are strongly affected by the electron-hole interaction. It is demonstrated that the long-range corrected exchange-correlation kernels could fairly reproduce the Bethe-Salpeter equation results. The effective carrier number reveals that at energies above 30 eV, the excitonic effects are not dominant any more and that the optical transitions originate mainly from electronic excitations. The emerged peaks in the calculated electron energy loss spectra are discussed in terms of plasmon excitations and interband transitions. The results of the research indicate that bct-C4 is an indirect wide-band-gap semiconductor, which is transparent in the visible region and opaque in the ultraviolet spectral range.

  7. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  8. Actively heated high-resolution fiber-optic-distributed temperature sensing to quantify streambed flow dynamics in zones of strong groundwater upwelling

    Briggs, Martin A.; Buckley, Sean F.; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Werkema, Dale D.; Lane, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Zones of strong groundwater upwelling to streams enhance thermal stability and moderate thermal extremes, which is particularly important to aquatic ecosystems in a warming climate. Passive thermal tracer methods used to quantify vertical upwelling rates rely on downward conduction of surface temperature signals. However, moderate to high groundwater flux rates (>−1.5 m d−1) restrict downward propagation of diurnal temperature signals, and therefore the applicability of several passive thermal methods. Active streambed heating from within high-resolution fiber-optic temperature sensors (A-HRTS) has the potential to define multidimensional fluid-flux patterns below the extinction depth of surface thermal signals, allowing better quantification and separation of local and regional groundwater discharge. To demonstrate this concept, nine A-HRTS were emplaced vertically into the streambed in a grid with ∼0.40 m lateral spacing at a stream with strong upward vertical flux in Mashpee, Massachusetts, USA. Long-term (8–9 h) heating events were performed to confirm the dominance of vertical flow to the 0.6 m depth, well below the extinction of ambient diurnal signals. To quantify vertical flux, short-term heating events (28 min) were performed at each A-HRTS, and heat-pulse decay over vertical profiles was numerically modeled in radial two dimension (2-D) using SUTRA. Modeled flux values are similar to those obtained with seepage meters, Darcy methods, and analytical modeling of shallow diurnal signals. We also observed repeatable differential heating patterns along the length of vertically oriented sensors that may indicate sediment layering and hyporheic exchange superimposed on regional groundwater discharge.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A worker calibrates a tracking telescope, part of the Distant Object Attitude Measurement System (DOAMS), located in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The telescope provides optical support for launches from KSC and Cape Canaveral.

    2003-09-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A worker calibrates a tracking telescope, part of the Distant Object Attitude Measurement System (DOAMS), located in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The telescope provides optical support for launches from KSC and Cape Canaveral.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers calibrate a tracking telescope, part of the Distant Object Attitude Measurement System (DOAMS), located in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The telescope provides optical support for launches from KSC and Cape Canaveral.

    2003-09-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers calibrate a tracking telescope, part of the Distant Object Attitude Measurement System (DOAMS), located in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The telescope provides optical support for launches from KSC and Cape Canaveral.

  11. Effect of substrate rotation speed and off-center deposition on the structural, optical, and electrical properties of AZO thin films fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkoglu, F.; Koseoglu, H.; Zeybek, S.; Ozdemir, M.; Aygun, G.; Ozyuzer, L.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The distance between the substrate and target axis, and substrate rotation speed were varied to get high quality AZO thin films. The influences of these deposition parameters on the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the fabricated films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, and four-point probe techniques. The overall analysis revealed that both sample position and substrate rotation speed are effective in changing the optical, structural, and electrical properties of the AZO thin films. We further observed that stress in the films can be significantly reduced by off-center deposition and rotating the sample holder during the deposition. An average transmittance above 85% in the visible range and a resistivity of 2.02 × 10-3 Ω cm were obtained for the AZO films.

  12. Environmental Assessment, Establishing a Drop Zone at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center in Socorro, New Mexico and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-07

    action is open space, and free of any residential or other structures . Biological Resources Minor impacts to vegetation and wildlife may occur from...mountains, rills, gullies, or other notable geologic features. There are no residences or other structures within the proposed drop zone. 3.2 Airspace...research, testing and training related to energetic materials. The land has also been used for livestock grazing. There are no structures on the

  13. Analysis of physical layer performance of data center with optical wavelength switches based on advanced modulation formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Chughtai, Mohsan Niaz

    2018-05-01

    In this paper the IRIS (Integrated Router Interconnected spectrally), an optical domain architecture for datacenter network is analyzed. The IRIS integrated with advanced modulation formats (M-QAM) and coherent optical receiver is analyzed. The channel impairments are compensated using the DSP algorithms following the coherent receiver. The proposed scheme allows N2 multiplexed wavelengths for N×N size. The performance of the N×N-IRIS switch with and without wavelength conversion is analyzed for different Baud rates over M-QAM modulation formats. The performance of the system is analyzed in terms of bit error rate (BER) vs OSNR curves.

  14. Measurement of soot morphology, chemistry, and optical properties in the visible and near-infrared spectrum in the flame zone and overfire region of large JP-8 pool fires.

    SciT

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Jensen, Kirk A.; Blevins, Linda Gail

    2005-03-01

    The dimensionless extinction coefficient, K{sub e}, was measured for soot produced in 2 m JP-8 pool fires. Light extinction and gravimetric sampling measurements were performed simultaneously at 635 and 1310 nm wavelengths at three heights in the flame zone and in the overfire region. Measured average K{sub e} values of 8.4 {+-} 1.2 at 635 nm and 8.7 {+-} 1.1 at 1310 nm in the overfire region agree well with values from 8-10 recently reported for different fuels and flame conditions. The overfire K{sub e} values are also relatively independent of wavelength, in agreement with recent findings for JP-8 sootmore » in smaller flames. K{sub e} was nearly constant at 635 nm for all sampling locations in the large fires. However, at 1310 nm, the overfire K{sub e} was higher than in the flame zone. Chemical analysis of physically sampled soot shows variations in carbon-to-hydrogen (C/H) ratio and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration that may account for the smaller K{sub e} values measured in the flame zone. Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory of scattering for polydisperse fractal aggregate (RDG-PFA) was applied to measured aggregate fractal dimensions and found to under-predict the extinction coefficient by 17-30% at 635 nm using commonly accepted refractive indices of soot, and agreed well with the experiments using the more recently published refractive index of 1.99-0.89i. This study represents the first measurements of soot chemistry, morphology, and optical properties in the flame zone of large, fully-turbulent pool fires, and emphasizes the importance of accurate measurements of optical properties both in the flame zone and overfire regions for models of radiative transport and interpretation of laser-based diagnostics of soot volume fraction and temperature.« less

  15. Zone lines

    Kevin T. Smith

    2001-01-01

    Zone lines are narrow, usually dark markings formed in decaying wood. Zone lines are found most frequently in advanced white rot of hardwoods, although they occasionally are associated both with brown rot and with softwoods.

  16. Retinal Capillary Network and Foveal Avascular Zone in Eyes with Vein Occlusion and Fellow Eyes Analyzed With Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    PubMed

    Adhi, Mehreen; Filho, Marco A Bonini; Louzada, Ricardo N; Kuehlewein, Laura; de Carlo, Talisa E; Baumal, Caroline R; Witkin, Andre J; Sadda, Srinivas R; Sarraf, David; Reichel, Elias; Duker, Jay S; Waheed, Nadia K

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the perifoveolar retinal capillary network at different depths and to quantify the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) in eyes with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) compared with their fellow eyes and healthy controls using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography angiography (SD-OCTA). We prospectively recruited 23 patients with RVO including 15 eyes with central RVO (CRVO) and 8 eyes with branch RVO (BRVO), their fellow eyes, and 8 age-matched healthy controls (8 eyes) for imaging on prototype OCTA software within RTVue-XR Avanti. The 3 × 3 mm and 6 × 6 mm en face angiograms of superficial and deep retinal capillary plexuses were segmented. Perifoveolar retinal capillary network was analyzed and FAZ was quantified. Decrease in vascular perfusion at the deep plexus was observed in all eyes with CRVO (8/8, 100%) and BRVO (6/6, 100%) without cystoid macular edema, and in 8 of 15 (53%) and 2 of 8 (25%) of the fellow eyes, respectively. Vascular tortuosity was observed in 13 of 15 (87%) CRVO and 5 of 8 (63%) BRVO eyes. Collaterals were seen in 10 of 15 (67%) CRVO and 5 of 8 (63%) BRVO eyes. Mean FAZ area was larger in eyes with RVO than their fellow eyes (1.13 ± 0.25 mm2 versus 0.58 ± 0.28 mm2; P = 0.007) and controls (1.13 ± 0.25 mm2 versus 0.30 ± 0.09 mm2; P < 0.0001), and in fellow eyes of RVO patients when compared to controls (0.58 ± 0.28 mm2 versus 0.30 ± 0.09 mm2; P = 0.01). Spectral-domain OCTA reveals abnormalities at different levels of perifoveolar retinal capillary network and is able to quantify the FAZ in RVO. Longitudinal studies may be considered to evaluate the clinical utility of OCTA in RVO and other retinal vascular diseases.

  17. Identification of water-bearing zones by the use of geophysical logs and borehole television surveys, collected February to September 1997, at the Former Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    Conger, Randall W.

    1998-01-01

    Between February 1997 and September 1997, 10 monitor wells were drilled near the site of the former Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Bucks County, Pa., to monitor water levels and sample ground-water contaminants in the shallow, intermediate, and deep water-bearing zones. The sampling will determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of contaminated ground water migrating from known or suspected contaminant sources. Four wells were drilled north of the property adjacent to Area A, three wells along strike located on Lewis Drive, and three wells directly down dip on Ivyland Road. Well depths range from 69 feet to 300 feet below land surface.Borehole-geophysical logging and television surveys were used to identify water-bearing zones so that appropriate intervals could be screened in each monitor well. Geophysical logs were obtained at the 10 monitor wells. Borehole television surveys were obtained at the four monitor wells adjacent to Area A.Caliper and borehole television surveys were used to locate fractures, inflections on fluidtemperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures, and heatpulse- flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, borehole television surveys, and driller's logs, all wells were screened such that water-level fluctuations could be monitored and water samples collected from discrete water-bearing zones in each borehole.

  18. Pigment organization and their interactions in reaction centers of photosystem II: optical spectroscopy at 6 K of reaction centers with modified pheophytin composition.

    PubMed

    Germano, M; Shkuropatov, A Y; Permentier, H; de Wijn, R; Hoff, A J; Shuvalov, V A; van Gorkom, H J

    2001-09-25

    Photosystem II reaction centers (RC) with selectively exchanged pheophytin (Pheo) molecules as described in [Germano, M., Shkuropatov, A. Ya., Permentier, H., Khatypov, R. A., Shuvalov, V. A., Hoff, A. J., and van Gorkom, H. J. (2000) Photosynth. Res. 64, 189-198] were studied by low-temperature absorption, linear and circular dichroism, and triplet-minus-singlet absorption-difference spectroscopy. The ratio of extinction coefficients epsilon(Pheo)/epsilon(Chl) for Q(Y) absorption in the RC is approximately 0.40 at 6 K and approximately 0.45 at room temperature. The presence of 2 beta-carotenes, one parallel and one perpendicular to the membrane plane, is confirmed. Absorption at 670 nm is due to the perpendicular Q(Y) transitions of the two peripheral chlorophylls (Chl) and not to either Pheo. The "core" pigments, two Pheo and four Chl absorb in the 676-685 nm range. Delocalized excited states as predicted by the "multimer model" are seen in the active branch. The inactive Pheo and the nearby Chl, however, mainly contribute localized transitions at 676 and 680 nm, respectively, although large CD changes indicate that exciton interactions are present on both branches. Replacement of the active Pheo prevents triplet formation, causes an LD increase at 676 and 681 nm, a blue-shift of 680 nm absorbance, and a bleach of the 685 nm exciton band. The triplet state is mainly localized on the Chl corresponding to B(A) in purple bacteria. Both Pheo Q(Y) transitions are oriented out of the membrane plane. Their Q(X) transitions are parallel to that plane, so that the Pheos in PSII are structurally similar to their homologues in purple bacteria.

  19. Research on the optical and EPR spectral data and the local structure for the trigonal Mn4+ centers in MgTiO3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bi-Tao; Mei, Yang; Chen, Bo-Wei; Zheng, Wen-Chen

    2017-07-01

    The optical bands and EPR (or spin-Hamiltonian) parameters (g factors g//, g⊥ and zero-field splitting D) for Mn4+ ions at the trigonal octahedral Ti4+ site of MgTiO3 crystal are uniformly computed by virtue of the complete diagonalization (of energy matrix) method based on the two-spin-orbit-parameter model, where besides the effects of spin-orbit parameter of central dn ion on the spectral data (in the classical crystal field theory), those of ligands are also contained. The computed eight optical and EPR spectral data with four suitable adjustable parameters (note: differing from those in the previous work within cubic symmetry approximation where the used Racah parameters violate the nephelauxetic effect, the present Racah parameters obey the effect and hence are suitable) are rationally coincident with the experimental values. In particular, the calculated ground state splitting 2D, the first excited splitting ΔE(2E) and g-anisotropy Δg (=g//-g⊥) (they depend strongly on the angular distortion of d3 centers) are in excellent agreement with the observed values, suggesting that the angular distortions caused by the impurity-induced local lattice relaxation obtained from the above calculation for the trigonal Mn4+ impurity center in MgTiO3: Mn4+ crystal seem to be acceptable.

  20. Primary extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of the uvea associated with massive diffuse epibulbar extension and focal infiltration of the optic nerve and meninges, clinically presented as uveitis masquerade syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rasić, D M; Stanković, Z; Terzić, T; Kovacević, D; Koturović, Z; Marković, V

    2010-09-01

    To report a clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings in a case of primary extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of the uvea associated with massive diffuse extraocular episcleral extension and focal infiltration of the optic nerve and meninges, clinically presented as longstanding uveitis masquerade syndrome. Interventional case reports with histopathological correlation. We describe a 80-year-old male patient with a 3-year history of chronic recurrent hypertensive (pan) uveitis associated with ocular pain, unresponsive to topical and systemic anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, antibiotic/antiviral and antiglaucomatous therapy. Because the eye was not salvageable with conservative treatment, enucleation of blind and painful eye was performed. Findings from histopathological and immunohistochemistry examination of the enucleated eye showed an extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of the uveal tract with massive epibulbar extension and optic nerve and meningeal penetration. During almost 3 years of clinical course and 6 months after the enucleation, there were no systemic manifestations of lymphoma, and patient has not required subsequent treatment. Primary lymphoproliferative lesions of the uvea, comprising the iris, ciliary body and choroid are very rare, associated with epibulbar extension extremely and with optic nerve and menigeal penetration exceptionally. Despite its rarity, primary lymphoma of the uvea should be included in the differential diagnosis particularly in older patients with longstanding recurrent uveitis.

  1. MEMS-based beam-steerable free-space optical communication link for reconfigurable wireless data center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Peng; Kavehrad, Mohsen; Lou, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Flexible wireless datacenter networks based on free space optical communication (FSO) links are being considered as promising solutions to meet the future datacenter demands of high throughput, robustness to dynamic traffic patterns, cabling complexity and energy efficiency. Robust and precise steerable FSO links over dynamic traffic play a key role in the reconfigurable optical wireless datacenter inter-rack network. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a reconfigurable 10Gbps FSO system incorporated with smart beam acquisition and tracking mechanism based on gimballess two-axis MEMS micro-mirror and retro-reflective film marked aperture. The fast MEMS-based beam acquisition switches laser beam of FSO terminal from one rack to the next for reconfigurable networks, and the precise beam tracking makes FSO device auto-correct the misalignment in real-time. We evaluate the optical power loss and bit error rate performance of steerable FSO links at various directions. Experimental results suggest that the MEMS based beam steerable FSO links hold considerable promise for the future reconfigurable wireless datacenter networks.

  2. Numerical analysis of residual stresses in preforms of stress applying part for PANDA-type polarization maintaining optical fibers in view of technological imperfections of the doped zone geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trufanov, Aleksandr N.; Trufanov, Nikolay A.; Semenov, Nikita V.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental data analysis of the stress applying rod section geometry for the PANDA-type polarization maintaining optical fiber has been performed. The dependencies of the change in the radial dimensions of the preform and the doping boundary on the angular coordinate have been obtained. The original algorithm of experimental data statistic analysis, which enables determination of the specimens' characteristic form of section, has been described. The influence of actual doped zone geometry on the residual stress fields formed during the stress rod preform fabrication has been investigated. It has been established that the deviation of the boundary between pure silica and the doped zone from the circular shape results in dissymmetry and local concentrations of the residual stress fields along the section, which can cause preforms destruction at high degrees of doping. The observed geometry deviations of up to 10% lead to the increase of the maximum stress intensity value by over 20%.

  3. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  4. Ultra-precision fabrication of high density micro-optical backbone interconnections for data center and mobile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, U.; Jahns, J.; Wagner, T.; Werner, C.

    2012-10-01

    A microoptical 3D interconnection scheme and fabricated samples of this fiberoptical multi-channel interconnec- tion with an actual capacity of 144 channels were shown. Additionally the aspects of micrometer-fabrication of such microoptical interconnection modules in the view of alignment-tolerances were considered. For the realiza- tion of the interconnection schemes, the approach of planar-integrated free space optics (PIFSO) is used with its well known advantages. This approach offers the potential for complex interconnectivity, and yet compact size.

  5. Flexure-Ring for Centering a Concave Lens in a Bore of a Housing for an Optical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Virginia G. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A flexure-ring is provided for centering a lens in a bore of a housing with 3N lens contacting stubs, where N is an integer equal to or greater than one. The stubs are formed by increasing the inside diameter of the ring made to fit tightly around a lens except at 3N locations for the aforesaid stubs, and said ring having an outside diameter made to fit tightly inside the housing bore locations. Behind each stub, a segment of the ring is removed down to a chord perpendicular to a ring diameter passing through the center of each stub. That chord is selected to have a length greater than the lens contacting surface of the stub, thereby to produce a reduced cross section of the ring on both sides of the stub to serve as flexures in relieving stresses due to different coefficients of thermal expansion of the three parts involved due to changes in temperature while in use.

  6. Research and development of optical measurement techniques for aerospace propulsion research: A NASA Lewis Research Center perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, Daniel J.

    1991-01-01

    The applied research effort required to develop new nonintrusive measurement techniques capable of obtaining the data required by aerospace propulsion researchers and of operating in the harsh environments encountered in research and test facilities is discussed and illustrated through several ongoing projects at NASA's Lewis Research Center. Factors including length of development time, funding levels, and collaborative support from fluid-thermal researchers are cited. Progress in developing new instrumentation via a multi-path approach, including NASA research, grant, and government-sponsored research through mechanisms like the Small Business Innovative Research program, is also described.

  7. Optical/Near-infrared Selection of Red Quasi-stellar Objects: Evidence for Steep Extinction Curves toward Galactic Centers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krogager, J.-K.; Venemans, B.; Noterdaeme, P.; Vestergaard, M.; Møller, P.; Ledoux, C.; Geier, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a search for red QSOs using a selection based on optical imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and near-infrared imaging from UKIDSS. Our main goal with the selection is to search for QSOs reddened by foreground dusty absorber galaxies. For a sample of 58 candidates (including 20 objects fulfilling our selection criteria that already have spectra in the SDSS), 46 (79%) are confirmed to be QSOs. The QSOs are predominantly dust-reddened except for a handful at redshifts z >~ 3.5. However, the dust is most likely located in the QSO host galaxies (and for two, the reddening is primarily caused by Galactic dust) rather than in the intervening absorbers. More than half of the QSOs show evidence of associated absorption (BAL absorption). Four (7%) of the candidates turned out to be late-type stars, and another four (7%) are compact galaxies. We could not identify the remaining four objects. In terms of their optical spectra, these QSOs are similar to the QSOs selected in the FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey except they are on average fainter, more distant, and only two are detected in the FIRST survey. As per the usual procedure, we estimate the amount of extinction using the SDSS QSO template reddened by Small-Magellanic-Cloud-(SMC) like dust. It is possible to get a good match to the observed (rest-frame ultraviolet) spectra, but it is not possible to match the observed near-IR photometry from UKIDSS for nearly all the reddened QSOs. The most likely reasons are that the SDSS QSO template is too red at optical wavelengths due to contaminating host galaxy light and because the assumed SMC extinction curve is too shallow. Three of the compact galaxies display old stellar populations with ages of several Gyr and masses of about 1010 M ⊙ (based on spectral energy distribution modeling). The inferred stellar densities in these galaxies exceed 1010 M ⊙ kpc-2, which is among the highest measured for early-type galaxies. Our survey has

  8. Optical Micromachining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) with Marshall Space Flight Center, Potomac Photonics, Inc., constructed and demonstrated a unique tool that fills a need in the area of diffractive and refractive micro-optics. It is an integrated computer-aided design and computer-aided micro-machining workstation that will extend the benefits of diffractive and micro-optic technology to optical designers. Applications of diffractive optics include sensors and monitoring equipment, analytical instruments, and fiber optic distribution and communication. The company has been making diffractive elements with the system as a commercial service for the last year.

  9. On-chip broadband ultra-compact optical couplers and polarization splitters based on off-centered and non-symmetric slotted Si-wire waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Raktim; Mishra, V.; Dutt, Avik; Varshney, Shailendra K.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we propose novel schemes to design on-chip ultra-compact optical directional couplers (DC) and broadband polarization beam splitters (PBS) based on off-centered and asymmetric dielectric slot waveguides, respectively. Slot dimensions and positions are optimized to achieve maximum coupling coefficients between two symmetric and non-symmetric slotted Si wire waveguides through overlap integral method. We observe >88% of enhancement in the coupling coefficients when the size-optimized slots are placed in optimal positions, with respect to the same waveguides with no slot. When the waveguides are parallel, in that case, a coupling length as short as 1.73 μm is accomplished for TM mode with the off-centered and optimized slots. This scheme enables us to design optical DC with very small footprint, L c ∼ 0.9 μm in the presence of S-bends. We also report a compact (L c ∼ 1.1 μm) on-chip broadband PBS with hybrid slots. Extinction ratios of 13 dB and 22.3 dB are realized with very low insertion loss (0.055 dB and 0.008 dB) for TM and TE modes at 1.55 μm, respectively. The designed PBS exhibits a bandwidth of 78 nm for the TM mode (C-and partial L-bands) and >100 nm for the TE mode (S + C + L wavelength bands). Such on-chip devices can be used to design compact photonic interconnects and quantum information processing units efficiently. We have also investigated the fabrication tolerances of the proposed devices and described the fabrication steps to realize such hybrid devices. Our results are in good agreement with 3D FDTD simulations.

  10. Development of quality control and instrumentation performance metrics for diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging instruments in the multi-center clinical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, Samuel T.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Warren, Robert V.; Hill, Brian; Roblyer, Darren; Leproux, AnaÑ--s.; Durkin, Amanda F.; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Haghany, Hosain; Mantulin, William W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Instrument equivalence and quality control are critical elements of multi-center clinical trials. We currently have five identical Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Imaging (DOSI) instruments enrolled in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN, #6691) trial located at five academic clinical research sites in the US. The goal of the study is to predict the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 60 patients. In order to reliably compare DOSI measurements across different instruments, operators and sites, we must be confident that the data quality is comparable. We require objective and reliable methods for identifying, correcting, and rejecting low quality data. To achieve this goal, we developed and tested an automated quality control algorithm that rejects data points below the instrument noise floor, improves tissue optical property recovery, and outputs a detailed data quality report. Using a new protocol for obtaining dark-noise data, we applied the algorithm to ACRIN patient data and successfully improved the quality of recovered physiological data in some cases.

  11. Investigations of the optical and EPR data and local structure for the trigonal tetrahedral Co2+ centers in LiGa5O8: Co2+ crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Liao, Bi-Tao; Mei, Yang; Liu, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Wen-Chen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate uniformly the optical and EPR data for Co2+ ion at the trigonal tetrahedral Ga3+ site in LiGa5O8 crystal from the complete diagonalization (of energy matrix) method founded on the two-spin-orbit-parameter model, where the contributions to the spectroscopic data from both the spin-orbit parameter of dn ion (in the classical crystal field theory) and that of ligand ions are contained. The calculated ten spectroscopic data (seven optical bands and three spin-Hamiltonian parameters g//, g⊥ and D) with only four adjustable parameters are in good agreement with the available observed values. Compared with the host (GaO4)5- cluster, the great angular distortion and hence the great trigonal distortion of (CoO4)6- impurity center obtained from the calculations are referred to the large charge and size mismatch substitution. This explains reasonably the observed great g-anisotropy Δg (= g// - g⊥) and zero-field splitting D for the (CoO4)6- cluster in LiGa5O8: Co2+ crystal.

  12. Generation of straight-line shifting bright-dark soliton trains with a wide dip in the symmetric center or dark solitons in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xianqiong; Yao, Na; Sheng, Jia'nan; Cheng, Ke

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear evolutions of dark soliton pulses with initially constant frequency chirps are investigated numerically for different soliton orders and chirp parameters in different dispersion regimes of optical fibers. The results show interestingly that, in the normal dispersion regime, the evolution properties remain unchanged apart from their straight-line shifts of the temporal trajectories compared with the chirp-free case. While in the anomalous dispersion regime, the dark solitons can evolve to bright-dark soliton trains with a wide black soliton in the symmetric center. The longer the distance, the more the pulse number. The larger the soliton order, the more the pulse number at the same distance. Similarly, straight-line shift of the temporal trajectory of the bright-dark soliton trains will also appear. The shifting amount and direction depend on the absolute value and the sign of the chirp parameter, respectively. This result inspires people to generate bright-dark soliton trains by using ordinary passive optical fibers instead of fiber lasers. Besides, this work also provides us an alternative approach to guide the formed solitons or soliton trains to move their temporal trajectories along straight lines.

  13. Modernization of NASA's Johnson Space Center Chamber: A Payload Transport Rail System to Support Cryogenic Vacuum Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Sam; Homan, Jonathan; Speed, John

    2016-01-01

    NASA is the mission lead for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next of the "Great Observatories", scheduled for launch in 2018. It is directly responsible for the integration and test (I&T) program that will culminate in an end-to-end cryo vacuum optical test of the flight telescope and instrument module in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center. Historic Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center and one of the largest space simulation chambers in the world. Chamber A has undergone a major modernization effort to support the deep cryogenic, vacuum and cleanliness requirements for testing the JWST. This paper describe the challenges of developing, integrating and modifying new payload rails capable of transporting payloads within the thermal vacuum chamber up to 65,000 pounds. Ambient and Cryogenic Operations required to configure for testing will be explained. Lastly review historical payload configurations stretching from the Apollo program era to current James Webb Space Telescope testing.

  14. Modernization of NASA's Johnson Space Center Chamber: A Liquid Nitrogen System to Support Cryogenic Vacuum Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Sammy; Homan, Jonathan; Montz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA is the mission lead for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next of the “Great Observatories”, scheduled for launch in 2018. It is directly responsible for the integration and test (I&T) program that will culminate in an end-to-end cryo vacuum optical test of the flight telescope and instrument module in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center. Historic Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center and one of the largest space simulation chambers in the world. Chamber A has undergone a major modernization effort to support the deep cryogenic, vacuum and cleanliness requirements for testing the JWST. This paper describes the steps performed in efforts to convert the existing the 60’s era Liquid Nitrogen System from a forced flow (pumped) process to a natural circulation (thermo-siphon) process. In addition, the paper will describe the dramatic conservation of liquid nitrogen to support the long duration thermal vacuum testing. Lastly, describe the simplistic and effective control system which results in zero to minimal human inputs during steady state conditions.

  15. A precocious adult visual center in the larva defines the unique optic lobe of the split-eyed whirligig beetle Dineutus sublineatus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Whirligig beetles (Coleoptera: Gyrinidae) are aquatic insects living on the water surface. They are equipped with four compound eyes, an upper pair viewing above the water surface and a lower submerged pair viewing beneath the water surface, but little is known about how their visual brain centers (optic lobes) are organized to serve such unusual eyes. We show here, for the first time, the peculiar optic lobe organization of the larval and adult whirligig beetle Dineutus sublineatus. Results The divided compound eyes of adult whirligig beetles supply optic lobes that are split into two halves, an upper half and lower half, comprising an upper and lower lamina, an upper and lower medulla and a bilobed partially split lobula. However, the lobula plate, a neuropil that in flies is known to be involved in mediating stabilized flight, exists only in conjunction with the lower lobe of the lobula. We show that, as in another group of predatory beetle larvae, in the whirligig beetle the aquatic larva precociously develops a lobula plate equipped with wide-field neurons. It is supplied by three larval laminas serving the three dorsal larval stemmata, which are adjacent to the developing upper compound eye. Conclusions In adult whirligig beetles, dual optic neuropils serve the upper aerial eyes and the lower subaquatic eyes. The exception is the lobula plate. A lobula plate develops precociously in the larva where it is supplied by inputs from three larval stemmata that have a frontal-upper field of view, in which contrasting objects such as prey items trigger a body lunge and mandibular grasp. This precocious lobula plate is lost during pupal metamorphosis, whereas another lobula plate develops normally during metamorphosis and in the adult is associated with the lower eye. The different roles of the upper and lower lobula plates in supporting, respectively, larval predation and adult optokinetic balance are discussed. Precocious development of the upper lobula

  16. Paleomagnetism of Basaltic Lava Flows in Coreholes ICPP 213, ICPP-214, ICPP-215, and USGS 128 Near the Vadose Zone Research Park, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    Champion, Duane E.; Herman, Theodore C.

    2003-01-01

    A paleomagnetic study was conducted on basalt from 41 lava flows represented in about 2,300 ft of core from coreholes ICPP-213, ICPP-214, ICPP-215, and USGS 128. These wells are in the area of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Vadose Zone Research Park within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 508 samples from the four coreholes, which are compared to each other, and to surface outcrop paleomagnetic data. In general, subhorizontal lines of correlation exist between sediment layers and between basalt layers in the area of the new percolation ponds. Some of the basalt flows and flow sequences are strongly correlative at different depth intervals and represent important stratigraphic unifying elements. Some units pinch out, or thicken or thin even over short separation distances of about 1,500 ft. A more distant correlation of more than 1 mile to corehole USGS 128 is possible for several of the basalt flows, but at greater depth. This is probably due to the broad subsidence of the eastern Snake River Plain centered along its topographic axis located to the south of INEEL. This study shows this most clearly in the oldest portions of the cored sections that have differentially subsided the greatest amount.

  17. Multichannel imager for littoral zone characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobna, Yuliya; Schoonmaker, Jon; Dirbas, Joe; Sofianos, James; Boucher, Cynthia; Gilbert, Gary

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes an approach to utilize a multi-channel, multi-spectral electro-optic (EO) system for littoral zone characterization. Advanced Coherent Technologies, LLC (ACT) presents their EO sensor systems for the surf zone environmental assessment and potential surf zone target detection. Specifically, an approach is presented to determine a Surf Zone Index (SZI) from the multi-spectral EO sensor system. SZI provides a single quantitative value of the surf zone conditions delivering an immediate understanding of the area and an assessment as to how well an airborne optical system might perform in a mine countermeasures (MCM) operation. Utilizing consecutive frames of SZI images, ACT is able to measure variability over time. A surf zone nomograph, which incorporates targets, sensor, and environmental data, including the SZI to determine the environmental impact on system performance, is reviewed in this work. ACT's electro-optical multi-channel, multi-spectral imaging system and test results are presented and discussed.

  18. Fractal kinetics of radiation-induced point-defect formation and decay in amorphous insulators: Application to color centers in silica-based optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griscom, David L.

    2001-11-01

    Formalisms have been developed to express the time evolution of bimolecular processes taking place in fractal spaces. These ``stretched-second-order'' solutions are specifically applicable to radiation-induced electron-hole pairs and/or vacancy-interstitial pairs in insulating glasses. Like the analogous Kohlrausch-type (stretched-first-order) expressions, the present solutions are functions of (kt)β, where 0<β<1, k is an effective rate coefficient, and t is time. Both the new second-order formalism and the familiar Kohlrausch approach have been used to fit experimental data (induced optical absorptions in silica-based glasses monitored at selected wavelengths) that serve as proxies for the numbers of color centers created by γ irradiation and/or destroyed by processes involving thermal, optical, or γ-ray activation. Two material systems were investigated: (1) optical fibers with Ge-doped-silica cores and (2) fibers with low-OH/low-chloride pure-silica cores. Successful fits of the growth curves for the Ge-doped-silica-core fibers at four widely separated dose rates were accomplished using solutions for color-center concentrations, N[(kt)β], which approach steady-state values, Nsat, as t-->∞. The parametrization of these fits reveals some unexpected, and potentially useful, empirical rules regarding the dose-rate dependences of β, k, and Nsat in the fractal regime (0<β<1). Similar, though possibly not identical, rules evidently apply to color centers in the pure-silica-core fibers as well. In both material systems, there appear to be fractal<==> classical phase transitions at certain threshold values of dose rate, below which the dose-rate dependencies of k and Nsat revert to those specified by classical (β=1) first- or second-order kinetics. For kt<<1, both the first- and second-order fractal kinetic growth curves become identical, i.e., N((kt)β)~Atβ, where the coefficient A depends on dose rate but not kinetic order. It is found empirically that A

  19. Infrared zone-scanning system.

    PubMed

    Belousov, Aleksandr; Popov, Gennady

    2006-03-20

    Challenges encountered in designing an infrared viewing optical system that uses a small linear detector array based on a zone-scanning approach are discussed. Scanning is performed by a rotating refractive polygon prism with tilted facets, which, along with high-speed line scanning, makes the scanning gear as simple as possible. A method of calculation of a practical optical system to compensate for aberrations during prism rotation is described.

  20. Optical magnetic resonances induced by the interference of reactive components in the near radiation-field zone of atoms in a glow discharge of a mixture of even neon isotopes

    SciT

    Saprykin, E. G., E-mail: Saprykin@gorodok.net

    2016-02-15

    Four types of anomalous optical magnetic resonances shifted with respect to the zero magnetic field and with different shapes are found in radiation of a glow discharge in a mixture of even neon isotopes placed in a swept longitudinal magnetic field. This testifies to the manifestation of collective processes of synchronous light emission by oscillators belonging to isotopically different spatially separated atoms in discharge plasma. The origin of resonances is associated with nonstationary interference of reactive fields in the near radiation-field zones of emission of atoms, averaged over the lifetime of the fields (interference), while different types of resonances aremore » associated with different methods of synchronization of the phases of the fields.« less

  1. Outcomes of microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography-guided center-sparing internal limiting membrane peeling for myopic traction maculopathy: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Ravani, Raghav; Mehta, Aditi; Simakurthy, Sriram; Dhull, Chirakshi

    2017-07-04

    To evaluate the outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (I-OCT)-guided traction removal and center-sparing internal limiting membrane (cs-ILM) peeling. Nine eyes with myopic traction maculopathy as diagnosed on SD-OCT underwent PPV with I-OCT-guided cs-ILM peeling and were evaluated prospectively for resolution of central macular thickness (CMT) and improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and complications, if any, were noted. All patients were followed up for more than 9 months. Resolution of the macular retinoschisis was seen in all nine eyes on SD-OCT. At 36 weeks, there was a significant improvement in mean BCVA from the preoperative BCVA (P = 0.0089) along with a reduction in the CMT from 569.77 ± 263.19 to 166.0 ± 43.91 um (P = 0.0039). None of the eyes showed worsening of BCVA or development of full-thickness macular hole in the intraoperative or follow-up period. PPV with I-OCT-guided cs-ILM peeling helps in complete removal of traction, resolution of retinoschisis and good functional recovery with low intraoperative and postoperative complications.

  2. Boresight Calibration of Construction Misalignments for 3D Scanners Built with a 2D Laser Rangefinder Rotating on Its Optical Center

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Jesús; Martínez, Jorge L.; Mandow, Anthony; Reina, Antonio J.; Pequeño-Boter, Alejandro; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Many applications, like mobile robotics, can profit from acquiring dense, wide-ranging and accurate 3D laser data. Off-the-shelf 2D scanners are commonly customized with an extra rotation as a low-cost, lightweight and low-power-demanding solution. Moreover, aligning the extra rotation axis with the optical center allows the 3D device to maintain the same minimum range as the 2D scanner and avoids offsets in computing Cartesian coordinates. The paper proposes a practical procedure to estimate construction misalignments based on a single scan taken from an arbitrary position in an unprepared environment that contains planar surfaces of unknown dimensions. Inherited measurement limitations from low-cost 2D devices prevent the estimation of very small translation misalignments, so the calibration problem reduces to obtaining boresight parameters. The distinctive approach with respect to previous plane-based intrinsic calibration techniques is the iterative maximization of both the flatness and the area of visible planes. Calibration results are presented for a case study. The method is currently being applied as the final stage in the production of a commercial 3D rangefinder. PMID:25347585

  3. Paramagnetic resonance of LaGaO3: Mn single crystals grown by floating zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazhenin, V. A.; Potapov, A. P.; Artyomov, M. Yu.; Salosin, M. A.; Fokin, A. V.; Gil'mutdinov, I. F.; Mukhamedshin, I. R.

    2016-02-01

    The EPR spectrum of Mn-doped lanthanum gallate single crystals grown by floating zone melting with optical heating has been studied. In contrast to the crystals grown according to the Czochralski method, no manganese is found in these crystals even after high-temperature annealing in air. The spectral characteristics of Fe3+ and Gd3+ centers in crystals prepared by various methods have been compared in the rhombohedral phase, and the fourth-rank nondiagonal parameters of the Fe3+ trigonal centers have been determined, as well.

  4. Center for Adaptive Optics | People

    Astronomy Professor of Earth & Planetary Science imke at berkeley dot edu (510) 642.1947 Stanley Klein UC Irvine Aaron Barth Associate Professor Physics and Astronomy barth at uci dot edu (949) 824.3013 dot edu (310) 206.7853 Andrea Ghez Professor of Astronomy ghez at astro dot ucla dot edu (310

  5. Center for Adaptive Optics | ISEE

    Workforce Initiative, a partnership between the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO of previous topics: * Internships * Professional Development Program * Akamai Workforce Initiative

  6. Optically tunable optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Robert T. B.; Wah, Christopher; Iizuka, Keigo; Shimotahira, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an optically tunable optical filter that uses photorefractive barium titanate. With our filter we implement a spectrum analyzer at 632.8 nm with a resolution of 1.2 nm. We simulate a wavelength-division multiplexing system by separating two semiconductor laser diodes, at 1560 nm and 1578 nm, with the same filter. The filter has a bandwidth of 6.9 nm. We also use the same filter to take 2.5-nm-wide slices out of a 20-nm-wide superluminescent diode centered at 840 nm. As a result, we experimentally demonstrate a phenomenal tuning range from 632.8 to 1578 nm with a single filtering device.

  7. Enterprise Zones: Restoring Economic Vitality to Inner-City Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Discusses how the proposed urban enterprise zones would solve problems of inner-city areas. The zones are designed to provide tax incentives which would attract new businesses to the inner city, create new jobs, and revitalize urban centers. (AM)

  8. Energetic and dynamical instability of spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a deep optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zi-Fa; Chai, Xu-Dan; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the energetic and dynamical instability of spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a deep optical lattice via a tight-binding model. The stability phase diagram is completely revealed in full parameter space, while the dependence of superfluidity on the dispersion relation is illustrated explicitly. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling, the superfluidity only exists in the center of the Brillouin zone. However, the combination of spin-orbit coupling, Zeeman field, nonlinearity and optical lattice potential can modify the dispersion relation of the system, and change the position of Brillouin zone for generating the superfluidity. Thus, the superfluidity can appear in either the center or the other position of the Brillouin zone. Namely, in the center of the Brillouin zone, the system is either superfluid or Landau unstable, which depends on the momentum of the lowest energy. Therefore, the superfluidity can occur at optional position of the Brillouin zone by elaborating spin-orbit coupling, Zeeman splitting, nonlinearity and optical lattice potential. For the linear case, the system is always dynamically stable, however, the nonlinearity can induce the dynamical instability, and also expand the superfluid region. These predicted results can provide a theoretical evidence for exploring the superfluidity of the system experimentally.

  9. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  10. Geohydrology of the unsaturated zone and simulated time of arrival of landfill leachate at the water table, municipal solid waste landfill facility, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    Frenzel, Peter F.; Abeyta, Cynthia G.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility (MSWLF) is located about 10 miles northeast of downtown El Paso, Texas. The landfill is built on the Hueco Bolson, a deposit that yields water to five public-supply wells within 1.1 miles of the landfill boundary on all sides. The bolson deposits consist of lenses and mixtures of sand, clay, silt, gravel, and caliche. The unsaturated zone at the landfill is about 300 feet thick. The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) and the Multimedia Exposure Assessment Model for Evaluating the Land Disposal of Wastes (MULTIMED) computer models were used to simulate the time of first arrival of landfill leachate at the water table. Site-specific data were collected for model input. At five sites on the landfill cover, hydraulic conductivity was measured by an in situ method; in addition, laboratory values were obtained for porosity, moisture content at field capacity, and moisture content at wilting point. Twenty-seven sediment samples were collected from two adjacent boreholes drilled near the southwest corner of the landfill. Of these, 23 samples were assumed to represent the unsaturated zone beneath the landfill. The core samples were analyzed in the laboratory for various characteristics required for the HELP and MULTIMED models: initial moisture content, dry bulk density, porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention percentages at various suction values, total organic carbon, and pH. Parameters were calculated for the van Genuchten and Brooks-Corey equations that relate hydraulic conductivity to saturation. A reported recharge value of 0.008 inch per year was estimated on the basis of soil- water chloride concentration. The HELP model was implemented using input values that were based mostly on site-specific data or assumed in a conservative manner. Exceptions were the default values used for waste characteristics. Flow through the landfill was

  11. Eruptive stratigraphy of the Tatara-San Pedro complex, 36°S, sourthern volcanic zone, Chilean Andes: reconstruction method and implications for magma evolution at long-lived arc volcanic centers

    Dungan, M.A.; Wulff, A.; Thompson, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Quaternary Tatara-San Pedro volcanic complex (36°S, Chilean Andes) comprises eight or more unconformity-bound volcanic sequences, representing variably preserved erosional remnants of volcanic centers generated during 930 ky of activity. The internal eruptive histories of several dominantly mafic to intermediate sequences have been reconstructed, on the basis of correlations of whole-rock major and trace element chemistry of flows between multiple sampled sections, but with critical contributions from photogrammetric, geochronologic, and paleomagnetic data. Many groups of flows representing discrete eruptive events define internal variation trends that reflect extrusion of heterogeneous or rapidly evolving magna batches from conduit-reservoir systems in which open-system processes typically played a large role. Long-term progressive evolution trends are extremely rare and the magma compositions of successive eruptive events rarely lie on precisely the same differentiation trend, even where they have evolved from similar parent magmas by similar processes. These observations are not consistent with magma differentiation in large long-lived reservoirs, but they may be accommodated by diverse interactions between newly arrived magma inputs and multiple resident pockets of evolved magma and / or crystal mush residing in conduit-dominated subvolcanic reservoirs. Without constraints provided by the reconstructed stratigraphic relations, the framework for petrologic modeling would be far different. A well-established eruptive stratigraphy may provide independent constraints on the petrologic processes involved in magma evolution-simply on the basis of the specific order in which diverse, broadly cogenetic magmas have been erupted. The Tatara-San Pedro complex includes lavas ranging from primitive basalt to high-SiO2 rhyolite, and although the dominant erupted magma type was basaltic andesite ( 52-55 wt % SiO2) each sequence is characterized by unique proportions of

  12. Analysis of focusing error signals by differential astigmatic method under off-center tracking in the land-groove-type optical disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Masahisa; Nakatani, Hidehiko

    2015-04-01

    We theoretically calculate the behavior of the focusing error signal in the land-groove-type optical disk when the objective lens traverses on out of the radius of the optical disk. The differential astigmatic method is employed instead of the conventional astigmatic method for generating the focusing error signals. The signal behaviors are compared and analyzed in terms of the gain difference of the slope sensitivity of the focusing error signals from the land and the groove. In our calculation, the format of digital versatile disc-random access memory (DVD-RAM) is adopted as the land-groove-type optical disk model, and advantageous conditions for suppressing the gain difference are investigated. The calculation method and results described in this paper will be reflected in the next generation land-groove-type optical disks.

  13. Structure and function of cytochrome c2 in electron transfer complexes with the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: optical linear dichroism and EPR.

    PubMed

    Drepper, F; Mathis, P

    1997-02-11

    The photosynthetic reaction center (RC) and its secondary electron donor the water-soluble cytochrome (cyt) c2 from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been used in cross-linked and non-cross-linked complexes, oriented in compressed gels or partially dried multilayers, to study the respective orientation of the primary donor P (BChl dimer) and of cyt c2. Three methods were used: (i) Polarized optical absorption spectra at 295 and 10 K were measured and the linear dichroism of the two individual transitions (Qx, Qy), which are nearly degenerate within the alpha-band of reduced cyt c2, was determined. Attribution of the polarization directions to the molecular axes within the heme plane yielded the average cyt orientation in the complexes. (ii) Time-resolved flash absorption measurements using polarized light allowed determination of the orientation of cyt c2 in complexes which differ in their kinetics of electron transfer. (iii) EPR spectroscopy of ferricyt c2 in cross-linked RC-cyt c2 complexes was used to determine the angle between the heme and the membrane plane. The results suggest the following structural properties for the docking of cyt c2 to the RC: (i) In cross-linked complexes, the two cytochromes displaying half-lives of 0.7 and 60 micros for electron transfer to P+ are similarly oriented (difference < 10 degrees). (ii) For cross-linked cyt c2 the heme plane is parallel to the symmetry axis of the RC (0 degrees +/- 10 degrees). Moreover, the Qy transition, which is assumed to be polarized within the ring III-ring I direction of the heme plane, makes an angle of 56 degrees +/- 1 degree with the symmetry axis. (iii) The dichroism spectrum for the fast phase (0.7 micros) for the non-cross-linked cyt c2-RC complex suggests an orientation similar to that of cross-linked cyt c2, but the heme plane is tilted about 20 degrees closer to the membrane. An alternative model is that two or more bound states of cyt c2 with heme plane tilt angles between

  14. Linear and nonlinear magneto-optical properties of an off-center single dopant in a spherical core/shell quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddi, E.; Talbi, A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; El Haouari, M.; Dujardin, F.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-11-01

    Using the effective mass approximation and a variational procedure, we have investigated the nonlinear optical absorption coefficient and the relative refractive index changes associated to a single dopant confined in core/shell quantum dots considering the influences of the core/shell dimensions, externally applied magnetic field, and dielectric mismatch. The results show that the optical absorption coefficient and the coefficients of relative refractive index change depend strongly on the core/shell sizes and they are blue shifted when the spatial confinement increases so this effect is magnified by higher structural dimensions. Additionally, it is obtained that both studied optical properties are sensitive to the dielectric environment in such a way that their amplitudes are very affected by the local field corrections.

  15. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  16. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  17. Fault location in optical networks

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Rick C [Apple Valley, MN; Kryzak, Charles J [Mendota Heights, MN; Keeler, Gordon A [Albuquerque, NM; Serkland, Darwin K [Albuquerque, NM; Geib, Kent M [Tijeras, NM; Kornrumpf, William P [Schenectady, NY

    2008-07-01

    One apparatus embodiment includes an optical emitter and a photodetector. At least a portion of the optical emitter extends a radial distance from a center point. The photodetector provided around at least a portion of the optical emitter and positioned outside the radial distance of the portion of the optical emitter.

  18. Optical Manipulation along Optical Axis with Polarization Sensitive Meta-lens.

    PubMed

    Markovich, Hen; Shishkin, Ivan; Hendler, Netta; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2018-06-27

    The ability to manipulate small objects with focused laser beams opens a broad spectrum of opportunities in fundamental and applied studies, where a precise control over mechanical path and stability is required. While conventional optical tweezers are based on bulky diffractive optical elements, developing compact integrable within a fluid cell trapping devices is highly demanded. Here, plasmonic polarization sensitive metasurface-based lens, embedded within a fluid, is demonstrated to provide several stable trapping centers along the optical axis. The position of a particle is controlled with the polarization of the incident light, interacting with plasmonic nanoscale patch antennas, organized within overlapping Fresnel zones of the lens. While standard diffractive optical elements face challenges to trap objects in lateral direction outside the depth of focus, bi-focal Fresnel meta-lens demonstrates the capability to manipulate a bead along 4 micrometers line. Additional fluorescent module, incorporated within the optical trapping setup, was implemented and enabled accurate mapping of optical potential via a particle tracking algorithm. Auxiliary micro- and nano- structures, integrated within fluidic devices, provide numerous opportunities to achieve flexible optomechanical manipulation, including, transport, trapping and sorting, which are highly demanded in lab-on-a-chip applications and many others.

  19. Fracture process zone in granite

    Zang, A.; Wagner, F.C.; Stanchits, S.; Janssen, C.; Dresen, G.

    2000-01-01

    In uniaxial compression tests performed on Aue granite cores (diameter 50 mm, length 100 mm), a steel loading plate was used to induce the formation of a discrete shear fracture. A zone of distributed microcracks surrounds the tip of the propagating fracture. This process zone is imaged by locating acoustic emission events using 12 piezoceramic sensors attached to the samples. Propagation velocity of the process zone is varied by using the rate of acoustic emissions to control the applied axial force. The resulting velocities range from 2 mm/s in displacement-controlled tests to 2 ??m/s in tests controlled by acoustic emission rate. Wave velocities and amplitudes are monitored during fault formation. P waves transmitted through the approaching process zone show a drop in amplitude of 26 dB, and ultrasonic velocities are reduced by 10%. The width of the process zone is ???9 times the grain diameter inferred from acoustic data but is only 2 times the grain size from optical crack inspection. The process zone of fast propagating fractures is wider than for slow ones. The density of microcracks and acoustic emissions increases approaching the main fracture. Shear displacement scales linearly with fracture length. Fault plane solutions from acoustic events show similar orientation of nodal planes on both sides of the shear fracture. The ratio of the process zone width to the fault length in Aue granite ranges from 0.01 to 0.1 inferred from crack data and acoustic emissions, respectively. The fracture surface energy is estimated from microstructure analysis to be ???2 J. A lower bound estimate for the energy dissipated by acoustic events is 0.1 J. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. The optics of occupational progressive lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, James E; Hardy, Raymond F

    2005-08-01

    Occupational progressive lenses (OPLs) utilize progressive power optics and are designed primarily to meet near and intermediate viewing needs such as working at a computer workstation for presbyopic patients. OPLs are fabricated to have the prescribed near power in the lower part of the lens and the power in the upper portion of the lens is determined by the amount of power "degression" (decrease in plus power) relative to the near power. Independent measurements of the optical characteristics of these lenses have not been reported previously. Manufacturers of 7 different OPL designs provided sample lenses for a patient with +2.50 D add that were measured with a Rotlex Class Plus lens analyzer (Rotlex Inc., Israel). Power measurements were normalized to the location specified by the manufacturer, and the vertical location of each lens was normalized to pupil center based on manufacturer fitting guidelines. Large optical differences exist among the OPL designs. The results show clear differences between the designs in terms of the add powers, their vertical location, and zone width. The size and location of the near, near-intermediate, far-intermediate, and far viewing zones were determined. The literature and clinical experience support that OPLs are successful at meeting the computer, general office, and other intermediate viewing distance needs of many patients. However, because of the large differences in the several OPL designs, patient success can likely be enhanced by selecting the design that best suits his or her viewing needs.

  1. High pressure optical combustion probe

    SciT

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod inmore » a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.« less

  2. Time-dependent broken-symmetry density functional theory simulation of the optical response of entangled paramagnetic defects: Color centers in lithium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesko, Benjamin G.

    2018-02-01

    Parameter-free atomistic simulations of entangled solid-state paramagnetic defects may aid in the rational design of devices for quantum information science. This work applies time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) embedded-cluster simulations to a prototype entangled-defect system, namely two adjacent singlet-coupled F color centers in lithium fluoride. TDDFT calculations accurately reproduce the experimental visible absorption of both isolated and coupled F centers. The most accurate results are obtained by combining spin symmetry breaking to simulate strong correlation, a large fraction of exact (Hartree-Fock-like) exchange to minimize the defect electrons' self-interaction error, and a standard semilocal approximation for dynamical correlations between the defect electrons and the surrounding ionic lattice. These results motivate application of two-reference correlated ab initio approximations to the M-center, and application of TDDFT in parameter-free simulations of more complex entangled paramagnetic defect architectures.

  3. The Base Zone Protection Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    The Base Zone Protection Problem Dinesh C. Verma IBM T. J. Watson Research Center Hawthorne, NY 10549 Theodore Brown, Amotz Bar Noy and...al. 2008 have tried to develop the impact of terrain on the coverage area of a sensor and simulated its impact on sensor coverage. Kumar et al...conference on Wireless sensor networks and applications. WSNA 03, ACM Press, 2003, pp. 115--121. Kumar S., Lai T. and Arora A., “Barrier Coverage

  4. Defining the Fresnel zone for broadband radiation.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Jeremy; Mittleman, Daniel

    2002-11-01

    The concept of the Fresnel zone is central to many areas of imaging. In tomographic imaging, the transverse spatial resolution can be limited by the size of the first Fresnel zone, usually defined only for monochromatic radiation. With the increasing prevalence of broadband tomographic imaging systems, a generalization of this concept is required. Here, a proposed generalization is described in the context of femtosecond optics, and experimentally verified using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Based on this definition, a simple zone plate design is demonstrated.

  5. Acoustically regulated optical emission dynamics from quantum dot-like emission centers in GaN/InGaN nanowire heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazić, S.; Chernysheva, E.; Hernández-Mínguez, A.; Santos, P. V.; van der Meulen, H. P.

    2018-03-01

    We report on experimental studies of the effects induced by surface acoustic waves on the optical emission dynamics of GaN/InGaN nanowire quantum dots. We employ stroboscopic optical excitation with either time-integrated or time-resolved photoluminescence detection. In the absence of the acoustic wave, the emission spectra reveal signatures originated from the recombination of neutral exciton and biexciton confined in the probed nanowire quantum dot. When the nanowire is perturbed by the propagating acoustic wave, the embedded quantum dot is periodically strained and its excitonic transitions are modulated by the acousto-mechanical coupling. Depending on the recombination lifetime of the involved optical transitions, we can resolve acoustically driven radiative processes over time scales defined by the acoustic cycle. At high acoustic amplitudes, we also observe distortions in the transmitted acoustic waveform, which are reflected in the time-dependent spectral response of our sensor quantum dot. In addition, the correlated intensity oscillations observed during temporal decay of the exciton and biexciton emission suggest an effect of the acoustic piezoelectric fields on the quantum dot charge population. The present results are relevant for the dynamic spectral and temporal control of photon emission in III-nitride semiconductor heterostructures.

  6. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    SciT

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  7. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciT

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results inmore » the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.« less

  8. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  9. New Mission Control Center Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Live footage shows panelists, Chief Center Systems Division John Muratore, and Acting Chief, Control Center Systems Division, Linda Uljon, giving an overview of the new Mission Control Center. Muratore and Uljon talk about the changes and modernization of the new Center. The panelists mention all the new capabilities of the new Center. They emphasize the Distributed real time command and control environment, the reduction in operation costs, and even the change from coaxial cables to fiber optic cables. Uljon also tells us that the new Control Center will experience its first mission after the launch of STS-70 and its first complete mission (both launching and landing) during STS-71.

  10. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.

    1994-11-08

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage. 5 figs.

  11. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage.

  12. Research Studies on Advanced Optical Module/Head Designs for Optical Disk Recording Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.; Seery, Bernard D.

    1993-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Optical Data Storage Center of the University of Arizona is presented. Summary reports on continuing projects are presented. Research areas include: magneto-optic media, optical heads, and signal processing.

  13. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  14. Research studies on advanced optical module/head designs for optical devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.

    1991-01-01

    A summary is presented of research in optical data storage materials and of research at the center. The first section contains summary reports under the general headings of: (1) Magnetooptic media: modeling, design, fabrication, characterization, and testing; (2) Optical heads: holographic optical elements; and (3) Optical heads: integrated optics. The second section consist of a proposal entitled, Signal Processing Techniques for Optical Data Storage. And section three presents various publications prepared by the center.

  15. The effect of interaction between surface plasmons of gold nanoparticles and optical active centers on luminescence of Eu3+- doped Zn2SnO4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thien, Nguyen Duy; Vu, Le Van; Long, Nguyen Ngoc

    2018-04-01

    The enhancement and quenching of Eu3+ ion emission were investigated in Zn2SnO4:Eu3+@Au (ZTO:Eu3+@Au) nanocomposites. Under 361 nm excitation we revealed the extinction of the intrinsic defect emission and the enhancement of Eu3+ ion emission when Au content in samples is increased, but under excitation wavelength of 394 nm we observed only the suppression of Eu3+ ion emission. The cause of the observed PL behavior is related to the interaction between surface plasmon induced by gold nanoparticles and luminescence centers in the samples.

  16. The Association between Judy Center Services and Kindergarten Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Judith P. Hoyer Family Learning Centers, also known as Judy Centers, serve all children birth through kindergarten who live in designated Title I school zones. There are twenty-seven Judy Centers and three satellites throughout Maryland serving forty-four elementary school zones. The Kindergarten Readiness Assessment (KRA) is conducted in the…

  17. High bandwidth electro-optic technology for intersatellite optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    The research and development of electronic and electro-optic components for geosynchronous and low earth orbiting satellite optical high bandwidth communications at the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is reviewed. Intersatellite optical communications retains a strong reliance on microwave circuit technology in several areas - the microwave to optical interface, the laser transmitter modulation driver and the optical receiver. A microwave to optical interface is described requiring high bandwidth electronic downconverters and demodulators. Electrical bandwidth and current drive requirements for the laser modulation driver for three laser alternatives are discussed. Bandwidth and noise requirements are presented for optical receiver architectures.

  18. Investigation of the relationship between radon anomalıes in deep water resources near Akşehir fault zone and the radial distances of the sources to an earthquake center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, Ayla; Yalım, Hüseyin Ali

    2018-02-01

    Radon emanation occurs all the rocks and earth containing uranium element. Anomalies in radon concentrations before earthquakes are observed in fault lines, geothermal sources, uranium deposits, volcanic movements. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the radon anomalies in water resources and the radial distances of the sources to the earthquake center. For this purpose, radon concentrations of 9 different deep water sources near Akşehir fault line were determined by taking samples with monthly periods for two years. The relationship between the radon anomalies and the radial distances of the sources to the earthquake center was obtained for the sources.

  19. Call for papers: Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2002-03-01

    The editors of the Journal of Optical Networking are soliciting papers for a special issue on "Optical Ethernet in a Carrier-Type Environment." Submissions are due March 15, 2002. <center>Deadline extended to May 1!center>

  20. New Diamond Color Center for Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ding; Rose, Brendon; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Sangtawesin, Sorawis; Srinivasan, Srikanth; Twitchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Edmonds, Andrew; Gali, Adam; Stacey, Alastair; Wang, Wuyi; D'Haenens-Johansson, Ulrika; Zaitsev, Alexandre; Lyon, Stephen; de Leon, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    Color centers in diamond are attractive for quantum communication applications because of their long electron spin coherence times and efficient optical transitions. Previous demonstrations of color centers as solid-state spin qubits were primarily focused on centers that exhibit either long coherence times or highly efficient optical interfaces. Recently, we developed a method to stabilize the neutral charge state of silicon-vacancy center in diamond (SiV0) with high conversion efficiency. We observe spin relaxation times exceeding 1 minute and spin coherence times of 1 ms for SiV0 centers. Additionally, the SiV0 center also has > 90 % of its emission into its zero-phonon line and a narrow inhomogeneous optical linewidth. The combination of a long spin coherence time and efficient optical interface make the SiV0 center a promising candidate for applications in long distance quantum communication.

  1. Optical and thermal charge-transfer processes occurring in a series of three-centered, cyanide-bridged intervalent charge-transfer complexes

    SciT

    Pfennig, B.W.; Bocarsly, A.B.

    1992-01-09

    The mixed-valent compound (Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}){sub 2}((NC){sub 5}Fe-CN-Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}-NC-Fe(CN){sub 5} was used as the starting point for the synthesis and characterization of two series of trinuclear {open_quotes}M-Pt-M{close_quotes} compounds. The first group of complexes have the general formula Na{sub 2}(L(NC){sub 4}Fe-CN-Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}-NC-Fe(CN){sub 4}L) (where the sixth coordination site on the terminal iron units has been varied using six different substituted pyridine or pyrazine ligands, L), and the secondary group of compounds have the general formula (Pt(NH){sub 3}){sub 4}){sub 2}((NC){sub 5}M-CN-Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}-NC-M(CN){sub 5}) (where M = Fe, Ru, and Os). All of the compounds yielded an absorption spectrum containingmore » an intervalent charge-transfer (IT) band in the visible. Both series of complexes were modeled using Marcus-Hush theory to estimate the reorganization energies for the optical electron-transfer processes, electron-transfer rate constants, thermal-activation barriers, and the degrees of delocalization of these species. In addition, the kinetics of formation, photochemical decomposition, and a novel solvent-gated charge-transfer process are discussed. 26 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.« less

  2. Optical Communications Transmitter

    1965-11-10

    S65-42598 (10 Nov. 1965) --- Douglas S. Idlly, Electromagnetic Systems Branch, Instrumentation and Electronic Systems Division, illustrates an Optical Communications Transmitter (LASER) during a briefing at the news center of the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas. Photo credit: NASA

  3. Optical instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A wide angle, low focal ratio, high resolution, catoptric, image plane scanner is described. The scanner includes the following features: (1) a reflective improvement on the Schmidt principle, (2) a polar line scanner in which all field elements are brought to and corrected on axis, and (3) a scanner arrangement in which the aperture stop of the system is imaged at the center of curvature of a spherical primary mirror. The system scans are a large radial angle and an extremely high rate of speed with relatively small scanning mirrors. Because the system is symmetrical about the optical axis, the obscuration is independent of the scan angle.

  4. The Supergalactic Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Habitability in the local universe is examined. Constrained by metal abundance and exposure to sterilizing events, life as we know it requires significantly long periods of stable environmental conditions. Planets within galaxies undergoing major mergers, active AGN, starburst episodes, and merging black holes pose serious threats to long-term habitability. Importantly, the development of several layers of protection from high-energy particles such as a thick atmosphere, a strong planetary magnetic field, an astrosphere, and a galactic magnetic field is of great benefit. Factors such as star type and activity, planet type and composition, the location of a planet within its host galaxy, and even the location within a supercluster of galaxies can affect the potential habitability of planets. We discuss the concept of the Supergalactic Habitable Zone introduced by Mason and Biermann in terms of habitability in the local universe and find that galaxies near the center of the Virgo cluster, for example, have a much lower probability for the development of life as we know it as compared to locations in the Milky Way.

  5. Low Group Delay Dispersion Optical Coating for Broad Bandwidth High Reflection at 45° Incidence, P Polarization of Femtosecond Pulses with 900 nm Center Wavelength

    DOE PAGES

    Bellum, John C.; Field, Ella S.; Winstone, Trevor B.; ...

    2016-03-01

    We describe an optical coating design suitable for broad bandwidth high reflection (BBHR) at 45° angle of incidence (AOI), P polarization (Ppol) of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses whose wavelengths range from 800 to 1000 nm. The design process is guided by quarter-wave HR coating properties. Our design must afford low group delay dispersion (GDD) for reflected light over the broad, 200 nm bandwidth in order to minimize temporal broadening of the fs pulses due to dispersive alteration of relative phases between their frequency components. The design should also be favorable to high laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT). We base the coatingmore » on TiO 2/SiO 2 layer pairs produced by means of e-beam evaporation with ion-assisted deposition, and use OptiLayer Thin Film Software to explore designs starting with TiO 2/SiO 2 layers having thicknesses in a reverse chirped arrangement. This approach led to a design with R > 99% from 800 to 1000 nm and GDD < 20 fs 2 from 843 to 949 nm (45° AOI, Ppol). The design’s GDD behaves in a smooth way, suitable for GDD compensation techniques, and its electric field intensities show promise for high LIDTs. Reflectivity and GDD measurements for the initial test coating indicate good performance of the BBHR design. Subsequent coating runs with improved process calibration produced two coatings whose HR bands satisfactorily meet the design goals. Lastly, for the sake of completeness, we summarize our previously reported transmission spectra and LIDT test results with 800 ps, 8 ps and 675 fs pulses for these two coatings, and present a table of the LIDT results we have for all of our TiO 2/SiO 2 BBHR coatings, showing the trends with test laser pulse duration from the ns to sub-ps regimes.« less

  6. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    SciT

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.

    component to construct a central core zone with a composition closer to that in an LMFBR core with high burnup. The high {sup 240}Pu configuration was constructed for two reasons. First, the composition of the high {sup 240}Pu zone more closely matched the composition of LMFBR cores anticipated in design work in 1970. Second, comparison of measurements in the ZPR-6/7 uniform core with corresponding measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu zone provided an assessment of some of the effects of long-term {sup 240}Pu buildup in LMFBR cores. The uniform core version of ZPR-6/7 is evaluated in ZPR-LMFR-EXP-001. This document only addresses measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu core version of ZPR-6/7. Many types of measurements were performed as part of the ZPR-6/7 program. Measurements of criticality, sodium void worth, control rod worth and reaction rate distributions in the high {sup 240}Pu core configuration are evaluated here. For each category of measurements, the uncertainties are evaluated, and benchmark model data are provided.« less

  7. Seismotectonic zoning of Azerbaijan territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangarli, Talat; Aliyev, Ali; Aliyev, Fuad; Rahimov, Fuad

    2017-04-01

    Studying of the space-time correlation and consequences effect between tectonic events and other geological processes that have created modern earth structure still remains as one of the most important problems in geology. This problem is especially important for the East Caucasus-South Caspian geodynamic zone. Being situated at the eastern part of the Caucasian strait, this zone refers to a center of Alpine-Himalayan active folded belt, and is known as a complex tectonic unit with jointing heterogeneous structural-substantial complexes arising from different branches of the belt (Doburja-Caucasus-Kopetdag from the north and Pyrenean-Alborz from the south with Kura and South Caspian zone). According to GPS and precise leveling data, activity of regional geodynamic processes shows intensive horizontal and vertical movements of the Earth's crust as conditioned by collision of the Arabian and Eurasian continental plates continuing since the end of Miocene. So far studies related to the regional of geology-geophysical data, periodically used for the geological and tectonic modeling of the environment mainly based on the fixing ideology. There still remains a number of uncertainties in solution of issues related to regional geology, tectonics and magmatism, structure and interrelation of different structural zones, space-time interrelations between onshore and offshore complexes, etc. At the same time large dataset produced by surface geological surveys, deep geological mapping of on- and offshore areas with the use of seismic and electrical reconnaissance and geophysical field zoning methods, deep well drilling and remote sensing activities. Conducted new studies produced results including differentiation of formerly unknown nappe complexes of the different ages and scales within the structure of mountain-fold zones, identification of new zones containing ophiolites in their section, outlining of currently active faulting areas, geophysical interpretation of the deep

  8. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a long history of both supporting plume model development and providing mixing zone modeling software. The Visual Plumes model is the most recent addition to the suite of public-domain models available through the EPA-Athens Center f...

  9. Advanced adaptive optics technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Scot S.

    2002-02-01

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  10. Space Operations Learning Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) is a tool that provides an online learning environment where students can learn science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through a series of training modules. SOLC is also an effective media for NASA to showcase its contributions to the general public. SOLC is a Web-based environment with a learning platform for students to understand STEM through interactive modules in various engineering topics. SOLC is unique in its approach to develop learning materials to teach schoolaged students the basic concepts of space operations. SOLC utilizes the latest Web and software technologies to present this educational content in a fun and engaging way for all grade levels. SOLC uses animations, streaming video, cartoon characters, audio narration, interactive games and more to deliver educational concepts. The Web portal organizes all of these training modules in an easily accessible way for visitors worldwide. SOLC provides multiple training modules on various topics. At the time of this reporting, seven modules have been developed: Space Communication, Flight Dynamics, Information Processing, Mission Operations, Kids Zone 1, Kids Zone 2, and Save The Forest. For the first four modules, each contains three components: Flight Training, Flight License, and Fly It! Kids Zone 1 and 2 include a number of educational videos and games designed specifically for grades K-6. Save The Forest is a space operations mission with four simulations and activities to complete, optimized for new touch screen technology. The Kids Zone 1 module has recently been ported to Facebook to attract wider audience.

  11. Use of intelligent transportation systems in rural work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    This project defined an approach to integrating data collected and traveler information displayed in a work zone : with a regional transportation management center and/or other state websites. The project conducted a literature : review to define the...

  12. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) work zone driver model software

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-11-01

    FHWA and the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) Volpe Center are developing a work zone car-following model and simulation software that interfaces with existing microsimulation tools, enabling more accurate simulation of car-following through...

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The master assembler, crane crew, removes a five-meter telescope in Cocoa Beach, Fla., for repair. The tracking telescope is part of the Distant Object Attitude Measurement System (DOAMS) that provides optical support for launches from KSC and Cape Canaveral.

    2003-08-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The master assembler, crane crew, removes a five-meter telescope in Cocoa Beach, Fla., for repair. The tracking telescope is part of the Distant Object Attitude Measurement System (DOAMS) that provides optical support for launches from KSC and Cape Canaveral.

  14. Transpiration purged optical probe

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John; Woodruff, Steven

    2004-01-06

    An optical apparatus for clearly viewing the interior of a containment vessel by applying a transpiration fluid to a volume directly in front of the external surface of the optical element of the optical apparatus. The fluid is provided by an external source and transported by means of an annular tube to a capped end region where the inner tube is perforated. The perforation allows the fluid to stream axially towards the center of the inner tube and then axially away from an optical element which is positioned in the inner tube just prior to the porous sleeve. This arrangement draws any contaminants away from the optical element keeping it free of contaminants. In one of several embodiments, the optical element can be a lens, a viewing port or a laser, and the external source can provide a transpiration fluid having either steady properties or time varying properties.

  15. The solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Objectives of the Solar Optical Telescope are to study the physics of the Sun on the scale at which many of the important physical processes occur and to attain a resolution of 73km on the Sun or 0.1 arc seconds of angular resolution. Topics discussed in this overview of the Solar Optical Telescope include: why is the Solar Optical Telescope needed; current picture of the Sun's atmosphere and convection zone; scientific problems for the Solar Optical Telescope; a description of the telescope; the facility - science management, contamination control, and accessibility to the instruments; the scientific instruments - a coordinated instrument package for unlocking the Sun's secrets; parameters of the coordinated instrument package; science operations from the Space Shuttle; and the dynamic solar atmosphere.

  16. Cloud and aerosol optical depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Russell, P. B.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Colburn, D. C.; Wrigley, R. C.; Spanner, M. A.; Livingston, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne Sun photometer was used to measure optical depths in clear atmospheres between the appearances of broken stratus clouds, and the optical depths in the vicinity of smokes. Results show that (human) activities can alter the chemical and optical properties of background atmospheres to affect their spectral optical depths. Effects of water vapor adsorption on aerosol optical depths are apparent, based on data of the water vapor absorption band centered around 940 nm. Smoke optical depths show increases above the background atmosphere by up to two orders of magnitude. When the total optical depths measured through clouds were corrected for molecular scattering and gaseous absorption by subtracting the total optical depths measured through the background atmosphere, the resultant values are lower than those of the background aerosol at short wavelengths. The spectral dependence of these cloud optical depths is neutral, however, in contrast to that of the background aerosol or the molecular atmosphere.

  17. Satisloh centering technology developments past to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, Ernst Michael; Moos, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    The centering of an optical lens is the grinding of its edge profile or contour in relationship to its optical axis. This is required to ensure that the lens vertex and radial centers are accurately positioned within an optical system. Centering influences the imaging performance and contrast of an optical system. Historically, lens centering has been a purely manual process. Along its 62 years of assembling centering machines, Satisloh introduced several technological milestones to improve the accuracy and quality of this process. During this time more than 2.500 centering machines were assembled. The development went from bell clamping and diamond grinding to Laser alignment, exchange chuckor -spindle systems, to multi axis CNC machines with integrated metrology and automatic loading systems. With the new centering machine C300, several improvements for the clamping and grinding process were introduced. These improvements include a user friendly software to support the operator, a coolant manifold and "force grinding" technology to ensure excellent grinding quality and process stability. They also include an air bearing directly driven centering spindle to provide a large working range of lenses made of all optical materials and diameters from below 10 mm to 300 mm. The clamping force can be programmed between 7 N and 1200 N to safely center lenses made of delicate materials. The smaller C50 centering machine for lenses below 50 mm diameter is available with an optional CNC loading system for automated production.

  18. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  19. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  20. Work zone safety analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  1. California tree seed zones

    John M. Buck; Ronald S. Adams; Jerrold Cone; M. Thompson Conkle; William J. Libby; Cecil J. Eden; Michel J. Knight

    1970-01-01

    California forest tree seed zones were established originally by Fowells (1946), with revisions proposed by Roy (1963) and Schubert (1966). The Forest Tree Seed Committee of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, has revised the original zones and updated the recording system described in the earlier reports. Fowells' (1946) Research Note...

  2. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  3. Longleaf pine site zones

    Phillip J. Craul; John S. Kush; William D. Boyer

    2005-01-01

    The authors delineate six major climatic areas of the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) region. They subdivide these areas into 21 site zones, each of which is deemed homogenous with respect to climate, physiography, and soils. The site zones are mapped and their climate, physiography, and soils described. The authors recommend that plantings of...

  4. Iowa Work Zone Fatalities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    From March through November, the Iowa DOT may have up to 500 road construction work zones, and each of the department's maintenance garages may establish one or more short-term work zones per day. Couple that with the work of cities and counties, and...

  5. Complexation of Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} with lanthanide(III) centers influenced by ethylene polyamines: Solvothermal syntheses, crystal structures, and optical properties of lanthanide selenidostannates

    SciT

    Tang, Chunying; Wang, Fang; Chen, Ruihong

    Lanthanide selenidostannates (H{sub 3}O){sub n}[Ce(tepa)(μ-1κ{sup 2}:2κ{sup 2}-Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6})]{sub n} (1), [(Yb(tepa)(μ-OH)){sub 2}(μ-1κ:2κ-Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6})]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O (2), [Htrien]{sub 2}[(Ln(trien)(tren)){sub 2}(μ-1κ:2κ-Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6})][Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6}] (Ln=Ce(3), Nd(4)) and [(Yb(dien){sub 2}){sub 2}(μ-OH){sub 2}]Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} (5) were solvothermally prepared in different ethylene polyamines. The Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} unit connects [Ce(tepa)]{sup 3+} and [(Yb(tepa)(μ-OH)){sub 2}]{sup 4+} fragments with tetradentate μ-1κ{sup 2}Se{sup 1},Se{sup 2}:2κ{sup 2}Se{sup 5},Se{sup 6} and bidentate μ-1κSe{sup 1}:2κSe{sup 5} bridging coordination modes in tepa, to form polymers 1 and 2, respectively. It joins two [Ln(trien)(tren)]{sup 3+} fragments as a μ-1κSe{sup 1}:2κSe{sup 5} ligand to form binuclear complexes 3 and 4more » in trien. Unlike the Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} units in 1–4 that bind with Ln(III) centers as Se-donor ligands, the Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} unit in 5 exists as a discrete ion. The syntheses of 1–5 show that the ethylene polyamines play an important role in the complexation of Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} ligand with Ln(III) centers. Compounds 1–5 exhibit optical band gaps in the range of 2.09–2.42 eV, which are influenced by the complexation of Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} with Ln(III) centers. - Graphical abstract: New lanthanide complexes concerning the Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} ligand were solvothermally prepared, and the effect of ethylene polyamines on the complexation of Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} with Ln(III) centers are observed. Highlights: • Lanthanide complexes concerning the selenidostannates have been solvothermally prepared in different ethylene polyamines. • A tetradentate μ-1κ{sup 2}Se{sup 1},Se{sup 2}:2κ{sup 2}Se{sup 5},Se{sup 6} and a bidentate μ-1κSe{sup 1}:2κSe{sup 5} bridging coordination modes for the Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} ligand is obtained. • The complexation of the Sn{sub 2}Se{sub 6} ligand with Ln

  6. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  7. Purification of Germanium Crystals by Zone Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Kyler; Yang, Gang; Mei, Dongming

    2016-09-01

    Germanium zone refining is one of the most important techniques used to produce high purity germanium (HPGe) single crystals for the fabrication of nuclear radiation detectors. During zone refining the impurities are isolated to different parts of the ingot. In practice, the effective isolation of an impurity is dependent on many parameters, including molten zone travel speed, the ratio of ingot length to molten zone width, and number of passes. By studying the theory of these influential factors, perfecting our cleaning and preparation procedures, and analyzing the origin and distribution of our impurities (aluminum, boron, gallium, and phosphorous) identified using photothermal ionization spectroscopy (PTIS), we have optimized these parameters to produce HPGe. We have achieved a net impurity level of 1010 /cm3 for our zone-refined ingots, measured with van der Pauw and Hall-effect methods. Zone-refined ingots of this purity can be processed into a detector grade HPGe single crystal, which can be used to fabricate detectors for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay detection. This project was financially supported by DOE Grant (DE-FG02-10ER46709) and the State Governor's Research Center.

  8. Habitable Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, D.; Lota, J.

    2012-12-01

    The location of the habitable zone around a star depends upon stellar luminosity and upon the properties of a potentially habitable planet such as its mass and near-surface volatile inventory. Stellar luminosity generally increases as a star ages whilst planetary properties change through time as a consequence of biological and geological evolution. Hence, the location of the habitable zone changes through time as a result of both stellar evolution and planetary evolution. Using the Earth's Phanerozoic temperature history as a constraint, it is shown that changes in our own habitable zone over the last 540 My have been dominated by planetary evolution rather than solar evolution. Furthermore, sparse data from earlier times suggests that planetary evolution may have dominated habitable zone development throughout our biosphere's history. Hence, the existence of a continuously habitable zone depends upon accidents of complex bio-geochemical evolution more than it does upon relatively simple stellar-evolution. Evolution of the inner margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations. Evolution of the outer margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations.

  9. Center for the Integration of Optical Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-15

    their photorefractive properties, calculating the possible interconnect capacities, and collaborating with industry( Brimrose Corp. and Hughes Research...cooperation with Hughes Research Laboratories and Brimrose Corporation we have proceeded with a basic study of CdTe, ZnTe, and the mixed crystals Cd

  10. Center for Electro Optics & Plasma Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    inversely proportional to the diameter of the plasma ring , the device had a large resistance and thus a large portion of the stored energy dissipated within...which produced an array of plasma rings concentric with the dye tube. These plasma rings emitted intense radiation over a wide range of the spectrum. The

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency The prevalence of LHON in ... Nerve Disorders Health Topic: Vision Impairment and Blindness Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Leber hereditary optic neuropathy ...

  12. Converged photonic data storage and switch platform for exascale disaggregated data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitwon, R.; Wang, K.; Worrall, A.

    2017-02-01

    We report on a converged optically enabled Ethernet storage, switch and compute platform, which could support future disaggregated data center architectures. The platform includes optically enabled Ethernet switch controllers, an advanced electro-optical midplane and optically interchangeable generic end node devices. We demonstrate system level performance using optically enabled Ethernet disk drives and micro-servers across optical links of varied lengths.

  13. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  14. Optical interferometer testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwood, Gary H.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on optical interferometer testbed presented at the MIT Space Research Engineering Center 3rd Annual Symposium are included. Topics covered include: space-based optical interferometer; optical metrology; sensors and actuators; real time control hardware; controlled structures technology (CST) design methodology; identification for MIMO control; FEM/ID correlation for the naked truss; disturbance modeling; disturbance source implementation; structure design: passive damping; low authority control; active isolation of lightweight mirrors on flexible structures; open loop transfer function of mirror; and global/high authority control.

  15. Optical Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shlomi; Britz, David M.; Boucouvalas, Anthony C.; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2005-01-01

    center">

    Call for Papers

    Optical Wireless Communications

    Submission Deadline: 1 February 2005

    center">
    Guest Editors:

  16. Center for Adaptive Optics | What is Adaptive Optics

    (?) microns in size. In astronomy, the turbulent atmosphere blurs images to a size of 0.5 to 1 arcsec even at an additional gain in contrast -- for astronomy, where light levels are often very low, this means

  17. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  18. Speeds in school zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    School speed zones are frequently requested traffic controls for school areas, based on the common belief : that if the transportation agency would only install a reduced speed limit, then drivers would no longer : speed through the area. This resear...

  19. Family Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-30

    34 Family Policy," December 30, 1988 o / (b) DoD Directive 4001.1, "Installation Management ,, September 4, 1986 (c) DoD 4165.63-M, "DoD Housing Management ... managing the competing demands of the military mission and the family . They shall provide the information and family services necessary to support single...effectiveness of Family Centers. The evaluation system shall include: (1) A management information report to allow Family Centers to reflect actual workloads

  20. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

    1. Theory of optical absorption by interlayer excitons in transition metal dichalcogenide heterobilayers

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wu, Fengcheng; Lovorn, Timothy; MacDonald, A. H.

      2018-01-01

      We present a theory of optical absorption by interlayer excitons in a heterobilayer formed from transition metal dichalcogenides. The theory accounts for the presence of small relative rotations that produce a momentum shift between electron and hole bands located in different layers, and a moiré pattern in real space. Because of the momentum shift, the optically active interlayer excitons are located at the moiré Brillouin zone's corners, instead of at its center, and would have elliptical optical selection rules if the individual layers were translationally invariant. We show that the exciton moiré potential energy restores circular optical selection rules by coupling excitons with different center of mass momenta. A variety of interlayer excitons with both senses of circular optical activity, and energies that are tunable by twist angle, are present at each valley. The lowest energy exciton states are generally localized near the exciton potential energy minima. We discuss the possibility of using the moiré pattern to achieve scalable two-dimensional arrays of nearly identical quantum dots.

    2. Interactive display system having a scaled virtual target zone

      DOEpatents

      Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

      2006-06-13

      A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector and imaging device cooperate with the panel for projecting a video image thereon. An optical detector bridges at least a portion of the waveguides for detecting a location on the outlet face within a target zone of an inbound light spot. A controller is operatively coupled to the imaging device and detector for displaying a cursor on the outlet face corresponding with the detected location of the spot within the target zone.

    3. Wide acceptance angle, high concentration ratio, optical collector

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Kruer, Mark Arthur (Inventor)

      1990-01-01

      The invention is directed to an optical collector requiring a wide acceptance angle, and a high concentration ratio. The invention is particularly adapted for use in solar collectors of cassegrain design. The optical collector system includes a parabolic circular concave primary mirror and a hyperbolic circular convex secondary mirror. The primary mirror includes a circular hole located at its center wherein a solar collector is located. The mirrored surface of the secondary mirror has three distinct zones: a center circle, an on-axis annulus, and an off-axis section. The parabolic shape of the primary mirror is chosen so that the primary mirror reflects light entering the system on-axis onto the on-axis annulus. A substantial amount of light entering the system off-axis is reflected by the primary mirror onto either the off-axis section or onto the center circle. Subsequently, the off-axis sections reflect the off-axis light toward the solar collector. Thus, off-axis light is captured which would otherwise be lost to the system. The novelty of the system appears to lie in the configuration of the primary mirror which focuses off-axis light onto an annular portion of the secondary mirror to enable capture thereof. This feature results in wide acceptance angle and a high concentration ratio, and also compensates for the effects of non-specular reflection, and enables a cassegrain configuration to be used where such characteristics are required.

    4. Investigation of Optical Fibers for Nonlinear Optics.

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1983-02-01

      fiber made v a hoc extrusi - n method (Ref I). The flber is then olaced between -wo oat f drive rollers, as shown in Figure I. A small heater coil s used...62 C 0030 UNCLASSIFED F/ 020/6 N IND 883 i1 0 1 ___ _Ill ; II 11112 1111121 MICROCOPy RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATNty AFOSR INVESTIGATION OF OPTICAL...3RCWTH The traveling zone method of facr-ca-:no SC iihers -s ’:nike an., other fiber arowth technaue. : n -his mehncd we .a. .wzn a olcr.stzalne (PC

    5. A Fresnel zone plate collimator: potential and aberrations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Menz, Benedikt; Bräuninger, Heinrich; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Predehl, Peter

      2015-09-01

      A collimator, that parallelizes an X-ray beam, provides a significant improvement of the metrology to characterize X-ray optics for space instruments at MPE's PANTER X-ray test facility. A Fresnel zone plate was selected as a collimating optic, as it meets a good angular resolution < 0.1n combined with a large active area > 10 cm2. Such an optic is ideally suited to illuminate Silicon Pore Optic (SPO) modules as proposed for ATHENA. This paper provides the theoretic description of such a Fresnel zone plate especially considering resolution and efficiency. Based on the theoretic results the collimator setup performance is analyzed and requirements for fabrication and alignment are calculated.

    6. Quantifying the Variation in Shear Zone Character with Depth: a Case Study from the Simplon Shear Zone, Central Alps

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cawood, T. K.; Platt, J. P.

      2017-12-01

      A widely-accepted model for the rheology of crustal-scale shear zones states that they comprise distributed strain at depth, in wide, high-temperature shear zones, which narrow to more localized, high-strain zones at lower temperature and shallower crustal levels. We test and quantify this model by investigating how the width, stress, temperature and deformation mechanisms change with depth in the Simplon Shear Zone (SSZ). The SSZ marks a major tectonic boundary in the central Alps, where normal-sense motion and rapid exhumation of the footwall have preserved evidence of older, deeper deformation in rocks progressively further into the currently-exposed footwall. As such, microstructures further from the brittle fault (which represents the most localized, most recently-active part of the SSZ) represent earlier, higher- temperature deformation from deeper crustal levels, while rocks closer to the fault have been overprinted by successively later, cooler deformation at shallower depths. This study uses field mapping and microstructural studies to identify zones representing deformation at various crustal levels, and characterize each in terms of zone width (representing width of the shear zone at that time and depth) and dominant deformation mechanism. In addition, quartz- (by Electron Backscatter Diffraction, EBSD) and feldspar grain size (measured optically) piezometry are used to calculate the flow stress for each zone, while the Ti-in-quartz thermometer (TitaniQ) is used to calculate the corresponding temperature of deformation. We document the presence of a broad zone in which quartz is recrystallized by the Grain Boundary Migration (GBM) mechanism and feldspar by Subgrain Rotation (SGR), which represents the broad, deep zone of deformation occurring at relatively high temperatures and low stresses. In map view, this transitions to successively narrower zones, respectively characterized by quartz SGR and feldspar Bulge Nucleation (BLG); quartz BLG and brittle

    7. Optimized square Fresnel zone plates for microoptics applications

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Rico-García, José María; Salgado-Remacha, Francisco Javier; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Alda, Javier

      2009-06-01

      Polygonal Fresnel zone plates with a low number of sides have deserved attention in micro and nanoptics, because they can be straightforwardly integrated in photonic devices, and, at the same time, they represent a balance between the high-focusing performance of a circular zone plate and the easiness of fabrication at micro and nano-scales of polygons. Among them, the most representative family are Square Fresnel Zone Plates (SFZP). In this work, we propose two different customized designs of SFZP for optical wavelengths. Both designs are based on the optimization of a SFZP to perform as close as possible as a usual Fresnel Zone Plate. In the first case, the criterion followed to compute it is the minimization of the difference between the area covered by the angular sector of the zone of the corresponding circular plate and the one covered by the polygon traced on the former. Such a requirement leads to a customized polygon-like Fresnel zone. The simplest one is a square zone with a pattern of phases repeating each five zones. On the other hand, an alternative SFZP can be designed guided by the same criterion but with a new restriction. In this case, the distance between the borders of different zones remains unaltered. A comparison between the two lenses is carried out. The irradiance at focus is computed for both and suitable merit figures are defined to account for the difference between them.

    8. Characterization on Smart Optics Using Ellipsometry

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Song, Kyo D.

      2002-01-01

      Recently, NASA Langley Research Center developed a smart active optical concept to filter narrow band pass or to control optical intensity. To characterize developed smart optics materials, we have measured thickness and reflection properties of the materials using a WVASE32 ellipsometry. This project allowed us to: (1) prepare the smart optical materials for measurement of thickness and optical properties at NASA Langley Research Center; (2) measure thickness and optical properties of the smart optical materials; (3) evaluate the measured properties in terms of applications for narrow band-pass filters. The outcomes of this research provide optical properties and physical properties of the smart optics on a selected spectral range. The applications of this development were used for field-controlled spectral smart filters.

    9. Mushy zone modeling

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Glicksman, Martin E.; Smith, Richard N.; Marsh, Steven P.; Kuklinski, Robert

      A key element of mushy zone modeling is the description of the microscopic evolution of the lengthscales within the mushy zone and the influence of macroscopic transport processes. This paper describes some recent progress in developing a mean-field statistical theory of phase coarsening in adiabatic mushy zones. The main theoretical predictions are temporal scaling laws that indicate that average lengthscale increases as time 1/3, a self-similar distribution of mushy zone lengthscales based on spherical solid particle shapes, and kinetic rate constants which provide the dependences of the coarsening process on material parameters and the volume fraction of the solid phase. High precision thermal decay experiments are described which verify aspects of the theory in pure material mushy zones held under adiabatic conditions. The microscopic coarsening theory is then integrated within a macroscopic heat transfer model of one-dimensional alloy solidification, using the Double Integral Method. The method demonstrates an ability to predict the influence of macroscopic heat transfer on the evolution of primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings in Al-Cu alloys. Finally, some suggestions are made for future experimental and theoretical studies required in developing comprehensive solidification processing models.

    10. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

      Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

      2003-01-01

      Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

    11. Freeway work zone lane capacity.

      DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

      2009-01-01

      The focus of this report is a capacity analysis of two long-term urban freeway Work Zones. Work Zone #1 : tapered four mainline lanes to two, using two separate tapers; Work Zone #2 tapered two mainline lanes to one. : Work Zone throughput was analyz...

    12. Hybrid RF / Optical Communication Terminal with Spherical Primary Optics for Optical Reception

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Charles, Jeffrey R.; Hoppe, Daniel H.; Sehic, Asim

      2011-01-01

      Future deep space communications are likely to employ not only the existing RF uplink and downlink, but also a high capacity optical downlink. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is currently investigating the benefits of a ground based hybrid RF and deep space optical terminal based on limited modification of existing 34 meter antenna designs. The ideal design would include as large an optical aperture as technically practical and cost effective, cause minimal impact to RF performance, and remain cost effective even when compared to a separate optical terminal of comparable size. Numerous trades and architectures have been considered, including shared RF and optical apertures having aspheric optics and means to separate RF and optical signals, plus, partitioned apertures in which various zones of the primary are dedicated to optical reception. A design based on the latter is emphasized in this paper, employing spherical primary optics and a new version of a "clamshell" corrector that is optimized to fit within the limited space between the antenna sub-reflector and the existing apex structure that supports the subreflector. The mechanical design of the hybrid accommodates multiple spherical primary mirror panels in the central 11 meters of the antenna, and integrates the clamshell corrector and optical receiver modules with antenna hardware using existing attach points to the maximum extent practical. When an optical collection area is implemented on a new antenna, it is possible to design the antenna structure to accommodate the additional weight of optical mirrors providing an equivalent aperture of several meters diameter. The focus of our near term effort is to use optics with the 34 meter DSS-13 antenna at Goldstone to demonstrate spatial optical acquisition and tracking capability using an optical system that is temporarily integrated into the antenna.

    13. A hybrid zone revisited: molecular and morphological analysis of the maintenance, movement, and evolution of a Great Plains avian (Cardinalidae: Pheucticus) hybrid zone

      PubMed Central

      METTLER, R. D.; SPELLMAN, G. M.

      2014-01-01

      Black-headed Grosbeaks (Pheucticus melanocephalus) and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks (Pheucticus ludovicianus) are passerine bird species known to hybridize in the Great Plains of North America. Both extrinsic (environmental) and intrinsic factors (pre- and postzygotic reproductive isolation) have been credited for the generation and maintenance of the grosbeak hybrid zone, but little is known about the genetic characteristics of this hybrid zone. To investigate the stability and extent of the grosbeak hybrid zone, we constructed clines from both molecular sequence data (mtDNA, 3 autosomal intron loci, and 1 Z-linked locus) and morphological data (morphometric analyses and hybrid index scores) to determined zone center and width. Hybrid zone center and width were also determined for samples collected across the zone 40 years ago from morphological data. The present and past clines were compared and provided support for stability in hybrid zone location and width, and the evolutionary implications of this are discussed. Three models of hybrid zone maintenance were investigated to consider the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on this zone. Our results suggest low hybrid frequencies, a stable zone location and narrow width, and reduced hybrid fitness over the past 40 years best categorize the grosbeak hybrid zone as a tension zone. PMID:19619198

    14. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions Support Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Guild, Liane; Kudela, Raphael; Hooker, Stanford; Morrow, John; Russell, Philip; Palacios, Sherry; Livingston, John M.; Negrey, Kendra; Torres-Perez, Juan; Broughton, Jennifer

      2014-01-01

      NASA has a continuing requirement to collect high-quality in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation ocean color satellite sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal is to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue spectral domain to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data are accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Flight operations are presented for the instrument payloads using the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter flown over Monterey Bay during the seasonal fall algal bloom in 2011 (COAST) and 2013 (OCEANIA) to support bio-optical measurements of

    15. Fabrication of an Optical Fiber Micro-Sphere with a Diameter of Several Tens of Micrometers.

      PubMed

      Yu, Huijuan; Huang, Qiangxian; Zhao, Jian

      2014-06-25

      A new method to fabricate an integrated optical fiber micro-sphere with a diameter within 100 µm, based on the optical fiber tapering technique and the Taguchi method is proposed. Using a 125 µm diameter single-mode (SM) optical fiber, an optical fiber taper with a cone angle is formed with the tapering technique, and the fabrication optimization of a micro-sphere with a diameter of less than 100 µm is achieved using the Taguchi method. The optimum combination of process factors levels is obtained, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of three quality evaluation parameters and the significance of each process factors influencing them are selected as the two standards. Using the minimum zone method (MZM) to evaluate the quality of the fabricated optical fiber micro-sphere, a three-dimensional (3D) numerical fitting image of its surface profile and the true sphericity are subsequently realized. From the results, an optical fiber micro-sphere with a two-dimensional (2D) diameter less than 80 µm, 2D roundness error less than 0.70 µm, 2D offset distance between the micro-sphere center and the fiber stylus central line less than 0.65 µm, and true sphericity of about 0.5 µm, is fabricated.

    16. Optical Eigenvector.

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1984-10-01

      it necessary and identify by blckci -. mbrr, ’At tile bneginninp, of this contract , bot], -,-j- .lc the rest of the optical community imagined * that...simple analog optical computer,, could produce satisfactory solutions to elgenproblems. Earl’ - in this contract we improved optical computing... contract both we and the rest of the optical community imagined that simple analog optical computers could produce . satisfactory solutions to

    17. Optical microspectrometer

      DOEpatents

      Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

      2004-05-25

      An optical microspectrometer comprises a grism to disperse the spectra in a line object. A single optical microspectrometer can be used to sequentially scan a planar object, such as a dye-tagged microchip. Because the optical microspectrometer is very compact, multiple optical microspectrometers can be arrayed to provide simultaneous readout across the width of the planar object The optical microspectrometer can be fabricated with lithographic process, such as deep X-ray lithography (DXRL), with as few as two perpendicular exposures.

    18. Buffer Zone Sign Template

      EPA Pesticide Factsheets

      The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

    19. Arid Zone Hydrology

      Arid zone hydrology encompasses a wide range of topics and hydro-meteorological and ecological characteristics. Although arid and semi-arid watersheds perform the same functions as those in humid environments, their hydrology and sediment transport characteristics cannot be readily predicted by inf...

    20. Zone of intrusion study.

      DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

      2010-10-15

      The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF) performed an analysis using LS-DYNA simulation to investigate the zone of intrusion (ZOI) of an NCHRP Report No. 350 2000p pickup truck when impacting a 40-in. high F-shape parapet. : The ZOI for the 40-in...

    1. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

      PubMed

      Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

      Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    2. Crossing Comfort Zones.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Madison, D. Soyini

      1993-01-01

      Offers a narrative based on a real event, in the form of a "docustory," describing that moment when teaching worked--when, in an instructional setting, communication was "perfect" or "excellent." Describes how three very different students, in a course on the cultures of women of color, moved beyond comfort zones while working together on a class…

    3. A Multiple Zone Method for Supersonic Tactical Missiles

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1986-06-01

      6a NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Naval Surface Weapons Center 6b OFFICE SYMBOL (If applicable) R -44 7a NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION 6c...3422a"KrAME~0F R ETPO N S 1 BLETNOTV I DUAL Dr. Andrew IJardlaw n DTIC USERS 21 ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Unclassified 22 ’i^^LELEPHONE...constant, zones are generalized in Figure 4. Each zone is described with respect to ch either represent cylindrical { r ,^,z) or cartesian lindrical

    4. Responding to Industry Demands: Advanced Technology Centers.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Smith, Elizabeth Brient

      1991-01-01

      Discusses characteristics identified by the Center for Occupational Research and Development as indicative of fully functioning advanced technology centers, including the provision of training and retraining in such areas as design, manufacturing, materials science, and electro-optics; technology transfer; demonstration sites; needs assessment;…

    5. Distribution of dilemma zone after intelligent transportation system established

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Deng, Yuanchang; Yang, Huiqin; Wu, Linying

      2017-03-01

      Dilemma zone refers to an area where vehicles can neither clear the intersection during the yellow interval nor stop safely before the stop line. The purpose of this paper is to analyzing the distribution of two types of dilemma zone after intelligent transportation system (ITS) established at Outer Ring Roads signalized intersections in Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center. To collect field data a drone aircraft was used. When calculating the type II dilemma zone's distribution, we considered the information of drivers' aggressiveness, which was classified by driving speed and type I dilemma zone as well. We also compared the two types dilemma zone's distribution before and after ITS established and analyzed the changes, which was brought by ITS.

    6. ITMO Photonics: center of excellence

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Voznesenskaya, Anna; Bougrov, Vladislav; Kozlov, Sergey; Vasilev, Vladimir

      2016-09-01

      ITMO University, the leading Russian center in photonics research and education, has the mission to train highlyqualified competitive professionals able to act in conditions of fast-changing world. This paradigm is implemented through creation of a strategic academic unit ITMO Photonics, the center of excellence concentrating organizational, scientific, educational, financial, laboratory and human resources. This Center has the following features: dissemination of breakthrough scientific results in photonics such as advanced photonic materials, ultrafast optical and quantum information, laser physics, engineering and technologies, into undergraduate and graduate educational programs through including special modules into the curricula and considerable student's research and internships; transformation of the educational process in accordance with the best international educational practices, presence in the global education market in the form of joint educational programs with leading universities, i.e. those being included in the network programs of international scientific cooperation, and international accreditation of educational programs; development of mechanisms for the commercialization of innovative products - results of scientific research; securing financial sustainability of research in the field of photonics of informationcommunication systems via funding increase and the diversification of funding sources. Along with focusing on the research promotion, the Center is involved in science popularization through such projects as career guidance for high school students; interaction between student's chapters of international optical societies; invited lectures of World-famous experts in photonics; short educational programs in optics, photonics and light engineering for international students; contests, Olympics and grants for talented young researchers; social events; interactive demonstrations.

    7. Insights into the base of the critical zone from geophysical logging and groundwater flow testing at U.S. Critical Zone Observatories (CZO) and critical zone study sites (CZs)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Carr, B.; Zhang, Y.; Ren, S.; Flinchum, B. A.; Parsekian, A.; Holbrook, S.; Riebe, C. S.; Moravec, B. G.; Chorover, J.; Pelletier, J. D.; Richter, D. D., Jr.

      2017-12-01

      Four prominent hypotheses exist and predict conceptual models defining the base of the critical zone. These hypotheses lack insights and constraints from borehole data since few deep (> 20 m) boreholes (and even fewer connected wellfields) are present in the U.S. Critical Zone Observatories (CZO) and similar critical zone study sites (CZs). The influence and interaction of fracture presence, fracture density, fracture orientation, groundwater presence and groundwater flow have only begun to be analyzed relative to any definition of the base of the critical zone. In this presentation, we examine each hypothesis by jointly evaluating borehole geophysical logs and groundwater testing datasets collected by the Wyoming Center for Environmental Hydrology and Geophysics (WyCEHG) since 2014 at these deep CZO or CZ boreholes. Deep boreholes allow a unique opportunity to observe the factors influencing groundwater transmissivity/storage capacity within the three main subsurface CZ layers: Unconsolidated (soil/saprolite), Fractured/weathered Bedrock, and Protolith bedrock (i.e. less fractured bedrock). The boreholes used in this study consist of: 1) nine wells of the Blair-Wallis (WY) WyCEHG CZ, 2) two wells in Catalina-Jemez CZO (Valle Caldera NM) and 3) one borehole at the Calhoun (SC) CZO. At this time, these are the only sites that contain boreholes with depths ranging from at least 20 m up to 70m that have been geophysically logged with full-waveform seismic, acoustic and optical televiewer, electric, electromagnetic, flowmeter (impeller and heat pulse), fluid temperature, fluid conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance. Further, the Blair-Wallis CZ site contains five hydraulically connected wells that allow us to estimate formation transmissivity and storage coefficients at increasing scales by conducting: slug tests, FLUTe™ borehole profiling, and cross-hole pumping tests. These well tests provide direct hydraulic data of the bedrock (both fractured and protolith

    8. Systems and methods for enhancing optical information

      DOEpatents

      DeVore, Peter Thomas Setsuda; Chou, Jason T.

      2018-01-02

      An Optical Information Transfer Enhancer System includes a first system for producing an information bearing first optical wave that is impressed with a first information having a first information strength wherein the first optical wave has a first shape. A second system produces a second optical wave. An information strength enhancer module receives the first and said second optical waves and impresses the first optical wave upon the second optical wave via cross-phase modulation (XPM) to produce an information-strength-enhanced second optical wave having a second information strength that is greater than the first information strength of the first optical wave. Following a center-wavelength changer by an Optical Information Transfer Enhancer System improves its performance.

    9. The Optics Option: Preparing For A Career In Optics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hartmann, Rudolf

      1989-04-01

      We live in a visual world. Without vision, our perception of the environment would be severely limited. Visual stimuli are seen, recorded, and processed in many different ways. Astronomy, the process of imaging distant objects, and microscopy, the process of magnifying minute detail, are extensions of vision. Other extensions of vision include seeing things in different spectra, processing images for enhancement, making decisions automatically, and guiding and controlling sophisticated, complex industrial and military equipment. Optics is the study of this vision and its applications. Optics is a fascinating field that is growing rapidly. Students and practitioners of optics are attracted to the field for a variety of reasons. Hobbies such as photography, astronomy, and video recording, as well as academic pursuits, such as a high school physics or science project, may spawn an interest in optics; however, college training is the cornerstone of an optics career. Optics is part of physics, and as such, requires coursework in the areas of geometrical optics, physical optics, spectroscopy, electricity, magnetism, and solid state physics. In addition, mathematics is extremely important for optics design, analysis, and modeling. Optics is the successful synergism of these many disciplines. Many colleges and universities offer undergraduate and graduate optics curricula. Rochester University's Institute of Optics and the Optical Sciences Center of the University of Arizona are the most prestigious of these institutions. Further, such societies as the Optical Society of America (OSA) and the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) offer a wide variety of valuable short courses, tutorials, seminars, and papers at conferences that are held several times a year. Traditional optics fields, such as optometry, the examination of the eye and correction of its defects, or ophthalmology, the study of disease and treatment of the eye, are optics-oriented careers

    10. Terrestrial Zone Exoplanets and Life

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Matthews, Brenda

      2018-01-01

      One of the most exciting results from ALMA has been the detection of significant substructure within protoplanetary disks that can be linked to planet formation processes. For the first time, we are able to observe the process of assembly of material into larger bodies within such disks. It is not possible, however, for ALMA to probe the growth of planets in protoplanetary disks at small radii, i.e., in the terrestrial zone, where we expect rocky terrestrial planets to form. In this regime, the optical depths prohibit observation at the high frequencies observed by ALMA. To probe the effects of planet building processes and detect telltale gaps and signatures of planetary mass bodies at such small separations from the parent star, we require a facility of superior resolution and sensitivity at lower frequencies. The ngVLA is just such a facility. We will present the fundamental science that will be enabled by the ngVLA in protoplanetary disk structure and the formation of planets. In addition, we will discuss the potential for an ngVLA facility to detect the molecules that are the building blocks of life, reaching limits well beyond those reachable with the current generation of telescopes, and also to determine whether such planets will be habitable based on studies of the impact of stars on their nearest planetary neighbours.

    11. Evaluation of Ohio work zone speed zones process.

      DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

      2014-06-01

      This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to determine the effectiveness of Ohio Department of Transportation processes for establishing work zone speed zones. Researchers observed motorists speed choice upstream of a...

    12. Study of intensification zones in a rectangular acoustic cavity

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Peretti, Linda F.; Dowell, Earl H.

      1992-01-01

      The interior acoustic field of a rectangular acoustic cavity, which is excited by the structural vibration of one of its walls, or a portion of the wall, has been studied. Particularly, the spatial variations of sound pressure levels from the peak levels at the boundaries (intensification zones) to the uniform interior are considered. Analytical expressions, which describe the intensification zones, are obtained using the methodology of asymptotic modal analysis. These results agree well with results computed by a discrete summation over all of the modes. The intensification zones were also modeled as a set of oblique waves incident upon a surface. The result for a rigid surface agrees with the asymptotic modal analysis result. In the presence of an absorptive surface, the character of the intensification zone is dramatically changed. The behavior of the acoustic field near an absorptive wall is described by an expression containing the rigid wall result plus additional terms containing impedance information. The important parameter in the intensification zone analysis is the bandwidth to center frequency ratio. The effect of bandwidth is separated from that of center frequency by expanding the expression about the center frequency wave number. The contribution from the bandwidth is second order in bandwidth to center frequency ratio.

    13. Theory of optical absorption by interlayer excitons in transition metal dichalcogenide heterobilayers

      DOE PAGES

      Wu, Fengcheng; Lovorn, Timothy; MacDonald, A. H.

      2018-01-22

      In this paper, we present a theory of optical absorption by interlayer excitons in a heterobilayer formed from transition metal dichalcogenides. The theory accounts for the presence of small relative rotations that produce a momentum shift between electron and hole bands located in different layers, and a moire pattern in real space. Because of the momentum shift, the optically active interlayer excitons are located at the moire Brillouin zone's corners, instead of at its center, and would have elliptical optical selection rules if the individual layers were translationally invariant. We show that the exciton moire potential energy restores circular opticalmore » selection rules by coupling excitons with different center of mass momenta. A variety of interlayer excitons with both senses of circular optical activity, and energies that are tunable by twist angle, are present at each valley. The lowest energy exciton states are generally localized near the exciton potential energy minima. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using the moire pattern to achieve scalable two-dimensional arrays of nearly identical quantum dots.« less

    14. Theory of optical absorption by interlayer excitons in transition metal dichalcogenide heterobilayers

      SciT

      Wu, Fengcheng; Lovorn, Timothy; MacDonald, A. H.

      In this paper, we present a theory of optical absorption by interlayer excitons in a heterobilayer formed from transition metal dichalcogenides. The theory accounts for the presence of small relative rotations that produce a momentum shift between electron and hole bands located in different layers, and a moire pattern in real space. Because of the momentum shift, the optically active interlayer excitons are located at the moire Brillouin zone's corners, instead of at its center, and would have elliptical optical selection rules if the individual layers were translationally invariant. We show that the exciton moire potential energy restores circular opticalmore » selection rules by coupling excitons with different center of mass momenta. A variety of interlayer excitons with both senses of circular optical activity, and energies that are tunable by twist angle, are present at each valley. The lowest energy exciton states are generally localized near the exciton potential energy minima. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using the moire pattern to achieve scalable two-dimensional arrays of nearly identical quantum dots.« less

    15. Astrometry Information Center - Naval Oceanography Portal

      are here: Home › USNO › Astrometry › Astrometry Information Center USNO Logo USNO Navigation Optical/IR Products VLBI-based Products Astrometry Information Center Catalog Information Double Star Information VLBI-based Product Information Info Astrometry Information Center Within the astrometry

    16. Twin Convergence Zones

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      2002-01-01

      NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

    17. Optical to optical interface device

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Oliver, D. S.; Vohl, P.; Nisenson, P.

      1972-01-01

      The development, fabrication, and testing of a preliminary model of an optical-to-optical (noncoherent-to-coherent) interface device for use in coherent optical parallel processing systems are described. The developed device demonstrates a capability for accepting as an input a scene illuminated by a noncoherent radiation source and providing as an output a coherent light beam spatially modulated to represent the original noncoherent scene. The converter device developed under this contract employs a Pockels readout optical modulator (PROM). This is a photosensitive electro-optic element which can sense and electrostatically store optical images. The stored images can be simultaneously or subsequently readout optically by utilizing the electrostatic storage pattern to control an electro-optic light modulating property of the PROM. The readout process is parallel as no scanning mechanism is required. The PROM provides the functions of optical image sensing, modulation, and storage in a single active material.

    18. Metal-Coated Optical Fibers for High Temperature Applications

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Zeakes, Jason; Murphy, Kent; Claus, Richard; Greene, Jonathan; Tran, Tuan

      1996-01-01

      This poster will highlight on-going research at the Virginia Tech Fiber & Electro-Optics Research Center (FEORC) in the area of thin films on optical fibers. Topics will include the sputter deposition of metals and metal; alloys onto optical fiber and fiber optic sensors for innovative applications. Specific information will be available on thin film fiber optic hydrogen sensors, corrosion sensors, and metal-coated optical fiber for high temperature aerospace applications.

    19. Theoretical model of the helium zone plate microscope

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Salvador Palau, Adrià; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

      2017-01-01

      Neutral helium microscopy is a new technique currently under development. Its advantages are the low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms, a potential large depth of field, and the fact that at thermal energies the helium atoms do not penetrate into any solid material. This opens the possibility, among others, for the creation of an instrument that can measure surface topology on the nanoscale, even on surfaces with high aspect ratios. One of the most promising designs for helium microscopy is the zone plate microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by an aperture (skimmer) focused by a Fresnel zone plate onto a sample. The resolution is determined by the focal spot size, which depends on the size of the skimmer, the optics of the system, and the velocity spread of the beam through the chromatic aberrations of the zone plate. An important factor for the optics of the zone plate is the width of the outermost zone, corresponding to the smallest opening in the zone plate. The width of the outermost zone is fabrication limited to around 10 nm with present-day state-of-the-art technology. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and width of the outermost zone. Here we present an optimization model for the helium zone plate microscope. Assuming constant resolution and width of the outermost zone, we are able to reduce the problem to a two-variable problem (zone plate radius and object distance) and we show that for a given beam temperature and pressure, there is always a single intensity maximum. We compare our model with the highest-resolution zone plate focusing images published and show that the intensity can be increased seven times. Reducing the width of the outermost zone to 10 nm leads to an increase in intensity of more than 8000

    20. Optical probe

      DOEpatents

      Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

      1999-01-01

      A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

    1. Optical Solitons

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Taylor, J. R.

      2005-08-01

      1. Optical solitons in fibres: theoretical review A. Hasegawa; 2. Solitons in optical fibres: an experimental account L. F. Mollenauer; 3. All-optical long-distance soliton-based transmission systems K. Smith and L. F. Mollenauer; 4. Nonlinear propagation effects in optical fibres: numerical studies K. J. Blow and N. J. Doran; 5. Soliton-soliton interactions C. Desem and P. L. Chu; 6. Soliton amplification in erbium-doped fibre amplifiers and its application to soliton communication M. Nakazawa; 7. Nonlinear transformation of laser radiation and generation of Raman solitons in optical fibres E. M. Dianov, A. B. Grudinin, A. M. Prokhorov and V. N. Serkin; 8. Generation and compression of femtosecond solitons in optical fibers P. V. Mamyshev; 9. Optical fibre solitons in the presence of higher order dispersion and birefringence C. R. Menyuk and Ping-Kong A. Wai; 10. Dark optical solitons A. M. Weiner; 11. Soliton Raman effects J. R. Taylor; Bibliography; Index.

    2. Optical Solitons

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Taylor, J. R.

      1992-04-01

      1. Optical solitons in fibres: theoretical review A. Hasegawa; 2. Solitons in optical fibres: an experimental account L. F. Mollenauer; 3. All-optical long-distance soliton-based transmission systems K. Smith and L. F. Mollenauer; 4. Nonlinear propagation effects in optical fibres: numerical studies K. J. Blow and N. J. Doran; 5. Soliton-soliton interactions C. Desem and P. L. Chu; 6. Soliton amplification in erbium-doped fibre amplifiers and its application to soliton communication M. Nakazawa; 7. Nonlinear transformation of laser radiation and generation of Raman solitons in optical fibres E. M. Dianov, A. B. Grudinin, A. M. Prokhorov and V. N. Serkin; 8. Generation and compression of femtosecond solitons in optical fibers P. V. Mamyshev; 9. Optical fibre solitons in the presence of higher order dispersion and birefringence C. R. Menyuk and Ping-Kong A. Wai; 10. Dark optical solitons A. M. Weiner; 11. Soliton Raman effects J. R. Taylor; Bibliography; Index.

    3. Optically induced melting of colloidal crystals and their recrystallization.

      PubMed

      Harada, Masashi; Ishii, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroshi

      2007-04-15

      Colloidal crystals melt by applying focused light of optical tweezers and recrystallize after removing it. The disturbed zone by the light grows radially from the focus point and the ordering starts from the interface with the crystal. Although the larger disturbed zone is observed for the higher power optical tweezers, a master curve is extracted by normalization of the disturbed zone. The temporal changes of the normalized disturbed zone are well described with exponential functions, indicating that the melting and recrystallization process is governed by a simple relaxation mechanism.

    4. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

      DOEpatents

      Faybishenko, Boris A.

      2005-10-25

      A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

    5. Aeration Zone Symposium

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Merkel, B.

      The International Symposium on Recent Investigations in the Zone of Aeration (RIZA) was organized by the Institute for Hydrogeology and Hydrochemistry of the Technical University of Munich and held October 1-5, 1984, in the lecture halls of the Grosshadern Klinik in Munich, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). P. Udluft, B. Merkel, and K.-H. Prüsl, all of the university, were responsible for the organization of the symposium, which was under the patronage of K.-E. Quentin. There were over 200 participants from 22 different countries, among them Australia, Canada, China, India, and the United States. The topics of the symposium were the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes in the unsaturated zone, the region between the surface and the groundwater level. Here a number of complex processes occur that on the one hand are of natural origin and on the other hand are influenced by human activities in a number of ways.

    6. Coherent optical modulation for antenna remoting

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Fitzmartin, D. J.; Gels, R. G.; Balboni, E. J.

      1991-01-01

      A coherent fiber optic link employing wideband frequency modulation (FM) of the optical carrier is used to transfer radio frequency (RF) or microwave signals. This system is used to link a remotely located antenna to a conveniently located electronics processing site. The advantages of coherent analog fiber optic systems over non-coherent intensity modulated fiber optic analog transmission systems are described. An optical FM link employing an indirect transmitter to frequency modulate the optical carrier and a microwave delay line discriminator receiver is described. Measured performance data for a video signal centered at 60 MHz is presented showing the use of wideband FM in the link.

    7. Optical keyboard

      SciT

      Veligdan, James T.; Feichtner, John D.; Phillips, Thomas E.

      2001-01-01

      An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

    8. Crash characteristics at work zones.

      DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

      2002-01-01

      Work zones tend to cause hazardous conditions for drivers and construction workers since they generate conflicts between construction activities and traffic. A clear understanding of the characteristics of work zone crashes will enhance the selection...

    9. Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System

      EPA Pesticide Factsheets

      This page provides an overview Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System water quality modeling and decision support system designed for environmental impact assessment of mixing zones resulting from wastewater discharge from point sources

    10. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

      DOEpatents

      Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

      2011-12-27

      A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

    11. Work zone intrusion alarm effectiveness.

      DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

      2010-09-01

      16. Abstract : The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) commissioned a study to evaluate how : effective a work zone safety device known as the SonoBlaster! Work Zone Intrusion Alarm would be : in protecting maintenance workers fro...

    12. Trojans in habitable zones.

      PubMed

      Schwarz, Richard; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Dvorak, Rudolf; Erdi, Balint; Sándor, Zsolt

      2005-10-01

      With the aid of numerical experiments we examined the dynamical stability of fictitious terrestrial planets in 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jovian-like planets of extrasolar planetary systems. In our stability study of the so-called "Trojan" planets in the habitable zone, we used the restricted three-body problem with different mass ratios of the primary bodies. The application of the three-body problem showed that even massive Trojan planets can be stable in the 1:1 mean motion resonance. From the 117 extrasolar planetary systems only 11 systems were found with one giant planet in the habitable zone. Out of this sample set we chose four planetary systems--HD17051, HD27442, HD28185, and HD108874--for further investigation. To study the orbital behavior of the stable zone in the different systems, we used direct numerical computations (Lie Integration Method) that allowed us to determine the escape times and the maximum eccentricity of the fictitious "Trojan planets."

    13. Optic neuritis

      MedlinePlus

      ... optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The nerve can swell when it becomes suddenly ... may include: Color vision testing MRI of the brain , including special images of the optic nerve Visual acuity testing Visual field testing Examination of the ...

    14. Distributed Active Archive Center

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

      1993-01-01

      The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

    15. Correlation analysis of the optics of progressive addition lenses.

      PubMed

      Sheedy, James E

      2004-05-01

      To investigate the relations between selected key optical parameters and the sizes of the clear viewing areas of progressive addition lenses (PALs). The optics of 28 PALs (plano with +2.00 D add) currently on the market were measured with a Rotlex Class Plus lens analyzer. Horizontal cross sections were analyzed in 1 mm vertical steps with respect to the fitting cross. Distance, intermediate, and near viewing zone widths and areas were calculated from the measurements. The maximum amount of unwanted astigmatism, minimum zone width (0.50 DC limit), and maximum power rate in the corridor were also recorded for each lens. Correlation coefficients were determined for all relations. Each of the three viewing zone areas had a significant negative relation with the other (r of -0.4 to -0.8), indicating design tradeoff. Maximum power rate was significantly related to minimum zone width (r = -0.695), which was significantly related to maximum astigmatism (r = -0.616), but there was not a significant relation between maximum power rate and maximum astigmatism. Higher power rates and narrower minimum zones were significantly related to smaller intermediate and larger near zones (r = 0.4 to 0.9). Maximum astigmatism was related to distance zone width (r = 0.42) and to intermediate zone size (r = -0.4 to -0.56), but not significantly related to near viewing zone. Power rate and astigmatism each vary relatively uniformly across each lens. The fundamental relation appears to be between power rate and zone width, each of which is highly related to sizes of the intermediate and near viewing zones. The maximum amount of astigmatism is related to zone width, but not to maximum power rate. The amount of astigmatism is unrelated to the size of the near zone. The pattern of correlations between the optical and viewing zone parameters help identify the underlying optical relations of PALs.

    16. Purification of selenium by zone refining

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Burger, A.; Henderson, D. O.; Morgan, S. H.; Feng, J.; Silberman, E.

      1990-11-01

      We studied the purification of Se using zone refining, with emphasis on the efficiency of this technique in removing the Cu impurity, which is known to be related to a trapping center in CdSe. After 78 passes it was found that Cu accumulates at one end section of the ingot, while at the opposite end the level was below the detection limit of the atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis employed. Infrared spectroscopic data, differential solubility and differential scanning calorimetry measurements also indicate that the effective distribution coefficient, k, for the Cu solute, is less than 1. A model for the various phases present during zone melting is presented and the possibility of segregating impurities having k>1 is discussed.

    17. Fluidic optics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Whitesides, George M.; Tang, Sindy K. Y.

      2006-09-01

      Fluidic optics is a new class of optical system with real-time tunability and reconfigurability enabled by the introduction of fluidic components into the optical path. We describe the design, fabrication, operation of a number of fluidic optical systems, and focus on three devices, liquid-core/liquid-cladding (L2) waveguides, microfluidic dye lasers, and diffraction gratings based on flowing, crystalline lattices of bubbles, to demonstrate the integration of microfluidics and optics. We fabricate these devices in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with soft-lithographic techniques. They are simple to construct, and readily integrable with microanalytical or lab-on-a-chip systems.

    18. 78 FR 75331 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 100-Dayton, Ohio; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; THOR...

      Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

      2013-12-11

      ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [B-104-2013] Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 100--Dayton, Ohio; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; THOR Industries, Inc. (Commercial Bus Manufacturing); Jackson Center, Ohio The Greater Dayton Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 100, submitted a notification of proposed production activit...

    19. National Health Information Center

      MedlinePlus

      ... About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health Information Center (NHIC) is ... of interest View the NHO calendar . Federal Health Information Centers and Clearinghouses Federal Health Information Centers and ...

    20. Optical Access Networks

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

      2005-01-01

      center">Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks

      center">Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology

      center">Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

      Background

      With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the

    1. First clinical evaluation of a new percutaneous optical fiber glucose sensor for continuous glucose monitoring in diabetes.

      PubMed

      Müller, Achim Josef; Knuth, Monika; Nikolaus, Katharina Sibylle; Krivánek, Roland; Küster, Frank; Hasslacher, Christoph

      2013-01-01

      This article describes a new fiber-coupled, percutaneous fluorescent continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system that has shown 14 days of functionality in a human clinical trial. The new optical CGM system (FiberSense) consists of a transdermal polymer optical fiber containing a biochemical glucose sensor and a small fluorescence photometer optically coupled to the fiber. The glucose-sensitive optical fiber was implanted in abdominal and upper-arm subcutaneous tissue of six diabetes patients and remained there for up to 14 days. The performance of the system was monitored during six visits to the study center during the trial. Blood glucose changes were induced by oral carbohydrate intake and insulin injections, and capillary blood glucose samples were obtained from the finger tip. The data were analyzed using linear regression and the consensus error grid analysis. The FiberSense worn at the upper arm exhibited excellent results during 14 wearing days, with an overall mean absolute relative difference (MARD) of 8.3% and 94.6% of the data in zone A of the consensus error grid. At the abdominal application site, FiberSense resulted in a MARD of 11.4 %, with 93.8% of the data in zone A. The FiberSense CGM system provided consistent, reliable measurements of subcutaneous glucose levels in human clinical trial patients with diabetes for up to 14 days. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

    2. Laser-Based Acousto-Optic Uplink Communications Technique

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2003-08-18

      An apparatus for enabling acousto - optic communication comprising an in-water platform comprising means for emitting an acoustic signal to an acousto ...portion of the first interrogation beam and a second laser beam formed from the reflection of the first interrogation beam off of the acousto - optic interaction... optic interaction zone, an in-air platform comprising the ability for transmitting a first optical interrogation beam, the ability for receiving a

    3. The generalized mean zone plate

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Xia, Tian; Cheng, Shubo; Tao, Shaohua

      2018-06-01

      In this paper a generalized mean zone plate is proposed, which generates twin foci located at the positions satisfying the expression of the generalized mean, which includes the m-golden mean, precious mean, and so on. The generalized mean zone plate can be designed to generate twin foci with various position ratios. The diffraction properties of the generalized mean zone plates have been investigated with simulations and experiments. The results show that the ratio of the positions of the twin foci for the generalized mean zone plate can be designed with the selected zone plate parameters.

    4. Sub-25-nm laboratory x-ray microscopy using a compound Fresnel zone plate.

      PubMed

      von Hofsten, Olov; Bertilson, Michael; Reinspach, Julia; Holmberg, Anders; Hertz, Hans M; Vogt, Ulrich

      2009-09-01

      Improving the resolution in x-ray microscopes is of high priority to enable future applications in nanoscience. However, high-resolution zone-plate optics often have low efficiency, which makes implementation in laboratory microscopes difficult. We present a laboratory x-ray microscope based on a compound zone plate. The compound zone plate utilizes multiple diffraction orders to achieve high resolution while maintaining reasonable efficiency. We analyze the illumination conditions necessary for this type of optics in order to suppress stray light and demonstrate microscopic imaging resolving 25 nm features.

    5. Recent Advances in Hyporheic Zone Science

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hester, E. T.

      2017-12-01

      The hyporheic zone exists beneath and adjacent to streams and rivers where surface water and groundwater interact. It provides unique habitat for aquatic organisms, can buffer surface water temperatures, and can be highly reactive, processing nutrients and improving water quality. The hyporheic zone is the subject of considerable research and the past year in WRR witnessed important conceptual advances. A key focus was rigorous evaluation of mixing between surface water and groundwater that occurs within hyporheic sediments. Field observations indicate that greater mixing occurs in the hyporheic zone than in deeper groundwater, and this distinction has been explored by recent numerical modeling studies, but more research is needed to fully understand the causes. A commentary this year in WRR proposed that hyporheic mixing is enhanced by a combination of fluctuating boundary conditions and multiscale physical and chemical spatial heterogeneity but confirmation is left to future research. This year also witnessed the boundaries of knowledge pushed back in a number of other key areas. Field quantification of hyporheic exchange and reactions benefited from advances including the use and interpretation of high frequency nutrient sensors, actively heater fiber optic sensors, isotope tracers, and geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity imaging. Conceptual advances were made in understanding the effects of unsteady environmental conditions (e.g., tides and storms) and preferential flow on hyporheic processes. Finally, hyporheic science is being brought increasingly to bear on applied issues such as informing nutrient removal crediting for stream restoration practices, for example in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

    6. Liquid zone seal

      DOEpatents

      Klebanoff, Leonard E.

      2001-01-01

      A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

    7. Smartphones and Time Zones

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Baird, William; Secrest, Jeffery; Padgett, Clifford; Johnson, Wayne; Hagrelius, Claire

      2016-09-01

      Using the Sun to tell time is an ancient idea, but we can take advantage of modern technology to bring it into the 21st century for students in astronomy, physics, or physical science classes. We have employed smartphones, Google Earth, and 3D printing to find the moment of local noon at two widely separated locations. By reviewing GPS time-stamped photos from each place, we are able to illustrate that local noon is longitude-dependent and therefore explain the need for time zones.

    8. Marginal Ice Zone Bibliography.

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1985-06-01

      A Voyage of Discovery. George Deacon 70th An-niversary Volume, (M. Angel, ed.), Pergamon Press, Oxford, p.15-41. Coachman, L.K., C.A. Barnes, 1961...some polar contrasts. In: S "" RUsium on Antarctic Ice and Water Masses, ( George Deacon, ed.), Sci- 72 Lebedev, A.A., 1968: Zone of possible icing of...Atlantic and Western Europe. British Meteorological Office. Geophysical Memoirs, 4(41). Brost , R.A., J.C. Wyngaard, 1978: A model study of the stably

    9. Convergence Zone over the Patagonian Shelf

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      2002-01-01

      The bright waters off the east coast of Argentina mark the convergence of the Malvinas and Brazil Currents. The interaction of the two currents brings nutrients from the dark ocean depths to the sunlit surface, resulting in dense blooms of phytoplankton, especially in the spring and early summer. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) imaged the area on November 29, 2001. For more information, read Convergence Zones: Where the Action Is Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

    10. Optical properties of Pr-doped BaY2F8

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Andrade, Adriano B.; de Mello, Ana C. S.; Rezende, Marcos V. dos S.; Baldochi, Sonia L.; Valerio, Mário E. G.

      2014-08-01

      Crystalline samples of Pr-doped BaY2F8 (BaYF) were prepared by zone melting technique. The pure phase obtained was identified by X-ray diffraction measurement. Optical absorption result was evaluated and it showed that the formation of the absorption bands can be connected to color centers generated by radiation in the matrix. Radioluminescence emission measurements after excitation by X-ray showed that the material exhibited components responsible for long lasting phosphorescence. Short decay times were also evaluated, the measurements showed a fast component around 70 ns associated to the 4f15d1 → 4f2 transition of the Pr3+ ion. The Thermoluminescence (TL) results indicate the presence of two trapping centers.

    11. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1991-01-01

      Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

    12. High Efficiency Photonic Switch for Data Centers

      SciT

      LaComb, Lloyd J.; Bablumyan, Arkady; Ordyan, Armen

      2016-12-06

      The worldwide demand for instant access to information is driving internet growth rates above 50% annually. This rapid growth is straining the resources and architectures of existing data centers, metro networks and high performance computer centers. If the current business as usual model continues, data centers alone will require 400TWhr of electricity by 2020. In order to meet the challenges of a faster and more cost effective data centers, metro networks and supercomputing facilities, we have demonstrated a new type of optical switch that will support transmissions speeds up to 1Tb/s, and requires significantly less energy per bit than

    13. Electro-optic component mounting device

      DOEpatents

      Gruchalla, M.E.

      1994-09-13

      A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor of the transmission line has an aperture formed therein for receiving the device. The aperture splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material. One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the center conductor and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface. The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device. 10 figs.

    14. Electro-optic component mounting device

      DOEpatents

      Gruchalla, Michael E.

      1994-01-01

      A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device (50) in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor (52) of the transmission line has an aperture (58) formed therein for receiving the device (50). The aperture (58) splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface (54), which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material (56). One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device (50) is directly connected to the center conductor 52 and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface (54). The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage ( 60) formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device.

    15. Relationship Between Optimal Gain and Coherence Zone in Flight Simulation

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Gracio, Bruno Jorge Correia; Pais, Ana Rita Valente; vanPaassen, M. M.; Mulder, Max; Kely, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

      2011-01-01

      In motion simulation the inertial information generated by the motion platform is most of the times different from the visual information in the simulator displays. This occurs due to the physical limits of the motion platform. However, for small motions that are within the physical limits of the motion platform, one-to-one motion, i.e. visual information equal to inertial information, is possible. It has been shown in previous studies that one-to-one motion is often judged as too strong, causing researchers to lower the inertial amplitude. When trying to measure the optimal inertial gain for a visual amplitude, we found a zone of optimal gains instead of a single value. Such result seems related with the coherence zones that have been measured in flight simulation studies. However, the optimal gain results were never directly related with the coherence zones. In this study we investigated whether the optimal gain measurements are the same as the coherence zone measurements. We also try to infer if the results obtained from the two measurements can be used to differentiate between simulators with different configurations. An experiment was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center which used both the Cockpit Motion Facility and the Visual Motion Simulator. The results show that the inertial gains obtained with the optimal gain are different than the ones obtained with the coherence zone measurements. The optimal gain is within the coherence zone.The point of mean optimal gain was lower and further away from the one-to-one line than the point of mean coherence. The zone width obtained for the coherence zone measurements was dependent on the visual amplitude and frequency. For the optimal gain, the zone width remained constant when the visual amplitude and frequency were varied. We found no effect of the simulator configuration in both the coherence zone and optimal gain measurements.

    16. [Current approach to zoning atomic shipbuilding plants].

      PubMed

      Blekher, A Ia

      2005-01-01

      The paper discusses the currently introduced radiation-and-hygienic system for zoning atomic shipbuilding plants, in accordance with which three radiation-and-hygienic zones (a strict regime zone, a controlled approach zone, and a free regime zone) are established at the plant site and two zones (a sanitary-and-protective zone and a follow-up zone) are also established outside the plant site.

    17. Optical computing.

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Stroke, G. W.

      1972-01-01

      Applications of the optical computer include an approach for increasing the sharpness of images obtained from the most powerful electron microscopes and fingerprint/credit card identification. The information-handling capability of the various optical computing processes is very great. Modern synthetic-aperture radars scan upward of 100,000 resolvable elements per second. Fields which have assumed major importance on the basis of optical computing principles are optical image deblurring, coherent side-looking synthetic-aperture radar, and correlative pattern recognition. Some examples of the most dramatic image deblurring results are shown.

    18. Optical trapping

      PubMed Central

      Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

      2006-01-01

      Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

    19. Fresnel zone plate light field spectral imaging simulation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hallada, Francis D.; Franz, Anthony L.; Hawks, Michael R.

      2017-05-01

      Through numerical simulation, we have demonstrated a novel snapshot spectral imaging concept using binary diffractive optics. Binary diffractive optics, such as Fresnel zone plates (FZP) or photon sieves, can be used as the single optical element in a spectral imager that conducts both imaging and dispersion. In previous demonstrations of spectral imaging with diffractive optics, the detector array was physically translated along the optic axis to measure different image formation planes. In this new concept the wavelength-dependent images are constructed synthetically, by using integral photography concepts commonly applied to light field (plenoptic) cameras. Light field cameras use computational digital refocusing methods after exposure to make images at different object distances. Our concept refocuses to make images at different wavelengths instead of different object distances. The simulations in this study demonstrate this concept for an imager designed with a FZP. Monochromatic light from planar sources is propagated through the system to a measurement plane using wave optics in the Fresnel approximation. Simple images, placed at optical infinity, are illuminated by monochromatic sources and then digitally refocused to show different spectral bins. We show the formation of distinct images from different objects, illuminated by monochromatic sources in the VIS/NIR spectrum. Additionally, this concept could easily be applied to imaging in the MWIR and LWIR ranges. In conclusion, this new type of imager offers a rugged and simple optical design for snapshot spectral imaging and warrants further development.

    20. An Optical Receiver Post Processing System for the Integrated Radio and Optical Communications Software Defined Radio Test Bed

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Nappier, Jennifer M.; Tokars, Roger P.; Wroblewski, Adam C.

      2016-01-01

      The Integrated Radio and Optical Communications (iROC) project at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Glenn Research Center is investigating the feasibility of a hybrid radio frequency (RF) and optical communication system for future deep space missions. As a part of this investigation, a test bed for a radio frequency (RF) and optical software defined radio (SDR) has been built. Receivers and modems for the NASA deep space optical waveform are not commercially available so a custom ground optical receiver system has been built. This paper documents the ground optical receiver, which is used in order to test the RF and optical SDR in a free space optical communications link.

    1. An Optical Receiver Post-Processing System for the Integrated Radio and Optical Communications Software Defined Radio Test Bed

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Nappier, Jennifer M.; Tokars, Roger P.; Wroblewski, Adam C.

      2016-01-01

      The Integrated Radio and Optical Communications (iROC) project at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Glenn Research Center is investigating the feasibility of a hybrid radio frequency (RF) and optical communication system for future deep space missions. As a part of this investigation, a test bed for a radio frequency (RF) and optical software defined radio (SDR) has been built. Receivers and modems for the NASA deep space optical waveform are not commercially available so a custom ground optical receiver system has been built. This paper documents the ground optical receiver, which is used in order to test the RF and optical SDR in a free space optical communications link.

    2. Perspective and potential of smart optical materials

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Choi, Sang H.; Duzik, Adam J.; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yeonjoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Ko, Hyun-U.; Kim, Hyun-Chan; Yun, Sungryul; Kyung, Ki-Uk

      2017-09-01

      The increasing requirements of hyperspectral imaging optics, electro/photo-chromic materials, negative refractive index metamaterial optics, and miniaturized optical components from micro-scale to quantum-scale optics have all contributed to new features and advancements in optics technology. Development of multifunctional capable optics has pushed the boundaries of optics into new fields that require new disciplines and materials to maximize the potential benefits. The purpose of this study is to understand and show the fundamental materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics (referred to as smart optics) that are essential for future industrial, scientific, military, and space applications, such as membrane optics, filters, windows for sensors and probes, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras, light valves, light switches, and flat-panel displays. The proposed smart optics are based on the Stark and Zeeman effects in materials tailored with quantum dot arrays and thin films made from readily polarizable materials via ferroelectricity or ferromagnetism. Bound excitonic states of organic crystals are also capable of optical adaptability, tunability, and reconfigurability. To show the benefits of smart optics, this paper reviews spectral characteristics of smart optical materials and device technology. Experiments testing the quantum-confined Stark effect, arising from rare earth element doping effects in semiconductors, and applied electric field effects on spectral and refractive index are discussed. Other bulk and dopant materials were also discovered to have the same aspect of shifts in spectrum and refractive index. Other efforts focus on materials for creating field-controlled spectrally smart active optics on a selected spectral range. Surface plasmon polariton transmission of light through apertures is also discussed, along with potential applications. New breakthroughs in micro scale multiple zone plate optics as a micro

    3. Revealing Optical Components

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      2002-01-01

      The Optical Vector Analyzer (OVA) 1550 significantly reduces the time and cost of testing sophisticated optical components. The technology grew from the research Luna Technologies' Dr. Mark Froggatt conducted on optical fiber strain measurement while working at Langley Research Center. Dr. Froggatt originally developed the technology for non- destructive evaluation testing at Langley. The new technique can provide 10,000 independent strain measurements while adding less than 10 grams to the weight of the vehicle. The OVA is capable of complete linear characterization of single-mode optical components used in high- bit-rate applications. The device can test most components over their full range in less than 30 seconds, compared to the more than 20 minutes required by other testing methods. The dramatically shortened measurement time results in increased efficiency in final acceptance tests of optical devices, and the comprehensive data produced by the instrument adds considerable value for component consumers. The device eliminates manufacturing bottlenecks, while reducing labor costs and wasted materials during production.

    4. Optical communication for space missions

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Firtmaurice, M.

      1991-01-01

      Activities performed at NASA/GSFC (Goddard Space Flight Center) related to direct detection optical communications for space applications are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) requirements for optical communication systems (data rates and channel quality; spatial acquisition; fine tracking and pointing; and transmit point-ahead correction); (2) component testing and development (laser diodes performance characterization and life testing; and laser diode power combining); (3) system development and simulations (The GSFC pointing, acquisition and tracking system; hardware description; preliminary performance analysis; and high data rate transmitter/receiver systems); and (4) proposed flight demonstration of optical communications.

    5. Practice Oriented Master's in Optics

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Dimmock, John O.

      1997-01-01

      This award provides support for the development and initial implementation of an interdisciplinary Master's Program with a concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology. This program is a collaboration between the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Alabama A&M University, Northwest Shoals Community College, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the U. S. Army Missile Command, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Institute for Standards and Technology, Advanced Optical Systems Inc., Dynetics, Inc., Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, Inc., Nichols Research Corp., SCI Inc., and Speedring Inc. These organizations have been participating fully in the design, development and implementation of the program. This program is directed at both traditional students as well as government and defense workers who desire specialty education in practical optics and optical systems design and manufacturing. It is intended to produce highly trained graduates who can solve practical problems, and includes an on-site practicum at a manufacturing location. The broad curriculum of this program emphasizes the fundamentals of optics, optical systems manufacturing and testing, and the principles of design and manufacturing-to-cost for commercial optical products. The degrees offered are the MS in Physics and the MSE in Electrical Engineering with concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology through the Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering departments of UAH with support from and in consultation with the Steering Committee composed of representatives from each of the participating organizations plus a student representative.

    6. Practice Oriented Master's in Optics

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Dimmock, John O.

      1996-01-01

      This award provides support for the development and initial implementation of an interdisciplinary Master's Program with a concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology. This program is a collaboration between the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Alabama A and M University, Northwest Shoals Community College, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the U.S. Army Missile Command, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Institute for Standards and Technology, Advanced Optical Systems Inc., Dynetics, Inc., Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, Inc., Nichols Research Corp., SCI Inc., and Speedring Inc. These organizations have been participating fully in the design, development and implementation of the program. This program is directed at both traditional students as well as government and defense workers who desire specialty education in practical optics and optical systems design and manufacturing. It is intended to produce highly trained graduates who can solve practical problems, and includes an on-site practicum at a manufacturing location. The broad curriculum of this program emphasizes the fundamentals of optics, optical systems manufacturing and testing, and the principles of design and manufacturing-to-cost for commercial optical products. The degrees offered are the MS in Physics and the MSE in Electrical Engineering with concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology through the Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering departments of UAH with support from and in consultation with the Steering Committee composed of representatives from each of the participating organizations plus a student representative.

    7. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

      DOEpatents

      Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

      2016-05-17

      A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

    8. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

      DOEpatents

      Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

      2012-11-06

      A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

    9. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

      DOEpatents

      Poshusta, Joseph C; Booten, Charles W; Martin, Jerry L

      2013-12-24

      A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

    10. Breathing zone air sampler

      DOEpatents

      Tobin, John

      1989-01-01

      A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

    11. Meaning of visualizing retinal cone mosaic on adaptive optics images.

      PubMed

      Jacob, Julie; Paques, Michel; Krivosic, Valérie; Dupas, Bénédicte; Couturier, Aude; Kulcsar, Caroline; Tadayoni, Ramin; Massin, Pascale; Gaudric, Alain

      2015-01-01

      To explore the anatomic correlation of the retinal cone mosaic on adaptive optics images. Retrospective nonconsecutive observational case series. A retrospective review of the multimodal imaging charts of 6 patients with focal alteration of the cone mosaic on adaptive optics was performed. Retinal diseases included acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (n = 1), hydroxychloroquine retinopathy (n = 1), and macular telangiectasia type 2 (n = 4). High-resolution retinal images were obtained using a flood-illumination adaptive optics camera. Images were recorded using standard imaging modalities: color and red-free fundus camera photography; infrared reflectance scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. On OCT, in the marginal zone of the lesions, a disappearance of the interdigitation zone was observed, while the ellipsoid zone was preserved. Image recording demonstrated that such attenuation of the interdigitation zone co-localized with the disappearance of the cone mosaic on adaptive optics images. In 1 case, the restoration of the interdigitation zone paralleled that of the cone mosaic after a 2-month follow-up. Our results suggest that the interdigitation zone could contribute substantially to the reflectance of the cone photoreceptor mosaic. The absence of cones on adaptive optics images does not necessarily mean photoreceptor cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    12. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1987-01-01

      The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

    13. Surface deformation in volcanic rift zones

      Pollard, D.D.; Delaney, P.T.; Duffield, W.A.; Endo, E.T.; Okamura, A.T.

      1983-01-01

      The principal conduits for magma transport within rift zones of basaltic volcanoes are steeply dipping dikes, some of which feed fissure eruptions. Elastic displacements accompanying a single dike emplacement elevate the flanks of the rift relative to a central depression. Concomitant normal faulting may transform the depression into a graben thus accentuating the topographic features of the rift. If eruption occurs the characteristic ridge-trough-ridge displacement profile changes to a single ridge, centered at the fissure, and the erupted lava alters the local topography. A well-developed rift zone owes its structure and topography to the integrated effects of many magmatic rifting events. To investigate this process we compute the elastic displacements and stresses in a homogeneous, two-dimensional half-space driven by a pressurized crack that may breach the surface. A derivative graphical method permits one to estimate the three geometric parameters of the dike (height, inclination, and depth-to-center) and the mechanical parameter (driving pressure/rock stiffness) from a smoothly varying displacement profile. Direct comparison of measured and theoretical profiles may be used to estimate these parameters even if inelastic deformation, notably normal faulting, creates discontinuities in the profile. Geological structures (open cracks, normal faults, buckles, and thrust faults) form because of stresses induced by dike emplacement and fissure eruption. Theoretical stress states associated with dilation of a pressurized crack are used to interpret the distribution and orientation of these structures and their role in rift formation. ?? 1983.

    14. Camera Optics.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Ruiz, Michael J.

      1982-01-01

      The camera presents an excellent way to illustrate principles of geometrical optics. Basic camera optics of the single-lens reflex camera are discussed, including interchangeable lenses and accessories available to most owners. Several experiments are described and results compared with theoretical predictions or manufacturer specifications.…

    15. Optical Disks.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Gale, John C.; And Others

      1985-01-01

      This four-article section focuses on information storage capacity of the optical disk covering the information workstation (uses microcomputer, optical disk, compact disc to provide reference information, information content, work product support); use of laser videodisc technology for dissemination of agricultural information; encoding databases…

    16. Optical biosensors.

      PubMed

      Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

      2016-06-30

      Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

    17. Fuel conditioning facility zone-to-zone transfer administrative controls.

      SciT

      Pope, C. L.

      2000-06-21

      The administrative controls associated with transferring containers from one criticality hazard control zone to another in the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) are described. FCF, located at the ANL-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, is used to remotely process spent sodium bonded metallic fuel for disposition. The process involves nearly forty widely varying material forms and types, over fifty specific use container types, and over thirty distinct zones where work activities occur. During 1999, over five thousand transfers from one zone to another were conducted. Limits are placed on mass, material form and type, and container typesmore » for each zone. Ml material and containers are tracked using the Mass Tracking System (MTG). The MTG uses an Oracle database and numerous applications to manage the database. The database stores information specific to the process, including material composition and mass, container identification number and mass, transfer history, and the operators involved in each transfer. The process is controlled using written procedures which specify the zone, containers, and material involved in a task. Transferring a container from one zone to another is called a zone-to-zone transfer (ZZT). ZZTs consist of four distinct phases, select, request, identify, and completion.« less

    18. Multiplexing and Filtering of Optical Signals.

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1977-06-01

      A0-A017 22« SPERRY RESEARCH CENTER SUOBURY MASS MULTIPLEXING ANO FILTERING OF OPTICAL SIGNALS.(U) JUN 77 A R NELSON UNCLASSIFIED SCRC-CR-77...0 F/G 20/6 Nil <r Research and Development Technical Report ECOM -76-1343-F MULTIPLEXING AND FILTERING OF OPTICAL SIGNALS A. R...Nelson SPERRY RESEARCH CENTER 100 North Road Sudbury, MA 01776 June 1977 Final Report for Period 29 April 1976 - 29 April 1977 DISTRIBUTION

    19. Molecular differences in transition zone and peripheral zone prostate tumors

      PubMed Central

      Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Rider, Jennifer R.; Carlsson, Jessica; Gerke, Travis; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Penney, Kathryn L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Loda, Massimo; Fall, Katja; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Pawitan, Yudi; Andersson, Sven-Olof; Andrén, Ove

      2015-01-01

      Prostate tumors arise primarily in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate, but 20–30% arise in the transition zone (TZ). Zone of origin may have prognostic value or reflect distinct molecular subtypes; however, it can be difficult to determine in practice. Using whole-genome gene expression, we built a signature of zone using normal tissue from five individuals and found that it successfully classified nine tumors of known zone. Hypothesizing that this signature captures tumor zone of origin, we assessed its relationship with clinical factors among 369 tumors of unknown zone from radical prostatectomies (RPs) and found that tumors that molecularly resembled TZ tumors showed lower mortality (P = 0.09) that was explained by lower Gleason scores (P = 0.009). We further applied the signature to an earlier study of 88 RP and 333 transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) tumor samples, also of unknown zone, with gene expression on ~6000 genes. We had observed previously substantial expression differences between RP and TURP specimens, and hypothesized that this might be because RPs capture primarily PZ tumors, whereas TURPs capture more TZ tumors. Our signature distinguished these two groups, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 87% (P < 0.0001). Our findings that zonal differences in normal tissue persist in tumor tissue and that these differences are associated with Gleason score and sample type suggest that subtypes potentially resulting from different etiologic pathways might arise in these zones. Zone of origin may be important to consider in prostate tumor biomarker research. PMID:25870172

    20. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

      DOEpatents

      Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Replogle, William C.

      2001-01-01

      Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

    1. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

      DOEpatents

      Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Replogle, William C.

      2003-04-08

      Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

    2. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

      DOEpatents

      Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Replogle, William C.

      2003-04-15

      Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

    3. Quantifying the Rate of Ellipsoid Zone Loss in Stargardt Disease.

      PubMed

      Cai, Cindy X; Light, Jacob G; Handa, James T

      2018-02-01

      To determine a reliable method of using the ellipsoid zone (EZ) on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to track disease progression in Stardgardt disease (STGD). Retrospective reliability study. STGD patients with genetically confirmed ABCA4 gene mutations seen at the Wilmer Eye Institute with follow-up visits separated by at least 12 months were identified. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) macula volume scans centered at the fovea and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images were obtained. The area of EZ loss was calculated from the SD-OCT and the area of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) loss from the FAF. Scans were reanalyzed by the primary grader to assess intragrader reliability, and reanalyzed by a second grader to assess intergrader reliability. Sixteen STGD patients (total of 31 eyes) were followed for a mean of 2 years (range 1-4.7 years). The mean rate of EZ loss, 0.31 ± 0.31 mm 2 /year, was similar to the average rate of RPE loss, 0.33 ± 0.38 mm 2 /year. The average area of EZ loss at the initial examination, 4.18 ± 1.91 mm 2 , was larger than the initial area of RPE loss, 2.25 ± 1.66 mm 2 (P < .01). The absolute difference of the area of EZ loss on test-retest for the first grader was 0.12 ± 0.10 mm 2 , and between graders 0.21 ± 0.21 mm 2 . The intraclass correlation (ICC) of both intragrader and intergrader reliability for EZ loss was excellent at 0.99. Tracking the area of EZ loss on SD-OCT macular volume scans longitudinally is a reliable way of monitoring disease progression in STGD. This could be used as a sensitive anatomic outcome measure in clinical trials related to STGD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    4. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

      DOEpatents

      Fleming, Kevin J.

      2001-01-01

      A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

    5. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor

      DOEpatents

      Weiss, Jonathan D.

      1991-01-01

      A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

    6. Spectral, electron microscopic and chemical investigations of gamma-induced purple color zonings in amethyst crystals from the Dursunbey-Balıkesir region of Turkey

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hatipoğlu, Murat; Kibar, Rana; Çetin, Ahmet; Can, Nurdoğan; Helvacı, Cahit; Derin, H.

      2011-07-01

      Amethyst crystals on matrix specimens from the Dursunbey-Balıkesir region in Turkey have five representative purple color zonings: dark purple, light purple, lilac, orchid, and violet. The purple color zonings have been analyzed with optical absorption spectra in the visible wavelength region, chemical full trace element analyses (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy), and scanning electron microscopic images with high magnification. It can be proposed that the production of the purple color in amethyst crystals is due to three dominant absorption bands centered at 375, 530, and 675 nm, respectively. In addition, the purple color zonings are also due to four minor absorption bands centered at 435, 480, 620, and 760 nm. X-ray diffraction graphics of the investigated amethyst crystals indicate that these crystals are composed of a nearly pure alpha-quartz phase and do not include any moganite silica phase and/or other mineral implications. Trace element analyses of the amethyst crystals show five representative purple color zonings, suggesting that the absorption bands can be mainly attributed to extrinsic defects (chemical impurities). However, another important factor that influences all structural defects in amethyst is likely to be the gamma irradiation that exists during amethyst crystallization and its inclusion in host materials. This gamma irradiation originates from the large underlying intrusive granitoid body in the region of amethyst formation. Irradiation modifies the valence values of the impurity elements in the amethyst crystals. It is observed that the violet-colored amethyst crystals have the most stable and the least reversible coloration when exposed to strong light sources. This situation can be related to the higher impurity content of Fe (2.50 ppm), Co (3.1 ppm), Ni (38 ppm), Cu (17.9 ppm), Zn (10 ppm), Zr (3.9 ppm), and Mo (21.8 ppm).

    7. Optical/IR Products - Naval Oceanography Portal

      are here: Home › USNO › Astrometry › Optical/IR Products USNO Logo USNO Navigation Optical/IR VLBI-based Products Astrometry Information Center Info Optical/IR Products Access to astrometric 2012. A poster paper describing the progress of URAT was presented at the April 2014 DDA meeting in

    8. Achieving That Elusive "Leadership Zone"

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Martin, Ann M.

      2016-01-01

      Reaching the "leadership zone" happens when librarians tap into the extraordinary skills lying within to overcome obstacles and transform sometimes-difficult situations into meaningful outcomes. Maturing into an experienced leader who stays in the leadership zone requires knowledge, training, and practice. This article provides tactical…

    9. High efficiency x-ray nanofocusing by the blazed stacking of binary zone plates

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Mohacsi, I.; Karvinen, P.; Vartiainen, I.; Diaz, A.; Somogyi, A.; Kewish, C. M.; Mercere, P.; David, C.

      2013-09-01

      The focusing efficiency of binary Fresnel zone plate lenses is fundamentally limited and higher efficiency requires a multi step lens profile. To overcome the manufacturing problems of high resolution and high efficiency multistep zone plates, we investigate the concept of stacking two different binary zone plates in each other's optical near-field. We use a coarse zone plate with π phase shift and a double density fine zone plate with π/2 phase shift to produce an effective 4- step profile. Using a compact experimental setup with piezo actuators for alignment, we demonstrated 47.1% focusing efficiency at 6.5 keV using a pair of 500 μm diameter and 200 nm smallest zone width. Furthermore, we present a spatially resolved characterization method using multiple diffraction orders to identify manufacturing errors, alignment errors and pattern distortions and their effect on diffraction efficiency.

    10. New developments in magneto-optical imaging applied to rock magnetism: a case study on meteorites (Invited)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Uehara, M.; Gattacceca, J.; van der Beek, C. J.; Leroux, H.; Jacob, D.

      2010-12-01

      We present results of an integrated study of metallic grains in meteorites, combining magneto-optical imaging (MOI), petrography, FE-SEM, TEM, and microprobe analyses. Indeed, metallic Fe-Ni grains in meteorites have inner structures due to Ni diffusion during slow cooling subsequent to metamorphism on their parent body. Previous magnetic studies suggested that tetrataenite (ordered FeNi) is the stable magnetic carriers in these meteorites. On the other hand, mineralogical studies showed that tetrataenite is intimately mixed with other Fe-Ni phases (kamacite and taenite, that contain less than 10 wt.% and around 30 wt.% Ni, respectively), and forms complex microstructures (see below). However, due to the typical spatial resolution of classical bulk magnetic measurements (~1 mm), it has been so far difficult to isolate the contribution of these different Fe-Ni minerals. The MOI technique measures the magnetic flux threading a magneto-optically active film directly placed on the sample. This film rotates the polarization direction of transmitted light (Faraday rotation). Through the analyzer of a reflected light microscope, the vertical component of surface magnetic field of the sample is observed with a spatial resolution of a few µm, which allows direct comparison between mineralogical and magnetic microstructures of metal grains. We studied Agen (H5) and Ausson (L5) ordinary chondrites. Optical and electron microscopies showed two types of micron- to submicron-scaled tetrataenite-bearing microstructures: (1) Zoned taenite particles that consist of a taenite core, surrounded by a "cloudy zone" (20-150 nm large tetrataenite granules embedded in taenite matrix), and a 1-10 µm thick tetrataenite rim. (2) Zoneless plessite particles that consist of < 10 µm large tetrataenite grains embedded in a kamacite matrix. MOI of saturation remanence showed that only the nm-sized tetrataenite granules in cloudy zone carry very strong remanence. Micron-scale mapping of

    11. Detecting livestock production zones.

      PubMed

      Grisi-Filho, J H H; Amaku, M; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Neto, J S Ferreira; Negreiros, R L; Ossada, R

      2013-07-01

      Communities are sets of nodes that are related in an important way, most likely sharing common properties and/or playing similar roles within a network. Unraveling a network structure, and hence the trade preferences and pathways, could be useful to a researcher or a decision maker. We implemented a community detection algorithm to find livestock communities, which is consistent with the definition of a livestock production zone, assuming that a community is a group of farm premises in which an animal is more likely to stay during its lifetime than expected by chance. We applied this algorithm to the network of animal movements within the state of Mato Grosso for 2007. This database holds information concerning 87,899 premises and 521,431 movements throughout the year, totaling 15,844,779 animals moved. The community detection algorithm achieved a network partition that shows a clear geographical and commercial pattern, two crucial features for preventive veterinary medicine applications; this algorithm provides also a meaningful interpretation to trade networks where links emerge based on trader node choices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    12. Contact Zone: Missoula

      2015-07-23

      A rock outcrop dubbed "Missoula," near Marias Pass on Mars, is seen in this image mosaic taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager on NASA's Curiosity rover. Pale mudstone (bottom of outcrop) meets coarser sandstone (top) in this geological contact zone, which has piqued the interest of Mars scientists. White mineral veins that fill fractures in the lower rock unit abruptly end when they meet the upper rock unit. Such clues help scientists understand the possible timing of geological events. First, the fine sediment that now forms the lower unit would have hardened into rock. It then would have fractured, and groundwater would have deposited calcium sulfate minerals into the fractures. Next, the coarser sediment that forms the upper unit would have been deposited. The area pictured is about 16 inches (40 centimeters) across. The image was taken on the 1,031st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 1, 2015). MAHLI was built by Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the project's Curiosity rover. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19829

    13. Jovian 'Twilight Zone'

      2018-03-01

      This image captures the swirling cloud formations around the south pole of Jupiter, looking up toward the equatorial region. NASA's Juno spacecraft took the color-enhanced image during its eleventh close flyby of the gas giant planet on Feb. 7 at 7:11 a.m. PST (10:11 a.m. EST). At the time, the spacecraft was 74,896 miles (120,533 kilometers) from the tops of Jupiter's clouds at 84.9 degrees south latitude. Citizen scientist Gerald Gerald Eichstädt processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. This image was created by reprocessing raw JunoCam data using trajectory and pointing data from the spacecraft. This image is one in a series of images taken in an experiment to capture the best results for illuminated parts of Jupiter's polar region. To make features more visible in Jupiter's terminator -- the region where day meets night -- the Juno team adjusted JunoCam so that it would perform like a portrait photographer taking multiple photos at different exposures, hoping to capture one image with the intended light balance. For JunoCam to collect enough light to reveal features in Jupiter's dark twilight zone, the much brighter illuminated day-side of Jupiter becomes overexposed with the higher exposure. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21980

    14. Vectorial structures of linear-polarized Butterfly-Gauss vortex beams in the far zone

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cheng, Ke; Zhou, Yan; Lu, Gang; Yao, Na; Zhong, Xianqiong

      2018-05-01

      By introducing the Butterfly catastrophe to optics, the far-zone vectorial structures of Butterfly-Gauss beam with vortex and non-vortex are studied using the angular spectrum representation and stationary phase method. The influence of topological charge, linear-polarized angle, off-axis distance and scaling length on the far-zone vectorial structures, especially in the Poynting vector and angular momentum density of the corresponding beam is emphasized. The results show that the embedded optical vortex at source plane lead to special dark zones in the far zone, where the number of dark zone equals the absolute value of topological charge of optical vortex. Furthermore, the symmetry and direction of the special dark zones can be controlled by off-axis distance and scaling length, respectively. The linear-polarized angle adjusts only the Poynting vectors of TE and TM terms, but it does not affect those of whole beam. Finally, the vectorial expressions also indicate that the total angular momentum density is certainly zero owing to the far-zone stable structures rather than rotation behaviors.

    15. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

      2014-07-01

      ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

    16. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

      2011-07-01

      ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

    17. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-07-01

      ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

    18. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

      2012-07-01

      ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

    19. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

      2013-07-01

      ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

    20. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

      PubMed

      Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

      2014-11-01

      We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks.