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Sample records for zone dispersion flue

  1. [Analysis of mechanism of transition zones among β, δ and γ dispersions in brain white matter and grey matter].

    PubMed

    Tian, Rui; Lu, Mai

    2017-08-01

    In order to explore the application of the dielectric properties of white matter and grey matter in β, δ and γ dispersion transition zones used in clinical medicine and microwave imaging technology, we calculated the dielectric constant and its increment by using Cole-Cole equation. Based on the mutation of the increment of dielectric constant, the frequency range of three dispersions were evaluated. The dominate dispersion and the corresponding polarization mechanism were analyzed by using Cole-Cole circle. The results showed that there are 3 transition zones in brain white matter, which occur between β and δ dispersion, δ and γ dispersion and β and γ dispersion respectively. In grey matter, there are only 2 transition zones, which are between β and δ dispersion and δ and γ dispersion respectively. By comparing the frequency range of white matter and grey matter, the frequency range in white matter is broader than that in grey matter for the transition zone of β and δ dispersion with the β dispersion occupying dominate position in both tissues, and the corresponding polarization mechanism is interfacial polarization. For the transition zone of δ and γ dispersion, the frequency range in white matter is also broader than that in grey matter with the δ dispersion occupying dominate position in both tissues, and the corresponding polarization mechanism is orientation polarization. This study can provide basic theory and reference for diagnosis of brain diseases and microwave imaging technology.

  2. An analytic description of electrodynamic dispersion in free-flow zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis

    2015-07-24

    The present work analyzes the electrodynamic dispersion of sample streams in a free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) chamber resulting due to partial or complete blockage of electroosmotic flow (EOF) across the channel width by the sidewalls of the conduit. This blockage of EOF has been assumed to generate a pressure-driven backflow in the transverse direction for maintaining flow balance in the system. A parallel-plate based FFZE device with the analyte stream located far away from the channel side regions has been considered to simplify the current analysis. Applying a method-of-moments formulation, an analytic expression was derived for the variance of the sample zone at steady state as a function of its position in the separation chamber under these conditions. It has been shown that the increase in stream broadening due to the electrodynamic dispersion phenomenon is additive to the contributions from molecular diffusion and sample injection, and simply modifies the coefficient for the hydrodynamic dispersion term for a fixed lateral migration distance of the sample stream. Moreover, this dispersion mechanism can dominate the overall spatial variance of analyte zones when a significant fraction of the EOF is blocked by the channel sidewalls. The analysis also shows that analyte streams do not undergo any hydrodynamic broadening due to unwanted pressure-driven cross-flows in an FFZE chamber in the absence of a transverse electric field. The noted results have been validated using Monte Carlo simulations which further demonstrate that while the sample concentration profile at the channel outlet approaches a Gaussian distribution only in FFZE chambers substantially longer than the product of the axial pressure-driven velocity and the characteristic diffusion time in the system, the spatial variance of the exiting analyte stream is well described by the Taylor-Aris dispersion limit even in analysis ducts much shorter than this length scale. Copyright © 2015

  3. Dispersed Volcanic Ash in Sediment Entering NW Pacific Ocean Subduction Zones: Towards a Regional Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, R. P.; Murray, R. W.; Underwood, M.; Kutterolf, S.; Plank, T.; Dyonisius, M.; Arshad, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic ash has long been recognized to be an important component of the global sedimentary system. Ash figures prominently in a number of sedimentary and petrophysical investigations, including how the fluid budget of subducting sediment will be affected by hydration/dehydration reactions. Additionally, many studies focus on discrete ash layers, and how to link their presence with volcanism, climate, arc evolution, biological productivity, and other processes. Less widely recognized is the ash that is mixed into the bulk sediment, or "dispersed" ash. Dispersed ash is quantitatively significant and is an under-utilized source of critical geochemical and tectonic information. Based on geochemical studies of ODP Site 1149, a composite of DSDP Sites 579 & 581, as well as IODP Sites C0011 & C0012 drilled during Expedition 322, we will show the importance of dispersed ash to the Izu-Bonin-Marianas, Kurile-Kamchatka and Nankai subduction zones. Initial geochemical analyses of the bulk sediment, as related to dispersed ash entering these subduction systems are presented here. Geochemical analysis shows that the characteristics of the three sites exhibit some variability consistent with observed lithological variations. For example, the average SiO2/Al2O3 ratios at Site 1149, Site C0011 and Site C0012 average 3.7. The composite of Sites 579 & 581 exhibits a higher average of 4.6. There are contrasts between other key major elemental indicators as well (e.g., Fe2O3). Ternary diagrams such as K2O-Na2O-CaO show that there are at least two distinct geochemical fields with Sites 1149, C0011 and C0012 clustering in one and Sites 579 & 581 in the other. Q-mode Factor Analysis was performed on the bulk sediment chemical data in order to determine the composition of potential end members of these sites. The multivariate statistics indicate that Site 1149 has 3-4 end members, consistent with the results of Scudder et al. (2009, EPSL, v. 284, pp 639), while each of the other sites

  4. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clobert, J.; Danchin, E.; Dhondt, A.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  5. System of treating flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Ziegler, D.L.

    1975-12-01

    A system is described for treating or cleaning incinerator flue gas containing acid gases and radioactive and fissionable contaminants. Flue gas and a quench solution are fed into a venturi and then tangentially into the lower portion of a receptacle for restricting volumetric content of the solution. The upper portion of the receptacle contains a scrub bed to further treat or clean the flue gas.

  6. On Wave-Ice Interaction in the Arctic Marginal Ice Zone: Dispersion, Attenuation, and Ice Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 2. REPORT TYPE1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 6. AUTHOR(S) 8. PERFORMING...schemes and contributes to a change of wave height (and direction) analogous to shoaling and refraction. A method for jointly measuring dispersion and...46 APPENDEX B: WAVE HEIGHTS MEASURED IN ARTIC ICE

  7. The no-spin zone: rotation versus dispersion support in observed and simulated dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Coral; Pace, Andrew B.; Bullock, James S.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Oñorbe, Jose; Elbert, Oliver D.; Fitts, Alex; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan

    2017-02-01

    We perform a systematic Bayesian analysis of rotation versus dispersion support (vrot/σ) in 40 dwarf galaxies throughout the local volume (LV) over a stellar mass range of 10^{3.5} M_{⊙}< M_{star }< 108 M_{⊙}. We find that the stars in ˜80 per cent of the LV dwarf galaxies studied - both satellites and isolated systems - are dispersion-supported. In particular, we show that 6/10 isolated dwarfs in our sample have vrot/σ ≲ 1.0, while all have vrot/σ ≲ 2.0. These results challenge the traditional view that the stars in gas-rich dwarf irregulars (dIrrs) are distributed in cold, rotationally supported stellar discs, while gas-poor dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) are kinematically distinct in having dispersion-supported stars. We see no clear trend between vrot/σ and distance to the closest L⋆ galaxy, nor between vrot/σ and M⋆ within our mass range. We apply the same Bayesian analysis to four FIRE hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies (10^9 M_{⊙}< M_{vir}< 10^{10} M_{⊙}) and show that the simulated isolated dIrr galaxies have stellar ellipticities and stellar vrot/σ ratios that are consistent with the observed population of dIrrs and dSphs without the need to subject these dwarfs to any external perturbations or tidal forces. We posit that most dwarf galaxies form as puffy, dispersion-dominated systems, rather than cold, angular-momentum-supported discs. If this is the case, then transforming a dIrr into a dSph may require little more than removing its gas.

  8. Flue gas conditioning today

    SciTech Connect

    Southam, B.J.; Coe, E.L. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Many relatively small electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s) exist which collect fly ash at remarkably high efficiencies and have been tested consistently at correspondingly high migration velocities. But the majority of the world`s coal supplies produce ashes which are collected at much lower migration velocities for a given efficiency and therefore require correspondingly large specific collection areas to achieve acceptable results. Early trials of flue gas conditioning (FGC) showed benefits in maximizing ESP performance and minimizing expense which justified continued experimentation. Trials of several dozen ways of doing it wrong eventually developed a set of reliable rules for doing it right. Onemore » result is that the use of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) for adjustment of the resistivity of fly ash from low sulfur coal has been widely applied and has become an automatically accepted part of the option of burning low sulfur coal for compliance with the Clean Air Act of l990 in the U.S.A. Currently, over 100,000 MW of generating capacity is using FGC, and it is estimated that approximately 45,800 MW will utilize coal-switching with FGC for Clean Air Act emission compliance. Guarantees that this equipment will be available to operate at least 98 percent of the time it is called upon are routinely fulfilled.« less

  9. Mercury sorbent delivery system for flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Klunder,; Edgar, B [Bethel Park, PA

    2009-02-24

    The invention presents a device for the removal of elemental mercury from flue gas streams utilizing a layer of activated carbon particles contained within the filter fabric of a filter bag for use in a flue gas scrubbing system.

  10. Trichinella nativa in Iceland: an example of Trichinella dispersion in a frigid zone.

    PubMed

    Skírnisson, K; Marucci, G; Pozio, E

    2010-06-01

    In most Arctic and subarctic regions, Trichinella nativa is a common zoonotic pathogen circulating among wild carnivores. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is one of the most important reservoirs for T. nativa in frigid zones. In Iceland, Trichinella infection has never been detected in the local wildlife, despite the presence of one of the host species, the arctic fox (Alopex lagopus). In 2008, one of two polar bears that had swum to Iceland's coast was found to have been infected with Trichinella sp. (8.5 larvae/g in the tongue, 6.8 larvae/g in the masseter and 4.4 larvae/g in the diaphragm); the larvae were identified as T. nativa. This is the second report of Trichinella infection in polar bears that reached the Icelandic coast. In the present work, we describe this case of infection and discuss the epidemiological features that have allowed T. nativa to spread in Arctic regions.

  11. Determination of benzimidazoles in meat samples by capillary zone electrophoresis tandem mass spectrometry following dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Casado, Carmen; Moreno-González, David; Lara, Francisco J; García-Campaña, Ana M; Del Olmo-Iruela, Monsalud

    2017-03-24

    A novel method based on capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry has been proposed and validated for the identification and simultaneous quantification of twelve benzimidazoles in meat samples. Electrophoretic separation was carried out using 500mM formic acid (pH 2.2) as background electrolyte and applying a voltage of 25kV at 25°C. In order to improve the sensitivity, stacking mode injection was applied, using as injection solvent a mixture of 30:70 acetonitrile/water at 50mbar for 75s. Sensitivity enhancement factors from 74 to 317 were obtained under these conditions. Detection using an ion trap as analyzer, operating in multiple reactions monitoring mode was employed. The main MS/MS parameters as well as the composition of the sheath liquid and other electrospray variables were optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity and precision in conjunction with an unequivocal identification. The method was applied to poultry and pork muscle samples. The deproteinization of samples and extraction of benzimidazoles was carried out with acetonitrile. MgSO 4 and NaCl were added as salting-out agents. Subsequently, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was applied as clean up procedure. The organic layer (acetonitrile, used as dispersant) containing the benzimidazoles was mixed with the extractant (chloroform) and both were injected in water, producing a cloudy solution. Recoveries for fortified samples were higher than 70%, with relative standard deviations lower than 16% were obtained in all cases. The limits of detection were below 3μgkg -1 , demonstrating the applicability of this fast, simple, and environmentally friendly method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. New particle formation in the fresh flue-gas plume from a coal-fired power plant: effect of flue-gas cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylläri, Fanni; Asmi, Eija; Anttila, Tatu; Saukko, Erkka; Vakkari, Ville; Pirjola, Liisa; Hillamo, Risto; Laurila, Tuomas; Häyrinen, Anna; Rautiainen, Jani; Lihavainen, Heikki; O'Connor, Ewan; Niemelä, Ville; Keskinen, Jorma; Dal Maso, Miikka; Rönkkö, Topi

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric emissions, including particle number and size distribution, from a 726 MWth coal-fired power plant were studied experimentally from a power plant stack and flue-gas plume dispersing in the atmosphere. Experiments were conducted under two different flue-gas cleaning conditions. The results were utilized in a plume dispersion and dilution model taking into account particle formation precursor (H2SO4 resulted from the oxidation of emitted SO2) and assessment related to nucleation rates. The experiments showed that the primary emissions of particles and SO2 were effectively reduced by flue-gas desulfurization and fabric filters, especially the emissions of particles smaller than 200 nm in diameter. Primary pollutant concentrations reached background levels in 200-300 s. However, the atmospheric measurements indicated that new particles larger than 2.5 nm are formed in the flue-gas plume, even in the very early phases of atmospheric ageing. The effective number emission of nucleated particles were several orders of magnitude higher than the primary particle emission. Modelling studies indicate that regardless of continuing dilution of the flue gas, nucleation precursor (H2SO4 from SO2 oxidation) concentrations remain relatively constant. In addition, results indicate that flue-gas nucleation is more efficient than predicted by atmospheric aerosol modelling. In particular, the observation of the new particle formation with rather low flue-gas SO2 concentrations changes the current understanding of the air quality effects of coal combustion. The results can be used to evaluate optimal ways to achieve better air quality, particularly in polluted areas like India and China.

  13. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOEpatents

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1984-05-01

    The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

  14. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOEpatents

    Im, Kwan H.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    1985-01-01

    A process and apparatus for removing sulfur oxide from combustion gas to form Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and for reducing the harmful effects of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 on auxiliary heat exchangers in which a sodium compound is injected into the hot combustion gas forming liquid Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 in a gas-gas reaction and the resultant gas containing Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is cooled to below about 1150.degree. K. to form particles of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 prior to contact with at least one heat exchanger with the cooling being provided by the recycling of combustion gas from a cooled zone downstream from the introduction of the cooling gas.

  15. Crustal thickness variations in the Zagros continental collision zone (Iran) from joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, M.; Nasrabadi, A.

    2013-10-01

    Variations in crustal thickness in the Zagros determined by joint inversion of P wave receiver functions (RFs) and Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion. The time domain iterative deconvolution procedure was employed to compute RFs from teleseismic recordings at seven broadband stations of INSN network. Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion curves were estimated employing two-station method. Fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocities for each station is taken from a regional scale surface wave tomographic imaging. The main variations in crustal thickness that we observe are between stations located in the Zagros fold and thrust belt with those located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ) and Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage (UDMA). Our results indicate that the average crustal thickness beneath the Zagros Mountain Range varies from ˜46 km in Western and Central Zagros beneath SHGR and GHIR up to ˜50 km beneath BNDS located in easternmost of the Zagros. Toward NE, we observe an increase in Moho depth where it reaches ˜58 km beneath SNGE located in the SSZ. Average crustal thickness also varies beneath the UDMA from ˜50 km in western parts below ASAO to ˜58 in central parts below NASN. The observed variation along the SSZ and UDMA may be associated to ongoing slab steepening or break off in the NW Zagros, comparing under thrusting of the Arabian plate beneath Central Zagros. The results show that in Central Iran, the crustal thickness decrease again to ˜47 km below KRBR. There is not a significant crustal thickness difference along the Zagros fold and thrust belt. We found the same crystalline crust of ˜34 km thick beneath the different parts of the Zagros fold and thrust belt. The similarity of crustal structure suggests that the crust of the Zagros fold and thrust belt was uniform before subsidence and deposition of the sediments. Our results confirm that the shortening of the western and eastern parts of the Zagros basement is small and

  16. Eruptive and environmental processes recorded by diatoms in volcanically-dispersed lake sediments from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, Margaret A.; Pledger, Shirley A.; Smith, Euan G. C.; Van Eaton, Alexa; Wilson, Colin J. N.

    2015-01-01

    Late Pleistocene diatomaceous sediment was widely dispersed along with volcanic ash (tephra) across and beyond New Zealand by the 25.4 ka Oruanui supereruption from Taupo volcano. We present a detailed analysis of the diatom populations in the Oruanui tephra and the newly discovered floras in two other eruptions from the same volcano: the 28.6 ka Okaia and 1.8 ka Taupo eruptions. For comparison, the diatoms were also examined in Late Pleistocene and Holocene lake sediments from the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ). Our study demonstrates how these microfossils provide insights into the lake history of the TVZ since the Last Glacial Maximum. Morphometric analysis of Aulacoseira valve dimensions provides a useful quantitative tool to distinguish environmental and eruptive processes within and between individual tephras. The Oruanui and Okaia diatom species and valve dimensions are highly consistent with a shared volcanic source, paleolake and eruption style (involving large-scale magma-water interaction). They are distinct from lacustrine sediments sourced elsewhere in the TVZ. Correspondence analysis shows that small, intact samples of erupted lake sediment (i.e., lithic clasts in ignimbrite) contain heterogeneous diatom populations, reflecting local variability in species composition of the paleolake and its shallowly-buried sediments. Our analysis also shows a dramatic post-Oruanui supereruption decline in Cyclostephanos novaezelandiae, which likely reflects a combination of (1) reorganisation of the watershed in the aftermath of the eruption, and (2) overall climate warming following the Last Glacial Maximum. This decline is reflected in substantially lower proportions of C. novaezelandiae in the 1.8 ka Taupo eruption deposits, and even fewer in post-1.8 ka sediments from modern (Holocene) Lake Taupo. Our analysis highlights how the excellent preservation of siliceous microfossils in volcanic tephra may fingerprint the volcanic source region and retain a valuable record

  17. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong

    2008-09-30

    This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending stronglymore » on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.« less

  18. Regional-scale input of dispersed and discrete volcanic ash to the Izu-Bonin and Mariana subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, Rachel P.; Murray, Richard W.; Schindlbeck, Julie C.; Kutterolf, Steffen; Hauff, Folkmar; McKinley, Claire C.

    2014-11-01

    We have geochemically and statistically characterized bulk marine sediment and ash layers at Ocean Drilling Program Site 1149 (Izu-Bonin Arc) and Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 52 (Mariana Arc), and have quantified that multiple dispersed ash sources collectively comprise ˜30-35% of the hemipelagic sediment mass entering the Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction system. Multivariate statistical analyses indicate that the bulk sediment at Site 1149 is a mixture of Chinese Loess, a second compositionally distinct eolian source, a dispersed mafic ash, and a dispersed felsic ash. We interpret the source of these ashes as, respectively, being basalt from the Izu-Bonin Front Arc (IBFA) and rhyolite from the Honshu Arc. Sr-, Nd-, and Pb isotopic analyses of the bulk sediment are consistent with the chemical/statistical-based interpretations. Comparison of the mass accumulation rate of the dispersed ash component to discrete ash layer parameters (thickness, sedimentation rate, and number of layers) suggests that eruption frequency, rather than eruption size, drives the dispersed ash record. At Site 52, the geochemistry and statistical modeling indicates that Chinese Loess, IBFA, dispersed BNN (boninite from Izu-Bonin), and a dispersed felsic ash of unknown origin are the sources. At Site 1149, the ash layers and the dispersed ash are compositionally coupled, whereas at Site 52 they are decoupled in that there are no boninite layers, yet boninite is dispersed within the sediment. Changes in the volcanic and eolian inputs through time indicate strong arc-related and climate-related controls.

  19. Reaction behavior of SO2 in the sintering process with flue gas recirculation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Gan, Min; Chen, Xu-Ling; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Yun-Song

    2016-07-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to reveal the reaction behavior of SO2 in the sinter zone, combustion zone, drying-preheating zone, and over-wet zone during flue gas recirculation (FGR) technique. The results showed that SO2 retention in the sinter zone was associated with free-CaO in the form of CaSO3/CaSO4, and the SO2 adsorption reached a maximum under 900ºC. SO2 in the flue gas came almost from the combustion zone. One reaction behavior was the oxidation of sulfur in the sintering mix when the temperature was between 800 and 1000ºC; the other behavior was the decomposition of sulfite/sulfate when the temperature was over 1000ºC. However, the SO2 adsorption in the sintering bed mainly occurred in the drying-preheating zone, adsorbed by CaCO3, Ca(OH)2, and CaO. When the SO2 adsorption reaction in the drying-preheating zone reached equilibrium, the excess SO2 gas continued to migrate to the over-wet zone and was then absorbed by Ca(OH)2 and H2O. The emission rising point of SO2 moved forward in combustion zone, and the concentration of SO2 emissions significantly increased in the case of flue gas recirculation (FGR) technique. Aiming for the reuse of the sensible heat and a reduction in exhaust gas emission, the FGR technique is proposed in the iron ore sintering process. When using the FGR technique, SO2 emission in exhaust gas gets changed. In practice, the application of the FGR technique in a sinter plant should be cooperative with the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technique. Thus, it is necessary to study the influence of the FGR technique on SO2 emissions because it will directly influence the demand and design of the FGD system.

  20. A finite parallel zone model to interpret and extend Giddings' coupling theory for the eddy-dispersion in porous chromatographic media.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Gert

    2013-11-01

    The finite length parallel zone (FPZ)-model is proposed as an alternative model for the axial- or eddy-dispersion caused by the occurrence of local velocity biases or flow heterogeneities in porous media such as those used in liquid chromatography columns. The mathematical plate height expression evolving from the model shows that the A- and C-term band broadening effects that can originate from a given velocity bias should be coupled in an exponentially decaying way instead of harmonically as proposed in Giddings' coupling theory. In the low and high velocity limit both models converge, while a 12% difference can be observed in the (practically most relevant) intermediate range of reduced velocities. Explicit expressions for the A- and C-constants appearing in the exponential decay-based plate height expression have been derived for each of the different possible velocity bias levels (single through-pore and particle level, multi-particle level and trans-column level). These expressions allow to directly relate the band broadening originating from these different levels to the local fundamental transport parameters, hence offering the possibility to include a velocity-dependent and, if, needed retention factor-dependent transversal dispersion coefficient. Having developed the mathematics for the general case wherein a difference in retention equilibrium establishes between the two parallel zones, the effect of any possible local variations in packing density and/or retention capacity on the eddy-dispersion can be explicitly accounted for as well. It is furthermore also shown that, whereas the lumped transport parameter model used in the basic variant of the FPZ-model only provides a first approximation of the true decay constant, the model can be extended by introducing a constant correction factor to correctly account for the continuous transversal dispersion transport in the velocity bias zones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  2. Method and apparatus for afterburning flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Sikander, A.; Bjorkman, A.; Jonsson, G.

    1984-11-13

    A method of afterburning flue gases comprises passing impure gases from, for example, an incineration plant such as a destructor, process furnace, crematory furnace or heating boiler, through a burner in an afterburner where through enforced mixture with combustion gas they undergo complete combustion. The combustion gas, depending on the composition of the flue gases, may comprise air or oxygen or either mixed with petroleum gas. In apparatus for implementation of the method, the flue gases and the combustion gas are introduced into a burner which blows the gas mixture into a flame bowl where temperatures in the range ofmore » from 1,500/sup 0/-2,000/sup 0/ C. can be achieved. In one embodiment, the burner produces a conical basket-shaped flame in which the flue gases undergo complete combustion.« less

  3. The Gonzaga desulfurization flue gas process

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, R.L.; O'Leary, T.J.; Shirk, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Gonzaga desulfurization flue gas process removes sulfur dioxide from a flue by cold water scrubbing. Sulfur dioxide is significantly more soluable in cold water (35/sup 0/F to 60/sup 0/F) than in warm water (100/sup 0/F). Sulfur dioxide reacts in water similarly as carbon dioxide reacts in water, in that both gasses are released from the water as the temperature of the water increases. The researchers at the Gonzaga University developed this process from the observations and techniques used in studying the acid and aldehyde concentrations in flue gasses with varying of fuel to air ratios. The apparatus was fixedmore » to a stationary engine and a gas/oil fired boiler. The flue gas was cooled to the dew point temperature of the air entering the combustion chamber on the pre-air heater. The system is described in two parts: the energies required for cooling in the scrubbing section and the energies required in the treatment section. The cold flue gas is utilized in cooling the scrubber section.« less

  4. Possibility study of gasifier with axial circulating flue gas for reducing Tar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poowadin, T.; Polsongkram, M.; Khantikomol, P.

    2018-01-01

    This present research article aims to study the possibility of gasification by axial core flue gas circulating kiln and find the efficiency of syngas production. An axial core flue gas circulating tube was installed in the center of the updraft gasifier in purposing of tar reducing. In the present study, the eucalyptus wood chip 4, 8, and 10 kg with the moisture content 16% were examined. Several type-K thermocouples were employed to measure the temperatures at preheat, combustion, reduction, pyrolysis, drying, and gas outlet zone. The results showed that the temperatures in the combustion and the reduction zone of the kiln with the axial core flue gas recirculating were lower than the kiln without the core owing to installing the core would reduce the combustion zone area in biomass burning. Obviously, the temperature in the pyrolysis and drying zone were nearly the same as both with and without the core. In consideration of syngas components, it was found that CO production from the gasifier with the core was higher than the gasifier without the core about 25%. Other gases, however, were almost same. The syngas production efficiency obtained from the gasifier with the core decreased with increasing the mass of biomass. It showed that the highest efficiency was 30% at 4 kg supplying biomass. In comparison, the efficiencies of both the kilns with and without the core were not different. For liquid product, the amount of liquid decreased about 47.23% comparing with the gasifier without the core.

  5. Thief process for the removal of mercury from flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Pennline, Henry W.; Granite, Evan J.; Freeman, Mark C.; Hargis, Richard A.; O'Dowd, William J.

    2003-02-18

    A system and method for removing mercury from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant is described. Mercury removal is by adsorption onto a thermally activated sorbent produced in-situ at the power plant. To obtain the thermally activated sorbent, a lance (thief) is inserted into a location within the combustion zone of the combustion chamber and extracts a mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas. The semi-combusted coal has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of elemental and oxidized mercury. The mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas is separated into a stream of gas and semi-combusted coal that has been converted to a stream of thermally activated sorbent. The separated stream of gas is recycled to the combustion chamber. The thermally activated sorbent is injected into the duct work of the power plant at a location downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber. Mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury combination is removed from the plant by a particulate collection system.

  6. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  7. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  8. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  9. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  10. Biological removal of NOx from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, R; Muyzer, G; Kuenen, J G; Loosdrecht, M C M

    2004-01-01

    BioDeNOx is a novel integrated physico-chemical and biological process for the removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas. Due to the high temperature of flue gas the process is performed at a temperature between 50-55 degrees C. Flue gas containing CO2, O2, SO2 and NOx, is purged through Fe(II)EDTA2- containing liquid. The Fe(II)EDTA2- complex effectively binds the NOx; the bound NOx is converted into N2 in a complex reaction sequence. In this paper an overview of the potential microbial reactions in the BioDeNOx process is discussed. It is evident that though the process looks simple, due to the large number of parallel potential reactions and serial microbial conversions, it is much more complex. There is a need for a detailed investigation in order to properly understand and optimise the process.

  11. Steam stripping of the unsaturated zone of contaminated sub-soils: The effect of diffusion/dispersion in the start-up phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.; Gilding, B. H.

    2006-02-01

    The unsteady process of steam stripping of the unsaturated zone of soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is addressed. A model is presented. It accounts for the effects of water and contaminants remaining in vapour phase, as well as diffusion and dispersion of contaminants in this phase. The model has two components. The first is a one-dimensional description of the propagation of a steam front in the start-up phase. This is based on Darcy's law and conservation laws of mass and energy. The second component describes the transport of volatile contaminants. Taking the view that non-equilibrium between liquid and vapour phases exists, it accounts for evaporation, transport, and condensation at the front. This leads to a moving-boundary problem. The moving-boundary problem is brought into a fixed domain by a suitable transformation of the governing partial differential equations, and solved numerically. For a broad range of the governing dimensionless numbers, such as the Henry, Merkel and Péclet numbers, computational results are discussed. A mathematical asymptotic analysis supports this discussion. The range of parameter values for which the model is valid is investigated. Diffusion and dispersion are shown to be of qualitative importance, but to have little quantitative effect in the start-up phase.

  12. DISPOSAL OF FLUE-GAS-CLEANING WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article describes current commercial and emerging technology for disposal of wastes from flue gas cleaning (FGC) systems for coal-fired power plants. Over 80 million metric tons/yr (dry) of coal ash and desulfurization solids are expected to be produced by the 1980's. Althoug...

  13. CLEANING OF FLUE GASES FROM WASTE COMBUSTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper addresses flue gas cleaning processes currently used commercially in waste combustion facilities. It also discusses the operating concepts of dry, semi-dry, and wet processes and their effectiveness in controlling various pollutants. Air pollutants from the combustion o...

  14. System and method for treatment of a flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Spiry, Irina Pavlovna; Wood, Benjamin Rue; Singh, Surinder Prabhjot

    A method for treatment of a flue gas involves feeding the flue gas and a lean solvent to an absorber. The method further involves reacting the flue gas with the lean solvent within the absorber to generate a clean flue gas and a rich solvent. The method also involves feeding the clean flue gas from the absorber and water from a source, to a wash tower to separate a stripped portion of the lean solvent from the clean flue gas to generate a washed clean flue gas and a mixture of the water and the stripped portion of the leanmore » solvent. The method further involves treating at least a portion of the mixture of the water and the stripped portion of the lean solvent via a separation system to separate the water from the stripped portion of the lean solvent.« less

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide Enhances Removal of NOx from Flue Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Pilot scale experiments have demonstrated a method of reducing the amounts of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emitted by industrial boilers and powerplant combustors that involves (1) injection of H2O2 into flue gases and (2) treatment of the flue gases by caustic wet scrubbing like that commonly used to remove SO2 from combustion flue gases. Heretofore, the method most commonly used for removing NOx from flue gases has been selective catalytic reduction (SCR), in which the costs of both installation and operation are very high. After further development, the present method may prove to be an economically attractive alternative to SCR.

  16. Flying MOFs: polyamine-containing fluidized MOF/SiO 2 hybrid materials for CO 2 capture from post-combustion flue gas

    DOE PAGES

    Luz, Ignacio; Soukri, Mustapha; Lail, Marty

    2018-01-01

    Solid-state synthesis ensures a high loading and well dispersed growth of a large collection of metal–organic framework (MOF) nanostructures within a series of commercially available mesoporous silica allowing to render MOFs into fluidized solid sorbents for CO 2 capture from post-combustion flue gas in a fluidized-bed reactor.

  17. Flying MOFs: polyamine-containing fluidized MOF/SiO 2 hybrid materials for CO 2 capture from post-combustion flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Luz, Ignacio; Soukri, Mustapha; Lail, Marty

    Solid-state synthesis ensures a high loading and well dispersed growth of a large collection of metal–organic framework (MOF) nanostructures within a series of commercially available mesoporous silica allowing to render MOFs into fluidized solid sorbents for CO 2 capture from post-combustion flue gas in a fluidized-bed reactor.

  18. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum agricultural network alabama (cotton)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is an excellent source of gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O) that can be beneficially used in agriculture. Research was conducted as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in collaboration wi...

  19. Contrasts in Sediment Delivery and Dispersal from River Mouth to Accumulation Zones in High Sediment Load Systems: Fly River, Papua New Guinea and Waipaoa River, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogston, A. S.; Walsh, J. P.; Hale, R. P.

    2011-12-01

    The relationships between sediment-transport processes, short-term sedimentary deposition, subsequent burial, and long-term accumulation are critical to understanding the morphological development of the continental margin. This study focuses on processes involved in formation and evolution of the clinoform in the Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea in which much of the riverine sediment accumulates, and comparison to those processes active off the Waipaoa River, New Zealand that form mid-shelf deposits and export sediment to the slope. In tidally dominated deltas, sediment discharged from the river sources must transit through an estuarine region located within the distributary channels, where particle pathways can undergo significant transformations. Within the distributaries of the Fly River tidally dominated delta, near-bed fluid-mud concentrations were observed at the estuarine turbidity maximum and sediment delivery to the nearshore was controlled by the morphology and gradient of the distributary. El Niño results in anonymously low flow and sediment discharge conditions, which limits transport of sediment from the distributaries to the nearshore zone of temporary storage. Because the sediment stored nearshore feeds the prograding clinoform, this perturbation propagates throughout the dispersal system. In wave-dominated regions, transport mechanisms actively move sediment away from the river source, separating the site of deposition and accumulation from the river mouth. River-flood and storm-wave events each create discrete deposits on the Waipaoa River shelf and data has been collected to determine their form, distribution, and relationship to factors such as flood magnitude or wave energy. In this case, transport pathways appear to be influenced by structurally controlled shelf bathymetry. In both cases, the combined fluvial and marine processes can initiate and maintain gravity-driven density flows, and although their triggers and controls differ vastly

  20. 10. Locomotive smoke flue coming through Roundhouse roof with gable ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Locomotive smoke flue coming through Roundhouse roof with gable end of Machine Shop in background. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Roundhouse, Site Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  1. 9. Smoke flue coming through Roundhouse roof. Central of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Smoke flue coming through Roundhouse roof. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Roundhouse, Site Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  2. PLENUM INTERIOR, SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF DRAFT REGULATORS AND FLUES. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLENUM INTERIOR, SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF DRAFT REGULATORS AND FLUES. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  3. 5. Detail view of masonry foundations and flue openings for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail view of masonry foundations and flue openings for Jamaican Train. - Hacienda Azucarera El Coto, Sugar Mill Ruins, .5 Mi. SW of Rt. 347 Bridge Over Guanajibo River, San German, San German Municipio, PR

  4. Advanced CFD modelling of air and recycled flue gas staging in a waste wood-fired grate boiler for higher combustion efficiency and greater environmental benefits.

    PubMed

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko; Hriberšek, Matjaž; Kokalj, Filip; Zadravec, Matej

    2018-07-15

    Grate-fired boilers are commonly used to burn biomass/wastes for heat and power production. In spite of the recent breakthrough in integration of advanced secondary air systems in grate boilers, grate-firing technology needs to be advanced for higher efficiency and lower emissions. In this paper, innovative staging of combustion air and recycled flue gas in a 13 MW th waste wood-fired grate boiler is comprehensively studied based on a numerical model that has been previously validated. In particular, the effects of the jet momentum, position and orientation of the combustion air and recycled flue gas streams on in-furnace mixing, combustion and pollutant emissions from the boiler are examined. It is found that the optimized air and recycled flue gas jets remarkably enhance mixing and heat transfer, result in a more uniform temperature and velocity distribution, extend the residence time of the combustibles in the hot zone and improve burnout in the boiler. Optimizing the air and recycled flue gas jet configuration can reduce carbon monoxide emission from the boiler by up to 86%, from the current 41.0 ppm to 5.7 ppm. The findings of this study can serve as useful guidelines for novel design and optimization of the combustion air supply and flue gas recycling for grate boilers of this type. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Wingender, R.J.

    1985-08-05

    A method of simultaneously removing SO/sub 2/ and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO/sub 2/ and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled. 3 figs.

  6. Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, John B. L.; Doctor, Richard D.; Wingender, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    A method of simultaneously removing SO.sub.2 and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO.sub.2 and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled.

  7. Method and apparatus for forming flues on tubular stock

    DOEpatents

    Beck, D.E.; Carson, C.

    1979-12-21

    The present invention is directed to a die mechanism utilized for forming flues on long, relatively narrow tubular stock. These flues are formed by displacing a die from within the tubular stock through perforations previously drilled through the tubular stock at selected locations. The drawing of the die upsets the material to form the flue of the desired configuration. The die is provided with a lubricating system which enables the lubricant to be dispensed uniformly about the entire periphery of the die in contact with the material being upset so as to assure the formation of the flues. Further, the lubricant is dispensed from within the die onto the peripheral surface of the latter at pressures in the range of about 2000 to 10,000 psi so as to assure the adequate lubrication of the die during the drawing operation. By injecting the lubricant at such high pressures, low viscosity liquid, such as water and/or alcohol, may be efficiently used as a lubricant and also provides a mechanism by which the lubricant may be evaporated from the surface of the flues at ambient conditions so as to negate the cleansing operations previously required prior to joining the flues to other conduit mechanisms by fusion welding and the like.

  8. Slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for steelmaking flue dust analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coedo, A. G.; Dorado, T.; Padilla, I.; Maibusch, R.; Kuss, H.-M.

    2000-02-01

    A commercial atomic absorption graphite furnace (AAGF), with a self-made adapter and valve system, was used as a slurry sampling cell for electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS). The system was applied to the determination of As, Sn, Sb, Se, Te, Bi, Cd, V, Ti and Mo in steelmaking flue dusts. Experimental conditions with respect to ETV and ICP-MS operating parameters were optimized. Compared to aqueous solutions, slurry samples were found to present better analyte transport. Microgram amounts of Rh were used to reduce the difference in analyte response in sensitivity for aqueous solutions of the tested analytes. No such increasing effect was observed for slurry samples and aqueous standards. An added quantity of Rh acting as modifier/carrier resulted in an increase for the same analytes in matrix-slurry solutions, even the addition of an extra Rh quantity has resulted in a decrease in the signals. The effect of Triton X-100 (used as a dispersant agent) on analyte intensity and precision was also studied. External calibration from aqueous standards spiked with 100 μg ml -1 Rh was performed to quantified 0.010 g/100 ml slurry samples. Results are presented for a certified reference electrical arc furnace flue dust (EAF): CRM-876-1 (Bureau of Analysis Samples Ltd., Cleveland, UK), a reference sample of coke ashes X-3705 (from AG der Dillinger Hüttenwerke, Germany), and a representative sample of EAF flue dust from a Spanish steelmaking company (CENIM-1). For the two reference materials an acceptable agreement with certificate values was achieved, and the results for the CENIM sample matched with those obtained from conventional nebulization solution.

  9. A micro-kinematic framework for vorticity analysis in polyphase shear zones using integrated field, microstructural and crystallographic orientation-dispersion methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruckenberg, S. C.; Michels, Z. D.; Parsons, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from integrated field, microstructural and textural analysis in the Burlington mylonite zone (BMZ) of eastern Massachusetts to establish a unified micro-kinematic framework for vorticity analysis in polyphase shear zones. Specifically, we define the vorticity-normal surface based on lattice-scale rotation axes calculated from electron backscatter diffraction data using orientation statistics. In doing so, we objectively identify a suitable reference frame for rigid grain methods of vorticity analysis that can be used in concert with textural studies to constrain field- to plate-scale deformation geometries without assumptions that may bias tectonic interpretations, such as relationships between kinematic axes and fabric forming elements or the nature of the deforming zone (e.g., monoclinic vs. triclinic shear zones). Rocks within the BMZ comprise a heterogeneous mix of quartzofeldspathic ± hornblende-bearing mylonitic gneisses and quartzites. Vorticity axes inferred from lattice rotations lie within the plane of mylonitic foliation perpendicular to lineation - a pattern consistent with monoclinic deformation geometries involving simple shear and/or wrench-dominated transpression. The kinematic vorticity number (Wk) is calculated using Rigid Grain Net analysis and ranges from 0.25-0.55, indicating dominant general shear. Using the calculated Wk values and the dominant geographic fabric orientation, we constrain the angle of paleotectonic convergence between the Nashoba and Avalon terranes to 56-75º with the convergence vector trending 142-160° and plunging 3-10°. Application of the quartz recrystallized grain size piezometer suggests differential stresses in the BMZ mylonites ranging from 44 to 92 MPa; quartz CPO patterns are consistent with deformation at greenschist- to amphibolite-facies conditions. We conclude that crustal strain localization in the BMZ involved a combination of pure and simple shear in a sinistral reverse transpressional

  10. 7 CFR 29.9403 - Flue-Cured Tobacco Advisory Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Policy Statement and Regulations Governing Availability of Tobacco Inspection and Price Support Services to Flue-Cured Tobacco on Designated Markets § 29.9403 Flue-Cured...

  11. Hydrophobic Catalysts For Removal Of NOx From Flue Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.; Voecks, Gerald E.

    1995-01-01

    Improved catalysts for removal of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) from combustion flue gases formulated as composites of vanadium pentoxide in carbon molecular sieves. Promotes highly efficient selective catalytic reduction of NOx at relatively low temperatures while not being adversely affected by presence of water vapor and sulfur oxide gases in flue gas. Apparatus utilizing catalyst of this type easily integrated into exhaust stream of power plant to remove nitrogen oxides, generated in combustion of fossil fuels and contribute to formation of acid rain and photochemical smog.

  12. Estimate of the dispersivity of rock crushing in the zone of demolition of mine workings by the action of an explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Sushkov, Y.V.; Borulev, A.D.; Yakovlev, N.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors consider the problems of modeling the process of collapse of extended mine workings on plane models. Their derivation has been effected on the basis of the model of the ground and criteria of its demolition. It is assumed that in order to ensure similarity of crushing, equality of the amount of fissures developed in the natural state and the model is necessary. An analysis of the dependence of the average size of a ''lump'' in the demolition zone on the magnitude of the maximum stress in the wave, carried out by the method of least squares, showed thatmore » it can be represented quite well in the form of two intersecting straight lines.« less

  13. SHAWNEE FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION COMPUTER MODEL USERS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual describes a Shawnee flue gas desulfurization (FGD) computer model and gives detailed instructions for its use. The model, jointly developed by Bechtel National, Inc. and TVA (in conjunction with the EPA-sponsored Shawnee test program), is capable of projecting prelimin...

  14. AN ADVANCED FLUE GAS MONITOR FOR SO2 - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of an instrument for continuously monitoring SO2 levels in flue gas is proposed. The SO2 will be detected by means of an electrochemical sensor cell, which operates in a three-electrode potentiostatic mode. The proposed innovation is develop-ment of an advan...

  15. STATUS OF COMMERCIAL UTILITY FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the status of FGD technology as of March 1983 and highlights recent trends in process selection, design, and performance of FGD systems. The information collected in the program is stored in the Flue Gas Desulfurization Information System (FGDIS), a collectio...

  16. 7 CFR 29.1019 - Flue-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flue-cured. 29.1019 Section 29.1019 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... tobacco; or tobacco cured by some other process which accomplishes the same results. [42 FR 21092, Apr. 25...

  17. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION: THE STATE OF THE ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a review of commercially available flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies that have an established record of full-scale performance. (NOTE: Sulfur dioxide (SO2) scrubbers may be used by coal-fired electrcity generating units to meet the requiremen...

  18. Effect of Flue Gas Desulfurization Waste on Corn Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a by-product of conversion of sulfur dioxide into solid waste from coal combustion power generation plant. This by-product is rich in calcium, magnesium, and contains various other essential plant nutrients. The beneficial use of application of this waste as...

  19. CURRENT STATUS OF ADVACATE PROCESS FOR FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The following report discusses current bench- and pilot-plant advances in preparation of ADVAnced siliCATE (ADVACATE) calcium silicate sorbentsfor flue gas desulfurization. It also discusses current bench- and pilot-plant advances in sorbent preparation. Fly ash was ground in a l...

  20. The benefits of flue gas recirculation in waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Liuzzo, Giuseppe; Verdone, Nicola; Bravi, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Flue gas recirculation in the incinerator combustion chamber is an operative technique that offers substantial benefits in managing waste incineration. The advantages that can be obtained are both economic and environmental and are determined by the low flow rate of fumes actually emitted if compared to the flue gas released when recirculation is not conducted. Simulations of two incineration processes, with and without flue gas recirculation, have been carried out by using a commercial flowsheeting simulator. The results of the simulations demonstrate that, from an economic point of view, the proposed technique permits a greater level of energy recovery (up to +3%) and, at the same time, lower investment costs as far as the equipment and machinery constituting the air pollution control section of the plant are concerned. At equal treatment system efficiencies, the environmental benefits stem from the decrease in the emission of atmospheric pollutants. Throughout the paper reference is made to the EC legislation in the field of environmental protection, thus ensuring the general validity in the EU of the foundations laid and conclusions drawn henceforth. A numerical example concerning mercury emission quantifies the reported considerations and illustrates that flue gas recirculation reduces emission of this pollutant by 50%.

  1. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION: THE STATE OF THE ART: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Srivastava*, R.K., and Jozewicz, W. Flue Gas Desulfurization: The State of the Art. Journal of Air and Waste Management Association (Air & Waste Management Asiciation) 51 (12):1676-88 (2001). EPA/600/J-01/391, Available: Journal of Air and Waste Management Association (journal)...

  2. INERTIAL CASCADE IMPACTOR SUBSTRATE MEDIA FOR FLUE GAS SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes Southern Research Institute's experience with greases and glass fiber filter material used as collection substrates in inertial cascade impactors. Available greases and glass fiber filter media have been tested to determine which are most suitable for flue g...

  3. MARKETING OF BYPRODUCT GYPSUM FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the 1985 marketing potential of byproduct gypsum from utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD), for the area east of the Rocky Mountains, using the calculated gypsum production rates of 14 selected power plants. The 114 cement plants and...

  4. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum agricultural network alabama (bermudagrass)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synthetic gypsum is being produced in large quantities each year as a byproduct of SO2 removal from flue gas stream at coal-fired utility plants. This synthetic gypsum which is believed to be comparable or better than mined gypsum may enhance crop production. However, there is a paucity of informati...

  5. A New Barrier to Dispersal Trapped Old Genetic Clines That Escaped the Easter Microplate Tension Zone of the Pacific Vent Mussels

    PubMed Central

    Plouviez, Sophie; Faure, Baptiste; Le Guen, Dominique; Lallier, François H.; Bierne, Nicolas; Jollivet, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography of deep-sea hydrothermal vent species has uncovered several genetic breaks between populations inhabiting northern and southern latitudes of the East Pacific Rise. However, the geographic width and position of genetic clines are variable among species. In this report, we further characterize the position and strength of barriers to gene flow between populations of the deep-sea vent mussel Bathymodiolus thermophilus. Eight allozyme loci and DNA sequences of four nuclear genes were added to previously published sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. Our data confirm the presence of two barriers to gene flow, one located at the Easter Microplate (between 21°33′S and 31°S) recently described as a hybrid zone, and the second positioned between 7°25′S and 14°S with each affecting different loci. Coalescence analysis indicates a single vicariant event at the origin of divergence between clades for all nuclear loci, although the clines are now spatially discordant. We thus hypothesize that the Easter Microplate barrier has recently been relaxed after a long period of isolation and that some genetic clines have escaped the barrier and moved northward where they have subsequently been trapped by a reinforcing barrier to gene flow between 7°25′S and 14°S. PMID:24312557

  6. A new barrier to dispersal trapped old genetic clines that escaped the Easter Microplate tension zone of the Pacific vent mussels.

    PubMed

    Plouviez, Sophie; Faure, Baptiste; Le Guen, Dominique; Lallier, François H; Bierne, Nicolas; Jollivet, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography of deep-sea hydrothermal vent species has uncovered several genetic breaks between populations inhabiting northern and southern latitudes of the East Pacific Rise. However, the geographic width and position of genetic clines are variable among species. In this report, we further characterize the position and strength of barriers to gene flow between populations of the deep-sea vent mussel Bathymodiolus thermophilus. Eight allozyme loci and DNA sequences of four nuclear genes were added to previously published sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. Our data confirm the presence of two barriers to gene flow, one located at the Easter Microplate (between 21°33'S and 31°S) recently described as a hybrid zone, and the second positioned between 7°25'S and 14°S with each affecting different loci. Coalescence analysis indicates a single vicariant event at the origin of divergence between clades for all nuclear loci, although the clines are now spatially discordant. We thus hypothesize that the Easter Microplate barrier has recently been relaxed after a long period of isolation and that some genetic clines have escaped the barrier and moved northward where they have subsequently been trapped by a reinforcing barrier to gene flow between 7°25'S and 14°S.

  7. Carbon dioxide capture strategies from flue gas using microalgae: a review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniya M; Mechery, Jerry; Paulose, Sylas V

    2016-09-01

    Global warming and pollution are the twin crises experienced globally. Biological offset of these crises are gaining importance because of its zero waste production and the ability of the organisms to thrive under extreme or polluted condition. In this context, this review highlights the recent developments in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gas using microalgae and finding the best microalgal remediation strategy through contrast and comparison of different strategies. Different flue gas microalgal remediation strategies discussed are as follows: (i) Flue gas to CO2 gas segregation using adsorbents for microalgal mitigation, (ii) CO2 separation from flue gas using absorbents and later regeneration for microalgal mitigation, (iii) Flue gas to liquid conversion for direct microalgal mitigation, and (iv) direct flue gas mitigation using microalgae. This work also studies the economic feasibility of microalgal production. The study discloses that the direct convening of flue gas with high carbon dioxide content, into microalgal system is cost-effective.

  8. Regenerable sorbents for mercury capture in simulated coal combustion flue gas.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Jorge; López-Antón, M Antonia; Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; García, Roberto; Martínez-Tarazona, M Rosa

    2013-09-15

    This work demonstrates that regenerable sorbents containing nano-particles of gold dispersed on an activated carbon are efficient and long-life materials for capturing mercury species from coal combustion flue gases. These sorbents can be used in such a way that the high investment entailed in their preparation will be compensated for by the recovery of all valuable materials. The characteristics of the support and dispersion of gold in the carbon surface influence the efficiency and lifetime of the sorbents. The main factor that determines the retention of mercury and the regeneration of the sorbent is the presence of reactive gases that enhance mercury retention capacity. The capture of mercury is a consequence of two mechanisms: (i) the retention of elemental mercury by amalgamation with gold and (ii) the retention of oxidized mercury on the activated carbon support. These sorbents were specifically designed for retaining the mercury remaining in gas phase after the desulfurization units in coal power plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-04-27

    The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfmmore » bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.« less

  10. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  11. Assessing sorbent injection mercury control effectiveness in flue gas streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, T.R.; Richardson, C.F.; Chang, R.; Meserole, F.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.

    2000-01-01

    One promising approach for removing mercury from coal-fired, utility flue gas involves the direct injection of mercury sorbents. Although this method has been effective at removing mercury in municipal waste incinerators, tests conducted to date on utility coal-fired boilers show that mercury removal is much more difficult in utility flue gas. EPRI is conducting research to investigate mercury removal using sorbents in this application. Bench-scale, pilot-scale, and field tests have been conducted to determine the ability of different sorbents to remove mercury in simulated and actual flue gas streams. This paper focuses on recent bench-scale and field test results evaluating the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon and fly ash and the use of these results to develop a predictive mercury removal model. Field tests with activated carbon show that adsorption characteristics measured in the lab agree reasonably well with characteristics measured in the field. However, more laboratory and field data will be needed to identify other gas phase components which may impact performance. This will allow laboratory tests to better simulate field conditions and provide improved estimates of sorbent performance for specific sites. In addition to activated carbon results, bench-scale and modeling results using fly ash are presented which suggest that certain fly ashes are capable of adsorbing mercury.

  12. Active methods of mercury removal from flue gases.

    PubMed

    Marczak, Marta; Budzyń, Stanisław; Szczurowski, Jakub; Kogut, Krzysztof; Burmistrz, Piotr

    2018-03-23

    Due to its adverse impact on health, as well as its global distribution, long atmospheric lifetime and propensity for deposition in the aquatic environment and in living tissue, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has classified mercury and its compounds as a severe air quality threat. Such widespread presence of mercury in the environment originates from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Global anthropogenic emission of mercury is evaluated at 2000 Mg year -1 . According to the National Centre for Emissions Management (Pol. KOBiZE) report for 2014, Polish annual mercury emissions amount to approximately 10 Mg. Over 90% of mercury emissions in Poland originate from combustion of coal.The purpose of this paper was to understand mercury behaviour during sub-bituminous coal and lignite combustion for flue gas purification in terms of reduction of emissions by active methods. The average mercury content in Polish sub-bituminous coal and lignite was 103.7 and 443.5 μg kg -1 . The concentration of mercury in flue gases emitted into the atmosphere was 5.3 μg m -3 for sub-bituminous coal and 17.5 μg m -3 for lignite. The study analysed six low-cost sorbents with the average achieved efficiency of mercury removal from 30.6 to 92.9% for sub-bituminous coal and 22.8 to 80.3% for lignite combustion. Also, the effect of coke dust grain size was examined for mercury sorptive properties. The fine fraction of coke dust (CD) adsorbed within 243-277 μg Hg kg -1 , while the largest fraction at only 95 μg Hg kg -1 . The CD fraction < 0.063 mm removed almost 92% of mercury during coal combustion, so the concentration of mercury in flue gas decreased from 5.3 to 0.4 μg Hg m -3 . The same fraction of CD had removed 93% of mercury from lignite flue gas by reducing the concentration of mercury in the flow from 17.6 to 1.2 μg Hg m -3 . The publication also presents the impact of photochemical oxidation of mercury on the effectiveness of Hg

  13. Optimize Flue Gas Settings to Promote Microalgae Growth in Photobioreactors via Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    He, Lian; Chen, Amelia B; Yu, Yi; Kucera, Leah; Tang, Yinjie

    2013-01-01

    Flue gas from power plants can promote algal cultivation and reduce greenhouse gas emissions1. Microalgae not only capture solar energy more efficiently than plants3, but also synthesize advanced biofuels2-4. Generally, atmospheric CO2 is not a sufficient source for supporting maximal algal growth5. On the other hand, the high concentrations of CO2 in industrial exhaust gases have adverse effects on algal physiology. Consequently, both cultivation conditions (such as nutrients and light) and the control of the flue gas flow into the photo-bioreactors are important to develop an efficient “flue gas to algae” system. Researchers have proposed different photobioreactor configurations4,6 and cultivation strategies7,8 with flue gas. Here, we present a protocol that demonstrates how to use models to predict the microalgal growth in response to flue gas settings. We perform both experimental illustration and model simulations to determine the favorable conditions for algal growth with flue gas. We develop a Monod-based model coupled with mass transfer and light intensity equations to simulate the microalgal growth in a homogenous photo-bioreactor. The model simulation compares algal growth and flue gas consumptions under different flue-gas settings. The model illustrates: 1) how algal growth is influenced by different volumetric mass transfer coefficients of CO2; 2) how we can find optimal CO2 concentration for algal growth via the dynamic optimization approach (DOA); 3) how we can design a rectangular on-off flue gas pulse to promote algal biomass growth and to reduce the usage of flue gas. On the experimental side, we present a protocol for growing Chlorella under the flue gas (generated by natural gas combustion). The experimental results qualitatively validate the model predictions that the high frequency flue gas pulses can significantly improve algal cultivation. PMID:24121788

  14. Analysis of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Processes for Potential Use on Army Coal-Fired Boilers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT N-93 September 1980 ANALYSIS OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (FGD) PROCESSES FOR POTENTIAL USE ON ARMY COAL-FIRED BOILERS TECHNICAL LIBRARY...REFERENCE: Technical Report N-93, Analysis of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Ppooesses for Potential Use on Army Coal-Fired Boilers Please take a few...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 1. REPORT NUMBER CERL-TR-N-93 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO «. TITLE (end Subtitle) ANALYSIS OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (FGD

  15. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2015-09-22

    A system including a vessel including a heat source and a flue; a turbine; a condenser; a fluid conduit circuit disposed between the vessel, the turbine and the condenser; and a diverter coupled to the flue to direct a portion of an exhaust from the flue to contact with a cooling medium for the condenser water. A method including diverting a portion of exhaust from a flue of a vessel; modifying the pH of a cooling medium for a condenser with the portion of exhaust; and condensing heated fluid from the vessel with the pH modified cooling medium.

  16. Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

    2006-06-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the powermore » plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention

  17. Distribution of heavy metals from flue gas in algal bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napan, Katerine

    Flue gas from coal-fired power plants is a major source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Microalgae can use this enriched form of CO2 as carbon source and in turn the biomass can be used to produce food, feed, fertilizer and biofuels. However, along with CO2, coal-based flue gas will inevitably introduce heavy metals, which have a high affinity to bind algal cells, could be toxic to the organisms and if transferred to the products could limit their uses. This study seeks to address the distribution and impact of heavy metals present in flue gas on microalgae production systems. To comprehend its effects, algae Scenedesmus obliquus was grown in batch reactors in a multimetal system. Ten heavy metals (Cu, Co, Zn, Pb, As, Se, Cr, Hg, Ni and Cd) were selected and were evaluated at four concentrations (1X, 2X, 5X and 10X). Results show that most heavy metals accumulated mainly in biomass and were found in very low concentrations in media. Hg was shown to be lost from the culture, with low amounts present in the biomass. An upper limit for As uptake was observed, suggesting its likelihood to build-up in the system during medium recycle. The As limited bioaccumulation was overcome by addition of sulfur to the algal medium. Heavy metal at 2X, 5X and 10X inhibited both growth and lipid production, while at the reference concentration both biomass and lipids yields were increased. Heavy metal concentrations in the medium and biomass were time dependent, and at the end of the cultivation most heavy metals in the supernatant solution complied with the recommendations for irrigation water, while biomass was below limits for cattle and poultry feed, fertilizer, plastic and paper. This research shows that bioremediation of CO2 and heavy metals in combination with energy production can be integrated, which is an environmentally friendly form of biotechnology.

  18. Development of corrosion resistant heat exchangers for flue gas desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, E.; Lorentz, R.

    1984-12-01

    A glass lining as protection against corrosion in flue gas desulfurization plants was developed. Glasses were evaluated under corrosive attack of fluoride-containing acids. The corrosion properties of one-layer and two-layer glass enamels are optimized. Two-layer systems always show better resistance and longer life. The optimized glass linings were tested in a power plant. Manufacturing principles for glass-lined heat exchanger elements are derived. The optimized glasses may be used as protective lining design for heat exchangers or parts of them.

  19. Potential Flue Gas Impurities in Carbon Dioxide Streams Separated from Coal-fired Power Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    For geological sequestration of CO2 separated from pulverized coal combustion flue gas, it is necessary to adequately evaluate the potential impacts of flue gas impurities on groundwater aquifers in the case of the CO2 leakage from its storage sites. This s...

  20. Use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum as a Heavy Metal Stabilizer in Contaminated Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a synthetic by-product generated from the flue gas desulfurization process in coal power plants. It has several beneficial applications such as an ingredient in cement production, wallboard production and in agricultural practice as a soil...

  1. MERCURY SPECIATION IN COMBUSTION SYSTEMS: STUDIES WITH SIMULATED FLUE GASES AND MODEL FLY ASHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a bench-scale study of the effects of flue gas and fly ash parameters on the oxidation of elemental mercury in simulated flue gases containing hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and water vapor (H2O...

  2. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION HELD AT LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, MARCH 1979; VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The publication, in two volumes, contains the text of all papers presented at EPA's fifth flue gas desulfurization (FGD) symposium, March 5-8, 1979, at Las Vegas, Nevada. A partial listing of papers in Volume 2 includes the following: Basin Electric's involvement with dry flue ga...

  3. Development of the Aqueous Processes for Removing NOx from Flue Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Gilford A.

    A screening study was conducted to evaluate the capability of aqueous solutions to scrub NOx from the flue gases emitted by stationary power plants fired with fossil fuels. The report summarizes the findings of this laboratory program. The experimental program studied the following media for absorption of NOx from flue gases containing no NOx:…

  4. Speciation, Characterization, And Mobility Of As, Se and Hg In Flue Gas Desulphurization Residues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg). The capture of these elements in the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in generation of a metal-laden residue...

  5. Speciation, Characterization, And Mobility Of As, Se, and Hg In Flue Gas Desulphurization Residues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile elements, such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg), which could lead to serious environmental health risks. The capture of these toxic elements in the scrubber with a flue gas desulphurization (FGD...

  6. CO2 , NOx and SOx removal from flue gas via microalgae cultivation: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hong-Wei; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-06-01

    Flue gas refers to the gas emitting from the combustion processes, and it contains CO2 , NOx , SOx and other potentially hazardous compounds. Due to the increasing concerns of CO2 emissions and environmental pollution, the cleaning process of flue gas has attracted much attention. Using microalgae to clean up flue gas via photosynthesis is considered a promising CO2 mitigation process for flue gas. However, the impurities in the flue gas may inhibit microalgal growth, leading to a lower microalgae-based CO2 fixation rate. The inhibition effects of SOx that contribute to the low pH could be alleviated by maintaining a stable pH level, while NOx can be utilized as a nitrogen source to promote microalgae growth when it dissolves and is oxidized in the culture medium. The yielded microalgal biomass from fixing flue gas CO2 and utilizing NOx and SOx as nutrients would become suitable feedstock to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals. In addition to the removal of SOx , NOx and CO2 , using microalgae to remove heavy metals from flue gas is also quite attractive. In conclusion, the use of microalgae for simultaneous removal of CO2 , SOx and NOx from flue gas is an environmentally benign process and represents an ideal platform for CO2 reutilization. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The removal of sulfur dioxide from flue gases

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Helmut

    1965-01-01

    The growth of industrialization makes it imperative to reduce the amounts of sulfur dioxide emitted into the atmosphere. This article describes various processes for cleaning flue gases, and gives details of new methods being investigated. Wet scrubbing with water, though widely practised, has many disadvantages. Scrubbing with zinc oxide, feasible in zinc works, is more satisfactory. Dry methods use a solid absorbent; they have the advantage of a high emission temperature. Other methods are based on the addition to the fuel or the flue gases of substances such as activated metal oxides, which react with the sulfur to form compounds less harmful than sulfur dioxide. Also being investigated are a two-stage combustion system, in which the sulfur dioxide is removed in the first stage, and the injection of activated powdered dolomite into burning fuel; the resulting sulfates being removed by electrostatic precipitation. A wet catalysis process has recently been developed. Most of the cleaning processes are not yet technically mature, but first results show good efficiency and relatively low cost. PMID:14315714

  8. NOx Removal from Flue Gases Using Non-Thermal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Koichi

    Air pollution caused by gas emission of pollutants produced from a wide range of sources including coal, oil and gas burning power plants, diesel engines, paper mills, steel and chemical production plants must be reduced drastically and urgently, as mandated by recent worldwide nation legislation which recently are being reinforced increasingly by international agreements. Non-thermal plasma in which the mean energy of electrons is substantially higher than that of the gas offer advantages in reducing energy required to remove the pollutants. The electrical energy supplied into the discharge is used preferentially to create energetic electrons which are then used to produce radicals by dissociation and ionization of the carrier gas in which the pollutants are present. These radicals are used to decompose the pollutants. There are two technologically promising techniques for generating non-thermal plasmas in atmospheric gas pressure containing the pollutants, namely electron beam irradiation and electrical discharge techniques. Both techniques are undergoing intensive and continuous development worldwide. This is done to reduce the energy requirement for pollutant removal, and therefore the associated cost, as well as to obtain a better understanding of the physical and chemical processes involved in reducing the pollutants. In the present paper only electrical discharge techniques for NOx removal from flue gases and exhaust emissions are reviewed. This paper summarizes the chemical reactions responsible for the removal of the major polluting constituents of NO and NO2 encountered in the flue gases.

  9. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  10. Mathematical Model of Two Phase Flow in Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Including Flue Gas Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The previously developed model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer is extended to be able to take into account the flow of supersaturated moist air. The two phase flow model is based on void fraction of gas phase which is included in the governing equations. Homogeneous equilibrium model, where the two phases are well mixed and have the same velocity, is used. The effect of flue gas injection is included into the developed mathematical model by using source terms in governing equations and by using momentum flux coefficient and kinetic energy flux coefficient. Heat and mass transfer in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations, where the mass transfer is represented by measured fill Merkel number and heat transfer is calculated using prescribed Lewis factor.

  11. Uptake of Cadmium by Flue-Cured Tobacco Plants: Exploring Bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, I.; Robarge, W. P.; Vann, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific understanding of cadmium (Cd) cycling in North Carolina tobacco plants and soils has lagged, even as production of flue-cured tobacco remains an important part of the NC economy ($903 million in 2014). Cd is considered a tobacco contaminant. When tobacco is burned, Cd can exist as a fine aerosol and subsequent inhalation is linked to cancer. Tobacco root exudates enhance Cd uptake, even though the Cd concentration in NC soils is <0.1 mg/kg. Quantifying Cd concentrations in tobacco plants is crucial to understanding Cd bioavailability and implementing soil remediation efforts. The objective of this study was to develop a Cd mass balance for flue-cured tobacco grown under field conditions in NC. Whole plant samples were collected at transplanting and every 2 weeks thereafter until harvest. Individual plants were segregated into root, stalk and individual leaves (n = 15 whole plants/sampling date; composite samples were taken early in the growing season). After recording dry mass, samples were analyzed using ion-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry or ion-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lower leaves contained the highest Cd concentrations ( 7-10 mg/kg). Leaves occupying the upper 50% of the plant had Cd concentrations of 2 mg/kg. Uptake rate was greatest from day 27 to 66 ( 21.5 μg Cd/day). Selective Cd uptake appears evident between day 27 and 43, but overall the relative rate of Cd uptake was similar to other trace metals and micronutrients. Cd distribution within the plants mirrored the distribution of calcium, a macronutrient. Of the 8 mg of soil extractable Cd (0.075 mg/kg) in the rooting zone, 15.0% (1203 μg) is removed by uptake. Of this 15%, 64.2% (772.2 μg) is exported at harvest, and 35.8% (430.8 μg; lower leaves, roots, stalks) is returned to the soil. This study must be replicated to account for seasonal and soil variations. These results do inform selection of tobacco strains that limit uptake of trace metals, particularly Cd.

  12. Potential flue gas impurities in carbon dioxide streams separated from coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Youp; Keener, Tim C; Yang, Y Jeffery

    2009-06-01

    For geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) separated from pulverized coal combustion flue gas, it is necessary to adequately evaluate the potential impacts of flue gas impurities on groundwater aquifers in the case of the CO2 leakage from its storage sites. This study estimated the flue gas impurities to be included in the CO2 stream separated from a CO2 control unit for a different combination of air pollution control devices and different flue gas compositions. Specifically, the levels of acid gases and mercury vapor were estimated for the monoethanolamine (MEA)-based absorption process on the basis of published performance parameters of existing systems. Among the flue gas constituents considered, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is known to have the most adverse impact on MEA absorption. When a flue gas contains 3000 parts per million by volume (ppmv) SO2 and a wet flue gas desulfurization system achieves its 95% removal, approximately 2400 parts per million by weight (ppmw) SO2 could be included in the separated CO2 stream. In addition, the estimated concentration level was reduced to as low as 135 ppmw for the SO2 of less than 10 ppmv in the flue gas entering the MEA unit. Furthermore, heat-stable salt formation could further reduce the SO2 concentration below 40 ppmw in the separated CO2 stream. In this study, it is realized that the formation rates of heat-stable salts in MEA solution are not readily available in the literature and are critical to estimating the levels and compositions of flue gas impurities in sequestered CO2 streams. In addition to SO2, mercury, and other impurities in separated CO2 streams could vary depending on pollutant removal at the power plants and impose potential impacts on groundwater. Such a variation and related process control in the upstream management of carbon separation have implications for groundwater protection at carbon sequestration sites and warrant necessary considerations in overall sequestration planning

  13. Growth of Aspergillus repens in Flue-Cured Tobacco 1

    PubMed Central

    Welty, Ronald E.; Nelson, Larry A.

    1971-01-01

    In laboratory tests, flue-cured tobacco inoculated with Aspergillus repens was stored at 75, 80, 85, 87, and 95% relative humidity at 20 and 30 C. Samples were taken weekly for 4 weeks and evaluated for mold growth (colony count) and moisture content (MC). The weekly rate of fungus increase was slower at 20 C than at 30 C. Tobacco at 20 C with MC between 25 to 30% supported a slight to moderate increase in A. repens after 3 weeks of storage. However, tobacco at the same MC stored at 30 C was subject to rapid invasion by the fungus in as few as 1 to 2 weeks. Tobacco with MC above 30% stored at either 20 or 30 C became moldy in about 1 week. A mold index is proposed for evaluating populations of A. repens in tobacco. PMID:16349905

  14. Growth of Aspergillus repens in Flue-Cured Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Welty, R E; Nelson, L A

    1971-05-01

    In laboratory tests, flue-cured tobacco inoculated with Aspergillus repens was stored at 75, 80, 85, 87, and 95% relative humidity at 20 and 30 C. Samples were taken weekly for 4 weeks and evaluated for mold growth (colony count) and moisture content (MC). The weekly rate of fungus increase was slower at 20 C than at 30 C. Tobacco at 20 C with MC between 25 to 30% supported a slight to moderate increase in A. repens after 3 weeks of storage. However, tobacco at the same MC stored at 30 C was subject to rapid invasion by the fungus in as few as 1 to 2 weeks. Tobacco with MC above 30% stored at either 20 or 30 C became moldy in about 1 week. A mold index is proposed for evaluating populations of A. repens in tobacco.

  15. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2006-05-02

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  16. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  17. Flue Gas Desulfurization at Navy Bases, Navy Energy Guidance Study. Phase IV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    WA08O9 146 BECHTEL NATIONAL INC SAN FRANCISCO CA FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION AT NAVY BASES, NAVY ENERGY GUIDANCE ST-ETC(U) AUG 80 A I MCCONE N68305-77C... Flue gas desulfurization 10. ABSTRACT (C lno d. It -.4..,.d id-1, by 61-hb n-.1..) A study o e availability, costs, and operating perfor- nce of...industral-sized flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems or coal-fired boilers 4...- mrfmmed for-the Civil Englneering- , - boratory at the Naval Construction

  18. Volatile metal species in coal combustion flue gas.

    PubMed

    Pavageau, Marie-Pierre; Pécheyran, Christophe; Krupp, Eva M; Morin, Anne; Donard, Olivier F X

    2002-04-01

    Metals are released in effluents of most of combustion processes and are under intensive regulations. To improve our knowledge of combustion process and their resulting emission of metal to the atmosphere, we have developed an approach allowing usto distinguish between gaseous and particulate state of the elements emitted. This study was conducted on the emission of volatile metallic species emitted from a coal combustion plant where low/medium volatile coal (high-grade ash) was burnt. The occurrence of volatile metal species emission was investigated by cryofocusing sampling procedure and detection using low-temperature packed-column gas chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as multielement detector (LT-GC/ICP-MS). Samples were collected in the stack through the routine heated sampling line of the plant downstream from the electrostatic precipitator. The gaseous samples were trapped with a cryogenic device and analyzed by LT-GC/ICP-MS. During the combustion process, seven volatile metal species were detected: three for Se, one for Sn, two for Hg, and one for Cu. Thermodynamic calculations and experimental metal species spiking experiments suggest that the following volatile metal species are present in the flue gas during the combustion process: COSe, CSSe, CSe2, SeCl2, Hg0, HgCl2, CuO-CuSO4 or CuSO4 x H2O, and SnO2 or SnCl2. The quantification of volatile species was compared to results traditionally obtained by standardized impinger-based sampling and analysis techniques recommended for flue gas combustion characterization. Results showed that concentrations obtained with the standard impinger approach are at least 10 times higher than obtained with cryogenic sampling, suggesting the trapping microaerosols in the traditional methods. Total metal concentrations in particles are also reported and discussed.

  19. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION - NEW ORLEANS, MARCH 1976, VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the presentation made during the symposium, which dealt with the status of flue gas desulfurization technology in the United States and abroad. Subjects considered included: regenerable, nonregenerable, and advanced processes; process costs; and by-produc...

  20. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION HELD AT HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 1977. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations made during the symposium, which dealt with the status of flue gas desulfurization technology in the United States and abroad. Subjects considered included: regenerable, non-regenerable, and advanced processes; process costs; and by-product ...

  1. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION HELD AT HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 1977. VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations made during the symposium, which dealt with the status of flue gas desulfurization technology in the United States and abroad. Subjects considered included: regenerable, non-regenerable, and advanced processes; process costs; and by-product ...

  2. [Research on the measurement of flue-dust concentration in Vis, IR spectral region].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-gang; Tang, Hong; Yuan, Gui-bin

    2008-10-01

    In the measurement of flue-dust concentration based on the transmission method, the dependent model algorithm was used to invert the flue-dust concentration in the visible, infrared and visible-infrared spectral regions respectively. By the analysis and comparison of the accuracy, linearity and sensitivity of the inversion flue-dust concentration, the optimal spectral region was determined. Meanwhile, the influence of the water droplet with different size distribution and volume concentration was simulated, and a method was proposed which has advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and suitability for on line measurement. Simulation experiments illustrate that the flue-dust concentration can be inverted very well in the visible-infrared spectral region, and it is feasible to use the ratio of the constrained light extinction method to overcome the influence of water droplet. The inverse results all remain satisfactory when 2% stochastic noise is added to the value of the light extinction.

  3. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Shuxiao; Wu, Qingru; Wang, Fengyang; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhang, Leiming; Hui, Mulin; Yang, Mei; Su, Haitao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, waste incinerators, biomass burning and so on. Mercury in coal, ores, and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of Hg0 to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g., TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher Hg0 fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non-ferrous metal smelting, cement and

  4. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wang, S. X.; Wu, Q. R.; Wang, F. Y.; Lin, C.-J.; Zhang, L. M.; Hui, M. L.; Hao, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, municipal solid waste incinerators, and biomass burning. Mercury in coal, ores and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g.,TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non

  5. Testing of heat exchanger systems for reheating flue gases from wet scrubbing desulfurization plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Than, K.

    1982-09-01

    Two heat exchanger systems: the cyclic process of GEA and, the plate heat exchanger of Kablitz/Thyssen, for reheating flue gases, which have been cooled to about 50 to 55 C due to wet scrubbing, to the required temperature at the outlet of the stack by extracting the sensible heat of the hot flue gases were tested. The problem of building materials and on keeping clean the heat exchanger surface are emphasized.

  6. Zone lines

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith

    2001-01-01

    Zone lines are narrow, usually dark markings formed in decaying wood. Zone lines are found most frequently in advanced white rot of hardwoods, although they occasionally are associated both with brown rot and with softwoods.

  7. Simultaneous flue gas bioremediation and reduction of microalgal biomass production costs.

    PubMed

    Douskova, I; Doucha, J; Livansky, K; Machat, J; Novak, P; Umysova, D; Zachleder, V; Vitova, M

    2009-02-01

    A flue gas originating from a municipal waste incinerator was used as a source of CO(2) for the cultivation of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris, in order to decrease the biomass production costs and to bioremediate CO(2) simultaneously. The utilization of the flue gas containing 10-13% (v/v) CO(2) and 8-10% (v/v) O(2) for the photobioreactor agitation and CO(2) supply was proven to be convenient. The growth rate of algal cultures on the flue gas was even higher when compared with the control culture supplied by a mixture of pure CO(2) and air (11% (v/v) CO(2)). Correspondingly, the CO(2) fixation rate was also higher when using the flue gas (4.4 g CO(2) l(-1) 24 h(-1)) than using the control gas (3.0 g CO(2) l(-1) 24 h(-1)). The toxicological analysis of the biomass produced using untreated flue gas showed only a slight excess of mercury while all the other compounds (other heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated biphenyls) were below the limits required by the European Union foodstuff legislation. Fortunately, extending the flue gas treatment prior to the cultivation unit by a simple granulated activated carbon column led to an efficient absorption of gaseous mercury and to the algal biomass composition compliant with all the foodstuff legislation requirements.

  8. Effects of simulated flue gas on components of Scenedesmus raciborskii WZKMT.

    PubMed

    Li, Xie-kun; Xu, Jing-liang; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Wei-zheng; Yuan, Zhen-hong

    2015-08-01

    Scenedesmus raciborskii WZKMT cultured with simulated flue gas was investigated. Cellular components, including total sugar, starch, chlorophyll, protein and lipid, were compared between simulated flue gas and 7% (v/v) CO2. Dissolution of SO2 and NO in simulated flue gas led to pH decrease and toxicity to microalgae cells. Furthermore, the death or aging of microalgae cells reduced the buffer capacity and caused decrease of simulated flue gas absorption. With 7% CO2, the highest total sugar and starch content could attain to 66.76% and 53.16%, respectively, which indicated S. raciborskii WZKMT is a desired feedstock candidate for bioethanol production. Microalgae growth and starch accumulation was inhibited, while cells produced more chlorophyll, protein and lipid when simulated flue gas was the carbon source. Fatty acids composition analysis indicated that there was no significant distinction on fatty acids relative content (fatty acid/TFA) between cells aerated using simulated flue gas and 7% CO2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Producing ammonium sulfate from flue gas desulfurization by-products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Bruinius, J.A.; Benig, V.; Chou, S.-F.J.; Carty, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Emission control technologies using flue gas desulfurization (FGD) have been widely adopted by utilities burning high-sulfur fuels. However, these technologies require additional equipment, greater operating expenses, and increased costs for landfill disposal of the solid by-products produced. The financial burdens would be reduced if successful high-volume commercial applications of the FGD solid by-products were developed. In this study, the technical feasibility of producing ammonium sulfate from FGD residues by allowing it to react with ammonium carbonate in an aqueous solution was preliminarily assessed. Reaction temperatures of 60, 70, and 80??C and residence times of 4 and 6 hours were tested to determine the optimal conversion condition and final product evaluations. High yields (up to 83%) of ammonium sulfate with up to 99% purity were achieved under relatively mild conditions. The optimal conversion condition was observed at 60??C and a 4-hour residence time. The results of this study indicate the technical feasibility of producing ammonium sulfate fertilizer from an FGD by-product. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Inc.

  10. Multi-component removal in flue gas by aqua ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, James T [Bethel Park, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2007-08-14

    A new method for the removal of environmental compounds from gaseous streams, in particular, flue gas streams. The new method involves first oxidizing some or all of the acid anhydrides contained in the gas stream such as sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) and nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N.sub.2O) to sulfur trioxide (SO.sub.3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2). The gas stream is subsequently treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide which captures the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions. The products of the reactions can be collected as slurries, dewatered, and dried for use as fertilizers, or once the slurries have been dewatered, used directly as fertilizers. The ammonium hydroxide can be regenerated and recycled for use via thermal decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate, one of the products formed. There are alternative embodiments which entail stoichiometric scrubbing of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides with subsequent separate scrubbing of carbon dioxide.

  11. Microbial communities associated with wet flue gas desulfurization systems

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bryan P.; Brown, Shannon R.; Senko, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are employed to remove SOx gasses that are produced by the combustion of coal for electric power generation, and consequently limit acid rain associated with these activities. Wet FGDs represent a physicochemically extreme environment due to the high operating temperatures and total dissolved solids (TDS) of fluids in the interior of the FGD units. Despite the potential importance of microbial activities in the performance and operation of FGD systems, the microbial communities associated with them have not been evaluated. Microbial communities associated with distinct process points of FGD systems at several coal-fired electricity generation facilities were evaluated using culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Due to the high solute concentrations and temperatures in the FGD absorber units, culturable halothermophilic/tolerant bacteria were more abundant in samples collected from within the absorber units than in samples collected from the makeup waters that are used to replenish fluids inside the absorber units. Evaluation of bacterial 16S rRNA genes recovered from scale deposits on the walls of absorber units revealed that the microbial communities associated with these deposits are primarily composed of thermophilic bacterial lineages. These findings suggest that unique microbial communities develop in FGD systems in response to physicochemical characteristics of the different process points within the systems. The activities of the thermophilic microbial communities that develop within scale deposits could play a role in the corrosion of steel structures in FGD systems. PMID:23226147

  12. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project, A DOE Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-08-31

    The AFGD process as demonstrated by Pure Air at the Bailly Station offers a reliable and cost-effective means of achieving a high degree of SO{sub 2} emissions reduction when burning high-sulfur coals. Many innovative features have been successfully incorporated in this process, and it is ready for widespread commercial use. The system uses a single-loop cocurrent scrubbing process with in-situ oxidation to produce wallboard-grade gypsum instead of wet sludge. A novel wastewater evaporation system minimizes effluents. The advanced scrubbing process uses a common absorber to serve multiple boilers, thereby saving on capital through economies of scale. Major results of themore » project are: (1) SO{sub 2} removal of over 94 percent was achieved over the three-year demonstration period, with a system availability exceeding 99.5 percent; (2) a large, single absorber handled the combined flue gas of boilers generating 528 MWe of power, and no spares were required; (3) direct injection of pulverized limestone into the absorber was successful; (4) Wastewater evaporation eliminated the need for liquid waste disposal; and (5) the gypsum by-product was used directly for wallboard manufacture, eliminating the need to dispose of waste sludge.« less

  13. Chemical treatment of wastewater from flue gas desulphurisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasiecznik, Iwona; Szczepaniak, Włodzimierz

    2017-11-01

    The article presents results of laboratory tests of removing boron and arsenium from non-ideal solutions using double-layered magnesium/aluminium hydroxides (Mg/Al Double-Layered Hydroxide - DLH) produced with nitrate-chloride method. In research, wastewater from an installation for flue gas desulfurization was examined. Double-layered hydroxides are perfect absorbents for anionic compounds. The research proved high effectiveness of preparation with reference to arsenium, as well as confirmed the effect of presence of sulfatic and arsenate ions on the effectiveness of boron removal. On the basis of research on absorption kinetics a theoretical dose of DLH/NO3-Cl/M preparation was calculated and compared with a dose that ensures emimination of boron below the limit standarized by the national regulations. Application of double-layered magnesium/aluminium hydroxides for boron elimination from industrial wastewater requires significantly higher doses of preparation than those calculated in model investigations. It is due to the priority of removal of multivalent ions, such as sulfatic, arsenate or phosphate ions, by DLH/NO3-Cl/M.

  14. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  15. ELECTROMAGNETIC STIRRING IN ZONE REFINING

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, I.; Frank, F.C.; Marshall, S.

    1958-02-01

    The efficiency of the zone refining process can obviously be increased by stirring the molten zone to disperse the impurity-rich layer at the solid- liquid surface. Induction heating is sometimes preferred to radiant heat because it produces more convection, but no marked improvement has been reported. Pfann and Dorsi(1967) have described a method of stirring the melt by passing an electric current through the ingot and compressing a magnetic field across the molten zone. Preliminary results obtained by using a rotating magnetic field us the stirring agent during the purification of aluminum are described. (A.C.)

  16. Flying MOFs: polyamine-containing fluidized MOF/SiO2 hybrid materials for CO2 capture from post-combustion flue gas.

    PubMed

    Luz, Ignacio; Soukri, Mustapha; Lail, Marty

    2018-05-28

    Solid-state synthesis ensures a high loading and well-dispersed growth of a large collection of metal-organic framework (MOF) nanostructures within a series of commercially available mesoporous silica. This approach provides a general, highly efficient, scalable, environmentally friendly, and inexpensive strategy for shaping MOFs into a fluidized form, thereby allowing their application in fluidized-bed reactors for diverse applications, such as CO 2 capture from post-combustion flue gas. A collection of polyamine-impregnated MOF/SiO 2 hybrid sorbents were evaluated for CO 2 capture under simulated flue gas conditions in a packed-bed reactor. Hybrid sorbents containing a moderate loading of (Zn)ZIF-8 are the most promising sorbents in terms of CO 2 adsorption capacity and long-term stability (up to 250 cycles in the presence of contaminants: SO 2 , NO x and H 2 S) and were successfully prepared at the kilogram scale. These hybrid sorbents demonstrated excellent fluidizability and performance under the relevant process conditions in a visual fluidized-bed reactor. Moreover, a biochemically inspired strategy for covalently linking polyamines to MOF/SiO 2 through strong phosphine bonds has been first introduced in this work as a powerful and highly versatile post-synthesis modification for MOF chemistry, thus providing a novel alternative towards more stable CO 2 solid sorbents.

  17. Mixotrophic cultivation of microalgae using industrial flue gases for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Kandimalla, Pooja; Desi, Sreekanth; Vurimindi, Himabindu

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to grow microalgae Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii in mixotropic cultivation mode using two different substrates, i.e. sewage and glucose as organic carbon sources along with flue gas inputs as inorganic carbon source. The experiments were carried out in 500 ml flasks with sewage and glucose-enriched media along with flue gas inputs. The composition of the flue gas was 7 % CO2, 210 ppm of NO x and 120 ppm of SO x . The results showed that S. quadricauda grown in glucose-enriched medium yielded higher biomass, lipid and fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) (biodiesel) yields of 2.6, 0.63 and 0.3 g/L, respectively. Whereas with sewage, the biomass, lipid and FAME yields of S. quadricauda were 1.9, 0.46, and 0.21 g/L, respectively. The other two species showed closer results as well. The glucose utilization was measured in terms of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) reduction, which was up to 93.75 % by S. quadricauda in the glucose-flue gas medium. In the sewage-flue gas medium, the COD removal was achieved up to 92 % by S. quadricauda. The other nutrients and pollutants from the sewage were removed up to 75 % on an average by the same. Concerning the flue gas treatment studies, S. quadricauda could remove CO2 up to 85 % from the flue gas when grown in glucose medium and 81 % when grown in sewage. The SO x and NO x concentrations were reduced up to 50 and 62 %, respectively, by S. quadricauda in glucose-flue gas medium. Whereas, in the sewage-flue gas medium, the SO x and NO x concentrations were reduced up to 45 and 50 %, respectively, by the same. The other two species were equally efficient however with little less significant yields and removal percentages. This study laid emphasis on comparing the feasibility in utilization of readily available carbon sources like glucose and inexpensive leftover carbon sources like sewage by microalgae to generate energy coupled with economical

  18. Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior

    2010-01-01

    Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using amore » wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury

  19. Status and perspectives for the electron beam technology for flue gases treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Norman W.

    The electron-beam process is one of the most effective methods of removing SO 2 and NO x from industrial flue gases. This flue gas treatment consists of adding a small amount of ammonia to the flue gas and irradiating the gas by means of an electron beam, thereby causing reactions which convert the SO 2 and NO x to ammonium sulfate and ammonium sulfate-nitrate. These salts may the be collected from the flue gas by means of such conventional collectors as an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This process has numerous advantages over currently-used conventional processes as follows: (1) the process simultaneously removes SO 2 and NO x from flue gas at high efficiency levels; (2) it is a dry process which is easily controlled and has excellent load-following capability; (3) stack-gas reheat is not required; (4) the pollutants are converted into a saleable agricultural fertilizer; (5) the process has low capital and operating cost requirements. The history of the process is shown with a summary of the work that is presently underway. All of the current work is for the purpose of fine tuning the process for commercial usage. It is believed that with current testing and improvements, the process will be very competitive with existing processes and it will find its place in an environmental conscious world.

  20. Valorization of Flue Gas by Combining Photocatalytic Gas Pretreatment with Microalgae Production.

    PubMed

    Eynde, Erik Van; Lenaerts, Britt; Tytgat, Tom; Blust, Ronny; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    Utilization of flue gas for algae cultivation seems to be a promising route because flue gas from fossil-fuel combustion processes contains the high amounts of carbon (CO2) and nitrogen (NO) that are required for algae growth. NO is a poor nitrogen source for algae cultivation because of its low reactivity and solublilty in water and its toxicity for algae at high concentrations. Here, we present a novel strategy to valorize NO from flue gas as feedstock for algae production by combining a photocatalytic gas pretreatment unit with a microalgal photobioreactor. The photocatalytic air pretreatment transforms NO gas into NO2 gas and thereby enhances the absorption of NOx in the cultivation broth. The absorbed NOx will form NO2(-) and NO3(-) that can be used as a nitrogen source by algae. The effect of photocatalytic air pretreatment on the growth and biomass productivity of the algae Thalassiosira weissflogii in a semicontinuous system aerated with a model flue gas (1% CO2 and 50 ppm of NO) is investigated during a long-term experiment. The integrated system makes it possible to produce algae with NO from flue gas as the sole nitrogen source and reduces the NOx content in the exhaust gas by 84%.

  1. Flue gas adsorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Romero-Hermida, M. I.; Departamento de Física Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla; Romero-Enrique, J. M.

    Adsorption of flue gases by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The flue gas is modeled as a ternary mixture of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}, emulating realistic compositions of the emissions from power plants. The adsorbed flue gas is in equilibrium with a bulk gas characterized by temperature T, pressure p, and mixture composition. We have considered different SWCNTs with different chiralities and diameters in a range between 7 and 20 Å. Our results show that the CO{sub 2} adsorption properties depend mainly on the bulk flue gas thermodynamic conditionsmore » and the SWCNT diameter. Narrow SWCNTs with diameter around 7 Å show high CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and selectivity, but they decrease abruptly as the SWCNT diameter is increased. For wide SWCNT, CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and selectivity, much smaller in value than for the narrow case, decrease mildly with the SWCNT diameter. In the intermediate range of SWCNT diameters, the CO{sub 2} adsorption properties may show a peculiar behavior, which depend strongly on the bulk flue gas conditions. Thus, for high bulk CO{sub 2} concentrations and low temperatures, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity remains high in a wide range of SWCNT diameters, although the corresponding selectivity is moderate. We correlate these findings with the microscopic structure of the adsorbed gas inside the SWCNTs.« less

  2. Flue gas adsorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Romero-Hermida, M I; Romero-Enrique, J M; Morales-Flórez, V; Esquivias, L

    2016-08-21

    Adsorption of flue gases by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The flue gas is modeled as a ternary mixture of N2, CO2, and O2, emulating realistic compositions of the emissions from power plants. The adsorbed flue gas is in equilibrium with a bulk gas characterized by temperature T, pressure p, and mixture composition. We have considered different SWCNTs with different chiralities and diameters in a range between 7 and 20 Å. Our results show that the CO2 adsorption properties depend mainly on the bulk flue gas thermodynamic conditions and the SWCNT diameter. Narrow SWCNTs with diameter around 7 Å show high CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, but they decrease abruptly as the SWCNT diameter is increased. For wide SWCNT, CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, much smaller in value than for the narrow case, decrease mildly with the SWCNT diameter. In the intermediate range of SWCNT diameters, the CO2 adsorption properties may show a peculiar behavior, which depend strongly on the bulk flue gas conditions. Thus, for high bulk CO2 concentrations and low temperatures, the CO2 adsorption capacity remains high in a wide range of SWCNT diameters, although the corresponding selectivity is moderate. We correlate these findings with the microscopic structure of the adsorbed gas inside the SWCNTs.

  3. Fate of hazardous air pollutants in oxygen-fired coal combustion with different flue gas recycling.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ye; Pavlish, John H

    2012-04-17

    Experiments were performed to characterize transformation and speciation of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), including SO(2)/SO(3), NO(x), HCl, particulate matter, mercury, and other trace elements in oxygen-firing bituminous coal with recirculation flue gas (RFG) from 1) an electrostatic precipitator outlet or 2) a wet scrubber outlet. The experimental results showed that oxycombustion with RFG generated a flue gas with less volume and containing HAPs at higher levels, while the actual emissions of HAPs per unit of energy produced were much less than that of air-blown combustion. NO(x) reduction was achieved in oxycombustion because of the elimination of nitrogen and the destruction of NO in the RFG. The elevated SO(2)/SO(3) in flue gas improved sulfur self-retention. SO(3) vapor could reach its dew point in the flue gas with high moisture, which limits the amount of SO(3) vapor in flue gas and possibly induces material corrosion. Most nonvolatile trace elements were less enriched in fly ash in oxycombustion than air-firing because of lower oxycombustion temperatures occurring in the present study. Meanwhile, Hg and Se were found to be enriched on submicrometer fly ash at higher levels in oxy-firing than in air-blown combustion.

  4. Measurement of Mercury in Flue Gas Based on an Aluminum Matrix Sorbent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xiaohao; Wang, Wenhua

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of total mercury in flue gas based on an economical aluminum matrix sorbent was developed in this paper. A sorbent trap consisted of three tubes was employed to capture Hg from flue gas. Hg trapped on sorbent was transferred into solution by acid leaching and then detected by CVAAS. Hg adsorbed on sorbent was recovered completely by leaching process. The 87.7% recovery of Hg in flue gas by tube 1 and tube 2 was obtained on the equipment of coal combustion and sampling in lab. In order to evaluate the ability to recover and accurately quantify Hg0 on the sorbent media, the analytical bias test on tube 3 spiked with Hg0 was also performed and got the average recovery of 97.1%. Mercury measurements based on this method were conducted for three coal-fired power plants in China. The mercury in coal is distributed into bottom ash, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) ash, wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) reactant, and flue gas, and the relative distribution varied depending on factors such as the coal type and the operation conditions of plants. The mercury mass balances of three plants were also calculated which were 91.6%, 77.1%, and 118%, respectively. The reliability of this method was verified by the Ontario Hydro (OH) method either in lab or in field. PMID:22235178

  5. Chemical and physical properties of dry flue gas desulfurization products.

    PubMed

    Kost, David A; Bigham, Jerry M; Stehouwer, Richard C; Beeghly, Joel H; Fowler, Randy; Traina, Samuel J; Wolfe, William E; Dick, Warren A

    2005-01-01

    Beneficial and environmentally safe recycling of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products requires detailed knowledge of their chemical and physical properties. We analyzed 59 dry FGD samples collected from 13 locations representing four major FGD scrubbing technologies. The chemistry of all samples was dominated by Ca, S, Al, Fe, and Si and strong preferential partitioning into the acid insoluble residue (i.e., coal ash residue) was observed for Al, Ba, Be, Cr, Fe, Li, K, Pb, Si, and V. Sulfur, Ca, and Mg occurred primarily in water- or acid-soluble forms associated with the sorbents or scrubber reaction products. Deionized water leachates (American Society for Testing and Materials [ASTM] method) and dilute acetic acid leachates (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP] method) had mean pH values of >11.2 and high mean concentrations of S primarily as SO(2-)4 and Ca. Concentrations of Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se (except for ASTM Se in two samples) were below drinking water standards in both ASTM and TCLP leachates. Total toxicity equivalents (TEQ) of dioxins, for two FGD products used for mine reclamation, were 0.48 and 0.53 ng kg(-1). This was similar to the background level of the mine spoil (0.57 ng kg(-1)). The FGD materials were mostly uniform in particle size. Specific surface area (m2 g(-1)) was related to particle size and varied from 1.3 for bed ash to 9.5 for spray dryer material. Many of the chemical and physical properties of these FGD samples were associated with the quality of the coal rather than the combustion and SO2 scrubbing processes used.

  6. Applying ACF to Desulfurization Process from Flue Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Zhigang; Tang, Qiang; Cao, Zidong

    2004-08-01

    Inasmuch as the status of environmental pollution caused by SO2 is more and more serious and the policy of environmental protection is executed more and more strictly, desulfurization from flue gas (FGD) is introduced to a wide-spread field of national economy. By a comparison with lime-limestone method, the application of adsorption method in FGD is more effective in desulfurization and more adapted to the situation of our country in respect of its more valuable byproduct. However, the technique of adsorption method is limited by the large amount of adsorbent used. In this paper, activated carbon fiber (ACF) is proposed as a new type of adsorbent to apply in FGD. A series of experiments have been made in order to compare the performances between ACF and granular activated carbon (GAC) which has been mostly used. Experiments show that under the same working conditions ACF's adsorption capacity is 16.6 times as high as that of GAC, mass loss rate is 1/12 of GAC's, desorption efficiency of ACF can reach 99.9%. The theory of micropore adsorption dynamics is adopted to analyze the characteristics of both adsorbents. It is indicated that adsorbability and perfectibility of desorption are tightly related to the distribution of pores and the surface micromechanism of adsorbent surface. The accessibility of pores for specified adsorptive and the effects of capillary condensation are crucial factors to influence the process of FGD. According to the research of different adsorbents, conclusion can be drawn that ACF is a kind of good material with a strong selectivity for SO2. Compared with the traditional methods of FGD, the use of ACF can greatly economize the consumption of adsorbent and obviously reduce the introduction of new adsorbent, and at the same time keep down the equipment investment and operating cost.

  7. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification

    SciTech Connect

    Minish Shah; Nich Degenstein; Monica Zanfir

    2012-06-30

    The objectives of this project were to carry out an experimental program to enable development and design of near zero emissions (NZE) CO{sub 2} processing unit (CPU) for oxy-combustion plants burning high and low sulfur coals and to perform commercial viability assessment. The NZE CPU was proposed to produce high purity CO{sub 2} from the oxycombustion flue gas, to achieve > 95% CO{sub 2} capture rate and to achieve near zero atmospheric emissions of criteria pollutants. Two SOx/NOx removal technologies were proposed depending on the SOx levels in the flue gas. The activated carbon process was proposed for power plantsmore » burning low sulfur coal and the sulfuric acid process was proposed for power plants burning high sulfur coal. For plants burning high sulfur coal, the sulfuric acid process would convert SOx and NOx in to commercial grade sulfuric and nitric acid by-products, thus reducing operating costs associated with SOx/NOx removal. For plants burning low sulfur coal, investment in separate FGD and SCR equipment for producing high purity CO{sub 2} would not be needed. To achieve high CO{sub 2} capture rates, a hybrid process that combines cold box and VPSA (vacuum pressure swing adsorption) was proposed. In the proposed hybrid process, up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in the cold box vent stream would be recovered by CO{sub 2} VPSA and then it would be recycled and mixed with the flue gas stream upstream of the compressor. The overall recovery from the process will be > 95%. The activated carbon process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx, thus exceeding the performance targets of >99% and >95%, respectively. The process was also found to be suitable for power plants burning both low and high sulfur coals. Sulfuric acid process did not meet the performance expectations. Although it could achieve high SOx (>99%) and NOx (>90%) removal efficiencies, it could not produce

  8. Joint Inversion of 1-D Magnetotelluric and Surface-Wave Dispersion Data with an Improved Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm and Application to the Data of the Longmenshan Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pingping; Tan, Handong; Peng, Miao; Ma, Huan; Wang, Mao

    2018-05-01

    Magnetotellurics and seismic surface waves are two prominent geophysical methods for deep underground exploration. Joint inversion of these two datasets can help enhance the accuracy of inversion. In this paper, we describe a method for developing an improved multi-objective genetic algorithm (NSGA-SBX) and applying it to two numerical tests to verify the advantages of the algorithm. Our findings show that joint inversion with the NSGA-SBX method can improve the inversion results by strengthening structural coupling when the discontinuities of the electrical and velocity models are consistent, and in case of inconsistent discontinuities between these models, joint inversion can retain the advantages of individual inversions. By applying the algorithm to four detection points along the Longmenshan fault zone, we observe several features. The Sichuan Basin demonstrates low S-wave velocity and high conductivity in the shallow crust probably due to thick sedimentary layers. The eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau shows high velocity and high resistivity in the shallow crust, while two low velocity layers and a high conductivity layer are observed in the middle lower crust, probably indicating the mid-crustal channel flow. Along the Longmenshan fault zone, a high conductivity layer from 8 to 20 km is observed beneath the northern segment and decreases with depth beneath the middle segment, which might be caused by the elevated fluid content of the fault zone.

  9. Current Techniques of Growing Algae Using Flue Gas from Exhaust Gas Industry: a Review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guanhua; Chen, Feng; Kuang, Yali; He, Huan; Qin, An

    2016-03-01

    The soaring increase of flue gas emission had caused global warming, environmental pollution as well as climate change. Widespread concern on reduction of flue gas released from industrial plants had considered the microalgae as excellent biological materials for recycling the carbon dioxide directly emitted from exhaust industries. Microalgae also have the potential to be the valuable feedback for renewable energy production due to their high growth rate and abilities to sequester inorganic carbon through photosynthetic process. In this review article, we will illustrate important relative mechanisms in the metabolic processes of biofixation by microalgae and their recent experimental researches and advances of sequestration of carbon dioxide by microalgae on actual industrial and stimulate flue gases, novel photobioreactor cultivation systems as well as the perspectives and limitations of microalgal cultivation in further development.

  10. [Removal of SO2 from flue gas by water vapor DC corona discharge].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming; Wu, Yan

    2006-07-01

    The influence of several factors on removal rate of SO2 from flue gas in unsaturated water vapor DC corona discharge was researched. Furthermore, the experiments of the removal rate of SO2 in pulsed discharge increased by water vapor DC corona discharge plasma were conducted. The experiment system is supplied with multi-nozzle-plate electrodes and the flow of simulated flue gas is under 70 m3/h. The results show that removal rate of SO2 can be improved by increasing the concentration of water vapor, intensity of electric field or decreasing flow of simulated flue gas. In unsaturated water vapor DC corona discharge, removal rate of SO2 can be improved by 10%, when NH3 is added as NH3 and SO2 is in a mole ratio of two to one, it can reach 60%. The removal rate of SO2 can be increased by 5% in pulsed corona discharge and reach above 90%.

  11. Numerical simulation of the baking of porous anode carbon in a vertical flue ring furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, M.; Melaaen, M.C.

    The interaction of pitch pyrolysis in porous anode carbon during heating and volatiles combustion in the flue gas channel has been analyzed to gain insight in the anode baking process. A two-dimensional geometry of a flue gas channel adjacent to a porous flue gas wall, packing coke, and an anode was used for studying the effect of heating rate on temperature gradients and internal gas pressure in the anodes. The mathematical model included porous heat and mass transfer, pitch pyrolysis, combustion of volatiles, radiation, and turbulent channel flow. The mathematical model was developed through source code modification of the computationalmore » fluid dynamics code FLUENT. The model was useful for studying the effects of heating rate, geometry, and anode properties.« less

  12. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ADDITION ON MERCURY OXIDATION BY SCR CATALYST UNDER SIMULATED SUBBITUMINOUS COAL FLUE GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An entrained flow reactor is used to study the effect of addition of chlorine-containing species on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hgo)by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst in simulated subbituminous coal combustion flue gas. The combustion flue gas was doped wit...

  13. Investigation and optimization of the depth of flue gas heat recovery in surface heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, V. V.; Bespalov, V. I.; Melnikov, D. V.

    2017-09-01

    Economic issues associated with designing deep flue gas heat recovery units for natural gas-fired boilers are examined. The governing parameter affecting the performance and cost of surface-type condensing heat recovery heat exchangers is the heat transfer surface area. When firing natural gas, the heat recovery depth depends on the flue gas temperature at the condenser outlet and determines the amount of condensed water vapor. The effect of the outlet flue gas temperature in a heat recovery heat exchanger on the additionally recovered heat power is studied. A correlation has been derived enabling one to determine the best heat recovery depth (or the final cooling temperature) maximizing the anticipated reduced annual profit of a power enterprise from implementation of energy-saving measures. Results of optimization are presented for a surface-type condensing gas-air plate heat recovery heat exchanger for the climatic conditions and the economic situation in Tomsk. The predictions demonstrate that it is economically feasible to design similar heat recovery heat exchangers for a flue gas outlet temperature of 10°C. In this case, the payback period for the investment in the heat recovery heat exchanger will be 1.5 years. The effect of various factors on the optimal outlet flue gas temperature was analyzed. Most climatic, economical, or technological factors have a minor effect on the best outlet temperature, which remains between 5 and 20°C when varying the affecting factors. The derived correlation enables us to preliminary estimate the outlet (final) flue gas temperature that should be used in designing the heat transfer surface of a heat recovery heat exchanger for a gas-fired boiler as applied to the specific climatic conditions.

  14. Adsorption of mercury by activated carbon prepared from dried sewage sludge in simulated flue gas.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongmin; Lee, Sang-Sup

    2018-04-25

    Conversion of sewage sludge to activated carbon is attractive as an alternative method to ocean dumping for the disposal of sewage sludge. Injection of activated carbon upstream of particulate matter control devices has been suggested as a method to remove elemental mercury from flue gas. Activated carbon was prepared using various activation temperatures and times and was tested for their mercury adsorption efficiency using lab-scale systems. To understand the effect of the physical property of the activated carbon, its mercury adsorption efficiency was investigated as a function of their Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area. Two simulated flue gas conditions: (1) without hydrogen chloride (HCl) and (2) with 20 ppm HCl, were used to investigate the effect of flue gas composition on the mercury adsorption capacity of activated carbon. Despite very low BET surface area of the prepared sewage sludge activated carbons, their mercury adsorption efficiencies were comparable under both simulated flue gas conditions to those of pinewood and coal activated carbons. After injecting HCl into the simulated flue gas, all sewage sludge activated carbons demonstrated high adsorption efficiencies, i.e., more than 87%, regardless of their BET surface area. IMPLICATIONS We tested activated carbons prepared from dried sewage sludge to investigate the effect of their physical properties on their mercury adsorption efficiency. Using two simulated flue gas conditions, we conducted mercury speciation for the outlet gas. We found that the sewage sludge activated carbon had comparable mercury adsorption efficiency to pinewood and coal activated carbons, and the presence of HCl minimized the effect of physical property of the activated carbon on its mercury adsorption efficiency.

  15. Survey of flue gas desulfurization systems: Hawthorn Station, Kansas City Power and Light Co. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, G.A.; Zada, F.K.

    1975-09-01

    Results are given of a survey of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems at Kansas City Power and Light Co.'s Hawthorn Power Station. The FGD systems on Hawthorn boilers 3 and 4 were designed to operate by injection of dry limestone in the boiler's furnace, followed by tail gas scrubbing. Because of tube plugging in boiler 4 the mode of operation of the FGD system on that boiler was modified: ground limestone is now introduced into the flue gas near the gas inlet to the scrubber tower. (GRA)

  16. Pilot-scale test for electron beam purification of flue gas from coal-combustion boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Shoji; Namba, Hideki; Tokunaga, Okihiro

    1995-06-01

    Construction of a pilot plant of the treatment capacity of 12,000 m{sup 3}N/h flue gas was completed in November, 1992 in the Shin-Nagoya Thermal Power Station, Nagoya for electron beam purification of flue-gas from coal combustion boiler and the operation had been continued during one year. The results obtained In the tests shows that the target removal efficiency for SO{sub 2} (94 %) and for NO{sub x} (80 %) was achieved with appropriate operation conditions (electron beam dose, temperature, amount of ammonia etc.). The effective collection of powdery by-products was performed by an electrostatic precipitator.

  17. Properties of Semi-dry Flue Gas Desulfurization Ash and Used for Phosphorus Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. P.; Fang, Y.; Chai, S. Y.; Zhuang, Z. Z.

    2018-05-01

    The composition of Semi-dry Flue Gas Desulfurization ash was as follows: CaSO3 · 0.5H2O and Ca(OH)2. Most of the particle size was about 8 µm particles were irregular and small, while the other part was rough and globular. CaSO3 strongly oxidized at about 466°C and Ca(OH)2 decomposed at ∼ 662°C. The maximum amount of phosphorus removal in Semi-dry Flue Gas Desulfurization ash was 79.898 mg/g.

  18. 40 CFR 62.15270 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? 62.15270 Section 62.15270 Protection....15270 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control... temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each particulate matter control device. ...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15270 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? 62.15270 Section 62.15270 Protection....15270 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control... temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each particulate matter control device. ...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1815 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? 60.1815 Section 60.1815 Protection of... I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? You... flue gas stream at the inlet of each particulate matter control device. ...

  1. 40 CFR 60.1815 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? 60.1815 Section 60.1815 Protection of... I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? You... flue gas stream at the inlet of each particulate matter control device. ...

  2. Airflow dispersion in unsaturated soil.

    PubMed

    Gidda, T; Cann, D; Stiver, W H; Zytner, R G

    2006-01-05

    Dispersion data is abundant for water flow in the saturated zone but is lacking for airflow in unsaturated soil. However, for remediation processes such as soil vapour extraction, characterization of airflow dispersion is necessary for improved modelling and prediction capabilities. Accordingly, gas-phase tracer experiments were conducted in five soils ranging from uniform sand to clay at air-dried and wetted conditions. The disturbed soils were placed in one-dimensional stainless steel columns, with sulfur hexafluoride used as the inert tracer. The tested interstitial velocities were typical of those present in the vicinity of a soil vapour extraction well, while wetting varied according to the water-holding capacity of the soils. Results gave dispersivities that varied between 0.42 and 2.6 cm, which are typical of values in the literature. In air-dried soils, dispersion was found to increase with the pore size variability of the soil. For wetted soils, particle shape was an important factor at low water contents, while at high water contents, the proportion of macroporous space filled with water was important. The relative importance of diffusion decreased with increasing interstitial velocity and water content and was, in general, found to be minor compared to mechanical mixing across all conditions studied.

  3. Synthesis and properties of nanostructured sol-gel sorbents for simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buelna Quijada, Genoveva

    2001-07-01

    Regenerative, alumina-supported, copper-based sorbent/catalysts provide a promising technique for simultaneous removal of SO2 and NO x from flue gas. These sorbents can remove over 90% of SO2 and 70+% of NOx while generating no wastes, reducing energy consumption, and producing valuable by-products. The lack of a cost-effective sorbent with low attrition rate and good reactivity has been the main hurdle to commercialization of this copper oxide process. Developing such a sorbent is the focus of this dissertation. This work examines using sol-gel techniques rather than traditional processes to produce gamma-alumina and copper coated 7-alumina granular sorbents. Important modifications to the established sol-gel synthesis process were made, which minimized generated wastes and reduced preparation time and sorbent cost. A laboratory scale semi-continuous process providing a basis for large-scale synthesis was developed. The effect of the copper content on the surface area and dispersion of the active species on sol-gel-derived sorbents coated by the one step and wet-impregnation methods was studied. The sol-gel-derived sorbents showed superior sulfation and regeneration properties than the existing commercial sorbents used in the copper oxide process in terms of sulfation capacity, fast regeneration, recovery of sorption capacity, and SO2 concentration in the regenerated effluent. The optimum temperature for NO reduction by NH3 over sol-gel-derived CuO/gamma-Al2O3 was found to be 350°C for both fresh and sulfated catalysts. This was also the optimum operating temperature for simultaneous removal of SO2 and NOx from simulated flue gas. At 350°C, the adsorption capacity of the sol-gel sorbent/catalyst was higher than UOP's sorbent, and very close to the capacity of ALCOA's sorbent, while the catalytic activity for NO reduction of the sol-gel-derived CuO/gamma-Al 2O3 sorbent fell between the commercial sorbents. The new mesoporous sol-gel-derived materials showed

  4. Genetics of dispersal.

    PubMed

    Saastamoinen, Marjo; Bocedi, Greta; Cote, Julien; Legrand, Delphine; Guillaume, Frédéric; Wheat, Christopher W; Fronhofer, Emanuel A; Garcia, Cristina; Henry, Roslyn; Husby, Arild; Baguette, Michel; Bonte, Dries; Coulon, Aurélie; Kokko, Hanna; Matthysen, Erik; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Nonaka, Etsuko; Stevens, Virginie M; Travis, Justin M J; Donohue, Kathleen; Bullock, James M; Del Mar Delgado, Maria

    2018-02-01

    Dispersal is a process of central importance for the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations and communities, because of its diverse consequences for gene flow and demography. It is subject to evolutionary change, which begs the question, what is the genetic basis of this potentially complex trait? To address this question, we (i) review the empirical literature on the genetic basis of dispersal, (ii) explore how theoretical investigations of the evolution of dispersal have represented the genetics of dispersal, and (iii) discuss how the genetic basis of dispersal influences theoretical predictions of the evolution of dispersal and potential consequences. Dispersal has a detectable genetic basis in many organisms, from bacteria to plants and animals. Generally, there is evidence for significant genetic variation for dispersal or dispersal-related phenotypes or evidence for the micro-evolution of dispersal in natural populations. Dispersal is typically the outcome of several interacting traits, and this complexity is reflected in its genetic architecture: while some genes of moderate to large effect can influence certain aspects of dispersal, dispersal traits are typically polygenic. Correlations among dispersal traits as well as between dispersal traits and other traits under selection are common, and the genetic basis of dispersal can be highly environment-dependent. By contrast, models have historically considered a highly simplified genetic architecture of dispersal. It is only recently that models have started to consider multiple loci influencing dispersal, as well as non-additive effects such as dominance and epistasis, showing that the genetic basis of dispersal can influence evolutionary rates and outcomes, especially under non-equilibrium conditions. For example, the number of loci controlling dispersal can influence projected rates of dispersal evolution during range shifts and corresponding demographic impacts. Incorporating more realism in

  5. DISPOSAL OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM NONREGENERABLE FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a 4-year study to determine environmentally sound methods for disposing of wastes from nonregenerable flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Data presented incorporates results obtained during the fourth year with material from report EPA-600/7-77-052...

  6. Investigation Of A Mercury Speciation Technique For Flue Gas Desulfurization Materials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to bene...

  7. A robust framework to predict mercury speciation in combustion flue gases.

    PubMed

    Ticknor, Jonathan L; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Deshusses, Marc A

    2014-01-15

    Mercury emissions from coal combustion have become a global concern as growing energy demands have increased the consumption of coal. The effective implementation of treatment technologies requires knowledge of mercury speciation in the flue gas, namely concentrations of elemental, oxidized and particulate mercury at the exit of the boiler. A model that can accurately predict mercury species in flue gas would be very useful in that context. Here, a Bayesian regularized artificial neural network (BRANN) that uses five coal properties and combustion temperature was developed to predict mercury speciation in flue gases before treatment technology implementation. The results of the model show that up to 97 percent of the variation in mercury species concentration is captured through the use of BRANNs. The BRANN model was used to conduct a parametric sensitivity which revealed that the coal chlorine content and coal calorific value were the most sensitive parameters, followed by the combustion temperature. The coal sulfur content was the least important parameter. The results demonstrate the applicability of BRANNs for predicting mercury concentration and speciation in combustion flue gas and provide a more efficient and effective technique when compared to other advanced non-mechanistic modeling strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hydrologic transport of fecal bacteria attenuated by flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a byproduct of coal-fired power plants. As a soil amendment for crop and pasture production it may increase water infiltration, reduce soil erosion, and decrease nutrient losses from applications of animal manures. Broiler litter is used as a source of plan...

  9. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Willman, Carl

    To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system concept. The CEPACS system utilizes Electrochemical Membrane (ECM) technology derived from the Company’s Direct FuelCell® products. The system separates the CO2 from the flue gas of other plants and produces electric power using a supplementary fuel. FCE is currently evaluating the use of ECM to cost effectively separate CO2 from the flue gas of Pulverized Coal (PC) power plants under a U.S. Department of Energy contract. The overarching objective of themore » project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project activities include: 1) laboratory scale operational and performance tests of a membrane assembly, 2) performance tests of the membrane to evaluate the effects of impurities present in the coal plant flue gas, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3) techno-economic analysis for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to a 550 MW existing PC plant, in partnership with URS Corporation, and 4) bench scale (11.7 m2 area) testing of an ECM-based CO2 separation and purification system.« less

  10. Results using flue gas desulfurization gypsum in soilless substrates for greenhouse crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent availability of Flue Gas Desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) has led to interested in its possible use in horticulture greenhouse production. Three studies were conducted to determine the effects of increasing rates of FGDG on six greenhouse crops. In the first study, substrates (6:1 pine bark:san...

  11. Carbon dioxide absorber and regeneration assemblies useful for power plant flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang

    2012-11-06

    Disclosed are apparatus and method to treat large amounts of flue gas from a pulverized coal combustion power plant. The flue gas is contacted with solid sorbents to selectively absorb CO.sub.2, which is then released as a nearly pure CO.sub.2 gas stream upon regeneration at higher temperature. The method is capable of handling the necessary sorbent circulation rates of tens of millions of lbs/hr to separate CO.sub.2 from a power plant's flue gas stream. Because pressurizing large amounts of flue gas is cost prohibitive, the method of this invention minimizes the overall pressure drop in the absorption section to less than 25 inches of water column. The internal circulation of sorbent within the absorber assembly in the proposed method not only minimizes temperature increases in the absorber to less than 25.degree. F., but also increases the CO.sub.2 concentration in the sorbent to near saturation levels. Saturating the sorbent with CO.sub.2 in the absorber section minimizes the heat energy needed for sorbent regeneration. The commercial embodiments of the proposed method can be optimized for sorbents with slower or faster absorption kinetics, low or high heat release rates, low or high saturation capacities and slower or faster regeneration kinetics.

  12. SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: ST. CLAIR STATION, DETROIT EDISON CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a survey of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system retrofitted on Unit 6 of Detroit Edison Co.'s St. Clair Station. The experimental FGD system, which operated through a 2-month (October 1976-January 1977) demonstration program, utilized a limestone...

  13. SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: WILL COUNTY STATION, COMMONWEALTH EDISON CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a second survey of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on Unit 1 of Commonwealth Edison Co.'s Will County Station. The FGD system, started up in February 1972, uses a limestone slurry in two parallel scrubbing trains. Each train includes a ventur...

  14. Adsorption separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas by a molecularly imprinted adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Shen, Yanmei; Ma, Guoyi; Hao, Rongjie

    2014-01-01

    CO2 separation by molecularly imprinted adsorbent from coal-fired flue gas after desulfurization system has been studied. The adsorbent was synthesized by molecular imprinted technique, using ethanedioic acid, acrylamide, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the template, functional monomer, and cross-linker, respectively. According to the conditions of coal-fired flue gas, the influencing factors, including adsorption temperature, desorption temperature, gas flow rate, and concentrations of CO2, H2O, O2, SO2, and NO, were studied by fixed bed breakthrough experiments. The experimental conditions were optimized to gain the best adsorption performance and reduce unnecessary energy consumption in future practical use. The optimized adsorption temperature, desorption temperature, concentrations of CO2, and gas flow rate are 60 °C, 80 °C, 13%, and 170 mL/min, respectively, which correspond to conditions of practical flue gases to the most extent. The CO2 adsorption performance was nearly unaffected by H2O, O2, and NO in the flue gas, and was promoted by SO2 within the emission limit stipulated in the Chinese emission standards of air pollutants for a thermal power plant. The maximum CO2 adsorption capacity, 0.57 mmol/g, was obtained under the optimized experimental conditions, and the SO2 concentration was 150 mg/m(3). The influence mechanisms of H2O, O2, SO2, and NO on CO2 adsorption capacity were investigated by infrared spectroscopic analysis.

  15. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION-NEW ORLEANS, MARCH 1976. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the presentations made during the symposium, which dealt with the status of flue gas desulfurization technology in the United States and abroad. Subjects considered included: regenerable, non-regenerable, and advanced processes; process costs; and by-prod...

  16. MODELING OF SO2 REMOVAL IN SPRAY-DRYER FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a comprehensive mathematical model of the SO2 removal process in a spray-dryer flue-gas desulfurization system. Simultaneous evaporation of a sorbent droplet and absorption/reaction of SO2 in the droplet are described by the corresponding heat- and mass-transf...

  17. Utilization of carbon dioxide in industrial flue gases for the cultivation of microalga Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chien-Ya; Chen, Tsai-Yu; Chang, Yu-Bin; Chiu, Tzai-Wen; Lin, Hsiun-Yu; Chen, Chun-Da; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    The biomass and lipid productivity of Chlorella sp. MTF-15 cultivated using aeration with flue gases from a coke oven, hot stove or power plant in a steel plant of the China Steel Corporation in Taiwan were investigated. Using the flue gas from the coke oven, hot stove or power plant for cultivation, the microalgal strain obtained a maximum specific growth rate and lipid production of (0.827 d(-1), 0.688 g L(-1)), (0.762 d(-1), 0.961 g L(-1)), and (0.728 d(-1), 0.792 g L(-1)), respectively. This study demonstrated that Chlorella sp. MTF-15 could efficiently utilize the CO₂, NOX and SO₂ present in the different flue gases. The results also showed that the growth potential, lipid production and fatty acid composition of the microalgal strain were dependent on the composition of the flue gas and on the operating strategy deployed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. AN ELECTROCHEMICAL SYSTEM FOR REMOVING AND RECOVERING ELEMENTAL MERCURY FROM FLUE-STACK GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    the impending EPA regulations on the control of mercury emissions from the flue stacks of coal-burning electric utilities has resulted in heightened interest in the development of advanced mercury control technologies such as sorbent injection and in-situ mercury oxidation. Altho...

  19. Production of activated char from Illinois coal for flue gas cleanup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.; Kruse, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Activated chars were produced from Illinois coal and tested in several flue gas cleanup applications. High-activity chars that showed excellent potential for both SO2 and NOx removal were prepared from an Illinois No. 2 bituminous coal. The SO2 (120 ??C) and NOx (25 ??C) removal performance of one char compared favorably with that of a commercial activated carbon (Calgon Centaur). The NOx removal performance of the same char at 120 ??C exceeded that of the Centaur carbon by more than 1 order of magnitude. Novel char preparation methods were developed including oxidation/thermal desorption and hydrogen treatments, which increased and preserved, respectively, the active sites for SO2 and NOx adsorption. The results of combined SO2/NOx removal tests, however, suggest that SO2 and NOx compete for similar adsorption sites and SO2 seems to be more strongly adsorbed than NO. A low-activity, low-cost char was also developed for cleanup of incinerator flue gas. A three-step method involving coal preoxidation, pyrolysis, and CO2 activation was used to produce the char from Illinois coal. Five hundred pounds of the char was tested on a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial incinerator in Germany. The char was effective in removing >97% of the dioxins and furans present in the flue gas; mercury levels were below detectable limits.

  20. COMPARISON OF WEST GERMAN AND U.S. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION AND SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION COSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents a comparison of the actual cost retrofitting flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on Federal Republic of German (FRG) boilers to cost estimating procedures used in the U.S. to estimate the retrofit of these controls on U.S. b...

  1. Kinetic Energy Recovery from the Chimney Flue Gases Using Ducted Turbine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Harjeet S.; Singh, Pradeep K.

    2017-03-01

    An innovative idea of extracting kinetic energy from man-made wind resources using ducted turbine system for on-site power generation is introduced in this paper. A horizontal axis ducted turbine is attached to the top of the chimney to harness the kinetic energy of flue gases for producing electricity. The turbine system is positioned beyond the chimney outlet, to avoid any negative impact on the chimney performance. The convergent-divergent duct causes increase in the flue gas velocity and hence enhances the performance of the turbine. It also acts as a safety cover to the energy recovery system. The results from the CFD based simulation analysis indicate that significant power 34 kW can be harnessed from the chimney exhaust. The effect of airfoils NACA4412 and NACA4416 and the diffuser angle on the power extraction by the energy recovery system using a 6-bladed ducted turbine has been studied with the CFD simulation. It is observed that the average flue gas velocity in the duct section at the throat is approximately twice that of the inlet velocity, whereas maximum velocity achieved is 2.6 times the inlet velocity. The simulated results show that about power may be extracted from the chimney flue gases of 660 MW power plant. The system can be retrofitted to existing chimneys of thermal power plants, refineries and other industries.

  2. CONTROLLING PCDD/PCDF EMISSIONS FROM INCINERATORS BY FLUE GAS CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses controlling polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDF) emissions from incinerators by flue gas cleaning. New Source performance Standards for municipal waste combustors (MWCs) and guide-lines for existing incinerators in the U.S., proposed on Dec...

  3. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum: Its effectiveness as an alternative bedding material for broiler production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) may be a viable low-cost alternative bedding material for broiler production. In order to evaluate FGD gypsum’s viability, three consecutive trials were conducted to determine its influence on live performance (body weight, feed consumption, feed efficiency, an...

  4. Decreasing phosphorus loss in tile-drained landscapes using flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elevated phosphorus (P) loading from agricultural non-point source pollution continues to impair inland waterbodies throughout the world. The application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to agricultural fields has been suggested to decrease P loading because of its high calcium content and P...

  5. ASSESSING AS, HG AND SE SPECIATION AND TRANSPORT IN FLUE GAS DESULPHURIZATION MATERIAL AND DRYWALL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk associated with the reuse of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) material in drywall manufacture is largely determined by the distribution or mineralogical fractionation of mercury(Hg), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se). During coal combustion, FGD material is enriched in volat...

  6. Experimental study of influence characteristics of flue gas fly ash on acid dew point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinhui; Li, Jiahu; Wang, Shuai; Yuan, Hui; Ren, Zhongqiang

    2017-12-01

    The long-term operation experience of a large number of utility boilers shows that the measured value of acid dew point is generally lower than estimated value. This is because the influence of CaO and MgO on acid dew point in flue gas fly ash is not considered in the estimation formula of acid dew point. On the basis of previous studies, the experimental device for acid dew point measurement was designed and constructed, and the acid dew point under different smoke conditions was measured. The results show that the CaO and MgO in the flue gas fly ash have an obvious influence on the acid dew point, and the content of the fly ash is negatively correlated with the temperature of acid dew point At the same time, the concentration of H2SO4 in flue gas is different, and the acid dew point of flue gas is different, and positively correlated with the acid dew point.

  7. THE EFFECT OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION AVAILABILITY ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES. VOLUME II. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analysis of the effect of the availability of a flue gas desulfurization system on the ability of an individual power plant to generate electricity at its rated capacity. (The availability of anything is the fraction of time it is capable of service...

  8. THE EFFECT OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION AVAILABILITY ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES. VOLUME I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analysis of the effect of the availability of a flue gas desulfurization system on the ability of an individual power plant to generate electricity at its rated capacity. (The availability of anything is the fraction of time it is capable of service...

  9. Possibilities of mercury removal in the dry flue gas cleaning lines of solid waste incineration units.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Šyc, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Kameníková, Petra; Jeremiáš, Michal; Durda, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    Dry methods of the flue gas cleaning (for HCl and SO2 removal) are useful particularly in smaller solid waste incineration units. The amount and forms of mercury emissions depend on waste (fuel) composition, content of mercury and chlorine and on the entire process of the flue gas cleaning. In the case of high HCl/total Hg molar ratio in the flue gas, the majority (usually 70-90%) of mercury is present in the form of HgCl2 and a smaller amount in the form of mercury vapors at higher temperatures. Removal of both main forms of mercury from the flue gas is dependent on chemical reactions and sorption processes at the temperatures below approx. 340 °C. Significant part of HgCl2 and a small part of elemental Hg vapors can be adsorbed on fly ash and solid particle in the air pollution control (APC) processes, which are removed in dust filters. Injection of non-impregnated active carbon (AC) or activated lignite coke particles is able to remove mainly the oxidized Hg(2+) compounds. Vapors of metallic Hg(o) are adsorbed relatively weakly. Much better chemisorption of Hg(o) together with higher sorbent capacity is achieved by AC-based sorbents impregnated with sulfur, alkali poly-sulfides, ferric chloride, etc. Inorganic sorbents with the same or similar chemical impregnation are also applicable for deeper Hg(o) removal (over 85%). SCR catalysts convert part of Hg(o) into oxidized compounds (HgO, HgCl2, etc.) contributing to more efficient Hg removal, but excess of NH3 has a negative effect. Both forms, elemental Hg(o) and HgCl2, can be converted into HgS particles by reacting with droplets/aerosol of poly-sulfides solutions/solids in flue gas. Mercury captured in the form of water insoluble HgS is more advantageous in the disposal of solid waste from APC processes. Four selected options of the dry flue gas cleaning with mercury removal are analyzed, assessed and compared (in terms of efficiency of Hg-emission reduction and costs) with wet methods and retrofits for more

  10. Genetics of dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Bocedi, Greta; Cote, Julien; Legrand, Delphine; Guillaume, Frédéric; Wheat, Christopher W.; Fronhofer, Emanuel A.; Garcia, Cristina; Henry, Roslyn; Husby, Arild; Baguette, Michel; Bonte, Dries; Coulon, Aurélie; Kokko, Hanna; Matthysen, Erik; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Nonaka, Etsuko; Stevens, Virginie M.; Travis, Justin M. J.; Donohue, Kathleen; Bullock, James M.; del Mar Delgado, Maria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dispersal is a process of central importance for the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations and communities, because of its diverse consequences for gene flow and demography. It is subject to evolutionary change, which begs the question, what is the genetic basis of this potentially complex trait? To address this question, we (i) review the empirical literature on the genetic basis of dispersal, (ii) explore how theoretical investigations of the evolution of dispersal have represented the genetics of dispersal, and (iii) discuss how the genetic basis of dispersal influences theoretical predictions of the evolution of dispersal and potential consequences. Dispersal has a detectable genetic basis in many organisms, from bacteria to plants and animals. Generally, there is evidence for significant genetic variation for dispersal or dispersal‐related phenotypes or evidence for the micro‐evolution of dispersal in natural populations. Dispersal is typically the outcome of several interacting traits, and this complexity is reflected in its genetic architecture: while some genes of moderate to large effect can influence certain aspects of dispersal, dispersal traits are typically polygenic. Correlations among dispersal traits as well as between dispersal traits and other traits under selection are common, and the genetic basis of dispersal can be highly environment‐dependent. By contrast, models have historically considered a highly simplified genetic architecture of dispersal. It is only recently that models have started to consider multiple loci influencing dispersal, as well as non‐additive effects such as dominance and epistasis, showing that the genetic basis of dispersal can influence evolutionary rates and outcomes, especially under non‐equilibrium conditions. For example, the number of loci controlling dispersal can influence projected rates of dispersal evolution during range shifts and corresponding demographic impacts

  11. Gas-phase mercury reduction to measure total mercury in the flue gas of a coal-fired boiler.

    PubMed

    Meischen, Sandra J; Van Pelt, Vincent J; Zarate, Eugene A; Stephens, Edward A

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous elemental and total (elemental + oxidized) mercury (Hg) in the flue gas from a coal-fired boiler was measured by a modified ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer. Challenges to Hg measurement were the spectral interferences from other flue gas components and that UV measures only elemental Hg. To eliminate interference from flue gas components, a cartridge filled with gold-coated sand removed elemental Hg from a flue gas sample. The Hg-free flue gas was the reference gas, eliminating the spectral interferences. To measure total Hg by UV, oxidized Hg underwent a gas-phase, thermal-reduction in a quartz cell heated to 750 degrees C. Simultaneously, hydrogen was added to flash react with the oxygen present forming water vapor and preventing Hg re-oxidation as it exits the cell. Hg concentration results are in parts per billion by volume Hg at the flue gas oxygen concentration. The modified Hg analyzer and the Ontario Hydro method concurrently measured Hg at a field test site. Measurements were made at a 700-MW steam turbine plant with scrubber units and selective catalytic reduction. The flue gas sampled downstream of the selective catalytic reduction contained 2100 ppm SO2 and 75 ppm NOx. Total Hg measured by the Hg analyzer was within 20% of the Ontario Hydro results.

  12. Capture zones for simple aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    Capture zones showing the area influenced by a well within a certain time are useful for both aquifer protection and cleanup. If hydrodynamic dispersion is neglected, a deterministic curve defines the capture zone. Analytical expressions for the capture zones can be derived for simple aquifers. However, the capture zone equations are transcendental and cannot be explicitly solved for the coordinates of the capture zone boundary. Fortunately, an iterative scheme allows the solution to proceed quickly and efficiently even on a modest personal computer. Three forms of the analytical solution must be used in an iterative scheme to cover the entire region of interest, after the extreme values of the x coordinate are determined by an iterative solution. The resulting solution is a discrete one, and usually 100-1000 intervals along the x-axis are necessary for a smooth definition of the capture zone. The presented program is written in FORTRAN and has been used in a variety of computing environments. No graphics capability is included with the program; it is assumed the user has access to a commercial package. The superposition of capture zones for multiple wells is expected to be satisfactory if the spacing is not too close. Because this program deals with simple aquifers, the results rarely will be the final word in a real application.

  13. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  14. Simulation of dispersion in layered coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    A density-dependent solute-transport formulation is used to examine ground-water flow in layered coastal aquifers. The numerical experiments indicate that although the transition zone may be thought of as an impermeable 'sharp' interface with freshwater flow parallel to the transition zone in homogeneous aquifers, this is not the case for layered systems. Freshwater can discharge through the transition zone in the confining units. Further, for the best simulation of layered coastal aquifer systems, either a flow-direction-dependent dispersion formulation is required, or the dispersivities must change spatially to reflect the tight thin confining unit. ?? 1990.

  15. Dispersion y dinamica poblacional

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dispersal behavior of fruit flies is appetitive. Measures of dispersion involve two different parameter: the maximum distance and the standard distance. Standard distance is a parameter that describes the probalility of dispersion and is mathematically equivalent to the standard deviation around ...

  16. a Numerical Model for Flue Gas Desulfurization System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Joon

    The purpose of this work is to develop a reliable numerical model for spray dryer desulfurization systems. The shape of the spray dryer requires that a body fitted orthogonal coordinate system be used for the numerical model. The governing equations are developed in the general orthogonal coordinates and discretized to yield a system of algebraic equations. A turbulence model is also included in the numerical program. A new second order numerical scheme is developed and included in the numerical model. The trajectory approach is used to simulate the flow of the dispersed phase. Two-way coupling phenomena is modeled by this scheme. The absorption of sulfur dioxide into lime slurry droplets is simulated by a model based on gas -phase mass transfer. The program is applied to a typical spray dryer desulfurization system. The results show the capability of the program to predict the sensitivity of system performance to changes in operational parameters.

  17. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  18. The importance of the location of sodium chlorite application in a multipollutant flue gas cleaning system.

    PubMed

    Krzyzynska, Renata; Hutson, Nick D

    2012-06-01

    In this study, removing sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), and mercury (Hg) from simulated flue gas was investigated in two laboratory-sized bubbling reactors that simulated an oxidizing reactor (where the NO and Hg(0) oxidation reactions are expected to occur) and a wet limestone scrubber, respectively. A sodium chlorite solution was used as the oxidizing agent. The sodium chlorite solution was an effective additive that enhanced the NO(x), Hg, and SO2 capture from the flue gas. Furthermore, it was discovered that the location of the sodium chlorite application (before, in, or after the wet scrubber) greatly influences which pollutants are removed and the amount removed. This effect is related to the chemical conditions (pH, absence/presence of particular gases) that are present at different positions throughout the flue gas cleaning system profile. The research results indicated that there is a potential to achieve nearly zero SO2, NO(x), and Hg emissions (complete SO2, NO, and Hg removals and -90% of NO(x) absorption from initial values of 1500 ppmv of SO2, 200 ppmv of NO(x), and 206 microg/m3 of Hg(0)) from the flue gas when sodium chlorite was applied before the wet limestone scrubber. However applying the oxidizer after the wet limestone scrubber was the most effective configuration for Hg and NO(x) control for extremely low chlorite concentrations (below 0.002 M) and therefore appears to be the best configuration for Hg control or as an additional step in NO(x) recleaning (after other NO(x) control facilities). The multipollutant scrubber, into which the chlorite was injected simultaneously with the calcium carbonate slurry, appeared to be the least expensive solution (when consider only capital cost), but exhibited the lowest NO(x) absorption at -50%. The bench-scale test results presented can be used to develop performance predictions for a full- or pilot-scale multipollutant flue gas cleaning system equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization

  19. The synthetic evaluation of CuO-MnOx-modified pinecone biochar for simultaneous removal formaldehyde and elemental mercury from simulated flue gas.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yaoyao; Li, Caiting; Zhao, Lingkui; Du, Xueyu; Gao, Lei; Chen, Jiaqiang; Zhai, Yunbo; Zeng, Guangming

    2018-02-01

    A series of low-cost Cu-Mn-mixed oxides supported on biochar (CuMn/HBC) synthesized by an impregnation method were applied to study the simultaneous removal of formaldehyde (HCHO) and elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) at 100-300° C from simulated flue gas. The metal loading value, Cu/Mn molar ratio, flue gas components, reaction mechanism, and interrelationship between HCHO removal and Hg 0 removal were also investigated. Results suggested that 12%CuMn/HBC showed the highest removal efficiency of HCHO and Hg 0 at 175° C corresponding to 89%and 83%, respectively. The addition of NO and SO 2 exhibited inhibitive influence on HCHO removal. For the removal of Hg 0 , NO showed slightly positive influence and SO 2 had an inhibitive effect. Meanwhile, O 2 had positive impact on the removal of HCHO and Hg 0 . The samples were characterized by SEM, XRD, BET, XPS, ICP-AES, FTIR, and H 2 -TPR. The sample characterization illustrated that CuMn/HBC possessed the high pore volume and specific surface area. The chemisorbed oxygen (O β ) and the lattice oxygen (O α ) which took part in the removal reaction largely existed in CuMn/HBC. What is more, MnO 2 and CuO (or Cu 2 O) were highly dispersed on the CuMn/HBC surface. The strong synergistic effect between Cu-Mn mixed oxides was critical to the removal reaction of HCHO and Hg 0 via the redox equilibrium of Mn 4+ + Cu + ↔ Mn 3+ + Cu 2+ .

  20. Dispersion, controlled dispersion, and three applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.

    Causality dictates that all physical media must be dispersive. (We will call a medium dispersive if its refractive index varies with frequency.) Ordinarily, strong dispersion is accompanied either by strong absorption or strong gain. However, over the past 15 years several groups have demonstrated that it is possible to have media that are both strongly dispersive and roughly transparent for some finite bandwidth. In these media, group and phase velocities may differ from each other by many orders of magnitude and even by sign. Relationships and intuitive models that are satisfactory when it is reasonable to neglect dispersion may then fail dramatically. In this dissertation we analyze three such cases of failure. Before looking at the specific cases, we review some basic ideas relating to dispersion. We review some of the geometric meanings of group velocity, touch on the relationship between group velocity and causality, and give some examples of techniques by which the group velocity may be manipulated. We describe the interplay between group velocity and energy density for non-absorbing dispersive media. We discuss the ideas of temporary absorption and emission as dictated by an instantaneous spectrum. We then apply these concepts in three specific areas. First, non-dispersive formulations for the momentum of light in a medium must be adjusted to account for dispersion. For over 100 years, there has been a gradual discussion of the proper form for the per-photon momentum. Two forms, each of which has experimental relevance in a 'dispersionless' medium, are the Abraham momentum, and the Minkowski momentum. If h is the angular frequency, n is the refractive index, h is Planck's constant, and c is the speed of light, then these reduce in a dispersionless medium to per-photon momenta of ho/(nc), and nho/c respectively. A simple generalization of the two momenta to dispersive media entails multiplying each per-photon momentum by n/ng, where ng is the group

  1. Effects of drying pretreatment and particle size adjustment on the composting process of discarded flue-cured tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gui-Hong; Yu, Yan-Ling; Zhou, Xiang-Tong; Lu, Bin-Yu; Li, Zi-Mu; Feng, Yu-Jie

    2017-05-01

    The main characteristic of discarded flue-cured tobacco leaves is their high nicotine content. Aerobic composting is an effective method to decrease the nicotine level in tobacco leaves and stabilize tobacco wastes. However, high levels of nicotine in discarded flue-cured tobacco leaves complicate tobacco waste composting. This work proposes a drying pretreatment process to reduce the nicotine content in discarded flue-cured tobacco leaves and thus enhance its carbon-to-nitrogen ratio to a suitable level for composting. The effect of another pretreatment method, particle size adjustment, on composting efficiency was also tested in this work. The results indicated that the air-dried (nicotine content: 1.35%) and relatively long discarded flue-cured tobacco leaves (25 mm) had a higher composting efficiency than damp (nicotine content: 1.57%) and short discarded flue-cured tobacco leaves (15 mm). When dry/25 mm discarded flue-cured tobacco leaves mixed with tobacco stems in an 8:2 ratio was composted at a temperature above 55 °C for 9 days, the nicotine content dropped from 1.29% to 0.28%. Since the discarded flue-cured tobacco leaves was successfully composted to a fertile and harmless material, the germination index values increased to 85.2%. The drying pretreatment and particle size adjustment offered ideal physical and chemical conditions to support microbial growth and bioactivity during the composting process, resulting in efficient conversion of discarded flue-cured tobacco leaves into a high quality and mature compost.

  2. Influence of carbonation under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas on the leachability of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Ni, Peng; Xiong, Zhuo; Tian, Chong; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-09-01

    Due to the high cost of pure CO 2 , carbonation of MSWI fly ash has not been fully developed. It is essential to select a kind of reaction gas with rich CO 2 instead of pure CO 2 . The CO 2 uptake and leaching toxicity of heavy metals in three typical types of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash were investigated with simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas under different reaction temperatures, which was compared with both pure CO 2 and simulated air combustion flue gas. The CO 2 uptake under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas were similar to that of pure CO 2 . The leaching concentration of heavy metals in all MSWI fly ash samples, especially in ash from Changzhou, China (CZ), decreased after carbonation. Specifically, the leached Pb concentration of the CZ MSWI fly ash decreased 92% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, 95% under pure CO 2 atmosphere and 84% under the air combustion flue gas. After carbonation, the leaching concentration of Pb was below the Chinese legal limit. The leaching concentration of Zn from CZ sample decreased 69% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, which of Cu, As, Cr and Hg decreased 25%, 33%, 11% and 21%, respectively. In the other two samples of Xuzhou, China (XZ) and Wuhan, China (WH), the leaching characteristics of heavy metals were similar to the CZ sample. The speciation of heavy metals was largely changed from the exchangeable to carbonated fraction because of the carbonation reaction under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas. After carbonation reaction, most of heavy metals bound in carbonates became more stable and leached less. Therefore, oxy-fuel combustion flue gas could be a low-cost source for carbonation of MSWI fly ash. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Removal of CO2 from simulated flue gas of power plants by membrane-based gas absorption processes].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Fen; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-Feng; Wang, Shu-Yuan; Xu, Zhi-Kang; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2005-07-01

    Three typical absorbents such as aqueous of aminoacetic acid potassium (AAAP), monoethanolamine (MEA) and methyldiethanolamine(MDEA) are selected to investigate the performance of CO2 separation from flue gas via membrane contactors made of hydrophobic hollow fiber polypropylene porous membrane. Impacts of absorbents, concentrations and flow rates of feeding gas and absorbent solution, cyclic loading of CO2 on the removal rate and the mass transfer velocity of CO2 are discussed. The results demonstrate that the mass transfer velocity was 7.1 mol x (m2 x s)(-1) for 1 mol x L(-1) MEA with flow rate of 0.1 m x s(-1) and flue gas with that of 0.211 m x s(-1). For 1 mol L(-1) AAAP with flow rate of 0.05 m x s(-1) and flue gas of 0.211 m x s(-1), CO2 removal rate (eta) was 93.2 % and eta was 98% for 4 mol x L(-1) AAAP under the same conditions. AAAP being absorbent, eta was higher than 90% in a wider range of concentrations of CO2. It indicates that membrane-based absorption process is a widely-applied and promising way of CO2 removal from flue gas of power plants, which not only appropriates for CO2 removal of flue gas of widely-used PF and NGCC, but also for that of flue gas of IGCC can be utilized widely in future.

  4. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Transport—Reaction process in the reaction of flue gas desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yan; Peng, Xiaofeng; Lee, Duu Jong

    2000-12-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to study the transport-reaction process in the spray-drying flue gas desulfurization. A transport-reaction model of single particle was proposed, which considered the water evaporation from the surface of droplet and the reaction at the same time. Based on this model, the reaction rate and the absorbent utilization can be calculated. The most appropriate particle radius and the initial absorbent concentration can be deduced through comparing the wet lifetime with the residence time, the result shows in the case that the partial pressure of vapor in the bulk flue gas is 2000Pa, the optimum initial radius and absorbent concentration are 210 310 µ m and 23% respectively. The model can supply the optimum parameters for semi-dry FGD system designed.

  6. Ore sintering flue gas desulfurization and its resoureilization by using pyrolusite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. E.; Long, Z. G.; Wu, F. Z.; Li, H. Y.; Cui, T. M.; Zhou, X. Z.

    2017-11-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) has been implemented for sulfur dioxide gas emission reduction by pyrolusite in iron ore sintering. However, the mechanism of SO2 reduction through FGD is still not fully clear. And in present work, the effects of operating conditions on desulfurization rate and Mn2+ leaching rate of pyrolusite were investigated. Six hours later, the desulfurization rate and Mn2+ leaching rate all can be higher than 70%. And a higher absorption temperature was good for desulfurization rate, while a middle temperature was good for Mn2+ leaching rate. A higher manganese ore granularity and SO2 concentration were good for desulfurization rate and Mn2+ leaching rate. However, a higher liquid-solid rate was only good for desulfurization rate, but Mn2+ leaching rate. The results demonstrate that the pyrolusite is a kind of very promising adsorbent in industrial flue gas desulfurization application due to its low cost and good desulfurization capacity.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and experimental investigation of Cu-BTC as CO2 adsorbent from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiangkun; Yan, Naiqiang; Qu, Zan; Yang, Shijian

    2012-01-01

    Porous Cu-BTC material was synthesized by the solvothermal method. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) was used to test the phase purity of the synthesized material and investigate its structural stability under the influence of flue gas components. The thermal stability of the material was determined through thermal gravimetric (TG) analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to study the microstructure of the material. Cu-BTC was demonstrated not only to have high CO2 adsorption capacity but also good selectivity of CO2 over N2 by means of packed bed tests. The adsorption capacity of Cu-BTC for CO2 was about 69 mL/g at 22 degrees C. The influence of the main flue gas components on the CO2 capacity of the material were discussed as well.

  8. Adjustment of the flue gas path in small combustion appliances with regard to particulate matter reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulovcová, Katarína; Jandačka, Jozef; Nosek, Radovan

    2014-08-01

    Concentration of solid particles in ambient atmosphere is increasing in many countries nowadays. Particulate matter pollution in higher concentration has harmful impact on human and animal health. Source of particulate matter are not only industry and traffic. Small heat sources with biomass combustion, especially during winter heating season, are also significant producer of particulate matter emission. There is a huge importance to decrease quantities of solid particles which are getting into the atmosphere in every region of their production in order to decrease environmental pollution and improve air quality. The ability of flue gas emission elimination can influence future using of biomass combustion. Therefore effective and affordable solutions are searching for. The paper deals with the reduction of particulate matter in small heat source with biomass combustion by modification of geometric parameters in flue gas path.

  9. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO 2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO 2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO 2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO 2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This final report details all development, analysis, design and testing of the project. Also included in the final report are an updatedmore » Techno-Economic Analysis and CO 2 Lifecycle Analysis. The subsystems included in the pilot demonstration plant are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant was proven to be capable of capturing CO 2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing it into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The final report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. The report also discusses the results of the fully integrated operation of the facility. Fiber cement boards have been produced in this facility exclusively using reactive calcium carbonate from captured CO 2 from flue gas. These boards meet all US and China appropriate acceptance standards. Use demonstrations for these boards are now underway.« less

  10. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristicsmore » of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.« less

  11. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristicsmore » of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.« less

  12. MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEQUESTER CO2 FROM POWER PLANT FLUE GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Merkel; Karl Amo; Richard Baker

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of using a membrane process to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. During this program, MTR developed a novel membrane (Polaris™) with a CO2 permeance tenfold higher than commercial CO2-selective membranes used in natural gas treatment. The Polaris™ membrane, combined with a process design that uses a portion of combustion air as a sweep stream to generate driving force for CO2 permeation, meets DOE post-combustion CO2 capture targets. Initial studies indicate a CO2 separation and liquefaction cost of $20 - $30/ton CO2 using about 15% of the plantmore » energy at 90% CO2 capture from a coal-fired power plant. Production of the Polaris™ CO2 capture membrane was scaled up with MTR’s commercial casting and coating equipment. Parametric tests of cross-flow and countercurrent/sweep modules prepared from this membrane confirm their near-ideal performance under expected flue gas operating conditions. Commercial-scale, 8-inch diameter modules also show stable performance in field tests treating raw natural gas. These findings suggest that membranes are a viable option for flue gas CO2 capture. The next step will be to conduct a field demonstration treating a realworld power plant flue gas stream. The first such MTR field test will capture 1 ton CO2/day at Arizona Public Service’s Cholla coal-fired power plant, as part of a new DOE NETL funded program.« less

  13. Using bromine gas to enhance mercury removal from flue gas of coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shou-Heng; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Zhao-Rong; Qu, Zan; Wang, H Paul; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

    2007-02-15

    Bromine gas was evaluated for converting elemental mercury (Hg0) to oxidized mercury, a form that can readily be captured by the existing air pollution control device. The gas-phase oxidation rates of Hg0 by Br2 decreased with increasing temperatures. SO2, CO, HCl, and H2O had insignificant effect, while NO exhibited a reverse course of effect on the Hg0 oxidation: promotion at low NO concentrations and inhibition at high NO concentrations. A reaction mechanism involving the formation of van der Waals clusters is proposed to accountfor NO's reverse effect. The apparent gas-phase oxidation rate constant, obtained under conditions simulating a flue gas without flyash, was 3.61 x 10(-17) cm3 x molecule(-1) x s(-1) at 410 K corresponding to a 50% Hg0 oxidation using 52 ppm Br2 in a reaction time of 15 s. Flyash in flue gas significantly promoted the oxidation of Hg0 by Br2, and the unburned carbon component played a major role in the promotion primarily through the rapid adsorption of Br2 which effectively removed Hg0 from the gas phase. At a typical flue gas temperature, SO2 slightly inhibited the flyash-induced Hg0 removal. Conversely, NO slightly promoted the flyash induced Hg0 removal by Br2. Norit Darco-Hg-LH and Darco-Hg powder activated carbons, which have been demonstrated in field tests, were inferred for estimating the flyash induced Hg0 oxidation by Br2. Approximately 60% of Hg0 is estimated to be oxidized with the addition of 0.4 ppm of gaseous Br2 into full scale power plant flue gas.

  14. Spray-dry desulfurization of flue gas from heavy oil combustion.

    PubMed

    Scala, Fabrizio; Lancia, Amedeo; Nigro, Roberto; Volpicelli, Gennaro

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation on sulfur dioxide removal in a pilot-scale spray dryer from the flue gas generated by combustion of low-sulfur (S) heavy oil is reported. A limewater slurry was sprayed through an ultrasonic two-fluid atomizer in the spray-dry chamber, and the spent sorbent was collected downstream in a pulse-jet baghouse together with fly ash. Flue gas was sampled at different points to measure the desulfurization efficiency after both the spray-dry chamber and the baghouse. Parametric tests were performed to study the effect of the following variables: gas inlet temperature, difference between gas outlet temperature and adiabatic saturation temperature, lime-to-S ratio, and average size of lime particles in the slurry. Results indicated that spray drying is an effective technology for the desulfurization of low-S fuel oil flue gas, provided operating conditions are chosen carefully. In particular, the lowest gas inlet and outlet temperatures compatible with baghouse operation should be selected, as should a sufficiently high lime-to-S ratio. The attainment of a small lime particle size in the slurry is critical for obtaining a high desulfurization efficiency. A previously presented spray-dry flue gas desulfurization model was used to simulate the pilot-scale desulfurization tests, to check the ability of the model to predict the S capture data and its usefulness as a design tool, minimizing the need for pilot-scale experimentation. Comparison between model and experimental results was fairly good for the whole range of calcium/S ratios considered.

  15. Study on optimum technological conditions of ore sintering flue gas desulfurization by using poor manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Y.; Li, S. E.; Long, Z. G.; Wu, F. Z.; Cui, T. M.; Zhou, X. Z.

    2017-11-01

    Orthogonal experiments were conducted to study the effect of each single factor on the desulfurization rate and leaching rate of Mn2+ to obtain improved process parameters. The results showed that the use of pyrolusite flue gas and the process method of by-product MnSO4 can not only effectively remove the sulfur in the gas, thereby controlling environmental pollution, but can also recover sulfur.

  16. Tests on a pilot plant for reheating desulfurized flue gases with the help of heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schug, W.

    1982-02-01

    Desulfurized flue gases were reheated with a heat pipe heat exchanger. Finned heat pipes, with a coating or made of high quality steel were subjected to different operating conditions for 1000 hr. The coating proved to be unsuitable for heat transfer because it swells and detaches itself from the background material. The high quality steels showed pitting and surface corrosion. The possibilities of cleaning were also studied to prevent deposits forming on the heat pipes, but no solution was found.

  17. Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Scrubber of Flue Gas Heat Recovery Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veidenbergs, Ivars; Blumberga, Dagnija; Vigants, Edgars; Kozuhars, Grigorijs

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the heat and mass transfer process research in a flue gas heat recovery device, where complicated cooling, evaporation and condensation processes are taking place simultaneously. The analogy between heat and mass transfer is used during the process of analysis. In order to prepare a detailed process analysis based on heat and mass process descriptive equations, as well as the correlation for wet gas parameter calculation, software in the Microsoft Office Excel environment is being developed.

  18. Influence of the technique for injection of flue gas and the configuration of the swirl burner throat on combustion of gaseous fuel and formation of nitrogen oxides in the flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoinishnikov, V. A.; Khokhlov, D. A.; Knyaz'kov, V. P.; Ershov, A. Yu.

    2017-05-01

    How the points at which the flue gas was injected into the swirl burner and the design of the burner outlet influence the formation and development of the flame in the submerged space, as well as the formation of nitrogen oxides in the combustion products, have been studied. The object under numerical investigation is the flame of the GMVI combined (oil/gas) burner swirl burner fitted with a convergent, biconical, cylindrical, or divergent throat at the burner outlet with individual supply of the air and injection of the gaseous fuel through tubing. The burners of two designs were investigated; they differ by the absence or presence of an inlet for individual injection of the flue gas. A technique for numerical simulation of the flame based on the CFD methods widely used in research of this kind underlies the study. Based on the summarized results of the numerical simulation of the processes that occur in jet flows, the specific features of the aerodynamic pattern of the flame have been established. It is shown that the flame can be conventionally divided into several sections over its length in all investigations. The lengths of each of the sections, as well as the form of the fields of axial velocity, temperatures, concentrations of the fuel, oxygen, and carbon and nitrogen oxides, are different and determined by the design features of the burner, the flow rates of the agent, and the compositions of the latter in the burner ducts as well as the configuration of the burner throat and the temperature of the environment. To what degree the burner throat configuration and the techniques for injection of the flue gas at different ambient temperatures influence the formation of nitrogen oxides has been established. It is shown that the supply of the recirculation of flue gas into the fuel injection zone enables a considerable reduction in the formation of nitrogen oxides in the flame combustion products. It has been established that the locations of the zones of

  19. CO2 capture from humid flue gases and humid atmosphere using a microporous coppersilicate.

    PubMed

    Datta, Shuvo Jit; Khumnoon, Chutharat; Lee, Zhen Hao; Moon, Won Kyung; Docao, Son; Nguyen, Thanh Huu; Hwang, In Chul; Moon, Dohyun; Oleynikov, Peter; Terasaki, Osamu; Yoon, Kyung Byung

    2015-10-16

    Capturing CO2 from humid flue gases and atmosphere with porous materials remains costly because prior dehydration of the gases is required. A large number of microporous materials with physical adsorption capacity have been developed as CO2-capturing materials. However, most of them suffer from CO2 sorption capacity reduction or structure decomposition that is caused by co-adsorbed H2O when exposed to humid flue gases and atmosphere. We report a highly stable microporous coppersilicate. It has H2O-specific and CO2-specific adsorption sites but does not have H2O/CO2-sharing sites. Therefore, it readily adsorbs both H2O and CO2 from the humid flue gases and atmosphere, but the adsorbing H2O does not interfere with the adsorption of CO2. It is also highly stable after adsorption of H2O and CO2 because it was synthesized hydrothermally. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Investigation on mercury reemission from limestone-gypsum wet flue gas desulfurization slurry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanmin; Liu, Songtao; Gao, Yang; Liu, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    Secondary atmospheric pollutions may result from wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems caused by the reduction of Hg(2+) to Hg(0) and lead to a damping of the cobenefit mercury removal efficiency by WFGD systems. The experiment on Hg(0) reemission from limestone-gypsum WFGD slurry was carried out by changing the operating conditions such as the pH, temperature, Cl(-) concentrations, and oxygen concentrations. The partitioning behavior of mercury in the solid and liquid byproducts was also discussed. The experimental results indicated that the Hg(0) reemission rate from WFGD slurry increased as the operational temperatures and pH values increased. The Hg(0) reemission rates decreased as the O2 concentration of flue gas and Cl(-) concentration of WFGD slurry increased. The concentrations of O2 in flue gas have an evident effect on the mercury retention in the solid byproducts. The temperature and Cl(-) concentration have a slight effect on the mercury partitioning in the byproducts. No evident relation was found between mercury retention in the solid byproducts and the pH. The present findings could be valuable for industrial application of characterizing and optimizing mercury control in wet FGD systems.

  1. Investigation on Mercury Reemission from Limestone-Gypsum Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Songtao; Liu, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    Secondary atmospheric pollutions may result from wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems caused by the reduction of Hg2+ to Hg0 and lead to a damping of the cobenefit mercury removal efficiency by WFGD systems. The experiment on Hg0 reemission from limestone-gypsum WFGD slurry was carried out by changing the operating conditions such as the pH, temperature, Cl− concentrations, and oxygen concentrations. The partitioning behavior of mercury in the solid and liquid byproducts was also discussed. The experimental results indicated that the Hg0 reemission rate from WFGD slurry increased as the operational temperatures and pH values increased. The Hg0 reemission rates decreased as the O2 concentration of flue gas and Cl− concentration of WFGD slurry increased. The concentrations of O2 in flue gas have an evident effect on the mercury retention in the solid byproducts. The temperature and Cl− concentration have a slight effect on the mercury partitioning in the byproducts. No evident relation was found between mercury retention in the solid byproducts and the pH. The present findings could be valuable for industrial application of characterizing and optimizing mercury control in wet FGD systems. PMID:24737981

  2. Simultaneous Waste Heat and Water Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gases for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dexin

    This final report presents the results of a two-year technology development project carried out by a team of participants sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project is to develop a membrane-based technology to recover both water and low grade heat from power plant flue gases. Part of the recovered high-purity water and energy can be used directly to replace plant boiler makeup water as well as improving its efficiency, and the remaining part of the recovered water can be used for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), cooling tower water makeup or other plant uses. This advancedmore » version Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) with lower capital and operating costs can be applied to existing plants economically and can maximize waste heat and water recovery from future Advanced Energy System flue gases with CO 2 capture in consideration, which will have higher moisture content that favors the TMC to achieve higher efficiency.« less

  3. Removal of mercury (II), elemental mercury and arsenic from simulated flue gas by ammonium sulphide.

    PubMed

    Ning, Ping; Guo, Xiaolong; Wang, Xueqian; Wang, Ping; Ma, Yixing; Lan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    A tubular resistance furnace was used as a reactor to simulate mercury and arsenic in smelter flue gases by heating mercury and arsenic compounds. The flue gas containing Hg(2+), Hg(0) and As was treated with ammonium sulphide. The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of varying the concentration of ammonium sulphide, the pH value of ammonium sulphide, the temperature of ammonium sulphide, the presence of SO2 and the presence of sulphite ion on removal efficiency. The prepared adsorption products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the optimal concentration of ammonium sulphide was 0.8 mol/L. The optimal pH value of ammonium sulphide was 10, and the optimal temperature of ammonium sulphide was 20°C.Under the optimum conditions, the removal efficiency of Hg(2+), Hg(0) and As could reach 99%, 88.8%, 98%, respectively. In addition, SO2 and sulphite ion could reduce the removal efficiency of mercury and arsenic from simulated flue gas.

  4. Copper slag as a catalyst for mercury oxidation in coal combustion flue gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Zhang, Weilin; Wang, Jun; Yang, Zequn; Li, Liqing; Shih, Kaimin

    2018-04-01

    Copper slag is a byproduct of the pyrometallurgical smelting of copper concentrate. It was used in this study to catalyze elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) oxidation in simulated coal combustion flue gas. The copper slag exhibited excellent catalytic performance in Hg 0 oxidation at temperatures between 200 °C and 300 °C. At the most optimal temperature of 250 °C, a Hg 0 oxidation efficiency of 93.8% was achieved under simulated coal combustion flue gas with both a high Hg 0 concentration and a high gas hourly space velocity of 128,000 h -1 . Hydrogen chloride (HCl) was the flue gas component responsible for Hg 0 oxidation over the copper slag. The transition metal oxides, including iron oxides and copper oxide in the copper slag, exhibited significant catalytic activities in the surface-mediated oxidation of Hg 0 in the presence of HCl. It is proposed that the Hg 0 oxidation over the copper slag followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism whereby reactive chlorine species that originated from HCl reacted with the physically adsorbed Hg 0 to form oxidized mercury. This study demonstrated the possibility of reusing copper slag as a catalyst for Hg 0 oxidation and revealed the mechanisms involved in the process and the key factors in the performance. This knowledge has fundamental importance in simultaneously reducing industrial waste and controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel regenerable sorbent for mercury capture from flue gases of coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Kelly, David J A; Yang, Hongqun; Lin, Christopher C H; Kuznicki, Steve M; Xu, Zhenghe

    2008-08-15

    A natural chabazite-based silver nanocomposite (AgMC) was synthesized to capture mercury from flue gases of coal-fired power plants. Silver nanoparticles were engineered on zeolite through ion-exchange of sodium ions with silver ions, followed by thermal annealing. Mercury sorption test using AgMC was performed at various temperatures by exposing it to either pulse injection of mercury or continuous mercury flow. A complete capture of mercury by AgMC was achieved up to a capture temperature of 250 degrees C. Nano silver particles were shown to be the main active component for mercury capture by amalgamation mechanism. Compared with activated carbon-based sorbents, the sorbent prepared in this study showed a much higher mercury capture capacity and upper temperature limit for mercury capture. More importantly, the mercury captured by the spent AgMC could be easily released for safe disposal and the sorbent regenerated by simple heating at 400 degrees C. Mercury capture tests performed in real flue gas environment showed a much higher level of mercury capture by AgMC than by other potential mercury sorbents tested. In our mercury capture tests, the AgMC exposed to real flue gases showed an increased mercury capture efficiency than the fresh AgMC.

  6. Recyclable Naturally Derived Magnetic Pyrrhotite for Elemental Mercury Recovery from Flue Gas.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yong; Chen, Dong; Zou, Sijie; Xiong, Shangchao; Xiao, Xin; Dang, Hao; Chen, Tianhu; Yang, Shijian

    2016-10-04

    Magnetic pyrrhotite, derived from the thermal treatment of natural pyrite, was developed as a recyclable sorbent to recover elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) from the flue gas as a cobenefit of wet electrostatic precipitators (WESP). The performance of naturally derived pyrrhotite for Hg 0 capture from the flue gas was much better than those of other reported magnetic sorbents, for example Mn-Fe spinel and Mn-Fe-Ti spinel. The rate of pyrrhotite for gaseous Hg 0 capture at 60 °C was 0.28 μg g min -1 and its capacity was 0.22 mg g -1 with the breakthrough threshold of 4%. After the magnetic separation from the mixture collected by the WESP, the spent pyrrhotite can be thermally regenerated for recycle. The experiment of 5 cycles of Hg 0 capture and regeneration demonstrated that both the adsorption efficiency and the magnetization were not notably degraded. Meanwhile, the ultralow concentration of gaseous Hg 0 in the flue gas was concentrated to high concentrations of gaseous Hg 0 and Hg 2+ during the regeneration process, which facilitated the centralized control of mercury pollution. Therefore, the control of Hg 0 emission from coal-fired plants by the recyclable pyrrhotite was cost-effective and did not have secondary pollution.

  7. Flue gas adsorption on periodic mesoporous phenylene-silica: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Mirtha A O; Ferreira, Paula; Gomes, José R B

    2018-06-20

    Periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs) were suggested as potential adsorbents for CO2/CH4 separation because of their large affinities towards CO2 and low interaction with CH4. Herewith, we present a comprehensive computational study on the binding properties of flue gas species with the pore walls of periodic mesoporous phenylene-silica (Ph-PMO) for understanding the possible impact of other gaseous species in the CO2/CH4 separation. The calculations considered three exchange-correlation functionals (PBE, PBE-D2 and M06-2X) based on the density functional theory and the walls of the periodic mesoporous phenylene-silica were modelled within the cluster model approach. The components of the flue gas considered were the diatomic CO, H2, N2, O2 and NO molecules, the triatomic CO2, H2O, H2S and SO2 species, the tetratomic SO3 and NH3 gases and the pentatomic CH4 molecule. The calculated data demonstrate that the presence of H2O, SO2, NH3, H2S and SO3 is a significant threat to CO2 capture by Ph-PMO and suggest that the Ph-PMO material would present high selectivity for CO2 over CH4, CO, H2 or N2 adsorption. The adsorption behaviour of flue gas components in Ph-PMO can be directly related to the experimental proton affinities, basicities or even the polarizabilities of the gaseous molecules.

  8. Is dispersal neutral?

    PubMed

    Lowe, Winsor H; McPeek, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal is difficult to quantify and often treated as purely stochastic and extrinsically controlled. Consequently, there remains uncertainty about how individual traits mediate dispersal and its ecological effects. Addressing this uncertainty is crucial for distinguishing neutral versus non-neutral drivers of community assembly. Neutral theory assumes that dispersal is stochastic and equivalent among species. This assumption can be rejected on principle, but common research approaches tacitly support the 'neutral dispersal' assumption. Theory and empirical evidence that dispersal traits are under selection should be broadly integrated in community-level research, stimulating greater scrutiny of this assumption. A tighter empirical connection between the ecological and evolutionary forces that shape dispersal will enable richer understanding of this fundamental process and its role in community assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnon dispersion in thin magnetic films.

    PubMed

    Balashov, T; Buczek, P; Sandratskii, L; Ernst, A; Wulfhekel, W

    2014-10-01

    Although the dispersion of magnons has been measured in many bulk materials, few studies deal with the changes in the dispersion when the material is in the form of a thin film, a system that is of interest for applications. Here we review inelastic tunneling spectroscopy studies of magnon dispersion in Mn/Cu3Au(1 0 0) and present new studies on Co and Ni thin films on Cu(1 0 0). The dispersion in Mn and Co films closely follows the dispersion of bulk samples with negligible dependence on thickness. The lifetime of magnons depends slightly on film thickness, and decreases considerably as the magnon energy increases. In Ni/Cu(1 0 0) films the thickness dependence of dispersion is much more pronounced. The measurements indicate a considerable mode softening for thinner films. Magnon lifetimes decrease dramatically near the edge of the Brillouin zone due to a close proximity of the Stoner continuum. The experimental study is supported by first-principles calculations.

  10. Dispersion management with metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2017-03-07

    An apparatus, system, and method to counteract group velocity dispersion in fibers, or any other propagation of electromagnetic signals at any wavelength (microwave, terahertz, optical, etc.) in any other medium. A dispersion compensation step or device based on dispersion-engineered metamaterials is included and avoids the need of a long section of specialty fiber or the need for Bragg gratings (which have insertion loss).

  11. Seed dispersal in fens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  12. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  13. A Column Dispersion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corapcioglu, M. Y.; Koroglu, F.

    1982-01-01

    Crushed glass and a Rhodamine B solution are used in a one-dimensional optically scanned column experiment to study the dispersion phenomenon in porous media. Results indicate that the described model gave satisfactory results and that the dispersion process in this experiment is basically convective. (DC)

  14. Dispersal of forest insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  15. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  16. Quantitative dispersion microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dan; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Yaqoob, Zahid; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Refractive index dispersion is an intrinsic optical property and a useful source of contrast in biological imaging studies. In this report, we present the first dispersion phase imaging of living eukaryotic cells. We have developed quantitative dispersion microscopy based on the principle of quantitative phase microscopy. The dual-wavelength quantitative phase microscope makes phase measurements at 310 nm and 400 nm wavelengths to quantify dispersion (refractive index increment ratio) of live cells. The measured dispersion of living HeLa cells is found to be around 1.088, which agrees well with that measured directly for protein solutions using total internal reflection. This technique, together with the dry mass and morphology measurements provided by quantitative phase microscopy, could prove to be a useful tool for distinguishing different types of biomaterials and studying spatial inhomogeneities of biological samples. PMID:21113234

  17. Dispersive hydrodynamics: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, G.; El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.; Miller, P. D.

    2016-10-01

    This Special Issue on Dispersive Hydrodynamics is dedicated to the memory and work of G.B. Whitham who was one of the pioneers in this field of physical applied mathematics. Some of the papers appearing here are related to work reported on at the workshop "Dispersive Hydrodynamics: The Mathematics of Dispersive Shock Waves and Applications" held in May 2015 at the Banff International Research Station. This Preface provides a broad overview of the field and summaries of the various contributions to the Special Issue, placing them in a unified context.

  18. Adsorbents for capturing mercury in coal-fired boiler flue gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongqun; Xu, Zhenghe; Fan, Maohong; Bland, Alan E; Judkins, Roddie R

    2007-07-19

    This paper reviews recent advances in the research and development of sorbents used to capture mercury from coal-fired utility boiler flue gas. Mercury emissions are the source of serious health concerns. Worldwide mercury emissions from human activities are estimated to be 1000 to 6000 t/annum. Mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are believed to be the largest source of anthropogenic mercury emissions. Mercury emissions from coal-fired utility boilers vary in total amount and speciation, depending on coal types, boiler operating conditions, and configurations of air pollution control devices (APCDs). The APCDs, such as fabric filter (FF) bag house, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD), can remove some particulate-bound and oxidized forms of mercury. Elemental mercury often escapes from these devices. Activated carbon injection upstream of a particulate control device has been shown to have the best potential to remove both elemental and oxidized mercury from the flue gas. For this paper, NORIT FGD activated carbon was extensively studied for its mercury adsorption behavior. Results from bench-, pilot- and field-scale studies, mercury adsorption by coal chars, and a case of lignite-burned mercury control were reviewed. Studies of brominated carbon, sulfur-impregnated carbon and chloride-impregnated carbon were also reviewed. Carbon substitutes, such as calcium sorbents, petroleum coke, zeolites and fly ash were analyzed for their mercury-adsorption performance. At this time, brominated activated carbon appears to be the best-performing mercury sorbent. A non-injection regenerable sorbent technology is briefly introduced herein, and the issue of mercury leachability is briefly covered. Future research directions are suggested.

  19. Silica-Silver Nanocomposites as Regenerable Sorbents for Hg0 Removal from Flue Gases.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tiantian; Li, Zhen; Xiong, Yong; Yang, Yue; Xu, Shengming; Bisson, Teresa; Gupta, Rajender; Xu, Zhenghe

    2017-10-17

    Silica-silver nanocomposites (Ag-SBA-15) are a novel class of multifunctional materials with potential applications as sorbents, catalysts, sensors, and disinfectants. In this work, an innovative yet simple and robust method of depositing silver nanoparticles on a mesoporous silica (SBA-15) was developed. The synthesized Ag-SBA-15 was found to achieve a complete capture of Hg 0 at temperatures up to 200 °C. Silver nanoparticles on the SBA-15 were shown to be the critical active sites for the capture of Hg 0 by the Ag-Hg 0 amalgamation mechanism. An Hg 0 capture capacity as high as 13.2 mg·g -1 was achieved by Ag(10)-SBA-15, which is much higher than that achievable by existing Ag-based sorbents and comparable with that achieved by commercial activated carbon. Even after exposure to more complex simulated flue gas flow for 1 h, the Ag(10)-SBA-15 could still achieve an Hg 0 removal efficiency as high as 91.6% with a Hg 0 capture capacity of 457.3 μg·g -1 . More importantly, the spent sorbent could be effectively regenerated and reused without noticeable performance degradation over five cycles. The excellent Hg 0 removal efficiency combined with a simple synthesis procedure, strong tolerance to complex flue gas environment, great thermal stability, and outstanding regeneration capability make the Ag-SBA-15 a promising sorbent for practical applications to Hg 0 capture from coal-fired flue gases.

  20. Reactive Carbon from Life Support Wastes for Incinerator Flue Gas Cleanup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, J. W.; Pisharody, S.; Moran, M. J.; Wignarajah, K.; Shi, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a joint research initiative between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National lab. The objective of the research is to produce activated carbon from life support wastes and to use the activated carbon to adsorb and chemically reduce the NO(sub x) and SO(sub 2) contained in incinerator flue gas. Inedible biomass waste from food production is the primary waste considered for conversion to activated carbon. Results to date show adsorption of both NO(sub x) and SO(sub 2) in activated carbon made from biomass. Conversion of adsorbed NO(sub x) to nitrogen has also been observed.

  1. Study of flue-gas temperature difference in supercritical once-through boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yanchang; Li, Bing; Song, Ang

    2018-02-01

    The 600 MW coal-fired once-through Boilers with opposed firing at a power plant are found to experience marked temperature variation and even overtemperature on the wall of the heating surface as a result of flue-gas temperature (FGT) variation in the boiler. In this study, operational adjustments were made to the pulverizing, combustion, and secondary air box systems in these boilers, in order to solve problems in internal combustion. The adjustments were found to reduce FGT difference and optimize the boiler’ combustion conditions. The results of this study can provide a reference for optimization of coal-fired boiler of the same type in similar conditions.

  2. Fungi isolated from flue-cured tobacco inoculated in the field with storage fungi.

    PubMed

    Welty, R E

    1971-03-01

    Flue-cured tobacco inoculated in the field with A. amstelodami, A. flavus, A. ochraceus, A. repens, A. ruber, and a species of Penicillium was rarely invaded by these fungi. Regardless of inoculum, the predominant fungi reisolated from green tissue were species of Alternaria and Cladosporium. After curing, A. repens, A. niger, and species of Alternaria and a species of Penicillium were the most commonly isolated fungi. The fungus used as inoculum was not the predominant fungus reisolated from green or cured tissue. Conditions during handling and storage prior to marketing probably determine when storage fungi become associated with the leaf and which species becomes predominant.

  3. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  4. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  5. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  6. CFD analysis of a rotary kiln using for plaster production and discussion of the effects of flue gas recirculation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürtürk, Mert; Oztop, Hakan F.; Pambudi, Nugroho Agung

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the CFD analysis of the rotary kiln is carried out for examining effects of various parameters on energy consumption and efficiency of the rotary kiln. The flue gas recirculation using in many applications is a useful method for combusting of fuel unburned in the flue gas. Also, effects of flue gas recirculation on the combusting of fuel, operating temperature and efficiency of the rotary kiln are discussed in this study. The rotary kiln, which is considered in this study, is used in plaster plant. Two different CFD models were created and these models are compared according to many parameters such as temperature distribution, mixture fraction, the mass fraction of O2, CO, CO and CH4 in the combustion chamber. It is found that the plaster plant has a great potential for an increase in energy efficiency. Results obtained for producers of rotary kiln and burner will be useful for determining better design parameters.

  7. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGES

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  8. 40 CFR 60.1325 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of... June 6, 2001 Other Monitoring Requirements § 60.1325 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at... a device to continuously measure the temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each...

  9. 40 CFR 62.15270 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of....15270 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control... temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each particulate matter control device. ...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15270 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of....15270 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control... temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each particulate matter control device. ...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1325 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of... June 6, 2001 Other Monitoring Requirements § 60.1325 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at... a device to continuously measure the temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each...

  12. 40 CFR 62.15270 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of....15270 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control... temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each particulate matter control device. ...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1325 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of... June 6, 2001 Other Monitoring Requirements § 60.1325 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at... a device to continuously measure the temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each...

  14. Comparison of Elemental Mercury Oxidation Across Vanadium and Cerium Based Catalysts in Coal Combustion Flue Gas: Catalytic Performances and Particulate Matter Effects.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qi; Yao, Qiang; Duan, Lei; Li, Xinghua; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Jiming

    2018-03-06

    This paper discussed the field test results of mercury oxidation activities over vanadium and cerium based catalysts in both coal-fired circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFBB) and chain grate boiler (CGB) flue gases. The characterizations of the catalysts and effects of flue gas components, specifically the particulate matter (PM) species, were also discussed. The catalytic performance results indicated that both catalysts exhibited mercury oxidation preference in CGB flue gas rather than in CFBB flue gas. Flue gas component studies before and after dust removal equipment implied that the mercury oxidation was well related to PM, together with gaseous components such as NO, SO 2 , and NH 3 . Further investigations demonstrated a negative PM concentration-induced effect on the mercury oxidation activity in the flue gases before the dust removal, which was attributed to the surface coverage by the large amount of PM. In addition, the PM concentrations in the flue gases after the dust removal failed in determining the mercury oxidation efficiency, wherein the presence of different chemical species in PM, such as elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and alkali (earth) metals (Na, Mg, K, and Ca) in the flue gases dominated the catalytic oxidation of mercury.

  15. Simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas using activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Li, Wen-Kai; Hung, Ming-Jui

    2014-09-01

    Incineration flue gas contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The effects of SO2 concentration (0, 350, 750, and 1000 ppm), reaction temperature (160, 200, and 280 degrees C), and the type of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on the removal of SO2 and PAHs by ACFs were examined in this study. A fluidized bed incinerator was used to simulate practical incineration flue gas. It was found that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas could drastically decrease removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. The effect of rise in the reaction temperature from 160 to 280 degrees C on removal of PAHs was greater than that on SO2 removal at an SO2 concentration of 750 ppm. Among the three ACFs studied, ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and the tightest structure, was the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs when these gases coexisted in the incineration flue gas. Implications: Simultaneous adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from incineration flue gas onto activated carbon fibers (ACFs) meant to devise a new technique showed that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas leads to a drastic decrease in removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. Reaction temperature had a greater influence on PAHs removal than on SO2 removal. ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and tightest structure among the three studied ACFs, was found to be the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs.

  16. The serpentine optical waveguide: engineering the dispersion relations and the stopped light points.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, Jacob; Weiss, Ori

    2011-06-06

    We present a study a new type of optical slow-light structure comprising a serpentine shaped waveguide were the loops are coupled. The dispersion relation, group velocity and GVD are studied analytically using a transfer matrix method and numerically using finite difference time domain simulations. The structure exhibits zero group velocity points at the ends of the Brillouin zone, but also within the zone. The position of mid-zone zero group velocity point can be tuned by modifying the coupling coefficient between adjacent loops. Closed-form analytic expressions for the dispersion relations, group velocity and the mid-zone zero v(g) points are found and presented.

  17. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  18. Thermochemical recovery of heat contained in flue gases by means of bioethanol conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, D. I.

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper consideration is being given to the use of bioethanol in the schemes of thermochemical recovery of heat contained in exit flue gases. Schematic diagrams illustrate the realization of thermochemical heat recovery by implementing ethanol steam conversion and conversion of ethanol by means of products of its complete combustion. The feasibility of attaining a high degree of recovery of heat contained in flue gases at the moderate temperature (up to 450°C) of combustion components is demonstrated in the example of the energy balance of the system for thermochemical heat recovery. The simplified thermodynamic analysis of the process of ethanol steam conversion was carried out in order to determine possible ranges of variation of process variables (temperature, pressure, composition) of a reaction mixture providing the efficient heat utilization. It was found that at the temperature above 600 K the degree of ethanol conversion is near unity. The equilibrium composition of products of reaction of ethanol steam conversion has been identified for different temperatures at which the process occurs at the ratio H2O/EtOH = 1 and at the pressure of 0.1 MPa. The obtained results of calculation agree well with the experimental data.

  19. Investigation of the biofuel flue and producer gases cleaning efficiency using ESP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poškas, Robertas; Sirvydas, Arūnas; Poškas, Povilas; Striūgas, Nerijus; Pedišius, Nerijus; Valinčius, Vitas

    2017-11-01

    The use of biofuel has been increasing in Europe over the last years, and the reason for that is acceptable cost and the least negative impact on the environment. However, NOx and emissions of fine particulates are important, and biofuel is still a disadvantage compared to oil and natural gas fired systems. Usually, flue gas is filtered in multicyclones or fibre filters before discharge into the atmosphere. Yet, in the case of fine particulates, the filters of such type do not show high effectiveness, thus electrostatic precipitators are used. In this comparative study on biofuel (wood pellets), the collection efficiency of solid particles from a class 3 boiler (50 kW) and from a gasification unit (100 kW) was investigated. Although releases of solid particles from modern boilers are low, a combination of such a boiler with an electrostatic precipitator may reduce the releases of particles to the minimum, and the collection efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator obtained during the investigation was 98-99%. There is a big difference in particle concentrations comparing the systems with flue gas and producer gas. As the working conditions in the test section with producer gas were harder, it led to lower efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator ( 75%).

  20. Investigation on an ammonia supply system for flue gas denitrification of low-speed marine diesel

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Zhao, Jian; Mei, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Low-speed marine diesel flue gas denitrification is in great demand in the ship transport industry. This research proposes an ammonia supply system which can be used for flue gas denitrification of low-speed marine diesel. In this proposed ammonia supply system, ammonium bicarbonate is selected as the ammonia carrier to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide by thermal decomposition. The diesel engine exhaust heat is used as the heating source for ammonium bicarbonate decomposition and ammonia gas desorption. As the ammonium bicarbonate decomposition is critical to the proper operation of this system, effects have been observed to reveal the performance of the thermal decomposition chamber in this paper. A visualization experiment for determination of the single-tube heat transfer coefficient and simulation of flow and heat transfer in two structures is conducted; the decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate is simulated by ASPEN PLUS. The results show that the single-tube heat transfer coefficient is 1052 W m2 °C−1; the thermal decomposition chamber fork-type structure gets a higher heat transfer compared with the row-type. With regard to the simulation of ammonium bicarbonate thermal decomposition, the ammonia production is significantly affected by the reaction temperature and the mass flow rate of the ammonium bicarbonate input. PMID:29308269

  1. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA. This topical report covers Subphase 2a which is the design phase of pilot demonstration subsystems. Materials of construction have been selected and proven in both lab scale and prototype testing to be acceptablemore » for the reagent conditions of interest. The target application for the reactive carbonate material has been selected based upon small-scale feasibility studies and the design of a continuous fiber board production line has been completed. The electrochemical cell architecture and components have been selected based upon both lab scale and prototype testing. The appropriate quality control and diagnostic techniques have been developed and tested along with the required instrumentation and controls. Finally the demonstrate site infrastructure, NEPA categorical exclusion, and permitting is all ready for the construction and installation of the new units and upgrades.« less

  2. Torrefaction of cedarwood in a pilot scale rotary kiln and the influence of industrial flue gas.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yanyang; Liu, Rujie; Yang, Qing; Yang, Haiping; Shao, Jingai; Draper, Christopher; Zhang, Shihong; Chen, Hanping

    2015-02-01

    Torrefaction of cedarwood was performed in a pilot-scale rotary kiln at various temperatures (200, 230, 260 and 290°C). The torrefaction properties, the influence on the grindability and hydroscopicity of the torrefied biomass were investigated in detail as well as the combustion performance. It turned out that, compared with raw biomass, the grindability and the hydrophobicity of the torrefied biomass were significantly improved, and the increasing torrefaction temperature resulted in a decrease in grinding energy consumption and an increase in the proportion of smaller-sized particles. The use of industrial flue gas had a significant influence on the behavior of cedarwood during torrefaction and the properties of the resultant solid products. To optimize the energy density and energy yield, the temperature of torrefaction using flue gas should be controlled within 260°C. Additionally, the combustion of torrefied samples was mainly the combustion of chars, with similar combustion characteristics to lignite. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Potential Agricultural Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum in the Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    DeSutter, T.M.; Cihacek, L.J.

    2009-07-15

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a byproduct from the combustion of coal for electrical energy production. Currently, FGDG is being produced by 15 electrical generating stations in Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. Much of this byproduct is used in the manufacturing of wallboard. The National Network for Use of FGDG in Agriculture was initiated to explore alternative uses of this byproduct. In the northern Great Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana), FGDG has the potential to be used as a Ca or S fertilizer, as an acid soil ameliorant,more » and for reclaiming or mitigating sodium-affected soils. Greater than 1.4 million Mg of FGDG could initially be used in these states for these purposes. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum can be an agriculturally important resource for helping to increase the usefulness of problem soils and to increase crop and rangeland production. Conducting beneficial use audits would increase the public awareness of this product and help identify to coal combustion electrical generating stations the agriculturally beneficial outlets for this byproduct.« less

  4. Recycling of an electric arc furnace flue dust to obtain high grade ZnO.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Oscar; Clemente, Carmen; Alonso, Manuel; Alguacil, Francisco Jose

    2007-03-06

    The production of steel in electric arc furnace (EAF) generates a by-product called EAF dusts. These steelmaking flue dusts are classified in most industrialized countries as hazardous residues because the heavy metals contained in them, tend to leach under slightly acidic rainfall conditions. However, and at the same time they contain zinc species which can be used as a source to obtain valuable by-products. The present investigation shows results on the processing of an EAF flue dust using ammonium carbonate solutions. Once zinc is dissolved: ZnO + 4NH3 + H2O --> Zn(NH3)4(2+) + 2OH- with other impurities (i.e. cadmium and copper), these are eliminated from the zinc solution via cementation with metallic zinc. The purified zinc solution was evaporated (distilled) until precipitation of a zinc carbonate species, which then was calcined to yield a zinc oxide of a high grade. For the unattacked dust residue from the leaching operation, mainly composed of zinc ferrite, several options can be considered: back-recycling to the furnace, further treatment by sodium hydroxide processing or a more safely dumping due to its relatively inertness.

  5. Effects of water vapor on flue gas conditioning in the electric fields with corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Liqiang, Qi; Yajuan, Zhang

    2013-07-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal via pulsed discharge nonthermal plasma in the absence of ammonia was investigated to determine how electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) can effectively collect particulate matter less than 2.5μm in diameter from flue gas. SO2 removal increased as water vapor concentration increased. In a wet-type plasma reactor, directing a gas-phase discharge plasma toward the water film surface significantly enhanced the liquid-phase oxidation of HSO3(-) to SO4(2-). Comparisons of various absorbents revealed that the hydroxyl radical is a key factor in plasma-induced liquid-phase reactions. The resistivity, size distribution, and cohesive force of fly ash at different water vapor contents were measured using a Bahco centrifuge, which is a dust electrical resistivity test instrument, as well as a cohesive force test apparatus developed by the researchers. When water vapor content increased by 5%, fly ash resistivity in flue gas decreased by approximately two orders of magnitude, adhesive force and size increased, and specific surface area decreased. Therefore, ESP efficiency increased. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Preparation of titanium dioxide particles and properties for flue gas desulfurization].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yonggang; Li, Daji; Huang, Zhen

    2003-01-01

    Under different sintering temperatures(340 degrees C, 440 degrees C, 540 degrees C, 640 degrees C), four TiO2 particles were prepared. The crystal types of all four samples were found to possess anatase structures by XRD. It was obtained by N2 experimental adsorption at low temperature (77K) that their surface areas and average pore size were between 79 and 124 m2/g, 56.8 and 254.8 A respectively. The pore structure of TiO2 particles was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The tests of adsorption dynamics for FGD and the performance of SO2 removal were investigated in a fixed-bed system for different samples. The results show that SG540 sample which made at 540 degrees C sintering temperature had the most quality among the four samples. It can adsorb SO2 of 38.9 mg for one gram SG540 sample. Different operating conditions for SG540 such as adsorption temperature, SO2 concentration in flue gas and the superficial velocity of flue gas were investigated. TiO2 particles for FGD had more efficiency than other physical sorbents such as active carbon and zeolite. The mechanism for SO2 removal was demonstrated by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and desorption test results to be mainly physical adsorption.

  7. Vanadium As a Potential Membrane Material for Carbon Capture: Effects of Minor Flue Gas Species.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mengyao; Liguori, Simona; Lee, Kyoungjin; Van Campen, Douglas G; Toney, Michael F; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2017-10-03

    Vanadium and its surface oxides were studied as a potential nitrogen-selective membrane material for indirect carbon capture from coal or natural gas power plants. The effects of minor flue gas components (SO 2 , NO, NO 2 , H 2 O, and O 2 ) on vanadium at 500-600 °C were investigated by thermochemical exposure in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that SO 2 , NO, and NO 2 are unlikely to have adsorbed on the surface vanadium oxides at 600 °C after exposure for up to 10 h, although NO and NO 2 may have exhibited oxidizing effects (e.g., exposure to 250 ppmv NO/N 2 resulted in an 2.4 times increase in surface V 2 O 5 compared to exposure to just N 2 ). We hypothesize that decomposition of surface vanadium oxides and diffusion of surface oxygen into the metal bulk are both important mechanisms affecting the composition and morphology of the vanadium membrane. The results and hypothesis suggest that the carbon capture performance of the vanadium membrane can potentially be strengthened by material and process improvements such as alloying, operating temperature reduction, and flue gas treatment.

  8. Experimental evidence of nitrous acid formation in the electron beam treatment of flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mätzing, H.; Namba, H.; Tokunaga, O.

    1994-03-01

    In the Electron Beam Dry Scrubbing (EBDS) process, flue gas from fossil fuel burning power plants is irradiated with accelerated (300-800 keV) electrons. Thereby, nitrogen oxide (NO x) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) traces are transformed into nitric and sulfuric acids, respectively, which are converted into particulate ammonium nitrate and sulfate upon the addition of ammonia. The powdery can be filtered from the main gas stream and can be sold as agricultural fertilizer. A lot of experimental investigations have been performed on the EBDS process and computer models have been developed to interpret the experimental results and to predict economic improvements. According to the model calculations, substantial amounts of intermediate nitrous acid (HNO 2) are formed in the electron beam treatment of flue gas. However, no corresponding experimental information is available so far. Therefore, we have undertaken the first experimental investigation about the formation of nitrous acid in an irradiated mixture of NO in synthetic air. Under these conditions, aerosol formation is avoided. UV spectra of the irradiated gas were recorded in the wavelength range λ = 345-375 nm. Both NO 2 and HNO 2 have characteristic absorption bands in this wavelength range. Calibration spectra of NO 2 were subtracted from the sample spectra. The remaining absorption bands can clearly be assigned to nitrous acid. The concentration of nitrous acid was determined by differential optical absorption. It was found lower than the model prediction. The importance of nitrous acid formation in the EBDS process needs to be clarified.

  9. Removal of Sulfur Dioxide from Flue Gas Using the Sludge Sodium Humate

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    This study shows the ability of sodium humate from alkaline treatment sludge on removing sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the simulated flue gas. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of various operating parameters, like the inlet SO2 concentration or temperature or O2, on the SO2 absorption efficiency and desulfurization time in a lab-scale bubbling reactor. The sludge sodium humate in the supernatant after alkaline sludge treatment shows great performance in SO2 absorption, and such efficiency can be maintained above 98% with 100 mL of this absorption solution at 298 K (flue gas rate of 0.12 m3/h). The highest SO2 absorption by 1.63 g SHA-Na is 0.946 mmol in the process, which is translated to 0.037 g SO2 g−1 SHA-Na. The experimental results indicate that the inlet SO2 concentration slightly influences the SO2 absorption efficiency and significantly influences the desulfurization time. The pH of the absorption solution should be above 3.5 in this process in order to make an effective desulfurization. The products of this process were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It can be seen that the desulfurization products mainly contain sludge humic acid sediment, which can be used as fertilizer components. PMID:24453875

  10. Simultaneous adsorption of SO2 and NO from flue gas over mesoporous alumina.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Tang, Xiaolong; Yi, Honghong; Li, Kai; Ning, Ping; Huang, Bin; Wang, Fang; Yuan, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous alumina (MA) with a higher ability to simultaneously remove SO2 and NO was prepared by the evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The adsorption capacities of MA are 1.79 and 0.702 mmol/g for SO2 and NO, respectively. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method was used to characterize the adsorbent. Simultaneous adsorption of SO2 and NO from flue gas over MA in different operating conditions had been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The effects of temperature, oxygen concentration and water vapour were investigated. The experimental results showed that the optimum temperature for MA to simultaneously remove SO2 and NO was 90°C. The simultaneous adsorption capacities of SO2 and NO could be enhanced by increasing O2 when its concentration was below 5%. The changes of simultaneous adsorption capacities were not obvious when O2 concentration was above 5%. The increase in relative humidity results in an increase after dropping of SO2 adsorption capacity, whereas the adsorption capacity of NO showed an opposite trend. The results suggest that MA is a great adsorbent for simultaneous removal of SO2 and NO from flue gas.

  11. A hybrid plasma-chemical system for high-NOx flue gas treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Zwolińska, Ewa; Licki, Janusz; Sun, Yongxia; Zimek, Zbigniew; Bułka, Sylwester

    2018-03-01

    The reduction of high concentrations of NOx and SO2 from simulated flue gas has been studied. Our aim was to optimise energy consumption for NOx and SO2 removal from off-gases from a diesel generator using heavy fuel oil. A hybrid process: electron beam (EB) plasma and wet scrubber has been applied. A much higher efficiency of NOx and SO2 removal was achieved in comparison to dry, ammonia free, electron beam flue gas treatment (EBFGT). A recorded removal from a concentration of 1500 ppm NOx reached 49% at a low dose of 6.5 kGy, while only 2% NOx was removed at the same dose if EB only was applied. For SO2, removal efficiency at a dose of 6.5 kGy increased from 15% (EB only) to 84% when sea water was used as a wet scrubber agent for 700 ppm SO2. The results of this study indicate that EB combined with wet scrubber is a very promising technology to be applied for removal of high concentrations of NOx and SO2 emitted from diesel engines operated e.g. on cargo ships, which are the main sources of SO2 and NOx pollution along their navigation routes.

  12. Factors influencing gypsum crystal morphology within a flue gas desulfurization vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Kinsey M.

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is utilized by the coal--powered generating industry to safely eliminate sulfur dioxide. A FGD vessel (scrubber) synthetically creates gypsum crystals by combining limestone (CaCO3), SO2 flue gas, water and oxygen resulting in crystalline gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O), which can be sold for an economic return. Flat disk--like crystals, opposed to rod--like crystals, are hard to dewater, lowering economic return. The objectives were to investigate the cause of varying morphologies, understand the environment of precipitation, as well as identify correlations between operating conditions and resulting unfavorable gypsum crystal growth. Results show evidence supporting airborne impurities due to the onsite coal pile, the abundance and size of CaCO 3 and high Ca:SO4 ratios within the scrubber as possible factors controlling gypsum crystal morphology. In conclusion, regularly purging the system and incorporating a filter on the air intake valve will provide an economic byproduct avoiding costly landfill deposits.

  13. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  14. Hg⁰ removal from flue gas by ionic liquid/H₂O₂.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guangwen; Bai, Bofeng; Zhang, Qiang; Cai, Ming

    2014-09-15

    1-Alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquids ([Cnmim] Cl, n=4, 6, 8) were prepared. The ionic liquid was then mixed with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to form an absorbent. The Hg(0) removal performance of the absorbent was investigated in a gas/liquid scrubber using simulated flue gas. It was found that the ionic liquid/H2O2 mixture was an excellent absorbent and could be used to remove Hg(0) from flue gas. When the mass ratio of H2O2 to ionic liquid was 0.5, the absorbent showed high Hg(0) removal efficiency (up to 98%). The Hg(0) removal efficiency usually increased with the absorption temperature, while decreased with the increase of alkyl chain length in ionic liquid molecule. The Hg(0) removal mechanism involved with Hg(0) oxidation by H2O2 and Hg(2+) transfer from aqueous phase to ionic liquid phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Explaining the differential solubility of flue gas components in ionic liquids from first-principle calculations.

    PubMed

    Prasad, B Ram; Senapati, Sanjib

    2009-04-09

    Flue gas is greatly responsible for acid rain formation and global warming. New generation ionic liquids (ILs) have potential in controlling the flue gas emissions, as they acquire high absorptivity for the component gases SO(2), CO(2), etc. The association of the IL-gas interactions to the absorptivity of gas molecules in ILs is, however, poorly understood. In this paper, we present a molecular level description of the interactions of ILs with SO(2), CO(2), and N(2) and show its implications to the differential gas solubility. Our results indicate that the IL anion-gas interactions play a key role in deciding the gas solubility in ILs, particularly for polar gases such as SO(2). On the other hand, regular solution assumption applies to N(2) solubility. In accordance with the previous theoretical and experimental findings, our results also imply that the IL anions dominate the interactions with gas molecules while the cations play a secondary role and the underlying fluid structures of the ILs remain unperturbed by the addition of gas molecules.

  16. N-ReN recovers CO/sub 2/ from flue gas economically

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, C.R.; Haigh, S.; Simiskey, P.L.

    1984-05-14

    Early in 1982, N-ReN Southwest was in the final stages of mechanical completion on a carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) recovery plant. The plant was designed to recover a maximum of 104 tons/day of CO/sub 2/, using 18-20% monoethanolamine. The CO/sub 2/ source is a combination of boiler flue gas and primary reformer exhaust gas from two ammonia plants. The primary concern of this project was the composition of the gas, which contains an average of about 4% oxygen. While N-ReN was completing its CO/sub 2/ unit in Carlsbad, N.M., Dow Chemical Co. was completing its flue gas CO/sub 2/ recoverymore » pilot plant project in Lubbock, Tex. This technology (GAS/SPEC FT-1) uses a specially formulated alkanolamine solvent to remove CO/sub 2/ from low pressure streams containing low levels of CO/sub 2/ and oxygen. Although N-ReN and Dow had been in communication, design and construction of the Carlsbad plant was completed before Dow successfully concluded evaluation of the FT-1 technology. However, the prospect of retrofitting the N-ReN plant was found to be feasible.« less

  17. Investigation on an ammonia supply system for flue gas denitrification of low-speed marine diesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiankun; Yuan, Han; Zhao, Jian; Mei, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Low-speed marine diesel flue gas denitrification is in great demand in the ship transport industry. This research proposes an ammonia supply system which can be used for flue gas denitrification of low-speed marine diesel. In this proposed ammonia supply system, ammonium bicarbonate is selected as the ammonia carrier to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide by thermal decomposition. The diesel engine exhaust heat is used as the heating source for ammonium bicarbonate decomposition and ammonia gas desorption. As the ammonium bicarbonate decomposition is critical to the proper operation of this system, effects have been observed to reveal the performance of the thermal decomposition chamber in this paper. A visualization experiment for determination of the single-tube heat transfer coefficient and simulation of flow and heat transfer in two structures is conducted; the decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate is simulated by ASPEN PLUS. The results show that the single-tube heat transfer coefficient is 1052 W m2 °C-1; the thermal decomposition chamber fork-type structure gets a higher heat transfer compared with the row-type. With regard to the simulation of ammonium bicarbonate thermal decomposition, the ammonia production is significantly affected by the reaction temperature and the mass flow rate of the ammonium bicarbonate input.

  18. Stabilization of a salamander moving hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Visser, Michaël; de Leeuw, Maarten; Zuiderwijk, Annie; Arntzen, Jan W

    2017-01-01

    When related species meet upon postglacial range expansion, hybrid zones are frequently formed. Theory predicts that such zones may move over the landscape until equilibrium conditions are reached. One hybrid zone observed to be moving in historical times (1950-1979) is that of the pond-breeding salamanders Triturus cristatus and Triturus marmoratus in western France. We identified the ecological correlates of the species hybrid zone as elevation, forestation, and hedgerows favoring the more terrestrial T. marmoratus and pond density favoring the more aquatic T. cristatus . The past movement of the zone of ca. 30 km over three decades has probably been driven by the drastic postwar reduction of the "bocage" hedgerow landscape, favoring T. cristatus over T. marmoratus . No further hybrid zone movement was observed from 1979 to the present. To explain the changing dynamics of the hybrid zone, we propose that it stalled, either because an equilibrium was found at an altitude of ca. 140 m a.s.l. or due to pond loss and decreased population densities. While we cannot rule out the former explanation, we found support for the latter. Under agricultural intensification, ponds in the study area are lost at an unprecedented rate of 5.5% per year, so that remaining Triturus populations are increasingly isolated, hampering dispersal and further hybrid zone movement.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, David A

    2010-06-30

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials developmentmore » and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs consists of infinite-rod secondary

  20. LMFBR fuel assembly design for HCDA fuel dispersal

    DOEpatents

    Lacko, Robert E.; Tilbrook, Roger W.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor having an upper axial blanket region disposed in a plurality of zones within the fuel assembly. The characterization of a zone is dependent on the height of the axial blanket region with respect to the active fuel region. The net effect of having a plurality of zones is to establish a dispersal flow path for the molten materials resulting during a core meltdown accident. Upward flowing molten material can escape from the core region and/or fuel assembly without solidifying on the surface of fuel rods due to the heat sink represented by blanket region pellets.

  1. Membrane Process to Capture CO{sub 2} from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Tim; Wei, Xiaotong; Firat, Bilgen

    2012-03-31

    This final report describes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) on development of an efficient membrane process to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from power plant flue gas (award number DE-NT0005312). The primary goal of this research program was to demonstrate, in a field test, the ability of a membrane process to capture up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in coal-fired flue gas, and to evaluate the potential of a full-scale version of the process to perform this separation with less than a 35% increase in the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE).more » Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Arizona Public Services (APS), who hosted a membrane field test at their Cholla coal-fired power plant, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and WorleyParsons (WP), who performed a comparative cost analysis of the proposed membrane CO{sub 2} capture process. The work conducted for this project included membrane and module development, slipstream testing of commercial-sized modules with natural gas and coal-fired flue gas, process design optimization, and a detailed systems and cost analysis of a membrane retrofit to a commercial power plant. The Polaris? membrane developed over a number of years by MTR represents a step-change improvement in CO{sub 2} permeance compared to previous commercial CO{sub 2}-selective membranes. During this project, membrane optimization work resulted in a further doubling of the CO{sub 2} permeance of Polaris membrane while maintaining the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. This is an important accomplishment because increased CO{sub 2} permeance directly impacts the membrane skid cost and footprint: a doubling of CO{sub 2} permeance halves the skid cost and footprint. In addition to providing high CO{sub 2} permeance, flue gas CO{sub 2} capture membranes must be stable in the presence of contaminants including SO{sub 2}. Laboratory tests

  2. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  3. Chiral Anomalous Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Andrey; Sen, Srimoyee

    The linearized Einstein equation describing graviton propagation through a chiral medium appears to be helicity dependent. We analyze features of the corresponding spectrum in a collision-less regime above a flat background. In the long wave-length limit, circularly polarized metric perturbations travel with a helicity dependent group velocity that can turn negative giving rise to a new type of an anomalous dispersion. We further show that this chiral anomalous dispersion is a general feature of polarized modes propagating through chiral plasmas extending our result to the electromagnetic sector.

  4. Chiral Anomalous Dispersion

    DOE PAGES

    Sadofyev, Andrey; Sen, Srimoyee

    2018-02-16

    The linearized Einstein equation describing graviton propagation through a chiral medium appears to be helicity dependent. We analyze features of the corresponding spectrum in a collision-less regime above a flat background. In the long wave-length limit, circularly polarized metric perturbations travel with a helicity dependent group velocity that can turn negative giving rise to a new type of an anomalous dispersion. We further show that this chiral anomalous dispersion is a general feature of polarized modes propagating through chiral plasmas extending our result to the electromagnetic sector.

  5. CO 2 Capture by Cold Membrane Operation with Actual Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chaubey, Trapti; Kulkarni, Sudhir; Hasse, David

    The main objective of the project was to develop a post-combustion CO 2 capture process based on the hybrid cold temperature membrane operation. The CO 2 in the flue gas from coal fired power plant is pre-concentrated to >60% CO 2 in the first stage membrane operation followed by further liquefaction of permeate stream to achieve >99% CO 2 purity. The aim of the project was based on DOE program goal of 90% CO 2 capture with >95% CO 2 purity from Pulverized Coal (PC) fired power plants with $40/tonne of carbon capture cost by 2025. The project moves themore » technology from TRL 4 to TRL 5. The project involved optimization of Air Liquide commercial 12” PI-1 bundle to improve the bundle productivity by >30% compared to the previous baseline (DE-FE0004278) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and bundle testing with synthetic flue gas at 0.1 MWe bench scale skid located at Delaware Research and Technology Center (DRTC). In parallel, the next generation polyimide based novel PI-2 membrane was developed with 10 times CO 2 permeance compared to the commercial PI-1 membrane. The novel PI-2 membrane was scaled from mini-permeator to 1” permeator and 1” bundle for testing. Bundle development was conducted with a Development Spin Unit (DSU) installed at MEDAL. Air Liquide’s cold membrane technology was demonstrated with real coal fired flue gas at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) with a 0.3 MWe field-test unit (FTU). The FTU was designed to incorporate testing of two PI-1 commercial membrane bundles (12” or 6” diameter) in parallel or series. A slip stream was sent to the next generation PI-2 membrane for testing with real flue gas. The system exceeded performance targets with stable PI-1 membrane operation for over 500 hours of single bundle, steady state testing. The 12” PI-1 bundle exceeded the productivity target by achieving ~600 Nm3/hr, where the target was set at ~455 Nm3/hr at 90% capture rate. The cost of 90% CO 2 capture from

  6. Simultaneous microalgal biomass production and CO2 fixation by cultivating Chlorella sp. GD with aquaculture wastewater and boiler flue gas.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chiu-Mei; Jian, Jhong-Fu; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chang, Yu-Bin; Wan, Xin-Hua; Lai, Jinn-Tsyy; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    A microalgal strain, Chlorella sp. GD, cultivated in aquaculture wastewater (AW) aerated with boiler flue gas, was investigated. When AW from a grouper fish farm was supplemented with additional nutrients, the microalgal biomass productivity after 7days of culture was 0.794gL -1 d -1 . CO 2 fixation efficiencies of the microalgal strains aerated with 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3vvm of boiler flue gas (containing approximately 8% CO 2 ) were 53, 51, 38, and 30%, respectively. When the microalgal strain was cultured with boiler flue gas in nutrient-added AW, biomass productivity increased to 0.892gL -1 d -1 . In semi-continuous cultures, average biomass productivities of the microalgal strain in 2-day, 3-day, and 4-day replacement cultures were 1.296, 0.985, and 0.944gL -1 d -1 , respectively. These results demonstrate the potential of using Chlorella sp. GD cultivations in AW aerated with boiler flue gas for reusing water resources, reducing CO 2 emission, and producing microalgal biomass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. SO x /NO x Removal from Flue Gas Streams by Solid Adsorbents: A Review of Current Challenges and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei, Fateme; Rownaghi, Ali A.; Monjezi, Saman

    One of the main challenges in the power and chemical industries is to remove generated toxic or environmentally harmful gases before atmospheric emission. To comply with stringent environmental and pollutant emissions control regulations, coal-fired power plants must be equipped with new technologies that are efficient and less energy-intensive than status quo technologies for flue gas cleanup. While conventional sulfur oxide (SOx) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) removal technologies benefit from their large-scale implementation and maturity, they are quite energy-intensive. In view of this, the development of lower-cost, less energy-intensive technologies could offer an advantage. Significant energy and cost savings can potentiallymore » be realized by using advanced adsorbent materials. One of the major barriers to the development of such technologies remains the development of materials that are efficient and productive in removing flue gas contaminants. In this review, adsorption-based removal of SOx/NOx impurities from flue gas is discussed, with a focus on important attributes of the solid adsorbent materials as well as implementation of the materials in conventional and emerging acid gas removal technologies. The requirements for effective adsorbents are noted with respect to their performance, key limitations, and suggested future research directions. The final section includes some key areas for future research and provides a possible roadmap for the development of technologies for the removal of flue gas impurities that are more efficient and cost-effective than status quo approaches.« less

  8. Impact of Leaching Conditions on Constituents Release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-Soil Mixture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum(FGDG) has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using rece...

  9. Mercury emission and plant uptake of trace elements during early stage of soil amendment using flue gas desulfurization materials.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A pilot-scale field study was carried out to investigate the distribution of Hg and other selected elements in the three potential mitigation pathways, i.e., emission to ambient air, uptake by surface vegetation (i.e., grass), and rainfall infiltration, after flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material ...

  10. A component prediction method for flue gas of natural gas combustion based on nonlinear partial least squares method.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Yan, Xingyu; Li, Yaojiang; Wang, Yanxia; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Sanchun

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis for the flue gas of natural gas-fired generator is significant for energy conservation and emission reduction. The traditional partial least squares method may not deal with the nonlinear problems effectively. In the paper, a nonlinear partial least squares method with extended input based on radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is used for components prediction of flue gas. For the proposed method, the original independent input matrix is the input of RBFNN and the outputs of hidden layer nodes of RBFNN are the extension term of the original independent input matrix. Then, the partial least squares regression is performed on the extended input matrix and the output matrix to establish the components prediction model of flue gas. A near-infrared spectral dataset of flue gas of natural gas combustion is used for estimating the effectiveness of the proposed method compared with PLS. The experiments results show that the root-mean-square errors of prediction values of the proposed method for methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide are, respectively, reduced by 4.74%, 21.76%, and 5.32% compared to those of PLS. Hence, the proposed method has higher predictive capabilities and better robustness.

  11. Metals in soil and runoff from a piedmont hayfield amended with broiler litter and flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) from coal-fired power plants is available for agricultural use in many US regions. Broiler litter (BL) provides plant available N, P, and K but may be a source of unwanted arsenic (As), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). FGDG provides Ca and S and can reduce runoff lo...

  12. Three annual flue gas desulfurization gypsum applications on macronutrient and micronutrient losses in runoff from bermudagrass fertilized with poultry litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Considerable amounts of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum are being produced as a by-product of generating electricity. As a result, beneficial reuse of this by-product is being sought to reduce landfilling and its associated cost. The use of this byproduct as a low-cost soil amendment for suppl...

  13. A growth inhibitory model with SOx influenced effective growth rate for estimation of algal biomass concentration under flue gas atmosphere

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A theoretical model for the prediction of biomass concentration under real flue gas emission has been developed. The model considers the CO2 mass transfer rate, the critical SOx concentration and its role on pH based inter-conversion of bicarbonate in model building. The calibration and subsequent v...

  14. EVALUATION OF THE DISPOSAL OF FLUE GAS CLEANING WASTES IN COAL MINES AND AT SEA: REFINED ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a refined assessment of the feasibility of disposing of flue gas cleaning (FGC) wastes in coal mines and at sea. Its focus is on specific impact areas identified in an earlier assessment. These areas were further investigated through laboratory studies as well as...

  15. [Effects of future climate change on climatic suitability of flue-cured tobacco plantation in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xue Qiong; Xu, Meng Ying; He, Yu Qin; Zhang, Ming da; Ji, Wen Juan; Zhu, Yong

    2016-04-22

    The climatic suitability distribution of flue-cured tobacco planting in Yunnan will be profoundly affected by climate change. According to three key factors influencing climatic suitability of flue-cured tobacco planting in Yunnan, namely, average temperature in July, sunshine duration from July to August, precipitation from April to September, the variations of climatic suitability distribution of flue-cured tobacco planting in Yunnan respectively in 1986-2005, 2021-2040 and 2041-2060 under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 climate scenarios were investigated by using the climatic simulation data in 1981-2060 and the meteorological observation data during 1986-2005. The results showed that climatic suitability region would expand northward and eastward and plantable area of flue-cured tobacco would gradually increase. The increment of plantable area was more in 2041-2060 than in 2021-2040, and under RCP8.5 scenario than under RCP4.5 scenario. The optimum climatic area and sub-suitable climatic area were expanded considerably, while the suitable climatic area was not much changed. In the future, the north-central Yunnan such as Kunming, Qujing, Dali, Chuxiong, Lijiang would have a big increase in both the optimum climatic area and the cultivable area, meanwhile, the southern Yunnan including Wenshan, Honghe, Puer and Xishuangbanna would have a big decrease in both the optimum climatic area and the cultivable area.

  16. Mixotrophic cultivation of oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 mediated by actual coal-fired flue gas for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Kim, Bohwa; Choi, Eunji; Lee, Kyubock; Cho, Sunja; Hyun, Ju-Soo; Park, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Young-Chul; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Jin-Suk; Oh, You-Kwan

    2014-10-01

    Flue gases mainly consist of CO2 that can be utilized to facilitate microalgal culture for bioenergy production. In the present study, to evaluate the feasibility of the utilization of flue gas from a coal-burning power plant, an indigenous and high-CO2-tolerant oleaginous microalga, Chlorella sp. KR-1, was cultivated under mixotrophic conditions, and the results were evaluated. When the culture was mediated by flue gas, highest biomass (0.8 g cells/L·d) and FAME (fatty acid methyl esters) productivity (121 mg/L·d) were achieved in the mixotrophic mode with 5 g/L glucose, 5 mM nitrate, and a flow rate of 0.2 vvm. By contrast, the photoautotrophic cultivation resulted in a lower biomass (0.45 g cells/L·d) and a lower FAME productivity (60.2 mg/L·d). In general, the fatty acid profiles of Chlorella sp. KR-1 revealed meaningful contents (>40 % of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids) under the mixotrophic condition, which enables the obtainment of a better quality of biodiesel than is possible under the autotrophic condition. Conclusively then, it was established that a microalgal culture mediated by flue gas can be improved by adoption of mixotrophic cultivation systems.

  17. Large-scale development of SSR markers in tobacco and construction of a linkage map in flue-cured tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhijun; Xiao, Bingguang; Jiao, Fangchan; Fang, Dunhuang; Zeng, Jianmin; Wu, Xingfu; Chen, Xuejun; Yang, Jiankang; Li, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), particularly flue-cured tobacco, is one of the most economically important nonfood crops and is also an important model system in plant biotechnology. Despite its importance, only limited molecular marker resources are available for genome analysis, genetic mapping, and breeding. Simple sequence repeats (SSR) are one of the most widely-used molecular markers, having significant advantages including that they are generally co-dominant, easy to use, abundant in eukaryotic organisms, and produce highly reproducible results. In this study, based on the genome sequence data of flue-cured tobacco (K326), we developed a total of 13,645 mostly novel SSR markers, which were working in a set of eighteen tobacco varieties of four different types. A mapping population of 213 backcross (BC1) individuals, which were derived from an intra-type cross between two flue-cured tobacco varieties, Y3 and K326, was selected for mapping. Based on the newly developed SSR markers as well as published SSR markers, we constructed a genetic map consisting of 626 SSR loci distributed across 24 linkage groups and covering a total length of 1120.45 cM with an average distance of 1.79 cM between adjacent markers, which is the highest density map of flue-cured tobacco till date. PMID:27436948

  18. Evaluation of flue-gas desulfurization gypsum in poultry litter as a substrate component for greenhouse horticultural crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to evaluate the growth response and consumer preference of three plant species to substrate blends containing flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG). Substrate blends used in this study were derived from a previous experiment that evaluated the use of FGD Gas a bedding material...

  19. Removal of elemental Mercury from flue gas using wheat straw chars modified by K2FeO4 reagent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianfei; Liu, Yangxian; Pan, Jianfeng

    2017-12-01

    In this article, wheat straw (WS) char, a common agricultural waste and renewable biomass, was pyrolyzed and then modified by K 2 FeO 4 reagent to develop an efficient sorbent for removal of Hg 0 from flue gas. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, scanning electron microscopy with energy spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the sorbents. The effects of K 2 FeO 4 loading, reaction temperature, Hg 0 inlet concentration and concentrations of gas mixtures O 2 , NO and SO 2 in flue gas on Hg 0 removal were investigated in a fixed-bed reactor. The results show that K 2 FeO 4 -impregnation can improve pore structure of WS char and produce new active sites, which significantly enhance Hg 0 removal. Increasing Hg 0 inlet concentration significantly decreases Hg 0 removal efficiency. O 2 in flue gas promotes Hg 0 oxidation by replenishing the oxygen groups on the surface of modified chars. The presence of NO obviously promotes Hg 0 removal since it can oxidize Hg 0 to Hg(NO 3 ) 2 . SO 2 in flue gas significantly decreases Hg 0 removal efficiency due to the competition adsorption between SO 2 and Hg 0 . The increase in reaction temperature has a dual impact on Hg 0 removal.

  20. Chromatic dispersion concentrator applied to photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, G.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how it is possible to realize a chromatic dispersion concentrator which collects the different monochromatic components of the solar spectrum separately in subsequently concentric rings in the focal zone. This comes about without an increase in the energetic losses compared to any other type of concentrator. If different photovoltaic elements with energy gaps equal to the photon energy falling on the focal zone are put in the latter, energy losses due to incomplete utilization of the solar spectrum and to incomplete utilization of the energy of a single photon can be drastically reduced. How the losses due to the voltage factor and the fill-factor of the photovoltaic elements of the system can be reduced compared to the normal silicon cells is also demonstrated. The other contributions to losses in the conversion process have only been mentioned, foreseeing their possible variation.

  1. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  2. Longleaf Pine Seed Dispersal

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1963-01-01

    Production and dispersal of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seeds were sampled in 1955, 1957, and 1958 on the Escambia Experimental Forest in southwest Alabama.Two transects of seed traps were established at right angles to each of four forest walls enclosing a rectangular 80-acre clearing. Walls were oriented in the cardinal...

  3. Dispersal of sticky particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Ramana; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we show through simulations that when sticky particles are broken continually, particles are dispersed into fine dust only if they are present in a narrow range of volume fractions. The upper limit of this range is 0.20 in the 2D and 0.10 in the 3D space. An increase in the dimensionality of space reduces the upper limit nearly by a factor of two. This scaling holds for dispersal of particles in hyperdimensional space of dimensions up to ten, the maximum dimension studied in this work. The maximum values of volume fractions obtained are significantly lower than those required for close packing and random packing of discs in 2D and spheres in 3D space. These values are also smaller than those required for critical phenomena of cluster percolation. The results obtained are attributed to merger cascades of sticky particles, triggered by breakup events. A simple theory that incorporates this cascade is developed to quantitatively explain the observed scaling of the upper limit with the dimensionality of space. The theory also captures the dynamics of the dispersal process in the corresponding range of particle volume fractions. The theory suggests that cascades of order one and two predominantly decide the upper limit for complete dispersal of particles.

  4. [Spatial and temporal characteristics of flue-cured tobacco water requirement and irrigation requirement index in Yunnan Province, China].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong-fang; Xu, Jia-yang; Lu, Xiu-ping; Xu, Zi-cheng; Li, Jun-ying; Pang, Tao; Zhang, Ya-jie; Wang, Pei-wen

    2015-07-01

    Based on the daily meteorological data of 124 agricultural meteorological sites during 1977-2010 in Yunnan Province, using recommended Penman-Monteith formula by FAO, water requirement and irrigation requirement index in the growth period of flue-cured tobacco were calculated to analyze their spatial and temporal characteristics and change patterns. The results showed that water requirements of flue-cured tobacco in root extending, vigorous, mature periods and field growth period during 1977-2010 were 76.73-174.73, 247.50-386.64, 180.28-258.14 and 528.18-764.08 mm, respectively, and the water requirement of vigorous period was the highest. The average irrigation demand index of each period was -0.02, 0.38, 0.17 and 0.26, respectively. Effective precipitation could meet the demand of flue-cured tobacco in root extending period. Water requirement of flue-cured tobacco in Yunnan Province decreased annually, and the rates of water requirement under the climate change trend in the four periods abovementioned were -12. 42, -21.46, -7.17 and -47.15 mm . (10 a)-1, respectively. The smallest irrigation demand index was observed in Dehong, and the largest in Diqing. The irrigation demand indexes of Dehong, Xishuangbanna and Puer regions were negative in flue-cured tobacco field growth period. The reference crop evapotranspiration, water requirement and effective precipitation decreased, but the irrigation requirement and irrigation requirement index increased with the increase of latitude. The effective precipitation decreased, but the irrigation requirement and irrigation requirement index increased with the increase of altitude.

  5. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  6. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results inmore » the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.« less

  7. The Clean Coal Technology Program 100 MWe demonstration of gas suspension absorption for flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, F.E.; Hedenhag, J.G.; Marchant, S.K.

    1997-12-31

    AirPol Inc., with the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) under a Cooperative Agreement with the United States Department of Energy, installed and tested a 10 MWe Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Demonstration system at TVA`s Shawnee Fossil Plant near Paducah, Kentucky. This low-cost retrofit project demonstrated that the GSA system can remove more than 90% of the sulfur dioxide from high-sulfur coal-fired flue gas, while achieving a relatively high utilization of reagent lime. This paper presents a detailed technical description of the Clean Coal Technology demonstration project. Test results and data analysis from the preliminary testing, factorial tests, airmore » toxics texts, 28-day continuous demonstration run of GSA/electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and 14-day continuous demonstration run of GSA/pulse jet baghouse (PJBH) are also discussed within this paper.« less

  8. Cyclotron autoresonant accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    LaPointe, M.A.; Hirshfield, J.L.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Design and construction is underway for a novel rf electron accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) of flue gases emanating from fossil-fuel burners. This machine, a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA), has already shown itself capable of converting rf power to electron beam power with efficiency values as high as 96{percent}. This proof-of-principle experiment will utilize a 300 kV, 33 A Pierce type electron gun and up to 24 MW of available rf power at 2.856 GHz to produce 1.0 MeV, 33 MW electron beam pulses. The self-scanning conical beam from the high power CARA will be evaluated for EBDSmore » and other possible environmental applications. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}« less

  9. Cyclotron autoresonant accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Department of Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208124, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124

    1999-06-10

    Design and construction is underway for a novel rf electron accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) of flue gases emanating from fossil-fuel burners. This machine, a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA), has already shown itself capable of converting rf power to electron beam power with efficiency values as high as 96%. This proof-of-principle experiment will utilize a 300 kV, 33 A Pierce type electron gun and up to 24 MW of available rf power at 2.856 GHz to produce 1.0 MeV, 33 MW electron beam pulses. The self-scanning conical beam from the high power CARA will be evaluated for EBDSmore » and other possible environmental applications.« less

  10. [Treatment of Flue Gas from Sludge Drying Process by A Thermophilic Biofilter].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-he; Deng, Ming-jia; Luo, Hui; Ding, Wen-iie; Li, Lin; Lin, Jian; Liu, Jun-xin

    2016-01-15

    A thermophilic biofilter was employed to treat the flue gas generated from sludge drying process, and the performance in both the start period and the stationary phase was studied under the gas flow rate of 2 700-3 100 m3 x h(-1) and retention time of 21.88-25.10 s. The results showed that the thermophilic biofilter could effectively treat gases containing sulfur dioxide, ammonia and volatile organic compounds (VOC). The removal efficiencies could reach 100%, 93.61% and 87.01%, respectively. Microbial analysis indicated that most of the population belonged to thermophilic bacteria. Paenibacillus sp., Chelatococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Clostridium thermosuccinogenes, Pseudoxanthomonas sp. and Geobacillus debilis which were abundant in the thermophilic biofilter, had the abilities of denitrification, desulfurization and degradation of volatile organic compounds.

  11. Processes of heat and mass transfer in straw bales using flue gasses as a drying medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryl, Wojciech; Szubel, Mateusz; Filipowicz, Mariusz

    2016-03-01

    Moisture content is a main problem of using straw in form of bales for energy production. The paper presents possibility of straw drying in dedicated, innovative and patented in Poland straw dryers which using flue gasses as a drying medium. Paper presents an improved way of drying which proved to be very sufficient. Temperature and humidity of straw during the process of drying were measured. The measurements helped understand and perform numerical model of heat and mass transfer inside the straw bale. By using CFD codes it was possible to perform analysis of phenomenon occurring inside the dried straw bale. Based on the CFD model, proposals of the optimization and improvement process of drying have been discussed. Experimental and computational data have been compared in terms of convergence. A satisfying degree of agreement has been achieved. Applying improved drying method, homogenous field of moisture content and temperature in the straw bale is achieved in a very cost effective way.

  12. DNA methylation polymorphism in flue-cured tobacco and candidate markers for tobacco mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie-hong; Zhang, Ji-shun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Ren-gang; Wu, Chun; Fan, Long-jiang; Ren, Xue-liang

    2011-11-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression during plant growth, development, and polyploidization. However, there is still no distinct evidence in tobacco regarding the distribution of the methylation pattern and whether it contributes to qualitative characteristics. We studied the levels and patterns of methylation polymorphism at CCGG sites in 48 accessions of allotetraploid flue-cured tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum, using a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique. The results showed that methylation existed at a high level among tobacco accessions, among which 49.3% sites were methylated and 69.9% allelic sites were polymorphic. A cluster analysis revealed distinct patterns of geography-specific groups. In addition, three polymorphic sites significantly related to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) resistance were explored. This suggests that tobacco breeders should pay more attention to epigenetic traits.

  13. DNA methylation polymorphism in flue-cured tobacco and candidate markers for tobacco mosaic virus resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie-hong; Zhang, Ji-shun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Ren-gang; Wu, Chun; Fan, Long-jiang; Ren, Xue-liang

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression during plant growth, development, and polyploidization. However, there is still no distinct evidence in tobacco regarding the distribution of the methylation pattern and whether it contributes to qualitative characteristics. We studied the levels and patterns of methylation polymorphism at CCGG sites in 48 accessions of allotetraploid flue-cured tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum, using a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique. The results showed that methylation existed at a high level among tobacco accessions, among which 49.3% sites were methylated and 69.9% allelic sites were polymorphic. A cluster analysis revealed distinct patterns of geography-specific groups. In addition, three polymorphic sites significantly related to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) resistance were explored. This suggests that tobacco breeders should pay more attention to epigenetic traits. PMID:22042659

  14. Flue gas desulfurization chemistry studies: limestone grindability. Volume 1. FGD reagent mapping. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmann, D.L.; Rossi, J.P.; Rashin, E.B.

    1984-07-01

    The major objective of this project is to provide electric utilities with information concerning the availability of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system reagents. Data presented in this report were obtained primarily from a comprehensive review of available literature. These were augmented by information gathered through interviews with knowledgeable individuals from industry, government, and academic institutions. Limestone data are presented on regional and state maps displaying, respectively, annual limestone production and number of active quarries by county; and areas most likely to contain potentially commercial deposits of high-Ca (greater than or equal to 90% CaCO/sub 3/) limestone. Lime data are presentedmore » on regional maps indicating ranges of annual production and number of active lime plants by county. Identification of commercial versus captive operations and estimates of lime availability on the open market are summarized in tables accompanying each map.« less

  15. Controllability analysis and decentralized control of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization plant

    SciTech Connect

    Perales, A.L.V.; Ortiz, F.J.G.; Ollero, P.

    2008-12-15

    Presently, decentralized feedback control is the only control strategy used in wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (WLFGD) plants. Proper tuning of this control strategy is becoming an important issue in WLFGD plants because more stringent SO{sub 2} regulations have come into force recently. Controllability analysis is a highly valuable tool for proper design of control systems, but it has not been applied to WLFGD plants so far. In this paper a decentralized control strategy is designed and applied to a WLFGD pilot plant taking into account the conclusions of a controllability analysis. The results reveal that good SO{sub 2} controlmore » in WLFGD plants can be achieved mainly because the main disturbance of the process is well-aligned with the plant and interactions between control loops are beneficial to SO{sub 2} control.« less

  16. Surface modification of calcium sulfate whisker prepared from flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengjun; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Yeguang; Shi, Peiyang; Jiang, Maofa

    2016-01-01

    In order to obtain hydrophobic whisker for preparing polymeric composite product, the calcium sulfate whisker (CSW) prepared from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum by hydrothermal synthesis was modified by various surfactants, and the effects of some modification conditions on the hydrophobic property of CSW were investigated in this study. Sodium stearate was considered to be a suitable surfactant and its reasonable dosage was 2% of ethanol solvent. Both physical and chemical absorptions were found in the surface modification process, and the later one was suggested to preferentially occur on the CSW surface. Moreover, modifying temperature, modifying duration, and agitation speed were experimentally found to have a remarkable influence on the modification behavior. Active ratio reached 0.845 when the modification process was conducted under reasonable conditions obtained in the current work. Finally, polypropylene sheet products were prepared from modified CSW showing an excellence mechanical property.

  17. Use of flue gas desulfurization gypsum for leaching Cd and Pb in reclaimed tidal flat soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Li, Xian; Tong, Ze-Jun; Li, Qu-Sheng; He, Bao-Yan; Wang, Li-Li; Guo, Shi-Hong; Xu, Zhi-Min

    2016-04-01

    A soil column leaching experiment was conducted to eliminate heavy metals from reclaimed tidal flat soil. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum was used for leaching. The highest removal rates of Cd and Pb in the upper soil layers (0-30 cm) were 52.7 and 30.5 %, respectively. Most of the exchangeable and carbonate-bound Cd and Pb were removed. The optimum FGD gypsum application rate was 7.05 kg·m(-2), and the optimum leaching water amount for the application was 217.74 L·m(-2). The application of FGD gypsum (two times) and the extension of the leaching interval time to 20 days increased the heavy metal removal rate in the upper soil layers. The heavy metals desorbed from the upper soil layers were re-adsorbed and fixed in the 30-70 cm soil layers.

  18. Fungi isolated from flue-cured tobacco sold in Southeast United States, 1968-1970.

    PubMed

    Welty, R E

    1972-09-01

    Flue-cured tobacco leaves, from low- and middle-stalk positions, offered for sale in each of two markets, within each of five tobacco types, were evaluated for moisture content (MC) and filamentous fungi during August through October in 1968, 1969, and 1970. Alternaria alternata, Penicillium cyclopium, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus repens, and Aspergillus flavus were most frequently isolated from cultured tissue. Other filamentous fungi that grew from the tissue included species from four genera of field fungi and seven species of storage fungi. Although the MC ranged from 11.0 to 22.5%, it averaged 16.4, 16.8, and 15.9% for samples taken in 1968, 1969, and 1970, respectively. Average populations of fungi per sample over the three years ranged from 0 to 1,528,500 colonies/g of tobacco.

  19. Fungi Isolated from Flue-Cured Tobacco Sold in Southeast United States, 1968-1970

    PubMed Central

    Welty, Ronald E.

    1972-01-01

    Flue-cured tobacco leaves, from low- and middle-stalk positions, offered for sale in each of two markets, within each of five tobacco types, were evaluated for moisture content (MC) and filamentous fungi during August through October in 1968, 1969, and 1970. Alternaria alternata, Penicillium cyclopium, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus repens, and Aspergillus flavus were most frequently isolated from cultured tissue. Other filamentous fungi that grew from the tissue included species from four genera of field fungi and seven species of storage fungi. Although the MC ranged from 11.0 to 22.5%, it averaged 16.4, 16.8, and 15.9% for samples taken in 1968, 1969, and 1970, respectively. Average populations of fungi per sample over the three years ranged from 0 to 1,528,500 colonies/g of tobacco. PMID:4627970

  20. Laboratory Testing of a Fluidized-Bed Dry-Scrubbing Process for the Removal of Acidic Gases from a Simulated Incinerator Flue Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    100 MW). Cost data for two conventional wet processes (limestone and wet lime) are shown in Table 5.1. Table 5.1. Costs for flue gas desulfurization ...Results of short-term dry-scrubbing tests ............... 8 5.1 Costs for flue gas desulfurization systems .............. 15 A.1 Detailed description of...this report is part of an effort by USATHAMA to develop and test a flue gas dry-scrubbing system that can be used as a replacement for wet scrubbers for

  1. Enhanced elemental mercury removal from coal-fired flue gas by sulfur-chlorine compounds.

    PubMed

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray L; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

    2009-07-15

    Oxidation of Hg(0) with any oxidant or converting itto a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg(0) by gas-phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas-phase reaction between Hg(0) and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas-phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1 (+/- 0.5) x 10(-18) mL-molecules(-1) x s(-1) at 373 K. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg(0) removal is about 90% with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that coinjection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90% of Hg(0) can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3% of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg(0)/SCl2 or Hg(0)/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8% of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

  2. Linear optical pulse compression based on temporal zone plates.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Ming; Lou, Shuqin; Azaña, José

    2013-07-15

    We propose and demonstrate time-domain equivalents of spatial zone plates, namely temporal zone plates, as alternatives to conventional time lenses. Both temporal intensity zone plates, based on intensity-only temporal modulation, and temporal phase zone plates, based on phase-only temporal modulation, are introduced and studied. Temporal zone plates do not exhibit the limiting tradeoff between temporal aperture and frequency bandwidth (temporal resolution) of conventional linear time lenses. As a result, these zone plates can be ideally designed to offer a time-bandwidth product (TBP) as large as desired, practically limited by the achievable temporal modulation bandwidth (limiting the temporal resolution) and the amount of dispersion needed in the target processing systems (limiting the temporal aperture). We numerically and experimentally demonstrate linear optical pulse compression by using temporal zone plates based on linear electro-optic temporal modulation followed by fiber-optics dispersion. In the pulse-compression experiment based on temporal phase zone plates, we achieve a resolution of ~25.5 ps over a temporal aperture of ~5.77 ns, representing an experimental TBP larger than 226 using a phase-modulation amplitude of only ~0.8π rad. We also numerically study the potential of these devices to achieve temporal imaging of optical waveforms and present a comparative analysis on the performance of different temporal intensity and phase zone plates.

  3. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  4. Investigation of the chemical pathway of gaseous nitrogen dioxide formation during flue gas desulfurization with dry sodium bicarbonate injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Antoinette Weil

    The chemical reaction pathway for the viable flue gas desulfurization process, dry sodium bicarbonate injection, was investigated to mitigate undesirable plume discoloration. Based on a foundation of past findings, a simplified three-step reaction pathway was hypothesized for the formation of the plume-discoloring constituent, NO2. As the first step, it was hypothesized that sodium sulfite formed by sodium bicarbonate reaction with flue gas SO 2. As the second step, it was hypothesized that sodium nitrate formed by sodium sulfite reaction with flue gas NO. And as the third step, it was hypothesized that NO2 and sodium sulfate formed by sodium nitrate reaction with SO2. The second and third hypothesized steps were experimentally investigated using an isothermal fixed bed reactor. As reported in the past, technical grade sodium sulfite was found to be un-reactive with NO and O2. Freshly prepared sodium sulfite, maintained unexposed to moist air, was shown to react with NO and O2 resulting in a mixture of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate together with a significant temperature rise. This reaction was found to proceed only when oxygen was present in the flue gas. As reported in the past, technical grade sodium nitrate was shown to be un-reactive with SO2. But freshly formed sodium nitrate kept unexposed to humidity was found to be reactive with SO2 and O 2 resulting in the formation of NO2 and sodium sulfate polymorphic Form I. The NO2 formation by this reaction was shown to be temperature dependent with maximum formation at 175°C. Plume mitigation methods were studied based on the validated three-step reaction pathway. Mitigation of NO2 was exhibited by limiting oxygen concentration in the flue gas to a level below 5%. It was also shown that significant NO2 mitigation was achieved by operating below 110°C or above 250°C. An innovative NO2 mitigation method was patented as a result of the findings of this study. The patented process incorporated a process step of

  5. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1996-04-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  6. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  7. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1998-06-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  8. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  9. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  10. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1998-04-14

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  11. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  12. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  13. The enhancement of CuO modified V2O5-WO3/TiO2 based SCR catalyst for Hg° oxidation in simulated flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuanmin; Jia, Wenbo; Liu, Songtao; Cao, Yue

    2018-04-01

    CuO modified V2O5-WO3/TiO2 based SCR catalysts prepared by improved impregnation method were investigated to evaluate the catalytic activity for elemental mercury (Hg°) oxidation in simulated flue gas at 150-400 °C. Nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the catalysts. It was found that V0.8WTi-Cu3 catalyst exhibited the superior Hg° oxidation activity and wide operating temperature window at the gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 3 × 105 h-1. The BET and XRD results showed that CuO was well loaded and highly dispersed on the catalysts surface. The XPS results suggested that the addition of CuO generated abundant chemisorbed oxygen, which was due to the synergistic effect between CuO and V2O5. The existence of the redox cycle of V4+ + Cu2+ ↔ V5+ + Cu+ in V0.8WTi-Cu3 catalyst enhanced Hg° oxidation activity. The effects of flue gas components (O2, NO, SO2 and H2O) on Hg° oxidation over V0.8WTi-Cu3 catalyst were also explored. Moreover, the co-presence of NO and NH3 remarkably inhibited Hg° oxidation, which was due to the competitive adsorption and reduction effect of NH3 at SCR condition. Fortunately, this inhibiting effect was gradually scavenged with the decrease of GHSV. The mechanism of Hg° oxidation was also investigated.

  14. 40 CFR 60.1325 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? 60.1325 Section 60.1325 Protection of... the inlet of my particulate matter control device? You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate... particulate matter control device. ...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1325 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? 60.1325 Section 60.1325 Protection of... the inlet of my particulate matter control device? You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate... particulate matter control device. ...

  16. High density dispersion fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G.L.

    1996-09-01

    A fuel development campaign that results in an aluminum plate-type fuel of unlimited LEU burnup capability with an uranium loading of 9 grams per cm{sup 3} of meat should be considered an unqualified success. The current worldwide approved and accepted highest loading is 4.8 g cm{sup {minus}3} with U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as fuel. High-density uranium compounds offer no real density advantage over U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and have less desirable fabrication and performance characteristics as well. Of the higher-density compounds, U{sub 3}Si has approximately a 30% higher uranium density but the density of the U{sub 6}X compounds would yield the factormore » 1.5 needed to achieve 9 g cm{sup {minus}3} uranium loading. Unfortunately, irradiation tests proved these peritectic compounds have poor swelling behavior. It is for this reason that the authors are turning to uranium alloys. The reason pure uranium was not seriously considered as a dispersion fuel is mainly due to its high rate of growth and swelling at low temperatures. This problem was solved at least for relatively low burnup application in non-dispersion fuel elements with small additions of Si, Fe, and Al. This so called adjusted uranium has nearly the same density as pure {alpha}-uranium and it seems prudent to reconsider this alloy as a dispersant. Further modifications of uranium metal to achieve higher burnup swelling stability involve stabilization of the cubic {gamma} phase at low temperatures where normally {alpha} phase exists. Several low neutron capture cross section elements such as Zr, Nb, Ti and Mo accomplish this in various degrees. The challenge is to produce a suitable form of fuel powder and develop a plate fabrication procedure, as well as obtain high burnup capability through irradiation testing.« less

  17. Rift Zone Abandonment and Reconfiguration in Hawaii: Evidence from Mauna Loa’s Ninole Rift Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. K.; Park, J.; Zelt, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    Large oceanic volcanoes commonly develop elongate rift zones that disperse viscous magmas to the distal reaches of the edifice. Intrusion and dike propagation occur under tension perpendicular to the rift zone, controlled by topography, magmatic pressures, and deformation of the edifice. However, as volcanoes grow and interact, the controlling stress fields can change, potentially altering the orientations and activities of rift zones. This phenomenon is probably common, and can produce complex internal structures that influence the evolution of a volcano and its neighbors. However, little direct evidence for such rift zone reconfiguration exists, primarily due to poor preservation or recognition of earlier volcanic configurations. A new onshore-offshore 3-D seismic velocity model for the Island of Hawaii, derived from a joint tomographic inversion of an offshore airgun shot - onshore receiver geometry and earthquake sources beneath the island, demonstrates a complicated history of rift zone reconfiguration on Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii, including wholesale rift zone abandonment. Mauna Loa’s southeast flank contains a massive high velocity intrusive complex, now buried beneath flows derived from Mauna Loa’s active southwest rift zone (SWRZ). Introduced here as the Ninole Rift Zone, this feature extends more than 60 km south of Mauna Loa’s summit, spans a depth range of ~2-14 km below sea level, and is the probable source of the 100-200 ka Ninole volcanics in several prominent erosional hills. A lack of high velocities beneath the upper SWRZ and its separate zone of high velocities on the submarine flank, indicate that the younger rift zone was built upon a pre-existing edifice that emanated from the Ninole rift zone. The ancient Ninole rift zone may stabilize Mauna Loa’s southeast flank, focusing recent volcanic activity and deformation onto the unbuttressed west flank. The upper portion of the Ninole rift zone appears to have migrated westward over time

  18. Screening of metal-organic frameworks for carbon dioxide capture from flue gas using a combined experimental and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Yazaydin, A Ozgür; Snurr, Randall Q; Park, Tae-Hong; Koh, Kyoungmoo; Liu, Jian; Levan, M Douglas; Benin, Annabelle I; Jakubczak, Paulina; Lanuza, Mary; Galloway, Douglas B; Low, John J; Willis, Richard R

    2009-12-30

    A diverse collection of 14 metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) was screened for CO(2) capture from flue gas using a combined experimental and modeling approach. Adsorption measurements are reported for the screened MOFs at room temperature up to 1 bar. These data are used to validate a generalized strategy for molecular modeling of CO(2) and other small molecules in MOFs. MOFs possessing a high density of open metal sites are found to adsorb significant amounts of CO(2) even at low pressure. An excellent correlation is found between the heat of adsorption and the amount of CO(2) adsorbed below 1 bar. Molecular modeling can aid in selection of adsorbents for CO(2) capture from flue gas by screening a large number of MOFs.

  19. Multi-functional sorbents for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and lead compounds from hot flue gases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Lin, Wen-Chiang

    2003-10-01

    A multi-functional sorbent is developed for the simultaneous removal of PbCl(2) vapor and sulfur dioxide from the combustion gases. The sorbent is tested in a bench-scale reactor at the temperature of 700 degrees C, using simulated flue gas (SFG) containing controlled amounts of PbCl(2) and SO(2) compounds. The removal characteristics of PbCl(2) and SO(2), individually and in combination, are investigated. The results show that the mechanism of capture by the sorbent is not a simple physical adsorption process but seems to involve a chemical reaction between the Ca-based sorbent and the contaminants from the simulated flue gas. The porous product layer in the case of individual SO(2) sorption is in a molten state at the reaction temperature. In contrast, the combined sorption of lead and sulfur compounds generates a flower-shaped polycrystalline product layer.

  20. Modeling study of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans behavior in flue gases under electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, Gennady

    2016-09-01

    The efficiency of the electron beam treatment of industrial flue gases for the removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides was investigated as applied to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) using methods of mathematical modeling. The proposed kinetic model of the process includes mechanism of PCDD/Fs decomposition caused by their interaction with OH radicals generated in the flue gases under the electron beam (EB) irradiation as well as PCDD/Fs formation from unburned aromatic compounds. The model allows to predict the main features of the process, which are observed in pilot plant installations, as well as to evaluate the process efficiency. The results of calculations are compared with the available experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular simulation of separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gases in Cu-BTC metal-organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Q.Y.; Xue, C.Y.; Zhong, C.L.

    2007-11-15

    In this work, a computational study was performed on the adsorption separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gases (mixtures of CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}/O{sub 2}) in Cu-BTC metal-organic framework (MOF) to investigate the applicability of MOFs to this important industrial system. The computational results showed that Cu-BTC is a promising material for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gases, and the macroscopic separation behaviors of the MOF were elucidated at a molecular level to give insight into the underlying mechanisms. The present work not only provided useful information for understanding the separation characteristics of MOFs, but also showed their potential applicationsmore » in chemical industry.« less

  2. Gas-phase elemental mercury removal in a simulated combustion flue gas using TiO2 with fluorescent light.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Han; Lee, Tai Gyu; Eom, Yujin

    2012-10-01

    A previously proposed technology incorporating TiO2 into common household fluorescent lighting was further tested for its Hg0 removal capability in a simulated flue-gas system. The flue gas is simulated by the addition of O2, SO2, HCl, NO, H2O, and Hg0, which are frequently found in combustion facilities such as waste incinerators and coal-fired power plants. In the O2 + N2 + Hg0 environment, a Hg0 removal efficiency (etaHg) greater than 95% was achieved. Despite the tendency for etaHg to decrease with increasing SO2 and HCl, no significant drop was observed at the tested level (SO2: 5-300 ppm, HCl: 30-120 ppm(v)). In terms of NO and moisture, a significant negative effect on etaHg was observed for both factors. NO eliminated the OH radical on the TiO2 surface, whereas water vapor caused either the occupation of active sites available to Hg0 or the reduction of Hg0 by free electron. However, the negative effect of NO was minimized (etaHg > 90%) by increasing the residence time in the photochemical reactor. The moisture effect can be avoided by installing a water trap before the flue gas enters the Hg0 removal system. This paper reports a novel technology for a removal of gas-phase elemental mercury (Hg0) from a simulated flue gas using TiO2-coated glass beads under a low-cost, easily maintainable household fluorescent light instead of ultraviolet (UV) light. In this study, the effects of individual chemical species (O2, SO2, HCl, NO, and water vapor) on the performance of the proposed technology for Hg0 removal are investigated. The result suggests that the proposed technology can be highly effective, even in real combustion environments such as waste incinerators and coal-fired power plants.

  3. Experimental study on Hg0 removal from flue gas over columnar MnOx-CeO2/activated coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yine; Li, Caiting; Zhao, Lingkui; Zhang, Jie; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Xunan; Zhang, Wei; Tao, Shasha

    2015-04-01

    Mn-Ce mixed oxides supported on commercial columnar activated coke (MnCe/AC) were employed to remove elemental mercury (Hg0) at low temperatures (100-250 °C) without the assistance of HCl in flue gas. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Effects of some factors, including Mn-Ce loading values, active component, reaction temperatures and flue gas components (O2, SO2, NO, H2O), on Hg0 removal efficiency were investigated. Results indicated that the optimal Mn-Ce loading value and reaction temperature were 6% and 190 °C, respectively. Considerable high Hg0 removal efficiency (>90%) can be obtained over MnCe6/AC under both N2/O2 atmosphere and simulated flue gas atmosphere at 190 °C. Besides, it was observed that O2 and NO exerted a promotional effect on Hg0 removal, H2O exhibited a suppressive effect, and SO2 hindered Hg0 removal seriously when in the absence of O2. Furthermore, the XPS spectra of Hg 4f and Hg-TPD results showed that the captured mercury were existed as Hg0 and HgO on the MnCe6/AC, and HgO was the major species, which illustrated that adsorption and catalytic oxidation process were included for Hg0 removal over MnCe6/AC, and catalytic oxidation played the critical role. What's more, both lattice oxygen and chemisorbed oxygen or OH groups on MnCe6/AC contributed to Hg0 oxidation. MnCe6/AC, which exhibited excellent performance on Hg0 removal in the absence of HCl, appeared to be promising in industrial application, especially for low-rank coal fired flue gas.

  4. Sequestration of flue gas CO₂ by direct gas-solid carbonation of air pollution control system residues.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo

    2012-12-18

    Direct gas-solid carbonation reactions of residues from an air pollution control system (APCr) were conducted using different combinations of simulated flue gas to study the impact on CO₂ sequestration. X-ray diffraction analysis of APCr determined the existence of CaClOH, whose maximum theoretical CO₂ sequestration potential of 58.13 g CO₂/kg APCr was calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The reaction mechanism obeyed a model of a fast kinetics-controlled process followed by a slow product layer diffusion-controlled process. Temperature is the key factor in direct gas-solid carbonation and had a notable influence on both the carbonation conversion and the CO₂ sequestration rate. The optimal CO₂ sequestrating temperature of 395 °C was easily obtained for APCr using a continuous heating experiment. CO₂ content in the flue gas had a definite influence on the CO₂ sequestration rate of the kinetics-controlled process, but almost no influence on the final carbonation conversion. Typical concentrations of SO₂ in the flue gas could not only accelerate the carbonation reaction rate of the product layer diffusion-controlled process, but also could improve the final carbonation conversion. Maximum carbonation conversions of between 68.6% and 77.1% were achieved in a typical flue gas. Features of rapid CO₂ sequestration rate, strong impurities resistance, and high capture conversion for direct gas-solid carbonation were proved in this study, which presents a theoretical foundation for the applied use of this encouraging technology on carbon capture and storage.

  5. Destruction of PCDD/Fs by SCR from flue gases of municipal waste incinerator and metal smelting plant.

    PubMed

    Chang, Moo Been; Chi, Kai Hsien; Chang, Shu Hao; Yeh, Jhy Wei

    2007-01-01

    Partitioning of PCDD/F congeners between vapor/solid phases and removal and destruction efficiencies achieved with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for PCDD/Fs at an existing municipal waste incinerator (MWI) and metal smelting plant (MSP) in Taiwan are evaluated via stack sampling and analysis. The MWI investigated is equipped with electrostatic precipitators (EP, operating temperature: 230 degrees C), wet scrubbers (WS, operating temperature: 70 degrees C) and SCR (operating temperature: 220 degrees C) as major air pollution control devices (APCDs). PCDD/F concentration measured at stack gas of the MWI investigated is 0.728 ng-TEQ/Nm(3). The removal efficiency of WS+SCR system for PCDD/Fs reaches 93% in the MWI investigated. The MSP investigated is equipped with EP (operating temperature: 240 degrees C) and SCR (operating temperature: 290 degrees C) as APCDs. The flue gas sampling results also indicate that PCDD/F concentration treated with SCR is 1.35 ng-TEQ/Nm(3). The SCR system adopted in MSP can remove 52.3% PCDD/Fs from flue gases (SCR operating temperature: 290 degrees C, Gas flow rate: 660 kN m(3)/h). In addition, the distributions of PCDD/F congeners observed in the flue gases of the MWI and MSP investigated are significantly different. This study also indicates that the PCDD/F congeners measured in the flue gases of those two facilities are mostly distributed in vapor phase prior to the SCR system and shift to solid phase (vapor-phase PCDD/Fs are effectively decomposed) after being treated with catalyst. Besides, the results also indicate that with SCR highly chlorinated PCDD/F congeners can be transformed to lowly chlorinated PCDD/F congeners probably by dechlorination, while the removal efficiencies of vapor-phase PCDD/Fs increase with increasing chlorination.

  6. Simultaneous removal of NO and SO2 from flue gas by combined heat and Fe2+ activated aqueous persulfate solutions.

    PubMed

    Adewuyi, Yusuf G; Sakyi, Nana Y; Arif Khan, M

    2018-02-01

    The use of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to integrate flue gas treatments for SO 2 , NO x and Hg 0 into a single process unit is rapidly gaining research attention. AOPs are processes that rely on the generation of mainly the hydroxyl radical. This work evaluates the effectiveness of the simultaneous removal of NO and SO 2 from flue gas utilizing AOP induced by the combined heat and Fe 2+ activation of aqueous persulfate, and elucidates the reaction pathways. The results indicated that both SO 2 in the flue gas and Fe 2+ in solution improved NO removal, while the SO 2 is almost completely removed. Increased temperature led to increase in NO removal in the absence and presence of both Fe 2+ and SO 2 , and in the absence of either SO 2 or Fe 2+ , but the enhanced NO removal due to the presence of SO 2 alone dominated at all temperatures. The removal of NO increased from 77.5% at 30 °C to 80.5% and 82.3% at 50 °C and 70 °C in the presence of SO 2 alone, and from 35.3% to 62.7% and 81.2%, respectively, in the presence of Fe 2+ alone. However, in the presence of both SO 2 and Fe 2+ , NO conversion is 46.2% at 30 °C, increased only slightly to 48.2% at 50 °C; but sharply increased to 78.7% at 70 °C compared to 63.9% for persulfate-only activation. Results suggest NO removal in the presence of SO 2 is equally effective by heat-only or heat-Fe 2+ activation as the temperature increases. The results should be useful for future developments of advanced oxidation processes for flue gas treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantum optical rotatory dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Nora; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Vidal, Xavier; Zeilinger, Anton; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, that is, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility of outperforming classical measurements. This has particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high power, which is a potential concern for chiroptical studies. We present the first experiment in which multiwavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme that we use for probing wavelength dependence not only allows one to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement but also can be used for more general differential measurements. PMID:27713928

  8. Determination of the main parameters of the cyclone separator of the flue gas produced during the smelting of secondary aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusov, Jozef; Gavlas, Stanislav

    2016-06-01

    One way how is possible to separate the solid particulate pollutants from the flue gas is use the cyclone separators. The cyclone separators are very frequently used separators due to the simplicity of their design and their low operating costs. Separation of pollutants in the form of solids is carried out using three types of forces: inertia force, centrifugal force, gravity force. The main advantage is that cyclone consist of the parts which are resistant to wear and have long life time, e.g. various rotating and sliding parts. Mostly are used as pre-separators, because they have low efficiency in the separation of small particles. Their function is to separate larger particles from the flue gases which are subsequently cleaned in the other device which is capable of removing particles smaller than 1 µm, which is limiting size of particle separation. The article will deal with the issue of calculating the basic dimensions and main parameters of the cyclone separator from flue gas produced during the smelting of secondary aluminum.

  9. Calcium and organic matter removal by carbonation process with waste incineration flue gas towards improvement of leachate biotreatment performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Xuedong; Wu, Liang; Li, Qingtao; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren

    2017-09-01

    Municipal solid wastes incineration (MSWI) flue gas was employed as the carbon source for in-situ calcium removal from MSWI leachate. Calcium removal efficiency was 95-97% with pH of 10.0-11.0 over 100min of flue gas aeration, with both bound Ca and free Ca being removed effectively. The fluorescence intensity of tryptophan, protein-like and humic acid-like compounds increased after carbonation process. The decrease of bound Ca with the increase of precipitate indicated that calcium was mainly converted to calcium carbonate precipitate. It suggested that the interaction between dissolved organic matter and Ca 2+ was weakened. Moreover, 10-16% of chemical oxygen demand removal and the decrease of ultraviolet absorption at 254nm indicated that some organics, especially aromatic compound decreased via adsorption onto the surface of calcium carbonate. The results indicate that introduce of waste incineration flue gas could be a feasible way for calcium removal from leachate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. JV Task 124 - Understanding Multi-Interactions of SO3, Mercury, Selenium, and Arsenic in Illinois Coal Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Zhuang; Christopher Martin; John Pavlish

    2009-03-31

    This project consisted of pilot-scale combustion testing with a representative Illinois basin coal to explore the multi-interactions of SO{sub 3}, mercury, selenium and arsenic. The parameters investigated for SO{sub 3} and mercury interactions included different flue gas conditions, i.e., temperature, moisture content, and particulate alkali content, both with and without activated carbon injection for mercury control. Measurements were also made to track the transformation of selenium and arsenic partitioning as a function of flue gas temperature through the system. The results from the mercury-SO{sub 3} testing support the concept that SO{sub 3} vapor is the predominant factor that impedes efficientmore » mercury removal with activated carbon in an Illinois coal flue gas, while H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol has less impact on activated carbon injection performance. Injection of a suitably mobile and reactive additives such as sodium- or calcium-based sorbents was the most effective strategy tested to mitigate the effect of SO{sub 3}. Transformation measurements indicate a significant fraction of selenium was associated with the vapor phase at the electrostatic precipitator inlet temperature. Arsenic was primarily particulate-bound and should be captured effectively with existing particulate control technology.« less

  11. Metapopulation extinction risk: dispersal's duplicity.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Kevin

    2009-09-01

    Metapopulation extinction risk is the probability that all local populations are simultaneously extinct during a fixed time frame. Dispersal may reduce a metapopulation's extinction risk by raising its average per-capita growth rate. By contrast, dispersal may raise a metapopulation's extinction risk by reducing its average population density. Which effect prevails is controlled by habitat fragmentation. Dispersal in mildly fragmented habitat reduces a metapopulation's extinction risk by raising its average per-capita growth rate without causing any appreciable drop in its average population density. By contrast, dispersal in severely fragmented habitat raises a metapopulation's extinction risk because the rise in its average per-capita growth rate is more than offset by the decline in its average population density. The metapopulation model used here shows several other interesting phenomena. Dispersal in sufficiently fragmented habitat reduces a metapopulation's extinction risk to that of a constant environment. Dispersal between habitat fragments reduces a metapopulation's extinction risk insofar as local environments are asynchronous. Grouped dispersal raises the effective habitat fragmentation level. Dispersal search barriers raise metapopulation extinction risk. Nonuniform dispersal may reduce the effective fraction of suitable habitat fragments below the extinction threshold. Nonuniform dispersal may make demographic stochasticity a more potent metapopulation extinction force than environmental stochasticity.

  12. SMED - Sulphur MEditerranean Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Sellitto, Pasquale; Corradini, Stefano; Di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio; Merucci, Luca; Caltabiano, Tommaso; La Spina, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of volcanic gases and particles can have profound impacts on terrestrial environment, atmospheric composition, climate forcing, and then on human health at various temporal and spatial scales. Volcanic emissions have been identified as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our understanding of recent climate change trends. In particular, a primary role is acted by sulphur dioxide emission due to its conversion to volcanic sulphate aerosol via atmospheric oxidation. Aerosols may play a key role in the radiative budget and then in photochemistry and tropospheric composition. Mt. Etna is one of the most prodigious and persistent emitters of gasses and particles on Earth, accounting for about 10% of global average volcanic emission of CO2 and SO2. Its sulphur emissions stand for 0.7 × 106 t S/yr9 and then about 10 times bigger than anthropogenic sulphur emissions in the Mediterranean area. Centrepiece of the SMED project is to advance the understanding of volcanogenic sulphur dioxide and sulphate aerosol particles dispersion and radiative impact on the downwind Mediterranean region by an integrated approach between ground- and space-based observations and modelling. Research is addressed by exploring the potential relationship between proximal SO2 flux and aerosol measured remotely in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna between 2000 and 2014 and distal aerosol ground-based measurements in Lampedusa, Greece, and Malta from AERONET network. Ground data are combined with satellite multispectral polar and geostationary imagers able to detect and retrieve volcanic ash and SO2. The high repetition time of SEVIRI (15 minutes) will ensure the potential opportunity to follow the entire evolution of the volcanic cloud, while, the higher spatial resolution of MODIS (1x1 km2), are exploited for investigating the probability to retrieve volcanic SO2 abundances from passive degassing. Ground and space observations are complemented with atmospheric Lagrangian model

  13. General relationships between consumer dispersal, resource dispersal and metacommunity diversity.

    PubMed

    Haegeman, Bart; Loreau, Michel

    2014-02-01

    One of the central questions of metacommunity theory is how dispersal of organisms affects species diversity. Here, we show that the diversity-dispersal relationship should not be studied in isolation of other abiotic and biotic flows in the metacommunity. We study a mechanistic metacommunity model in which consumer species compete for an abiotic or biotic resource. We consider both consumer species specialised to a habitat patch, and generalist species capable of using the resource throughout the metacommunity. We present analytical results for different limiting values of consumer dispersal and resource dispersal, and complement these results with simulations for intermediate dispersal values. Our analysis reveals generic patterns for the combined effects of consumer and resource dispersal on the metacommunity diversity of consumer species, and shows that hump-shaped relationships between local diversity and dispersal are not universal. Diversity-dispersal relationships can also be monotonically increasing or multimodal. Our work is a new step towards a general theory of metacommunity diversity integrating dispersal at multiple trophic levels. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  14. Attenuation and velocity dispersion in the exploration seismic frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Langqiu

    In an anelastic medium, seismic waves are distorted by attenuation and velocity dispersion, which depend on petrophysical properties of reservoir rocks. The effective attenuation and velocity dispersion is a combination of intrinsic attenuation and apparent attenuation due to scattering, transmission response, and data acquisition system. Velocity dispersion is usually neglected in seismic data processing partly because of insufficient observations in the exploration seismic frequency band. This thesis investigates the methods of measuring velocity dispersion in the exploration seismic frequency band and interprets the velocity dispersion data in terms of petrophysical properties. Broadband, uncorrelated vibrator data are suitable for measuring velocity dispersion in the exploration seismic frequency band, and a broad bandwidth optimizes the observability of velocity dispersion. Four methods of measuring velocity dispersion in uncorrelated vibrator VSP data are investigated, which are the sliding window crosscorrelation (SWCC) method, the instantaneous phase method, the spectral decomposition method, and the cross spectrum method. Among them, the SWCC method is a new method and has satisfactory robustness, accuracy, and efficiency. Using the SWCC method, velocity dispersion is measured in the uncorrelated vibrator VSP data from three areas with different geological settings, i.e., Mallik gas hydrate zone, McArthur River uranium mines, and Outokumpu crystalline rocks. The observed velocity dispersion is fitted to a straight line with respect to log frequency for a constant (frequency-independent) Q value. This provides an alternative method for calculating Q. A constant Q value does not directly link to petrophysical properties. A modeling study is implemented for the Mallik and McArthur River data to interpret the velocity dispersion observations in terms of petrophysical properties. The detailed multi-parameter petrophysical reservoir models are built according to

  15. Comparison of alternative flue gas dry treatment technologies in waste-to-energy processes.

    PubMed

    Dal Pozzo, Alessandro; Antonioni, Giacomo; Guglielmi, Daniele; Stramigioli, Carlo; Cozzani, Valerio

    2016-05-01

    Acid gases such as HCl and SO2 are harmful both for human health and ecosystem integrity, hence their removal is a key step of the flue gas treatment of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants. Methods based on the injection of dry sorbents are among the Best Available Techniques for acid gas removal. In particular, systems based on double reaction and filtration stages represent nowadays an effective technology for emission control. The aim of the present study is the simulation of a reference two-stage (2S) dry treatment system performance and its comparison to three benchmarking alternatives based on single stage sodium bicarbonate injection. A modelling procedure was applied in order to identify the optimal operating configuration of the 2S system for different reference waste compositions, and to determine the total annual cost of operation. Taking into account both operating and capital costs, the 2S system appears the most cost-effective solution for medium to high chlorine content wastes. A Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis was carried out to assess the robustness of the results. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Sodic soil properties and sunflower growth as affected by byproducts of flue gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2012-01-01

    The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) is CaSO(4), which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha(-1)) and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m(3) ha(-1)). The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), pH and total dissolved salts (TDS) in the soils decreased after the byproducts were applied. Excessive BFGD also affected sunflower germination and growth, and leaching improved reclamation efficiency. The physical and chemical properties of the reclaimed soils were best when the byproducts were applied at 7.5 t ha(-1) and water was supplied at 1200 m(3)·ha(-1). Under these conditions, the soil pH, ESP, and TDS decreased from 9.2, 63.5 and 0.65% to 7.8, 2.8 and 0.06%, and the germination rate and yield per sunflower reached 90% and 36.4 g, respectively. Salinity should be controlled by leaching when sodic soils are reclaimed with BFGD as sunflower growth is very sensitive to salinity during its seedling stage.

  17. Coal fly ash based carbons for SO2 removal from flue gases.

    PubMed

    Rubio, B; Izquierdo, M T

    2010-07-01

    Two different coal fly ashes coming from the burning of two coals of different rank have been used as a precursor for the preparation of steam activated carbons. The performance of these activated carbons in the SO(2) removal was evaluated at flue gas conditions (100 degrees C, 1000 ppmv SO(2), 5% O(2), 6% H(2)O). Different techniques were used to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of the samples in order to explain the differences found in their behaviour. A superior SO(2) removal capacity was shown by the activated carbon obtained using the fly ash coming from a sub-bituminous-lignite blend. Experimental results indicated that the presence of higher amount of certain metallic oxides (Ca, Fe) in the carbon-rich fraction of this fly ash probably has promoted a deeper gasification in the activation with steam. A more suitable surface chemistry and textural properties have been obtained in this case which explains the higher efficiency shown by this sample in the SO(2) removal. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Load calculation on the nozzle in a flue gas desulphurization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Róbert, Olšiak; Zoltán, Fuszko; Zoltán, Csuka

    2017-09-01

    The desulphurization system is used to remove sulfur oxides from exhaust, so-called flue gases through absorbing them via the sprayed suspension. The suspension delivered from the pump system to the atmospheric bi-directional double hollow cone nozzle has the prescribed working pressure. The unknown mechanical load on the solid body of the nozzle is present through the change of moment due to the flow of the suspension through the bi-directional outflow areas [1], [4]. The calculation of the acting forces and torques in the 3 directions was carried out with the methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the software ANSYS Fluent. The geometric model of the flow areas of the nozzle were created with the methods of reverse engineering. The computational mesh required by the CFD solver was created, and its quality verified with the standard criteria. The used boundary conditions were defined by the hydraulic parameters of the pump system, the properties of the suspension present in the hydraulic system were specified by sample analysis. The post-processed and analyzed results of the CFD calculation, the pressure-field and the velocity magnitudes in particular directions were further used as input parameters at the mechanical analysis of the load on the bi-directional nozzle.

  19. Influence Of Coal Combustion Flue Gas Desulfurization Waste On Element Uptake By Maize (Zea Mays L.)

    SciTech Connect

    ANNA, KNOX

    2005-01-10

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effect of coal combustion flue gas desulfurization (FGD) waste from a coal combustion electric power facility on element uptake by maize (Zea mays L.). Unweathered FGD was applied to an Orangeburg Series (Typic Paleudult) soil with an initial soil pH salt of 4.90. The FGD was added at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 per cent by weight. The test plant, maize, was harvested after 6 weeks of growth. Within 56 days of the FGD application, all rates of FGD significantly increased pH in the soil and the soil leachatemore » above 6.0. The elemental concentration of the maize tissues indicated a characteristic elevation of B, Se, Mo, and As. However, no visual symptoms of toxicity of B or other elements in plants were observed. Increasing level of FGD caused a steady decline in dry weight, with the highest treatment producing plants which had approximately half the biomass of the control plants. Due to elevated concentrations of B and other elements and due to adverse yield effects measured on plants, unweathered FGD would not be a suitable amendment for 6-week old maize on this soil.« less

  20. [Characteristics and mechanism of sodium removal by the synergistic action of flue gas and waste solid].

    PubMed

    Yi, Yuan-Rong; Han, Min-Fang

    2012-07-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2) in flue gas was used to remove the sodium in the red mud (RM) , a kind of alkaline solid waste generated during alumina production. The reaction characteristics and mechanism of sodium removal by the synergistic action of CO2 and RM were studied with different medium pH, reaction time and temperature. It was demonstrated that the remove of sodium by RM was actually the result of the synergistic action of sodium-based solid waste in RM with the CO2-H2O and OH(-)-CO2 systems. The sodium removal efficiency was correlated with pH, reaction temperature and time. The characteristics of RM before and after sodium removal were analyzed using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the results showed that the alkaline materials in the red mud reacted with CO2 and the sodium content in solid phases decreased significantly after reaction. The sodium removal efficiency could reach up to 70% with scientific procedure. The results of this research will offer an efficient way for low-cost sodium removal.

  1. Characteristics and reactivity of rapidly hydrated sorbent for semidry flue gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; You, Changfu; Zhao, Suwei; Chen, Changhe; Qi, Haiying

    2008-03-01

    Semidry flue gas desulfurization with a rapidly hydrated sorbent was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental facility. The desulfurization efficiency was measured for various operating parameters, including the sorbent recirculation rate and the water spray method. The experimental results show that the desulfurization efficiencies of the rapidly hydrated sorbent were 1.5-3.0 times higher than a commonly used industrial sorbent for calcium to sulfur molar ratios from 1.2 to 3.0, mainly due to the higher specific surface area and pore volume. The Ca(OH)2 content in the cyclone separator ash was about 2.9% for the rapidly hydrated sorbent and was about 0.1% for the commonly used industrial sorbent, due to the different adhesion between the fine Ca(OH)2 particles and the fly ash particles, and the low cyclone separation efficiency for the fine Ca(OH)2 particles that fell off the sorbent particles. Therefore the actual recirculation rates of the active sorbent with Ca(OH)2 particles were higher for the rapidly hydrated sorbent, which also contributed to the higher desulfurization efficiency. The high fly ash content in the rapidly hydrated sorbent resulted in good operating stability. The desulfurization efficiency with upstream water spray was 10-15% higher than that with downstream water spray.

  2. [Effects of different organic fertilizers on the microbes in rhizospheric soil of flue-cured tobacco].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Wei; Xu, Zhi; Tang, Li; Li, Yan-Hong; Song, Jian-Qun; Xu, Jian-Qin

    2013-09-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of applying different organic fertilizers (refined organic fertilizer and bio-organic fertilizer) and their combination with 20% reduced chemical fertilizers on the microbes in rhizospheric soil of flue-cured tobacco, the resistance of the tobacco against bacterial wilt, and the tobacco yield and quality. As compared with conventional chemical fertilization (CK), applying refined organic fertilizer (ROF) or bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) in combining with 20% reduced chemical fertilization increased the bacterial number and the total microbial number in the rhizospheric soil significantly. Applying BIO in combining with 20% reduced chemical fertilization also increased the actinomyces number in the rhizospheric soil significantly, with an increment of 44.3% as compared with that under the application of ROF in combining with 20% reduced chemical fertilization, but decreased the fungal number. As compared with CK, the ROF and BIO increased the carbon use capacity of rhizospheric microbes significantly, and the BIO also increased the capacity of rhizospheric microbes in using phenols significantly. Under the application of ROF and BIO, the disease incidence and the disease index of bacterial wilt were decreased by 4% and 8%, and 23% and 15.9%, and the proportions of high grade tobacco leaves increased significantly by 10.5% and 9.7%, respectively, as compared with those in CK. BIO increased the tobacco yield and its output value by 17.1% and 18.9% , respectively, as compared with ROF.

  3. Species Diversity and Functional Prediction of Surface Bacterial Communities on Aging Flue-Cured Tobaccos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Zhao, Hongwei; Xiang, Haiying; Wu, Lijun; Men, Xiao; Qi, Chang; Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Yi; Xian, Mo

    2018-06-05

    Microbes on aging flue-cured tobaccos (ATFs) improve the aroma and other qualities desirable in products. Understanding the relevant organisms would picture microbial community diversity, metabolic potential, and their applications. However, limited efforts have been made on characterizing the microbial quality and functional profiling. Herein, we present our investigation of the bacterial diversity and predicted potential genetic capability of the bacteria from two AFTs using 16S rRNA gene sequences and phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt) software. The results show that dominant bacteria from AFT surfaces were classified into 48 genera, 36 families, and 7 phyla. In addition, Bacillus spp. was found prevalent on both ATFs. Furthermore, PICRUSt predictions of bacterial community functions revealed many attractive metabolic capacities in the AFT microbiota, including several involved in the biosynthesis of flavors and fragrances and the degradation of harmful compounds, such as nicotine and nitrite. These results provide insights into the importance of AFT bacteria in determining product qualities and indicate specific microbial species with predicted enzymatic capabilities for the production of high-efficiency flavors, the degradation of undesirable compounds, and the provision of nicotine and nitrite tolerance which suggest fruitful areas of investigation into the manipulation of AFT microbiota for AFT and other product improvements.

  4. Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs

    2011-10-16

    Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizingmore » available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.« less

  5. Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Youp; Cho, Kyungmin; Cheng, Lei; Keener, Tim C; Jegadeesan, Gautham; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2009-08-01

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride (HgCl2), mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2), mercury oxide (HgO), mercury sulfide (HgS), and mercuric sulfate (HgSO4) were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg2Cl2 and HgCl2 could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury.

  6. Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.Y.; Cho K.; Cheng L.

    2009-08-15

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method and samples from power plants in Pennsylvania. Potential candidatesmore » of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride, mercurous chloride, mercury oxide, mercury sulfide, and mercuric sulfate were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and HgCl{sub 2} could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  7. Ca removal and Mg recovery from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater by selective precipitation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Min; Ye, Chunsong; Pi, Kewu; Liu, Defu; Gerson, Andrea R

    2017-11-01

    Selective removal of Ca and recovery of Mg by precipitation from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater has been investigated. Thermodynamic analysis of four possible additives, Na 2 CO 3 , Na 2 C 2 O 4 , NaF and Na 2 SO 4 , indicated that both carbonate and oxalate could potentially provide effective separation of Ca via precipitation from Mg in FGD wastewater. However, it was found experimentally that the carbonate system was not as effective as oxalate in this regard. The oxalate system performed considerably better, with Ca removal efficiency of 96% being obtained, with little Mg inclusion at pH 6.0 when the dosage was ×1.4 the stoichiometric requirement. On this basis, the subsequent recovery process for Mg was carried out using NaOH with two-step precipitation. The product was confirmed to be Mg(OH) 2 (using X-ray diffraction and thermo gravimetric analysis) with elemental analysis suggesting a purity of 99.3 wt.%.

  8. CO.sub.2 separation from low-temperature flue gases

    DOEpatents

    Dilmore, Robert; Allen, Douglas; Soong, Yee; Hedges, Sheila

    2010-11-30

    Two methods are provide for the separation of carbon dioxide from the flue gases. The first method utilizes a phase-separating moiety dissolved in an aqueous solution of a basic moiety to capture carbon dioxide. The second method utilizes a phase-separating moiety as a suspended solid in an aqueous solution of a basic moiety to capture carbon dioxide. The first method takes advantage of the surface-independent nature of the CO.sub.2 absorption reactions in a homogeneous aqueous system. The second method also provides permanent sequestration of the carbon dioxide. Both methods incorporate the kinetic rate enhancements of amine-based scrubbing while eliminating the need to heat the entire amine solution (80% water) in order to regenerate and release CO.sub.2. Both methods also take advantage of the low-regeneration temperatures of CO.sub.2-bearing mineral systems such as Na.sub.2CO.sub.3/NaHCO.sub.3 and K.sub.2CO.sub.3/KHCO.sub.3.

  9. Feasibility of mercury removal from simulated flue gas by activated chars made from poultry manures.

    PubMed

    Klasson, K Thomas; Lima, Isabel M; Boihem, Larry L; Wartelle, Lynda H

    2010-12-01

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plants has resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents for mercury removal. At the same time, the quantity of poultry manure generated each year is large and technologies that take advantage of the material should be explored. The purpose of the work was to obtain preliminary data to investigate if activated chars made from different poultry manures could adsorb mercury from simulated flue gas. In laboratory experiments, activated chars made from chicken cake and litter removed mercury from the gas as well as a commercial alternative. It was also found that acid-washing these chars after activation may improve pore structure but does not influence the mercury removal efficiency. Activated chars were also made from turkey cake and litter. These raw materials produced activated chars with similar pore structure as those made from chicken manure, but they did not adsorb mercury as well. Acid-washing the turkey manure-based chars improved their performance, but this step would add to the cost of production. Preliminary evaluations suggest that unwashed activated chars may cost as little as $0.95/kg to produce. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Design of a low-cost, compact SRF accelerator for flue gas and wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2016-04-01

    Funding is being requested pursuant to a proposal that was submitted and reviewed through the Portfolio Analysis and Management System (PAMS). PAMS Proposal ID: 222439. The proposed project consists of the design of a novel superconducting continuous-wave accelerator capable of providing a beam current of ~1 A at an energy of 1-2 MeV for the treatment of flue gases and wastewater streams. The novel approach consists on studying the feasibility of using a single-cell Nb cavity coated with a thin Nb3Sn layer of the inner surface and conductively cooled by to 4.2 K by cryocoolers inside a compact cryomodule. Themore » proposed study will include beam transport simulations, thermal and mechanical engineering analysis of the cryomodule and a cost analysis for both the fabrications costs and the operational and maintenance costs of such accelerator. The outcome of the project will be a report summarizing the analysis and results from the design study.« less

  11. Simplified models of flue instruments: Influence of mouth geometry on the sound source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dequand, S.; Willems, J. F. H.; Leroux, M.; Vullings, R.; van Weert, M.; Thieulot, C.; Hirschberg, A.

    2003-03-01

    Flue instruments such as the recorder flute and the transverse flute have different mouth geometries and acoustical response. The effect of the mouth geometry is studied by considering the aeroacoustical response of a simple whistle. The labium of a transverse flute has a large edge angle (60°) compared to that of a recorder flute (15°). Furthermore, the ratio W/h of the mouth width W to the jet thickness h can be varied in the transverse flute (lips of the musician) while it is fixed to a value W/h~4 in a recorder flute. A systematic experimental study of the steady oscillation behavior has been carried out. Results of acoustical pressure measurements and flow visualization are presented. The sharp edge of the recorder provides a sound source which is rich in harmonics at the cost of stability. The larger angle of the labium of the flute seems to be motivated by a better stability of the oscillations for thick jets but could also be motivated by a reduction of broadband turbulence noise. We propose two simplified sound source models which could be used for sound synthesis: a jet-drive model for W/h>2 and a discrete-vortex model for W/h<2.

  12. Adsorption of SO2 and NO from incineration flue gas onto activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Shu

    2008-11-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were used to remove SO2 and NO from incineration flue gas. Three types of ACFs in their origin state and after pretreatment with HNO3, NaOH, and KOH were investigated. The removal efficiencies of SO2 and NO were determined experimentally at defined SO2 and NO concentrations and at temperatures of 150, 200 and 260 degrees C. Experimental results indicated that the removal efficiencies of SO2 and NO using the original ACFs were < 56% and < 27%, respectively. All ACFs modified with HNO3, NaOH, and KOH solution could increase the removal efficiencies of SO(2) and NO. The mesopore volumes and functional groups of ACFs are important in determining the removal of SO2 and NO. When the mesopore volumes of the ACFs are insufficient for removing SO2 and NO, the functional groups on the ACFs are not important in determining the removal of SO2 and NO. On the contrary, the effects of the functional groups on the removal of SO2 and NO are more important than the mesopore volumes as the amount of mesopores on the ACFs is sufficient to remove SO2 and NO. Moreover, the removal efficiencies of SO2 and NO were greatest at 200 degrees C. When the inlet concentration of SO2 increased to 600 ppm, the removal efficiency of SO2 increased slightly and the removal efficiency of NO decreased.

  13. Use Of limestone resources in flue-gas desulfurization power plants in the Ohio River Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foose, M.P.; Barsotti, A.F.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, more than 41 of the approximately 160 coal-fired, electrical- power plants within the six-state Ohio River Valley region used flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) units to desulfurize their emissions, an approximately 100% increase over the number of plants using FGD units in 1989. This increase represents a trend that may continue with greater efforts to meet Federal Clean Air Act standards. Abundant limestone resources exist in the Ohio River Valley and are accessed by approximately 975 quarries. However, only 35 of these are believed to have supplied limestone for FGD electrical generating facilities. The locations of these limestone suppliers do not show a simple spatial correlation with FGD facilities, and the closest quarries are not being used in most cases. Thus, reduction in transportation costs may be possible in some cases. Most waste generated by FGD electrical-generating plants is not recycled. However, many FGD sites are relatively close to gypsum wallboard producers that may be able to process some of their waste.

  14. Treatment of wastewater from flue gas desulphurization plants in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Vredenbregt, L.H.J.; Brugghen, F.W. van der; Enoch, G.D.

    1995-06-01

    In the Netherlands, all coal fired boilers of power stations are equipped with a wet lime(stone)-gypsum flue gas desulphurization (FGD) installation in order to fulfill the emission demands for SO{sub 2}. These wet FGD installations produce a wastewater stream containing impurities like suspended solids and traces of heavy metals like As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Za. As the target values stated by the licensing authorities are very stringent, most of these heavy metals and suspended solids have to be removed to very low concentration levels. Therefore, a very efficient treatment method, based on coprecipitation ofmore » heavy metal hydroxides and sulphides, which was developed by KEMA, has been installed at all, the coal fired power plants. This paper describes the operational experiences until now with these wastewater treatment installations at two coal fired power plants using sea-water for make-up and one using fresh water. The following aspects will be discussed in more detail: reliability of the wastewater treatment processes both with respect to removal efficiency of heavy metals and suspended solids and plant operation itself influence of a changing composition of the wastewater on the performance of these wastewater treatment installations. Finally, also the impact of co-firing of the sludge produced in these wastewater treatment installations will be discussed.« less

  15. Aroma types of flue-cured tobacco in China: spatial distribution and association with climatic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Wei; Wu, Shu-Cheng; Liu, Hong-Bin; Peng, Qing

    2014-02-01

    Aroma types of flue-cured tobacco (FCT) are classified into light, medium, and heavy in China. However, the spatial distribution of FCT aroma types and the relationships among aroma types, chemical parameters, and climatic variables were still unknown at national scale. In the current study, multi-year averaged chemical parameters (total sugars, reducing sugars, nicotine, total nitrogen, chloride, and K2O) of FCT samples with grade of C3F and climatic variables (mean, minimum and maximum temperatures, rainfall, relative humidity, and sunshine hours) during the growth periods were collected from main planting areas across China. Significant relationships were found between chemical parameters and climatic variables ( p < 0.05). A spatial distribution map of FCT aroma types were produced using support vector machine algorithms and chemical parameters. Significant differences in chemical parameters and climatic variables were observed among the three aroma types based on one-way analysis of variance ( p < 0.05). Areas with light aroma type had significantly lower values of mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures than regions with medium and heavy aroma types ( p < 0.05). Areas with heavy aroma type had significantly lower values of rainfall and relative humidity and higher values of sunshine hours than regions with light and medium aroma types ( p < 0.05). The output produced by classification and regression trees showed that sunshine hours, rainfall, and maximum temperature were the most important factors affecting FCT aroma types at national scale.

  16. Fungi Isolated from Flue-cured Tobacco at Time of Sale and After Storage.

    PubMed

    Welty, R E; Lucas, G B

    1969-03-01

    The fungi isolated from 100 samples of flue-cured tobacco from 12 markets in 2 tobacco belts comprised 11 genera, including 10 species of Aspergillus. The mean percentage per sample isolated from 62 samples of tobacco from Middle Belt markets was Alternaria, 40.6%; Aspergillus niger, 47.8%; Aspergillus repens, 38.0%; and Penicillium, 25.8%. The mean percentage per sample isolated from 38 samples of tobacco from Old Belt markets was Alternaria, 74.0%; Penicillium, 52.5%; Aspergillus repens, 38.0%; and Aspergillus ruber, 36.2%. Damaged (74 samples) and nondamaged (26 samples) stored tobacco yielded species of six genera of fungi, including eight species of Aspergillus. Species of Aspergillus and Penicillium were commonly isolated from both damaged and nondamaged tobacco, whereas species of Alternaria, Cladosporium, Fusarium, and Rhizopus were isoalted more frequently from nondamaged tobacco. The fungi that occurred in the highest population in damaged tobacco were Aspergillus repens, A. niger, A. ruber, and Penicillium species.

  17. Fungi Isolated from Flue-cured Tobacco at Time of Sale and After Storage1

    PubMed Central

    Welty, R. E.; Lucas, G. B.

    1969-01-01

    The fungi isolated from 100 samples of flue-cured tobacco from 12 markets in 2 tobacco belts comprised 11 genera, including 10 species of Aspergillus. The mean percentage per sample isolated from 62 samples of tobacco from Middle Belt markets was Alternaria, 40.6%; Aspergillus niger, 47.8%; Aspergillus repens, 38.0%; and Penicillium, 25.8%. The mean percentage per sample isolated from 38 samples of tobacco from Old Belt markets was Alternaria, 74.0%; Penicillium, 52.5%; Aspergillus repens, 38.0%; and Aspergillus ruber, 36.2%. Damaged (74 samples) and nondamaged (26 samples) stored tobacco yielded species of six genera of fungi, including eight species of Aspergillus. Species of Aspergillus and Penicillium were commonly isolated from both damaged and nondamaged tobacco, whereas species of Alternaria, Cladosporium, Fusarium, and Rhizopus were isoalted more frequently from nondamaged tobacco. The fungi that occurred in the highest population in damaged tobacco were Aspergillus repens, A. niger, A. ruber, and Penicillium species. PMID:16349841

  18. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  19. Anisotropic Shear Dispersion Parameterization for Mesoscale Eddy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, S. J.; Fox-Kemper, B.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of mesoscale eddies are universally treated isotropically in general circulation models. However, the processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. The Gent-McWilliams/Redi mesoscale eddy parameterization is extended for anisotropy and tested using 1-degree Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations. The sensitivity of the model to anisotropy includes a reduction of temperature and salinity biases, a deepening of the southern ocean mixed-layer depth, and improved ventilation of biogeochemical tracers, particularly in oxygen minimum zones. The parameterization is further extended to include the effects of unresolved shear dispersion, which sets the strength and direction of anisotropy. The shear dispersion parameterization is similar to drifter observations in spatial distribution of diffusivity and high-resolution model diagnosis in the distribution of eddy flux orientation.

  20. Hybrid Dispersion Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Goda, K.; Mahjoubfar, A.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points. PMID:22685627

  1. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Macedonio, Giovanni

    2010-10-22

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around themore » volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.« less

  2. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema

    Macedonio, Giovanni

    2018-05-22

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  3. Turbulent dispersal promotes species coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Berkley, Heather A; Kendall, Bruce E; Mitarai, Satoshi; Siegel, David A

    2010-01-01

    Several recent advances in coexistence theory emphasize the importance of space and dispersal, but focus on average dispersal rates and require spatial heterogeneity, spatio-temporal variability or dispersal-competition tradeoffs to allow coexistence. We analyse a model with stochastic juvenile dispersal (driven by turbulent flow in the coastal ocean) and show that a low-productivity species can coexist with a high-productivity species by having dispersal patterns sufficiently uncorrelated from those of its competitor, even though, on average, dispersal statistics are identical and subsequent demography and competition is spatially homogeneous. This produces a spatial storage effect, with an ephemeral partitioning of a ‘spatial niche’, and is the first demonstration of a physical mechanism for a pure spatiotemporal environmental response. ‘Turbulent coexistence’ is widely applicable to marine species with pelagic larval dispersal and relatively sessile adult life stages (and perhaps some wind-dispersed species) and complements other spatial and temporal storage effects previously documented for such species. PMID:20455921

  4. Nest-mediated seed dispersal

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Warren; Jason P. Love; Mark A. Bradford

    2017-01-01

    Many plant seeds travel on the wind and through animal ingestion or adhesion; however, an overlooked dispersal mode may lurk within those dispersal modes. Viable seeds may remain attached or embedded within materials birds gather for nest building. Our objective was to determine if birds inadvertently transport seeds when they forage for plant materials to...

  5. CO2 Capture by Injection of Flue Gas or CO2-N2 Mixtures into Hydrate Reservoirs: Dependence of CO2 Capture Efficiency on Gas Hydrate Reservoir Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hassanpouryouzband, Aliakbar; Yang, Jinhai; Tohidi, Bahman; Chuvilin, Evgeny; Istomin, Vladimir; Bukhanov, Boris; Cheremisin, Alexey

    2018-04-03

    Injection of flue gas or CO 2 -N 2 mixtures into gas hydrate reservoirs has been considered as a promising option for geological storage of CO 2 . However, the thermodynamic process in which the CO 2 present in flue gas or a CO 2 -N 2 mixture is captured as hydrate has not been well understood. In this work, a series of experiments were conducted to investigate the dependence of CO 2 capture efficiency on reservoir conditions. The CO 2 capture efficiency was investigated at different injection pressures from 2.6 to 23.8 MPa and hydrate reservoir temperatures from 273.2 to 283.2 K in the presence of two different saturations of methane hydrate. The results showed that more than 60% of the CO 2 in the flue gas was captured and stored as CO 2 hydrate or CO 2 -mixed hydrates, while methane-rich gas was produced. The efficiency of CO 2 capture depends on the reservoir conditions including temperature, pressure, and hydrate saturation. For a certain reservoir temperature, there is an optimum reservoir pressure at which the maximum amount of CO 2 can be captured from the injected flue gas or CO 2 -N 2 mixtures. This finding suggests that it is essential to control the injection pressure to enhance CO 2 capture efficiency by flue gas or CO 2 -N 2 mixtures injection.

  6. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 2: SOx/Nox/Hg Removal for High Sulfur Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Degenstein; Minish Shah; Doughlas Louie

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxy-combustion technology. The objective of Task 2 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning high sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was not only to investigate a new method of flue gas purification but also to produce useful acid byproduct streams as an alternative to using a traditional FGD and SCR for flue gas processing.more » During the project two main constraints were identified that limit the ability of the process to achieve project goals. 1) Due to boiler island corrosion issues >60% of the sulfur must be removed in the boiler island with the use of an FGD. 2) A suitable method could not be found to remove NOx from the concentrated sulfuric acid product, which limits sale-ability of the acid, as well as the NOx removal efficiency of the process. Given the complexity and safety issues inherent in the cycle it is concluded that the acid product would not be directly saleable and, in this case, other flue gas purification schemes are better suited for SOx/NOx/Hg control when burning high sulfur coal, e.g. this project's Task 3 process or a traditional FGD and SCR.« less

  7. Microalgal biomass production and on-site bioremediation of carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide from flue gas using Chlorella sp. cultures.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Sheng-Yi; Kao, Chien-Ya; Huang, Tzu-Ting; Lin, Chia-Jung; Ong, Seow-Chin; Chen, Chun-Da; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    The growth and on-site bioremediation potential of an isolated thermal- and CO₂-tolerant mutant strain, Chlorella sp. MTF-7, were investigated. The Chlorella sp. MTF-7 cultures were directly aerated with the flue gas generated from coke oven of a steel plant. The biomass concentration, growth rate and lipid content of Chlorella sp. MTF-7 cultured in an outdoor 50-L photobioreactor for 6 days was 2.87 g L⁻¹ (with an initial culture biomass concentration of 0.75 g L⁻¹), 0.52 g L⁻¹ d⁻¹ and 25.2%, respectively. By the operation with intermittent flue gas aeration in a double-set photobioreactor system, average efficiency of CO₂ removal from the flue gas could reach to 60%, and NO and SO₂ removal efficiency was maintained at approximately 70% and 50%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that flue gas from coke oven could be directly introduced into Chlorella sp. MTF-7 cultures to potentially produce algal biomass and efficiently capture CO₂, NO and SO₂ from flue gas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Classification of the fragrant styles and evaluation of the aromatic quality of flue-cured tobacco leaves by machine-learning methods.

    PubMed

    Gu, Li; Xue, Lichun; Song, Qi; Wang, Fengji; He, Huaqin; Zhang, Zhongyi

    2016-12-01

    During commercial transactions, the quality of flue-cured tobacco leaves must be characterized efficiently, and the evaluation system should be easily transferable across different traders. However, there are over 3000 chemical compounds in flue-cured tobacco leaves; thus, it is impossible to evaluate the quality of flue-cured tobacco leaves using all the chemical compounds. In this paper, we used Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm together with 22 chemical compounds selected by ReliefF-Particle Swarm Optimization (R-PSO) to classify the fragrant style of flue-cured tobacco leaves, where the Accuracy (ACC) and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) were 90.95% and 0.80, respectively. SVM algorithm combined with 19 chemical compounds selected by R-PSO achieved the best assessment performance of the aromatic quality of tobacco leaves, where the PCC and MSE were 0.594 and 0.263, respectively. Finally, we constructed two online tools to classify the fragrant style and evaluate the aromatic quality of flue-cured tobacco leaf samples. These tools can be accessed at http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn/tobacco .

  9. Developing a dispersant spraying capability

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    In developing a national dispersant spraying capability, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has undertaken a modification program to enable the conventional offshore spraying gear to be mounted on almost any vessel of convenience. Smaller, more versatile inshore spraying vessels and pumps have been designed and built. With the popularization of concentrated dispersants, the inshore pumping equipment can be used aboard hovercraft for special application situations. A program of acquiring mobile dispersant storage tanks has been undertaken with auxiliary equipment that will facilitate the shipment of dispersants in bulk by air freight. Work also has commenced on extending the dispersant applicationmore » program to include the CCG fleet of helicopters.« less

  10. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  11. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  12. Work zone safety analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  13. California tree seed zones

    Treesearch

    John M. Buck; Ronald S. Adams; Jerrold Cone; M. Thompson Conkle; William J. Libby; Cecil J. Eden; Michel J. Knight

    1970-01-01

    California forest tree seed zones were established originally by Fowells (1946), with revisions proposed by Roy (1963) and Schubert (1966). The Forest Tree Seed Committee of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, has revised the original zones and updated the recording system described in the earlier reports. Fowells' (1946) Research Note...

  14. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  15. Longleaf pine site zones

    Treesearch

    Phillip J. Craul; John S. Kush; William D. Boyer

    2005-01-01

    The authors delineate six major climatic areas of the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) region. They subdivide these areas into 21 site zones, each of which is deemed homogenous with respect to climate, physiography, and soils. The site zones are mapped and their climate, physiography, and soils described. The authors recommend that plantings of...

  16. Iowa Work Zone Fatalities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    From March through November, the Iowa DOT may have up to 500 road construction work zones, and each of the department's maintenance garages may establish one or more short-term work zones per day. Couple that with the work of cities and counties, and...

  17. Deterministic influences exceed dispersal effects on hydrologically-connected microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Graham, Emily B; Crump, Alex R; Resch, Charles T; Fansler, Sarah; Arntzen, Evan; Kennedy, David W; Fredrickson, Jim K; Stegen, James C

    2017-04-01

    Subsurface groundwater-surface water mixing zones (hyporheic zones) have enhanced biogeochemical activity, but assembly processes governing subsurface microbiomes remain a critical uncertainty in understanding hyporheic biogeochemistry. To address this obstacle, we investigated (a) biogeographical patterns in attached and waterborne microbiomes across three hydrologically-connected, physicochemically-distinct zones (inland hyporheic, nearshore hyporheic and river); (b) assembly processes that generated these patterns; (c) groups of organisms that corresponded to deterministic changes in the environment; and (d) correlations between these groups and hyporheic metabolism. All microbiomes remained dissimilar through time, but consistent presence of similar taxa suggested dispersal and/or common selective pressures among zones. Further, we demonstrated a pronounced impact of deterministic assembly in all microbiomes as well as seasonal shifts from heterotrophic to autotrophic microorganisms associated with increases in groundwater discharge. The abundance of one statistical cluster of organisms increased with active biomass and respiration, revealing organisms that may strongly influence hyporheic biogeochemistry. Based on our results, we propose a conceptualization of hyporheic zone metabolism in which increased organic carbon concentrations during surface water intrusion support heterotrophy, which succumbs to autotrophy under groundwater discharge. These results provide new opportunities to enhance microbially-explicit ecosystem models describing hyporheic zone biogeochemistry and its influence over riverine ecosystem function. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (EGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k/sub 12/, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate after being normalized by the concentrations of organic acid and dissolved S(IV). K/sub 12/, not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen, is around 10/sup -3/ in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Co, Ni, and Fe and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnified these effects. No k/sub 12/more » greater than 4 x 10/sup -3/ or smaller than 0.1 x 10/sup -3/ has been observed. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics: (1) sulfate free radical is the major radical responsible to the degradation of organic acid; (2) ferrous generates sulfate radical by reacting with monoxypersulfate to enhance k/sub 12/; (3) manganous consumes sulfate radical to decrease k/sub 12/; (4) dissolved S(IV) competes with ferrous for monoxypersulfate and with manganous for sulfate radical to demonstrate the effects of dissolved S(IV) on k/sub 12/. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product, glutaric semialdehyde - the major retained product with low manganese, glutaric acid and valeric acids - the major retained product with high manganese, lower molecular weight mono- and dicarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.« less

  19. The effects of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system additives on solid by-products. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Huyck, K.A.; Tatum, G.S.; DeKraker, D.P.

    This study was designed to examine characteristics of by-products from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems that use performance-enhancing additives. The by-products were evaluated for handling, disposal, properties, and utilization potential. This study was designed to identify potential operation-limiting consequences (fatal flaws) caused by using FGD system additives. It was not intended to be an all-encompassing study of the possible process, environmental, and utilization circumstances at each plant. Seven utilities conducting additive testing agreed to provide samples for this study both before and during their testing. Solid samples were collected from FGD systems using the following additives: di-basic acid (DBA), whichmore » is a mixture of succinic, glutaric, and adipic acids; formate; sulfur; ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA); and chloride. Changes in handling properties that may alter process operations were observed at sites where DBS was used. Changes in leaching behavior, permeability and unconfined compressive strength (properties that affect by-product disposal properties) showed no clear trend for additive or system type. The intent of this study is to provide an overall assessment of potential system-limiting effects of FGD additive use. There were no overriding problems relating to disposal with the use of additives. However, properties of solids produced with and without additives should be tested at each site prior to use of an FGD system additive. This is necessary because of the variability in state disposal and permitting requirements and the influence of specific operating conditions on by-product properties.« less

  20. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-06-01

    Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline-alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation.

  1. Effective NOx remediation from a surrogate flue gas using the US NRL Electra electron beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tz. B.; Petrov, G. M.; Wolford, M. F.; Giuliani, J. L.; Ladouceur, H. D.; Hegeler, F.; Myers, M. C.; Sethian, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NOx) emission is under restrictive federal regulations because of its negative impact on atmosphere, biosphere, and human health. Therefore, its removal has been a subject of extensive research to develop new efficient and cost effective techniques that can be applied on an industrial scale. In this work, we study both experimentally and theoretically an effective removal of NOx pollutants from a surrogate flue gas (SFG) using high power electron beam (e-beam) pulses. SFG is a simulant for exhaust from coal combustion power plants (82% N2, 6% O2, 12% CO2, and ˜100 ppm of NOx). The pulsed electron beam is generated using the United States Naval Research Laboratory Electra facility, which delivers e-beams with energies of ˜500 keV and a power pulse duration of ˜140 ns. During the e-beam irradiation, the energetic electrons generate a non-equilibrium plasma containing chemically active species, which then react with NOx to form harmless substances. A non-equilibrium time-dependent model is developed to describe NOx remediation from SFG. The model combines e-beam deposition rates obtained by solving the electron Boltzmann equation and extensive plasma chemistry modeling, which follows the species on a time scale from sub-nanoseconds to a few seconds. NOx decomposition as a function of electron beam parameters is studied. It is demonstrated experimentally that short (ns) pulses are the most efficient for NOx removal. A sharp reduction of NOx was measured with e-beam power deposition increasing, following the trend predicted by the model, achieving a 20 fold reduction to ˜5 ppm at energy deposition ˜20 J/l.

  2. Testing CO2 Sequestration in an Alkaline Soil Treated with Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Identifying effective and economical methods for increasing carbon storage in soils is of interest for reducing soil CO2 fluxes to the atmosphere in order to partially offset anthropogenic CO2 contributions to climate change This study investigates an alternative strategy for increasing carbon retention in soils by accelerating calcite (CaCO3) precipitation and promoting soil organic carbon (SOC) complexation on mineral surfaces. The addition of calcium ion to soils with pH > 8, often found in arid and semi-arid regions, may accelerate the slow process of calcite precipitation. Increased ionic strength from addition of a soluble Ca source also suppresses microbial activity which oxidizes SOC to gaseous CO2. Through obtaining C mass balances in soil profiles, this study is quantifying the efficiency of gypsum amendments for mitigating C losses to the atmosphere. The objective of this study is to identify conditions in which inorganic and organic C sequestration is practical in semi-arid and arid soils by gypsum treatment. As an inexpensive calcium source, we proposed to use flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG), a byproduct of fossil fuel burning electric power plants. To test the hypothesis, laboratory column experiments have been conducted in calcite-buffered soil with addition of gypsum and FGDG. The results of several months of column monitoring are demonstrating that gypsum-treated soil have lowered amounts of soil organic carbon loss and increased inorganic carbon (calcite) production. The excess generation of FGDG relative to industrial and agricultural needs, FGDG, is currently regarded as waste. Thus application of FGDG application in some soils may be an effective and economical means for fixing CO2 in soil organic and inorganic carbon forms.Soil carbon cycle, with proposed increased C retention by calcite precipitation and by SOC binding onto soil mineral surfaces, with both processes driven by calcium released from gypsum dissolution.

  3. Cycle development and design for CO2 capture from flue gas by vacuum swing adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Webley, Paul A

    2008-01-15

    CO2 capture and storage is an important component in the development of clean power generation processes. One CO2 capture technology is gas-phase adsorption, specifically pressure (or vacuum) swing adsorption. The complexity of these processes makes evaluation and assessment of new adsorbents difficult and time-consuming. In this study, we have developed a simple model specifically targeted at CO2 capture by pressure swing adsorption and validated our model by comparison with data from a fully instrumented pilot-scale pressure swing adsorption process. The model captures nonisothermal effects as well as nonlinear adsorption and nitrogen coadsorption. Using the model and our apparatus, we have designed and studied a large number of cycles for CO2 capture. We demonstrate that by careful management of adsorption fronts and assembly of cycles based on understanding of the roles of individual steps, we are able to quickly assess the effect of adsorbents and process parameters on capture performance and identify optimal operating regimes and cycles. We recommend this approach in contrast to exhaustive parametric studies which tend to depend on specifics of the chosen cycle and adsorbent. We show that appropriate combinations of process steps can yield excellent process performance and demonstrate how the pressure drop, and heat loss, etc. affect process performance through their effect on adsorption fronts and profiles. Finally, cyclic temperature profiles along the adsorption column can be readily used to infer concentration profiles-this has proved to be a very useful tool in cyclic function definition. Our research reveals excellent promise for the application of pressure/vacuum swing adsorption technology in the arena of CO2 capture from flue gases.

  4. Decreasing Phosphorus Loss in Tile-Drained Landscapes Using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum.

    PubMed

    King, K W; Williams, M R; Dick, W A; LaBarge, G A

    2016-09-01

    Elevated phosphorus (P) loading from agricultural nonpoint-source pollution continues to impair inland waterbodies throughout the world. The application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to agricultural fields has been suggested to decrease P loading because of its high calcium content and P sorbing potential. A before-after control-impact paired field experiment was used to examine the water quality effects of successive FGD gypsum applications (2.24 Mg ha; 1 ton acre each) to an Ohio field with high soil test P levels (>480 ppm Mehlich-3 P). Analysis of covariance was used to compare event discharge, dissolved reactive P (DRP), and total P (TP) concentrations and loadings in surface runoff and tile discharge between the baseline period (86 precipitation events) and Treatment Period 1 (42 precipitation events) and Treatment Period 2 (84 precipitation events). Results showed that, after the first application of FGD gypsum, event mean DRP and TP concentrations in treatment field tile water were significantly reduced by 21 and 10%, respectively, and DRP concentrations in surface runoff were significantly reduced by 14%; however, no significant reductions were noted in DRP or TP loading. After the second application, DRP and TP loads were significantly reduced in surface runoff (DRP, 41%; TP 40%), tile discharge (DRP, 35%; TP, 15%), and combined (surface + tile) discharge (DRP, 36%; TP, 38%). These findings indicate that surface application of FGD gypsum can be used as a tool to address elevated P concentrations and loadings in drainage waters. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Development of Fly Ash-Based Sorbent to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrzak-Kucęba, I.; Nowak, W.

    In the present work the thermogravimetric characterization of the sorption of carbon dioxide on polymer-modifiedmesoporous materials (MCM-41) from fly ashes is described. In order to obtain MCM-41 materials from three different types fly ashes,(including CFB fly ash) hydrothermal processesusing the supernatantsof coal fly ashes and surfactantsas the structure-directing agents,have been carried out. The obtained mesoporous materials were subjected to polyethylenimine (PEI) modification by their impregnation to obtain samples with PEl contents of 30, 50 and 70%, respectively. CO2 sorption/desorption tests on loaded PEl samples were carried out in a flow of a mixture of gasses (CO2-1O%, O2-10%, N2-80%) at different temperatures: 25 and 75°C. The highest CO2 sorption value was obtained for the sample that contained the best-quality MCM-41 and was impregnatedwith PEI in the amount of 50%. This sample at a temperatureof 75°C can take CO2 in an amount equivalent to 111.7 mgCO2/g sample weight. Under the same conditions, but without PEI impregnation, this sample can take CO2 in an amount equivalent to 3.2 mgCO2/g sample weight, thus 35 times less. The research of CO2 adsorption on polymer-modified mesoporous materials from fly ashes carried out within this work has shown that these materials are characterized by high CO2 adsorption capacity under conditions typical of coal combustionboiler flue gas and have the chance of becoming an efficient adsorbent for application to post-combustion CO2 separation. For PEI impregnated samples, a different behaviour of adsorption/desorption profiles has also been observed (both sorption and desorptionprogressesvery rapidly).

  6. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline–alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation. PMID:26064038

  7. The impact of wet flue gas desulfurization scrubbing on mercury emissions from coal-fired power stations.

    PubMed

    Niksa, Stephen; Fujiwara, Naoki

    2005-07-01

    This article introduces a predictive capability for Hg retention in any Ca-based wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber, given mercury (Hg) speciation at the FGD inlet, the flue gas composition, and the sulphur dioxide (SO2) capture efficiency. A preliminary statistical analysis of data from 17 full-scale wet FGDs connects flue gas compositions, the extents of Hg oxidation at FGD inlets, and Hg retention efficiencies. These connections clearly signal that solution chemistry within the FGD determines Hg retention. A more thorough analysis based on thermochemical equilibrium yields highly accurate predictions for total Hg retention with no parameter adjustments. For the most reliable data, the predictions were within measurement uncertainties for both limestone and Mg/lime systems operating in both forced and natural oxidation mode. With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Information Collection Request (ICR) database, the quantitative performance was almost as good for the most modern FGDs, which probably conform to the very high SO2 absorption efficiencies assumed in the calculations. The large discrepancies for older FGDs are tentatively attributed to the unspecified SO2 capture efficiencies and operating temperatures and to the possible elimination of HCl in prescrubbers. The equilibrium calculations suggest that Hg retention is most sensitive to inlet HCl and O2 levels and the FGD temperature; weakly dependent on SO2 capture efficiency; and insensitive to HgCl2, NO, CA:S ratio, slurry dilution level in limestone FGDs, and MgSO3 levels in Mg/lime systems. Consequently, systems with prescrubbers to eliminate HCl probably retain less Hg than fully integrated FGDs. The analysis also predicts re-emission of Hg(O) but only for inlet O2 levels that are much lower than those in full-scale FGDs.

  8. MSW oxy-enriched incineration technology applied in China: combustion temperature, flue gas loss and economic considerations.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhe; Zhang, Shihong; Li, Xiangpeng; Shao, Jingai; Wang, Ke; Chen, Hanping

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the application prospect of MSW oxy-enriched incineration technology in China, the technical and economical analyses of a municipal solid waste (MSW) grate furnace with oxy-fuel incineration technology in comparison to co-incineration with coal are performed. The rated capacity of the grate furnace is 350 tonnes MSW per day. When raw MSW is burned, the amount of pure oxygen injected should be about 14.5 wt.% under 25% O2 oxy-fuel combustion conditions with the mode of oxygen supply determined by the actual situation. According to the isothermal combustion temperature (Ta), the combustion effect of 25% O2 oxy-enriched incineration (α = 1.43) is identical with that of MSW co-incineration with 20% mass ratio of coal (α = 1.91). However, the former is better than the latter in terms of plant cost, flue gas loss, and environmental impact. Despite the lower costs of MSW co-incineration with mass ratio of 5% and 10% coal (α = 1.91), 25% O2 oxy-enriched incineration (α = 1.43) is far more advantageous in combustion and pollutant control. Conventional combustion flue gas loss (q2) for co-incineration with 0% coal, 20% coal, 10% coal, 5% coal are around 17%, 13%, 14% and 15%, respectively, while that under the condition of 25% O2 oxy-enriched combustion is approximately 12% (α = 1.43). Clearly, q2 of oxy-enriched incineration is less than other methods under the same combustion conditions. High moisture content presents challenges for MSW incineration, therefore it is necessary to dry MSW prior to incineration, and making oxy-enriched incineration technology achieves higher combustion temperature and lower flue gas loss. In conclusion, based on technical and economical analysis, MSW oxy-enriched incineration retains obvious advantages and demonstrates great future prospects for MSW incineration in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Guidelines for the use of fiberglass reinforced plastic in utility FGD systems. [Flue gas desulfurization (FGD); contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Rapoza, R.J.; Vollmer, H.R.; Haberly, K.L.

    1992-11-01

    Fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) materials offer excellent corrosion-resistant properties and long-term cost advantages compared to exotic alloys or organic lining systems. This guideline document provides potential buyers of FRP FGD (flue gas desulfurization) equipment with enough knowledge of FRP materials and methods to make informed decisions when procuring FRP equipment or services. It is divided into the following chapters: application criteria, procurement strategies, FRP basics, guidelines for designing FRP equipment, quality management. A glossary and manufacturers information/recommendations are included.

  10. Integrating Waste Heat from CO 2 Removal and Coal-Fired Flue Gas to Increase Plant Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Irvin, Nick; Kowalczyk, Joseph

    In project DE-FE0007525, Southern Company Services demonstrated heat integration methods for the capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide produced from pulverized coal combustion. A waste heat recovery technology (termed High Efficiency System) from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America was integrated into an existing 25-MW amine-based CO 2 capture process (Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process®1) at Southern Company’s Plant Barry to evaluate improvements in the energy performance of the pulverized coal plant and CO 2 capture process. The heat integration system consists of two primary pieces of equipment: (1) the CO 2 Cooler which uses product CO 2 gas from themore » capture process to heat boiler condensate, and (2) the Flue Gas Cooler which uses air heater outlet flue gas to further heat boiler condensate. Both pieces of equipment were included in the pilot system. The pilot CO 2 Cooler used waste heat from the 25-MW CO 2 capture plant (but not always from product CO 2 gas, as intended). The pilot Flue Gas Cooler used heat from a slipstream of flue gas taken from downstream of Plant Barry’s air heater. The pilot also included a 0.25-MW electrostatic precipitator. The 25-MW High Efficiency System operated for approximately six weeks over a four month time period in conjunction with the 25-MW CO 2 capture facility at Plant Barry. Results from the program were used to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of full-scale implementation of this technology. The test program quantified energy efficiency improvements to a host power plant that could be realized due to the High Efficiency System. Through the execution of this project, the team verified the integrated operation of the High Efficiency System and Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process®. The ancillary benefits of the High Efficiency System were also quantified, including reduced water consumption, a decrease in toxic air emissions, and better overall air quality

  11. Removal potential of toxic 2378-substituted PCDD/F from incinerator flue gases by waste-derived activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2011-06-01

    The application of activated carbons has become a commonly used emission control protocol for the removal or adsorption of persistent organic pollutants from the flue gas streams of waste incinerators. In this study, the 2378-substituted PCDD/F removal efficiency of three types of activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of refuse derived fuel, textile waste and scrap tyre was investigated and compared with that of a commercial carbon. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor under a simulated flue gas at 275°C with a reaction period of four days. The PCDD/F in the solid matrices and exhaust gas, were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the absence of activated carbon adsorbent, there was a significant increase in the concentration of toxic PCDD/F produced in the reacted flyash, reaching up to 6.6 times higher than in the raw flyash. In addition, there was a substantial release of PCDD/F into the gas phase, which was found in the flue gas trapping system. By application of the different commercial, refuse derived fuel, textile and tyre activated carbons the total PCDD/F toxic equivalent removal efficiencies in the exhaust gas stream were 58%, 57%, 64% and 52%, respectively. In general, the removal of the PCDDs was much higher with an average of 85% compared to PCDFs at 41%. Analysis of the reacted activated carbons showed that there was some formation of PCDD/F, for instance, a total of 60.6 μg I-TEQ kg(-1) toxic PCDD/F was formed in the refuse derived fuel activated carbon compared to 34 μg I-TEQ kg(-1) in the commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of waste, therefore, showed good potential as a control material for PCDD/F emissions in waste incinerator flue gases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Migration of dispersive GPR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, M.H.; Oden, C.P.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and dielectric and magnetic relaxation phenomena cause electromagnetic propagation to be dispersive in earth materials. Both velocity and attenuation may vary with frequency, depending on the frequency content of the propagating energy and the nature of the relaxation phenomena. A minor amount of velocity dispersion is associated with high attenuation. For this reason, measuring effects of velocity dispersion in ground penetrating radar (GPR) data is difficult. With a dispersive forward model, GPR responses to propagation through materials with known frequency-dependent properties have been created. These responses are used as test data for migration algorithms that have been modified to handle specific aspects of dispersive media. When either Stolt or Gazdag migration methods are modified to correct for just velocity dispersion, the results are little changed from standard migration. For nondispersive propagating wavefield data, like deep seismic, ensuring correct phase summation in a migration algorithm is more important than correctly handling amplitude. However, the results of migrating model responses to dispersive media with modified algorithms indicate that, in this case, correcting for frequency-dependent amplitude loss has a much greater effect on the result than correcting for proper phase summation. A modified migration is only effective when it includes attenuation recovery, performing deconvolution and migration simultaneously.

  13. Impact of mixing time and energy on the dispersion effectiveness and droplets size of oil.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhong; Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Conmy, Robyn; Lee, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    The effects of mixing time and energy on Alaska Northern Slope (ANS) and diluted bitumen Cold Lake Blend (CLB) were investigated using EPA baffled flask test. Dispersion effectiveness and droplet size distribution were measured after 5-120 min. A modeling method to predict the mean droplet size was introduced for the first time to tentatively elucidate the droplet size breakup mechanism. The ANS dispersion effectiveness greatly increased with dispersant and mixing energy. However, little CLB dispersion was noted at small energy input (ε = 0.02 Watt/kg). With dispersant, the ANS droplet size distribution reached quasi-equilibrium within 10 min, but that of CLB seems to reach quasi-equilibrium after 120 min. Dispersants are assumed ineffective on high viscosity oils because dispersants do not penetrate them. We provide an alternative explanation based on the elongation time of the droplets and its residence in high intensity zones. When mixing energy is small, CLB did not disperse after 120 min, long enough to allow the surfactant penetration. Our findings suggest that dispersants may disperse high viscosity oils at a rougher sea state and a longer time. The latter could determine how far offshore one can intervene for effective responses to a high viscosity oil spill offshore. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrodynamics of CNT dispersion in high shear dispersion mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Hwang, Wook Ryol; Lee, Sang Bok; Jung, Seung-Il

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the carbon nanotube (CNT) fragmentation mechanism and dispersion in high shear homogenizers as a plausible dispersion technique, correlating with device geometries and processing conditions, for mass production of CNT-aluminum composites for automobile industries. A CNT dispersion model has been established in a turbulent flow regime and an experimental method in characterizing the critical yield stress of CNT flocs are presented. Considering CNT dispersion in ethanol as a model system, we tested two different geometries of high shear mixers — blade-stirrer type and rotor-stator type homogenizers — and reported the particle size distributions in time and the comparison has been made with the modeling approach and partly with the computational results.

  15. Habitable Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, D.; Lota, J.

    2012-12-01

    The location of the habitable zone around a star depends upon stellar luminosity and upon the properties of a potentially habitable planet such as its mass and near-surface volatile inventory. Stellar luminosity generally increases as a star ages whilst planetary properties change through time as a consequence of biological and geological evolution. Hence, the location of the habitable zone changes through time as a result of both stellar evolution and planetary evolution. Using the Earth's Phanerozoic temperature history as a constraint, it is shown that changes in our own habitable zone over the last 540 My have been dominated by planetary evolution rather than solar evolution. Furthermore, sparse data from earlier times suggests that planetary evolution may have dominated habitable zone development throughout our biosphere's history. Hence, the existence of a continuously habitable zone depends upon accidents of complex bio-geochemical evolution more than it does upon relatively simple stellar-evolution. Evolution of the inner margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations. Evolution of the outer margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations.

  16. Effect of water on sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gas in a direct current corona discharge reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiaxiang; Chi, Xiaochun; Dong, Limin

    2007-05-01

    A direct current (dc) corona discharge reactor composed of needle-plate electrodes in a glass container filled with flue gas was designed. To clarify the influence of water on discharge characteristics, water was introduced in the plasma reactor as electrode where plate electrode is immersed, under the application of dc voltage. Experiment results show that (1) corona wind forming between high-voltage needle electrode and water by corona discharge enhances the cleaning efficiency of flue gas due to the existence of water and the cleaning efficiency will increase with the increase of applied dc voltage within definite range and (2) both removal efficiencies of NOx and SO2 increased in the presence of water, which reach up to 98% for SO2, and about 85% for NOx under suitable conditions. These results play an important role in flue gas cleanup research.

  17. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  18. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich

    2010-06-08

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  19. Asphaltene dispersants as demulsification aids

    SciTech Connect

    Manek, M.B.

    1995-11-01

    Destabilization of petroleum asphaltenes may cause a multitude of problems in crude oil recovery and production. One major problem is their agglomeration at the water-oil interface of crude oil emulsions. Once agglomeration occurs, destabilized asphaltenes can form a thick pad in the dehydration equipment, which significantly reduces the demulsification rate. Certain polymeric dispersants increase asphaltene solubilization in hydrocarbon media, and when used in conjunction with emulsion breakers, facilitate the demulsification process. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how asphaltene dispersants can efficiently inhibit pad formation and help reduce demulsifier dosage. Criteria for dispersant application and selection are discussed, whichmore » include the application of a novel laboratory technique to assess asphaltene stabilization in the crude oil. The technique monitors asphaltene agglomeration while undergoing titration with an incompatible solvent (precipitant). The method was used to evaluate stabilization of asphaltenes in the crude oil and to screen asphaltene dispersants.« less

  20. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  1. Speeds in school zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    School speed zones are frequently requested traffic controls for school areas, based on the common belief : that if the transportation agency would only install a reduced speed limit, then drivers would no longer : speed through the area. This resear...

  2. Technoeconomic Optimization of Waste Heat Driven Forward Osmosis for Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Bartholomew, Timothy V; Mauter, Meagan S

    With the Environmental Protection Agency’s recent Effluent Limitation Guidelines for Steam Electric Generators, power plants are having to install and operate new wastewater technologies. Many plants are evaluating desalination technologies as possible compliance options. However, the desalination technologies under review that can reduce wastewater volume or treat to a zero-liquid discharges standard have a significant energy penalty to the plant. Waste heat, available from the exhaust gas or cooling water from coal-fired power plants, offers an opportunity to drive wastewater treatment using thermal desalination technologies. One such technology is forward osmosis (FO). Forward osmosis utilizes an osmotic pressure gradient tomore » passively pull water from a saline or wastewater stream across a semi-permeable membrane and into a more concentrated draw solution. This diluted draw solution is then fed into a distillation column, where the addition of low temperature waste heat can drive the separation to produce a reconcentrated draw solution and treated water for internal plant reuse. The use of low-temperature waste heat decouples water treatment from electricity production and eliminates the link between reducing water pollution and increasing air emissions from auxiliary electricity generation. In order to evaluate the feasibility of waste heat driven FO, we first build a model of an FO system for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater treatment at coal-fired power plants. This model includes the FO membrane module, the distillation column for draw solution recovery, and waste heat recovery from the exhaust gas. We then add a costing model to account for capital and operating costs of the forward osmosis system. We use this techno-economic model to optimize waste heat driven FO for the treatment of FGD wastewater. We apply this model to three case studies: the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) 550 MW model coal fired power plant without

  3. Utilization of the gypsum from a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Patel, V.; Lytle, J.M.; Chou, S.J.; Carty, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have been developing a process which converts FGD-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer with precipitated calcium carbonate as a by-product during the conversion. Preliminary cost estimates suggest that the process is economically feasible when ammonium sulfate crystals are produced in a granular size (1.2 to 3.3 mm), instead of a powder form. However, if additional revenue from the sale of the PCC for higher-value commercial application is applicable, this could further improve the economics of the process. Ammonium sulfate is known to be an excellent source of nitrogen and sulfur in fertilizer for corn and wheat production. It was not known what impurities might co-exist in ammonium sulfate derived from scrubber gypsum. Before the product could be recommended for use on farm land, the impurities and their impact on soil productivity had to be assessed. The objectives of this phase of the study were to evaluate the chemical properties of ammonium sulfate made from the FGD-gypsum, to estimate its effects on soil productivity, and to survey the marketability of the two products. The results of this phase of the study indicated that the impurities in the ammonium sulfate produced would not impose any practical limitations on its use at application levels used by farmers. The market survey showed that the sale price of solid ammonium sulfate fertilizer increased significantly from 1974 at $110/ton to 1998 at $187/ton. Utilities currently pay $16 to $20/ton for the calcium carbonate they use in their flue gas scrubber system. The industries making animal-feed grade calcium supplement pay $30/ton to $67/m-ton for their source of calcium carbonate. Paper, paint, and plastic industries pay as much as $200 to $300/ton for their calcium carbonate filers. The increased sale price of solid ammonium sulfate fertilizer and the possible additional revenue from the sale of the PCC by-product could further improve the economics of producing ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum.

  4. Demonstration of Advanced CO 2 Capture Process Improvements for Coal-Fired Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, John

    This document summarizes the activities of Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0026590, “Demonstration of Advanced CO 2 Capture Process Improvements for Coal-Fired Flue Gas” during the performance period of October 1, 2015 through May 31, 2017. This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) was the prime contractor and co-funder of the project. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America (MHIA) and AECOM were project team members. The overall project objective was to improve costs, energy requirements, and performance of an existing amine-based CO 2 capture process. This will occur via improvements inmore » three areas: 1. Reboiler design – The first objective of the program was to demonstrate performance of an integrated stripper/reboiler (termed Built-in Reboiler, or BIR) to reduce footprint, capital costs, and integration issues of the current technology. 2. Particulate management – The second objective was to carry out a Particulate Matter Management (PMM) test. This has the potential to reduce operating costs and capital costs due to the reduced or eliminated need for mechanical filtration. 3. Solvent – The third objective was to carry out a new solvent test plan (referred to as NSL) to demonstrate a new solvent (termed New Solvent A), which is expected to reduce regeneration steam. The bulk price is also expected to be lower than KS-1, which is the current solvent used in this process. NSL testing would include baseline testing, optimization, long term testing, solvent reclamation testing, and final inspection. These combine to form the Advanced Carbon Capture (ACC) technology. Much of this work will be applicable to generic solvent processes, especially in regards to improved reboiler design, and focused to meet or exceed the DOE’s overall carbon capture performance goals of 90% CO 2 capture rate with 95% CO 2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO 2 by 2025 and at

  5. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  6. A generic analysis of energy use and solvent selection for CO2 separation from post-combustion flue gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic calculation was performed to determine the theoretical minimum energy used to separate CO2 from a coal combustion flue gas in a typical adsorption-desorption system. Under ideal conditions, the minimum energy required to separate CO2 from post-combustion flue gas and produce pure CO2 at 1 atmospheric pressure was only about 1183 kJ/kg CO2. This amount could double with the addition of the driving forces of mass and heat transfer and the adverse impacts of absorption heat release on adsorption capacity. Thermodynamic analyses were also performed for the aqueous amine-based absorption process. Two CO2 reaction mechanisms, the carbamate formation reaction with primary/secondary amines and the CO2 hydration reaction with tertiary amines, were included in the absorption reaction. The reaction heat, sensible heat, and stripping heat were all important to the total heat requirement. The heat use of an ideal tertiary amine amounted to 2786 kJ/kg, compared to 3211 kJ/kg for an ideal primary amine. The heat usage of an ideal amine was about 20% lower than that of commercially available amines. Optimizing the absorption process configuration could further reduce energy use. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2008 AIChE Spring National Meeting (New Orleans, LA 4/6-10/2008).

  7. Acidity of vapor plume from cooling tower mixed with flue gases emitted from coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Hlawiczka, Stanislaw; Korszun, Katarzyna; Fudala, Janina

    2016-06-01

    Acidity of products resulting from the reaction of flue gas components emitted from a coal-fired power plant with water contained in a vapor plume from a wet cooling tower was analyzed in a close vicinity of a power plant (710 m from the stack and 315 m from the cooling tower). Samples of this mixture were collected using a precipitation funnel where components of the mixed plumes were discharged from the atmosphere with the rainfall. To identify situations when the precipitation occurred at the same time as the wind directed the mixed vapor and flue gas plumes above the precipitation funnel, an ultrasound anemometer designed for 3D measurements of the wind field located near the funnel was used. Precipitation samples of extremely high acidity were identified - about 5% of samples collected during 12 months showed the acidity below pH=3 and the lowest recorded pH was 1.4. During the measurement period the value of pH characterizing the background acidity of the precipitation was about 6. The main outcome of this study was to demonstrate a very high, and so far completely underestimated, potential of occurrence of episodes of extremely acid depositions in the immediate vicinity of a coal-fired power plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Survey of flue gas desulfurization systems: Duck Creek Station, Central Illinois Light Co. Final report, Jul-Dec 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Laseke, B.A. Jr.

    The report presents the results of a survey of operational flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. The FGD system installed on Unit 1 at the Duck Creek Station of Central Illinois Light Company is described in terms of design and performance. The system consists of four parallel, wet-limestone, rod-deck scrubber modules designed for 25% capacity each, providing a total sulfur dioxide removal efficiency of 85%. The bottom ash, fly ash, and scrubbing wastes are disposed of in a sludge pond lined with a natural impermeable material. The first module of this four modulemore » FGD system was placed in service on July 1, 1976, and operated intermittently throughout the remainder of the year and for approximately one month in early 1977. On July 23, 1978, the three remaining modules were completed and all four modules were placed in the gas path for treatment of high sulfur flue gas.« less

  9. Effects of Php Gene-Associated versus Induced Resistance to Tobacco Cyst Nematode in Flue-Cured Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Charles S.; Eisenback, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-inducing compound acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and the plant-growth promoting rhizobacterial mixture Bacillus subtilis A13 and B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a (GB99+GB122) were assessed on the reproduction of a tobacco cyst nematode (TCN- Globodera tabacum solanacearum) under greenhouse conditions. Two sets of two independent experiments were conducted, each involving soil or root sampling. Soil sample experiments included flue-cured tobacco cultivars with (Php+: NC71 and NC102) and without (Php-: K326 and K346) a gene (Php) suppressing TCN parasitism. Root sample experiments examined TCN root parasitism of NC71 and K326. Cultivars possessing the Php gene (Php+) were compared with Php- cultivars to assess the effects of resistance mediated via Php gene vs. induced resistance to TCN. GB99+GB122 consistently reduced nematode reproductive ratio on both Php+ and Php- cultivars, but similar effects of ASM across Php- cultivars were less consistent. In addition, ASM application resulted in leaf yellowing and reduced root weight. GB99+GB122 consistently reduced nematode development in roots of both Php+ and Php- cultivars, while similar effects of ASM were frequently less consistent. The results of this study indicate that GB99+GB122 consistently reduced TCN reproduction in all flue-cured tobacco cultivars tested, while the effects of ASM were only consistent in Php+ cultivars. Under most circumstances, GB99+GB122 suppressed nematode reproduction more consistently than ASM compared to the untreated control. PMID:22736824

  10. Evaluating the energy performance of a hybrid membrane-solvent process for flue gas carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuma, Victor A.; Li, Zhiwei; Hopkinson, David

    In this study, a particularly energy intensive step in the conventional amine absorption process to remove carbon dioxide is solvent regeneration using a steam stripping column. An attractive alternative to reduce the energy requirement is gas pressurized stripping, in which a high pressure noncondensable gas is used to strip CO 2 off the rich solvent stream. The gas pressurized stripping column product, having CO 2 at high concentration and high partial pressure, can then be regenerated readily using membrane separation. In this study, we performed an energetic analysis in the form of total equivalent work and found that, for capturingmore » CO 2 from flue gas, this hybrid stripping process consumes 49% less energy compared to the base case conventional MEA absorption/steam stripping process. We also found the amount of membrane required in this process is much less than required for direct CO 2 capture from the flue gas: approximately 100-fold less than a previously published two-stage cross-flow scheme, mostly due to the more favorable pressure ratio and CO 2 concentration. There does exist a trade-off between energy consumption and required membrane area that is most strongly affected by the gas pressurized stripper operating pressure. While initial analysis looks promising from both an energy requirement and membrane unit capital cost, the viability of this hybrid process depends on the availability of advanced, next generation gas separation membranes to perform the stripping gas regeneration.« less

  11. Regenerable cobalt oxide loaded magnetosphere catalyst from fly ash for mercury removal in coal combustion flue gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianping; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2014-12-16

    To remove Hg(0) in coal combustion flue gas and eliminate secondary mercury pollution of the spent catalyst, a new regenerable magnetic catalyst based on cobalt oxide loaded magnetospheres from fly ash (Co-MF) was developed. The catalyst, with an optimal loading of 5.8% cobalt species, attained approximately 95% Hg(0) removal efficiency at 150 °C under simulated flue gas atmosphere. O2 could enhance the Hg(0) removal activity of magnetospheres catalyst via the Mars-Maessen mechanism. SO2 displayed an inhibitive effect on Hg(0) removal capacity. NO with lower concentration could promote the Hg(0) removal efficiency. However, when increasing the NO concentration to 300 ppm, a slightly inhibitive effect of NO was observed. In the presence of 10 ppm of HCl, greater than 95.5% Hg(0) removal efficiency was attained, which was attributed to the formation of active chlorine species on the surface. H2O presented a seriously inhibitive effect on Hg(0) removal efficiency. Repeated oxidation-regeneration cycles demonstrated that the spent Co-MF catalyst could be regenerated effectively via thermally treated at 400 °C for 2 h.

  12. Removal of elemental mercury from flue gas by thermally activated ammonium persulfate in a bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangxian; Wang, Qian

    2014-10-21

    In this article, a novel technique on removal of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from flue gas by thermally activated ammonium persulfate ((NH4)(2)S(2)O(8)) has been developed for the first time. Some experiments were carried out in a bubble column reactor to evaluate the effects of process parameters on Hg(0) removal. The mechanism and kinetics of Hg(0) removal are also studied. The results show that the parameters, (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration, activation temperature and solution pH, have significant impacts on Hg(0) removal. The parameters, Hg(0), SO2 and NO concentration, only have small effects on Hg(0) removal. Hg(0) is removed by oxidations of (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8), sulfate and hydroxyl free radicals. When (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration is more than 0.1 mol/L and solution pH is lower than 9.71, Hg(0) removal by thermally activated (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) meets a pseudo-first-order fast reaction with respect to Hg(0). However, when (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration is less than 0.1 mol/L or solution pH is higher than 9.71, the removal process meets a moderate speed reaction with respect to Hg(0). The above results indicate that this technique is a feasible method for emission control of Hg(0) from flue gas.

  13. SOXAL combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} flue gas control demonstration. Quarterly report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    AQUATECH Systems a business unit of Allied-Signal Inc., proposes to demonstrate the technical viability and cost effectiveness of the SOXAL process a combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control process on a 3 MW equivalent flue gas slip stream from Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, Dunkirk Steam Station Boiler No. 4, a coal fired boiler. The SOXAL process combines 90+% sulfur dioxide removal from the flue gas using a sodium based scrubbing solution and regeneration of the spent scrubbing liquor using AQUATECH Systems` proprietary bipolar membrane technology. This regeneration step recovers a stream of sulfur dioxide suitable for subsequent processing to salable sulfurmore » or sulfuric acid. Additionally 90+% control of NO{sub x} gases can be achieved in combination with conventional urea/methanol injection of NO{sub 2} gas into the duct. The SOXAL process is applicable to both utility and industrial scale boilers using either high or low sulfur coal. The SOXAL demonstration Program began September 10, 1991 and is approximately 22 months in duration. During the 6 months of scheduled operations period, expected to begin January 1992, data will be collected from the SOXAL system to define: SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control efficiencies; Current efficiency for the regeneration unit; Sulfate oxidation in the absorber; Make-up reagent rates; Product quality including concentrations and compositions; System integration and control philosophy; and Membrane stability and performance with respect to foulants.« less

  14. SOXAL combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} flue gas control demonstration. Quarterly report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    AQUATECH Systems, a business unit of Allied-Signal Inc., proposes to demonstrate the technical viability and cost effectiveness of the SOXAL process a combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control process on a 3 MW equivalent flue gas slip stream from Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, Dunkirk Steam Station Boiler No. 4, a coal fired boiler. The SOXAL process combines 90+% sulfur dioxide removal from the flue gas using a sodium based scrubbing solution and regeneration of the spent scrubbing liquor using AQUATECH Systems` proprietary bipolar membrane technology. This regeneration step recovers a stream of sulfur dioxide suitable for subsequent processing to salable sulfurmore » or sulfuric acid. Additionally 90+% control of NO{sub x} gases can be achieved in combination with conventional urea/methanol injection of NO{sub 2} gas into the duct. The SOXAL process is applicable to both utility and industrial scale boilers using either high or low sulfur coal. The SOXAL demonstration Program began September 10, 1991 and is approximately 22 months in duration.« less

  15. SOXAL combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} flue gas control demonstration. Quarterly report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    AQUATECH Systems a business unit of Allied-Signal Inc., proposes to demonstrate the technical viability and cost effectiveness of the SOXAL process a combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control process on a 2--3 MW equivalent flue gas slip stream from Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, Dunkirk Steam Station Boiler {number_sign}4, a coal fired boiler. The SOXAL process combines 90+% sulfur dioxide removal from the flue gas using a sodium based scrubbing solution and regeneration of the spent scrubbing liquor using AQUATECH Systems` proprietary bipolar membrane technology. This regeneration step recovers a stream of sulfur dioxide suitable for subsequent processing to salable sulfur ormore » sulfuric acid. Additionally 90+% control of NO{sub x} gases can be achieved in combination with conventional urea/methanol injection of NO{sub 2} gas into the duct. The SOXAL process is applicable to both utility and industrial scale boilers using either high or low sulfur coal. The SOXAL Demonstration Program began September 10, 1991 and is approximately 22 months in duration.« less

  16. Biomass fast pyrolysis for bio-oil production in a fluidized bed reactor under hot flue atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Wang, Xiang; Bai, Xueyuan; Li, Zhihe; Zhang, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Fast pyrolysis experiments of corn stalk were performed to investigate the optimal pyrolysis conditions of temperature and bed material for maximum bio-oil production under flue gas atmosphere. Under the optimized pyrolysis conditions, furfural residue, xylose residue and kelp seaweed were pyrolyzed to examine their yield distributions of products, and the physical characteristics of bio-oil were studied. The best flow rate of the flue gas at selected temperature is obtained, and the pyrolysis temperature at 500 degrees C and dolomite as bed material could give a maximum bio-oil yield. The highest bio-oil yield of 43.3% (W/W) was achieved from corn stalk under the optimal conditions. Two main fractions were recovered from the stratified bio-oils: light oils and heavy oils. The physical properties of heavy oils from all feedstocks varied little. The calorific values of heavy oils were much higher than that of light oils. The pyrolysis gas could be used as a gaseous fuel due to a relatively high calorific value of 6.5-8.5 MJ/m3.

  17. The acclimation of Chlorella to high-level nitrite for potential application in biological NOx removal from industrial flue gases.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianpei; Xu, Gang; Rong, Junfeng; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Giordano, Mario; Wang, Qiang

    2016-05-20

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are the components of fossil flue gas that give rise to the greatest environmental concerns. This study evaluated the ability of the green algae Chlorella to acclimate to high level of NOx and the potential utilization of Chlorella strains in biological NOx removal (DeNOx) from industrial flue gases. Fifteen Chlorella strains were subject to high-level of nitrite (HN, 176.5 mmolL(-1) nitrite) to simulate exposure to high NOx. These strains were subsequently divided into four groups with respect to their ability to tolerate nitrite (excellent, good, fair, and poor). One strain from each group was selected to evaluate their photosynthetic response to HN condition, and the nitrite adaptability of the four Chlorella strains were further identified by using chlorophyll fluorescence. The outcome of our experiments shows that, although high concentrations of nitrite overall negatively affect growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella strains, the degree of nitrite tolerance is a strain-specific feature. Some Chlorella strains have an appreciably higher ability to acclimate to high-level of nitrite. Acclimation is achieved through a three-step process of restrict, acclimate, and thriving. Notably, Chlorella sp. C2 was found to have a high tolerance and to rapidly acclimate to high concentrations of nitrite; it is therefore a promising candidate for microalgae-based biological NOx removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Study on the impact of industrial flue gases on the PCDD/Fs congener profile in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Węgiel, Małgorzata; Chrząszcz, Ryszard; Maślanka, Anna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of emissions from combustion processes from sinter, medical, waste and sewage waste incineration plants on the PCDD and PCDF congener profile in ambient air in Krakow (city in Poland). The subject matter of the study were air samples from the outskirts and the city center. It was found that in flue gases from industrial sources and in ambient air the share of PCDF congeners in relation to the total content of PCDD/Fs was higher than the share of PCDDs. However, in air samples collected in the city center, this relationship was reversed. The PCDD congener profiles in flue gases and in air samples are comparable. However, in the samples from the city centre, the share of OCDD is significantly higher and amounts to about 80%. The PCDF congener shares show higher spatial diversity, although in all the analyzed air samples, ODCF and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8 HpCDF dominated. Analyzing the share of congeners in regard to the sum of PCDDs/Fs a mutual resemblance of air from the suburbs, exhaust gases from the sinter ore and sewage sludge incinerator plant was observed. The study showed a similarity between the profile of congeners in air from the city centre and exhaust gases from the medical waste incinerator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating the energy performance of a hybrid membrane-solvent process for flue gas carbon dioxide capture

    DOE PAGES

    Kusuma, Victor A.; Li, Zhiwei; Hopkinson, David; ...

    2016-10-13

    In this study, a particularly energy intensive step in the conventional amine absorption process to remove carbon dioxide is solvent regeneration using a steam stripping column. An attractive alternative to reduce the energy requirement is gas pressurized stripping, in which a high pressure noncondensable gas is used to strip CO 2 off the rich solvent stream. The gas pressurized stripping column product, having CO 2 at high concentration and high partial pressure, can then be regenerated readily using membrane separation. In this study, we performed an energetic analysis in the form of total equivalent work and found that, for capturingmore » CO 2 from flue gas, this hybrid stripping process consumes 49% less energy compared to the base case conventional MEA absorption/steam stripping process. We also found the amount of membrane required in this process is much less than required for direct CO 2 capture from the flue gas: approximately 100-fold less than a previously published two-stage cross-flow scheme, mostly due to the more favorable pressure ratio and CO 2 concentration. There does exist a trade-off between energy consumption and required membrane area that is most strongly affected by the gas pressurized stripper operating pressure. While initial analysis looks promising from both an energy requirement and membrane unit capital cost, the viability of this hybrid process depends on the availability of advanced, next generation gas separation membranes to perform the stripping gas regeneration.« less

  20. Thermo Dynamics and Economics Evaluations: Substitution of the Extraction Steam with the Wasted Heat of Flue Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lifen; Qiu, Lixia; Li, Jinping; Li, Dongxiong

    2018-01-01

    A new heat supplying system is proposed that utilizes the exhausted gas of the boiler to substitute the extraction steam from the turbine as the driving force for the adsorption heat pump regarding the recovery of the condensation heat of power plant. However, our system is not subject to the low efficiency of wasted heat utilization due to the low temperature of flue gas, which hence possesses higher performance in COP factors in the utilization of heat than that of the conventional techniques of using flues gas, so the amount of extracted gas from turbine can be reduced and the power generate rate be enhanced. Subsequently, detailed evaluation of the performance of this system in the point of views of thermodynamics and economics are presented in this work. For the instance of a 330 MW heat supply unit, 5 sample cities are chosen to demonstrate and confirm our economic analysis. It is revealed that when the heating coefficient of the heat pump is 1.8, the investment payback periods for these 5 cities are within the range of 2.4 to 4.8 years, which are far below the service year of the heat pump, demonstrating remarkable economic benefits for our system.

  1. Alloying effect of copper on the corrosion properties of low-alloy steel for flue gas desulfurization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Hong; Park, Sun-Ah; Kim, Jung-Gu; Shin, Kee-Sam; He, Yinsheng

    2015-03-01

    The alloying effect of Cu for a flue gas desulfurization materials was investigated using the electrochemical methods in the modified green death solution and the surface analyses. The test results demonstrated that the densely formed rust layer with high metallic Cu content improves the corrosion resistance of Cu-containing steel in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) environment. The rust layer on the surface of the 0.02 wt% Cu steel, which has an insufficient Cu content, was less protective than others. The 0.05 wt% Cu steel represented the highest corrosion resistance due to the formation of the densely formed rust layer with optimum Cu content. Because the free standing Cu2S precipitates had the insoluble characteristic in highly acidic solution, it produced the relatively porous Cu-enriched layer on the 0.08 wt% Cu steel surface. From these phenomena, the corrosion resistance of specimen decreased as the Cu content of specimen increased from 0.05 wt% to 0.08 wt%.

  2. Effects of X-ray irradiation on the microbial growth and quality of flue-cured tobacco during aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Xu, Z. C.; Fan, J. L.; Wang, Y.; Tian, Z. J.; Chen, Y. T.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray irradiation was evaluated for improving microbial safety and the quality of flue-cured tobacco during aging. Tobacco samples were irradiated at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 kGy and stored for 12 months under normal storage conditions or in a high-humidity (RH>70%) room. Microbiological data indicated that the population of total aerobic bacteria was significantly decreased with increasing irradiation doses. In particular, a dose of 2 kGy was effective for the decontamination of fungi from the tested samples, with a 0.93 log CFU/g reduction for bacteria. The control and 1 kGy X-ray treated tobacco samples were became rotted and moldy after the 12th month, whereas those treated with 2, 3 and 5 kGy had no detectable mold during 12 months of storage at high humidity. Chemical measurements showed that irradiation up to 3 kGy did not affect the total nitrogen, nicotine, reducing and total sugars, ratio of total nitrogen to nicotine and sugar-to-nicotine ratio. Furthermore, sensory evaluation results also showed that X-ray irradiation did not affect sensory scores with irradiation at a dose <3 kGy. Based on these results, X-ray irradiation dose in the range of 2-3 kGy is recommended for the decontamination of fungi from flue-cured tobacco.

  3. Analysis of mixing conditions and multistage irradiation impact on NOx removal efficiency in the electron beam flue gas treatment process.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, Andrzej; Dobrowolski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    In the process of electron beam flue gas treatment (EBFGT), most energy is spent on NO x removal. The dose distribution in the reactor is not uniform and the flue gas flow pattern plays an important role in the process efficiency. It was found that proper construction of the reactor may increase the energy efficiency of the process. The impact of the number of irradiation stages and mixing conditions on NO x removal efficiency was investigated for an ideal case and a practical solution was presented and compared with previously known EBFGT reactor constructions. The research was performed by means of computational fluid dynamics methods in combination with empirical Wittig formula. Two versions of dose distribution were taken for calculations. The results of the research show that for an ideal case, application of multistage irradiation and interstage mixing may reduce the energy consumption in the process by up to 39%. On the other side, simulation of reactor construction modification for two-stage irradiation results in 25% energy consumption reduction. The results of presented case study may be applied for improving the existing reactors and proper design of future installations.

  4. Hydroquinone and Quinone-Grafted Porous Carbons for Highly Selective CO2 Capture from Flue Gases and Natural Gas Upgrading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Krishna, Rajamani; Yang, Jiangfeng; Deng, Shuguang

    2015-08-04

    Hydroquinone and quinone functional groups were grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework via the Friedel-Crafts reaction to develop more efficient adsorbents for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases and natural gas. The oxygen-doped porous carbons were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. CO2, CH4, and N2 adsorption isotherms were measured and correlated with the Langmuir model. An ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) selectivity for the CO2/N2 separation of 26.5 (298 K, 1 atm) was obtained on the hydroquinone-grafted carbon, which is 58.7% higher than that of the pristine porous carbon, and a CO2/CH4 selectivity value of 4.6 (298 K, 1 atm) was obtained on the quinone-grafted carbon (OAC-2), which represents a 28.4% improvement over the pristine porous carbon. The highest CO2 adsorption capacity on the oxygen-doped carbon adsorbents is 3.46 mmol g(-1) at 298 K and 1 atm. In addition, transient breakthrough simulations for CO2/CH4/N2 mixture separation were conducted to demonstrate the good separation performance of the oxygen-doped carbons in fixed bed adsorbers. Combining excellent adsorption separation properties and low heats of adsorption, the oxygen-doped carbons developed in this work appear to be very promising for flue gas treatment and natural gas upgrading.

  5. Mapping air quality zones for coastal urban centers.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Brian; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Thé, Jesse; Munshed, Mohammad; Faisal, Shah; Abdullah, Meshal; Al Aseed, Athari

    2017-05-01

    This study presents a new method that incorporates modern air dispersion models allowing local terrain and land-sea breeze effects to be considered along with political and natural boundaries for more accurate mapping of air quality zones (AQZs) for coastal urban centers. This method uses local coastal wind patterns and key urban air pollution sources in each zone to more accurately calculate air pollutant concentration statistics. The new approach distributes virtual air pollution sources within each small grid cell of an area of interest and analyzes a puff dispersion model for a full year's worth of 1-hr prognostic weather data. The difference of wind patterns in coastal and inland areas creates significantly different skewness (S) and kurtosis (K) statistics for the annually averaged pollutant concentrations at ground level receptor points for each grid cell. Plotting the S-K data highlights grouping of sources predominantly impacted by coastal winds versus inland winds. The application of the new method is demonstrated through a case study for the nation of Kuwait by developing new AQZs to support local air management programs. The zone boundaries established by the S-K method were validated by comparing MM5 and WRF prognostic meteorological weather data used in the air dispersion modeling, a support vector machine classifier was trained to compare results with the graphical classification method, and final zones were compared with data collected from Earth observation satellites to confirm locations of high-exposure-risk areas. The resulting AQZs are more accurate and support efficient management strategies for air quality compliance targets effected by local coastal microclimates. A novel method to determine air quality zones in coastal urban areas is introduced using skewness (S) and kurtosis (K) statistics calculated from grid concentrations results of air dispersion models. The method identifies land-sea breeze effects that can be used to manage local air

  6. What is the Brillouin zone of an anisotropic photonic crystal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivarajah, P.; Maznev, A. A.; Ofori-Okai, B. K.; Nelson, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of the Brillouin zone (BZ) in relation to a photonic crystal fabricated in an optically anisotropic material is explored both experimentally and theoretically. In experiment we used femtosecond laser pulses to excite THz polaritons and image their propagation in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate photonic crystal (PhC) slabs. We directly measured the dispersion relation inside PhCs and observed that the lowest band gap expected to form at the BZ boundary forms inside the BZ in the anisotropic lithium niobate PhC. Our analysis shows that in an anisotropic material the BZ—defined as the Wigner-Seitz cell in the reciprocal lattice—is no longer bounded by Bragg planes and thus does not conform to the original definition of the BZ by Brillouin. We construct an alternative Brillouin zone defined by Bragg planes and show its utility in identifying features of the dispersion bands. We show that for an anisotropic two-dimensional PhC without dispersion, the Bragg plane BZ can be constructed by applying the Wigner-Seitz method to a stretched or compressed reciprocal lattice. We also show that in the presence of the dispersion in the underlying material or in a slab waveguide, the Bragg planes are generally represented by curved surfaces rather than planes. The concept of constructing a BZ with Bragg planes should prove useful in understanding the formation of dispersion bands in anisotropic PhCs and in selectively tailoring their optical properties.

  7. Mushy zone modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Smith, Richard N.; Marsh, Steven P.; Kuklinski, Robert

    A key element of mushy zone modeling is the description of the microscopic evolution of the lengthscales within the mushy zone and the influence of macroscopic transport processes. This paper describes some recent progress in developing a mean-field statistical theory of phase coarsening in adiabatic mushy zones. The main theoretical predictions are temporal scaling laws that indicate that average lengthscale increases as time 1/3, a self-similar distribution of mushy zone lengthscales based on spherical solid particle shapes, and kinetic rate constants which provide the dependences of the coarsening process on material parameters and the volume fraction of the solid phase. High precision thermal decay experiments are described which verify aspects of the theory in pure material mushy zones held under adiabatic conditions. The microscopic coarsening theory is then integrated within a macroscopic heat transfer model of one-dimensional alloy solidification, using the Double Integral Method. The method demonstrates an ability to predict the influence of macroscopic heat transfer on the evolution of primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings in Al-Cu alloys. Finally, some suggestions are made for future experimental and theoretical studies required in developing comprehensive solidification processing models.

  8. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  9. Pollen Dispersion Forecast At Regional Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangin, A.; Asthma Forecast System Team

    The forecast of the pollen concentration is generally based on an identification of sim- ilar coincidence of measured pollen at given points and meteorological data that is searched in an archive and which, with the help of experts, allows building a predicted value. This may be classified under the family of statistical approaches for forecast- ing. While palynologists make these methods more and more accurate with the help of innovative techniques of regression against empirical rules and/or evolving mathe- matical structures (e.g. neural networks), the spatial dispersion of the pollen is not or poorly considered, mainly because it requires a lot of means and technique that are not familiar to this scientific discipline. The research on pollen forecasts are presently mainly focused on the problematic of modeling the behavior of pollen trends and sea- sons at one location regardless of the topography, the locations of emitters, the relative strengths of emitter, in one word the Sspatial backgroundT. This research work was a & cedil;successful attempt to go a step further combining this SlocalT approach with a trans- & cedil;port/dispersion modeling allowing the access to mapping of concentration. The areas of interest that were selected for the demonstration of feasibility were 200x200km zones centered on Cordoba, Barcelona and Bologna and four pollen types were ex- amined, namely: Cupressaceae, Olea europaea, Poaceae and Parietaria. At the end of this three-year European project in December 2001, the system was fully deployed and validated. The multidisciplinary team will present the original methodologies that were derived for modeling the numerous aspects of this problem and also some con- clusions regarding potential extent to other areas and taxa.

  10. Freeway work zone lane capacity.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this report is a capacity analysis of two long-term urban freeway Work Zones. Work Zone #1 : tapered four mainline lanes to two, using two separate tapers; Work Zone #2 tapered two mainline lanes to one. : Work Zone throughput was analyz...

  11. Dispersion of folded phonons in {Si}/{Si xGe1- x} superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugger, H.; Reiner, H.; Abstreiter, G.; Jorke, H.; Herzog, H. J.; Kasper, E.

    Zone folding effects on acoustic phonons in {Si}/{Si xGe1- x} strained layer superlattices are studied by Raman spectroscopy. A quantitative explanation of the measured frequencies is given in terms of the elastic continuum theory. The scattering wavevector q s is varied by use of different laser lines to probe directly the phonon dispersion curve in the superlattices. For large period samples q s can be shifted through the new Brillouin zone boundary. We report on observation of a finite doublet splitting corresponding to the first zone-edge gap.

  12. POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS AND DIBENZOFURANS: REMOVAL FROM FLUE GAS AND DISTRIBUTION IN ASH/RESIDUE OF A REFUSE-DERIVED FUEL COMBUSTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an early-1989 investigation of the effect of changing combustion and flue gas cleaning (FGC) system variables on the performance of these systems. Using information from earlier characterization tests at the same site (Mid-Connecticut facility in Hartfo...

  13. PILOT-SCALE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION CATALYST ON MERCURY SPECIATION IN ILLINOIS AND POWDER RIVER BASIN COAL COMBUSTION FLUE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur and chlorine) and one Po...

  14. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH TRANSITION METAL CONTENT AND FLUE GAS HCL/SO2 RATIO ON MERCURY SPECIATION IN WASTE COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results of research on the effect of sulfur dioxide (SO2):HCI ratio on heterogeneous Hg0 oxidation. The addition of SO2 to moist flue gas at high SO2:HCI ratios (4:1 to 10:1) caused a decrease in oxidation of Hg0 relative to flur gas without SO2. This is attrib...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1815 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of... I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a device to continuously measure the temperature of the...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1815 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of... I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a device to continuously measure the temperature of the...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1815 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of... I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a device to continuously measure the temperature of the...

  18. PCDD/F and dioxin-like PCB minimization: A 13-year experimental study along the flue gas cleaning system of a secondary aluminium refining plant.

    PubMed

    Collina, Elena; Bortolami, Michele; Franzoni, Francesco; Lasagni, Marina; Piccinelli, Elsa; Pitea, Demetrio

    2017-08-01

    A 13-years study shows that a careful design of the flue gas cleaning system of a full scale secondary aluminium refining plant results in a minimized and very stable emission of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins (PCDD), Polychlorinated Dibenzo Furans (PCDF) and dioxin-like Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB). The value of equivalent toxicity of PCDD/F in the emission was definitely of an order of magnitude less than the regulation limit. In the initial flue gas cleaning system, the PCB mean fingerprint after the slow cooling of the flue gas was typical of de novo synthesis. Instead, in the presence of quenching, there was evidence that the fast cooling of flue gas prevented the PCB de novo synthesis. In fact, the PCB profile was similar to that in the air collected from the aspiration hoods for the quenching. The gas-phase and solid-phase partitioning of PCBs, before and after the fabric filters, highlights the predominant role of the vapor phase with respect to the total removal efficiency. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons breakdown could be an additional de novo formation pathway even in industrial plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Study on the decomposition of trace benzene over V2O5-WO3/TiO2-based catalysts in simulated flue gas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial and laboratory-prepared V2O5–WO3/TiO2-based catalysts with different compositions were tested for catalytic decomposition of chlorobenzene (ClBz) in simulated flue gas. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) was employe...

  20. Study on the decomposition of trace benzene over V2O5–WO3/TiO2-based catalysts in simulated flue gas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace levels (1 and 10 ppm) of gaseous benzene were catalytically decomposed in a fixed-bed catalytic reactor with monolithic oxides of vanadium and tungsten supported on titanium oxide (V2O5–WO3/TiO2) catalysts under conditions simulating the cooling of waste incineration flue g...

  1. A dispersive treatment of decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffer, Peter; Colangelo, Gilberto; Passemar, Emilie

    2017-01-01

    decays have several features of interest: they allow an accurate measurement of ππ-scattering lengths; the decay is the best source for the determination of some low-energy constants of chiral perturbation theory (χPT) one form factor of the decay is connected to the chiral anomaly. We present the results of our dispersive analysis of decays, which provides a resummation of ππ- and Kπ-rescattering effects. The free parameters of the dispersion relation are fitted to the data of the high-statistics experiments E865 and NA48/2. By matching to χPT at NLO and NNLO, we determine the low-energy constants and . In contrast to a pure chiral treatment, the dispersion relation describes the observed curvature of one of the form factors, which we understand as an effect of rescattering beyond NNLO.

  2. Improving IUE High Dispersion Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, Patricia J.; VanSteenberg, M. E.; Massa, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a different method to extract high dispersion International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra from the New Spectral Image Processing System (NEWSIPS) geometrically and photometrically corrected (SI HI) images of the echellogram. The new algorithm corrects many of the deficiencies that exist in the NEWSIPS high dispersion (SIHI) spectra . Specifically, it does a much better job of accounting for the overlap of the higher echelle orders, it eliminates a significant time dependency in the extracted spectra (which can be traced to the background model used in the NEWSIPS extractions), and it can extract spectra from echellogram images that are more highly distorted than the NEWSIPS extraction routines can handle. Together, these improvements yield a set of IUE high dispersion spectra whose scientific integrity is sign ificantly better than the NEWSIPS products. This work has been supported by NASA ADP grants.

  3. Dike zones on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.; Sukhanov, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Venusian dike zone structures were identified from Venera 15 and 16 radar images. These include: a zone of subparallel rows centered at 30 deg N, 7 deg E; a system of intersecting bands centered at 67 deg N, 284 deg E; polygonal systems in lavas covering the structural base uplift centered at 47 deg N, 200 deg E; a system of light bands in the region of the ring structure centered at 43 deg N, 13 deg E; and a dike band centered at 27 deg N, 36 deg E.

  4. Mimicking glide symmetry dispersion with coupled slot metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Miguel; Mitchell-Thomas, Rhiannon C.; Hibbins, Alastair P.; Sambles, J. Roy; Quevedo-Teruel, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate that the dispersion properties associated with glide symmetry can be achieved in systems that only possess reflection symmetry by balancing the influence of two sublattices. We apply this approach to a pair of coupled slots cut into an infinite perfectly conducting plane. Each slot is notched on either edge, with the complete two-slot system having only mirror symmetry. By modifying the relative size of the notches on either side of the slots, we show that a linear dispersion relation with a degeneracy with non-zero group velocity at the Brillouin zone boundary can be achieved. These properties, until now, only found in systems with glide symmetry are numerically and experimentally validated. We also show that these results can be used for the design of ultra-wideband one-dimensional leaky wave antennas in coplanar waveguide technology.

  5. The dominance of dispersion in the evolution of bed material waves in gravel-bed rivers

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Lisle; Yantao Cui; Gary Parker; James E. Pizzuto; Annjanette M. Dodd

    2001-01-01

    Abstract - Bed material waves are temporary zones of sediment accumulation created by large sediment inputs. Recent theoretical, experimental and field studies examine factors in fluencing dispersion and translation of bed material waves in quasi-uniform, gravel-bed channels. Exchanges of sediment between a channel and its floodplain are...

  6. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  7. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; DeGrassie, J.S.

    1991-08-27

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figures.

  8. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  9. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Ikezi, Hiroyuki; Lin-Liu, Yuh-Ren; DeGrassie, John S.

    1991-01-01

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other.

  10. DISPERSION HARDENING OF URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Arbiter, W.

    1963-01-15

    A method of hardening U metal involves the forming of a fine dispersion of UO/sub 2/. This method consists of first hydriding the U to form a finely divided powder and then exposing the powder to a very dilute O gas in an inert atmosphere under such pressure and temperature conditions as to cause a thin oxide film to coat each particle of the U hydride, The oxide skin prevents agglomeration of the particles as the remaining H is removed, thus preserving the small particle size. The oxide skin coatings remain as an oxide dispersion. The resulting product may be workhardened to improve its physical characteristics. (AEC)

  11. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  12. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present calculations of the performance of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters (FADOF) on IR transitions indicate that such filters may furnish high transmission, narrow-pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth under optimum operating conditions. A FADOF consists of an atomic vapor cell between crossed polarizers that are subject to a dc magnetic field along the optical path; when linearly polarized light travels along the direction of the magnetic field through the dispersive atomic vapor, a polarization rotation occurs. If FADOF conditions are suitably adjusted, a maximum transmission with very narrow bandwidth is obtained.

  13. Soil disturbance effects on the composition of seed-dispersing ants in roadside environments.

    PubMed

    Palfi, Zsofia; Spooner, Peter G; Robinson, Wayne

    2017-02-01

    Myrmecochory (the dispersal of seeds by ants) is a significant ecological process in sclerophyll woodlands, but habitat disturbance is known to alter the extent and success of this mutualism. We investigated the influence of soil disturbance on the composition of the seed-dispersing ant community. Surveys were conducted in roadside verges where soils are regularly disturbed by road maintenance activities. Using a 'cafeteria' bait station approach, we selected 24 roads of different widths to investigate ant composition and abundance in relation to soil disturbance. We found ant species richness was greater in non-disturbed than disturbed zones, where road verge width significantly influenced results. The composition and abundance of individual seed-dispersing ant species varied between disturbed and non-disturbed zones. Rhytidoponera metallica were more abundant in non-disturbed sites, whereas Melophorus bruneus and Monomorium rothseini were more frequently recorded in disturbed areas. Commonly found Iridomyrmex purpureus was significantly more abundant in disturbed zones in narrow roadsides and vice versa in wide roadsides, and strongly influenced total community composition. Variation in the abundance of commonly recorded Iridomyrmex and Monomorium genera were related more to site conditions (roadside width and habitat) than soil disturbance. The rich composition of seed dispersing ants in roadside environments, and the effects of soil disturbances on these ant communities that we describe, provide a key insight to important seed dispersal vectors occurring in fragmented rural landscapes.

  14. Modeling tidal exchange and dispersion in Boston Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Butman, Bradford

    1992-01-01

    Tidal dispersion and the horizontal exchange of water between Boston Harbor and the surrounding ocean are examined with a high-resolution (200 m) depth-averaged numerical model. The strongly varying bathymetry and coastline geometry of the harbor generate complex spatial patterns in the modeled tidal currents which are verified by shipboard acoustic Doppler surveys. Lagrangian exchange experiments demonstrate that tidal currents rapidly exchange and mix material near the inlets of the harbor due to asymmetry in the ebb/flood response. This tidal mixing zone extends roughly a tidal excursion from the inlets and plays an important role in the overall flushing of the harbor. Because the tides can only efficiently mix material in this limited region, however, harbor flushing must be considered a two step process: rapid exchange in the tidal mixing zone, followed by flushing of the tidal mixing zone by nontidal residual currents. Estimates of embayment flushing based on tidal calculations alone therefore can significantly overestimate the flushing time that would be expected under typical environmental conditions. Particle-release simulations from point sources also demonstrate that while the tides efficiently exchange material in the vicinity of the inlets, the exact nature of dispersion from point sources is extremely sensitive to the timing and location of the release, and the distribution of particles is streaky and patchlike. This suggests that high-resolution modeling of dispersion from point sources in these regions must be performed explicitly and cannot be parameterized as a plume with Gaussian-spreading in a larger scale flow field.

  15. Mixed microalgae consortia growth under higher concentration of CO2 from unfiltered coal fired flue gas: Fatty acid profiling and biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Ambreen; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Manzoor, Maleeha; Jabeen, Faiza; Iqbal, Munawar; Uz Zaman, Qamar; Schenk, Peer M; Asif Tahir, M

    2018-02-01

    Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from oleaginous microalgae feedstock. Biodiesel fuel properties were studied and compared with biodiesel standards. Qualitative analysis of FAME was done while cultivating mixed microalgae consortia under three concentrations of coal fired flue gas (1%, 3.0% and 5.5% CO 2 ). Under 1% CO 2 concentration (flue gas), the FAME content was 280.3 μg/mL, whereas the lipid content was 14.03 μg/mL/D (day). Both FAMEs and lipid contents were low at other CO 2 concentrations (3.0 and 5.5%). However, mixed consortia in the presence of phosphate buffer and flue gas (PB + FG) showed higher saturated fatty acids (SFA) (36.28%) and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) (63.72%) versus 5.5% CO 2 concentration, which might be responsible for oxidative stability of biodiesel. Subsequently, higher cetane number (52) and low iodine value (136.3 gI 2 /100 g) biodiesel produced from mixed consortia (PB + FG) under 5.5% CO 2 along with 50 mM phosphate buffer were found in accordance with European (EN 14214) standard. Results revealed that phosphate buffer significantly enhanced the biodiesel quality, but reduced the FAME yield. This study intended to develop an integrated approach for significant improvement in biodiesel quality under surplus phosphorus by utilizing waste flue gas (as CO 2 source) using microalgae. The CO 2 sequestration from industrial flue gas not only reduced greenhouse gases, but may also ensure the sustainable and eco-benign production of biodiesel. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  17. Arid Zone Hydrology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arid zone hydrology encompasses a wide range of topics and hydro-meteorological and ecological characteristics. Although arid and semi-arid watersheds perform the same functions as those in humid environments, their hydrology and sediment transport characteristics cannot be readily predicted by inf...

  18. Zone of intrusion study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-15

    The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF) performed an analysis using LS-DYNA simulation to investigate the zone of intrusion (ZOI) of an NCHRP Report No. 350 2000p pickup truck when impacting a 40-in. high F-shape parapet. : The ZOI for the 40-in...

  19. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  1. Crossing Comfort Zones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison, D. Soyini

    1993-01-01

    Offers a narrative based on a real event, in the form of a "docustory," describing that moment when teaching worked--when, in an instructional setting, communication was "perfect" or "excellent." Describes how three very different students, in a course on the cultures of women of color, moved beyond comfort zones while working together on a class…

  2. Survey of flue gas desulfurization systems: Dickerson Station, Potomac Electric Power Co. Final report, Feb--Aug 1975

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, G.A.

    1975-09-01

    Results are given of a survey of a flue gas desulfurization system, utilizing the Chemico/Basic MgO-SO2 removal/recovery process, that has been retrofitted to handle approximately half of the exhaust gas from the 190 MW unit 3 at Potomac Electric Power Company's Dickerson Station. The system was installed at a cost of SO.5 million. The boiler burns 2% sulfur coal and is equipped with a 94% efficient electrostatic precipitator. A single two-stage scrubber/absorber is used. The liquor streams for the two stages are separate, both operating in a closed-loop mode. Magnesium oxide (MgO) is regenerated off-site. (GRA)

  3. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from gypsum-rich byproduct of flue gas desulfurization - A prefeasibility cost estimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M.; Achorn, F.P.

    1996-01-01

    Costs for constructing and operating a conceptual plant based on a proposed process that converts flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer has been calculated and used to estimate a market price for the product. The average market price of granular ammonium sulfate ($138/ton) exceeds the rough estimated cost of ammonium sulfate from the proposed process ($111/ ton), by 25 percent, if granular size ammonium sulfate crystals of 1.2 to 3.3 millimeters in diameters can be produced by the proposed process. However, there was at least ??30% margin in the cost estimate calculations. The additional costs for compaction, if needed to create granules of the required size, would make the process uneconomical unless considerable efficiency gains are achieved to balance the additional costs. This study suggests the need both to refine the crystallization process and to find potential markets for the calcium carbonate produced by the process.

  4. Robust C–C bonded porous networks with chemically designed functionalities for improved CO2 capture from flue gas

    PubMed Central

    Thirion, Damien; Lee, Joo S; Özdemir, Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Effective carbon dioxide (CO2) capture requires solid, porous sorbents with chemically and thermally stable frameworks. Herein, we report two new carbon–carbon bonded porous networks that were synthesized through metal-free Knoevenagel nitrile–aldol condensation, namely the covalent organic polymer, COP-156 and 157. COP-156, due to high specific surface area (650 m2/g) and easily interchangeable nitrile groups, was modified post-synthetically into free amine- or amidoxime-containing networks. The modified COP-156-amine showed fast and increased CO2 uptake under simulated moist flue gas conditions compared to the starting network and usual industrial CO2 solvents, reaching up to 7.8 wt % uptake at 40 °C. PMID:28144294

  5. Removal of SO2 from O2-containing flue gas by activated carbon fiber (ACF) impregnated with NH3.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lüsi; Guo, Jia; Jin, Feng; Zeng, Hancai

    2006-02-01

    Adsorption of SO(2) from the O(2)-containing flue gas by granular activated carbons (GACs) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) impregnated with NH(3) was studied in this technical note. Experimental results showed that the ACFs were high-quality adsorbents due to their unique textural properties. In the presence of moisture, the desulphurization efficiency for the ACFs was improved significantly due to the formation of sulfuric acid. After NH(3) impregnation of ACF samples, nitrogen-containing functional groups (pyridyl C(5)H(4)N- and pyrrolyl C(4)H(4)N-) were detected on the sample surface by using an X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. These functional groups accounted for the enhanced SO(2) adsorption via chemisorption and/or catalytic oxidization.

  6. Effect of tungsten on the corrosion behavior of sulfuric acid-resistant steels for flue gas desulfurization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Woo-Soo; Jang, Young-Wook; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2011-06-01

    Flue gas desulfurization systems (FGDs) are operated in severely corrosive environments that cause sulfuric acid dew-point corrosion. The corrosion behavior of low-alloy steels was tested using electrochemical techniques (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic tests, potentiostatic tests), and the corrosion products were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electrochemical results showed that alloying W with small amounts of Sb, Cu, and Co improves the corrosion resistance of steels. The results of surface analyses showed that the surface of the steels alloyed with W consisted of W oxides and higher amounts of Sb and Cu oxides. This suggests that the addition of W promotes the formation of a protective WO3 film, in addition to Sb2O5 and CuO films on the surface.

  7. Study of composition change and agglomeration of flue gas cleaning residue from a fluidized bed waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Lievens, P; Verbinnen, B; Bollaert, P; Alderweireldt, N; Mertens, G; Elsen, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2011-10-01

    Blocking of the collection hoppers of the baghouse filters in a fluidized bed incinerator for co-incineration of high calorific industrial solid waste and sludge was observed. The composition of the flue gas cleaning residue (FGCR), both from a blocked hopper and from a normal hopper, was investigated by (differential) thermogravimetric analysis, quantitative X-ray powder diffraction and wet chemical analysis. The lower elemental carbon concentration and the higher calcium carbonate concentration of the agglomerated sample was the result of oxidation of carbon and subsequent reaction of CO2 with CaO. The evolved heat causes a temperature increase, with the decomposition of CaOHCl as a consequence. The formation of calcite and calcium chloride and the evolution of heat caused agglomeration of the FGCR. Activated lignite coke was replaced by another adsorption agent with less carbon, so the auto-ignition temperature increased; since then no further block formation has occurred.

  8. Phylogeographic Structure in Benthic Marine Invertebrates of the Southeast Pacific Coast of Chile with Differing Dispersal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Haye, Pilar A.; Segovia, Nicolás I.; Muñoz-Herrera, Natalia C.; Gálvez, Francisca E.; Martínez, Andrea; Meynard, Andrés; Pardo-Gandarillas, María C.; Poulin, Elie; Faugeron, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The role of dispersal potential on phylogeographic structure, evidenced by the degree of genetic structure and the presence of coincident genetic and biogeographic breaks, was evaluated in a macrogeographic comparative approach along the north-central coast of Chile, across the biogeographic transition zone at 30°S. Using 2,217 partial sequences of the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I gene of eight benthic invertebrate species along ca. 2,600 km of coast, we contrasted dispersal potential with genetic structure and determined the concordance between genetic divergence between biogeographic regions and the biogeographic transition zone at 30°S. Genetic diversity and differentiation highly differed between species with high and low dispersal potential. Dispersal potential, sometimes together with biogeographic region, was the factor that best explained the genetic structure of the eight species. The three low dispersal species, and one species assigned to the high dispersal category, had a phylogeographic discontinuity coincident with the biogeographic transition zone at 30°S. Furthermore, coalescent analyses based on the isolation-with-migration model validate that the split between biogeographic regions north and south of 30°S has a historic origin. The signatures of the historic break in high dispersers is parsimoniously explained by the homogenizing effects of gene flow that have erased the genetic signatures, if ever existed, in high dispersers. Of the four species with structure across the break, only two had significant albeit very low levels of asymmetric migration across the transition zone. Historic processes have led to the current biogeographic and phylogeographic structure of marine species with limited dispersal along the north-central coast of Chile, with a strong lasting impact in their genetic structure. PMID:24586356

  9. SOXAL combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} flue gas control demonstration. Quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    AQUATECH Systems, a business unit of Allied-Signal Inc., proposes to demonstrate the technical viability and cost effectiveness of the SOXAL process a combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control process on a 3 MW equivalent flue gas slip stream from Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Dunkirk Steam Station Boiler No. 4, a coal fired boiler. The SOXAL process combines 90+% sulfur dioxide removal from the flue gas using a sodium based scrubbing solution and regeneration of the spent scrubbing liquor using AQUATECH Systems` proprietary bipolar membrane technology. This regeneration step recovers a stream of sulfur dioxide suitable for subsequent processing to salable sulfurmore » or sulfuric acid. Additionally 90+% control of NO{sub x} gases can be achieved in combination with conventional urea/methanol injection of NO{sub 2} gas into the duct. The SOXAL process is applicable to both utility and industrial scale boilers using either high or lower sulfur coal. The SOXAL demonstration Program began September 10, 1991 and is approximately 26 months in duration. During the 6 months of scheduled operations, between January and July of 1993, data was collected from the SOXAL system to define: SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control efficiencies; Current efficiency for the regeneration unit; Sulfate oxidation in the absorber; Make-up reagent rates; Product quality including concentrations and compositions; System integration and control philosophy; and Membrane stability and performance with respect to foulants. The program is expected to be concluded in November 1993.« less

  10. Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.

    2008-07-01

    In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulatemore » and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.« less

  11. Integrated removal of NO and mercury from coal combustion flue gas using manganese oxides supported on TiO2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shibo; Zhao, Yongchun; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Lulu; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-03-01

    A catalyst composed of manganese oxides supported on titania (MnO x /TiO 2 ) synthesized by a sol-gel method was selected to remove nitric oxide and mercury jointly at a relatively low temperature in simulated flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The physico-chemical characteristics of catalysts were investigated by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses, etc. The effects of Mn loading, reaction temperature and individual flue gas components on denitration and Hg 0 removal were examined. The results indicated that the optimal Mn/Ti molar ratio was 0.8 and the best working temperature was 240°C for NO conversion. O 2 and a proper ratio of [NH 3 ]/[NO] are essential for the denitration reaction. Both NO conversion and Hg 0 removal efficiency could reach more than 80% when NO and Hg 0 were removed simultaneously using Mn0.8Ti at 240°C. Hg 0 removal efficiency slightly declined as the Mn content increased in the catalysts. The reaction temperature had no significant effect on Hg 0 removal efficiency. O 2 and HCl had a promotional effect on Hg 0 removal. SO 2 and NH 3 were observed to weaken Hg 0 removal because of competitive adsorption. NO first facilitated Hg 0 removal and then had an inhibiting effect as NO concentration increased without O 2 , and it exhibited weak inhibition of Hg 0 removal efficiency in the presence of O 2 . The oxidation of Hg 0 on MnO x /TiO 2 follows the Mars-Maessen and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Bio-desulfurization and denitrification by anaerobic-anoxic process for the treatment of wastewater from flue gas washing.

    PubMed

    Song, Ziyu; Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang; Yang, Maohua; Xing, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    For amine-based carbon dioxide capture, nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides were the main pollutants that had a negative effect on the regeneration of solvent. Before carbon dioxide capture, the sulfur oxides in flue gas should be removed by the method of calcium salt, and then washed by alkaline solution to eliminate the residual nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. The washing wastewater containing sulfate and nitrate needs to be treated. In this study, a novel anaerobic-anoxic process was built up for the treatment of this washing wastewater. Nitrate was reduced to nitrogen by denitrifying bacteria. Sulfate was firstly reduced to sulfide by sulfate reducing bacteria, and then selectively oxidized to element sulfur by sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The treated liquid could be reused as absorption after the adjustment of pH value. The performances of this bioprocess were investigated under various pH values and S/N ratios. It was found that the optimal pH value of influent was 6.0, the percentages of denitrification and sulfate reducing could reach 90 and 89%, respectively. Seventy-six percent of sulfate was transformed into element sulfur. Nitrate significantly had a negative effect on sulfate reduction above 10 mM. As 20 mM nitrate, the sulfate reducing percentage would drop to 67%. These results showed that the anaerobic-anoxic process was feasible for the treatment of flue gas washing wastewater. It would be prospectively applied to other wastewater with the higher ratio of SO4(2-)/NO3(-).

  13. Integrated Pest Management Practices Reduce Insecticide Applications, Preserve Beneficial Insects, and Decrease Pesticide Residues in Flue-Cured Tobacco Production.

    PubMed

    Slone, Jeremy D; Burrack, Hannah J

    2016-12-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) recommendations, including scouting and economic thresholds (ETs), are available for North Carolina flue-cured tobacco growers, although ETs for key pests have not been updated in several decades. Moreover, reported IPM adoption rates by flue-cured tobacco growers remain low, at < 40%, according to NC cooperative extension surveys conducted during the last four years. Previous research has suggested that timing insecticide treatments using currently available ETs can reduce the average number of applications to two or fewer per season. We conducted field-scale trials at nine commercial tobacco farms, three in 2104 and six in 2015, to quantify inputs associated with current scouting recommendations, to determine if current ETs were able to reduce insecticide applications as compared to grower standard practices, and to assess the impacts of reduced insecticide applications on end of season yield and pesticide residues. Two fields were identified at each farm and were scouted weekly for insects. One field was only treated with insecticides if pests reached ET (IPM), while the other field was managed per grower discretion (Grower Standard). IPM fields received an average of two fewer insecticide applications without compromising yield. More insecticide applications resulted in higher pesticide residues in cured leaf samples from Grower Standard fields than those from IPM fields. Reductions in insecticides and management intensity also resulted in larger beneficial insect populations in IPM fields. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. [Effects of biochar on the micro-ecology of tobacco-planting soil and physiology of flue-cured tobacco].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Chen, Wei; Lin, Ye-chun; Cheng, Jian-zhong; Pan, Wen-jie

    2015-12-01

    Biochar is one of the research hotspots in the field of the agroforestry waste utilization. A field experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of different amounts of tobacco stem biochar (0, 1, 10, 50 t · hm⁻²) on soil micro-ecology and physiological properties of flue-cured tobacco. The results showed that soil water content (SWC) increased at all tobacco growth stages as the amounts of biochar applications increased. There were significant differences of SWC between the treatment of 50 t · hm⁻² and other treatments at the period of tobacco vigorous growth. As the application of biochar increased, the total soil porosity and capillary porosity increased, while soil bacteria, actinomyces, fungi amount increased firstly and then decreased. The amount of soil bacteria, actinomyces, fungi reached the maximum at the treatment of 10 t · hm⁻². Soil respiration rate (SRR) at earlier stage increased with the increase of biochar application. Compared with the control, SSR under biochar treatments increased by 7.9%-36.9%, and there were significant differences of SRR between high biochar application treatments (50 t · hm⁻² and 10 t · hm⁻²) and the control. Biochar improved leaf water potential, carotenoid and chlorophyll contents. Meanwhile, the dry mass of root, shoot and total dry mass under biochar application were higher than that of the control. These results indicated that the biochar played active roles in improving tobacco-planting soil micro-ecology and regulating physiological properties of flue-cured tobacco.

  15. Dry flue gas desulfurization by-product application effects on plant uptake and soil storage changes in a managed grassland.

    PubMed

    Burgess-Conforti, Jason R; Brye, Kristofor R; Miller, David M; Pollock, Erik D; Wood, Lisa S

    2018-02-01

    Environmental regulations mandate that sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) be removed from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants, which results in the generation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. These FGD by-products may be a viable soil amendment, but the large amounts of trace elements contained in FGD by-products are potentially concerning. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of land application of a high-Ca dry FGD (DFGD) by-product on trace elements in aboveground biomass and soil. A high-Ca DFGD by-product was applied once at a rate of 9 Mg ha -1 on May 18, 2015 to small plots with mixed-grass vegetation. Soil and biomass were sampled prior to application and several times thereafter. Aboveground dry matter and tissue As, Co, Cr, Hg, Se, U, and V concentrations increased (P < 0.05) following application, but did not differ (P > 0.05) from pre-application levels or the unamended control within 3 to 6 months of application. Soil pH in the amended treatment 6 months after application was greater (P < 0.05) than in the unamended control. Soil Ca, S, and Na contents also increased (P < 0.05), following by-product application compared to the unamended control. High-Ca DFGD by-products appear to be useful as a soil amendment, but cause at least a temporary increase in tissue concentrations of trace elements, which may be problematic for animal grazing situations.

  16. Correlational correction to plasmon dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, G.; Golden, K.I.

    The authors question the suggestion that plasmon dispersion increases for small values of the coupling over its random-phase-approximation value, and conclude that, contrary to what has been stated in the literature, it does not: high-frequency-moment sum-rule and Kramers-Kronig arguments, when properly treated, do not entail such a consequence.

  17. Refraction of dispersive shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El, G. A.; Khodorovskii, V. V.; Leszczyszyn, A. M.

    2012-09-01

    We study a dispersive counterpart of the classical gas dynamics problem of the interaction of a shock wave with a counter-propagating simple rarefaction wave, often referred to as the shock wave refraction. The refraction of a one-dimensional dispersive shock wave (DSW) due to its head-on collision with the centred rarefaction wave (RW) is considered in the framework of the defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. For the integrable cubic nonlinearity case we present a full asymptotic description of the DSW refraction by constructing appropriate exact solutions of the Whitham modulation equations in Riemann invariants. For the NLS equation with saturable nonlinearity, whose modulation system does not possess Riemann invariants, we take advantage of the recently developed method for the DSW description in non-integrable dispersive systems to obtain main physical parameters of the DSW refraction. The key features of the DSW-RW interaction predicted by our modulation theory analysis are confirmed by direct numerical solutions of the full dispersive problem.

  18. An Introduction to Dispersive Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taddei, M. M.; Mendes, T. N. C.; Farina, C.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersive forces are a kind of van der Waals intermolecular force which could only be fully understood with the establishment of quantum mechanics and, in particular, of quantum electrodynamics. In this pedagogical paper, we introduce the subject in a more elementary approach, aiming at students with basic knowledge of quantum mechanics. We…

  19. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davit, Y.; Byrne, H.; Osborne, J.; Pitt-Francis, J.; Gavaghan, D.; Quintard, M.

    2013-01-01

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher's equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels' network; (2) the solute's diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport.

  20. Emerald ash borer adult dispersal

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice

    2003-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an Asian buprestid beetle that was first discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002 (Haack et al. 2002). Smaller populations, resulting from movement of infested host material, were found in Ohio, Maryland, and Virginia in 2003. EAB adult dispersal has not been studied in Asia; however,...

  1. Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizert, Christo; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2016-09-01

    Commonly, three mechanisms of firn air transport are distinguished: molecular diffusion, advection, and near-surface convective mixing. Here we identify and describe a fourth mechanism, namely dispersion driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability (or barometric pumping). We use published gas chromatography experiments on firn samples to derive the along-flow dispersivity of firn, and combine this dispersivity with a dynamical air pressure propagation model forced by surface air pressure time series to estimate the magnitude of dispersive mixing in the firn. We show that dispersion dominates mixing within the firn lock-in zone. Trace gas concentrations measured in firn air samples from various polar sites confirm that dispersive mixing occurs. Including dispersive mixing in a firn air transport model suggests that our theoretical estimates have the correct order of magnitude, yet may overestimate the true dispersion. We further show that strong barometric pumping, such as at the Law Dome site, may reduce the gravitational enrichment of δ15N-N2 and other tracers below gravitational equilibrium, questioning the traditional definition of the lock-in depth as the depth where δ15N enrichment ceases. Last, we propose that 86Kr excess may act as a proxy for past synoptic activity (or paleo-storminess) at the site.

  2. Investigation of the Profile Control Mechanisms of Dispersed Particle Gel

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang; Dai, Caili; Zhao, Mingwei

    2014-01-01

    Dispersed particle gel (DPG) particles of nano- to micron- to mm-size have been prepared successfully and will be used for profile control treatment in mature oilfields. The profile control and enhanced oil recovery mechanisms of DPG particles have been investigated using core flow tests and visual simulation experiments. Core flow test results show that DPG particles can easily be injected into deep formations and can effectively plug the high permeability zones. The high profile improvement rate improves reservoir heterogeneity and diverts fluid into the low permeability zone. Both water and oil permeability were reduced when DPG particles were injected, but the disproportionate permeability reduction effect was significant. Water permeability decreases more than the oil permeability to ensure that oil flows in its own pathways and can easily be driven out. Visual simulation experiments demonstrate that DPG particles can pass directly or by deformation through porous media and enter deep formations. By retention, adsorption, trapping and bridging, DPG particles can effectively reduce the permeability of porous media in high permeability zones and divert fluid into a low permeability zone, thus improving formation profiles and enhancing oil recovery. PMID:24950174

  3. Evaluation of Ohio work zone speed zones process.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to determine the effectiveness of Ohio Department of Transportation processes for establishing work zone speed zones. Researchers observed motorists speed choice upstream of a...

  4. Seed dispersal capacity and post-dispersal fate of the invasive Spartina alterniflora in saltmarshes of the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Derong; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Liquan; Zhu, Zhenchang; Tian, Kun; Gao, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Spartina alterniflora is one of the most serious invasive species in the coastal saltmarshes of China. Seeds are generally considered to be the main method for this species to colonise new habitat, but little is known quantitatively about the seed dispersal capacity and post-dispersal fate (i.e., germination and survival time). We measured the duration of seed flotation, seed persistence and seed germination of S. alterniflora in three intertidal zones [low intertidal zone (LIT), middle intertidal zone (MIT) and high intertidal zone (HIT)] in the Yangtze Estuary on the eastern coast of China. The results showed that (1) the flotation time of S. alterniflora seeds ranged from 3 to 13 days, and the values were higher in HIT and MIT than in LIT; (2) the period of seed germination was from February to June, mainly in March and April, and seed source affected seed germination as the values for seeds from HIT and MIT were much higher than those from LIT, while burial sites had no effect on germination percentages, and (3) the seed persistence was less than a year regardless of seed source, which was characterised by a transient seed bank, with values being higher in HIT and MIT than in LIT. Our results suggested that low marsh plants were far less able to produce successful seeds, or conversely, that the mid-marsh location had plants with the greatest seed production and seed mass, and the high- and mid-marsh plants had good seed floatation ability, germination and survival. Thus, plants in the mid-and high-marsh may contribute disproportionally to an invasion.

  5. Projected changes in distributions of Australian tropical savanna birds under climate change using three dispersal scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Reside, April E; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Kutt, Alex S

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the species most vulnerable to extinction as a result of climate change is a necessary first step in mitigating biodiversity decline. Species distribution modeling (SDM) is a commonly used tool to assess potential climate change impacts on distributions of species. We use SDMs to predict geographic ranges for 243 birds of Australian tropical savannas, and to project changes in species richness and ranges under a future climate scenario between 1990 and 2080. Realistic predictions require recognition of the variability in species capacity to track climatically suitable environments. Here we assess the effect of dispersal on model results by using three approaches: full dispersal, no dispersal and a partial-dispersal scenario permitting species to track climate change at a rate of 30 km per decade. As expected, the projected distributions and richness patterns are highly sensitive to the dispersal scenario. Projected future range sizes decreased for 66% of species if full dispersal was assumed, but for 89% of species when no dispersal was assumed. However, realistic future predictions should not assume a single dispersal scenario for all species and as such, we assigned each species to the most appropriate dispersal category based on individual mobility and habitat specificity; this permitted the best estimates of where species will be in the future. Under this “realistic” dispersal scenario, projected ranges sizes decreased for 67% of species but showed that migratory and tropical-endemic birds are predicted to benefit from climate change with increasing distributional area. Richness hotspots of tropical savanna birds are expected to move, increasing in southern savannas and southward along the east coast of Australia, but decreasing in the arid zone. Understanding the complexity of effects of climate change on species’ range sizes by incorporating dispersal capacities is a crucial step toward developing adaptation policies for the conservation of

  6. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  7. Subduction zone guided waves in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, Thomas; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Guided wave dispersion is observed in subduction zones as high frequency energy is retained and delayed by low velocity structure in the subducting slab, while lower frequency energy is able to travel at the faster velocities associated with the surrounding mantle material. As subduction zone guided waves spend longer interacting with the low velocity structure of the slab than any other seismic phase, they have a unique capability to resolve these low velocity structures. In Northern Chile, guided wave arrivals are clearly observed on two stations in the Chilean fore-arc on permanent stations of the IPOC network. High frequency (> 5 Hz) P-wave arrivals are delayed by approximately 2 seconds compared to the low frequency (< 2 Hz) P-wave arrivals. Full waveform finite difference modelling is used to test the low velocity slab structure that cause this P-wave dispersion. The synthetic waveforms produced by these models are compared to the recorded waveforms. Spectrograms are used to compare the relative arrival times of different frequencies, while the velocity spectra is used to constrain the relative amplitude of the arrivals. Constraining the waveform in these two ways means that the full waveform is also matched, and the low pass filtered observed and synthetic waveforms can be compared. A combined misfit between synthetic and observed waveforms is then calculated following Garth & Rietbrock (2014). Based on this misfit criterion we constrain the velocity model by using a grid search approach. Modelling the guided wave arrivals suggest that the observed dispersion cannot be solely accounted for by a single low velocity layer as suggested by previous guided wave studies. Including dipping low velocity normal fault structures in the synthetic model not only accounts for the observed strong P-wave coda, but also produces a clear first motion dispersion. We therefore propose that the lithospheric mantle of the subducting Nazca plate is highly hydrated at intermediate

  8. Laser control of natural disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, Olga L.; Bezrukova, Alexandra G.

    2003-10-01

    Different water disperse systems were studied by integral (spectroturbidemetry) and differential light scattering method with a laser as a source of light. The investigation done concerns the state of kaolin dispersions at storage and under dilution as an example of mineral dispersion systems such as natural water. The role of some light scattering parameters for an optical analysis of water dispersions, like the dispersion of erythrocytes and bacterial cells -Escherichia coli is discussed. The results obtained can help to elaborate the methods for on-line optical control fo natural disperse systems (water, air) with mineral and biological particles.

  9. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOEpatents

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  10. Aeration Zone Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, B.

    The International Symposium on Recent Investigations in the Zone of Aeration (RIZA) was organized by the Institute for Hydrogeology and Hydrochemistry of the Technical University of Munich and held October 1-5, 1984, in the lecture halls of the Grosshadern Klinik in Munich, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). P. Udluft, B. Merkel, and K.-H. Prüsl, all of the university, were responsible for the organization of the symposium, which was under the patronage of K.-E. Quentin. There were over 200 participants from 22 different countries, among them Australia, Canada, China, India, and the United States. The topics of the symposium were the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes in the unsaturated zone, the region between the surface and the groundwater level. Here a number of complex processes occur that on the one hand are of natural origin and on the other hand are influenced by human activities in a number of ways.

  11. Nanocomposites from Stable Dispersions of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymeric Matrices Using Dispersion Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Stable dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in polymeric matrices include CNTs dispersed in a host polymer or copolymer whose monomers have delocalized electron orbitals, so that a dispersion interaction results between the host polymer or copolymer and the CNTs dispersed therein. Nanocomposite products, which are presented in bulk, or when fabricated as a film, fiber, foam, coating, adhesive, paste, or molding, are prepared by standard means from the present stable dispersions of CNTs in polymeric matrices, employing dispersion interactions, as presented hereinabove.

  12. Crash characteristics at work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    Work zones tend to cause hazardous conditions for drivers and construction workers since they generate conflicts between construction activities and traffic. A clear understanding of the characteristics of work zone crashes will enhance the selection...

  13. Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System water quality modeling and decision support system designed for environmental impact assessment of mixing zones resulting from wastewater discharge from point sources

  14. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  15. Work zone intrusion alarm effectiveness.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-09-01

    16. Abstract : The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) commissioned a study to evaluate how : effective a work zone safety device known as the SonoBlaster! Work Zone Intrusion Alarm would be : in protecting maintenance workers fro...

  16. Trojans in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Dvorak, Rudolf; Erdi, Balint; Sándor, Zsolt

    2005-10-01

    With the aid of numerical experiments we examined the dynamical stability of fictitious terrestrial planets in 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jovian-like planets of extrasolar planetary systems. In our stability study of the so-called "Trojan" planets in the habitable zone, we used the restricted three-body problem with different mass ratios of the primary bodies. The application of the three-body problem showed that even massive Trojan planets can be stable in the 1:1 mean motion resonance. From the 117 extrasolar planetary systems only 11 systems were found with one giant planet in the habitable zone. Out of this sample set we chose four planetary systems--HD17051, HD27442, HD28185, and HD108874--for further investigation. To study the orbital behavior of the stable zone in the different systems, we used direct numerical computations (Lie Integration Method) that allowed us to determine the escape times and the maximum eccentricity of the fictitious "Trojan planets."

  17. The travel-time ellipse: An approximate zone of transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almendinger, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    A zone of transport for a well is defined as the area in the horizontal plane bounded by a contour of equal ground-water travel time to the well. For short distances and ground-water travel times near a well, the potentiometric surface may be simulated analytically as that for a fully penetrating well in a uniform flow field. The zone of transport for this configuration is nearly elliptical. A simple method is derived to calculate a travel-time ellipse that approximates the zone of transport for a well in a uniform flow field. The travel-time ellipse was nearly congruent with the exact solution for the theoretical zone of transport for ground-water travel times of at least 10 years and for aquifer property values appropriate for southeastern Minnesota. For distances and travel times approaching infinity, however, the ellipse becomes slightly wider at its midpoint and narrower near its upgradient boundary than the theoretical zone of transport. The travel-time ellipse also may be used to simulate the plume area surrounding an injection well. However, the travel-time ellipse is an approximation that does not account for the effect of dispersion in enlarging the true area of an injection plume or zone of transport; hence, caution is advised in the use and interpretation of this simple construction.

  18. Dispersive Readout of Adiabatic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Sigmund

    2017-11-01

    We propose a protocol for the measurement of adiabatic phases of periodically driven quantum systems coupled to an open cavity that enables dispersive readout. It turns out that the cavity transmission exhibits peaks at frequencies determined by a resonance condition that involves the dynamical and the geometric phase. Since these phases scale differently with the driving frequency, one can determine them by fitting the peak positions to the theoretically expected behavior. For the derivation of the resonance condition and for a numerical study, we develop a Floquet theory for the dispersive readout of ac driven quantum systems. The feasibility is demonstrated for two test cases that generalize Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interference to two-parameter driving.

  19. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  20. Dispersed Fringe Sensing Analysis - DFSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Redding, David C.; Basinger, Scott A.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.; Spechler, Joshua A.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersed Fringe Sensing (DFS) is a technique for measuring and phasing segmented telescope mirrors using a dispersed broadband light image. DFS is capable of breaking the monochromatic light ambiguity, measuring absolute piston errors between segments of large segmented primary mirrors to tens of nanometers accuracy over a range of 100 micrometers or more. The DFSA software tool analyzes DFS images to extract DFS encoded segment piston errors, which can be used to measure piston distances between primary mirror segments of ground and space telescopes. This information is necessary to control mirror segments to establish a smooth, continuous primary figure needed to achieve high optical quality. The DFSA tool is versatile, allowing precise piston measurements from a variety of different optical configurations. DFSA technology may be used for measuring wavefront pistons from sub-apertures defined by adjacent segments (such as Keck Telescope), or from separated sub-apertures used for testing large optical systems (such as sub-aperture wavefront testing for large primary mirrors using auto-collimating flats). An experimental demonstration of the coarse-phasing technology with verification of DFSA was performed at the Keck Telescope. DFSA includes image processing, wavelength and source spectral calibration, fringe extraction line determination, dispersed fringe analysis, and wavefront piston sign determination. The code is robust against internal optical system aberrations and against spectral variations of the source. In addition to the DFSA tool, the software package contains a simple but sophisticated MATLAB model to generate dispersed fringe images of optical system configurations in order to quickly estimate the coarse phasing performance given the optical and operational design requirements. Combining MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks), MACOS (JPL s software package for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical