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Sample records for zone ii region-specific

  1. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  2. AUGO II: a comprehensive subauroral zone observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, I. S.; Connors, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    A new geophysical observatory dedicated to the study of the aurora borealis will be built 25 km southwest of the town of Athabasca, Alberta, Canada. It is anticipated to see first light in the winter of 2010/2011 and be fully operational in the fall of 2011. Based on the highly successful Athabasca University Geophysical Observatory (AUGO), opened in 2002 at the Athabasca University campus in Athabasca, Alberta, AUGO II will have expanded observational capacity featuring up to eight climate-controlled domed optical observation suites for instrumentation, on-site accommodation for up to six researchers, and most importantly, dark skies free of light pollution from urban development. AUGO II will share the same advantages as its predecessor, one being its location in central Alberta, allowing routine study of the subauroral zone, auroral oval studies during active times, and very rarely of the polar cap. Like the original AUGO, AUGO II will be in close proximity to major highways, be connected to a high bandwidth network, and be within two hour driving distance to the city of Edmonton and its international airport. Opportunities are open for guest researchers in space physics to conduct auroral studies at this new, state-of-the-art research facility through the installation of remotely controlled instruments and/or campaigns. An innovative program of instrument development will accompany the new observatory’s enhanced infrastructure with a focus on magnetics and H-beta meridian scanning photometry.

  3. The Functional Arm Scale for Throwers (FAST)-Part II: Reliability and Validity of an Upper Extremity Region-Specific and Population-Specific Patient-Reported Outcome Scale for Throwing Athletes.

    PubMed

    Huxel Bliven, Kellie C; Snyder Valier, Alison R; Bay, R Curtis; Sauers, Eric L

    2017-04-01

    The Functional Arm Scale for Throwers (FAST) is an upper extremity (UE) region-specific and population-specific patient-reported outcome (PRO) scale developed to measure health-related quality of life in throwers with UE injuries. Stages I and II, described in a companion paper, of FAST development produced a 22-item scale and a 9-item pitcher module. Stage III of scale development, establishing reliability and validity of the FAST, is reported herein. To describe stage III of scale development: reliability and validity of the FAST. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Data from throwing athletes collected over 5 studies were pooled to assess reliability and validity of the FAST. Reliability was estimated using FAST scores from 162 throwing athletes who were injured (n = 23) and uninjured (n = 139). Concurrent validity was estimated using FAST scores and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) scores from 106 healthy, uninjured throwing athletes. Known-groups validity was estimated using FAST scores from 557 throwing athletes who were injured (n = 142) and uninjured (n = 415). Reliability and validity were assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and measurement error was assessed using standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimum detectable change (MDC). Receiver operating characteristic curves and sensitivity/specificity values were estimated for known-groups validity. Data from a separate group (n = 18) of postsurgical and nonoperative/conservative rehabilitation patients were analyzed to report responsiveness of the FAST. The FAST total, subscales, and pitcher module scores demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability (ICC, 0.91-0.98). The SEM 95 and MDC 95 for the FAST total score were 3.8 and 10.5 points, respectively. The SEM 95 and MDC 95 for the pitcher module score were 5.7 and 15.7 points, respectively. The FAST scores showed acceptable correlation with DASH (ICC, 0

  4. The Functional Arm Scale for Throwers (FAST)—Part II: Reliability and Validity of an Upper Extremity Region-Specific and Population-Specific Patient-Reported Outcome Scale for Throwing Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Huxel Bliven, Kellie C.; Snyder Valier, Alison R.; Bay, R. Curtis; Sauers, Eric L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Functional Arm Scale for Throwers (FAST) is an upper extremity (UE) region-specific and population-specific patient-reported outcome (PRO) scale developed to measure health-related quality of life in throwers with UE injuries. Stages I and II, described in a companion paper, of FAST development produced a 22-item scale and a 9-item pitcher module. Stage III of scale development, establishing reliability and validity of the FAST, is reported herein. Purpose: To describe stage III of scale development: reliability and validity of the FAST. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Data from throwing athletes collected over 5 studies were pooled to assess reliability and validity of the FAST. Reliability was estimated using FAST scores from 162 throwing athletes who were injured (n = 23) and uninjured (n = 139). Concurrent validity was estimated using FAST scores and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) scores from 106 healthy, uninjured throwing athletes. Known-groups validity was estimated using FAST scores from 557 throwing athletes who were injured (n = 142) and uninjured (n = 415). Reliability and validity were assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and measurement error was assessed using standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimum detectable change (MDC). Receiver operating characteristic curves and sensitivity/specificity values were estimated for known-groups validity. Data from a separate group (n = 18) of postsurgical and nonoperative/conservative rehabilitation patients were analyzed to report responsiveness of the FAST. Results: The FAST total, subscales, and pitcher module scores demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability (ICC, 0.91-0.98). The SEM95 and MDC95 for the FAST total score were 3.8 and 10.5 points, respectively. The SEM95 and MDC95 for the pitcher module score were 5.7 and 15.7 points, respectively. The FAST scores

  5. Risk factors and rate of progression for zone I versus zone II type 1 retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Kong, Mingui; Kim, Sang Jin; Ham, Don Il; Kang, Se Woong; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2014-04-01

    To compare the risk factors and rate of progression of zone I versus zone II type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). The medical records of consecutive preterm infants with bilateral type 1 ROP in zone I and age-matched control infants with type 1 ROP in zone II were retrospectively analyzed. Fundus findings at each screening examination and systemic parameters were compared between groups. Univariate and conditional multivariate regression analyses were employed to identify variables significantly associated with zone I ROP. A total of 30 cases and 30 controls were included. The mean gestational age of included infants was 24.6 weeks in both groups, and the mean birth weights were 685 g in the zone I group and 667 g in the zone II group. The postmenstrual age (PMA) at the time of initial ROP detection did not differ between groups, but the PMA at the time of type 1 ROP detection was significantly earlier in the zone I group (mean, 34.9 vs 37.6 weeks). Conditional multiple logistic regression revealed that mechanical ventilation for 30 days or more was significantly associated with the type 1 ROP in zone I compared with zone II (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2-10.0). Zone I ROP exhibited rapid progression, necessitating close monitoring and prompt treatment. Compromised pulmonary function with associated mechanical ventilation in early life may restrict retinal vascular growth and increase the likelihood of zone I type 1 ROP. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of early operative stabilization on late displacement of zone I and II sacral fractures.

    PubMed

    Emohare, Osa; Slinkard, Nathaniel; Lafferty, Paul; Vang, Sandy; Morgan, Robert

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect on displacement of early operative stabilization on unstable fractures when compared to stable fractures of the sacrum. Patient consisted of those sustaining traumatic pelvic fractures that also included sacral fractures of Denis type I and type II classification, who were over 18 at the time of the study. Patients were managed emergently, as judged appropriate at the time and then subsequently divided into two cohorts, comprising those who were either treated operatively or non-operatively. The operative group comprised those treated with either internal fixation or external fixation. Twenty-eight patients had zone II fractures, and 20 had zone I fractures. Zone II fractures showed average displacements of 6.5mm and 6.9mm in the rostral-caudal and anteroposterior directions, respectively, at final follow up. Zone I fractures had average displacements of 6.6mm and 6.1mm in both directions. There were no significant differences between zone I and II sacral fractures (rostral-caudal P=0.74, anteroposterior P=0.24). Average changes in fracture displacement in patients with zone I fractures were 0.6-1.0mm in both directions. Average changes in zone II fractures were 1.8-1.5mm in both directions. There were no significant differences between the average changes in zone I and II fractures in any direction (rostral-caudal P=0.64, anteroposterior P=0.68) or in average displacements at final follow up in any of zone or the entire cohort. Statistically significant differences were noted in average changes in displacement in zone II fractures in the anteroposterior plane (P=0.03) and the overall cohort in the anteroposterior plane (P=0.02). Operative fixation for unstable sacral fractures ensures displacement at follow up is comparable with stable fractures treated non operatively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. NAFTA II : California border zone land transportation issues

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-09-01

    This report constitutes Phase II of a study of the impacts of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) of 1992 on border areas and determines transportation infrastructure access. Reviews status of NAFTA impact issues; identifies new issues; d...

  8. Age-and Brain Region-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mitochondria are central regulators of energy homeostasis and play a pivotal role in mechanisms of cellular senescence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate mitochondrial bio­-energetic parameters in five brain regions [brainstem (BS), frontal cortex (FC), cerebellum (CER), striatum (STR), hippocampus (HIP)] of four diverse age groups [1 Month (young), 4 Month (adult), 12 Month (middle-aged), 24 Month (old age)] to understand age-related differences in selected brain regions and their contribution to age-related chemical sensitivity. Mitochondrial bioenergetics parameters and enzyme activity were measured under identical conditions across multiple age groups and brain regions in Brown Norway rats (n = 5). The results indicate age- and brain region-specific patterns in mitochondrial functional endpoints. For example, an age-specific decline in ATP synthesis (State 111 respiration) was observed in BS and HIP. Similarly, the maximal respiratory capacities (State V1 and V2) showed age-specific declines in all brain regions examined (young > adult > middle-aged > old age). Amongst all regions, HIP had the greatest change in mitochondrial bioenergetics, showing declines in the 4, 12 and 24 Month age groups. Activities of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I, II, and IV enzymes were also age- and brain-region specific. In general changes associated with age were more pronounced, with

  9. Contemporary Strategies in the Management of Civilian Neck Zone II Vascular Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karaolanis, Georgios; Maltezos, Konstantinos; Bakoyiannis, Chris; Georgopoulos, Sotiris

    2017-01-01

    Neck trauma is the leading cause of death mainly in younger persons posing to surgeons the dilemma whether to proceed with reconstruction of vascular injuries either in the presence of coma or in severe neurological deficit. Vascular injuries in zone II predominate over the other injuries located in zones I/III of the neck. Conventional open repair of carotid injuries with primary closure or interposition grafting is always recommended due to the effective long-term results for penetrating injuries or for patients unfit for endovascular intervention. In cases of blunt trauma, anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy should be administered first in neurologically stable patients. In case of worsening of the neurological status of the patient despite adequate anticoagulation endovascular means should be considered in cases of appropriate anatomy of the arterial trauma. We provide an update on penetrating/blunt trauma in zone II of the neck, giving emphasis on the anticoagulant and endovascular treatment. PMID:29034244

  10. Mineral resources of parts of the Departments of Antioquia and Caldas, Zone II, Colombia

    Hall, R.B.; Feininger, Tomas; Barrero, L.; Dario, Rico H.; ,; Alvarez, A.

    1970-01-01

    The mineral resources of an area of 40,000 sq km, principally in the Department of Antioquia, but including small parts of the Departments of Caldas, C6rdoba, Risaralda, and Tolima, were investigated during the period 1964-68. The area is designated Zone II by the Colombian Inventario Minero Nacional(lMN). The geology of approximately 45 percent of this area, or 18,000 sq km, has been mapped by IMN. Zone II has been a gold producer for centuries, and still produces 75 percent of Colombia's gold. Silver is recovered as a byproduct. Ferruginous laterites have been investigated as potential sources of iron ore but are not commercially exploitable. Nickeliferous laterite on serpentinite near Ure in the extreme northwest corner of the Zone is potentially exploitable, although less promising than similar laterites at Cerro Matoso, north of the Zone boundary. Known deposits of mercury, chromium, manganese, and copper are small and have limited economic potentia1. Cement raw materials are important among nonmetallic resources, and four companies are engaged in the manufacture of portland cement. The eastern half of Zone II contains large carbonate rock reserves, but poor accessibility is a handicap to greater development at present. Dolomite near Amalfi is quarried for the glass-making and other industries. Clay saprolite is abundant and widely used in making brick and tiles in backyard kilns. Kaolin of good quality near La Union is used by the ceramic industry. Subbituminous coal beds of Tertiary are an important resource in the western part of the zone and have good potential for greater development. Aggregate materials for construction are varied and abundant. Deposits of sodic feldspar, talc, decorative stone, and silica are exploited on a small scale. Chrysotils asbestos deposits north of Campamento are being developed to supply fiber for Colombia's thriving asbestos-cement industry, which is presently dependent upon imported fiber. Wollastonite and andalusite are

  11. Clinical Results of Flexor Tendon Repair in Zone II Using a six Strand Double Loop Technique.

    PubMed

    Savvidou, Christiana; Tsai, Tsu-Min

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the clinical results after repair of flexor tendon zone II injuries utilizing a 6-strand double-loop technique and early post-operative active rehabilitation. We retrospectively reviewed 22 patients involving 51 cases with zone II flexor tendon repair using a six strand double loop technique from September 1996 to December 2012. Most common mechanism of injuries was sharp lacerations (86.5 %). Tendon injuries occurred equally in manual and non-manual workers and were work-related in 33 % of the cases. The Strickland score for active range of motion (ROM) postoperatively was excellent and good in the majority of the cases (81 %). The rupture rate was 1.9 %. The six strand double loop technique for Zone II flexor tendon repair leads to good and excellent motion in the majority of patients and low re- rupture rate. It is clinically effective and allows for early postoperative active rehabilitation.

  12. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Zone II Partial Flexor Tendon Lacerations of the Fingers: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; Gordon, Joshua A; Buterbaugh, Kristen L; Bozentka, David J; Steinberg, David R; Khoury, Viviane

    2018-04-01

    Accurate assessment of zone II partial flexor tendon lacerations in the finger is clinically important. Surgical repair is recommended for lacerations of greater than 50% to 60%. Our goal was to evaluate ultrasonographic test characteristics and accuracy in identifying partial flexor tendon lacerations in a cadaveric model. From fresh-frozen above-elbow human cadaveric specimens, 32 flexor digitorum profundus tendons were randomly selected to remain intact or receive low- or high-grade lacerations involving 10% to 40% and 60% to 90% of the radioulnar width within Verdan Zone II, respectively. Static and dynamic ultrasonography using a linear array 14-MHz transducer was performed by a blinded musculoskeletal radiologist. Sensitivities, specificities, and other standard test performance metrics were calculated. Actual and measured percentages of tendon laceration were compared by the paired t test. After randomization, 24 tendons were lacerated (12 low- and 12 high-grade), whereas 8 remained intact. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting the presence versus absence of a partial laceration were 0.54 and 0.75, respectively, with positive and negative likelihood ratio values of 2.17 and 0.61. For low-grade lacerations, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.25 and 0.85, compared to 0.83 and 0.85 for high-grade lacerations. Ultrasonography underestimated the percentage of tendon involvement by a mean of 18.1% for the study population as a whole (95% confidence interval, 9.0% to 27.2%; P < .001) but accurately determined the extent for correctly diagnosed high-grade lacerations (-6.7%; 95% confidence interval, -18.7% to 5.2%; P = .22). Ultrasonography was useful in identifying and characterizing clinically relevant high-grade zone II partial flexor digitorum profundus lacerations in a cadaveric model. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  13. New reductions of the Astrographic Catalogue. Plate adjustments of the Algiers, Oxford I and II, and Vatican Zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, S. E.; Martin, J. C.; Jackson, E. S.; Corbin, T. E.

    1996-07-01

    The U. S. Naval Observatory is in the process of making new reductions of the Astrographic Catalogue using a modern reference catalog, the ACRS, and new data analysis and reduction software. Currently ten AC zones have been reduced. This papers discusses the reduction models and results from the Algiers, Oxford I and II, and Vatican zones (those of the Cape zone are discussed elsewhere). The resulting star positions will be combined with those of the U.S. Naval Observatory's Twin Astrograph Catalog to produce a catalog of positions and proper motions in support of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  14. Phase II, improved work zone design guidelines and enhanced model of traffic delays in work zones : final report, March 2009.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-03-01

    This project contains three major parts. In the first part a digital computer simulation model was developed with the aim to model the traffic through a freeway work zone situation. The model was based on the Arena simulation software and used cumula...

  15. Phase II, improved work zone design guidelines and enhanced model of traffic delays in work zones : executive summary report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-03-01

    This project contains three major parts. In the first part a digital computer simulation model was developed with the aim to model the traffic through a freeway work zone situation. The model was based on the Arena simulation software and used cumula...

  16. 76 FR 22809 - Safety Zone; Bay Ferry II Maritime Security Exercise; San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Ferry II Maritime Security Exercise; San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA AGENCY... Security Exercise, a multi-agency exercise that tests the proficiency of teams called upon in real [[Page... exercise, many of whom will be traveling at high speeds while interfacing with law enforcement responders...

  17. GLORIA II Sonograph Mosaic of the Western U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacchione, D. A.; Drake, D. E.; Edwards, B.; Field, M.; Gardner, J.; Hampton, M.; Karl, H.; McCulloch, D.; Kenyon, N.; Masson, D.

    In 1983 the United States declared sovereign rights and jurisdiction over living and nonliving resources in an area extending 200 nautical miles (370 km) seaward from its shores. In response to the establishment of this Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has implemented a program, called EEZ-Scan, to systematically map the EEZ, using the Geological Long- Range Inclined ASDIC (GLORIA) II longrange side scan sonar system developed by the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) of Great Britain [Somers et al, 1978]. The first part of the EEZ-Scan field program was completed in the summer of 1984, when USGS and IOS scientists surveyed the EEZ off the western conterminous United States aboard the British research vessel Farnella (Figure 1). The west coast survey, requiring 96 days of ship time and four separate legs, has resulted in virtually total sonograph coverage of the sea floor from the continental shelf break to the 200-nautical mile limit between the Mexican and Canadian borders, an area of about 850,000 km2 . Other data collected on the cruises included two-channel digital seismic reflection and 3.5-kHz highresolution and 10-kHz bathymetric profiles, as well as towed magnetometer data along approximately 20,000 km of trackline spaced nominally at 30-km intervals.

  18. Operative Treatment of Fifth Metatarsal Jones Fractures (Zones II and III) in the NBA.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Martin; DeSandis, Bridget; Allen, Answorth; Levitsky, Matthew; O'Malley, Quinn; Williams, Riley

    2016-05-01

    Proximal fractures of the fifth metatarsal (zone II and III) are common in the elite athlete and can be difficult to treat because of a tendency toward delayed union, nonunion, or refracture. The purpose of this case series was to report our experience in treating 10 NBA players, determine the healing rate, return to play, refracture rate, and role of foot type in these athletes. The records of 10 professional basketball players were retrospectively reviewed. Seven athletes underwent standard percutaneous internal fixation with bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) whereas the other 3 had open bone grafting primarily in addition to fixation and BMAC. Radiographic features evaluated included fourth-fifth intermetatarsal, fifth metatarsal lateral deviation, calcaneal pitch, and metatarsus adductus angles. Radiographic healing was observed at an overall average of 7.5 weeks and return to play was 9.8 weeks. Three athletes experienced refractures. There were no significant differences in clinical features or radiographic measurements except that the refracture group had the highest metatatarsus adductus angles. Most athletes were pes planus and 9 of 10 had a bony prominence under the fifth metatarsal styloid. This is the largest published series of operatively treated professional basketball players who exemplify a specific patient population at high risk for fifth metatarsal fracture. These players were large and possessed a unique foot type that seemed to be associated with increased risk of fifth metatarsal fracture and refracture. This foot type had forefoot metatarsus adductus and a fifth metatarsal that was curved with a prominent base. We continue to use standard internal fixation with bone marrow aspirate but advocate additional prophylactic open bone grafting in patients with high fourth-to-fifth intermetatarsal, fifth metatarsal lateral deviation, and metatarsus adductus angles as well as prominent fifth metatarsal styloids in order to improve fracture

  19. Regional specificity of aberrant thalamocortical connectivity in autism.

    PubMed

    Nair, Aarti; Carper, Ruth A; Abbott, Angela E; Chen, Colleen P; Solders, Seraphina; Nakutin, Sarah; Datko, Michael C; Fishman, Inna; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2015-11-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests aberrant (mostly reduced) thalamocortical (TC) connectivity in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but despite the crucial role of thalamus in sensorimotor functions and its extensive connectivity with cerebral cortex, relevant evidence remains limited. We performed a comprehensive investigation of region-specific TC connectivity in ASD. Resting-state functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were acquired for 60 children and adolescents with ASD (ages 7-17 years) and 45 age, sex, and IQ-matched typically developing (TD) participants. We examined intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) and anatomical connectivity (probabilistic tractography) with thalamus, using 68 unilateral cerebral cortical regions of interest (ROIs). For frontal and parietal lobes, iFC was atypically reduced in the ASD group for supramodal association cortices, but was increased for cingulate gyri and motor cortex. Temporal iFC was characterized by overconnectivity for auditory cortices, but underconnectivity for amygdalae. Occipital iFC was broadly reduced in the ASD group. DTI indices (such as increased radial diffusion) for regions with group differences in iFC further indicated compromised anatomical connectivity, especially for frontal ROIs, in the ASD group. Our findings highlight the regional specificity of aberrant TC connectivity in ASD. Their overall pattern can be largely accounted for by functional overconnectivity with limbic and sensorimotor regions, but underconnectivity with supramodal association cortices. This could be related to comparatively early maturation of limbic and sensorimotor regions in the context of early overgrowth in ASD, at the expense of TC connectivity with later maturing cortical regions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. HEROD: a human ethnic and regional specific omics database.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xian; Tao, Lin; Zhang, Peng; Qin, Chu; Chen, Shangying; He, Weidong; Tan, Ying; Xia Liu, Hong; Yang, Sheng Yong; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Yu Yang; Chen, Yu Zong

    2017-10-15

    Genetic and gene expression variations within and between populations and across geographical regions have substantial effects on the biological phenotypes, diseases, and therapeutic response. The development of precision medicines can be facilitated by the OMICS studies of the patients of specific ethnicity and geographic region. However, there is an inadequate facility for broadly and conveniently accessing the ethnic and regional specific OMICS data. Here, we introduced a new free database, HEROD, a human ethnic and regional specific OMICS database. Its first version contains the gene expression data of 53 070 patients of 169 diseases in seven ethnic populations from 193 cities/regions in 49 nations curated from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), the ArrayExpress Archive of Functional Genomics Data (ArrayExpress), the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC). Geographic region information of curated patients was mainly manually extracted from referenced publications of each original study. These data can be accessed and downloaded via keyword search, World map search, and menu-bar search of disease name, the international classification of disease code, geographical region, location of sample collection, ethnic population, gender, age, sample source organ, patient type (patient or healthy), sample type (disease or normal tissue) and assay type on the web interface. The HEROD database is freely accessible at http://bidd2.nus.edu.sg/herod/index.php. The database and web interface are implemented in MySQL, PHP and HTML with all major browsers supported. phacyz@nus.edu.sg. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Entrainment Zone Characteristics and Entrainment Rates in Cloud-Topped Boundary Layers from DYCOMS-II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    water and ozone across the EIL. The scalar variables from this flight (not shown) suggest significant horizontal variation in the free- troposphere ...near the cloud top where mixing occurs between dry free- troposphere air and moist turbulent air. Although the concept of the entrainment zone is...mixing occurs between dry free- troposphere air and moist turbulent air. Although the concept of the entrainment zone is clear, defining the top and

  2. Evidence of educational inadequacies in region-specific musculoskeletal medicine.

    PubMed

    Day, Charles S; Yeh, Albert C

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies suggest US medical schools are not effectively addressing musculoskeletal medicine in their curricula. We examined if there were specific areas of weakness by analyzing students' knowledge of and confidence in examining specific anatomic regions. A cross-sectional survey study of third- and fourth-year students at Harvard Medical School was conducted during the 2005 to 2006 academic year. One hundred sixty-two third-year students (88% response) and 87 fourth-year students (57% response) completed the Freedman and Bernstein cognitive mastery examination in musculoskeletal medicine and a survey eliciting their clinical confidence in examining the shoulder, elbow, hand, back, hip, knee, and foot on a one to five Likert scale. We specifically analyzed examination questions dealing with the upper extremity, lower extremity, back, and others, which included more systemic conditions such as arthritis, metabolic bone diseases, and cancer. Students failed to meet the established passing benchmark of 70% in all subgroups except for the others category. Confidence scores in performing a physical examination and in generating a differential diagnosis indicated students felt below adequate confidence (3.0 of 5) in five of the seven anatomic regions. Our study provides evidence that region-specific musculoskeletal medicine is a potential learning gap that may need to be addressed in the undergraduate musculoskeletal curriculum.

  3. Revealing region-specific biofilm viscoelastic properties by means of a micro-rheological approach.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huayu; Habimana, Olivier; Safari, Ashkan; Heffernan, Rory; Dai, Yihong; Casey, Eoin

    2016-01-01

    Particle-tracking microrheology is an in situ technique that allows quantification of biofilm material properties. It overcomes the limitations of alternative techniques such as bulk rheology or force spectroscopy by providing data on region specific material properties at any required biofilm location and can be combined with confocal microscopy and associated structural analysis. This article describes single particle tracking microrheology combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy to resolve the biofilm structure in 3 dimensions and calculate the creep compliances locally. Samples were analysed from Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms that were cultivated over two timescales (24 h and 48 h) and alternate ionic conditions (with and without calcium chloride supplementation). The region-based creep compliance analysis showed that the creep compliance of biofilm void zones is the primary contributor to biofilm mechanical properties, contributing to the overall viscoelastic character.

  4. Surgery in World War II. Orthopedic Surgery in the Zone of Interior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-01-01

    General Reference and Research Branch ROSE C. ENGELMAN, Ph. D., Chief, Historians Branch GERALDINE B. SITES, Chief, Information Activities Branch Major...SERIES Internal Medicine in World War II: Vol. I. Activities of Medical Consultants Vol. II. Infectious Diseases Vol. III. Infectious Diseases and General...Arthropodborne Diseases Other Than Malaria Vol. IX. Special Fields Surgery in World War II: Activities of Surgical Consultants, vol. I Activities of Surgical

  5. Brain noise is task dependent and region specific.

    PubMed

    Misić, Bratislav; Mills, Travis; Taylor, Margot J; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2010-11-01

    The emerging organization of anatomical and functional connections during human brain development is thought to facilitate global integration of information. Recent empirical and computational studies have shown that this enhanced capacity for information processing enables a diversified dynamic repertoire that manifests in neural activity as irregularity and noise. However, transient functional networks unfold over multiple time, scales and the embedding of a particular region depends not only on development, but also on the manner in which sensory and cognitive systems are engaged. Here we show that noise is a facet of neural activity that is also sensitive to the task context and is highly region specific. Children (6-16 yr) and adults (20-41 yr) performed a one-back face recognition task with inverted and upright faces. Neuromagnetic activity was estimated at several hundred sources in the brain by applying a beamforming technique to the magnetoencephalogram (MEG). During development, neural activity became more variable across the whole brain, with most robust increases in medial parietal regions, such as the precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex. For young children and adults, activity evoked by upright faces was more variable and noisy compared with inverted faces, and this effect was reliable only in the right fusiform gyrus. These results are consistent with the notion that upright faces engender a variety of integrative neural computations, such as the relations among facial features and their holistic constitution. This study shows that transient changes in functional integration modulated by task demand are evident in the variability of regional neural activity.

  6. ESTIMATION OF INFILTRATION RATE IN THE VADOSE ZONE: APPLICATION OF SELECTED MATHEMATICAL MODELS - VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Movement of water into and through the vadose zone is of great importance to the assessment of contaminant fate and transport, agricultural management, and natural resource protection. The process of water movement is very dynamic, changing dramatically over time and space. Inf...

  7. Development of a Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones Phase II 2nd Report

    SciT

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Doughty, Christine; Gasperikova, Erika

    2011-03-31

    This is the 2nd report on the three-year program of the 2nd phase of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement. As such, this report is a compendium of the results by Kiho et al. (2011) and those by LBNL.

  8. ELECTROSTATIC BARRIER AGAINST DUST GROWTH IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. MEASURING THE SIZE OF THE 'FROZEN' ZONE

    SciT

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sakagami, Masa-aki; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2011-04-20

    Coagulation of submicron-sized dust grains into porous aggregates is the initial step of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. Recently, it has been pointed out that negative charging of dust in the weakly ionized disks could significantly slow down the coagulation process. In this paper, we apply the growth criteria obtained in Paper I to finding out a location ('frozen' zone) where the charging stalls dust growth at the fractal growth stage. For low-turbulence disks, we find that the frozen zone can cover a major part of the disks at a few to 100 AU from the central star. The maximummore » mass of the aggregates is approximately 10{sup -7}g at 1 AU and as small as a few monomer masses at 100 AU. Strong turbulence can significantly reduce the size of the frozen zone, but such turbulence will cause the fragmentation of macroscopic aggregates at later stages. We examine a possibility that complete freezeout of dust evolution in low-turbulence disks could be prevented by global transport of dust in the disks. Our simple estimation shows that global dust transport can lead to the supply of macroscopic aggregates and the removal of frozen aggregates on a timescale of 10{sup 6} yr. This overturns the usual understanding that tiny dust particles get depleted on much shorter timescales unless collisional fragmentation is effective. The frozen zone together with global dust transport might explain 'slow' ({approx}10{sup 6} yr) dust evolution suggested by infrared observation of T Tauri stars and by radioactive dating of chondrites.« less

  9. Steady hydromagnetic flows in open magnetic fields. II - Global flows with static zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K.; Low, B. C.

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical study of an axisymmetric steady stellar wind with a static zone is presented, with emphasis on the situation where the global magnetic field is symmetrical about the stellar equator and is partially open. In this scenario, the wind escapes in open magnetic fluxes originating from a region at the star pole and a region at an equatorial belt of closed magnetic field in static equilibrium. The two-dimensional balance of the pressure gradient and the inertial, gravitational, and Lorentz forces in different parts of the flow are studied, along with the static interplay between external sources of energy (heating and/or cooling) distributed in the flow and the pressure distribution.

  10. MERIDIONAL FLOW IN THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE. II. HELIOSEISMIC INVERSIONS OF GONG DATA

    SciT

    Jackiewicz, J.; Serebryanskiy, A.; Kholikov, S., E-mail: jasonj@nmsu.edu

    2015-06-01

    Meridional flow is thought to play a very important role in the dynamics of the solar convection zone; however, because of its relatively small amplitude, precisely measuring it poses a significant challenge. Here we present a complete time–distance helioseismic analysis of about 2 years of ground-based Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Doppler data to retrieve the meridional circulation profile for modest latitudes in an attempt to corroborate results from other studies. We use an empirical correction to the travel times due to an unknown center-to-limb systematic effect. The helioseismic inversion procedure is first tested and reasonably validated on artificial datamore » from a large-scale numerical simulation followed by a test to broadly recover the solar differential rotation found from global seismology. From GONG data, we measure poleward photospheric flows at all latitudes with properties that are comparable with earlier studies and a shallow equatorward flow about 65 Mm beneath the surface, in agreement with recent findings from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data. No strong evidence of multiple circulation cells in depth or latitude is found, yet the whole phase space has not yet been explored. Tests of mass flux conservation are then carried out on the inferred GONG and HMI flows and compared to a fiducial numerical baseline from models, and we find that the continuity equation is poorly satisfied. While the two disparate data sets do give similar results for about the outer 15% of the interior radius, the total inverted circulation pattern appears to be unphysical in terms of mass conservation when interpreted over modest time scales. We can likely attribute this to both the influence of realization noise and subtle effects in the data and measurement procedure.« less

  11. Structure and Development of the Subesophageal Zone of the Drosophila Brain. II. Sensory Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Kendroud, Sarah; Bohra, Ali Asgar; Kuert, Philipp A.; Nguyen, Bao; Guillermin, Oriane; Sprecher, Simon G.; Reichert, Heinrich; VijayRaghavan, Krishnaswamy; Hartenstein, Volker

    2018-01-01

    The subesophageal zone (SEZ) of the Drosophila brain processes mechanosensory and gustatory sensory input from sensilla located on the head, mouth cavity and trunk. Motor output from the SEZ directly controls the movements involved in feeding behavior. In an accompanying paper (Hartenstein et al., 2017) we analyzed the systems of fiber tracts and secondary lineages to establish reliable criteria for defining boundaries between the four neuromeres of the SEZ, as well as discrete longitudinal neuropil domains within each SEZ neuromere. Here we use this anatomical framework to systematically map the sensory projections entering the SEZ throughout development. Our findings show a continuity between larval and adult sensory neuropils. Gustatory axons from internal and external taste sensilla of the larva and adult form two closely related sensory projections, (1) the anterior central sensory center (ACSC) located deep in the ventromedial neuropil of the tritocerebrum and mandibular neuromere, and (2) the anterior ventral sensory center (AVSC), occupying a superficial layer within the ventromedial tritocerebrum. Additional, presumed mechanosensory terminal axons entering via the labial nerve define the ventromedial sensory center (VMSC) in the maxilla and labium. Mechanosensory afferents of the massive array of chordotonal organs (Johnston’s organ) of the adult antenna project into the centrolateral neuropil column of the anterior SEZ, creating the antenno-mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC). Dendritic projections of dye back-filled motor neurons extend throughout a ventral layer of the SEZ, overlapping widely with the AVSC and VMSC. Our findings elucidate fundamental structural aspects of the developing sensory systems in Drosophila. PMID:28875566

  12. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part II: Inverse models

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian network model has been developed to simulate a relatively simple problem of wave propagation in the surf zone (detailed in Part I). Here, we demonstrate that this Bayesian model can provide both inverse modeling and data-assimilation solutions for predicting offshore wave heights and depth estimates given limited wave-height and depth information from an onshore location. The inverse method is extended to allow data assimilation using observational inputs that are not compatible with deterministic solutions of the problem. These inputs include sand bar positions (instead of bathymetry) and estimates of the intensity of wave breaking (instead of wave-height observations). Our results indicate that wave breaking information is essential to reduce prediction errors. In many practical situations, this information could be provided from a shore-based observer or from remote-sensing systems. We show that various combinations of the assimilated inputs significantly reduce the uncertainty in the estimates of water depths and wave heights in the model domain. Application of the Bayesian network model to new field data demonstrated significant predictive skill (R2 = 0.7) for the inverse estimate of a month-long time series of offshore wave heights. The Bayesian inverse results include uncertainty estimates that were shown to be most accurate when given uncertainty in the inputs (e.g., depth and tuning parameters). Furthermore, the inverse modeling was extended to directly estimate tuning parameters associated with the underlying wave-process model. The inverse estimates of the model parameters not only showed an offshore wave height dependence consistent with results of previous studies but the uncertainty estimates of the tuning parameters also explain previously reported variations in the model parameters.

  13. Region-specific ischemia, neovascularization and macular oedema in treatment-naïve proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jason; Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Zhang, Jingfa; Li, Weiye

    2018-02-07

    Region-specific pathology in proliferative diabetic retinopathy enhances our understanding and management of this disease. To investigate non-perfusion, neovascularization and macular oedema. A cross-sectional, observational, non-randomized study. Consecutive 43 eyes of 27 treatment-naïve patients. Ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography for studying specific zones, that is, far-peripheral zone, mid-peripheral zone and central retina (cr), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography for analysing thickness of macular layers. Non-perfusion index (NPI) and neovascularization index (NVI) in different zones, thickness of cr, retinal nerve fibre layer, ganglion cell layer (GCL), inner nuclear layer (INL) and outer plexiform layer in parafoveal regions. The NPI of far-periphery and NVI of mid-periphery were the highest by one-way analysis of variance testing. Ischemic retina defined as high NPI in far-periphery was significantly related to macular oedema via a binary classification approach (P < 0.05). The ischemic retina was correlated with a decreased thickness of both retinal nerve fibre and GCL (P < 0.05); macular oedema was correlated with increased INL thickness (P < 0.0001). The region-specific correlation of NPI of far-periphery and NVI of mid-periphery, but not with central retinal thickness, suggests different pathogeneses of neovascularization and macular oedema. Retinal nerve fibre layer and GCL, both biomarkers of diabetic retinal neuronopathy, are associated with retinal ischemia, but not with macular oedema, suggesting that diabetic microangiopathy and neuronopathy possess distinct pathogenic pathways. The strong correlation between macular oedema and INL indicates that intracellular oedema is a determining factor of diabetic macular oedema. © 2018 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  14. Temporal and Region-Specific Requirements of αCaMKII in Spatial and Contextual Learning

    PubMed Central

    Achterberg, Katharina G.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H.S.; Kool, Martijn J.; Goorden, Susanna M.I.; Post, Laura; Slump, Denise E.; Silva, Alcino J.; van Woerden, Geeske M.

    2014-01-01

    The α isoform of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII) has been implicated extensively in molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying spatial and contextual learning in a wide variety of species. Germline deletion of Camk2a leads to severe deficits in spatial and contextual learning in mice. However, the temporal and region-specific requirements for αCaMKII have remained largely unexplored. Here, we generated conditional Camk2a mutants to examine the influence of spatially restricted and temporally controlled expression of αCaMKII. Forebrain-specific deletion of the Camk2a gene resulted in severe deficits in water maze and contextual fear learning, whereas mice with deletion restricted to the cerebellum learned normally. Furthermore, we found that temporally controlled deletion of the Camk2a gene in adult mice is as detrimental as germline deletion for learning and synaptic plasticity. Together, we confirm the requirement for αCaMKII in the forebrain, but not the cerebellum, in spatial and contextual learning. Moreover, we highlight the absolute requirement for intact αCaMKII expression at the time of learning. PMID:25143599

  15. Analysis of Truck Drivers' Opinions on Safety and Traffic Control on Highway Work Zones - Volume II - Final Report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the truck drivers' travel characteristics, concerns about work zone traffic control devices, assessment of work zone features, as well as to determine the location of accidents and bad driving situations based on...

  16. Region-specific role for Pten in maintenance of epithelial phenotype and integrity

    PubMed Central

    Flodby, Per; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Castillo, Dan R.; McConnell, Alicia M.; Krishnaveni, Manda S.; Banfalvi, Agnes; Li, Min; Stripp, Barry; Zhou, Beiyun; Crandall, Edward D.; Minoo, Parviz

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated resistance to naphthalene-induced injury in proximal airways of mice with lung epithelial-specific deletion of the tumor-suppressor gene Pten, attributed to increased proliferation of airway progenitors. We tested effects of Pten loss following bleomycin injury, a model typically used to study distal lung epithelial injury, in conditional PtenSFTPC-cre knockout mice. Pten-deficient airway epithelium exhibited marked hyperplasia, particularly in small bronchioles and at bronchoalveolar duct junctions, with reduced E-cadherin and β-catenin expression between cells toward the luminal aspect of the hyperplastic epithelium. Bronchiolar epithelial and alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cells in PtenSFTPC-cre mice showed decreased expression of epithelial markers and increased expression of mesenchymal markers, suggesting at least partial epithelial-mesenchymal transition at baseline. Surprisingly, and in contrast to previous studies, mutant mice were exquisitely sensitive to bleomycin, manifesting rapid weight loss, respiratory distress, increased early mortality (by day 5), and reduced dynamic lung compliance. This was accompanied by sloughing of the hyperplastic airway epithelium with occlusion of small bronchioles by cellular debris, without evidence of increased parenchymal lung injury. Increased airway epithelial cell apoptosis due to loss of antioxidant defenses, reflected by decreased expression of superoxide dismutase 3, in combination with deficient intercellular adhesion, likely predisposed to airway sloughing in knockout mice. These findings demonstrate an important role for Pten in maintenance of airway epithelial phenotype integrity and indicate that responses to Pten deletion in respiratory epithelium following acute lung injury are highly context-dependent and region-specific. PMID:27864284

  17. Zic deficiency in the cortical marginal zone and meninges results in cortical lamination defects resembling those in type II lissencephaly.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Masaharu; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Aruga, Jun

    2008-04-30

    The formation of the highly organized cortical structure depends on the production and correct placement of the appropriate number and types of neurons. The Zic family of zinc-finger transcription factors plays essential roles in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitors in the medial forebrain and the cerebellum. Examination of the expression of Zic genes demonstrated that Zic1, Zic2, and Zic3 were expressed by the progenitor cells in the septum and cortical hem, the sites of generation of the Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed that Zic proteins were abundantly expressed in the meningeal cells and that the majority of the CR cells distributed in the medial and dorsal cortex also expressed Zic proteins in the mid-late embryonic and postnatal cortical marginal zones. During embryonic cortical development, Zic1/Zic3 double-mutant and hypomorphic Zic2 mutant mice showed a reduction in the number of CR cells in the rostral cortex, whereas the cell number remained unaffected in the caudal cortex. These mutants also showed mislocalization of the CR cells and cortical lamination defects, resembling the changes noted in type II (cobblestone) lissencephaly, throughout the brain. In the Zic1/3 mutant, reduced proliferation of the meningeal cells was observed before the thinner and disrupted organization of the pial basement membrane (BM) with reduced expression of the BM components and the meningeal cell-derived secretory factor. These defects correlated with the changes in the end feet morphology of the radial glial cells. These findings indicate that the Zic genes play critical roles in cortical development through regulating the proliferation of meningeal cells and the pial BM assembly.

  18. Optimising the use of marine tephrochronology in the North Atlantic: a detailed investigation of the Faroe Marine Ash Zones II, III and IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griggs, Adam J.; Davies, Siwan M.; Abbott, Peter M.; Rasmussen, Tine L.; Palmer, Adrian P.

    2014-12-01

    Tephrochronology is central to the INTIMATE goals for testing the degree of climatic synchroneity during abrupt climatic events that punctuated the last glacial period. Since their identification in North Atlantic marine sequences, the Faroe Marine Ash Zone II (FMAZ II), FMAZ III and FMAZ IV have received considerable attention due to their potential for high-precision synchronisation with the Greenland ice-cores. In order to optimise the use of these horizons as isochronous markers, a detailed re-investigation of their geochemical composition, sedimentology and the processes that deposited each ash zone is presented. Shard concentration profiles, geochemical homogeneity and micro-sedimentological structures are investigated for each ash zone preserved within core JM11-19PC, retrieved from the southeastern Norwegian Sea on the central North Faroe Slope. This approach allows a thorough assessment of primary ash-fall preservation and secondary depositional features and demonstrates its value for assessing depositional integrity in the marine environment. Results indicate that the FMAZ II and IV are well-resolved primary deposits that can be used as isochrons for high-precision correlation studies. We outline key recommendations for future marine tephra studies and provide a protocol for optimising the application of tephrochronology to meet the INTIMATE synchronisation goals.

  19. Free-Standing Zone Plate Optimized for He II 30.4 nm Solar Irradiance Measurements Having High Accuracy and Stability in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; McMullin, D. R.; Vest, R.; Sakdinawat, A.; Chang, C.; Jones, A. R.; Bremer, J.

    2015-12-01

    A zone plate was designed to record the He II 30.4 nm solar irradiance, was fabricated using electron beam lithography, and was absolutely calibrated using the NIST SURF synchrotron. The zone plate has an open support grid identical to those used to successfully launch transmission gratings in previous solar radiometers and is otherwise free-standing with no support membrane that would absorb EUV radiation. The measured efficiency of 3.0 ± 0.1% at 30.4 nm is consistent with detailed modeling of the efficiency and accounting for the geometrical transmittance of the support grid. The binary nature of the zone plate, consisting of opaque gold bars and open spaces with no support membrane, results in excellent long-term stability in space against contamination, radiation damage, and other effects that could alter the efficiency and instrument throughput. The zone plate's focusing property enables the rejection of out-of-band radiation by small apertures and high signal to background values that are superior to previous radiometers. The 4 mm outer diameter of the zone plate and the 25 mm focal length for 30.4 nm radiation enable a compact instrument that is attractive for small CubeSats and other space flight missions where resources are extremely limited.

  20. Process-based modeling of temperature and water profiles in the seedling recruitment zone: Part II. Seedling emergence timing

    Predictions of seedling emergence timing for spring wheat are facilitated by process-based modeling of the microsite environment in the shallow seedling recruitment zone. Hourly temperature and water profiles within the recruitment zone for 60 days after planting were simulated from the process-base...

  1. Regional specific groundwater arsenic levels and neuropsychological functioning: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Melissa; Johnson, Leigh; Mauer, Cortney; Barber, Robert; Hall, James; O'Bryant, Sid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the link between geographic information system (GIS)-estimated regional specific groundwater levels and neuropsychological functioning in a sample of individuals with and without cognitive impairment. This cross-sectional study design analyzed data from 1390 participants (733 Alzheimer's disease, 127 Mild Cognitive Impairment, and 530 with normal cognition) enrolled in the Texas Alzheimer's Research and Care Consortium. GISs analyses were used to estimate regional specific groundwater arsenic concentrations using the Environmental Systems Research Institute and arsenic concentrations from the Texas Water Development Board. In the full cohort, regional specific arsenic concentrations were positively associated with language abilities (p = 0.008), but associated with poorer verbal memory, immediate (p = 0.008), and delayed (p < 0.001), as well as poorer visual memory, immediate (p = 0.02), and delayed (p < 0.001). The findings varied by diagnostic category with arsenic being related with cognition most prominently among mild cognitive impairment cases. Overall, estimated regional specific groundwater arsenic levels were negatively associated with neuropsychological performance.

  2. Regional specific groundwater arsenic levels and neuropsychological functioning: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Melissa; Johnson, Leigh; Mauer, Cortney; Barber, Robert; Hall, James; O'Bryant, Sid

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to examine the link between GIS-estimated regional specific groundwater levels and neuropsychological functioning in a sample of individuals with and without cognitive impairment. Methods This cross-sectional study design analyzed data from 1390 participants (733 Alzheimer's disease, 127 Mild Cognitive Impairment, and 530 with normal cognition) enrolled in the Texas Alzheimer's Research and Care Consortium. Geographic information systems analyses were used to estimate regional specific groundwater arsenic concentrations using the Environmental Systems Research Institute and arsenic concentrations from the Texas Water Development Board. Results In the full cohort, regional specific arsenic concentrations were positively associated with language abilities (p=0.008), but associated with poorer verbal memory, immediate (p=0.008) and delayed (p<0.001) as well as poorer visual memory, immediate (p=0.02) and delayed (p<0.001). The findings varied by diagnostic category with arsenic being related with cognition most prominently among MCI cases. Conclusions Overall, estimated regional specific groundwater arsenic levels were negatively associated with neuropsychological performance. PMID:24506178

  3. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciT

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  4. Region-Specific Effect of the Decellularized Meniscus Extracellular Matrix on Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Meniscus Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Tuan, Rocky S

    2017-03-01

    The meniscus is the most commonly injured knee structure, and surgical repair is often ineffective. Tissue engineering-based repair or regeneration may provide a needed solution. Decellularized, tissue-derived extracellular matrices (ECMs) have received attention for their potential use as tissue-engineered scaffolds. In considering meniscus-derived ECMs (mECMs) for meniscus tissue engineering, it is noteworthy that the inner and outer regions of the meniscus have different structural and biochemical features, potentially directing the differentiation of cells toward region-specific phenotypes. To investigate the applicability of mECMs for meniscus tissue engineering by specifically comparing region-dependent effects of mECMs on 3-dimensional constructs seeded with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Controlled laboratory study. Bovine menisci were divided into inner and outer halves and were minced, treated with Triton X-100 and DNase, and extracted with urea. Then, hBMSCs (1 × 10 6 cells/mL) were encapsulated in a photo-cross-linked 10% polyethylene glycol diacrylate scaffold containing mECMs (60 μg/mL) derived from either the inner or outer meniscus, with an ECM-free scaffold as a control. The cell-seeded constructs were cultured with chondrogenic medium containing recombinant human transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3) and were analyzed for expression of meniscus-associated genes as well as for the collagen (hydroxyproline) and glycosaminoglycan content as a function of time. Decellularization was verified by the absence of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cell nuclei and a reduction in the DNA content. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that collagen type I expression was significantly higher in the outer mECM group than in the other groups, while collagen type II and aggrecan expression was highest in the inner mECM group. The collagen (hydroxyproline) content was highest in the outer mECM group, while the

  5. Percutaneous internal fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal jones fractures (Zones II and III) with Charlotte Carolina screw and bone marrow aspirate concentrate: an outcome study in athletes.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Christopher D; Kennedy, John G

    2011-06-01

    Internal fixation is a popular first-line treatment method for proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fractures in athletes; however, nonunions and screw breakage can occur, in part because of nonspecific fixation hardware and poor blood supply. To report the results from 26 patients who underwent percutaneous internal fixation with a specialized screw system of a proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fracture (zones II and III) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Percutaneous internal fixation for a proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fracture (zones II and III) was performed on 26 athletic patients (mean age, 27.47 years; range, 18-47). All patients were competing at some level of sport and were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and SF-12 outcome scores. The mean follow-up time was 20.62 months (range, 12-28). Of the 26 fractures, 17 were traditional zone II Jones fractures, and the remaining 9 were zone III proximal diaphyseal fractures. The mean Foot and Ankle Outcome Score significantly increased, from 51.15 points preoperatively (range, 14-69) to 90.91 at final follow-up (range, 71-100; P < .01). The mean physical component of the SF-12 score significantly improved, from 25.69 points preoperatively (range, 6-39) to 54.62 at final follow-up (range, 32-62; P < .01). The mean mental component of the SF-12 score also significantly improved, from 28.20 points preoperatively (range, 14-45) to 58.41 at final follow-up (range, 36-67; P < .01). The mean time to fracture healing on standard radiographs was 5 weeks after surgery (range, 4-24). Two patients did not return to their previous levels of sporting activity. One patient experienced a delayed union, and 1 healed but later refractured. Percutaneous internal fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fractures, with a Charlotte Carolina screw and bone marrow aspirate concentrate, provides more predictable results while permitting athletes a

  6. Regional-specific effect of fluoxetine on rapidly dividing progenitors along the dorsoventral axis of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi-Gang; Lee, Daehoon; Ro, Eun Jeoung; Suh, Hoonkyo

    2016-10-19

    Hippocampus-dependent cognitive and emotional function appears to be regionally dissociated along the dorsoventral (DV) axis of the hippocampus. Recent observations that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a critical role in both cognition and emotion raised an interesting question whether adult neurogenesis within specific subregions of the hippocampus contributes to these distinct functions. We examined the regional-specific and cell type-specific effects of fluoxetine, which requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis to function as an antidepressant, on the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). Fluoxetine specifically increased proliferation of NSCs located in the ventral region of the hippocampus while the mitotic index of NSCs in the dorsal portion of the hippocampus remained unaltered. Moreover, within the ventral hippocampus, type II NSC and neuroblast populations specifically responded to fluoxetine, showing increased proliferation; however, proliferation of type I NSCs was unchanged in response to fluoxetine. Activation or inhibition of serotonin receptor 1A (5-HTR1A) recapitulated or abolished the effect of fluoxetine on proliferation of type II NSCs and neuroblast populations in the ventral hippocampus. Our study showed that the effect of fluoxetine on proliferation is dependent upon the type and the position of the NSCs along the DV axis of the hippocampus.

  7. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Brown Norway Rats

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Differences in various mitochondrial bioenergetics parameters in different brain regions in different age groups.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Pandya, J.D., J. Royland , R.C. McPhail, P.G. Sullivan, and P. Kodavanti. Age-and Brain Region-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Brown Norway Rats. NEUROBIOLOGY OF AGING. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 42: 25-34, (2016).

  8. Extensive piano practicing has regionally specific effects on white matter development.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Sara L; Nagy, Zoltán; Skare, Stefan; Forsman, Lea; Forssberg, Hans; Ullén, Fredrik

    2005-09-01

    Using diffusion tensor imaging, we investigated effects of piano practicing in childhood, adolescence and adulthood on white matter, and found positive correlations between practicing and fiber tract organization in different regions for each age period. For childhood, practicing correlations were extensive and included the pyramidal tract, which was more structured in pianists than in non-musicians. Long-term training within critical developmental periods may thus induce regionally specific plasticity in myelinating tracts.

  9. Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: II. Water Level Models, Floodplain Wetland Inundation, and System Zones

    SciT

    Jay, David A.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    Spatially varying water-level regimes are a factor controlling estuarine and tidal-fluvial wetland vegetation patterns. As described in Part I, water levels in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) are influenced by tides, river flow, hydropower operations, and coastal processes. In Part II, regression models based on tidal theory are used to quantify the role of these processes in determining water levels in the mainstem river and floodplain wetlands, and to provide 21-year inundation hindcasts. Analyses are conducted at 19 LCRE mainstem channel stations and 23 tidally exposed floodplain wetland stations. Sum exceedance values (SEVs) are used to compare wetlandmore » hydrologic regimes at different locations on the river floodplain. A new predictive tool is introduced and validated, the potential SEV (pSEV), which can reduce the need for extensive new data collection in wetland restoration planning. Models of water levels and inundation frequency distinguish four zones encompassing eight reaches. The system zones are the wave- and current-dominated Entrance to river kilometer (rkm) 5; the Estuary (rkm-5 to 87), comprised of a lower reach with salinity, the energy minimum (where the turbidity maximum normally occurs), and an upper estuary reach without salinity; the Tidal River (rkm-87 to 229), with lower, middle, and upper reaches in which river flow becomes increasingly dominant over tides in determining water levels; and the steep and weakly tidal Cascade (rkm-229 to 234) immediately downstream from Bonneville Dam. The same zonation is seen in the water levels of floodplain stations, with considerable modification of tidal properties. The system zones and reaches defined here reflect geological features and their boundaries are congruent with five wetland vegetation zones« less

  10. In situ reactive zone with modified Mg(OH)2 for remediation of heavy metal polluted groundwater: Immobilization and interaction of Cr(III), Pb(II) and Cd(II).

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Li, Bowen; Bao, Qiburi

    2017-04-01

    Mg(OH) 2 dissolves slowly and can provide a long-term source of alkalinity, thus a promising alternative reagent for the in situ remediation of heavy metal polluted groundwater. However, the application of Mg(OH) 2 on in situ reactive zone (IRZ) for heavy metal polluted groundwater has never been investigated. In this study, the behaviors of heavy metals in a Mg(OH) 2 IRZ were monitored for 45d. The heavy metals show a sequential precipitation by modified Mg(OH) 2 due to the difference of K sp . Column tests were conducted to investigate the temporal and spatial distribution of heavy metals in Mg(OH) 2 IRZ and evaluate the stabilization effect for multi-heavy metal polluted groundwater. Experimental results indicate that there exist interactions between different heavy metals, and their zoning distribution is attributed either to the competitive adsorption onto porous media (control column) or to the sequential precipitation of heavy metal ions (IRZ column). In contrast with the control column, heavy metal contaminated area in Mg(OH) 2 IRZ significantly shrinks. According to the chemical speciation analysis, when water containing Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III) flows through Mg(OH) 2 IRZ, exchangeable fraction of total concentration significantly reduce and the proportion of carbonate and Fe/Mn oxides fraction increase, indicating the decrease of their mobility and toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In situ reactive zone with modified Mg(OH)2 for remediation of heavy metal polluted groundwater: Immobilization and interaction of Cr(III), Pb(II) and Cd(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Li, Bowen; Bao, Qiburi

    2017-04-01

    Mg(OH)2 dissolves slowly and can provide a long-term source of alkalinity, thus a promising alternative reagent for the in situ remediation of heavy metal polluted groundwater. However, the application of Mg(OH)2 on in situ reactive zone (IRZ) for heavy metal polluted groundwater has never been investigated. In this study, the behaviors of heavy metals in a Mg(OH)2 IRZ were monitored for 45 d. The heavy metals show a sequential precipitation by modified Mg(OH)2 due to the difference of Ksp. Column tests were conducted to investigate the temporal and spatial distribution of heavy metals in Mg(OH)2 IRZ and evaluate the stabilization effect for multi-heavy metal polluted groundwater. Experimental results indicate that there exist interactions between different heavy metals, and their zoning distribution is attributed either to the competitive adsorption onto porous media (control column) or to the sequential precipitation of heavy metal ions (IRZ column). In contrast with the control column, heavy metal contaminated area in Mg(OH)2 IRZ significantly shrinks. According to the chemical speciation analysis, when water containing Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III) flows through Mg(OH)2 IRZ, exchangeable fraction of total concentration significantly reduce and the proportion of carbonate and Fe/Mn oxides fraction increase, indicating the decrease of their mobility and toxicity.

  12. Region-Specific Responses of Adductor Longus Muscle to Gravitational Load-Dependent Activity in Wistar Hannover Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, Takashi; Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Nakai, Naoya; Ogura, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2011-01-01

    Response of adductor longus (AL) muscle to gravitational unloading and reloading was studied. Male Wistar Hannover rats (5-wk old) were hindlimb-unloaded for 16 days with or without 16-day ambulation recovery. The electromyogram (EMG) activity in AL decreased after acute unloading, but that in the rostral region was even elevated during continuous unloading. The EMG levels in the caudal region gradually increased up to 6th day, but decreased again. Approximately 97% of fibers in the caudal region were pure type I at the beginning of experiment. Mean percentage of type I fibers in the rostral region was 61% and that of type I+II and II fiber was 14 and 25%, respectively. The percent type I fibers decreased and de novo appearance of type I+II was noted after unloading. But the fiber phenotype in caudal, not rostral and middle, region was normalized after 16-day ambulation. Pronounced atrophy after unloading and re-growth following ambulation was noted in type I fibers of the caudal region. Sarcomere length in the caudal region was passively shortened during unloading, but that in the rostral region was unchanged or even stretched slightly. Growth-associated increase of myonuclear number seen in the caudal region of control rats was inhibited by unloading. Number of mitotic active satellite cells decreased after unloading only in the caudal region. It was indicated that the responses of fiber properties in AL to unloading and reloading were closely related to the region-specific neural and mechanical activities, being the caudal region more responsive. PMID:21731645

  13. Dynamical Evolution of Planetesimals in the Outer Solar System. II. The Saturn/Uranus and Uranus/Neptune Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazier, Kevin R.; Newman, William I.; Varadi, Ferenc; Kaula, William M.; Hyman, James M.

    1999-08-01

    We report on numerical simulations exploring the dynamical stability of planetesimals in the gaps between the outer Solar System planets. We search for stable niches in the Saturn/Uranus and Uranus/Neptune zones by employing 10,000 massless particles-many more than previous studies in these two zones-using high-order optimized multistep integration schemes coupled with roundoff error minimizing methods. An additional feature of this study, differing from its predecessors, is the fact that our initial distributions contain particles on orbits which are both inclined and noncircular. These initial distributions were also Gaussian distributed such that the Gaussian peaks were at the midpoint between the neighboring perturbers. The simulations showed an initial transient phase where the bulk of the primordial planetesimal swarm was removed from the Solar System within 105 years. This is about 10 times longer than we observed in our previous Jupiter/Saturn studies. Next, there was a gravitational relaxation phase where the particles underwent a random walk in momentum space and were exponentially eliminated by random encounters with the planets. Unlike our previous Jupiter/Saturn simulation, the particles did not fully relax into a third Lagrangian niche phase where long-lived particles are at Lagrange points or stable niches. This is either because the Lagrangian niche phase never occurs or because these simulations did not have enough particles for this third phase to manifest. In these simulations, there was a general trend for the particles to migrate outward and eventually to be cleared out by the outermost planet in the zone. We confirmed that particles with higher eccentricities had shorter lifetimes and that the resonances between the jovian planets "pumped up" the eccentricities of the planetesimals with low-inclination orbits more than those with higher inclinations. We estimated the expected lifetime of particles using kinetic theory and even though the time

  14. The regulation of growth and metabolism of kidney stem cells with regional specificity using extracellular matrix derived from kidney.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, John D; Freytes, Donald O; Anandappa, Annabelle J; Oliver, Juan A; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana V

    2013-12-01

    Native extracellular matrix (ECM) that is secreted and maintained by resident cells is of great interest for cell culture and cell delivery. We hypothesized that specialized bioengineered niches for stem cells can be established using ECM-derived scaffolding materials. Kidney was selected as a model system because of the high regional diversification of renal tissue matrix. By preparing the ECM from three specialized regions of the kidney (cortex, medulla, and papilla; whole kidney, heart, and bladder as controls) in three forms: (i) intact sheets of decellularized ECM, (ii) ECM hydrogels, and (iii) solubilized ECM, we investigated how the structure and composition of ECM affect the function of kidney stem cells (with mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs, as controls). All three forms of the ECM regulated KSC function, with differential structural and compositional effects. KSCs cultured on papilla ECM consistently displayed lower proliferation, higher metabolic activity, and differences in cell morphology, alignment, and structure formation as compared to KSCs on cortex and medulla ECM, effects not observed in corresponding MSC cultures. These data suggest that tissue- and region-specific ECM can provide an effective substrate for in vitro studies of therapeutic stem cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fe(II)- and Sulfide-Facilitated Reduction of 99Tc(VII)O4- in Microbially Reduced Hyporheic Zone Sediments

    SciT

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    Redox-reactive, biogeochemical phases generated by reductive microbial activity in hyporheic zone sediments from a dynamic groundwater-river interaction zone were evaluated for their ability to reduce soluble pertechnetate [99Tc(VII)O4-] to less soluble Tc(IV). The sediments were bioreduced by indigenous microorganisms that were stimulated by organic substrate addition in synthetic groundwater with or without sulfate. In most treatments, 20 µmol L-1 initial aqueous Tc(VII) was reduced to near or below detection (3.82×10-9 mol L-1) over periods of days to months in suspensions of variable solids concentrations. Native sediments containing significant lithogenic Fe(II) in various phases were, in contrast, unreactive with Tc(VII). Themore » reduction rates in the bioreduced sediments increased with increases in sediment mass, in proportion to weak acid-extractable Fe(II) and sediment-associated sulfide (AVS). The rate of Tc(VII) reduction was first order with respect to both aqueous Tc(VII) concentration and sediment mass, but correlations between specific reductant concentrations and reaction rate were not found. X-ray microprobe measurements revealed a strong correlation between Tc hot spots and Fe-containing mineral particles in the sediment. However, only a portion of Fe-containing particles were Tc-hosts. The Tc-hot spots displayed a chemical signature (by EDXRF) similar to pyroxene. The application of autoradiography and electron microprobe allowed further isolation of Tc-containing particles that were invariably found to be ca 100 µm aggregates of primary mineral material embedded within a fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix. EXAFS spectroscopy revealed that the Tc(IV) within these were a combination of a Tc(IV)O2-like phase and Tc(IV)-Fe surface clusters, with a significant fraction of a TcSx-like phase in sediments incubated with SO42-. AVS was implicated as a more selective reductant at low solids concentration even though its concentration was below

  16. Fe(II)- and sulfide-facilitated reduction of 99Tc(VII)O4- in microbially reduced hyporheic zone sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.

    2014-07-01

    Redox-reactive, biogeochemical phases generated by reductive microbial activity in hyporheic zone sediments from a dynamic groundwater-river interaction zone were evaluated for their ability to reduce soluble pertechnetate [99Tc(VII)O4-] to less soluble Tc(IV). The sediments were bioreduced by indigenous microorganisms that were stimulated by organic substrate addition in synthetic groundwater with or without sulfate. In most treatments, 20 μmol L-1 initial aqueous Tc(VII) was reduced to near or below detection (3.82 × 10-9 mol L-1) over periods of days to months in suspensions of variable solids concentrations. Native sediments containing significant lithogenic Fe(II) in various phases were, in contrast, unreactive with Tc(VII). The reduction rates in the bioreduced sediments increased with increases in sediment mass, in proportion to weak acid-extractable Fe(II) and sediment-associated sulfide (AVS). The rate of Tc(VII) reduction was first order with respect to both aqueous Tc(VII) concentration and sediment mass, but correlations between specific reductant concentrations and reaction rate were not found. X-ray microprobe measurements revealed a strong correlation between Tc hot spots and Fe-containing mineral particles in the sediment. However, only a portion of Fe-containing particles were Tc-hosts. The Tc-hot spots displayed a chemical signature (by EDXRF) similar to pyroxene. The application of autoradiography and electron microprobe allowed further isolation of Tc-containing particles that were invariably found to be ca 100 μm aggregates of primary mineral material embedded within a fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix. EXAFS spectroscopy revealed that the Tc(IV) within these were a combination of a Tc(IV)O2-like phase and Tc(IV)-Fe surface clusters, with a significant fraction of a TcSx-like phase in sediments incubated with SO42-. AVS was implicated as a more selective reductant at low solids concentration even though its concentration was below that

  17. Low mass planet migration in magnetically torqued dead zones - II. Flow-locked and runaway migration, and a torque prescription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Nelson, Richard P.; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan

    2018-04-01

    We examine the migration of low mass planets in laminar protoplanetary discs, threaded by large scale magnetic fields in the dead zone that drive radial gas flows. As shown in Paper I, a dynamical corotation torque arises due to the flow-induced asymmetric distortion of the corotation region and the evolving vortensity contrast between the librating horseshoe material and background disc flow. Using simulations of laminar torqued discs containing migrating planets, we demonstrate the existence of the four distinct migration regimes predicted in Paper I. In two regimes, the migration is approximately locked to the inward or outward radial gas flow, and in the other regimes the planet undergoes outward runaway migration that eventually settles to fast steady migration. In addition, we demonstrate torque and migration reversals induced by midplane magnetic stresses, with a bifurcation dependent on the disc surface density. We develop a model for fast migration, and show why the outward runaway saturates to a steady speed, and examine phenomenologically its termination due to changing local disc conditions. We also develop an analytical model for the corotation torque at late times that includes viscosity, for application to discs that sustain modest turbulence. Finally, we use the simulation results to develop torque prescriptions for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation.

  18. Emergence of differentially regulated pathways associated with the development of regional specificity in chicken skin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai-Wei; Huang, Nancy A; Liu, I-Hsuan; Wang, Yi-Hui; Wu, Ping; Tseng, Yen-Tzu; Hughes, Michael W; Jiang, Ting Xin; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chen, Chien-Yu; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Lin, En-Chung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Lin, Shau-Ping

    2015-01-23

    Regional specificity allows different skin regions to exhibit different characteristics, enabling complementary functions to make effective use of the integumentary surface. Chickens exhibit a high degree of regional specificity in the skin and can serve as a good model for when and how these regional differences begin to emerge. We used developing feather and scale regions in embryonic chickens as a model to gauge the differences in their molecular pathways. We employed cosine similarity analysis to identify the differentially regulated and co-regulated genes. We applied low cell techniques for expression validation and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-based enhancer identification to overcome limited cell availabilities from embryonic chicken skin. We identified a specific set of genes demonstrating a high correlation as being differentially expressed during feather and scale development and maturation. Some members of the WNT, TGF-beta/BMP, and Notch family known to be involved in feathering skin differentiation were found to be differentially regulated. Interestingly, we also found genes along calcium channel pathways that are differentially regulated. From the analysis of differentially regulated pathways, we used calcium signaling pathways as an example for further verification. Some voltage-gated calcium channel subunits, particularly CACNA1D, are expressed spatio-temporally in the skin epithelium. These calcium signaling pathway members may be involved in developmental decisions, morphogenesis, or epithelial maturation. We further characterized enhancers associated with histone modifications, including H3K4me1, H3K27ac, and H3K27me3, near calcium channel-related genes and identified signature intensive hotspots that may be correlated with certain voltage-gated calcium channel genes. We demonstrated the applicability of cosine similarity analysis for identifying novel regulatory pathways that are differentially regulated during development. Our study

  19. Irradiation induces regionally specific alterations in pro-inflammatory environments in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Hee; Sonntag, William E.; Mitschelen, Matthew; Yan, Han; Lee, Yong Woo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pro-inflammatory environments in the brain have been implicated in the onset and progression of neurological disorders. In the present study, we investigate the hypothesis that brain irradiation induces regionally specific alterations in cytokine gene and protein expression. Materials and methods Four month old F344 × BN rats received either whole brain irradiation with a single dose of 10 Gy γ-rays or sham-irradiation, and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. The mRNA and protein expression levels of pro-inflammatory mediators were analysed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunofluorescence staining. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of irradiation-induced brain inflammation, effects of irradiation on the DNA-binding activity of pro-inflammatory transcription factors were also examined. Results A significant and marked up-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), was observed in hippocampal and cortical regions isolated from irradiated brain. Cytokine expression was regionally specific since TNF-α levels were significantly elevated in cortex compared to hippocampus (57% greater) and IL-1β levels were elevated in hippocampus compared to cortical samples (126% greater). Increases in cytokine levels also were observed after irradiation of mouse BV-2 microglial cells. A series of electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrated that irradiation significantly increased activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Conclusion The present study demonstrated that whole brain irradiation induces regionally specific pro-inflammatory environments through activation of AP-1, NF-κB, and CREB and overexpression of TNF-α, IL

  20. Crustal magnetization and accretion at the Southwest Indian Ridge near the Atlantis II fracture zone, 0-25 Ma

    Hosford, A.; Tivey, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Dick, H.; Schouten, Hans; Kinoshita, H.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze geophysical data that extend from 0 to 25-Myr-old seafloor on both flanks of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Lineated marine magnetic anomalies are consistent and identifiable within the study area, even over seafloor lacking a basaltic upper crust. The full spreading rate of 14 km/Myr has remained nearly constant since at least 20 Ma, but crustal accretion has been highly asymmetric, with half rates of 8.5 and 5.5 km/Myr on the Antarctic and African flanks, respectively. This asymmetry may be unique to a ???400 km wide corridor between large-offset fracture zones of the SWIR. In contrast to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, crustal magnetization amplitudes correlate directly with seafloor topography along the present-day rift valleys. This pattern appears to be primarily a function of along-axis variations in crustal thickness, rather than magnetic mineralogy. Off-axis, magnetization amplitudes at paleo-segment ends are more positive than at paleo-segment midpoints, suggesting the presence of an induced component of magnetization within the lower crust or serpentinized upper mantle. Alteration of the magnetic source layer at paleo-segment midpoints reduces magnetization amplitudes by 70-80% within 20 Myr of accretion. Magnetic and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 735B data suggest that the lower crust cooled quickly enough to lock in a primary thermoremanent magnetization that is in phase with that of the overlying upper crust. Thus magnetic polarity boundaries within the intrusive lower crust may be steeper than envisioned in prior models of ocean crustal magnetization. As the crust ages, the lower crust becomes increasingly important in preserving marine magnetic stripes.

  1. Region-specific spike frequency acceleration in Layer 5 pyramidal neurons mediated by Kv1 subunits

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark N; Okaty, Benjamin W; Nelson, Sacha B

    2009-01-01

    Separation of the cortical sheet into functionally distinct regions is a hallmark of neocortical organization. Cortical circuit function emerges from afferent and efferent connectivity, local connectivity within the cortical microcircuit, and the intrinsic membrane properties of neurons that comprise the circuit. While localization of functions to particular cortical areas can be partially accounted for by regional differences in both long range and local connectivity, it is unknown whether the intrinsic membrane properties of cortical cell-types differ between cortical regions. Here we report the first example of a region-specific firing type in layer 5 pyramidal neurons, and show that the intrinsic membrane and integrative properties of a discrete subtype of layer 5 pyramidal neurons differ between primary motor and somatosensory cortices due to region and cell-type-specific Kv1 subunit expression. PMID:19091962

  2. Associations of Region-Specific Foot Pain and Foot Biomechanics: The Framingham Foot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Thomas J.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Specific regions of the foot are responsible for the gait tasks of weight acceptance, single-limb support, and forward propulsion. With region foot pain, gait abnormalities may arise and affect the plantar pressure and force pattern utilized. Therefore, this study’s purpose was to evaluate plantar pressure and force pattern differences between adults with and without region-specific foot pain. Methods. Plantar pressure and force data were collected on Framingham Foot Study members while walking barefoot at a self-selected pace. Foot pain was evaluated by self-report and grouped by foot region (toe, forefoot, midfoot, or rearfoot) or regions (two or three or more regions) of pain. Unadjusted and adjusted linear regression with generalized estimating equations was used to determine associations between feet with and without foot pain. Results. Individuals with distal foot (forefoot or toes) pain had similar maximum vertical forces under the pain region, while those with proximal foot (rearfoot or midfoot) pain had different maximum vertical forces compared to those without regional foot pain (referent). During walking, there were significant differences in plantar loading and propulsion ranging from 2% to 4% between those with and without regional foot pain. Significant differences in normalized maximum vertical force and plantar pressure ranged from 5.3% to 12.4% and 3.4% to 24.1%, respectively, between those with and without regional foot pain. Conclusions. Associations of regional foot pain with plantar pressure and force were different by regions of pain. Region-specific foot pain was not uniformly associated with an increase or decrease in loading and pressure patterns regions of pain. PMID:25995291

  3. Region-specific reduction in brain volume in young adults with perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bregant, Tina; Rados, Milan; Vasung, Lana; Derganc, Metka; Evans, Alan C; Neubauer, David; Kostovic, Ivica

    2013-11-01

    A severe form of perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) carries a high risk of perinatal death and severe neurological sequelae while in mild HIE only discrete cognitive disorders may occur. To compare total brain volumes and region-specific cortical measurements between young adults with mild-moderate perinatal HIE and a healthy control group of the same age. MR imaging was performed in a cohort of 14 young adults (9 males, 5 females) with a history of mild or moderate perinatal HIE. The control group consisted of healthy participants, matched with HIE group by age and gender. Volumetric analysis was done after the processing of MR images using a fully automated CIVET pipeline. We measured gyrification indexes, total brain volume, volume of grey and white matter, and of cerebrospinal fluid. We also measured volume, thickness and area of the cerebral cortex in the parietal, occipital, frontal, and temporal lobe, and of the isthmus cinguli, parahippocampal and cingulated gyrus, and insula. The HIE patient group showed smaller absolute volumetric data. Statistically significant (p < 0.05) reductions of gyrification index in the right hemisphere, of cortical areas in the right temporal lobe and parahippocampal gyrus, of cortical volumes in the right temporal lobe and of cortical thickness in the right isthmus of the cingulate gyrus were found. Comparison between the healthy group and the HIE group of the same gender showed statistically significant changes in the male HIE patients, where a significant reduction was found in whole brain volume; left parietal, bilateral temporal, and right parahippocampal gyrus cortical areas; and bilateral temporal lobe cortical volume. Our analysis of total brain volumes and region-specific corticometric parameters suggests that mild-moderate forms of perinatal HIE lead to reductions in whole brain volumes. In the study reductions were most pronounced in temporal lobe and parahippocampal gyrus. Copyright © 2013 European

  4. Corticosterone mediates stress-related increased intestinal permeability in a region-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gen; Wu, Shu-Pei; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E; Wiley, John W.; Hong, Shuangsong

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic psychological stress (CPS) is associated with increased intestinal epithelial permeability and visceral hyperalgesia. It is unknown whether corticosterone (CORT) plays a role in mediating alterations of epithelial permeability in response to CPS. Methods Male rats were subjected to 1-hour water avoidance (WA) stress or subcutaneous CORT injection daily for 10 consecutive days in the presence or absence of corticoid-receptor antagonist RU-486. The visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) was measured. The in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion was used to measure intestinal permeability in jejunum and colon simultaneously. Key Results We observed significant decreases in the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and tight junction proteins in the colon but not the jejunum in stressed rats. These changes were largely reproduced by serial CORT injections in control rats and were significantly reversed by RU-486. Stressed and CORT-injected rats demonstrated a 3-fold increase in permeability for PEG-400 (MW) in colon but not jejunum and significant increase in VMR to CRD, which was significantly reversed by RU-486. In addition, no differences in permeability to PEG-4,000 and PEG-35,000 were detected between control and WA groups. Conclusions & Inferences Our findings indicate that CPS was associated with region-specific decrease in epithelial tight junction protein levels in the colon, increased colon epithelial permeability to low-molecular weight macromolecules which were largely reproduced by CORT treatment in control rats and prevented by RU-486. These observations implicate a novel, region-specific role for CORT as a mediator of CPS-induced increased permeability to macromolecules across the colon epithelium. PMID:23336591

  5. 76 FR 38297 - Safety Zone; Marine Events Requiring Safety Zones in the Captain of the Port Sault Sainte Marie Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ...'' W [DATUM: NAD 83]. (ii) Enforcement Period. This safety zone will be enforced on July 4, 2011 from 9...'' N, 086[deg]39'08.52'' W [DATUM: NAD 83]. (ii) Enforcement Period. This safety zone will be enforced...: NAD 83], with the West Bay shoreline forming the South and West boundaries of the zone. (ii...

  6. Intrachromosomal Rearrangements in Rodents from the Perspective of Comparative Region-Specific Painting

    PubMed Central

    Serdyukova, Natalya A.; Perelman, Polina L.; Pavlova, Svetlana V.; Bulatova, Nina S.; Golenishchev, Feodor N.; Stanyon, Roscoe

    2017-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that chromosomal rearrangements play a central role in different evolutionary processes, particularly in speciation and adaptation. Interchromosomal rearrangements have been extensively mapped using chromosome painting. However, intrachromosomal rearrangements have only been described using molecular cytogenetics in a limited number of mammals, including a few rodent species. This situation is unfortunate because intrachromosomal rearrangements are more abundant than interchromosomal rearrangements and probably contain essential phylogenomic information. Significant progress in the detection of intrachromosomal rearrangement is now possible, due to recent advances in molecular biology and bioinformatics. We investigated the level of intrachromosomal rearrangement in the Arvicolinae subfamily, a species-rich taxon characterized by very high rate of karyotype evolution. We made a set of region specific probes by microdissection for a single syntenic region represented by the p-arm of chromosome 1 of Alexandromys oeconomus, and hybridized the probes onto the chromosomes of four arvicolines (Microtus agrestis, Microtus arvalis, Myodes rutilus, and Dicrostonyx torquatus). These experiments allowed us to show the intrachromosomal rearrangements in the subfamily at a significantly higher level of resolution than previously described. We found a number of paracentric inversions in the karyotypes of M. agrestis and M. rutilus, as well as multiple inversions and a centromere shift in the karyotype of M. arvalis. We propose that during karyotype evolution, arvicolines underwent a significant number of complex intrachromosomal rearrangements that were not previously detected. PMID:28867774

  7. Finite element modeling predictions of region-specific cell-matrix mechanics in the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Upton, Maureen L; Guilak, Farshid; Laursen, Tod A; Setton, Lori A

    2006-06-01

    The knee meniscus exhibits significant spatial variations in biochemical composition and cell morphology that reflect distinct phenotypes of cells located in the radial inner and outer regions. Associated with these cell phenotypes is a spatially heterogeneous microstructure and mechanical environment with the innermost regions experiencing higher fluid pressures and lower tensile strains than the outer regions. It is presently unknown, however, how meniscus tissue mechanics correlate with the local micromechanical environment of cells. In this study, theoretical models were developed to study mechanics of inner and outer meniscus cells with varying geometries. The results for an applied biaxial strain predict significant regional differences in the cellular mechanical environment with evidence of tensile strains along the collagen fiber direction of approximately 0.07 for the rounded inner cells, as compared to levels of 0.02-0.04 for the elongated outer meniscus cells. The results demonstrate an important mechanical role of extracellular matrix anisotropy and cell morphology in regulating the region-specific micromechanics of meniscus cells, that may further play a role in modulating cellular responses to mechanical stimuli.

  8. Effects of ethanol on immune response in the brain: region-specific changes in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Kane, Cynthia J M; Phelan, Kevin D; Douglas, James C; Wagoner, Gail; Johnson, Jennifer Walker; Xu, Jihong; Drew, Paul D

    2013-05-23

    Alcohol abuse has dramatic effects on the health of the elderly. Recent studies indicate that ethanol increases immune activity in younger animals and that some of these proinflammatory molecules alter alcohol consumption and addiction. However, the effects of alcohol on immune activation in aged animals have not been thoroughly investigated. We compared the effects of ethanol on chemokine and cytokine expression in the hippocampus, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex of aged C57BL/6 mice. Mice were treated via gavage with 6 g/kg ethanol for 10 days and tissue was harvested 1 day post-treatment. Ethanol selectively increased mRNA levels of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in the hippocampus and cerebellum, but not in the cortex of aged mice relative to control animals. In this paradigm, ethanol did not affect mRNA levels of the cytokines IL-6 or TNF-α in any of these brain regions in aged animals. Collectively, these data indicate a region-specific susceptibility to ethanol regulation of neuroinflammatory and addiction-related molecules in aged mice. These studies could have important implications concerning alcohol-induced neuropathology and alcohol addiction in the elderly.

  9. Olanzapine Reverses MK-801-Induced Cognitive Deficits and Region-Specific Alterations of NMDA Receptor Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Jitao; Guo, Chunmei; Wang, Hongli; Sun, Yaxin; Wang, Han; Su, Yun-Ai; Li, Keqing; Si, Tianmei

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction constitutes an essential component in schizophrenia for its early presence in the pathophysiology of the disease and close relatedness to life quality of patients. To develop effective treatment of cognitive deficits, it is important to understand their neurobiological causes and to identify potential therapeutic targets. In this study, adopting repeated MK-801 treatment as an animal model of schizophrenia, we investigated whether antipsychotic drugs, olanzapine and haloperidol, can reverse MK-801-induced cognitive deficits and how the reversal processes recruited proteins involved in glutamate neurotransmission in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus. We found that low-dose chronic MK-801 treatment impaired object-in-context recognition memory and reversal learning in the Morris water maze, leaving reference memory relatively unaffected, and that these cognitive deficits can be partially reversed by olanzapine, not haloperidol, treatment. At the molecular level, chronic MK-801 treatment resulted in the reduction of multiple N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits in rat mPFC and olanzapine, not haloperidol, treatment restored the levels of GluN1 and phosphorylated GluN2B in this region. Taken together, MK-801-induced cognitive deficits may be associated with region-specific changes in NMDA receptor subunits and the reversal of specific NMDA receptor subunits may underlie the cognition-enhancing effects of olanzapine. PMID:29375333

  10. Clinical activity of everolimus in relapsed/refractory marginal zone B-cell lymphomas: results of a phase II study of the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Conconi, Annarita; Raderer, Markus; Franceschetti, Silvia; Devizzi, Liliana; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Magagnoli, Massimo; Arcaini, Luca; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Martinelli, Giovanni; Vitolo, Umberto; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Porro, Elena; Stathis, Anastasios; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cavalli, Franco; Zucca, Emanuele

    2014-07-01

    The International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group coordinated a phase II trial to evaluate the activity and safety of everolimus in marginal zone lymphomas (MZLs). Thirty patients with relapsed/refractory MZLs received everolimus for six cycles or until dose-limiting toxicity or progression. Median age was 71 years (range, 51-88 years). Twenty patients had extranodal, six splenic, four nodal MZL. Twenty-four patients had stage III-IV. Median number of prior therapies was two (range 1-5). Seventeen patients had early treatment discontinuation, in most cases due to toxicity. Median number of cycles was 4.5 (range, 1-16). Among the 24 assessable patients, the overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (95% confidence interval: 10-47). Grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia (17% of patients, each), infections (17%), mucositis and odontogenic infections (13%) and lung toxicity (3%). The median response duration was 6.8 months (range, 1.4-11.1+). After a median follow-up of 14.5 months, five deaths were reported: four deaths were due to lymphoma, one was due to toxicity. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the projected median progression-free survival was 14 months. The moderate antitumour activity of everolimus in relapsed/refractory MZLs and the observed toxicity limit its therapeutical applicability in these indolent entities. Lower doses of the drug and, perhaps, different strategies including combination with additional agents need to be explored. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Region-specific protein misfolding cyclic amplification reproduces brain tropism of prion strains.

    PubMed

    Privat, Nicolas; Levavasseur, Etienne; Yildirim, Serfildan; Hannaoui, Samia; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Béringue, Vincent; Seilhean, Danielle; Haïk, Stéphane

    2017-10-06

    Human prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are transmissible brain proteinopathies, characterized by the accumulation of a misfolded isoform of the host cellular prion protein (PrP) in the brain. According to the prion model, prions are defined as proteinaceous infectious particles composed solely of this abnormal isoform of PrP (PrP Sc ). Even in the absence of genetic material, various prion strains can be propagated in experimental models. They can be distinguished by the pattern of disease they produce and especially by the localization of PrP Sc deposits within the brain and the spongiform lesions they induce. The mechanisms involved in this strain-specific targeting of distinct brain regions still are a fundamental, unresolved question in prion research. To address this question, we exploited a prion conversion in vitro assay, protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), by using experimental scrapie and human prion strains as seeds and specific brain regions from mice and humans as substrates. We show here that region-specific PMCA in part reproduces the specific brain targeting observed in experimental, acquired, and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases. Furthermore, we provide evidence that, in addition to cellular prion protein, other region- and species-specific molecular factors influence the strain-dependent prion conversion process. This important step toward understanding prion strain propagation in the human brain may impact research on the molecular factors involved in protein misfolding and the development of ultrasensitive methods for diagnosing prion disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Region-specific changes in presynaptic agmatine and glutamate levels in the aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jing, Y; Liu, P; Leitch, B

    2016-01-15

    During the normal aging process, the brain undergoes a range of biochemical and structural alterations, which may contribute to deterioration of sensory and cognitive functions. Age-related deficits are associated with altered efficacy of synaptic neurotransmission. Emerging evidence indicates that levels of agmatine, a putative neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, are altered in a region-specific manner during the aging process. The gross tissue content of agmatine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of aged rat brains is decreased whereas levels in the temporal cortex (TE) are increased. However, it is not known whether these changes in gross tissue levels are also mirrored by changes in agmatine levels at synapses and thus could potentially contribute to altered synaptic function with age. In the present study, agmatine levels in presynaptic terminals in the PFC and TE regions (300 terminals/region) of young (3month; n=3) and aged (24month; n=3) brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats were compared using quantitative post-embedding immunogold electron-microscopy. Presynaptic levels of agmatine were significantly increased in the TE region (60%; p<0.001) of aged rats compared to young rats, however no significant differences were detected in synaptic levels in the PFC region. Double immunogold labeling indicated that agmatine and glutamate were co-localized in the same synaptic terminals, and quantitative analyses revealed significantly reduced glutamate levels in agmatine-immunopositive synaptic terminals in both regions in aged rats compared to young animals. This study, for the first time, demonstrates differential effects of aging on agmatine and glutamate in the presynaptic terminals of PFC and TE. Future research is required to understand the functional significance of these changes and the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Complex and region-specific changes in astroglial markers in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, José J; Yeh, Chia-Yu; Terzieva, Slavica; Olabarria, Markel; Kulijewicz-Nawrot, Magdalena; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    Morphological aging of astrocytes was investigated in entorhinal cortex (EC), dentate gyrus (DG), and cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) regions of hippocampus of male SV129/C57BL6 mice of different age groups (3, 9, 18, and 24 months). Astroglial profiles were visualized by immunohistochemistry by using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamine synthetase (GS), and s100β staining; these profiles were imaged using confocal or light microscopy for subsequent morphometric analysis. GFAP-positive profiles in the DG and the CA1 of the hippocampus showed progressive age-dependent hypertrophy, as indicated by an increase in surface, volume, and somata volume at 24 months of age compared with 3-month-old mice. In contrast with the hippocampal regions, aging induced a decrease in GFAP-positive astroglial profiles in the EC: the surface, volume, and cell body volume of astroglial cells at 24 months of age were decreased significantly compared with the 3-month group. The GS-positive astrocytes displayed smaller cellular surface areas at 24 months compared with 3-month-old animals in both areas of hippocampus, whereas GS-positive profiles remained unchanged in the EC of old mice. The morphometry of s100β-immunoreactive profiles revealed substantial increase in the EC, more moderate increase in the DG, and no changes in the CA1 area. Based on the morphological analysis of 3 astroglial markers, we conclude that astrocytes undergo a complex age-dependent remodeling in a brain region-specific manner. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Variation in the Oxytocin Receptor Gene Predicts Brain Region Specific Expression and Social Attachment

    PubMed Central

    King, Lanikea B.; Walum, Hasse; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Eyrich, Nicholas W.; Young, Larry J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxytocin (OXT) modulates several aspects of social behavior. Intranasal OXT is a leading candidate for treating social deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and common genetic variants in the human oxytocin receptor (OXTR) are associated with emotion recognition, relationship quality and ASD. Animal models have revealed that individual differences in Oxtr expression in the brain drive social behavior variation. Our understanding of how genetic variation contributes to brain OXTR expression is very limited. Methods We investigated Oxtr expression in monogamous prairie voles, which have a well characterized OXT system. We quantified brain region-specific levels of Oxtr mRNA and OXTR protein with established neuroanatomical methods. We used pyrosequencing to investigate allelic imbalance of Oxtr mRNA, a molecular signature of polymorphic genetic regulatory elements. We performed next-generation sequencing to discover variants in and near the Oxtr gene. We investigated social attachment using the partner preference test. Results Our allelic imbalance data demonstrates that genetic variants contribute to individual differences in Oxtr expression, but only in particular brain regions, including the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), where OXTR signaling facilitates social attachment. Next-generation sequencing identified one polymorphism in the Oxtr intron, near a putative cis-regulatory element, explaining 74% of the variance in striatal Oxtr expression specifically. Males homozygous for the high expressing allele display enhanced social attachment. Discussion Taken together, these findings provide convincing evidence for robust genetic influence on Oxtr expression and provide novel insights into how non-coding polymorphisms in the OXTR might influence individual differences in human social cognition and behavior PMID:26893121

  15. High-fat diet-induced brain region-specific phenotypic spectrum of CNS resident microglia.

    PubMed

    Baufeld, Caroline; Osterloh, Anja; Prokop, Stefan; Miller, Kelly R; Heppner, Frank L

    2016-09-01

    Diets high in fat (HFD) are known to cause an immune response in the periphery as well as the central nervous system. In peripheral adipose tissue, this immune response is primarily mediated by macrophages that are recruited to the tissue. Similarly, reactivity of microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, has been shown to occur in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet. To characterize the nature of the microglial response to diets high in fat in a temporal fashion, we studied the phenotypic spectrum of hypothalamic microglia of mice fed high-fat diet for 3 days and 8 weeks by assessing their tissue reaction and inflammatory signature. While we observed a significant increase in Iba1+ myeloid cells and a reaction of GFAP+ astrocytes in the hypothalamus after 8 weeks of HFD feeding, we found the hypothalamic myeloid cell reaction to be limited to endogenous microglia and not mediated by infiltrating myeloid cells. Moreover, obese humans were found to present with signs of hypothalamic gliosis and exacerbated microglia dystrophy, suggesting a targeted microglia response to diet in humans as well. Notably, the glial reaction occurring in the mouse hypothalamus was not accompanied by an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, but rather by an anti-inflammatory reaction. Gene expression analyses of isolated microglia not only confirmed this observation, but also revealed a downregulation of microglia genes important for sensing signals in the microenvironment. Finally, we demonstrate that long-term exposure of microglia to HFD in vivo does not impair the cell's ability to respond to additional stimuli, like lipopolysaccharide. Taken together, our findings support the notion that microglia react to diets high in fat in a region-specific manner in rodents as well as in humans; however, this response changes over time as it is not exclusively pro-inflammatory nor does exposure to HFD prime microglia in the hypothalamus.

  16. Region-Specific Dissociation between Cortical Noradrenaline Levels and the Sleep/Wake Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bellesi, Michele; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara; Serra, Pier Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The activity of the noradrenergic system of the locus coeruleus (LC) is high in wake and low in sleep. LC promotes arousal and EEG activation, as well as attention, working memory, and cognitive flexibility. These functions rely on prefrontal cortex and are impaired by sleep deprivation, but the extent to which LC activity changes during wake remains unclear. Moreover, it is unknown whether noradrenergic neurons can sustain elevated firing during extended wake. Recent studies show that relative to LC neurons targeting primary motor cortex (M1), those projecting to medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have higher spontaneous firing rates and are more excitable. These results suggest that noradrenaline (NA) levels should be higher in mPFC than M1, and that during prolonged wake LC cells targeting mPFC may fatigue more, but direct evidence is lacking. Methods: We performed in vivo microdialysis experiments in adult (9–10 weeks old) C57BL/6 mice implanted for chronic electroencephalographic recordings. Cortical NA levels were measured during spontaneous sleep and wake (n = 8 mice), and in the course of sleep deprivation (n = 6). Results: We found that absolute NA levels are higher in mPFC than in M1. Moreover, in both areas they decline during sleep and increase during wake, but these changes are faster in M1 than mPFC. Finally, by the end of sleep deprivation NA levels decline only in mPFC. Conclusions: Locus coeruleus (LC) neurons targeting prefrontal cortex may fatigue more markedly, or earlier, than other LC cells, suggesting one of the mechanisms underlying the cognitive impairment and the increased sleep presure associated with sleep deprivation. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 11. Citation: Bellesi M, Tononi G, Cirelli C, Serra PA. Region-specific dissociation between cortical noradrenaline levels and the sleep/wake cycle. SLEEP 2016;39(1):143–154. PMID:26237776

  17. Radiation Therapy Administration and Survival in Stage I/II Extranodal Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue

    SciT

    Olszewski, Adam J., E-mail: adam_olszewski@brown.edu; Desai, Amrita

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the factors associated with the use of radiation therapy and associated survival outcomes in early-stage marginal zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Methods and Materials: We extracted data on adult patients with stage I/II MALT lymphoma diagnoses between 1998 and 2010 recorded in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. We studied factors associated with radiation therapy administration in a logistic regression model and described the cumulative incidence of lymphoma-related death (LRD) according to receipt of the treatment. The association of radiation therapy with survival was explored in multivariate models with adjustment for immortalmore » time bias. Results: Of the 7774 identified patients, 36% received radiation therapy as part of the initial course of treatment. Older patients; black or Hispanic men; white, Hispanic, and black women; and socioeconomically disadvantaged and underinsured patients had a significantly lower chance of receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy administration was associated with a lower chance of LRD in most sites. In cutaneous, ocular, and salivary MALT lymphomas, the 5-year estimate of LRD after radiation therapy was 0%. The association of radiation therapy with overall survival in different lymphoma sites was heterogeneous, and statistically significant in cutaneous (hazard ratio 0.45, P=.009) and ocular (hazard ratio 0.47, P<.0001) locations after multivariate adjustment. Conclusions: Demographic factors are associated with the use of radiation therapy in MALT lymphoma. Clinicians should be sensitive to those disparities because the administration of radiation therapy may be associated with improved survival, particularly in cutaneous and ocular lymphomas.« less

  18. Brain region-specific altered expression and association of mitochondria-related genes in autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD) has been observed in approximately five percent of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). MtD could impair highly energy-dependent processes such as neurodevelopment, thereby contributing to autism. Most of the previous studies of MtD in autism have been restricted to the biomarkers of energy metabolism, while most of the genetic studies have been based on mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Despite the mtDNA, most of the proteins essential for mitochondrial replication and function are encoded by the genomic DNA; so far, there have been very few studies of those genes. Therefore, we carried out a detailed study involving gene expression and genetic association studies of genes related to diverse mitochondrial functions. Methods For gene expression analysis, postmortem brain tissues (anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG), motor cortex (MC) and thalamus (THL)) from autism patients (n=8) and controls (n=10) were obtained from the Autism Tissue Program (Princeton, NJ, USA). Quantitative real-time PCR arrays were used to quantify the expression of 84 genes related to diverse functions of mitochondria, including biogenesis, transport, translocation and apoptosis. We used the delta delta Ct (∆∆Ct) method for quantification of gene expression. DNA samples from 841 Caucasian and 188 Japanese families were used in the association study of genes selected from the gene expression analysis. FBAT was used to examine genetic association with autism. Results Several genes showed brain region-specific expression alterations in autism patients compared to controls. Metaxin 2 (MTX2), neurofilament, light polypeptide (NEFL) and solute carrier family 25, member 27 (SLC25A27) showed consistently reduced expression in the ACG, MC and THL of autism patients. NEFL (P = 0.038; Z-score 2.066) and SLC25A27 (P = 0.046; Z-score 1.990) showed genetic association with autism in Caucasian and Japanese samples, respectively. The expression of

  19. Behavioral stress alters corticolimbic microglia in a sex- and brain region-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Justin L; Collins, Kaitlyn E; Patel, Rushi; Wellman, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Women are more susceptible to numerous stress-linked psychological disorders (e.g., depression) characterized by dysfunction of corticolimbic brain regions critical for emotion regulation and cognitive function. Although sparsely investigated, a number of studies indicate sex differences in stress effects on neuronal structure, function, and behaviors associated with these regions. We recently demonstrated a basal sex difference in- and differential effects of stress on- microglial activation in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The resident immune cells of the brain, microglia are implicated in synaptic and dendritic plasticity, and cognitive-behavioral function. Here, we examined the effects of acute (3h/day, 1 day) and chronic (3h/day, 10 days) restraint stress on microglial density and morphology, as well as immune factor expression in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), and dorsal hippocampus (DHC) in male and female rats. Microglia were visualized, classified based on their morphology, and stereologically counted. Microglia-associated transcripts (CD40, iNOS, Arg1, CX3CL1, CX3CR1, CD200, and CD200R) were assessed in brain punches from each region. Expression of genes linked with cellular stress, neuroimmune state, and neuron-microglia communication varied between unstressed male and female rats in a region-specific manner. In OFC, chronic stress upregulated a wider variety of immune factors in females than in males. Acute stress increased microglia-associated transcripts in BLA in males, whereas chronic stress altered immune factor expression in BLA more broadly in females. In DHC, chronic stress increased immune factor expression in males but not females. Moreover, acute and chronic stress differentially affected microglial morphological activation state in male and female rats across all brain regions investigated. In males, chronic stress altered microglial activation in a pattern consistent with microglial involvement in stress

  20. Behavioral stress alters corticolimbic microglia in a sex- and brain region-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, Justin L.; Collins, Kaitlyn E.; Patel, Rushi

    2017-01-01

    Women are more susceptible to numerous stress-linked psychological disorders (e.g., depression) characterized by dysfunction of corticolimbic brain regions critical for emotion regulation and cognitive function. Although sparsely investigated, a number of studies indicate sex differences in stress effects on neuronal structure, function, and behaviors associated with these regions. We recently demonstrated a basal sex difference in- and differential effects of stress on- microglial activation in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The resident immune cells of the brain, microglia are implicated in synaptic and dendritic plasticity, and cognitive-behavioral function. Here, we examined the effects of acute (3h/day, 1 day) and chronic (3h/day, 10 days) restraint stress on microglial density and morphology, as well as immune factor expression in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), and dorsal hippocampus (DHC) in male and female rats. Microglia were visualized, classified based on their morphology, and stereologically counted. Microglia-associated transcripts (CD40, iNOS, Arg1, CX3CL1, CX3CR1, CD200, and CD200R) were assessed in brain punches from each region. Expression of genes linked with cellular stress, neuroimmune state, and neuron-microglia communication varied between unstressed male and female rats in a region-specific manner. In OFC, chronic stress upregulated a wider variety of immune factors in females than in males. Acute stress increased microglia-associated transcripts in BLA in males, whereas chronic stress altered immune factor expression in BLA more broadly in females. In DHC, chronic stress increased immune factor expression in males but not females. Moreover, acute and chronic stress differentially affected microglial morphological activation state in male and female rats across all brain regions investigated. In males, chronic stress altered microglial activation in a pattern consistent with microglial involvement in stress

  1. The heterogeneity of regional specific ventilation is unchanged following heavy exercise in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Tedjasaputra, Vince; Sá, Rui Carlos; Arai, Tatsuya J.; Holverda, Sebastiaan; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Chen, William T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Davis, Christopher K.; Kim Prisk, G.

    2013-01-01

    Heavy exercise increases ventilation-perfusion mismatch and decreases pulmonary gas exchange efficiency. Previous work using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) arterial spin labeling in athletes has shown that, after 45 min of heavy exercise, the spatial heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow was increased in recovery. We hypothesized that the heterogeneity of regional specific ventilation (SV, the local tidal volume over functional residual capacity ratio) would also be increased following sustained exercise, consistent with the previously documented changes in blood flow heterogeneity. Trained subjects (n = 6, maximal O2 consumption = 61 ± 7 ml·kg−1·min−1) cycled 45 min at their individually determined ventilatory threshold. Oxygen-enhanced MRI was used to quantify SV in a sagittal slice of the right lung in supine posture pre- (preexercise) and 15- and 60-min postexercise. Arterial spin labeling was used to measure pulmonary blood flow in the same slice bracketing the SV measures. Heterogeneity of SV and blood flow were quantified by relative dispersion (RD = SD/mean). The alveolar-arterial oxygen difference was increased during exercise, 23.3 ± 5.3 Torr, compared with rest, 6.3 ± 3.7 Torr, indicating a gas exchange impairment during exercise. No significant change in RD of SV was seen after exercise: preexercise 0.78 ± 0.15, 15 min postexercise 0.81 ± 0.13, 60 min postexercise 0.78 ± 0.08 (P = 0.5). The RD of blood flow increased significantly postexercise: preexercise 1.00 ± 0.12, 15 min postexercise 1.15 ± 0.10, 45 min postexercise 1.10 ± 0.10, 60 min postexercise 1.19 ± 0.11, 90 min postexercise 1.11 ± 0.12 (P < 0.005). The lack of a significant change in RD of SV postexercise, despite an increase in the RD of blood flow, suggests that airways may be less susceptible to the effects of exercise than blood vessels. PMID:23640585

  2. Brain Barrier Disruption and Region-Specific Neuronal Degeneration during Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Pigs.

    PubMed

    Brunse, Anders; Abbaspour, Afrouz; Sangild, Per Torp

    2018-06-06

    preterm birth. Acute gastrointestinal NEC lesions were associated with systemic inflammation, increased BCSFB permeability and region-specific neuronal damage. The results demonstrate the importance of early interventions against NEC to prevent brain injury in preterm infants. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Brain region-specific altered expression and association of mitochondria-related genes in autism.

    PubMed

    Anitha, Ayyappan; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Thanseem, Ismail; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Miyachi, Taishi; Yamada, Satoru; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Matsumoto, Kaori; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Ichikawa, Hironobu; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Mori, Norio

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD) has been observed in approximately five percent of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). MtD could impair highly energy-dependent processes such as neurodevelopment, thereby contributing to autism. Most of the previous studies of MtD in autism have been restricted to the biomarkers of energy metabolism, while most of the genetic studies have been based on mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Despite the mtDNA, most of the proteins essential for mitochondrial replication and function are encoded by the genomic DNA; so far, there have been very few studies of those genes. Therefore, we carried out a detailed study involving gene expression and genetic association studies of genes related to diverse mitochondrial functions. For gene expression analysis, postmortem brain tissues (anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG), motor cortex (MC) and thalamus (THL)) from autism patients (n=8) and controls (n=10) were obtained from the Autism Tissue Program (Princeton, NJ, USA). Quantitative real-time PCR arrays were used to quantify the expression of 84 genes related to diverse functions of mitochondria, including biogenesis, transport, translocation and apoptosis. We used the delta delta Ct (∆∆Ct) method for quantification of gene expression. DNA samples from 841 Caucasian and 188 Japanese families were used in the association study of genes selected from the gene expression analysis. FBAT was used to examine genetic association with autism. Several genes showed brain region-specific expression alterations in autism patients compared to controls. Metaxin 2 (MTX2), neurofilament, light polypeptide (NEFL) and solute carrier family 25, member 27 (SLC25A27) showed consistently reduced expression in the ACG, MC and THL of autism patients. NEFL (P = 0.038; Z-score 2.066) and SLC25A27 (P = 0.046; Z-score 1.990) showed genetic association with autism in Caucasian and Japanese samples, respectively. The expression of DNAJC19, DNM1L, LRPPRC

  4. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  5. Potential-based and non-potential-based cohesive zone formulations under mixed-mode separation and over-closure-Part II: Finite element applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máirtín, Éamonn Ó.; Parry, Guillaume; Beltz, Glenn E.; McGarry, J. Patrick

    2014-02-01

    This paper, the second of two parts, presents three novel finite element case studies to demonstrate the importance of normal-tangential coupling in cohesive zone models (CZMs) for the prediction of mixed-mode interface debonding. Specifically, four new CZMs proposed in Part I of this study are implemented, namely the potential-based MP model and the non-potential-based NP1, NP2 and SMC models. For comparison, simulations are also performed for the well established potential-based Xu-Needleman (XN) model and the non-potential-based model of van den Bosch, Schreurs and Geers (BSG model). Case study 1: Debonding and rebonding of a biological cell from a cyclically deforming silicone substrate is simulated when the mode II work of separation is higher than the mode I work of separation at the cell-substrate interface. An active formulation for the contractility and remodelling of the cell cytoskeleton is implemented. It is demonstrated that when the XN potential function is used at the cell-substrate interface repulsive normal tractions are computed, preventing rebonding of significant regions of the cell to the substrate. In contrast, the proposed MP potential function at the cell-substrate interface results in negligible repulsive normal tractions, allowing for the prediction of experimentally observed patterns of cell cytoskeletal remodelling. Case study 2: Buckling of a coating from the compressive surface of a stent is simulated. It is demonstrated that during expansion of the stent the coating is initially compressed into the stent surface, while simultaneously undergoing tangential (shear) tractions at the coating-stent interface. It is demonstrated that when either the proposed NP1 or NP2 model is implemented at the stent-coating interface mixed-mode over-closure is correctly penalised. Further expansion of the stent results in the prediction of significant buckling of the coating from the stent surface, as observed experimentally. In contrast, the BSG model

  6. Region-Specific Involvement of Actin Rearrangement-Related Synaptic Structure Alterations in Conditioned Taste Aversion Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bi, Ai-Ling; Wang, Yue; Li, Bo-Qin; Wang, Qian-Qian; Ma, Ling; Yu, Hui; Zhao, Ling; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Actin rearrangement plays an essential role in learning and memory; however, the spatial and temporal regulation of actin dynamics in different phases of associative memory has not been fully understood. Here, using the conditioned taste aversion (CTA) paradigm, we investigated the region-specific involvement of actin rearrangement-related…

  7. Brain region-specific deficit in mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Abha; Gu, Feng; Essa, Musthafa M; Wegiel, Jerzy; Kaur, Kulbir; Brown, William Ted; Chauhan, Ved

    2011-04-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in generation of free radicals, ATP formation, and in apoptosis. We studied the levels of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, that is, complexes I, II, III, IV, and V, in brain tissue samples from the cerebellum and the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal cortices of subjects with autism and age-matched control subjects. The subjects were divided into two groups according to their ages: Group A (children, ages 4-10 years) and Group B (adults, ages 14-39 years). In Group A, we observed significantly lower levels of complexes III and V in the cerebellum (p<0.05), of complex I in the frontal cortex (p<0.05), and of complexes II (p<0.01), III (p<0.01), and V (p<0.05) in the temporal cortex of children with autism as compared to age-matched control subjects, while none of the five ETC complexes was affected in the parietal and occipital cortices in subjects with autism. In the cerebellum and temporal cortex, no overlap was observed in the levels of these ETC complexes between subjects with autism and control subjects. In the frontal cortex of Group A, a lower level of ETC complexes was observed in a subset of autism cases, that is, 60% (3/5) for complexes I, II, and V, and 40% (2/5) for complexes III and IV. A striking observation was that the levels of ETC complexes were similar in adult subjects with autism and control subjects (Group B). A significant increase in the levels of lipid hydroperoxides, an oxidative stress marker, was also observed in the cerebellum and temporal cortex in the children with autism. These results suggest that the expression of ETC complexes is decreased in the cerebellum and the frontal and temporal regions of the brain in children with autism, which may lead to abnormal energy metabolism and oxidative stress. The deficits observed in the levels of ETC complexes in children with autism may readjust to normal levels by adulthood. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry

  8. Brain region-specific deficit in mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes in children with autism

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Abha; Gu, Feng; Essa, Musthafa M.; Wegiel, Jerzy; Kaur, Kulbir; Brown, William Ted; Chauhan, Ved

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in generation of free radicals, ATP formation, and in apoptosis. We studied the levels of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, that is, complexes I, II, III, IV, and V, in brain tissue samples from the cerebellum and the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal cortices of subjects with autism and age-matched control subjects. The subjects were divided into two groups according to their ages: Group A (children, ages 4–10 years) and Group B (adults, ages 14–39 years). In Group A, we observed significantly lower levels of complexes III and V in the cerebellum (p < 0.05), of complex I in the frontal cortex (p < 0.05), and of complexes II (p < 0.01), III (p<0.01), and V (p < 0.05) in the temporal cortex of children with autism as compared to age-matched control subjects, while none of the five ETC complexes was affected in the parietal and occipital cortices in subjects with autism. In the cerebellum and temporal cortex, no overlap was observed in the levels of these ETC complexes between subjects with autism and control subjects. In the frontal cortex of Group A, a lower level of ETC complexes was observed in a subset of autism cases, that is, 60% (3/5) for complexes I, II, and V, and 40% (2/5) for complexes III and IV. A striking observation was that the levels of ETC complexes were similar in adult subjects with autism and control subjects (Group B). A significant increase in the levels of lipid hydroperoxides, an oxidative stress marker, was also observed in the cerebellum and temporal cortex in the children with autism. These results suggest that the expression of ETC complexes is decreased in the cerebellum and the frontal and temporal regions of the brain in children with autism, which may lead to abnormal energy metabolism and oxidative stress. The deficits observed in the levels of ETC complexes in children with autism may readjust to normal levels by adulthood. PMID:21250997

  9. A demonstration of expert systems applications in transportation engineering : volume II, TRANZ, a prototype expert system for traffic control in highway work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1988-01-01

    The development of a prototype knowledge-based expert system (KBES) for selecting appropriate traffic control strategies and management techniques around highway work zones was initiated. This process was encompassed by the steps that formulate the p...

  10. Functional Assessment of Region-Specific Neglect: Are There Differential Behavioural Consequences of Peripersonal versus Extrapersonal Neglect?

    PubMed Central

    Nijboer, T. C. W.; ten Brink, A. F.; Kouwenhoven, M.; Visser-Meily, J. M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Region-specific types of neglect (peripersonal and extrapersonal) have been dissociated, yet, differential behavioural consequences are unknown. Objective. The aim of the current study was to investigate behavioural consequences at the level of basic activities of daily living of region-specific neglect, using the Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS). Methods. 118 stroke patients were screened within the first two weeks after admission to the rehabilitation center for inpatient rehabilitation. Results. Patients with peripersonal neglect and patients with neglect for both regions had significantly higher total score on the CBS compared to nonneglect patients. Total scores for patients with extrapersonal neglect were comparable to non-neglect patients. ADL impairments were found across activities (e.g., looking towards one side, forgetting body parts, colliding) for both patients with peripersonal neglect and patients with neglect for both regions. Patients with extrapersonal neglect were only impaired on the item on way finding. Conclusions. When diagnosing neglect, it is relevant to distinguish the type of region-specific neglect and, where needed, to adjust the rehabilitation program accordingly. As the CBS is not developed to typically measure ADL in extrapersonal neglect, it would be of importance to add other (instrumental) activities that heavily rely on processing information in farther space. PMID:24825959

  11. Zone lines

    Kevin T. Smith

    2001-01-01

    Zone lines are narrow, usually dark markings formed in decaying wood. Zone lines are found most frequently in advanced white rot of hardwoods, although they occasionally are associated both with brown rot and with softwoods.

  12. Using MERRA, AMIP II, CMIP5 Outputs to Assess Actual and Potential Building Climate Zone Change and Variability From the Last 30 Years Through 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stackhouse, P. W.; Westberg, D. J.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Chandler, W.; Zhang, T.

    2014-12-01

    In the US, residential and commercial building infrastructure combined consumes about 40% of total energy usage and emits about 39% of total CO2emission (DOE/EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2013"). Thus, increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is paramount to reducing energy costs and emissions. Building codes, as used by local and state enforcement entities are typically tied to the dominant climate within an enforcement jurisdiction classified according to various climate zones. These climates zones are based upon a 30-year average of local surface observations and are developed by DOE and ASHRAE (formerly known as the American Society of Hearting, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers). A significant shortcoming of the methodology used in constructing such maps is the use of surface observations (located mainly near airports) that are unequally distributed and frequently have periods of missing data that need to be filled by various approximation schemes. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of using NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric data assimilation to derive the ASHRAE climate zone maps and then using MERRA to define the last 30 years of variability in climate zones. These results show that there is a statistically significant increase in the area covered by warmer climate zones and some tendency for a reduction of area in colder climate zones that require longer time series to confirm. Using the uncertainties of the basic surface temperature and precipitation parameters from MERRA as determined by comparison to surface measurements, we first compare patterns and variability of ASHRAE climate zones from MERRA relative to present day climate model runs from AMIP simulations to establish baseline sensitivity. Based upon these results, we assess the variability of the ASHRAE climate zones according to CMIP runs through 2100 using an ensemble analysis that classifies model output changes by

  13. The seasonal succession of zooplankton in the Southern Ocean south of Australia, part II: The Sub-Antarctic to Polar Frontal Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Brian P. V.; Hosie, Graham W.

    2006-07-01

    Between October 2001 and March 2002 six transects were completed at monthly intervals in the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ) and Inter-Sub-Antarctic Front Zone (ISAFZ)/Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) in the Southern Ocean south of Australia. Zooplankton were collected with a Continuous Plankton Recorder and NORPAC net and multivariate analysis was used to analyse the seasonal succession of communities. Despite strong, seasonally consistent, biogeographic differences between the SAZ and ISAFZ/PFZ, community structure in all zones was dominated by a suite of common taxa. These included the ubiquitous Oithona similis, foraminiferans and appendicularians (Core taxa), occurring in >97% of samples and contributing an average of 75% to total sample abundance, and Calanus simillimus, Rhincalanus gigas, Ctenocalanus citer, Clausocalanus brevipes, Clausocalanus laticeps, Oithona frigida, Limacina spp. and chaetognaths (Summer taxa), present in >57% of samples and occurring at seasonally high densities. Because of the dominance of the Core and Summer taxa, the seasonal succession was most clearly evident as a change in zooplankton densities. In October densities averaged <15 ind m -3, rising to 52 ind m -3 (max=92 ind m -3) in November, and subsequently increasing slowly through to January (ave=115 ind m -3; max=255 ind m -3). Densities peaked abruptly in February (ave=634 ind m -3; max=1593 ind m -3), and remained relatively high in March (ave=193 ind m -3; max=789 ind m -3). A latitudinal lag in seasonal development was observed with peak densities occurring first in the SAZ (February) and then in the ISAFZ/PFZ (March). The seasonal community succession was strongly influenced by species population cycles. The role of zooplankton in biogeochemical cycling in the SAZ and ISAFZ/PFZ was discussed in the light of past sediment trap data collected from the study area.

  14. Effects of defoliation in the developing leaf zone on young Populus Xeuramericana plants. II. Distribution of UC-photosynthate after defoliation

    SciT

    Bassman, J.H.; Dickmann, D.I.

    Patterns of UC-photosynthate distribution in growth chamber-grown Populus xeuramericana cv. Negrito de Granada were determined 24 h, 3 weeks, and 5 weeks after defoliation in the developing leaf zone. Translocation patterns were determined by exposing leaves below, within, or above the defoliated zone to UCO2 and determining UC distribution within the plant after 48 h. Translocation patterns were altered within 24 h after defoliation. When leaves below or remaining tissue of leaves within the zone of defoliation were exposed to UCO2, a greater percentage of UC-photosynthate was transported to the expanding shoot and lateral branches and less to the rootsmore » in defoliated plants compared to controls. Little difference between defoliated and control plants and UC distribution occurred when new leaves produced subsequent to defoliation were exposed to UCO2. By 5 weeks after defoliation there was little difference in patterns of UC distribution between defoliated and control plants. These results substantiate biomass partitioning data which showed that a single defoliation of young poplar plants did not affect diameter or height growth, whereas leaf growth was stimulated and root growth reduced.« less

  15. Generation of Regionally Specific Neural Progenitor Cells (NPCs) and Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells (hPSCs).

    PubMed

    Cutts, Josh; Brookhouser, Nicholas; Brafman, David A

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are a multipotent cell population capable of long-term expansion and differentiation into a variety of neuronal subtypes. As such, NPCs have tremendous potential for disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. Current methods for the generation of NPCs results in cell populations homogenous for pan-neural markers such as SOX1 and SOX2 but heterogeneous with respect to regional identity. In order to use NPCs and their neuronal derivatives to investigate mechanisms of neurological disorders and develop more physiologically relevant disease models, methods for generation of regionally specific NPCs and neurons are needed. Here, we describe a protocol in which exogenous manipulation of WNT signaling, through either activation or inhibition, during neural differentiation of hPSCs, promotes the formation of regionally homogenous NPCs and neuronal cultures. In addition, we provide methods to monitor and characterize the efficiency of hPSC differentiation to these regionally specific cell identities.

  16. Differentiation and magma mixing on Kilauea's east rift zone: A further look at the eruptions of 1955 and 1960. Part II. The 1960 lavas

    Wright, T.L.; Helz, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    New and detailed petrographic observations, mineral compositional data, and whole-rock vs glass compositional trends document magma mixing in lavas erupted from Kilauea's lower east rift zone in 1960. Evidence includes the occurrence of heterogeneous phenocryst assemblages, including resorbed and reversely zoned minerals in the lavas inferred to be hybrids. Calculations suggest that this mixing, which is shown to have taken place within magma reservoirs recharged at the end of the 1955 eruption, involved introduction of four different magmas. These magmas originated beneath Kilauea's summit and moved into the rift reservoirs beginning 10 days after the eruption began. We used microprobe analyses of glass to calculate temperatures of liquids erupted in 1955 and 1960. We then used the calculated proportions of stored and recharge components to estimate the temperature of the recharge components, and found those temperatures to be consistent with the temperature of the same magmas as they appeared at Kilauea's summit. Our studies reinforce conclusions reached in previous studies of Kilauea's magmatic plumbing. We infer that magma enters shallow storage beneath Kilauea's summit and also moves laterally into the fluid core of the East rift zone. During this process, if magmas of distinctive chemistry are present, they retain their chemical identity and the amount of cooling is comparable for magma transported either upward or laterally to eruption sites. Intrusions within a few kilometers of the surface cool and crystallize to produce fractionated magma. Magma mixing occurs both within bodies of previously fractionated magma and when new magma intersects a preexisting reservoir. Magma is otherwise prevented from mixing, either by wall-rock septa or by differing thermal and density characteristics of the successive magma batches.

  17. HttQ111/+ Huntington's Disease Knock-in Mice Exhibit Brain Region-Specific Morphological Changes and Synaptic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Marina; Milnerwood, Austen; Giordano, James; St Claire, Jason; Guide, Jolene R; Stromberg, Mary; Gillis, Tammy; Sapp, Ellen; DiFiglia, Marian; MacDonald, Marcy E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Lee, Jong-Min; Tappan, Susan; Raymond, Lynn; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2018-01-01

    Successful disease-modifying therapy for Huntington's disease (HD) will require therapeutic intervention early in the pathogenic process. Achieving this goal requires identifying phenotypes that are proximal to the HTT CAG repeat expansion. To use Htt CAG knock-in mice, precise genetic replicas of the HTT mutation in patients, as models to study proximal disease events. Using cohorts of B6J.HttQ111/+ mice from 2 to 18 months of age, we analyzed pathological markers, including immunohistochemistry, brain regional volumes and cortical thickness, CAG instability, electron microscopy of striatal synapses, and acute slice electrophysiology to record glutamatergic transmission at striatal synapses. We also incorporated a diet perturbation paradigm for some of these analyses. B6J.HttQ111/+ mice did not exhibit significant neurodegeneration or gliosis but revealed decreased striatal DARPP-32 as well as subtle but regional-specific changes in brain volumes and cortical thickness that parallel those in HD patients. Ultrastructural analyses of the striatum showed reduced synapse density, increased postsynaptic density thickness and increased synaptic cleft width. Acute slice electrophysiology showed alterations in spontaneous AMPA receptor-mediated postsynaptic currents, evoked NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents, and elevated extrasynaptic NMDA currents. Diet influenced cortical thickness, but did not impact somatic CAG expansion, nor did it show any significant interaction with genotype on immunohistochemical, brain volume or cortical thickness measures. These data show that a single HttQ111 allele is sufficient to elicit brain region-specific morphological changes and early neuronal dysfunction, highlighting an insidious disease process already apparent in the first few months of life.

  18. Region-specificity of GABAA receptor mediated effects on orientation and direction selectivity in cat visual cortical area 18.

    PubMed

    Jirmann, Kay-Uwe; Pernberg, Joachim; Eysel, Ulf T

    2009-01-01

    The role of GABAergic inhibition in orientation and direction selectivity has been investigated with the GABA(A)-Blocker bicuculline in the cat visual cortex, and results indicated a region specific difference of functional contributions of GABAergic inhibition in areas 17 and 18. In area 17 inhibition appeared mainly involved in sculpturing orientation and direction tuning, while in area 18 inhibition seemed more closely associated with temporal receptive field properties. However, different types of stimuli were used to test areas 17 and 18 and further studies performed in area 17 suggested an important influence of the stimulus type (single light bars vs. moving gratings) on the evoked responses (transient vs. sustained) and inhibitory mechanisms (GABA(A) vs. GABA(B)) which in turn might be more decisive for the specific results than the cortical region. To insert the missing link in this chain of arguments it was necessary to study GABAergic inhibition in area 18 with moving light bars, which has not been done so far. Therefore, in the present study we investigated area 18 cells responding to oriented moving light bars with extracellular recordings and reversible microiontophoretic blockade of GABAergig inhibition with bicuculline methiodide. The majority of neurons was characterized by a pronounced orientation specificity and variable degrees of direction selectivity. GABA(A)ergic inhibition significantly influenced preferred orientation and preferred direction in area 18. During the action of bicuculline orientation tuning width increased and orientation and direction selectivity indices decreased. Our results obtained in area 18 with moving bar stimuli, although in the proportion of affected cells similar to those described in area 17, quantitatively matched the findings for direction and orientation specificity obtained with moving gratings in area 18. Accordingly, stimulus type is not decisive in area 18 and the GABA(A) dependent, inhibitory intracortical

  19. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part II. Application to electron beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.; Klokkehaug, S.

    2000-03-01

    In the present investigation, a process model for electron beam (EB) welding of different grades of duplex stainless steels (i.e. SAF 2205 and 2507) has been developed. A number of attractive features are built into the original finite element code, including (1) a separate module for prediction of the penetration depth and distribution of the heat source into the plate, (2) adaptive refinement of the three-dimensional (3-D) element mesh for quick and reliable solution of the differential heat flow equation, and (3) special subroutines for calculation of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evolution. The process model has been validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from in situ thermocouple measurements and optical microscope examinations. Subsequently, its aptness to alloy design and optimization of welding conditions for duplex stainless steels is illustrated in different numerical examples and case studies pertaining to EB welding of tubular joints.

  20. Results From a Borehole Seismometer Array II: 3-D Mapping of an Active Geothermal Field at the Kilauea Lower Rift Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, E.; Kenedi, C. L.; Malin, P.

    2008-12-01

    The geothermal power plant in Puna, in southeastern Hawaii, is located in a section of the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone that was resurfaced by lava flows as recently as 1955, 1960, and 1972. In 2006 a seismic array consisting of eight 3-component stations was installed around the geothermal field in Puna. The instrument depths range from 24 to 210 m. The shallower instruments have 2 Hz geophones and the deeper have 4.5 Hz geophones. 3-D tomographic analyses of P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, and the Vp/Vs ratio show an area of very fast P-wave velocity at the relatively shallow depth of 2.5 km in the southern section of the field. The same area shows moderate S-wave velocity. This high P-wave velocity anomaly at the southern part of the geothermal field may indicate the presence of dense rock material usually found at greater depths.

  1. Region-specific vulnerability to lipid peroxidation and evidence of neuronal mechanisms for polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in the healthy adult human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Naudí, Alba; Cabré, Rosanna; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Mayelin; Ayala, Victoria; Jové, Mariona; Mota-Martorell, Natalia; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Gil-Villar, Maria Pilar; Rué, Montserrat; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Ferrer, Isidre; Pamplona, Reinald

    2017-05-01

    Lipids played a determinant role in the evolution of the brain. It is postulated that the morphological and functional diversity among neural cells of the human central nervous system (CNS) is projected and achieved through the expression of particular lipid profiles. The present study was designed to evaluate the differential vulnerability to oxidative stress mediated by lipids through a cross-regional comparative approach. To this end, we compared 12 different regions of CNS of healthy adult subjects, and the fatty acid profile and vulnerability to lipid peroxidation, were determined by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), respectively. In addition, different components involved in PUFA biosynthesis, as well as adaptive defense mechanisms against lipid peroxidation, were also measured by western blot and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We found that: i) four fatty acids (18.1n-9, 22:6n-3, 20:1n-9, and 18:0) are significant discriminators among CNS regions; ii) these differential fatty acid profiles generate a differential selective neural vulnerability (expressed by the peroxidizability index); iii) the cross-regional differences for the fatty acid profiles follow a caudal-cranial gradient which is directly related to changes in the biosynthesis pathways which can be ascribed to neuronal cells; and iv) the higher the peroxidizability index for a given human brain region, the lower concentration of the protein damage markers, likely supported by the presence of adaptive antioxidant mechanisms. In conclusion, our results suggest that there is a region-specific vulnerability to lipid peroxidation and offer evidence of neuronal mechanisms for polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in the human central nervous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stress during a Critical Postnatal Period Induces Region-Specific Structural Abnormalities and Dysfunction of the Prefrontal Cortex via CRF1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Dun; Liao, Xue-Mei; Uribe-Mariño, Andrés; Liu, Rui; Xie, Xiao-Meng; Jia, Jiao; Su, Yun-Ai; Li, Ji-Tao; Schmidt, Mathias V; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Si, Tian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    During the early postnatal period, environmental influences play a pivotal role in shaping the development of the neocortex, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that is crucial for working memory and goal-directed actions. Exposure to stressful experiences during this critical period may disrupt the development of PFC pyramidal neurons and impair the wiring and function of related neural circuits. However, the molecular mechanisms of the impact of early-life stress on PFC development and function are not well understood. In this study, we found that repeated stress exposure during the first postnatal week hampered dendritic development in layers II/III and V pyramidal neurons in the dorsal agranular cingulate cortex (ACd) and prelimbic cortex (PL) of neonatal mice. The deleterious effects of early postnatal stress on structural plasticity persisted to adulthood only in ACd layer V pyramidal neurons. Most importantly, concurrent blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1) by systemic antalarmin administration (20 μg/g of body weight) during early-life stress exposure prevented stress-induced apical dendritic retraction and spine loss in ACd layer V neurons and impairments in PFC-dependent cognitive tasks. Moreover, the magnitude of dendritic regression, especially the shrinkage of apical branches, of ACd layer V neurons predicted the degree of cognitive deficits in stressed mice. Our data highlight the region-specific effects of early postnatal stress on the structural plasticity of prefrontal pyramidal neurons, and suggest a critical role of CRF1 in modulating early-life stress-induced prefrontal abnormalities. PMID:25403725

  3. Mobility dynamics of migrant workers and their socio-behavioral parameters related to malaria in Tier II, Artemisinin Resistance Containment Zone, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Hlaing, Thaung; Wai, Khin Thet; Oo, Tin; Sint, Nyan; Min, Tun; Myar, Shwe; Lon, Khin Nan; Naing, Myo Myint; Tun, Tet Toe; Maung, Nay Lin Yin; Galappaththy, Gawrie N L; Thimarsan, Krongthong; Wai, Tin Tin; Thaung, Lwin Ni Ni

    2015-09-14

    Areas with dynamic population movements are likely to be associated with higher levels of drug-resistant malaria. Myanmar Artemisinin Resistance Containment (MARC) Project has been launching since 2012. One of its components includes enhancing strategic approaches for mobile/migrant populations. We aimed to ascertain the estimated population of mobile migrant workers and their families in terms of stability in work setting in townships classified as tier II (areas with significant inflows of people from areas with credible evidence of artemisinin resistance) for Artemisinin resistance; to identify knowledge, attitudes and practices related to prevention and control of malaria and to recommend cost-effective strategies in planning for prevention and control of malaria. A prospective cross-sectional study conducted between June to December 2013 that covered 1,899 migrant groups from 16 tier II townships of Bago Region, and Kayin and Kayah States. Trained data collectors used a pre-tested and subsequently modified questionnaire and interviewed 2,381 respondents. Data of migrant groups were analyzed and compared by category depending upon the stability of their work setting. The estimated population of the 1,899 migrant groups categorized into three on the nature of their work setting was 56,030. Bago region was the commonest reported source of origin of migrant groups as well as their transit. Malaria volunteers were mostly within the reach of category 1 migrant groups (43/66, 65.2 %). Less stable migrant groups in category 3 had limited access to malaria information (14.7 %) and malaria care providers (22.1 %), low level of awareness and use of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (46.6 and 38.8 %). Also, they had poor knowledge on malaria prevention on confirming suspected malaria and on using artemisinin combined therapy (ACT). Within two weeks prior to the survey, only 16.5 % of respondents in all categories combined reported acute undifferentiated fever

  4. The Functional Arm Scale for Throwers (FAST)-Part I: The Design and Development of an Upper Extremity Region-Specific and Population-Specific Patient-Reported Outcome Scale for Throwing Athletes.

    PubMed

    Sauers, Eric L; Bay, R Curtis; Snyder Valier, Alison R; Ellery, Traci; Huxel Bliven, Kellie C

    2017-03-01

    Upper extremity (UE) region-specific, patient-reported outcome (PRO) scales assess injuries to the UE but do not account for the demands of overhead throwing athletes or measure patient-oriented domains of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). To develop the Functional Arm Scale for Throwers (FAST), a UE region-specific and population-specific PRO scale that assesses multiple domains of disablement in throwing athletes with UE injuries. In stage I, a beta version of the scale was developed for subsequent factor identification, final item reduction, and construct validity analysis during stage II. Descriptive laboratory study. Three-stage scale development was utilized: Stage I (item generation and initial item reduction) and stage II (factor analysis, final item reduction, and construct validity) are reported herein, and stage III (establishment of measurement properties [reliability and validity]) will be reported in a companion paper. In stage I, a beta version was developed, incorporating National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research disablement domains and ensuring a blend of sport-related and non-sport-related items. An expert panel and focus group assessed importance and interpretability of each item. During stage II, the FAST was reduced, preserving variance characteristics and factor structure of the beta version and construct validity of the final FAST scale. During stage I, a 54-item beta version and a separate 9-item pitcher module were developed. During stage II, a 22-item FAST and 9-item pitcher module were finalized. The factor solution for FAST scale items included pain (n = 6), throwing (n = 10), activities of daily living (n = 5), psychological impact (n = 4), and advancement (n = 3). The 6-item pain subscale crossed factors. The remaining subscales and pitcher module are distinctive, correlated, and internally consistent and may be interpreted individually or combined. This article describes the development of the FAST, which assesses

  5. Low-mass planet migration in magnetically torqued dead zones - II. Flow-locked and runaway migration, and a torque prescription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Nelson, Richard P.; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan

    2018-07-01

    We examine the migration of low-mass planets in laminar protoplanetary discs, threaded by large-scale magnetic fields in the dead zone that drive radial gas flows. As shown in Paper I, a dynamical corotation torque arises due to the flow-induced asymmetric distortion of the corotation region and the evolving vortensity contrast between the librating horseshoe material and background disc flow. Using simulations of laminar torqued discs containing migrating planets, we demonstrate the existence of the four distinct migration regimes predicted in Paper I. In two regimes, the migration is approximately locked to the inward or outward radial gas flow, and in the other regimes the planet undergoes outward runaway migration that eventually settles to fast steady migration. In addition, we demonstrate torque and migration reversals induced by mid-plane magnetic stresses, with a bifurcation dependent on the disc surface density. We develop a model for fast migration, and show why the outward runaway saturates to a steady speed, and examine phenomenologically its termination due to changing local disc conditions. We also develop an analytical model for the corotation torque at late times that includes viscosity, for application to discs that sustain modest turbulence. Finally, we use the simulation results to develop torque prescriptions for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation.

  6. Rate-distortion analysis of dead-zone plus uniform threshold scalar quantization and its application--part II: two-pass VBR coding for H.264/AVC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Duan, Yizhou; Li, Jiangtao; Liu, Jiaying; Guo, Zongming

    2013-01-01

    In the first part of this paper, we derive a source model describing the relationship between the rate, distortion, and quantization steps of the dead-zone plus uniform threshold scalar quantizers with nearly uniform reconstruction quantizers for generalized Gaussian distribution. This source model consists of rate-quantization, distortion-quantization (D-Q), and distortion-rate (D-R) models. In this part, we first rigorously confirm the accuracy of the proposed source model by comparing the calculated results with the coding data of JM 16.0. Efficient parameter estimation strategies are then developed to better employ this source model in our two-pass rate control method for H.264 variable bit rate coding. Based on our D-Q and D-R models, the proposed method is of high stability, low complexity and is easy to implement. Extensive experiments demonstrate that the proposed method achieves: 1) average peak signal-to-noise ratio variance of only 0.0658 dB, compared to 1.8758 dB of JM 16.0's method, with an average rate control error of 1.95% and 2) significant improvement in smoothing the video quality compared with the latest two-pass rate control method.

  7. Resuspension and redistribution of radionuclides during grassland and forest fires in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: part II. Modeling the transport process.

    PubMed

    Yoschenko, V I; Kashparov, V A; Levchuk, S E; Glukhovskiy, A S; Khomutinin, Yu V; Protsak, V P; Lundin, S M; Tschiersch, J

    2006-01-01

    To predict parameters of radionuclide resuspension, transport and deposition during forest and grassland fires, several model modules were developed and adapted. Experimental data of controlled burning of prepared experimental plots in the Chernobyl exclusion zone have been used to evaluate the prognostic power of the models. The predicted trajectories and elevations of the plume match with those visually observed during the fire experiments in the grassland and forest sites. Experimentally determined parameters could be successfully used for the calculation of the initial plume parameters which provide the tools for the description of various fire scenarios and enable prognostic calculations. In summary, the model predicts a release of some per thousand from the radionuclide inventory of the fuel material by the grassland fires. During the forest fire, up to 4% of (137)Cs and (90)Sr and up to 1% of the Pu isotopes can be released from the forest litter according to the model calculations. However, these results depend on the parameters of the fire events. In general, the modeling results are in good accordance with the experimental data. Therefore, the considered models were successfully validated and can be recommended for the assessment of the resuspension and redistribution of radionuclides during grassland and forest fires in contaminated territories.

  8. Cell and region specificity of Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) system in the testis and the epididymis.

    PubMed

    Wajda, A; Łapczuk, J; Grabowska, M; Pius-Sadowska, E; Słojewski, M; Laszczynska, M; Urasinska, E; Machalinski, B; Drozdzik, M

    2017-04-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays multiple important functions in adaptive responses. Exposure to AhR ligands may produce an altered metabolic activity controlled by the AhR pathways, and consequently affect drug/toxin responses, hormonal status and cellular homeostasis. This research revealed species-, cell- and region-specific pattern of the AhR system expression in the rat and human testis and epididymis, complementing the existing knowledge, especially within the epididymal segments. The study showed that AhR level in the rat and human epididymis is higher than in the testis. The downregulation of AhR expression after TCDD treatment was revealed in the spermatogenic cells at different stages and the epididymal epithelial cells, but not in the Sertoli and Leydig cells. Hence, this basic research provides information about the AhR function in the testis and epididymis, which may provide an insight into deleterious effects of drugs, hormones and environmental pollutants on male fertility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Region-Specific Changes in Gamma and Beta2 Rhythms in NMDA Receptor Dysfunction Models of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Roopun, Anita K.; Cunningham, Mark O.; Racca, Claudia; Alter, Kai; Traub, Roger D.; Whittington, Miles A.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive disruption in schizophrenia is associated with altered patterns of spatiotemporal interaction associated with multiple electroencephalogram (EEG) frequency bands in cortex. In particular, changes in the generation of gamma (30–80 Hz) and beta2 (20–29 Hz) rhythms correlate with observed deficits in communication between different cortical areas. Aspects of these changes can be reproduced in animal models, most notably those involving acute or chronic reduction in glutamatergic synaptic communication mediated by N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In vitro electrophysiological and immunocytochemical approaches afforded by such animal models continue to reveal a great deal about the mechanisms underlying EEG rhythm generation and are beginning to uncover which basic molecular, cellular, and network phenomena may underlie their disruption in schizophrenia. Here we briefly review the evidence for changes in γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) and glutamatergic function and address the problem of region specificity of changes with quantitative comparisons of effects of ketamine on gamma and beta2 rhythms in vitro. We conclude, from available evidence, that many observed changes in markers for GABAergic function in schizophrenia may be secondary to deficits in NMDA receptor–mediated excitatory synaptic activity. Furthermore, the broad range of changes in cortical dynamics seen in schizophrenia—with contrasting effects seen in different brain regions and for different frequency bands—may be more directly attributable to underlying deficits in glutamatergic neuronal communication rather than GABAergic inhibition alone. PMID:18544550

  10. Cognitive deficits in adult rats by lead intoxication are related with regional specific inhibition of cNOS.

    PubMed

    García-Arenas, Guadalupe; Ramírez-Amaya, Victor; Balderas, Israela; Sandoval, Jimena; Escobar, Martha L; Ríos, Camilo; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    2004-02-04

    It is well known that lead can affect several cognitive abilities in developing animals. In this work, we investigate the effects of different sub-chronic lead doses (0, 65, 125, 250 and 500 ppm of lead acetate in their drinking water for 14 days) in the performance of male adult rats in a water maze, cue maze and inhibitory avoidance tasks. We found that the acquisition of these tasks was not affected by lead, however, the highest dosage of lead (500 ppm) impaired memory consolidation in spatial and inhibitory avoidance tasks, but not in cue maze task while the 250 ppm dose only affected retrieval of spatial memory. Additionally, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in the perforant path after exposing adult rats to different doses of lead was studied. LTP induction was affected in a dose-dependent manner, and treatments of 250 and 500 ppm completely blocked LTP. We investigated the effects of lead intoxication on the activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) in different brain regions of adult animals. The activity of cNOS was significantly inhibited in the hippocampus and cerebellum but not in the frontal cortex and brain stem, although lead had accumulated in all brain regions. These results suggest that lead intoxication can impair memory in adult animals and this impairment might be related with region-specific effects on cNOS activity.

  11. Region-specific changes in gene expression in rat brain after chronic treatment with levetiracetam or phenytoin

    PubMed Central

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Taubøll, Erik; Shaw, Renee; Gjerstad, Leif; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose It is commonly assumed that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) act similarly in the various parts of the brain as long as their molecular targets are present. A few experimental studies on metabolic effects of vigabatrin, levetiracetam, valproate, and lamotrigine have shown that these drugs may act differently in different brain regions. We examined effects of chronic treatment with levetiracetam or phenytoin on mRNA levels to detect regional drug effects in a broad, nonbiased manner. Methods mRNA levels were monitored in three brain regions with oligonucleotide-based microarrays. Results Levetiracetam (150 mg/kg for 90 days) changed the expression of 65 genes in pons/medulla oblongata, two in hippocampus, and one in frontal cortex. Phenytoin (75 mg/kg), in contrast, changed the expression of only three genes in pons/medulla oblongata, but 64 genes in hippocampus, and 327 genes in frontal cortex. Very little overlap between regions or drug treatments was observed with respect to effects on gene expression. Discussion We conclude that chronic treatment with levetiracetam or phenytoin causes region-specific and highly differential effects on gene expression in the brain. Regional effects on gene expression could reflect regional differences in molecular targets of AEDs, and they could influence the clinical profiles of AEDs. PMID:20345932

  12. Region-specific associations between sex, social status, and oxytocin receptor density in the brains of eusocial rodents.

    PubMed

    Mooney, S J; Coen, C W; Holmes, M M; Beery, A K

    2015-09-10

    Naturally occurring variations in neuropeptide receptor distributions in the brain contribute to numerous mammalian social behaviors. In naked mole-rats, which live in large social groups and exhibit remarkable reproductive skew, colony-related social behaviors vary with reproductive status. Here we examined whether variation in social status is associated with variations in the location and/or density of oxytocin binding in this species. Autoradiography was performed to assess forebrain oxytocin receptor (OTR) densities in breeding and non-breeding naked mole-rats of both sexes. Overall, males exhibited higher OTR binding in the medial amygdala in comparison to females. While there were no main effects of reproductive status in any region, a sex difference in OTR binding in the nucleus accumbens was mediated by status. Specifically, breeding males tended to have more OTR binding than breeding females in the nucleus accumbens, while no sex difference was observed in subordinates. These effects suggest that oxytocin may act in a sex- and region-specific way that corresponds to reproductive status and associated social behaviors. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Region-Specific Slowing of Alpha Oscillations is Associated with Visual-Perceptual Abilities in Children Born Very Preterm

    PubMed Central

    Doesburg, Sam M.; Moiseev, Alexander; Herdman, Anthony T.; Ribary, Urs; Grunau, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    Children born very preterm (≤32 weeks gestational age) without major intellectual or neurological impairments often express selective deficits in visual-perceptual abilities. The alterations in neurophysiological development underlying these problems, however, remain poorly understood. Recent research has indicated that spontaneous alpha oscillations are slowed in children born very preterm, and that atypical alpha-mediated functional network connectivity may underlie selective developmental difficulties in visual-perceptual ability in this group. The present study provides the first source-resolved analysis of slowing of spontaneous alpha oscillations in very preterm children, indicating alterations in a distributed set of brain regions concentrated in areas of posterior parietal and inferior temporal regions associated with visual perception, as well as prefrontal cortical regions and thalamus. We also uniquely demonstrate that slowing of alpha oscillations is associated with selective difficulties in visual-perceptual ability in very preterm children. These results indicate that region-specific slowing of alpha oscillations contribute to selective developmental difficulties prevalent in this population. PMID:24298250

  14. Morphometric variability within the axial zone of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: Interpretation from Sea MARC II, Sea MARC I, and deep-sea photography

    Kappel, Ellen S.; Normark, William R.

    1987-01-01

    The morphometric characteristics of the axial regions of oceanic spreading centers are determined by (1) the type of volcanic flows, (2) the relation between primary volcanic relief (on a scale of a few meters to tens of meters) and degree of sediment cover, and (3) the extent of surficial expression and timing of tectonic disruption of the young oceanic crust. Even within a single, continuous, linear spreading-ridge segment with relatively uniform axial valley dimensions over a distance of 50 or more kilometers, such as along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge, the changes in morphometric characteristics along axis within the youngest crust indicate distinct variation in tectonic and volcanic activity over short distances within short time periods. An integrated analysis of Sea MARC I, Sea MARC II, and photographic data for the southernmost continuous segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge shows that generalizations about tectonic and volcanic processes at spreading ridges must consider both the temporal scale of processes as well as the physical scales of observations if predictive models are to be successful. Comparison of the morphometric expression within the major hydrothermal vent area and the rest of the southernmost ridge segment suggests that the mapped distribution of hydrothermal vents may reflect the extent of survey effort rather than uniqueness of geologic setting.

  15. Regional-specific Stochastic Simulation of Spatially-distributed Ground-motion Time Histories using Wavelet Packet Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Stochastic simulation of spatially distributed ground-motion time histories is important for performance-based earthquake design of geographically distributed systems. In this study, we develop a novel technique to stochastically simulate regionalized ground-motion time histories using wavelet packet analysis. First, a transient acceleration time history is characterized by wavelet-packet parameters proposed by Yamamoto and Baker (2013). The wavelet-packet parameters fully characterize ground-motion time histories in terms of energy content, time- frequency-domain characteristics and time-frequency nonstationarity. This study further investigates the spatial cross-correlations of wavelet-packet parameters based on geostatistical analysis of 1500 regionalized ground motion data from eight well-recorded earthquakes in California, Mexico, Japan and Taiwan. The linear model of coregionalization (LMC) is used to develop a permissible spatial cross-correlation model for each parameter group. The geostatistical analysis of ground-motion data from different regions reveals significant dependence of the LMC structure on regional site conditions, which can be characterized by the correlation range of Vs30 in each region. In general, the spatial correlation and cross-correlation of wavelet-packet parameters are stronger if the site condition is more homogeneous. Using the regional-specific spatial cross-correlation model and cokriging technique, wavelet packet parameters at unmeasured locations can be best estimated, and regionalized ground-motion time histories can be synthesized. Case studies and blind tests demonstrated that the simulated ground motions generally agree well with the actual recorded data, if the influence of regional-site conditions is considered. The developed method has great potential to be used in computational-based seismic analysis and loss estimation in a regional scale.

  16. Distribution and region-specific sources of Dechlorane Plus in marine sediments from the coastal East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoguang; Peng, Jialin; Hao, Ting; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Dahai; Li, Xianguo

    2016-12-15

    Dechlorane Plus (DP) is a highly chlorinated flame retardant and found to be ubiquitously present in the environment. We reported here the first record of DP in sediments from the coastal East China Sea (ECS). DP was detected in most of the surface sediments, and the concentrations ranged from 14.8 to 198pg/g dry weight (dw) with a mean value of 64.4pg/g dw. Overall, DP levels exhibited a seaward decreasing trend from the inshore toward outer sea. The fractional abundance of anti-DP (f anti ) showed regional discrepancies, attributing to different environmental behaviors of DP isomers. Depth profiles of DP in a sediment core from estuarine environment showed distinct fluctuation, and the core in open sea had stable deposition environment with two peak values of DP in ~1978 and 2000. The f anti exhibited downward decreasing trend prior to mid-1950s, indicating a preferential degradation of anti-DP and/or a greater adsorption capacity of syn-DP after its burial. Lignin and lipid biomarkers (∑C 27 +C 29 +C 31 n-alkanes) of terrestrial organic matters were introduced to identify region-specific sources of DP, and the results showed that DP in the northern inner shelf, southern inner shelf of 29 °N and mud area southwest of Cheju Island was mainly come from Yangtze River (YR) input, surface runoffs after discharge of local sources close to the Taizhou-Wenzhou Region and the atmospheric deposition from the North China and East Asia, respectively. The coastal ECS was an important reservoir of DP in the world, with mass inventory of approximately 310.7kg in the surface sediments (0-5cm). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Maternal immune activation causes age- and region-specific changes in brain cytokines in offspring throughout development

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Paula A.; Hsiao, Elaine Y.; Patterson, Paul H.; McAllister, A. Kimberley

    2012-01-01

    Maternal infection is a risk factor for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Indeed, modeling this risk factor in mice through maternal immune activation (MIA) causes ASD- and SZ-like neuropathologies and behaviors in the offspring. Although MIA upregulates pro-inflammatory cytokines in the fetal brain, whether MIA leads to long-lasting changes in brain cytokines during postnatal development remains unknown. Here, we tested this possibility by measuring protein levels of 23 cytokines in the blood and three brain regions from offspring of poly(I:C)- and saline-injected mice at five postnatal ages using multiplex arrays. Most cytokines examined are present in sera and brains throughout development. MIA induces changes in the levels of many cytokines in the brains and sera of offspring in a region- and age-specific manner. These MIA-induced changes follow a few, unexpected and distinct patterns. In frontal and cingulate cortices, several, mostly pro-inflammatory, cytokines are elevated at birth, followed by decreases during periods of synaptogenesis and plasticity, and increases again in the adult. Cytokines are also altered in postnatal hippocampus, but in a pattern distinct from the other regions. The MIA-induced changes in brain cytokines do not correlate with changes in serum cytokines from the same animals. Finally, these MIA-induced cytokine changes are not accompanied by breaches in the blood-brain barrier, immune cell infiltration or increases in microglial density. Together, these data indicate that MIA leads to long-lasting, region-specific changes in brain cytokines in offspring—similar to those reported for ASD and SZ—that may alter CNS development and behavior. PMID:22841693

  18. Optogenetic fMRI and electrophysiological identification of region-specific connectivity between the cerebellar cortex and forebrain.

    PubMed

    Choe, Katrina Y; Sanchez, Carlos F; Harris, Neil G; Otis, Thomas S; Mathews, Paul J

    2018-06-01

    Complex animal behavior is produced by dynamic interactions between discrete regions of the brain. As such, defining functional connections between brain regions is critical in gaining a full understanding of how the brain generates behavior. Evidence suggests that discrete regions of the cerebellar cortex functionally project to the forebrain, mediating long-range communication potentially important in motor and non-motor behaviors. However, the connectivity map remains largely incomplete owing to the challenge of driving both reliable and selective output from the cerebellar cortex, as well as the need for methods to detect region specific activation across the entire forebrain. Here we utilize a paired optogenetic and fMRI (ofMRI) approach to elucidate the downstream forebrain regions modulated by activating a region of the cerebellum that induces stereotypical, ipsilateral forelimb movements. We demonstrate with ofMRI, that activating this forelimb motor region of the cerebellar cortex results in functional activation of a variety of forebrain and midbrain areas of the brain, including the hippocampus and primary motor, retrosplenial and anterior cingulate cortices. We further validate these findings using optogenetic stimulation paired with multi-electrode array recordings and post-hoc staining for molecular markers of activated neurons (i.e. c-Fos). Together, these findings demonstrate that a single discrete region of the cerebellar cortex is capable of influencing motor output and the activity of a number of downstream forebrain as well as midbrain regions thought to be involved in different aspects of behavior. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Antidepressants and mood stabilizers effects on histone deacetylase expression in C57BL/6 mice: Brain region specific changes.

    PubMed

    Ookubo, Masanori; Kanai, Hirohiko; Aoki, Harusuke; Yamada, Naoto

    2013-09-01

    To determine whether treatment with various antidepressants or mood stabilizers leads to region-specific changes, we investigated the effects of their subchronic (14 days of intraperitoneal injection) administration on the tissue concentration of monoamines, dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine, and the protein expression of acetylated histone H3 (AcH3) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the mouse striatum (ST), nucleus accumbens (Acb), hippocampus (Hip), cingulate cortex (Cg), and amygdala (Amy). Subchronic administration with the antidepressants (S)-citalopram oxalate (ECM), duloxetine hydrochloride (DLX), and mirtazapine (MIR) commonly induced significant increases in dopamine and serotonin levels in the ST and Cg. By contrast, no common profiles for dopamine, serotonin, or norepinephrine were identified in the Acb, Hip, or Amy. Treatment with sodium valproate (VPA), lithium chloride (Li), lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LTM), olanzapine (OLZ), clozapine (CLZ), clomipramine (CLM), ECM, and DLX induced significant increases in AcH3 expression in the Acb, while treatment with CLM, ECM, DLX, MIR, carbamazepine (CBZ), LTG, LTM, OLZ, or CLZ induced significant increases in HDAC2 and HDAC3 in the ST. CLM, MIR, VPA, CBZ, LTG, LTM, OLZ, or CLZ induced significant increases in HDAC3 in the Cg, and ECM, DLX, MIR, VPA, CBZ, LTG, LTM, or OLZ resulted in significant increases in HDAC5 in the Amy. Collectively, the changes of monoamine content were restricted for mood stabilizer effects, but increased expression of HDAC2, HDAC3, or HDAC5 in the ST, Cg, or Amy was often found, supporting the possibility that antidepressant-like effects involve epigenetic modifications associated with changes in HDAC expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cdk5 Contributes to Huntington's Disease Learning and Memory Deficits via Modulation of Brain Region-Specific Substrates.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Periel, Elena; Puigdellívol, Mar; Brito, Verónica; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Silvia

    2017-12-29

    Cognitive deficits are a major hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD) with a great impact on the quality of patient's life. Gaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying learning and memory impairments in HD is, therefore, of critical importance. Cdk5 is a proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity and memory processes that has been associated with several neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we aim to investigate the role of Cdk5 in learning and memory impairments in HD using a novel animal model that expresses mutant huntingtin (mHtt) and has genetically reduced Cdk5 levels. Genetic reduction of Cdk5 in mHtt knock-in mice attenuated both corticostriatal learning deficits as well as hippocampal-dependent memory decline. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms by which Cdk5 counteracts the mHtt-induced learning and memory impairments appeared to be differentially regulated in a brain region-specific manner. While the corticostriatal learning deficits are attenuated through compensatory regulation of NR2B surface levels, the rescue of hippocampal-dependent memory was likely due to restoration of hippocampal dendritic spine density along with an increase in Rac1 activity. This work identifies Cdk5 as a critical contributor to mHtt-induced learning and memory deficits. Furthermore, we show that the Cdk5 downstream targets involved in memory and learning decline differ depending on the brain region analyzed suggesting that distinct Cdk5 effectors could be involved in cognitive impairments in HD.

  1. Brain region-specific enhancement of remyelination and prevention of demyelination by the CSF1R kinase inhibitor BLZ945.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Giorgetti, Elisa; Neuhaus, Anna; Zurbruegg, Stefan; Accart, Nathalie; Smith, Paul; Perdoux, Julien; Perrot, Ludovic; Nash, Mark; Desrayaud, Sandrine; Wipfli, Peter; Frieauff, Wilfried; Shimshek, Derya R

    2018-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the central nervous system (CNS). While multiple effective immunomodulatory therapies for MS exist today, they lack the scope of promoting CNS repair, in particular remyelination. Microglia play a pivotal role in regulating myelination processes, and the colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) pathway is a key regulator for microglia differentiation and survival. Here, we investigated the effects of the CSF-1 receptor kinase inhibitor, BLZ945, on central myelination processes in the 5-week murine cuprizone model by non-invasive and longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. Therapeutic 2-week BLZ945 treatment caused a brain region-specific enhancement of remyelination in the striatum/cortex, which was absent in the corpus callosum/external capsule. This beneficial effect correlated positively with microglia reduction, increased oligodendrocytes and astrogliosis. Prophylactic BLZ945 treatment prevented excessive demyelination in the corpus callosum by reducing microglia and increasing oligondendrocytes. In the external capsule oligodendrocytes were depleted but not microglia and a buildup of myelin debris and axonal damage was observed. A similar microglial dysfunction in the external capsule with an increase of myelin debris was obvious in triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) knock-out mice treated with cuprizone. Finally, therapeutic BLZ945 treatment did not change the disease course in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice, a peripherally driven neuroinflammation model. Taken together, our data suggest that a short-term therapeutic inhibition of the CSF-1 receptor pathway by BLZ945 in the murine cuprizone model enhances central remyelination by modulating neuroinflammation. Thus, microglia-modulating therapies could be considered clinically for promoting myelination in combination with standard-of-care treatments in MS patients.

  2. Effects of ethanol on immune response in the brain: region-specific changes in adolescent versus adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kane, Cynthia J M; Phelan, Kevin D; Douglas, James C; Wagoner, Gail; Johnson, Jennifer W; Xu, Jihong; Phelan, Patrick S; Drew, Paul D

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol use occurs across the life span beginning in adolescence and continuing through adulthood. Ethanol (EtOH)-induced pathology varies with age and includes changes in neurogenesis, neurodegeneration, and glial cell activation. EtOH-induced changes in glial activation and immune activity are believed to contribute to EtOH-induced neuropathology. Recent studies indicate an emerging role of glial-derived neuroimmune molecules in alcohol abuse and addiction. Adolescent and adult C57BL/6 mice were treated via gavage with 6 g/kg EtOH for 10 days, and tissue was harvested 1 day post treatment. We compared the effects of EtOH on chemokine and cytokine expression and astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining and morphology in the hippocampus, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex. EtOH increased mRNA levels of the chemokine CCL2/MCP-1 in all 3 regions of adult mice relative to controls. The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) was selectively increased only in the adult cerebellum. EtOH did not affect mRNA levels of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in any of these brain regions in adult animals. Interestingly, CCL2, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNA levels were not increased in the hippocampus, cerebellum, or cortex of adolescent mice. EtOH treatment of adult and adolescent mice resulted in increased GFAP immunostaining. Collectively, these data indicate an age- and region-specific susceptibility to EtOH regulation of neuroinflammatory and addiction-related molecules as well as astrocyte phenotype. These studies may have important implications concerning differential alcohol-induced neuropathology and alcohol addiction across the life span. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  3. FemZone trial: a randomized phase II trial comparing neoadjuvant letrozole and zoledronic acid with letrozole in primary breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this prospectively randomized phase II trial (Trial registration: EUCTR2004-004007-37-DE) was to compare the clinical response of primary breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant therapy with letrozole alone (LET) or letrozole and zoledronic acid (LET + ZOL). Methods Patients were randomly assigned to receive either LET 2.5 mg/day (n = 79) or the combination of LET 2.5 mg/day and a total of seven infusions of ZOL 4 mg every 4 weeks (n = 89) for 6 months. Primary endpoint was clinical response rate as assessed by mammogram readings. The study was terminated prematurely due to insufficient recruitment. We report here on an exploratory analysis of this data. Results Central assessment of tumor sizes during the treatment period was available for 131 patients (66 LET, 65 LET + ZOL). Clinical responses (complete or partial) were seen in 54.5% (95% CI: 41.8-66.9) of the patients in the LET arm and 69.2% (95% CI: 56.6-80.1) of those in the LET + ZOL arm (P = 0.106). A multivariate model showed an OR of 1.72 (95% CI: 0.83-3.59) for the experimental arm. Conclusion No increase in the clinical response rate was observed with the addition of ZOL to a neoadjuvant treatment regimen with LET. However a trend towards a better reponse in the LET + ZOL arm could be observed. This trend is consistent with previous studies that have investigated the addition of ZOL to chemotherapy, and it may support the evidence for a direct antitumor action of zoledronic acid. PMID:24499441

  4. 76 FR 40808 - Safety Zones; Fireworks Within the Sector Boston Captain of the Port Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... radius of the fireworks barge located at position 42[deg]50.6' N, 070[deg]48.4' W (NAD 83). (ii...]56.1' W (NAD 83). (ii) Enforcement Period. This safety zone will be enforced from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m...[deg]27.62' N, 070[deg]55.58' W (NAD 83). (ii) Enforcement Period. This safety zone will be enforced...

  5. Region-specific expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor splice variants in morphine conditioned place preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Min; Zhao, Xinhan; Dang, Yonghui; Ma, Jingyuan; Li, Lixu; Gu, Shanzhi

    2013-06-26

    It is well established that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a pivotal role in brain plasticity-related processes, such as learning, memory and drug addiction. However, changes in expression of BDNF splice variants after acquisition, extinction and reinstatement of cue-elicited morphine seeking behavior have not yet been investigated. Real-time PCR was used to assess BDNF splice variants (I, II, IV and VI) in various brain regions during acquisition, extinction and reinstatement of morphine-conditioned place preference (CPP) in mice. Repeated morphine injections (10mg/kg, i.p.) increased expression of BDNF splice variants II, IV and VI in the hippocampus, caudate putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Levels of BDNF splice variants decreased after extinction training and continued to decrease during reinstatement induced by a morphine priming injection (10mg/kg, i.p.). However, after reinstatement induced by exposure to 6 min of forced swimming (FS), expression of BDNF splice variants II, IV and VI was increased in the hippocampus, CPu, NAcc and prefrontal cortex (PFC). After reinstatement induced by 40 min of restraint, expression of BDNF splice variants was increased in PFC. These results show that exposure to either morphine or acute stress can induce reinstatement of drug-seeking, but expression of BDNF splice variants is differentially affected by chronic morphine and acute stress. Furthermore, BDNF splice variants II, IV and VI may play a role in learning and memory for morphine addiction in the hippocampus, CPu and NAcc. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model

    SciT

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jianying; Chin, Mark H

    2010-02-15

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal region of the brain; however, the neurodegeneration extends well beyond dopaminergic neurons. To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes relevant to PD, we applied two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to comparatively analyze the proteome changes in four brain regions (striatum, cerebellum, cortex, and the rest of brain) using a MPTP-induced PD mouse model with the objective to identify nigrostriatal-specific and other region-specific protein abundance changes. The combined analyses resulted in the identification of 4,895 non-redundant proteins with at least two unique peptides per protein. The relative abundance changes in eachmore » analyzed brain region were estimated based on the spectral count information. A total of 518 proteins were observed with significant MPTP-induced changes across different brain regions. 270 of these proteins were observed with specific changes occurring either only in the striatum and/or in the rest of the brain region that contains substantia nigra, suggesting that these proteins are associated with the underlying nigrostriatal pathways. Many of the proteins that exhibit significant abundance changes were associated with dopamine signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, the ubiquitin system, calcium signaling, the oxidative stress response, and apoptosis. A set of proteins with either consistent change across all brain regions or with changes specific to the cortex and cerebellum regions were also detected. One of the interesting proteins is ubiquitin specific protease (USP9X), a deubiquination enzyme involved in the protection of proteins from degradation and promotion of the TGF-β pathway, which exhibited altered abundances in all brain regions. Western blot validation showed similar spatial changes, suggesting that USP9X is potentially associated with neurodegeneration. Together, this study for the first time presents an overall

  7. Region-specific RNA m6A methylation represents a new layer of control in the gene regulatory network in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mengqi; Lv, Hongyi; Zhang, Weilong; Ma, Chunhui; He, Xue; Zhao, Shunli; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Song, Shuhui; Niu, Yamei; Tong, Wei-Min

    2017-09-01

    N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) is the most abundant epitranscriptomic mark found on mRNA and has important roles in various physiological processes. Despite the relatively high m 6 A levels in the brain, its potential functions in the brain remain largely unexplored. We performed a transcriptome-wide methylation analysis using the mouse brain to depict its region-specific methylation profile. RNA methylation levels in mouse cerebellum are generally higher than those in the cerebral cortex. Heterogeneity of RNA methylation exists across different brain regions and different types of neural cells including the mRNAs to be methylated, their methylation levels and methylation site selection. Common and region-specific methylation have different preferences for methylation site selection and thereby different impacts on their biological functions. In addition, high methylation levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) target mRNAs suggest that m 6 A methylation is likely to be used for selective recognition of target mRNAs by FMRP in the synapse. Overall, we provide a region-specific map of RNA m 6 A methylation and characterize the distinct features of specific and common methylation in mouse cerebellum and cerebral cortex. Our results imply that RNA m 6 A methylation is a newly identified element in the region-specific gene regulatory network in the mouse brain. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. 33 CFR 165.163 - Safety Zones; Port of New York/New Jersey Fleet Week.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... as safety zones: (1) Safety Zone A—(i) Location. A moving safety zone for the Parade of Ships... Wednesday before Memorial Day. (2) Safety Zone B—(i) Location. A safety zone including all waters of the.... (ii) Enforcement period. Paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section is enforced annually from 8 a.m. until 5...

  9. 50 CFR 654.24 - Shrimp/stone crab separation zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shrimp/stone crab separation zones. 654.24... Measures § 654.24 Shrimp/stone crab separation zones. Five zones are established in the management area and... trapping. The zones are as shown in Appendix A, Figure 3, of this part. Although Zone II is entirely within...

  10. 50 CFR 654.24 - Shrimp/stone crab separation zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Shrimp/stone crab separation zones. 654... Measures § 654.24 Shrimp/stone crab separation zones. Five zones are established in the management area and... trapping. The zones are as shown in Appendix A, Figure 3, of this part. Although Zone II is entirely within...

  11. An investigation into the relationship between region specific quality of life and adverse tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Babalik, A; Kiziltas, S; Gencer, S; Kilicaslan, Z

    2014-01-01

    Istanbul has the highest incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in Turkey. It is also the largest city, with considerable differences in quality of life across its urban regions. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between (i) the diverse quality of life across specific urban regions, (ii) TB incidence rates, inclusive of demographic and clinical characteristics of TB patients, and (iii) adverse treatment outcomes. This retrospective study included 23,845 new TB patients (recorded in the National TB Registry between 2006 and 2010) in Istanbul. Thirty-nine urban districts of Istanbul were ranked into five groups on the basis of an urban quality of life index. Patient data were matched with these groups, and further categorized according to 'age', 'sex', 'country of birth' and 'antibiotics resistance'. Adverse treatment outcomes and TB incidence rates were extracted from official records. Logistic regression, clustered analyses, 95% CI and p values (STATA) were reported to describe the association between variables. Six per cent of total cases had 'at least one adverse treatment outcome' (default 3.8%, failure 0.5%, death 1.7% in total cases). 'An adverse treatment outcome' was found to be associated with age OR (CI 95%) (1.02 (1.01-1.03)); 'male sex' 1.65 (1.28-2.12); 'other country of birth' 4.82 (3.05-7.62); 100,000 per 'over 60' insidence goups 1.61 (1.32-1.97), the lowest quality of life index 0.65 (0.47-0.83). Patients with high tuberculosis risk factors living in high incidence regions need to be closely monitored. Patients living in lower ranking regions are more likely to have 'poor treatment outcomes'. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. 24 CFR 3285.405 - Severe wind zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Severe wind zones. 3285.405 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.405 Severe wind zones. When any part of a home is installed within 1,500 feet of a coastline in Wind Zones II or III, the...

  13. 24 CFR 3285.405 - Severe wind zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Severe wind zones. 3285.405 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.405 Severe wind zones. When any part of a home is installed within 1,500 feet of a coastline in Wind Zones II or III, the...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.405 - Severe wind zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Severe wind zones. 3285.405 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.405 Severe wind zones. When any part of a home is installed within 1,500 feet of a coastline in Wind Zones II or III, the...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.405 - Severe wind zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Severe wind zones. 3285.405 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.405 Severe wind zones. When any part of a home is installed within 1,500 feet of a coastline in Wind Zones II or III, the...

  16. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  17. The dynamical oscillation and propulsion of magnetic fields in the convective zone of a star. II - Thermal shadows. III - Accumulation of heat and the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of thermal shadows which develop in the convective zone of a star around an insulating obstacle such as a horizontal band in intense magnetic field are studied. The depth of the shadow on the cool side of the obstacle is found to depend largely on the width of the obstacle multiplied by the temperature gradient. Thermal shadows pressing fields up to 10,000 G downward against the bottom of the convective zone are produced by the broad bands of the azimuthal field in the sun's convective zone. In the third part, the time-dependent accumulation of heat beneath a thermal barrier simulating such a band in the lower convective zone of the sun is considered. The resulting Rayleigh-Taylor instability is shown to cause tongues of heated gas to penetrate upward through the field, providing the emerging magnetic fields that give rise to the activity of the sun.

  18. Minimum important differences for the patient-specific functional scale, 4 region-specific outcome measures, and the numeric pain rating scale.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J Haxby; Schmitt, John

    2014-08-01

    Multicenter, prospective, longitudinal cohort study. To investigate the minimum important difference (MID) of the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), 4 region-specific outcome measures, and the numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) across 3 levels of patient-perceived global rating of change in a clinical setting. The MID varies depending on the external anchor defining patient-perceived "importance." The MID for the PSFS has not been established across all body regions. One thousand seven hundred eight consecutive patients with musculoskeletal disorders were recruited from 5 physical therapy clinics. The PSFS, NPRS, and 4 region-specific outcome measures-the Oswestry Disability Index, Neck Disability Index, Upper Extremity Functional Index, and Lower Extremity Functional Scale-were assessed at the initial and final physical therapy visits. Global rating of change was assessed at the final visit. MID was calculated for the PSFS and NPRS (overall and for each body region), and for each region-specific outcome measure, across 3 levels of change defined by the global rating of change (small, medium, large change) using receiver operating characteristic curve methodology. The MID for the PSFS (on a scale from 0 to 10) ranged from 1.3 (small change) to 2.3 (medium change) to 2.7 (large change), and was relatively stable across body regions. MIDs for the NPRS (-1.5 to -3.5), Oswestry Disability Index (-12), Neck Disability Index (-14), Upper Extremity Functional Index (6 to 11), and Lower Extremity Functional Scale (9 to 16) are also reported. We reported the MID for small, medium, and large patient-perceived change on the PSFS, NPRS, Oswestry Disability Index, Neck Disability Index, Upper Extremity Functional Index, and Lower Extremity Functional Scale for use in clinical practice and research.

  19. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  20. Region-specific connectivity in patients with periventricular nodular heterotopia and epilepsy: A study combining diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyu; An, Dongmei; Tong, Xin; Niu, Running; Gong, Qiyong; Zhou, Dong

    2017-10-01

    Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) is an important cause of chronic epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate region-specific connectivity in PNH patients with epilepsy and assess correlation between connectivity strength and clinical factors including duration and prognosis. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting state functional MRI (fMRI) were performed in 28 subjects (mean age 27.4years; range 9-56years). The structural connectivity of fiber bundles passing through the manually-selected segmented nodules and other brain regions were analyzed by tractography. Cortical lobes showing functional correlations to nodules were also determined. For all heterotopic gray matter nodules, including at least one in each subject, the most frequent segments to which nodular heterotopia showed structural (132/151) and functional (146/151) connectivity were discrete regions of the ipsilateral overlying cortex. Agreement between diffusion tensor tractography and functional connectivity analyses was conserved in 81% of all nodules (122/151). In patients with longer duration or refractory epilepsy, the connectivity was significantly stronger, particularly to the frontal and temporal lobes (P<0.05). Nodules in PNH were structurally and functionally connected to the cortex. The extent is stronger in patients with longstanding or intractable epilepsy. These findings suggest the region-specific interactions may help better evaluate prognosis and seek medical or surgical interventions of PNH-related epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    SciT

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  2. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciT

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results inmore » the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.« less

  3. Trends in genome-wide and region-specific genetic diversity in the Dutch-Flemish Holstein-Friesian breeding program from 1986 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Doekes, Harmen P; Veerkamp, Roel F; Bijma, Piter; Hiemstra, Sipke J; Windig, Jack J

    2018-04-11

    In recent decades, Holstein-Friesian (HF) selection schemes have undergone profound changes, including the introduction of optimal contribution selection (OCS; around 2000), a major shift in breeding goal composition (around 2000) and the implementation of genomic selection (GS; around 2010). These changes are expected to have influenced genetic diversity trends. Our aim was to evaluate genome-wide and region-specific diversity in HF artificial insemination (AI) bulls in the Dutch-Flemish breeding program from 1986 to 2015. Pedigree and genotype data (~ 75.5 k) of 6280 AI-bulls were used to estimate rates of genome-wide inbreeding and kinship and corresponding effective population sizes. Region-specific inbreeding trends were evaluated using regions of homozygosity (ROH). Changes in observed allele frequencies were compared to those expected under pure drift to identify putative regions under selection. We also investigated the direction of changes in allele frequency over time. Effective population size estimates for the 1986-2015 period ranged from 69 to 102. Two major breakpoints were observed in genome-wide inbreeding and kinship trends. Around 2000, inbreeding and kinship levels temporarily dropped. From 2010 onwards, they steeply increased, with pedigree-based, ROH-based and marker-based inbreeding rates as high as 1.8, 2.1 and 2.8% per generation, respectively. Accumulation of inbreeding varied substantially across the genome. A considerable fraction of markers showed changes in allele frequency that were greater than expected under pure drift. Putative selected regions harboured many quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated to a wide range of traits. In consecutive 5-year periods, allele frequencies changed more often in the same direction than in opposite directions, except when comparing the 1996-2000 and 2001-2005 periods. Genome-wide and region-specific diversity trends reflect major changes in the Dutch-Flemish HF breeding program. Introduction of

  4. Integrative Analysis of Brain Region-specific Shank3 Interactomes for Understanding the Heterogeneity of Neuronal Pathophysiology Related to SHANK3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeunkum; Kang, Hyojin; Lee, Bokyoung; Zhang, Yinhua; Kim, Yoonhee; Kim, Shinhyun; Kim, Won-Ki; Han, Kihoon

    2017-01-01

    Recent molecular genetic studies have identified 100s of risk genes for various neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. As the number of risk genes increases, it is becoming clear that different mutations of a single gene could cause different types of disorders. One of the best examples of such a gene is SHANK3, which encodes a core scaffold protein of the neuronal excitatory post-synapse. Deletions, duplications, and point mutations of SHANK3 are associated with autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Nevertheless, how the different mutations of SHANK3 can lead to such phenotypic diversity remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether Shank3 could form protein complexes in a brain region-specific manner, which might contribute to the heterogeneity of neuronal pathophysiology caused by SHANK3 mutations. To test this, we generated a medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) Shank3 in vivo interactome consisting of 211 proteins, and compared this protein list with a Shank3 interactome previously generated from mixed hippocampal and striatal (HP+STR) tissues. Unexpectedly, we found that only 47 proteins (about 20%) were common between the two interactomes, while 164 and 208 proteins were specifically identified in the mPFC and HP+STR interactomes, respectively. Each of the mPFC- and HP+STR-specific Shank3 interactomes represents a highly interconnected network. Upon comparing the brain region-enriched proteomes, we found that the large difference between the mPFC and HP+STR Shank3 interactomes could not be explained by differential protein expression profiles among the brain regions. Importantly, bioinformatic pathway analysis revealed that the representative biological functions of the mPFC- and HP+STR-specific Shank3 interactomes were different, suggesting that these interactors could mediate the brain region-specific functions of Shank3. Meanwhile, the

  5. Brain region-specific gene expression changes after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and early withdrawal in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Roberto I.; McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Kalivas, Peter W.; Becker, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroadaptations that participate in the ontogeny of alcohol dependence are likely a result of altered gene expression in various brain regions. The present study investigated brain region-specific changes in the pattern and magnitude of gene expression immediately following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure and 8 hours following final ethanol exposure [i.e. early withdrawal (EWD)]. High-density oligonucleotide microarrays (Affymetrix 430A 2.0, Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and bioinformatics analysis were used to characterize gene expression and function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HPC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) of C57BL/6J mice (Jackson Laboratories, Bar Harbor, ME, USA). Gene expression levels were determined using gene chip robust multi-array average followed by statistical analysis of microarrays and validated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Results indicated that immediately following CIE exposure, changes in gene expression were strikingly greater in the PFC (284 genes) compared with the HPC (16 genes) and NAc (32 genes). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that most of the transcriptionally responsive genes in the PFC were involved in Ras/MAPK signaling, notch signaling or ubiquitination. In contrast, during EWD, changes in gene expression were greatest in the HPC (139 genes) compared with the PFC (four genes) and NAc (eight genes). The most transcriptionally responsive genes in the HPC were involved in mRNA processing or actin dynamics. Of the few genes detected in the NAc, the most representatives were involved in circadian rhythms. Overall, these findings indicate that brain region-specific and time-dependent neuroadaptive alterations in gene expression play an integral role in the development of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. PMID:21812870

  6. HttQ111/+ Huntington’s Disease Knock-in Mice Exhibit Brain Region-Specific Morphological Changes and Synaptic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Marina; Milnerwood, Austen; Giordano, James; St. Claire, Jason; Guide, Jolene R.; Stromberg, Mary; Gillis, Tammy; Sapp, Ellen; DiFiglia, Marian; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Lee, Jong-Min; Tappan, Susan; Raymond, Lynn; Wheeler, Vanessa C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Successful disease-modifying therapy for Huntington’s disease (HD) will require therapeutic intervention early in the pathogenic process. Achieving this goal requires identifying phenotypes that are proximal to the HTT CAG repeat expansion. Objective: To use Htt CAG knock-in mice, precise genetic replicas of the HTT mutation in patients, as models to study proximal disease events. Methods: Using cohorts of B6J.HttQ111/+ mice from 2 to 18 months of age, we analyzed pathological markers, including immunohistochemistry, brain regional volumes and cortical thickness, CAG instability, electron microscopy of striatal synapses, and acute slice electrophysiology to record glutamatergic transmission at striatal synapses. We also incorporated a diet perturbation paradigm for some of these analyses. Results: B6J.HttQ111/+ mice did not exhibit significant neurodegeneration or gliosis but revealed decreased striatal DARPP-32 as well as subtle but regional-specific changes in brain volumes and cortical thickness that parallel those in HD patients. Ultrastructural analyses of the striatum showed reduced synapse density, increased postsynaptic density thickness and increased synaptic cleft width. Acute slice electrophysiology showed alterations in spontaneous AMPA receptor-mediated postsynaptic currents, evoked NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents, and elevated extrasynaptic NMDA currents. Diet influenced cortical thickness, but did not impact somatic CAG expansion, nor did it show any significant interaction with genotype on immunohistochemical, brain volume or cortical thickness measures. Conclusions: These data show that a single HttQ111 allele is sufficient to elicit brain region-specific morphological changes and early neuronal dysfunction, highlighting an insidious disease process already apparent in the first few months of life. PMID:29480209

  7. Age- and region-specific imbalances of basal amino acids and monoamine metabolism in limbic regions of female Fmr1 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Michael; Braun, Katharina

    2004-07-01

    The Fragile X syndrome, a common form of mental retardation in humans, originates from the loss of expression of the Fragile X mental retardation gene leading to the absence of the encoded Fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMRP). A broad pattern of morphological and behavioral abnormalities is well described for affected humans as well as Fmr1 knock-out mice, a transgenic animal model for the human Fragile X syndrome. In the present study, we examined neurochemical differences between female Fmr1 knock-out and wildtype mice with particular focus on neurotransmission. Significant age- and region-specific differences of basal tissue neurotransmitter and metabolite levels measured by high performance liquid chromatography were found. Those differences were more numerous in juvenile animals (postnatal day (PND) 28-31) compared to adults (postnatal day 209-221). In juvenile female knock-out mice, especially aspartate and taurine were increased in cortical regions, striatum, cerebellum, and brainstem. Furthermore, compared to the wildtype animals, the juvenile knock-out mice displayed an increased level of neuronal inhibition in the hippocampus and brainstem reflected by decreased ratios of (aspartate + glutamate)/(taurine + GABA), as well as an increased dopamine (DA) turnover in cortical regions, striatum, and hippocampus. These results provide the first evidence that the lack of FMRP expression in female Fmr1 knock-out mice is accompanied by age-dependent, region-specific alterations in brain amino acids, and monoamine turnover, which might be related to the reported synaptical and behavioural alterations in these animals.

  8. Histone methylation at gene promoters is associated with developmental regulation and region-specific expression of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors in human brain.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Florian; Kolb, Gabriele; Rubusch, Lothar; Baker, Stephen P; Jones, Edward G; Akbarian, Schahram

    2005-07-01

    Glutamatergic signaling is regulated, in part, through differential expression of NMDA and AMPA/KA channel subunits and G protein-coupled metabotropic receptors. In human brain, region-specific expression patterns of glutamate receptor genes are maintained over the course of decades, suggesting a role for molecular mechanisms involved in long-term regulation of transcription, including methylation of lysine residues at histone N-terminal tails. Using a native chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we studied histone methylation marks at proximal promoters of 16 ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor genes (GRIN1,2A-D; GRIA1,3,4; GRIK2,4,5; GRM1,3,4,6,7 ) in cerebellar cortex collected across a wide age range from midgestation to 90 years old. Levels of di- and trimethylated histone H3-lysine 4, which are associated with open chromatin and transcription, showed significant differences between promoters and a robust correlation with corresponding mRNA levels in immature and mature cerebellar cortex. In contrast, levels of trimethylated H3-lysine 27 and H4-lysine 20, two histone modifications defining silenced or condensed chromatin, did not correlate with transcription but were up-regulated overall in adult cerebellum. Furthermore, differential gene expression patterns in prefrontal and cerebellar cortex were reflected by similar differences in H3-lysine 4 methylation at promoters. Together, these findings suggest that histone lysine methylation at gene promoters is involved in developmental regulation and maintenance of region-specific expression patterns of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The association of a specific epigenetic mark, H3-(methyl)-lysine 4, with the molecular architecture of glutamatergic signaling in human brain has potential implications for schizophrenia and other disorders with altered glutamate receptor function.

  9. Microbial community development in a dynamic gut model is reproducible, colon region specific, and selective for Bacteroidetes and Clostridium cluster IX.

    PubMed

    Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Grootaert, Charlotte; Marzorati, Massimo; Possemiers, Sam; Verstraete, Willy; Gérard, Philippe; Rabot, Sylvie; Bruneau, Aurélia; El Aidy, Sahar; Derrien, Muriel; Zoetendal, Erwin; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Dynamic, multicompartment in vitro gastrointestinal simulators are often used to monitor gut microbial dynamics and activity. These reactors need to harbor a microbial community that is stable upon inoculation, colon region specific, and relevant to in vivo conditions. Together with the reproducibility of the colonization process, these criteria are often overlooked when the modulatory properties from different treatments are compared. We therefore investigated the microbial colonization process in two identical simulators of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (SHIME), simultaneously inoculated with the same human fecal microbiota with a high-resolution phylogenetic microarray: the human intestinal tract chip (HITChip). Following inoculation of the in vitro colon compartments, microbial community composition reached steady state after 2 weeks, whereas 3 weeks were required to reach functional stability. This dynamic colonization process was reproducible in both SHIME units and resulted in highly diverse microbial communities which were colon region specific, with the proximal regions harboring saccharolytic microbes (e.g., Bacteroides spp. and Eubacterium spp.) and the distal regions harboring mucin-degrading microbes (e.g., Akkermansia spp.). Importantly, the shift from an in vivo to an in vitro environment resulted in an increased Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio, whereas Clostridium cluster IX (propionate producers) was enriched compared to clusters IV and XIVa (butyrate producers). This was supported by proportionally higher in vitro propionate concentrations. In conclusion, high-resolution analysis of in vitro-cultured gut microbiota offers new insight on the microbial colonization process and indicates the importance of digestive parameters that may be crucial in the development of new in vitro models.

  10. 24 CFR 3285.405 - Severe wind zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.405 Severe wind zones. When any part of a home is installed within 1,500 feet of a coastline in Wind Zones II or III, the manufactured home must be designed for the increased requirements, as specified on the home's data plate (refer...

  11. 76 FR 21677 - Safety Zones; Annual Events Requiring Safety Zones in the Captain of the Port Sault Sainte Marie...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ..., 087[deg]23'07.60'' W [DATUM: NAD 83]. (ii) Enforcement Period This safety zone will be enforced each...]24'50.08'' N, 086[deg]39'08.52'' W [DATUM: NAD 83]. (ii) Enforcement Period This safety zone will be...[deg]57'46.14'' W, and 46[deg]40'19.68'' N, 085[deg]57'43.08'' W [DATUM: NAD 83], with the West Bay...

  12. Regulation of Growth Response to Water Stress in the Soybean Primary Root. I. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Region-Specific Regulation of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism and Control of Free Iron in the Elongation Zone.

    In water-stressed soybean primary roots, elongation was maintained at well-watered rates in the apical 4 mm (region 1) but was progressively inhibited in the 4-8 mm region (region 2), which exhibits maximum elongation in well-watered roots. These responses are similar to previous results for the mai...

  13. Premature Aging Phenotype in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors: Region-Specific Changes in Layer V Pyramidal Cell Morphology.

    PubMed

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Skaliora, Irini

    2015-08-01

    The mechanisms by which aging leads to alterations in brain structure and cognitive deficits are unclear. Α deficient cholinergic system has been implicated as one of the main factors that could confer a heightened vulnerability to the aging process, and mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors (β2(-/-)) have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated cognitive aging. To date, however, age-related changes in neuronal microanatomy have not been studied in these mice. In the present study, we examine the neuronal structure of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP(+)) layer V neurons in 2 cytoarchitectonically distinct cortical regions in wild-type (WT) and β2(-/-) animals. We find that (1) substantial morphological differences exist between YFP(+) cells of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and primary visual cortex (V1), in both genotypes; (2) in WT animals, ACC cells are more susceptible to aging compared with cells in V1; and (3) β2 deletion is associated with a regionally and temporally specific increase in vulnerability to aging. ACC cells exhibit a prematurely aged phenotype already at 4-6 months, whereas V1 cells are spared in adulthood but strongly affected in old animals. Collectively, our data reveal region-specific synergistic effects of aging and genotype and suggest distinct vulnerabilities in V1 and ACC neurons. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. 26 CFR 1.1394-1 - Enterprise zone facility bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in effect under section 1391 (zone designation period); and (ii) The period that ends on the weighted... pooled financing bond and loan recycling programs. In the case of a pooled financing bond program described in paragraph (g)(2) of this section or a loan recycling program described in paragraph (m)(2)(ii...

  15. 26 CFR 1.1394-1 - Enterprise zone facility bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in effect under section 1391 (zone designation period); and (ii) The period that ends on the weighted... pooled financing bond and loan recycling programs. In the case of a pooled financing bond program described in paragraph (g)(2) of this section or a loan recycling program described in paragraph (m)(2)(ii...

  16. 26 CFR 1.1394-1 - Enterprise zone facility bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in effect under section 1391 (zone designation period); and (ii) The period that ends on the weighted... pooled financing bond and loan recycling programs. In the case of a pooled financing bond program described in paragraph (g)(2) of this section or a loan recycling program described in paragraph (m)(2)(ii...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1394-1 - Enterprise zone facility bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in effect under section 1391 (zone designation period); and (ii) The period that ends on the weighted... pooled financing bond and loan recycling programs. In the case of a pooled financing bond program described in paragraph (g)(2) of this section or a loan recycling program described in paragraph (m)(2)(ii...

  18. Acute exercise increases brain region-specific expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, GLUT1, and COX IV proteins.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, Masaki; Hamada, Taku

    2014-05-01

    The brain is capable of oxidizing lactate and ketone bodies through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). We examined the protein expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), and cytochrome-c oxidase subunit IV (COX IV) in the rat brain within 24 h after a single exercise session. Brain samples were obtained from sedentary controls and treadmill-exercised rats (20 m/min, 8% grade). Acute exercise resulted in an increase in lactate in the cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, but not the brainstem, and an increase in β-hydroxybutyrate in the cortex alone. After a 2-h exercise session MCT1 increased in the cortex and hippocampus 5 h postexercise, and the effect lasted in the cortex for 24 h postexercise. MCT2 increased in the cortex and hypothalamus 5-24 h postexercise, whereas MCT2 increased in the hippocampus immediately after exercise, and remained elevated for 10 h postexercise. Regional upregulation of MCT2 after exercise was associated with increases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine-related kinase B proteins, but not insulin-like growth factor 1. MCT4 increased 5-10 h postexercise only in the hypothalamus, and was associated with increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression. However, none of the MCT isoforms in the brainstem was affected by exercise. Whereas GLUT 1 in the cortex increased only at 18 h postexercise, COX IV in the hippocampus increased 10 h after exercise and remained elevated for 24 h postexercise. These results suggest that acute prolonged exercise induces the brain region-specific upregulation of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, GLUT1, and COX IV proteins.

  19. In a non-human primate model, aging disrupts the neural control of intestinal smooth muscle contractility in a region-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Tran, L; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B

    2014-03-01

    Incidences of gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders increase with age. However, there is a paucity of knowledge about the aging mechanisms leading to GI dysmotility. Motility in the GI tract is a function of smooth muscle contractility, which is modulated in part by the enteric nervous system (ENS). Evidence suggests that aging impairs the ENS, thus we tested the hypothesis that senescence in the GI tract precipitates abnormalities in smooth muscle and neurally mediated contractility in a region-specific manner. Jejunal and colonic circular muscle strips were isolated from young (4-10 years) and old (18+ years) baboons. Myogenic responses were investigated using potassium chloride (KCl) and carbachol (CCh). Neurally mediated contractile responses were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and were recorded in the absence and presence of atropine (1 μM) or NG-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 100 μM). The myogenic responses to KCl in the jejunum and colon were unaffected by age. In the colon, but not the jejunum, CCh-induced contractile responses were reduced in aged animals. Compared to young baboons, there was enhanced EFS-induced contractility of old baboon jejunal smooth muscle in contrast to the reduced contractility in the colon. The effect of atropine on the EFS response was lower in aged colonic tissue, suggesting reduced participation of acetylcholine. In aged jejunal tissue, higher contractile responses to EFS were found to be due to reduced nitregic inhibition. These findings provide key evidence for the importance of intestinal smooth muscle and ENS senescence in age-associated GI motility disorders. © 2014 The Authors. Neurogastroenterology & Motility published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Region-specific expression and hormonal regulation of the first exon variants of rat prolactin receptor mRNA in rat brain and anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Nogami, H; Hoshino, R; Ogasawara, K; Miyamoto, S; Hisano, S

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed the occurrence of five first exon variants of the rat prolactin receptor mRNA, suggesting that multiple promoters direct prolactin receptor transcription in response to different regulatory factors. In the present study, regional expression of these first exon variants, as well as two prolactin receptor subtypes generated by alternative splicing, was examined in the brains and anterior pituitary glands of female rats. Expression of the long-form was detected in the choroid plexus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and anterior pituitary gland, whereas the short form was detected only in the choroid plexus. E1-3 mRNA, a first exon variant, was detected in the choroid plexus, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary gland, whereas E1-4 was detected only in the choroid plexus. Other variants were not detectable by the polymerase chain reaction protocol employed in this study. Ovariectomy increased the short form in the choroid plexus and the E1-3 expression in the choroid plexus and pituitary gland, but changes in the long-form and E1-4 expression were minimal. Replacement of oestrogens and prolactin suggest that oestrogens down-regulate E1-3 expression in the choroid plexus and pituitary gland, and that the negative effect of oestrogen is mediated by prolactin in the pituitary gland. The present results revealed the region-specific promoter usage in prolactin receptor mRNA transcription, as well as the involvement of oestrogens in the regulation of E1-3 mRNA expression in the brain and pituitary gland.

  1. Neuregulin 1 Deficiency Modulates Adolescent Stress-Induced Dendritic Spine Loss in a Brain Region-Specific Manner and Increases Complement 4 Expression in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Clarke, David J; Chohan, Tariq W; Kassem, Mustafa S; Smith, Kristie L; Chesworth, Rose; Karl, Tim; Kuligowski, Michael P; Fok, Sandra Y; Bennett, Maxwell R; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2018-03-16

    One neuropathological feature of schizophrenia is a diminished number of dendritic spines in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) system is involved in the plasticity of dendritic spines, and chronic stress decreases dendritic spine densities in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Here, we aimed to assess whether Nrg1 deficiency confers vulnerability to the effects of adolescent stress on dendritic spine plasticity. We also assessed other schizophrenia-relevant neurobiological changes such as microglial cell activation, loss of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and induction of complement factor 4 (C4). Adolescent male wild-type (WT) and Nrg1 heterozygous mice were subjected to chronic restraint stress before their brains underwent Golgi impregnation or immunofluorescent staining of PV interneurons, microglial cells, and C4. Stress in WT mice promoted dendritic spine loss and microglial cell activation in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. However, Nrg1 deficiency rendered mice resilient to stress-induced dendritic spine loss in the infralimbic cortex and the CA3 region of the hippocampus without affecting stress-induced microglial cell activation in these brain regions. Nrg1 deficiency and adolescent stress combined to trigger increased dendritic spine densities in the prelimbic cortex. In the hippocampal CA1 region, Nrg1 deficiency accentuated stress-induced dendritic spine loss. Nrg1 deficiency increased C4 protein and decreased C4 mRNA expression in the hippocampus, and the number of PV interneurons in the basolateral amygdala. This study demonstrates that Nrg1 modulates the impact of stress on the adolescent brain in a region-specific manner. It also provides first evidence of a link between Nrg1 and C4 systems in the hippocampus.

  2. [Regional specific differences in prevalence of overweight/obesity in China: findings from China Kadoorie Biobank study in 10 areas in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixiang; Lyu, Jun; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Yu, Canqing; Zhou, Huiyan; Tan, Yunlong; Pei, Pei; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-11-01

    To describe gender and regional differences in the prevalence of overweight/obesity in adults found by China Kadoorie Biobank (CKB) study, involving 512 489 adults, in 10 areas in China. The baseline survey of CKB was conducted in 5 urban areas and 5 rural areas in China during 2004-2008. After excluding those with extreme value of BMI (<15.0 kg/m(2) or >50 kg/m(2)), 512 489 subjects were included in the analysis. Overweight/obesity was classified according to BMI and WC, and diagnosed according to the guideline for prevention and control of overweight/obesity in Chinese adults. The gender and regional specific distributions of overweight/obesity were compared after adjusting for age. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity was higher in females (45.3%) than in males (41.7%), and the prevalence of central obesity was also higher in females (44.6%) than in males (38.3%). Both the prevalence of overweight/obesity (66.9% in males and 67.5% in females) and the central obesity (63.3% in males and 64.9% in females) were highest in Qingdao. The area specific difference in the prevalence was more obvious in males than in females. Rural areas all had the low prevalence except Henan. Moreover, central obesity was diagnosed in some subjects (15.3% in females, 9.8% in males) with normal/low BMI (<24.0 kg/m(2)). This phenomenon was more obvious in Qingdao (22.2% in males and 23.2% in females). The prevalence of overweight/obesity in adults varied greatly across different areas in China.

  3. Vertebral heights and ratios are not only race-specific, but also gender- and region-specific: establishment of reference values for mainland Chinese.

    PubMed

    Ning, Lei; Song, Li-Jiang; Fan, Shun-Wu; Zhao, Xing; Chen, Yi-Lei; Li, Zhao-Zhi; Hu, Zi-Ang

    2017-10-11

    This study established gender-specific reference values in mainland Chinese (MC) and is important for quantitative morphometry for diagnosis and epidemiological study of osteoporotic vertebral compressive fracture. Comparisons of reference values among different racial populations are then performed to demonstrate the MC-specific characteristic. Osteoporotic vertebral compressive fracture (OVCF) is a common complication of osteoporosis in the elder population. Clinical diagnosis and epidemiological study of OVCF often employ quantitative morphometry, which relies heavily on the comparison of patients' vertebral parameters to existing reference values derived from the normal population. Thus, reference values are crucial in clinical diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first study to establish reference values of the mainland Chinese (MC) for quantitative morphometry. Vertebral heights including anterior (Ha), middle (Hm), posterior (Hp) heights, and predicted posterior height (pp) from T4 to L5 were obtained; and ratios of Ha/Hp, Hm/Hp and Hp/pp. were calculated from 585 MC (both female and male) for establishing reference values and subsequent comparisons with other studies. Vertebral heights increased progressively from T4 to L3 but then decreased in L4 and L5. Both genders showed similar ratios of vertebral dimensions, but male vertebrae were statistically larger than those of female (P < 0.01). Vertebral size of MC population was smaller than that of US and UK population, but was surprisingly larger than that of Hong Kong Chinese, although these two are commonly considered as one race. Data from different racial populations showed similar dimensional ratios in all vertebrae. We established gender-specific reference values for MC. Our results also indicated the necessity of establishing reference values that are not only race- and gender-specific, but also population- or region-specific for accurate quantitative morphometric assessment of OVCF.

  4. Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-08

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  5. 26 CFR 1.1397E-1 - Qualified zone academy bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Empowerment Zone Employment Credit § 1.1397E-1 Qualified zone... section 1397E(d)(2)(B)(i), (ii), (iii), (iv) or (v). Services of employees of the eligible local education... empowerment zone or enterprise community (as defined in section 1393), or there is a reasonable expectation...

  6. 26 CFR 1.1397E-1 - Qualified zone academy bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Empowerment Zone Employment Credit § 1.1397E-1 Qualified zone... section 1397E(d)(2)(B)(i), (ii), (iii), (iv) or (v). Services of employees of the eligible local education... empowerment zone or enterprise community (as defined in section 1393), or there is a reasonable expectation...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1397E-1 - Qualified zone academy bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Empowerment Zone Employment Credit § 1.1397E-1 Qualified zone... section 1397E(d)(2)(B)(i), (ii), (iii), (iv) or (v). Services of employees of the eligible local education... empowerment zone or enterprise community (as defined in section 1393), or there is a reasonable expectation...

  8. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  9. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  10. Work zone safety analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  11. California tree seed zones

    John M. Buck; Ronald S. Adams; Jerrold Cone; M. Thompson Conkle; William J. Libby; Cecil J. Eden; Michel J. Knight

    1970-01-01

    California forest tree seed zones were established originally by Fowells (1946), with revisions proposed by Roy (1963) and Schubert (1966). The Forest Tree Seed Committee of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, has revised the original zones and updated the recording system described in the earlier reports. Fowells' (1946) Research Note...

  12. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  13. Longleaf pine site zones

    Phillip J. Craul; John S. Kush; William D. Boyer

    2005-01-01

    The authors delineate six major climatic areas of the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) region. They subdivide these areas into 21 site zones, each of which is deemed homogenous with respect to climate, physiography, and soils. The site zones are mapped and their climate, physiography, and soils described. The authors recommend that plantings of...

  14. Iowa Work Zone Fatalities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    From March through November, the Iowa DOT may have up to 500 road construction work zones, and each of the department's maintenance garages may establish one or more short-term work zones per day. Couple that with the work of cities and counties, and...

  15. Habitable Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, D.; Lota, J.

    2012-12-01

    The location of the habitable zone around a star depends upon stellar luminosity and upon the properties of a potentially habitable planet such as its mass and near-surface volatile inventory. Stellar luminosity generally increases as a star ages whilst planetary properties change through time as a consequence of biological and geological evolution. Hence, the location of the habitable zone changes through time as a result of both stellar evolution and planetary evolution. Using the Earth's Phanerozoic temperature history as a constraint, it is shown that changes in our own habitable zone over the last 540 My have been dominated by planetary evolution rather than solar evolution. Furthermore, sparse data from earlier times suggests that planetary evolution may have dominated habitable zone development throughout our biosphere's history. Hence, the existence of a continuously habitable zone depends upon accidents of complex bio-geochemical evolution more than it does upon relatively simple stellar-evolution. Evolution of the inner margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations. Evolution of the outer margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations.

  16. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  17. Radiotherapy in marginal zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) for early-stage nodal and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MZL). Materials and methods Patients with stage I (n = 22) and stage II (n = 8) MZL, who were treated with RT were reviewed. The primary tumor localisation was in the orbita (n = 12), stomach (n = 8), head and neck other than the orbita (n = 8), breast (n = 1) and one case of marginal zone lymphoma of the skin (n = 1). The median radiotherapy dose was 40 Gy (5 to 45 Gy). Results The median follow-up time was 103 months. The 5-year overall survival and event-free survival rates were 85 ± 7% and 71 ± 9%, respectively. There was no infield recurrence. Recurrence occurred outside of the radiation field in six patients. The relapses were treated with salvage RT and had excellent local control (100%) at five years after salvage RT. Conclusions Localized extranodal MZL have an excellent prognosis following moderate-dose RT. RT is also an effective salvage therapy in cases of localized recurrence. Further clinical studies should evaluate the optimal dose for MZL. PMID:23281682

  18. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  19. Speeds in school zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    School speed zones are frequently requested traffic controls for school areas, based on the common belief : that if the transportation agency would only install a reduced speed limit, then drivers would no longer : speed through the area. This resear...

  20. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  1. Coronal mass ejection (CME) activity of low mass M stars as an important factor for the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets. II. CME-induced ion pick up of Earth-like exoplanets in close-in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Kulikov, Yuri N; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Terada, N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Biernat, Helfried K; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Ribas, Ignasi; Penz, Thomas; Selsis, Franck

    2007-02-01

    Atmospheric erosion of CO2-rich Earth-size exoplanets due to coronal mass ejection (CME)-induced ion pick up within close-in habitable zones of active M-type dwarf stars is investigated. Since M stars are active at the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) wave-lengths over long periods of time, we have applied a thermal balance model at various XUV flux input values for simulating the thermospheric heating by photodissociation and ionization processes due to exothermic chemical reactions and cooling by the CO2 infrared radiation in the 15 microm band. Our study shows that intense XUV radiation of active M stars results in atmospheric expansion and extended exospheres. Using thermospheric neutral and ion densities calculated for various XUV fluxes, we applied a numerical test particle model for simulation of atmospheric ion pick up loss from an extended exosphere arising from its interaction with expected minimum and maximum CME plasma flows. Our results indicate that the Earth-like exoplanets that have no, or weak, magnetic moments may lose tens to hundreds of bars of atmospheric pressure, or even their whole atmospheres due to the CME-induced O ion pick up at orbital distances

  2. Defense.gov Special Report: World War II: Turning Points

    Department of Defense Submit Search Turning points of World War II U.S. Marines rest in the field on landed several miles from his intended drop zone. Cook, 87, was among the handful of World War II -Day U.S. and Allied military veterans of World War II and contemporay warriors attended commemoration

  3. Mushy zone modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Smith, Richard N.; Marsh, Steven P.; Kuklinski, Robert

    A key element of mushy zone modeling is the description of the microscopic evolution of the lengthscales within the mushy zone and the influence of macroscopic transport processes. This paper describes some recent progress in developing a mean-field statistical theory of phase coarsening in adiabatic mushy zones. The main theoretical predictions are temporal scaling laws that indicate that average lengthscale increases as time 1/3, a self-similar distribution of mushy zone lengthscales based on spherical solid particle shapes, and kinetic rate constants which provide the dependences of the coarsening process on material parameters and the volume fraction of the solid phase. High precision thermal decay experiments are described which verify aspects of the theory in pure material mushy zones held under adiabatic conditions. The microscopic coarsening theory is then integrated within a macroscopic heat transfer model of one-dimensional alloy solidification, using the Double Integral Method. The method demonstrates an ability to predict the influence of macroscopic heat transfer on the evolution of primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings in Al-Cu alloys. Finally, some suggestions are made for future experimental and theoretical studies required in developing comprehensive solidification processing models.

  4. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  5. Freeway work zone lane capacity.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this report is a capacity analysis of two long-term urban freeway Work Zones. Work Zone #1 : tapered four mainline lanes to two, using two separate tapers; Work Zone #2 tapered two mainline lanes to one. : Work Zone throughput was analyz...

  6. Distribution of dilemma zone after intelligent transportation system established

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuanchang; Yang, Huiqin; Wu, Linying

    2017-03-01

    Dilemma zone refers to an area where vehicles can neither clear the intersection during the yellow interval nor stop safely before the stop line. The purpose of this paper is to analyzing the distribution of two types of dilemma zone after intelligent transportation system (ITS) established at Outer Ring Roads signalized intersections in Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center. To collect field data a drone aircraft was used. When calculating the type II dilemma zone's distribution, we considered the information of drivers' aggressiveness, which was classified by driving speed and type I dilemma zone as well. We also compared the two types dilemma zone's distribution before and after ITS established and analyzed the changes, which was brought by ITS.

  7. Dike zones on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.; Sukhanov, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Venusian dike zone structures were identified from Venera 15 and 16 radar images. These include: a zone of subparallel rows centered at 30 deg N, 7 deg E; a system of intersecting bands centered at 67 deg N, 284 deg E; polygonal systems in lavas covering the structural base uplift centered at 47 deg N, 200 deg E; a system of light bands in the region of the ring structure centered at 43 deg N, 13 deg E; and a dike band centered at 27 deg N, 36 deg E.

  8. BASS II

    2014-02-14

    ISS038-E-047576 (14 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS-II) experiment in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. BASS-II explores how different substances burn in microgravity with benefits for combustion on Earth and fire safety in space.

  9. BASS II

    2014-02-14

    ISS038-E-047582 (14 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS-II) experiment in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. BASS-II explores how different substances burn in microgravity with benefits for combustion on Earth and fire safety in space.

  10. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  11. Arid Zone Hydrology

    Arid zone hydrology encompasses a wide range of topics and hydro-meteorological and ecological characteristics. Although arid and semi-arid watersheds perform the same functions as those in humid environments, their hydrology and sediment transport characteristics cannot be readily predicted by inf...

  12. Zone of intrusion study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-15

    The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF) performed an analysis using LS-DYNA simulation to investigate the zone of intrusion (ZOI) of an NCHRP Report No. 350 2000p pickup truck when impacting a 40-in. high F-shape parapet. : The ZOI for the 40-in...

  13. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  15. Crossing Comfort Zones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison, D. Soyini

    1993-01-01

    Offers a narrative based on a real event, in the form of a "docustory," describing that moment when teaching worked--when, in an instructional setting, communication was "perfect" or "excellent." Describes how three very different students, in a course on the cultures of women of color, moved beyond comfort zones while working together on a class…

  16. Evaluation of Ohio work zone speed zones process.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to determine the effectiveness of Ohio Department of Transportation processes for establishing work zone speed zones. Researchers observed motorists speed choice upstream of a...

  17. Photosystem II

    James Barber

    2017-12-09

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  18. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  19. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOEpatents

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  20. Aeration Zone Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, B.

    The International Symposium on Recent Investigations in the Zone of Aeration (RIZA) was organized by the Institute for Hydrogeology and Hydrochemistry of the Technical University of Munich and held October 1-5, 1984, in the lecture halls of the Grosshadern Klinik in Munich, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). P. Udluft, B. Merkel, and K.-H. Prüsl, all of the university, were responsible for the organization of the symposium, which was under the patronage of K.-E. Quentin. There were over 200 participants from 22 different countries, among them Australia, Canada, China, India, and the United States. The topics of the symposium were the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes in the unsaturated zone, the region between the surface and the groundwater level. Here a number of complex processes occur that on the one hand are of natural origin and on the other hand are influenced by human activities in a number of ways.

  1. Crash characteristics at work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    Work zones tend to cause hazardous conditions for drivers and construction workers since they generate conflicts between construction activities and traffic. A clear understanding of the characteristics of work zone crashes will enhance the selection...

  2. Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System water quality modeling and decision support system designed for environmental impact assessment of mixing zones resulting from wastewater discharge from point sources

  3. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  4. Work zone intrusion alarm effectiveness.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-09-01

    16. Abstract : The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) commissioned a study to evaluate how : effective a work zone safety device known as the SonoBlaster! Work Zone Intrusion Alarm would be : in protecting maintenance workers fro...

  5. Trojans in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Dvorak, Rudolf; Erdi, Balint; Sándor, Zsolt

    2005-10-01

    With the aid of numerical experiments we examined the dynamical stability of fictitious terrestrial planets in 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jovian-like planets of extrasolar planetary systems. In our stability study of the so-called "Trojan" planets in the habitable zone, we used the restricted three-body problem with different mass ratios of the primary bodies. The application of the three-body problem showed that even massive Trojan planets can be stable in the 1:1 mean motion resonance. From the 117 extrasolar planetary systems only 11 systems were found with one giant planet in the habitable zone. Out of this sample set we chose four planetary systems--HD17051, HD27442, HD28185, and HD108874--for further investigation. To study the orbital behavior of the stable zone in the different systems, we used direct numerical computations (Lie Integration Method) that allowed us to determine the escape times and the maximum eccentricity of the fictitious "Trojan planets."

  6. 77 FR 24880 - Safety Zone; Jet Express Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Lakeside, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Jet Express Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Lakeside, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Erie during the Jet Express Triathlon. This proposed safety zone is necessary to protect participants... Erie. The participants will begin by jumping off the ferry boat JET EXPRESS II at the designated...

  7. An 8/15-channel Tx/Rx head neck RF coil combination with region-specific B1 + shimming for whole-brain MRI focused on the cerebellum at 7T.

    PubMed

    Pfaffenrot, Viktor; Brunheim, Sascha; Rietsch, Stefan H G; Koopmans, Peter J; Ernst, Thomas M; Kraff, Oliver; Orzada, Stephan; Quick, Harald H

    2018-02-09

    To design and evaluate an 8/15-channel transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) head-neck RF coil combination with region-specific B1+ shimming for whole-brain MRI with focus on improved functional MRI of the cerebellum at 7 T. An 8-channel transceiver RF head coil was combined with a 7-channel receive-only array. The noise parameters and acceleration capabilities of this 8Tx/15Rx coil setup were compared with a commercially available 1Tx/32Rx RF head coil. Region-specific 8-channel B1+ shimming was applied when using the 8Tx/15Rx RF coil. To evaluate the capability for functional MRI of the cerebellum, temporal SNR and statistical nonparametric maps for finger-tapping experiments with 14 healthy subjects were derived by applying a variable slice thickness gradient-echo echo-planar functional MRI sequence. The 8Tx/15Rx setup had a lower maximum noise correlation between channels, but higher average correlations compared with the 1Tx/32Rx coil. Both RF coils exhibited identical g-factors in the cerebellum with R = 3 acceleration. The enlarged FOV of the 8Tx/15Rx coil in combination with region-specific B1+ shimming increased homogeneity of the transmission field and temporal SNR in caudal cerebellar regions. Temporal SNR losses in cranial parts were reduced, resulting in more highly significant voxels in the caudally activated areas and identical patterns in the cranial cerebellar parts during a finger-tapping task. Compared with the 1Tx/32Rx RF coil, the presented 8Tx/15Rx RF coil combination successfully improves functional MRI of the human cerebellum at 7 T while maintaining whole-brain coverage. A clear temporal SNR gain in caudal cerebellar regions is shown. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Fibonacci-like zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shubo; Liu, Mengsi; Xia, Tian; Tao, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    We present a new family of diffractive lenses, Fibonacci-like zone plates, generated with a modified Fibonacci sequence. The focusing properties and the evolution of transverse diffraction pattern for the Fibonacci-like zone plates have been analytically investigated both theoretically and experimentally and compared with the corresponding Fresnel zone plates of the same resolution. The results demonstrate that the Fibonacci-like zone plates possess the self-similar property and the multifocal behavior. Furthermore, the Fibonacci-like zone plate beams are found to possess the self-reconstruction property, and would be promising for 3D optical tweezers, laser machining, and optical imaging.

  9. The generalized mean zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; Cheng, Shubo; Tao, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    In this paper a generalized mean zone plate is proposed, which generates twin foci located at the positions satisfying the expression of the generalized mean, which includes the m-golden mean, precious mean, and so on. The generalized mean zone plate can be designed to generate twin foci with various position ratios. The diffraction properties of the generalized mean zone plates have been investigated with simulations and experiments. The results show that the ratio of the positions of the twin foci for the generalized mean zone plate can be designed with the selected zone plate parameters.

  10. An arthroscopic evaluation of the anatomical "critical zone".

    PubMed

    Naidoo, N; Lazarus, L; Osman, S A; Satyapal, K S

    2017-01-01

    The "critical zone", a region of speculated vascularity, is situated approximately 10 mm proximal to the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon. Despite its obvious role as an anatomical landmark demarcator, its patho-anatomic nature has been identified as the source of rotator cuff pathology. Although many studies have attempted to evaluate the vascularity of this region, the architecture regarding the exact length, width and shape of the critical zone, remains unreported. This study aimed to determine the shape and morphometry of the "critical zone" arthroscopically. The sample series, which was comprised of 38 cases (n = 38) specific to pathological types, employed an anatomical investigation of the critical zone during routine real-time arthroscopy. Demographic representation: i) sex: 19 males, 19 females; ii) age range: 18-76 years; iii) race: white (n = 29), Indian (n = 7) and coloured (n = 2). The incidence of shape and the mean lengths and widths of the critical zone were determined in accordance with the relevant demographic factors and patient history. Although the cresenteric shape was predominant, hemispheric and sail-shaped critical zones were also identified. The lengths and widths of the critical zone appeared markedly increased in male individuals. While the increase in age may account for the increased incidence of rotator cuff degeneration due to poor end-vascular supply, the additional factors of height and weight presented as major determinants of the increase in size of the critical zone. In addition, the comparisons of length and width with each other and shape yielded levels of significant difference, therefore indicating a directly proportional relationship between the length and width of the critical zone. This detailed understanding of the critical zone may prove beneficial for the success of post-operative rotator cuff healing.

  11. Liquid zone seal

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  12. Smartphones and Time Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, William; Secrest, Jeffery; Padgett, Clifford; Johnson, Wayne; Hagrelius, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Using the Sun to tell time is an ancient idea, but we can take advantage of modern technology to bring it into the 21st century for students in astronomy, physics, or physical science classes. We have employed smartphones, Google Earth, and 3D printing to find the moment of local noon at two widely separated locations. By reviewing GPS time-stamped photos from each place, we are able to illustrate that local noon is longitude-dependent and therefore explain the need for time zones.

  13. Marginal Ice Zone Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    A Voyage of Discovery. George Deacon 70th An-niversary Volume, (M. Angel, ed.), Pergamon Press, Oxford, p.15-41. Coachman, L.K., C.A. Barnes, 1961...some polar contrasts. In: S "" RUsium on Antarctic Ice and Water Masses, ( George Deacon, ed.), Sci- 72 Lebedev, A.A., 1968: Zone of possible icing of...Atlantic and Western Europe. British Meteorological Office. Geophysical Memoirs, 4(41). Brost , R.A., J.C. Wyngaard, 1978: A model study of the stably

  14. Coseismic microstructures of experimental fault zones in Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ree, Jin-Han; Ando, Jun-ichi; Han, Raehee; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2014-09-01

    Experimental fault zones developed in Carrara marble that were deformed at seismic slip rates (1.18-1.30 m s-1) using a high-velocity-rotary-shear apparatus exhibit very low friction (friction coefficient as low as 0.06) at steady state due to nanoparticle lubrication of the decomposition product (lime). The fault zones show a layered structure; a central slip-localization layer (5-60 μm thick) of lime nanograins mantled by gouge layers (5-150 μm thick) and a plastically deformed layer (45-500 μm thick) between the wall rock and gouge layer in the marginal portion of cylindrical specimens. Calcite grains of the wall rock adjacent to the slip zone deform by dislocation glide when subjected to frictional heating and a lower strain rate than that of the principal slip zone. The very fine (2-5 μm) calcite grains in the gouge layer show a foam structure with relatively straight grain boundaries and 120° triple junctions. This foam structure is presumed to develop by welding at high temperature and low strain once slip is localized along the central layer. We suggest that a seismic event can be inferred from deformed marbles, given: (i) the presence of welded gouge with foam structure in a fault zone where wall rocks show no evidence of thermal metamorphism and (ii) a thin plastically deformed layer immediately adjacent to the principal slip zone of a cataclastic fault zone.

  15. Metagenomic insights into important microbes from the Dead Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrash, C.; Baker, B.; Seitz, K.; Temperton, B.; Gillies, L.; Rabalais, N. N.; Mason, O. U.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal regions of eutrophication-driven oxygen depletion are widespread and increasing in number. Also known as dead zones, these regions take their name from the deleterious effects of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen less than 2 mg/L) on shrimp, demersal fish, and other animal life. Dead zones result from nutrient enrichment of primary production, concomitant consumption by chemoorganotrophic aerobic microorganisms, and strong stratification that prevents ventilation of bottom water. One of the largest dead zones in the world occurs seasonally in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM), where hypoxia can reach up to 22,000 square kilometers. While this dead zone shares many features with more well-known marine oxygen minimum zones, it is nevertheless understudied with regards to the microbial assemblages involved in biogeochemical cycling. We performed metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing on six samples from the 2013 nGOM dead zone from both hypoxic and oxic bottom waters. Assembly and binning led to the recovery of over fifty partial to nearly complete metagenomes from key microbial taxa previously determined to be numerically abundant from 16S rRNA data, such as Thaumarcheaota, Marine Group II Euryarchaeota, SAR406, SAR324, Synechococcus spp., and Planctomycetes. These results provide information about the roles of these taxa in the nGOM dead zone, and opportunities for comparing this region of low oxygen to others around the globe.

  16. FAQs II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Frank, Vikki; Lester, Jaime; Yang, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    In their paper entitled "Why should postsecondary institutions consider partnering to offer (Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?" the authors reviewed frequently asked questions they encountered from higher education professionals about IDAs, but as their research continued so did the questions. FAQ II has more in-depth questions and…

  17. [Current approach to zoning atomic shipbuilding plants].

    PubMed

    Blekher, A Ia

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusses the currently introduced radiation-and-hygienic system for zoning atomic shipbuilding plants, in accordance with which three radiation-and-hygienic zones (a strict regime zone, a controlled approach zone, and a free regime zone) are established at the plant site and two zones (a sanitary-and-protective zone and a follow-up zone) are also established outside the plant site.

  18. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  19. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  20. BORE II

    SciT

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolutionmore » than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  1. Partially-overlapped viewing zone based integral imaging system with super wide viewing angle.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhao-Long; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Li, Shu-Li; Deng, Huan; Ji, Chao-Chao

    2014-09-22

    In this paper, we analyze the relationship between viewer and viewing zones of integral imaging (II) system and present a partially-overlapped viewing zone (POVZ) based integral imaging system with a super wide viewing angle. In the proposed system, the viewing angle can be wider than the viewing angle of the conventional tracking based II system. In addition, the POVZ can eliminate the flipping and time delay of the 3D scene as well. The proposed II system has a super wide viewing angle of 120° without flipping effect about twice as wide as the conventional one.

  2. Fuel conditioning facility zone-to-zone transfer administrative controls.

    SciT

    Pope, C. L.

    2000-06-21

    The administrative controls associated with transferring containers from one criticality hazard control zone to another in the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) are described. FCF, located at the ANL-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, is used to remotely process spent sodium bonded metallic fuel for disposition. The process involves nearly forty widely varying material forms and types, over fifty specific use container types, and over thirty distinct zones where work activities occur. During 1999, over five thousand transfers from one zone to another were conducted. Limits are placed on mass, material form and type, and container typesmore » for each zone. Ml material and containers are tracked using the Mass Tracking System (MTG). The MTG uses an Oracle database and numerous applications to manage the database. The database stores information specific to the process, including material composition and mass, container identification number and mass, transfer history, and the operators involved in each transfer. The process is controlled using written procedures which specify the zone, containers, and material involved in a task. Transferring a container from one zone to another is called a zone-to-zone transfer (ZZT). ZZTs consist of four distinct phases, select, request, identify, and completion.« less

  3. Molecular differences in transition zone and peripheral zone prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Rider, Jennifer R.; Carlsson, Jessica; Gerke, Travis; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Penney, Kathryn L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Loda, Massimo; Fall, Katja; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Pawitan, Yudi; Andersson, Sven-Olof; Andrén, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Prostate tumors arise primarily in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate, but 20–30% arise in the transition zone (TZ). Zone of origin may have prognostic value or reflect distinct molecular subtypes; however, it can be difficult to determine in practice. Using whole-genome gene expression, we built a signature of zone using normal tissue from five individuals and found that it successfully classified nine tumors of known zone. Hypothesizing that this signature captures tumor zone of origin, we assessed its relationship with clinical factors among 369 tumors of unknown zone from radical prostatectomies (RPs) and found that tumors that molecularly resembled TZ tumors showed lower mortality (P = 0.09) that was explained by lower Gleason scores (P = 0.009). We further applied the signature to an earlier study of 88 RP and 333 transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) tumor samples, also of unknown zone, with gene expression on ~6000 genes. We had observed previously substantial expression differences between RP and TURP specimens, and hypothesized that this might be because RPs capture primarily PZ tumors, whereas TURPs capture more TZ tumors. Our signature distinguished these two groups, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 87% (P < 0.0001). Our findings that zonal differences in normal tissue persist in tumor tissue and that these differences are associated with Gleason score and sample type suggest that subtypes potentially resulting from different etiologic pathways might arise in these zones. Zone of origin may be important to consider in prostate tumor biomarker research. PMID:25870172

  4. APOLLO II

    SciT

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.

    1988-11-01

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  5. Achieving That Elusive "Leadership Zone"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Reaching the "leadership zone" happens when librarians tap into the extraordinary skills lying within to overcome obstacles and transform sometimes-difficult situations into meaningful outcomes. Maturing into an experienced leader who stays in the leadership zone requires knowledge, training, and practice. This article provides tactical…

  6. The Supergalactic Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Habitability in the local universe is examined. Constrained by metal abundance and exposure to sterilizing events, life as we know it requires significantly long periods of stable environmental conditions. Planets within galaxies undergoing major mergers, active AGN, starburst episodes, and merging black holes pose serious threats to long-term habitability. Importantly, the development of several layers of protection from high-energy particles such as a thick atmosphere, a strong planetary magnetic field, an astrosphere, and a galactic magnetic field is of great benefit. Factors such as star type and activity, planet type and composition, the location of a planet within its host galaxy, and even the location within a supercluster of galaxies can affect the potential habitability of planets. We discuss the concept of the Supergalactic Habitable Zone introduced by Mason and Biermann in terms of habitability in the local universe and find that galaxies near the center of the Virgo cluster, for example, have a much lower probability for the development of life as we know it as compared to locations in the Milky Way.

  7. Detecting livestock production zones.

    PubMed

    Grisi-Filho, J H H; Amaku, M; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Neto, J S Ferreira; Negreiros, R L; Ossada, R

    2013-07-01

    Communities are sets of nodes that are related in an important way, most likely sharing common properties and/or playing similar roles within a network. Unraveling a network structure, and hence the trade preferences and pathways, could be useful to a researcher or a decision maker. We implemented a community detection algorithm to find livestock communities, which is consistent with the definition of a livestock production zone, assuming that a community is a group of farm premises in which an animal is more likely to stay during its lifetime than expected by chance. We applied this algorithm to the network of animal movements within the state of Mato Grosso for 2007. This database holds information concerning 87,899 premises and 521,431 movements throughout the year, totaling 15,844,779 animals moved. The community detection algorithm achieved a network partition that shows a clear geographical and commercial pattern, two crucial features for preventive veterinary medicine applications; this algorithm provides also a meaningful interpretation to trade networks where links emerge based on trader node choices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Contact Zone: Missoula

    2015-07-23

    A rock outcrop dubbed "Missoula," near Marias Pass on Mars, is seen in this image mosaic taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager on NASA's Curiosity rover. Pale mudstone (bottom of outcrop) meets coarser sandstone (top) in this geological contact zone, which has piqued the interest of Mars scientists. White mineral veins that fill fractures in the lower rock unit abruptly end when they meet the upper rock unit. Such clues help scientists understand the possible timing of geological events. First, the fine sediment that now forms the lower unit would have hardened into rock. It then would have fractured, and groundwater would have deposited calcium sulfate minerals into the fractures. Next, the coarser sediment that forms the upper unit would have been deposited. The area pictured is about 16 inches (40 centimeters) across. The image was taken on the 1,031st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 1, 2015). MAHLI was built by Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the project's Curiosity rover. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19829

  9. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  10. Jovian 'Twilight Zone'

    2018-03-01

    This image captures the swirling cloud formations around the south pole of Jupiter, looking up toward the equatorial region. NASA's Juno spacecraft took the color-enhanced image during its eleventh close flyby of the gas giant planet on Feb. 7 at 7:11 a.m. PST (10:11 a.m. EST). At the time, the spacecraft was 74,896 miles (120,533 kilometers) from the tops of Jupiter's clouds at 84.9 degrees south latitude. Citizen scientist Gerald Gerald Eichstädt processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. This image was created by reprocessing raw JunoCam data using trajectory and pointing data from the spacecraft. This image is one in a series of images taken in an experiment to capture the best results for illuminated parts of Jupiter's polar region. To make features more visible in Jupiter's terminator -- the region where day meets night -- the Juno team adjusted JunoCam so that it would perform like a portrait photographer taking multiple photos at different exposures, hoping to capture one image with the intended light balance. For JunoCam to collect enough light to reveal features in Jupiter's dark twilight zone, the much brighter illuminated day-side of Jupiter becomes overexposed with the higher exposure. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21980

  11. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  12. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  13. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  14. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  15. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  16. 49 CFR 71.11 - Alaska zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska zone. 71.11 Section 71.11 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.11 Alaska zone. The sixth zone, the Alaska standard time zone, includes the entire State of Alaska, except as provided in § 71.12...

  17. 49 CFR 71.13 - Samoa zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Samoa zone. 71.13 Section 71.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.13 Samoa zone. The eighth zone, the Samoa standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 169 degrees...

  18. 49 CFR 71.6 - Central zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.6 Central zone. The third zone, the central standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of the boundary line between the eastern and central standard time zones described in § 71.5 and east of the...

  19. 49 CFR 71.4 - Eastern zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eastern zone. 71.4 Section 71.4 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.4 Eastern zone. The second zone, the eastern standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of 67°30″ W...

  20. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″ W...

  1. 49 CFR 71.14 - Chamorro Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chamorro Zone. 71.14 Section 71.14 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.14 Chamorro Zone. The ninth zone, the Chamorro standard time zone, includes the Island of Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern...

  2. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of the boundary line between the central and mountain standard time zones described in § 71.7 and east of the...

  3. 49 CFR 71.10 - Pacific zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.10 Pacific zone. The fifth zone, the Pacific standard time zone, includes that part of the continental United States that is west of the boundary line between the mountain and Pacific standard time zones described in § 71.9, but...

  4. Capture zones for simple aquifers

    McElwee, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    Capture zones showing the area influenced by a well within a certain time are useful for both aquifer protection and cleanup. If hydrodynamic dispersion is neglected, a deterministic curve defines the capture zone. Analytical expressions for the capture zones can be derived for simple aquifers. However, the capture zone equations are transcendental and cannot be explicitly solved for the coordinates of the capture zone boundary. Fortunately, an iterative scheme allows the solution to proceed quickly and efficiently even on a modest personal computer. Three forms of the analytical solution must be used in an iterative scheme to cover the entire region of interest, after the extreme values of the x coordinate are determined by an iterative solution. The resulting solution is a discrete one, and usually 100-1000 intervals along the x-axis are necessary for a smooth definition of the capture zone. The presented program is written in FORTRAN and has been used in a variety of computing environments. No graphics capability is included with the program; it is assumed the user has access to a commercial package. The superposition of capture zones for multiple wells is expected to be satisfactory if the spacing is not too close. Because this program deals with simple aquifers, the results rarely will be the final word in a real application.

  5. Habitable zone limits for dry planets.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yutaka; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Sleep, Norman H; Zahnle, Kevin J

    2011-06-01

    Most discussion of habitable planets has focused on Earth-like planets with globally abundant liquid water. For an "aqua planet" like Earth, the surface freezes if far from its sun, and the water vapor greenhouse effect runs away if too close. Here we show that "land planets" (desert worlds with limited surface water) have wider habitable zones than aqua planets. For planets at the inner edge of the habitable zone, a land planet has two advantages over an aqua planet: (i) the tropics can emit longwave radiation at rates above the traditional runaway limit because the air is unsaturated and (ii) the dry air creates a dry stratosphere that limits hydrogen escape. At the outer limits of the habitable zone, the land planet better resists global freezing because there is less water for clouds, snow, and ice. Here we describe a series of numerical experiments using a simple three-dimensional global climate model for Earth-sized planets. Other things (CO(2), rotation rate, surface pressure) unchanged, we found that liquid water remains stable at the poles of a low-obliquity land planet until net insolation exceeds 415 W/m(2) (170% that of modern Earth), compared to 330 W/m(2) (135%) for the aqua planet. At the outer limits, we found that a low-obliquity land planet freezes at 77%, while the aqua planet freezes at 90%. High-obliquity land and aqua planets freeze at 58% and 72%, respectively, with the poles offering the last refuge. We show that it is possible that, as the Sun brightens, an aqua planet like Earth can lose most of its hydrogen and become a land planet without first passing through a sterilizing runaway greenhouse. It is possible that Venus was a habitable land planet as recently as 1 billion years ago.

  6. ELECTROMAGNETIC STIRRING IN ZONE REFINING

    SciT

    Braun, I.; Frank, F.C.; Marshall, S.

    1958-02-01

    The efficiency of the zone refining process can obviously be increased by stirring the molten zone to disperse the impurity-rich layer at the solid- liquid surface. Induction heating is sometimes preferred to radiant heat because it produces more convection, but no marked improvement has been reported. Pfann and Dorsi(1967) have described a method of stirring the melt by passing an electric current through the ingot and compressing a magnetic field across the molten zone. Preliminary results obtained by using a rotating magnetic field us the stirring agent during the purification of aluminum are described. (A.C.)

  7. 77 FR 6007 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ...] Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation... they could be published in the Federal Register. This notice lists temporary safety zones, security zones, special local regulations, drawbridge operation regulations and regulated navigation areas, all...

  8. Improving work zone safety through speed management.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    Safety hazards are increased in highway work zones as the dynamics of a work zone introduce a constantly changing : environment with varying levels of risk. Excessive speeding through work and maintenance zones is a common occurrence : which elevates...

  9. Crash characteristics at work zones

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-05-01

    Work zones tend to cause hazardous conditions for vehicle drivers and construction workers since they generate conflicts between construction activities and the traffic, and therefore aggravate the existing traffic conditions.

  10. Work zone and operation enhancements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-02-01

    Oregon Department of Transportation contractors are required to implement Traffic Control Plans (TCPs) to protect and direct traffic through work zones. The design and implementation of TCPs have shown variation from project-to-project across the Sta...

  11. Zoning, equity, and public health.

    PubMed Central

    Maantay, J

    2001-01-01

    Zoning, the most prevalent land use planning tool in the United States, has substantial implications for equity and public health. Zoning determines where various categories of land use may go, thereby influencing the location of resulting environmental and health impacts. Industrially zoned areas permit noxious land uses and typically carry higher environmental burdens than other areas. Using New York City as a case study, the author shows that industrial zones have large residential populations within them or nearby. Noxious uses tend to be concentrated in poor and minority industrial neighborhoods because more affluent industrial areas and those with lower minority populations are rezoned for other uses, and industrial zones in poorer neighborhoods are expanded. Zoning policies, therefore, can have adverse impacts on public health and equity. The location of noxious uses and the pollution they generate have ramifications for global public health and equity; these uses have been concentrated in the world's poorer places as well as in poorer places within more affluent countries. Planners, policymakers, and public health professionals must collaborate on a worldwide basis to address these equity, health, and land use planning problems. PMID:11441726

  12. Climate change and dead zones.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Andrew H; Gedan, Keryn B

    2015-04-01

    Estuaries and coastal seas provide valuable ecosystem services but are particularly vulnerable to the co-occurring threats of climate change and oxygen-depleted dead zones. We analyzed the severity of climate change predicted for existing dead zones, and found that 94% of dead zones are in regions that will experience at least a 2 °C temperature increase by the end of the century. We then reviewed how climate change will exacerbate hypoxic conditions through oceanographic, ecological, and physiological processes. We found evidence that suggests numerous climate variables including temperature, ocean acidification, sea-level rise, precipitation, wind, and storm patterns will affect dead zones, and that each of those factors has the potential to act through multiple pathways on both oxygen availability and ecological responses to hypoxia. Given the variety and strength of the mechanisms by which climate change exacerbates hypoxia, and the rates at which climate is changing, we posit that climate change variables are contributing to the dead zone epidemic by acting synergistically with one another and with recognized anthropogenic triggers of hypoxia including eutrophication. This suggests that a multidisciplinary, integrated approach that considers the full range of climate variables is needed to track and potentially reverse the spread of dead zones. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Zoning, equity, and public health.

    PubMed

    Maantay, J

    2001-07-01

    Zoning, the most prevalent land use planning tool in the United States, has substantial implications for equity and public health. Zoning determines where various categories of land use may go, thereby influencing the location of resulting environmental and health impacts. Industrially zoned areas permit noxious land uses and typically carry higher environmental burdens than other areas. Using New York City as a case study, the author shows that industrial zones have large residential populations within them or nearby. Noxious uses tend to be concentrated in poor and minority industrial neighborhoods because more affluent industrial areas and those with lower minority populations are rezoned for other uses, and industrial zones in poorer neighborhoods are expanded. Zoning policies, therefore, can have adverse impacts on public health and equity. The location of noxious uses and the pollution they generate have ramifications for global public health and equity; these uses have been concentrated in the world's poorer places as well as in poorer places within more affluent countries. Planners, policymakers, and public health professionals must collaborate on a worldwide basis to address these equity, health, and land use planning problems.

  14. The global aftershock zone

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Margaret Segou,; Warner Marzocchi,

    2014-01-01

    The aftershock zone of each large (M ≥ 7) earthquake extends throughout the shallows of planet Earth. Most aftershocks cluster near the mainshock rupture, but earthquakes send out shivers in the form of seismic waves, and these temporary distortions are large enough to trigger other earthquakes at global range. The aftershocks that happen at great distance from their mainshock are often superposed onto already seismically active regions, making them difficult to detect and understand. From a hazard perspective we are concerned that this dynamic process might encourage other high magnitude earthquakes, and wonder if a global alarm state is warranted after every large mainshock. From an earthquake process perspective we are curious about the physics of earthquake triggering across the magnitude spectrum. In this review we build upon past studies that examined the combined global response to mainshocks. Such compilations demonstrate significant rate increases during, and immediately after (~ 45 min) M > 7.0 mainshocks in all tectonic settings and ranges. However, it is difficult to find strong evidence for M > 5 rate increases during the passage of surface waves in combined global catalogs. On the other hand, recently published studies of individual large mainshocks associate M > 5 triggering at global range that is delayed by hours to days after surface wave arrivals. The longer the delay between mainshock and global aftershock, the more difficult it is to establish causation. To address these questions, we review the response to 260 M ≥ 7.0 shallow (Z ≤ 50 km) mainshocks in 21 global regions with local seismograph networks. In this way we can examine the detailed temporal and spatial response, or lack thereof, during passing seismic waves, and over the 24 h period after their passing. We see an array of responses that can involve immediate and widespread seismicity outbreaks, delayed and localized earthquake clusters, to no response at all. About 50% of the

  15. The Sorong Fault Zone, Indonesia: Mapping a Fault Zone Offshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, S.; Hall, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Sorong Fault Zone is a left-lateral strike-slip fault zone in eastern Indonesia, extending westwards from the Bird's Head peninsula of West Papua towards Sulawesi. It is the result of interactions between the Pacific, Caroline, Philippine Sea, and Australian Plates and much of it is offshore. Previous research on the fault zone has been limited by the low resolution of available data offshore, leading to debates over the extent, location, and timing of movements, and the tectonic evolution of eastern Indonesia. Different studies have shown it north of the Sula Islands, truncated south of Halmahera, continuing to Sulawesi, or splaying into a horsetail fan of smaller faults. Recently acquired high resolution multibeam bathymetry of the seafloor (with a resolution of 15-25 meters), and 2D seismic lines, provide the opportunity to trace the fault offshore. The position of different strands can be identified. On land, SRTM topography shows that in the northern Bird's Head the fault zone is characterised by closely spaced E-W trending faults. NW of the Bird's Head offshore there is a fold and thrust belt which terminates some strands. To the west of the Bird's Head offshore the fault zone diverges into multiple strands trending ENE-WSW. Regions of Riedel shearing are evident west of the Bird's Head, indicating sinistral strike-slip motion. Further west, the ENE-WSW trending faults turn to an E-W trend and there are at least three fault zones situated immediately south of Halmahera, north of the Sula Islands, and between the islands of Sanana and Mangole where the fault system terminates in horsetail strands. South of the Sula islands some former normal faults at the continent-ocean boundary with the North Banda Sea are being reactivated as strike-slip faults. The fault zone does not currently reach Sulawesi. The new fault map differs from previous interpretations concerning the location, age and significance of different parts of the Sorong Fault Zone. Kinematic

  16. 77 FR 50929 - Security Zones; 2012 RNC Bridge Security Zones, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone, Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ...-AA87 Security Zones; 2012 RNC Bridge Security Zones, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone, Tampa, FL... temporary security zones around certain bridges on the waters of Pinellas County and Tampa Bay, Florida..., or mooring on waters within 50 yards of the designated bridges during the times that the security...

  17. Fracture process zone in granite

    Zang, A.; Wagner, F.C.; Stanchits, S.; Janssen, C.; Dresen, G.

    2000-01-01

    In uniaxial compression tests performed on Aue granite cores (diameter 50 mm, length 100 mm), a steel loading plate was used to induce the formation of a discrete shear fracture. A zone of distributed microcracks surrounds the tip of the propagating fracture. This process zone is imaged by locating acoustic emission events using 12 piezoceramic sensors attached to the samples. Propagation velocity of the process zone is varied by using the rate of acoustic emissions to control the applied axial force. The resulting velocities range from 2 mm/s in displacement-controlled tests to 2 ??m/s in tests controlled by acoustic emission rate. Wave velocities and amplitudes are monitored during fault formation. P waves transmitted through the approaching process zone show a drop in amplitude of 26 dB, and ultrasonic velocities are reduced by 10%. The width of the process zone is ???9 times the grain diameter inferred from acoustic data but is only 2 times the grain size from optical crack inspection. The process zone of fast propagating fractures is wider than for slow ones. The density of microcracks and acoustic emissions increases approaching the main fracture. Shear displacement scales linearly with fracture length. Fault plane solutions from acoustic events show similar orientation of nodal planes on both sides of the shear fracture. The ratio of the process zone width to the fault length in Aue granite ranges from 0.01 to 0.1 inferred from crack data and acoustic emissions, respectively. The fracture surface energy is estimated from microstructure analysis to be ???2 J. A lower bound estimate for the energy dissipated by acoustic events is 0.1 J. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Exercise BANYAN TREE II, 8-16 March 1960

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-04-23

    confirmed that a composite air strike force was available for deployment to this command. c. At this time, participation in Banyan Tree II by Latin...participate in future exercises conducted in this area. b. That desired composition of forces for future exercises be determined sufficiently early to...channel ( VHP ) radio relay system was established between the Canal Zone and Rio Hato. Ter- minals were installed on Flamenco Island, Canal Zone and

  19. 33 CFR 165.20 - Safety zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety zones. 165.20 Section 165... WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Safety Zones § 165.20 Safety zones. A Safety Zone is a water area, shore area, or water and shore area to which, for safety or environmental...

  20. 33 CFR 165.20 - Safety zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety zones. 165.20 Section 165... WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Safety Zones § 165.20 Safety zones. A Safety Zone is a water area, shore area, or water and shore area to which, for safety or environmental...

  1. 33 CFR 165.30 - Security zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security zones. 165.30 Section... AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Security Zones § 165.30 Security zones. (a) A security zone is an area of land, water, or land and water which is so designated by...

  2. Laser Vacuum Furnace for Zone Refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.; Zurburg, F. W.; Penn, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Laser beam scanned to produce moving melt zone. Experimental laser vacuum furnace scans crystalline wafer with high-power CO2-laser beam to generate precise melt zone with precise control of temperature gradients around zone. Intended for zone refining of silicon or other semiconductors in low gravity, apparatus used in normal gravity.

  3. 47 CFR 73.609 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Zones. 73.609 Section 73.609 Telecommunication... Broadcast Stations § 73.609 Zones. (a) For the purpose of allotment and assignment, the United States is divided into three zones as follows: (1) Zone I consists of that portion of the United States located...

  4. 47 CFR 73.609 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Zones. 73.609 Section 73.609 Telecommunication... Broadcast Stations § 73.609 Zones. (a) For the purpose of allotment and assignment, the United States is divided into three zones as follows: (1) Zone I consists of that portion of the United States located...

  5. 47 CFR 73.609 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Zones. 73.609 Section 73.609 Telecommunication... Broadcast Stations § 73.609 Zones. (a) For the purpose of allotment and assignment, the United States is divided into three zones as follows: (1) Zone I consists of that portion of the United States located...

  6. 47 CFR 73.609 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Zones. 73.609 Section 73.609 Telecommunication... Broadcast Stations § 73.609 Zones. (a) For the purpose of allotment and assignment, the United States is divided into three zones as follows: (1) Zone I consists of that portion of the United States located...

  7. 47 CFR 73.609 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Zones. 73.609 Section 73.609 Telecommunication... Broadcast Stations § 73.609 Zones. (a) For the purpose of allotment and assignment, the United States is divided into three zones as follows: (1) Zone I consists of that portion of the United States located...

  8. State Enterprise Zone Programs: Have They Worked?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Alan H.; Fisher, Peter S.

    The effectiveness of state enterprise zone programs was examined by using a hypothetical-firm model called the Tax and Incentives Model-Enterprise Zones (TAIM-ez) model to analyze the value of enterprise zone incentives to businesses across the United States and especially in the 13 states that had substantial enterprise zone programs by 1990. The…

  9. 47 CFR 5.313 - Innovation zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Innovation zones. 5.313 Section 5.313... Licenses § 5.313 Innovation zones. (a) An innovation zone is a specified geographic location with pre... own motion or in response to a request from the public. Innovation zones will be announced via public...

  10. 47 CFR 5.313 - Innovation zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Innovation zones. 5.313 Section 5.313... Licenses § 5.313 Innovation zones. (a) An innovation zone is a specified geographic location with pre... own motion or in response to a request from the public. Innovation zones will be announced via public...

  11. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer's Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using 18F-FDG-PET.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Yuan; Men, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Hua; Lei, Jian-Feng; Zuo, Fu-Xing; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhu, Zhao-Hui; Bao, Xin-Jie; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2016-10-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using 18 F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr). Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD). By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD). Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer's cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals.

  12. Repeated administration of phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-THC or synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 induces tolerance to hypothermia but not locomotor suppression in mice, and reduces CB1 receptor expression and function in a brain region-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Tai, S; Hyatt, W S; Gu, C; Franks, L N; Vasiljevik, T; Brents, L K; Prather, P L; Fantegrossi, W E

    2015-12-01

    These studies probed the relationship between intrinsic efficacy and tolerance/cross-tolerance between ∆(9)-THC and synthetic cannabinoid drugs of abuse (SCBs) by examining in vivo effects and cellular changes concomitant with their repeated administration in mice. Dose-effect relationships for hypothermic effects were determined in order to confirm that SCBs JWH-018 and JWH-073 are higher efficacy agonists than ∆(9)-THC in mice. Separate groups of mice were treated with saline, sub-maximal hypothermic doses of JWH-018 or JWH-073 (3.0mg/kg or 10.0mg/kg, respectively) or a maximally hypothermic dose of 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 5 consecutive days while core temperature and locomotor activity were monitored via biotelemetry. Repeated administration of all drugs resulted in tolerance to hypothermic effects, but not locomotor effects, and this tolerance was still evident 14 days after the last drug administration. Further studies treated mice with 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 4 days, then tested with SCBs on day 5. Mice with a ∆(9)-THC history were cross-tolerant to both SCBs, and this cross-tolerance also persisted 14 days after testing. Select brain regions from chronically treated mice were examined for changes in CB1 receptor expression and function. Expression and function of hypothalamic CB1Rs were reduced in mice receiving chronic drugs, but cortical CB1R expression and function were not altered. Collectively, these data demonstrate that repeated ∆(9)-THC, JWH-018 and JWH-073 can induce long-lasting tolerance to some in vivo effects, which is likely mediated by region-specific downregulation and desensitization of CB1Rs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Circadian signaling in Homarus americanus: Region-specific de novo assembled transcriptomes show that both the brain and eyestalk ganglia possess the molecular components of a putative clock system.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Yu, Andy; Pascual, Micah G; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C; Warner, Amanda N; Lameyer, Tess J; Stanhope, Meredith E; Dickinson, Patsy S; Joe Hull, J

    2018-04-11

    region-specific variation in clock function, especially if the brain and eyestalk clocks represent independent oscillators. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Sex- and Region-Specific Role of Akt1 in the Modulation of Methamphetamine-Induced Hyperlocomotion and Striatal Neuronal Activity: Implications in Schizophrenia and Methamphetamine-Induced Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wen-Sung

    2014-01-01

    AKT1 (also known as protein kinase B, α), a serine/threonine kinase of AKT family, has been implicated in both schizophrenia and methamphetamine (Meth) use disorders. AKT1 or its protein also has epistatic effects on the regulation of dopamine-dependent behaviors or drug effects, especially in the striatum. The aim of this study is to investigate the sex-specific role of Akt1 in the regulation of Meth-induced behavioral sensitization and the alterations of striatal neurons using Akt1 −/− mice and wild-type littermates as a model. A series of 4 Experiments were conducted. Meth-induced hyperlocomotion and Meth-related alterations of brain activity were measured. The neural properties of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) were also characterized. Further, 17β-estradiol was applied to examine its protective effect in Meth-sensitized male mice. Our findings indicate that (1) Akt1 −/− males were less sensitive to Meth-induced hyperlocomotion during Meth challenge compared with wild-type controls and Akt1 −/− females, (2) further sex differences were revealed by coinjection of Meth with raclopride but not SCH23390 in Meth-sensitized Akt1 −/− males, (3) Meth-induced alterations of striatal activity were confirmed in Akt1 −/− males using microPET scan with 18F-flurodeoxyglucose, (4) Akt1 deficiency had a significant impact on the electrophysiological and neuromorphological properties of striatal MSNs in male mice, and (5) subchronic injections of 17β-estradiol prevented the reduction of Meth-induced hyperactivity in Meth-sensitized Akt1 −/− male mice. This study highlights a sex- and region-specific effect of Akt1 in the regulation of dopamine-dependent behaviors and implies the importance of AKT1 in the modulation of sex differences in Meth sensitivity and schizophrenia. PMID:23474853

  15. Application of Zoning and ``Limits of Acceptable Change'' to Manage Snorkelling Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, George S. J.; Dearden, Philip; Rollins, Rick

    2007-06-01

    Zoning and applying Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) are two promising strategies for managing tourism in Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Typically, these management strategies require the collection and integration of ecological and socioeconomic data. This problem is illustrated by a case study of Koh Chang National Marine Park, Thailand. Biophysical surveys assessed coral communities in the MPA to derive indices of reef diversity and vulnerability. Social surveys assessed visitor perceptions and satisfaction with conditions encountered on snorkelling tours. Notably, increased coral mortality caused a significant decrease in visitor satisfaction. The two studies were integrated to prescribe zoning and “Limits of Acceptable Change” (LAC). As a biophysical indicator, the data suggest a LAC value of 0.35 for the coral mortality index. As a social indicator, the data suggest that a significant fraction of visitors would find a LAC value of under 30 snorkellers per site as acceptable. The draft zoning plan prescribed four different types of zones: (I) a Conservation Zone with no access apart from monitoring or research; (II) Tourism Zones with high tourism intensities at less vulnerable reefs; (III) Ecotourism zones with a social LAC standard of <30 snorkellers per site, and (IV) General Use Zones to meet local artisanal fishery needs. This study illustrates how ecological and socioeconomic field studies in MPAs can be integrated to craft zoning plans addressing multiple objectives.

  16. Application of zoning and "limits of acceptable change" to manage snorkelling tourism.

    PubMed

    Roman, George S J; Dearden, Philip; Rollins, Rick

    2007-06-01

    Zoning and applying Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) are two promising strategies for managing tourism in Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Typically, these management strategies require the collection and integration of ecological and socioeconomic data. This problem is illustrated by a case study of Koh Chang National Marine Park, Thailand. Biophysical surveys assessed coral communities in the MPA to derive indices of reef diversity and vulnerability. Social surveys assessed visitor perceptions and satisfaction with conditions encountered on snorkelling tours. Notably, increased coral mortality caused a significant decrease in visitor satisfaction. The two studies were integrated to prescribe zoning and "Limits of Acceptable Change" (LAC). As a biophysical indicator, the data suggest a LAC value of 0.35 for the coral mortality index. As a social indicator, the data suggest that a significant fraction of visitors would find a LAC value of under 30 snorkellers per site as acceptable. The draft zoning plan prescribed four different types of zones: (I) a Conservation Zone with no access apart from monitoring or research; (II) Tourism Zones with high tourism intensities at less vulnerable reefs; (III) Ecotourism zones with a social LAC standard of <30 snorkellers per site, and (IV) General Use Zones to meet local artisanal fishery needs. This study illustrates how ecological and socioeconomic field studies in MPAs can be integrated to craft zoning plans addressing multiple objectives.

  17. Approximate Model of Zone Sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzianik, František

    2011-12-01

    The process of zone sedimentation is affected by many factors that are not possible to express analytically. For this reason, the zone settling is evaluated in practice experimentally or by application of an empirical mathematical description of the process. The paper presents the development of approximate model of zone settling, i.e. the general function which should properly approximate the behaviour of the settling process within its entire range and at the various conditions. Furthermore, the specification of the model parameters by the regression analysis of settling test results is shown. The suitability of the model is reviewed by graphical dependencies and by statistical coefficients of correlation. The approximate model could by also useful on the simplification of process design of continual settling tanks and thickeners.

  18. Beyond the classic thermoneutral zone

    PubMed Central

    Kingma, Boris RM; Frijns, Arjan JH; Schellen, Lisje; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2014-01-01

    The thermoneutral zone is defined as the range of ambient temperatures where the body can maintain its core temperature solely through regulating dry heat loss, i.e., skin blood flow. A living body can only maintain its core temperature when heat production and heat loss are balanced. That means that heat transport from body core to skin must equal heat transport from skin to the environment. This study focuses on what combinations of core and skin temperature satisfy the biophysical requirements of being in the thermoneutral zone for humans. Moreover, consequences are considered of changes in insulation and adding restrictions such as thermal comfort (i.e. driver for thermal behavior). A biophysical model was developed that calculates heat transport within a body, taking into account metabolic heat production, tissue insulation, and heat distribution by blood flow and equates that to heat loss to the environment, considering skin temperature, ambient temperature and other physical parameters. The biophysical analysis shows that the steady-state ambient temperature range associated with the thermoneutral zone does not guarantee that the body is in thermal balance at basal metabolic rate per se. Instead, depending on the combination of core temperature, mean skin temperature and ambient temperature, the body may require significant increases in heat production or heat loss to maintain stable core temperature. Therefore, the definition of the thermoneutral zone might need to be reformulated. Furthermore, after adding restrictions on skin temperature for thermal comfort, the ambient temperature range associated with thermal comfort is smaller than the thermoneutral zone. This, assuming animals seek thermal comfort, suggests that thermal behavior may be initiated already before the boundaries of the thermoneutral zone are reached. PMID:27583296

  19. Methods for converting industrial zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talipova, L.; Kosyakov, E.; Polyakova, Irina

    2017-10-01

    In this article, industrial zones of Saint Petersburg and Hong Kong were considered. Competitive projects aimed at developing the grey belt of Saint Petersburg were considered. The methodology of the survey of reconstruction of the industrial zone of Hong Kong is also analyzed. The potential of the city’s grey belt lies in its location on the border of the city’s historical centre. Rational use of this potential will make it possible to achieve numerous objectives, including development of the city’s transport infrastructure, positioning of business functions, and organization of housing and the city’s system of green public spaces.

  20. Selected approaches to determining the purpose of emergency planning zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobeš, Pavel; Baudišová, Barbora; Sluka, Vilém; Skřínský, Jan; Danihelka, Pavel; Dlabka, Jakub; Řeháček, Jakub

    2013-04-01

    One of the major accident hazards (hereinafter referred to as "MAH") tools to determine the range of effects of a major accident and consequent protection of the public is the determination of the emergency planning zone (hereinafter referred to as "zone"). In the Czech Republic, the determination of the zone is regulated by the Decree No. 103/2006 Coll. laying down the principles for determination of the emergency planning zone and the extent and manner of elaborating the external emergency plan (hereinafter referred to as "Decree") 3. The Decree is based on the principles of the IAEA-TECDOC-727 method - Manual for the Classification and Prioritization of Risks Due to Major Accidents in Process and Related Industries (hereinafter referred to as "method" and "manual", respectively)3. In the manual, it is pointed out that the method used is not suitable for making emergency plans for special situations (industrial activities in an inhabited area). Nonetheless, its principles and procedures are still used for such purposes in the Czech Republic. The expert scientific community dealing with MAH issues in the Czech Republic, however, realizes that the procedure of the zone boundary delineation should be modified to reflect up-to-date knowledge in protection of the public and its enhancement. Therefore, the OPTIZON Project (Optimization of the Emergency Planning Zone Designation and Elaboration of Emergency Plans Based on Threatening Effects of Dangerous Chemical Substances at Operational Accidents with Respect to Inhabitant Protection Enhancement) was developed and approved for the Program of Security Research of the Czech Republic 2010 - 2015 (BV II/2-VS). One of the main project's objectives is to define clearly the purpose of the zone because at present it is not quite apparent. From the general view, this step may seem insignificant or trivial, but the reverse is true. It represents one of the most important stages in seeking the approach to the zone designation as

  1. Seismotectonic zoning of Azerbaijan territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangarli, Talat; Aliyev, Ali; Aliyev, Fuad; Rahimov, Fuad

    2017-04-01

    Studying of the space-time correlation and consequences effect between tectonic events and other geological processes that have created modern earth structure still remains as one of the most important problems in geology. This problem is especially important for the East Caucasus-South Caspian geodynamic zone. Being situated at the eastern part of the Caucasian strait, this zone refers to a center of Alpine-Himalayan active folded belt, and is known as a complex tectonic unit with jointing heterogeneous structural-substantial complexes arising from different branches of the belt (Doburja-Caucasus-Kopetdag from the north and Pyrenean-Alborz from the south with Kura and South Caspian zone). According to GPS and precise leveling data, activity of regional geodynamic processes shows intensive horizontal and vertical movements of the Earth's crust as conditioned by collision of the Arabian and Eurasian continental plates continuing since the end of Miocene. So far studies related to the regional of geology-geophysical data, periodically used for the geological and tectonic modeling of the environment mainly based on the fixing ideology. There still remains a number of uncertainties in solution of issues related to regional geology, tectonics and magmatism, structure and interrelation of different structural zones, space-time interrelations between onshore and offshore complexes, etc. At the same time large dataset produced by surface geological surveys, deep geological mapping of on- and offshore areas with the use of seismic and electrical reconnaissance and geophysical field zoning methods, deep well drilling and remote sensing activities. Conducted new studies produced results including differentiation of formerly unknown nappe complexes of the different ages and scales within the structure of mountain-fold zones, identification of new zones containing ophiolites in their section, outlining of currently active faulting areas, geophysical interpretation of the deep

  2. 76 FR 63202 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Lake Michigan Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...-AA87 Security Zones; Captain of the Port Lake Michigan Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Based on a review of safety and security zones around critical infrastructure in the... Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor--Safety and Security Zone regulation and the Security Zones; Captain...

  3. 33 CFR 165.911 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. 165.911 Section 165.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. (a) Location. The following are security zones: (1) Nine...

  4. 33 CFR 165.911 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. 165.911 Section 165.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. (a) Location. The following are security zones: (1) Nine...

  5. 33 CFR 165.911 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. 165.911 Section 165.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. (a) Location. The following are security zones: (1) Nine...

  6. 33 CFR 165.911 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. 165.911 Section 165.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. (a) Location. The following are security zones: (1) Nine...

  7. Work zone positive protection guidelines.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this project was to develop implementation guidance that the Texas Department of : Transportation (TxDOT) can use to make better decisions regarding when and where to use positive : protection in work zones and when to consider exposure c...

  8. Issues in Coastal Zone Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Derrin

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the following issues relevant to coastal zone management: overcrowding, resource exploitation, pollution, agriculture, fisheries, industrial, and other uses. Describes conflicts and trade-offs in management typified by fragmented agency decision making. Discusses implications of the greenhouse effect, sustainable development, and the…

  9. Building a Subduction Zone Observatory

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Bodin, Paul; Bourgeois, Jody; Cashman, Susan; Cowan, Darrel; Creager, Kenneth C.; Crowell, Brendan; Duvall, Alison; Frankel, Arthur; González, Frank I.; Houston, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Kelsey, Harvey; Miller, Una; Roland, Emily C.; Schmidt, David; Staisch, Lydia; Vidale, John; Wilcock, William; Wirth, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Subduction zones contain many of Earth’s most remarkable geologic structures, from the deepest oceanic trenches to glacier-covered mountains and steaming volcanoes. These environments formed through spectacular events: Nature’s largest earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions are born here.

  10. Fifty years of shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Rodney

    2017-04-01

    We are here, of course, because 1967 saw the publication of John Ramsay's famous book. Two years later a memorable field trip from Imperial College to the Outer Hebrides saw John on a bleak headland on the coast of North Uist where a relatively undeformed metadolerite within Lewisian (Precambrian) gneisses contained ductile shear zones with metamorphic fabrics in amphibolite facies. One particular outcrop was very special - a shear zone cutting otherwise completely isotropic, undeformed metadolerite, with an incremental foliation starting to develop at 45° to the deformation zone, and increasing in intensity as it approached the shear direction. Here was proof of the process of simple shear under ductile metamorphic conditions - the principles of simple shear outlined in John Ramsay's 1967 book clearly visible in nature, and verified by Ramsay's mathematical proofs in the eventual paper (Ramsay and Graham, 1970). Later work on the Lewisian on the mainland of Scotland, in South Harris, in Africa, and elsewhere applied Ramsay's simple shear principles more liberally, more imprecisely and on larger scale than at Caisteal Odair, but in retrospect it documented what seems now to be the generality of mid and lower crustal deformation. Deep seismic reflection data show us that on passive margins hyper-stretched continental crust (whether or not cloaked by Seaward Dipping Reflectors) seems to have collapsed onto the mantle. Crustal faults mostly sole out at or above the mantle - so the Moho is a detachment- an 'outer marginal detachment', if you like, and, of course, it must be a ductile shear. On non-volcanic margins this shear zone forms the first formed ocean floor before true sea floor spreading gets going to create real oceanic crust. Gianreto Manatschal, Marcel Lemoine and others realised that the serpentinites described in parts of the Alps are exposed remnants of this ductile shear zone. Associated ophicalcite breccias tell of sea floor exposure, while high

  11. Region-specific roles of the prelimbic cortex, the dorsal CA1, the ventral DG and ventral CA1 of the hippocampus in the fear return evoked by a sub-conditioning procedure in rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Xing, Xiaoli; Han, Mengfi; Xu, Na; Piao, Chengji; Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Xigeng

    2016-02-01

    The return of learned fear is an important issue in anxiety disorder research since an analogous process may contribute to long-term fear maintenance or clinical relapse. A number of studies demonstrate that mPFC and hippocampus are important in the modulation of post-extinction re-expression of fear memory. However, the region-specific role of these structures in the fear return evoked by a sub-threshold conditioning (SC) is not known. In the present experiments, we first examined specific roles of the prelimbic cortex (PL), the dorsal hippocampus (DH, the dorsal CA1 area in particular), the ventral hippocampus (the ventral dentate gyrus (vDG) and the ventral CA1 area in particular) in this fear return process. Then we examined the role of connections between PL and vCA1 with this behavioral approach. Rats were subjected to five tone-shock pairings (1.0-mA shock) to induce conditioned fear (freezing), followed by three fear extinction sessions (25 tone-alone trials each session). After a post-test for extinction memory, some rats were retrained with the SC procedure to reinstate tone-evoked freezing. Rat groups were injected with low doses of the GABAA agonist muscimol to selectively inactivate PL, DH, vDG, or vCA1 120 min before the fear return test. A disconnection paradigm with ipsilateral or contralateral muscimol injection of the PL and the vCA1 was used to examine the role of this pathway in the fear return. We found that transient inactivation of these areas significantly impaired fear return (freezing): inactivation of the prelimbic cortex blocked SC-evoked fear return in particular but did not influence fear expression in general; inactivation of the DH area impaired fear return, but had no effect on the extinction retrieval process; both ventral DG and ventral CA1 are required for the return of extinguished fear whereas only ventral DG is required for the extinction retrieval. These findings suggest that PL, DH, vDG, and vCA1 all contribute to the fear

  12. The TRAPPIST-1 Habitable Zone

    2017-02-22

    The TRAPPIST-1 system contains a total of seven planets, all around the size of Earth. Three of them -- TRAPPIST-1e, f and g -- dwell in their star's so-called "habitable zone." The habitable zone, or Goldilocks zone, is a band around every star (shown here in green) where astronomers have calculated that temperatures are just right -- not too hot, not too cold -- for liquid water to pool on the surface of an Earth-like world. While TRAPPIST-1b, c and d are too close to be in the system's likely habitable zone, and TRAPPIST-1h is too far away, the planets' discoverers say more optimistic scenarios could allow any or all of the planets to harbor liquid water. In particular, the strikingly small orbits of these worlds make it likely that most, if not all of them, perpetually show the same face to their star, the way our moon always shows the same face to the Earth. This would result in an extreme range of temperatures from the day to night sides, allowing for situations not factored into the traditional habitable zone definition. The illustrations shown for the various planets depict a range of possible scenarios of what they could look like. The system has been revealed through observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the ground-based TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) telescope, as well as other ground-based observatories. The system was named for the TRAPPIST telescope. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21424

  13. Seismic fault zone trapped noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillers, G.; Campillo, M.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Roux, P.

    2014-07-01

    Systematic velocity contrasts across and within fault zones can lead to head and trapped waves that provide direct information on structural units that are important for many aspects of earthquake and fault mechanics. Here we construct trapped waves from the scattered seismic wavefield recorded by a fault zone array. The frequency-dependent interaction between the ambient wavefield and the fault zone environment is studied using properties of the noise correlation field. A critical frequency fc ≈ 0.5 Hz defines a threshold above which the in-fault scattered wavefield has increased isotropy and coherency compared to the ambient noise. The increased randomization of in-fault propagation directions produces a wavefield that is trapped in a waveguide/cavity-like structure associated with the low-velocity damage zone. Dense spatial sampling allows the resolution of a near-field focal spot, which emerges from the superposition of a collapsing, time reversed wavefront. The shape of the focal spot depends on local medium properties, and a focal spot-based fault normal distribution of wave speeds indicates a ˜50% velocity reduction consistent with estimates from a far-field travel time inversion. The arrival time pattern of a synthetic correlation field can be tuned to match properties of an observed pattern, providing a noise-based imaging tool that can complement analyses of trapped ballistic waves. The results can have wide applicability for investigating the internal properties of fault damage zones, because mechanisms controlling the emergence of trapped noise have less limitations compared to trapped ballistic waves.

  14. Zircon growth in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaulina, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    The possibility of direct dating of the deformation process is critical for understanding of orogenic belts evolution. Establishing the age of deformation by isotopic methods is indispensable in the case of uneven deformation overlapping, when later deformation inherits the structural plan of the early strains, and to distinguish them on the basis of the structural data only is impossible. A good example of zircon from the shear zones is zircon formed under the eclogite facies conditions. On the one hand, the composition of zircon speaks about its formation simultaneously to eclogitic paragenesis (Rubatto, Herman, 1999; Rubatto et al., 2003). On the other hand, geological studies show that mineral reactions of eclogitization are often held only in areas of shear deformations, which provides access of fluid to the rocks (Austrheim, 1987; Jamtveit et al., 2000; Bingen et al., 2004). Zircons from mafic and ultramafic rocks of the Tanaelv and Kolvitsa belts (Kola Peninsula, the Baltic Shield) have showed that the metamorphic zircon growth is probably controlled by the metamorphic fluid regime, as evidenced by an increase of zircon quantity with the degree of shearing. The internal structure of zircon crystals can provide an evidence of zircon growth synchronous with shearing. The studied crystals have a sector zoning and often specific "patchy" zoning (Fig. 1), which speaks about rapid change of growth conditions. Such internal structure can be compared with the "snowball" garnet structure reflecting the rotation of crystals during their growth under a shift. Rapidly changing crystallization conditions can also be associated with a small amount of fluid, where supersaturation is changing even at a constant temperature. Thus, the growth of metamorphic zircon in shear zones is more likely to occur in the fluid flow synchronous with deformation. A distinctive feature of zircons in these conditions is isometric shape and sector "patchy" zoning. The work was supported by

  15. Synthesis and studies on Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) complexes of Knoevenagel β-diketone ligands.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, S; Tharmaraj, P; Sheela, C D; Anitha, C

    2012-11-01

    Transition metal complexes of various acetylacetone based ligands of the type ML [where M=Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II); L=3-(aryl)-pentane-2,4-dione] have been synthesized. The structural features have been derived from their elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance, IR, UV-Vis, (1)H NMR, Mass and ESR spectral studies. Conductivity measurements reveal that all the complexes are non-electrolytic in nature. Spectroscopic and other analytical data of the complexes suggest octahedral geometry for other metal(II) complexes. The redox behavior of the copper(II) complexes have been studied by cyclic voltammetry. The free ligands and their metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro biological activities against the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as well as the fungus Candida albicans by well diffusion method. The zone of inhibition value indicates that the most of the metal(II) complexes are found to possess increased activities compared to those of the free ligands. All synthesized compounds may serve as potential photoactive materials as indicated from their characteristic fluorescence properties. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the ligands (L1-L3) was found to be considerable effect than that of urea and KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and studies on Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) complexes of Knoevenagel β-diketone ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathi, S.; Tharmaraj, P.; Sheela, C. D.; Anitha, C.

    2012-11-01

    Transition metal complexes of various acetylacetone based ligands of the type ML [where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II); L = 3-(aryl)-pentane-2,4-dione] have been synthesized. The structural features have been derived from their elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance, IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, Mass and ESR spectral studies. Conductivity measurements reveal that all the complexes are non-electrolytic in nature. Spectroscopic and other analytical data of the complexes suggest octahedral geometry for other metal(II) complexes. The redox behavior of the copper(II) complexes have been studied by cyclic voltammetry. The free ligands and their metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro biological activities against the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as well as the fungus Candida albicans by well diffusion method. The zone of inhibition value indicates that the most of the metal(II) complexes are found to possess increased activities compared to those of the free ligands. All synthesized compounds may serve as potential photoactive materials as indicated from their characteristic fluorescence properties. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the ligands (L1-L3) was found to be considerable effect than that of urea and KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate).

  17. Response of hyporheic zones to transient forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, T.; Wu, L.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.; Krause, S.; Hannah, D. M.; Lewandowski, J.; Nuetzmann, G.

    2017-12-01

    Exchange of water, solutes, and energy between river channels and hyporheic zones (HZs) modulates biogeochemical cycling, regulates stream temperature and impacts ecological structure and function. Numerical modelling of HZ processes is required as field observations are challenging for transient flow. To gain a deeper mechanistic understanding of the effects of transient discharge on hyporheic exchange, we performed a systematic analysis using numerical experiments. In this case, we vary (i) the characteristics of time-varying flood events; (ii) river bedform geometry; (iii) river hydraulic geometry; and (iv) the magnitude and direction of groundwater fluxes (neutral, gaining and losing conditions). We conceptualize the stream bed as a two-dimensional system. Whereby the flow is driven by a dynamically changing head distribution at the water-sediment interface and is modulated by steady groundwater flow. Our model estimates both net values for a single bedform and spatial distributions of (i) the flow field; (ii) mean residence times; and (iii) the concentration of a conservative tracer. A detailed sensitivity analysis was performed by changing channel slope, flood characteristics, groundwater upwelling/downwelling fluxes and biogeochemical time-scales in different bedforms such as ripples, dunes and alternating bars. Results show that change of parameters can have a substantial impact on exchange fluxes which can lead to the expansion, contraction, emergence and/or dissipation of HZs . Our results also reveal that groundwater fluxes have different impacts on HZs during flood events, depending on the channel slope and bedform topography. It is found that topographies with smaller aspect ratios and shallower slopes are more affected by groundwater upwelling/downwelling fluxes during flood events. The analysis of biogeochemical transformations shows that discharge events can potentially affects the efficiencies of nitrate removal. Taking into consideration multiple

  18. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report ( SAR ) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-439 Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Acquisition Management Information Retrieval (DAMIR) March 23, 2016 16:19:13 UNCLASSIFIED SDB II December 2015 SAR March 23, 2016 16:19:13 UNCLASSIFIED...Document OSD - Office of the Secretary of Defense O&S - Operating and Support PAUC - Program Acquisition Unit Cost SDB II December 2015 SAR March 23

  19. Mild myelin disruption elicits early alteration in behavior and proliferation in the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Gould, Elizabeth A; Busquet, Nicolas; Shepherd, Douglas; Dietz, Robert M; Herson, Paco S; Simoes de Souza, Fabio M; Li, Anan; George, Nicholas M; Restrepo, Diego; Macklin, Wendy B

    2018-02-13

    Myelin, the insulating sheath around axons, supports axon function. An important question is the impact of mild myelin disruption. In the absence of the myelin protein proteolipid protein (PLP1), myelin is generated but with age, axonal function/maintenance is disrupted. Axon disruption occurs in Plp1 -null mice as early as 2 months in cortical projection neurons. High-volume cellular quantification techniques revealed a region-specific increase in oligodendrocyte density in the olfactory bulb and rostral corpus callosum that increased during adulthood. A distinct proliferative response of progenitor cells was observed in the subventricular zone (SVZ), while the number and proliferation of parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells was unchanged. This SVZ proliferative response occurred prior to evidence of axonal disruption. Thus, a novel SVZ response contributes to the region-specific increase in oligodendrocytes in Plp1 -null mice. Young adult Plp1- null mice exhibited subtle but substantial behavioral alterations, indicative of an early impact of mild myelin disruption. © 2018, Gould et al.

  20. Mild myelin disruption elicits early alteration in behavior and proliferation in the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Elizabeth A; Busquet, Nicolas; Shepherd, Douglas; Dietz, Robert M; Herson, Paco S; Simoes de Souza, Fabio M; Li, Anan; George, Nicholas M

    2018-01-01

    Myelin, the insulating sheath around axons, supports axon function. An important question is the impact of mild myelin disruption. In the absence of the myelin protein proteolipid protein (PLP1), myelin is generated but with age, axonal function/maintenance is disrupted. Axon disruption occurs in Plp1-null mice as early as 2 months in cortical projection neurons. High-volume cellular quantification techniques revealed a region-specific increase in oligodendrocyte density in the olfactory bulb and rostral corpus callosum that increased during adulthood. A distinct proliferative response of progenitor cells was observed in the subventricular zone (SVZ), while the number and proliferation of parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells was unchanged. This SVZ proliferative response occurred prior to evidence of axonal disruption. Thus, a novel SVZ response contributes to the region-specific increase in oligodendrocytes in Plp1-null mice. Young adult Plp1-null mice exhibited subtle but substantial behavioral alterations, indicative of an early impact of mild myelin disruption. PMID:29436368

  1. The twilight zone of cis element alignments.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Alvaro; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Sequence alignment of proteins and nucleic acids is a routine task in bioinformatics. Although the comparison of complete peptides, genes or genomes can be undertaken with a great variety of tools, the alignment of short DNA sequences and motifs entails pitfalls that have not been fully addressed yet. Here we confront the structural superposition of transcription factors with the sequence alignment of their recognized cis elements. Our goals are (i) to test TFcompare (http://floresta.eead.csic.es/tfcompare), a structural alignment method for protein-DNA complexes; (ii) to benchmark the pairwise alignment of regulatory elements; (iii) to define the confidence limits and the twilight zone of such alignments and (iv) to evaluate the relevance of these thresholds with elements obtained experimentally. We find that the structure of cis elements and protein-DNA interfaces is significantly more conserved than their sequence and measures how this correlates with alignment errors when only sequence information is considered. Our results confirm that DNA motifs in the form of matrices produce better alignments than individual sequences. Finally, we report that empirical and theoretically derived twilight thresholds are useful for estimating the natural plasticity of regulatory sequences, and hence for filtering out unreliable alignments.

  2. The twilight zone of cis element alignments

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Alvaro; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Sequence alignment of proteins and nucleic acids is a routine task in bioinformatics. Although the comparison of complete peptides, genes or genomes can be undertaken with a great variety of tools, the alignment of short DNA sequences and motifs entails pitfalls that have not been fully addressed yet. Here we confront the structural superposition of transcription factors with the sequence alignment of their recognized cis elements. Our goals are (i) to test TFcompare (http://floresta.eead.csic.es/tfcompare), a structural alignment method for protein–DNA complexes; (ii) to benchmark the pairwise alignment of regulatory elements; (iii) to define the confidence limits and the twilight zone of such alignments and (iv) to evaluate the relevance of these thresholds with elements obtained experimentally. We find that the structure of cis elements and protein–DNA interfaces is significantly more conserved than their sequence and measures how this correlates with alignment errors when only sequence information is considered. Our results confirm that DNA motifs in the form of matrices produce better alignments than individual sequences. Finally, we report that empirical and theoretically derived twilight thresholds are useful for estimating the natural plasticity of regulatory sequences, and hence for filtering out unreliable alignments. PMID:23268451

  3. Satellite-Derived Management Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepoutre, Damien; Layrol, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    The term "satellite-derived management zones" (SAMZ) denotes agricultural management zones that are subdivisions of large fields and that are derived from images of the fields acquired by instruments aboard Earth-orbiting satellites during approximately the past 15 years. "SAMZ" also denotes the methodology and the software that implements the methodology for creating such zones. The SAMZ approach is one of several products of continuing efforts to realize a concept of precision agriculture, which involves optimal variations in seeding, in application of chemicals, and in irrigation, plus decisions to farm or not to farm certain portions of fields, all in an effort to maximize profitability in view of spatial and temporal variations in the growth and health of crops, and in the chemical and physical conditions of soils. As used here, "management zone" signifies, more precisely, a subdivision of a field within which the crop-production behavior is regarded as homogeneous. From the perspective of precision agriculture, management zones are the smallest subdivisions between which the seeding, application of chemicals, and other management parameters are to be varied. In the SAMZ approach, the main sources of data are the archives of satellite imagery that have been collected over the years for diverse purposes. One of the main advantages afforded by the SAMZ approach is that the data in these archives can be reused for purposes of precision agriculture at low cost. De facto, these archives contain information on all sources of variability within a field, including weather, crop types, crop management, soil types, and water drainage patterns. The SAMZ methodology involves the establishment of a Web-based interface based on an algorithm that generates management zones automatically and quickly from archival satellite image data in response to requests from farmers. A farmer can make a request by either uploading data describing a field boundary to the Web site or else

  4. A geometric reappraisal of proximal landing zones for thoracic endovascular aortic repair according to aortic arch types.

    PubMed

    Marrocco-Trischitta, Massimiliano M; de Beaufort, Hector W; Secchi, Francesco; van Bakel, Theodorus M; Ranucci, Marco; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Moll, Frans L; Trimarchi, Santi

    2017-06-01

    This study assessed whether the additional use of the aortic arch classification in type I, II, and III may complement Ishimaru's aortic arch map and provide valuable information on the geometry and suitability of proximal landing zones for thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Anonymized thoracic computed tomography scans of healthy aortas were reviewed and stratified according to the aortic arch classification, and 20 of each type of arch were selected. Further processing allowed calculation of angulation and tortuosity of each proximal landing zone. Data were described indicating both proximal landing zone and type of arch (eg, 0/I). Angulation was severe (>60°) in 2/III and in 3/III. Comparisons among the types of arch showed an increase in proximal landing zones angulation (P < .001) and tortuosity (P = .009) depending on the type of arch. Comparisons within type of arch showed no change in angulation and tortuosity across proximal landing zones within type I arch (P = .349 and P = .409), and increases in angulation and tortuosity toward more distal proximal landing zones within type II (P = .003 and P = .043) and type III (P < .001 in both). The aortic arch classification is associated with a consistent geometric pattern of the aortic arch map, which identifies specific proximal landing zones with suboptimal angulation for stent graft deployment. Arches II and III also appear to have progressively less favorable anatomy for thoracic endovascular aortic repair compared with arch I. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Vapor-dominated zones within hydrothermal systems: evolution and natural state

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Sorey, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Three conceptual models illustrate the range of hydrothermal systems in which vapor-dominated conditions are found. The first model (model I) represents a system with an extensive near-vaporstatic vapor-dominated zone and limited liquid throughflow and is analogous to systems such as The Geysers, California. Models II and III represent systems with significant liquid throughflow and include steam-heated discharge features at higher elevations and high-chloride springs at lower elevations connected to and fed by a single circulation system at depth. In model II, as in model I, the vapor-dominated zone has a near-vaporstatic vertical pressure gradient and is generally underpressured with respect to local hydrostatic pressure. The vapor-dominated zone in model III is quite different, in that phase separation takes place at pressures close to local hydrostatic and the overall pressure gradient is near hydrostatic. -from Authors

  6. Infrared zone-scanning system.

    PubMed

    Belousov, Aleksandr; Popov, Gennady

    2006-03-20

    Challenges encountered in designing an infrared viewing optical system that uses a small linear detector array based on a zone-scanning approach are discussed. Scanning is performed by a rotating refractive polygon prism with tilted facets, which, along with high-speed line scanning, makes the scanning gear as simple as possible. A method of calculation of a practical optical system to compensate for aberrations during prism rotation is described.

  7. The Base Zone Protection Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    The Base Zone Protection Problem Dinesh C. Verma IBM T. J. Watson Research Center Hawthorne, NY 10549 Theodore Brown, Amotz Bar Noy and...al. 2008 have tried to develop the impact of terrain on the coverage area of a sensor and simulated its impact on sensor coverage. Kumar et al...conference on Wireless sensor networks and applications. WSNA 03, ACM Press, 2003, pp. 115--121. Kumar S., Lai T. and Arora A., “Barrier Coverage

  8. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    SciT

    Fusselman, Steve

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from themore » outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to

  9. USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map

    those with slower Internet access. Users may also simply type in a ZIP Code and find the hardiness zone : Find Javascript is not enabled in this Internet Browser For a better experience throughout this web site, please enable Javascript in your Internet Browser What is a Captcha and why am I seeing one (on

  10. Evaluation of Work Zone Speed Reduction Measures

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-04-01

    The Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) has made improving work zone (WZ) safety a high priority. Managing vehicle speeds through work zones is perceived to be an important factor in achieving this goal. A number of speed reduction techniques are...

  11. Downtown Crossing: Auto Restricted Zone in Boston

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-07-01

    The Downtown Crossing auto restricted zone, implemented in 1978, involved the : elimination of all auto traffic froma zone of twelve blocks encompassing six : different streets in Bostn's central business district. Some of the blocks were : pedestria...

  12. New York City green loading zones study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact and potential benefits of Green Loading Zones (GLZs)a policy solution to incentivize further : electric truck adoption with the creation of curbside loading zones that are exclusively available to...

  13. 49 CFR 71.6 - Central zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... States that is west of the boundary line between the eastern and central standard time zones described in... between the central and mountain time zones. The Chicago, Rock Island and Gulf Railway Company and the...

  14. PLANT INVASIONS IN RHODE ISLAND RIPARIAN ZONES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vegetation in riparian zones provides valuable wildlife habitat while enhancing instream habitat and water quality. Forest fragmentation, sunlit edges, and nutrient additions from adjacent development may be sources of stress on riparian zones. Landscape plants may include no...

  15. Effectiveness of work zone intelligent transportation systems.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) have increasingly been deployed in work zones by state departments of transportation. Also known as smart work zone systems they improve traffic operations and safety by providing real-time...

  16. Buffer Zone Requirements for Soil Fumigant Applications

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated pesticide product labels require fumigant users to establish a buffer zone around treated fields to reduce risks to bystanders. Useful information includes tarp testing guidance and a buffer zone calculator.

  17. Research notes : helping businesses in work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-03-01

    Many business owners fear that highway construction projects will significantly reduce traffic to their businesses. Customers complain about the difficulty in finding business driveways in work zones. Drivers are guided through most work zone using o...

  18. Life zone investigations in Wyoming

    Cary, Merritt

    1917-01-01

    Wyoming is among the foremost of our States in its wealth of natural scenery, culminating in the grandeur of Yellowstone National Park, one of the wonders of the world. In addition to this distinction it posseses vast open plains and lofty mountains whence flow the headwaters of mighty river systems emptying far away to the west into the Pacific Ocean, to the southeast into the Gulf of Mexico, and to the southwest into the Gulf of California. The various slope exposures of its mountain ranges, the fertility of its intervening valleys or basins, and the aridity of its desert spaces present a study of geographic and vertical distribution of wild life that is in many particulars unique.The study of geographic and vertical distribution of life with the governing factors and attendant problems is valuable as a matter of scientific research and in the attainment of practical knowledge. The Biological Survey has been making detailed investigations of the transcontinental life belts, or zones, of North America for some years, and this work has been carried on with special reference to their practical value. It has become increasingly evident that life zones furnish a fairly accurate index to average climatic conditions and, therefore, are useful as marking the limits of agricultural possibilities, so far as these are dependent upon climate. The knowledge thus gained has been published and made available as the investigations have progressed and the life zones have been mapped.1

  19. 19 CFR 146.7 - Zone changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... common or contract carriers transporting goods to or from the zone. [T.D. 86-16, 51 FR 5049, Feb. 11... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zone changes. 146.7 Section 146.7 Customs Duties U... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES General Provisions § 146.7 Zone changes. (a) Alteration of an activated area...

  20. 19 CFR 146.7 - Zone changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... common or contract carriers transporting goods to or from the zone. [T.D. 86-16, 51 FR 5049, Feb. 11... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zone changes. 146.7 Section 146.7 Customs Duties U... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES General Provisions § 146.7 Zone changes. (a) Alteration of an activated area...

  1. 19 CFR 146.7 - Zone changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... common or contract carriers transporting goods to or from the zone. [T.D. 86-16, 51 FR 5049, Feb. 11... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zone changes. 146.7 Section 146.7 Customs Duties U... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES General Provisions § 146.7 Zone changes. (a) Alteration of an activated area...

  2. 19 CFR 146.7 - Zone changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... common or contract carriers transporting goods to or from the zone. [T.D. 86-16, 51 FR 5049, Feb. 11... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zone changes. 146.7 Section 146.7 Customs Duties U... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES General Provisions § 146.7 Zone changes. (a) Alteration of an activated area...

  3. 19 CFR 146.7 - Zone changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... common or contract carriers transporting goods to or from the zone. [T.D. 86-16, 51 FR 5049, Feb. 11... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zone changes. 146.7 Section 146.7 Customs Duties U... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES General Provisions § 146.7 Zone changes. (a) Alteration of an activated area...

  4. Zone heating for fluidized bed silane pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iya, Sridhar K. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An improved heated fluidized bed reactor and method for the production of high purity polycrystalline silicon by silane pyrolysis wherein silicon seed particles are heated in an upper heating zone of the reactor and admixed with particles in a lower reaction zone, in which zone a silane-containing gas stream, having passed through a lower cooled gas distribution zone not conducive to silane pyrolysis, contacts the heated seed particles whereon the silane is heterogeneously reduced to silicon.

  5. Recent findings relating to firefighter safety zones

    Bret Butler; Russ Parsons; William Mell

    2015-01-01

    Designation of safety zones is a primary duty of all wildland firefighters. Unfortunately, information regarding what constitutes an adequate safety zone is inadequately defined. Measurements of energy release from wildland fires have been used to develop an empirically based safety zone guideline. The basis for this work is described here.

  6. 76 FR 23485 - Safety Zone; Red River

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Red River AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone for all waters of the Red River in the State of North..., extending the entire width of the river. This safety zone is needed to protect persons and vessels from...

  7. Does zoning winter recreationists reduce recreation conflict?

    Aubrey Miller; Jerry J. Vaske; John R. Squires; Lucretia E. Olson

    2016-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation - often by nonmotorized and motorized activity - is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation...

  8. Does zoning winter recreationists reduce recreation conflict?

    Aubrey D. Miller; Jerry J. Vaske; John R. Squires; Lucretia E. Olson; Elizabeth K. Roberts

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation - often by nonmotorized and motorized activity - is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation...

  9. 46 CFR 76.23-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Sprinkling System, Details § 76.23-5 Zoning. (a) Separate zones may be used for each deck, and on any particular... that the end sprinkler heads of both adjoining zones will cover the identical area. Table 76.23-5(b...

  10. 46 CFR 76.23-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Sprinkling System, Details § 76.23-5 Zoning. (a) Separate zones may be used for each deck, and on any particular... that the end sprinkler heads of both adjoining zones will cover the identical area. Table 76.23-5(b...

  11. 46 CFR 76.23-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Sprinkling System, Details § 76.23-5 Zoning. (a) Separate zones may be used for each deck, and on any particular... that the end sprinkler heads of both adjoining zones will cover the identical area. Table 76.23-5(b...

  12. 46 CFR 76.23-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Sprinkling System, Details § 76.23-5 Zoning. (a) Separate zones may be used for each deck, and on any particular... that the end sprinkler heads of both adjoining zones will cover the identical area. Table 76.23-5(b...

  13. 46 CFR 76.23-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Sprinkling System, Details § 76.23-5 Zoning. (a) Separate zones may be used for each deck, and on any particular... that the end sprinkler heads of both adjoining zones will cover the identical area. Table 76.23-5(b...

  14. 46 CFR 76.33-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Smoke Detecting System, Details § 76.33-5 Zoning. (a) The smoke detecting system shall be divided into separate zones to restrict the area covered by any particular alarm signal. (b) The smoke detecting zone shall not include...

  15. 46 CFR 76.33-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Smoke Detecting System, Details § 76.33-5 Zoning. (a) The smoke detecting system shall be divided into separate zones to restrict the area covered by any particular alarm signal. (b) The smoke detecting zone shall not include...

  16. 46 CFR 76.33-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Smoke Detecting System, Details § 76.33-5 Zoning. (a) The smoke detecting system shall be divided into separate zones to restrict the area covered by any particular alarm signal. (b) The smoke detecting zone shall not include...

  17. Do "Some" Enterprise Zones Create Jobs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, Jed; Neumark, David

    2010-01-01

    We study how the employment effects of enterprise zones vary with their location, implementation, and administration, based on evidence from California. We use new establishment-level data and geographic mapping methods, coupled with a survey of enterprise zone administrators. Overall, the evidence indicates that enterprise zones do not increase…

  18. NSLS-II beamline scattered gas bremsstrahlung radiation shielding calculation

    SciT

    Popescu, Razvan; Xia, Zhenghua, E-mail: xiazhenghuacn@hotmail.com; Job, Panakkal

    2016-07-27

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a new state-of-the-art 3rd generation synchrotron. The NSLS-II facility is shielded up to 3 GeV electron beam energy at 500 mA. When the gas bremsstrahlung (GB) from the storage ring is scattered by the beamline components in the first optical enclosure (FOE), the scattered radiation will pose additional radiation hazard (bypassing primary GB collimators and stops) and challenge the FOE shielding. The scattered GB radiation hazard can be mitigated by supplementary shielding or with an exclusion zone downstream of the FOE.

  19. Evolution of a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Van Hoolst, Tim; Dehant, Veronique

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand how Earth's surface might have evolved with time and to examine in a more general way the initiation and continuance of subduction zones and the possible formation of continents on an Earth-like planet. Plate tectonics and continents seem to influence the likelihood of a planet to harbour life, and both are strongly influenced by the planetary interior (e.g. mantle temperature and rheology) and surface conditions (e.g. stabilizing effect of continents, atmospheric temperature), but may also depend on the biosphere. Employing the Fortran convection code CHIC (developed at the Royal Observatory of Belgium), we simulate a subduction zone with a pre-defined weak zone (between oceanic and continental crust) and a fixed plate velocity for the subducting oceanic plate (Quinquis et al. in preparation). In our study we first investigate the main factors that influence the subduction process. We simulate the subduction of an oceanic plate beneath a continental plate (Noack et al., 2013). The crust is separated into an upper crust and a lower crust. We apply mixed Newtonian/non-Newtonian rheology and vary the parameters that are most likely to influence the subduction of the ocanic plate, as for example density of the crust/mantle, surface temperature, plate velocity and subduction angle. The second part of our study concentrates on the long-term evolution of a subduction zone. Even though we model only the upper mantle (until a depth of 670km), the subducted crust is allowed to flow into the lower mantle, where it is no longer subject to our investigation. This way we can model the subduction zone over long time spans, for which we assume a continuous inflow of the oceanic plate into the investigated domain. We include variations in mantle temperatures (via secular cooling and decay of radioactive heat sources) and dehydration of silicates (leading to stiffening of the material). We investigate how the mantle environment influences

  20. Kartogenin with PRP promotes the formation of fibrocartilage zone in the tendon-bone interface.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiqin; Zhang, Jianying; Yang, Jinsong; Narava, Manoj; Zhao, Guangyi; Yuan, Ting; Wu, Haishan; Zheng, Nigel; Hogan, MaCalus V; Wang, James H-C

    2017-12-01

    Treatment of tendon-bone junction injuries is a challenge because tendon-bone interface often heals poorly and the fibrocartilage zone, which reduces stress concentration, at the interface is not formed. In this study, we used a compound called kartogenin (KGN) with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to induce the formation of fibrocartilage zone in a rat tendon graft-bone tunnel model. The experimental rats received KGN-PRP or PRP injections in the tendon graft-bone tunnel interface. The control group received saline. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, Safranin O staining of the tendon graft-bone tunnels revealed abundant proteoglycans in the KGN-PRP group indicating the formation of cartilage-like transition zone. Immunohistochemical and immuno-fluorescence staining revealed collagen types I (Col-I) and II (Col-II) in the newly formed fibrocartilage zone. Both fibrocartilage zone formation and maturation were healing time dependent. In contrast, the PRP and saline control groups had no cartilage-like tissues and minimal Col-I and Col-II staining. Some gaps were also present in the saline control group. Finally, pull-out strength in the KGN-PRP-treated group at 8 weeks was 1.4-fold higher than the PRP-treated group and 1.6-fold higher than the saline control group. These findings indicate that KGN, with PRP as a carrier, promotes the formation of fibrocartilage zone between the tendon graft and bone interface. Thus, KGN-PRP may be used as a convenient cell-free therapy in clinics to promote fibrocartilage zone formation in rotator calf repair and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, thereby enhancing the mechanical strength of the tendon-bone interface and hence the clinical outcome of these procedures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. 76 FR 17782 - Security Zone: Passenger Vessels, Sector Southeastern New England Captain of the Port Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ...-AA87 Security Zone: Passenger Vessels, Sector Southeastern New England Captain of the Port Zone AGENCY... extending the effective period for temporary fixed and moving security zones around certain passenger vessels in the Sector Southeastern New England Captain of the Port Zone through October 1, 2011. Temporary...

  2. 76 FR 70342 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ...] Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation... published in the Federal Register. This notice lists temporary safety zones, security zones, special local..., telephone (202) 372-3862. For questions on viewing, or on submitting material to the docket, contact Ms...

  3. 78 FR 5717 - Safety Zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal... Guard is establishing a safety zone in the navigable waters of Suisun Bay near Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA in support of military onload and offload operations. This safety zone is established to...

  4. 76 FR 22033 - Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ...-AAOO Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary... a temporary safety zone on the Red River, MN. This safety zone is being established to ensure the... Red River in the State of Minnesota north of a line drawn across latitude 46[deg]20'00'' N, including...

  5. 78 FR 41694 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Events in Captain of the Port New York Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... Zone; Fireworks Events in Captain of the Port New York Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce safety zones in the Captain of the Port New York Zone on the specified dates and times. This action is necessary to ensure the safety of vessels...

  6. 78 FR 57482 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Event in Captain of the Port New York Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... York Zone on the specified date and time. This action is necessary to ensure the safety of vessels and... regulation for the safety zone described in 33 CFR 165.160 will be enforced on the date and time listed in... Zone; Fireworks Event in Captain of the Port New York Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  7. 77 FR 59551 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Event in Captain of the Port New York Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Zone; Fireworks Event in Captain of the Port New York Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce a safety zone in the Captain of the Port New York Zone on the specified date and time. This action is necessary to ensure the safety of vessels and...

  8. 77 FR 19970 - Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ...-AA87 Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone... Marine Science Technician First Class Nolan L. Ammons, Sector St. Petersburg Prevention Department, Coast... proposed rule would establish seven temporary security zones in the Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone...

  9. 77 FR 30245 - Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Detroit Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ...-AA00 Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Detroit Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard... by adding three permanent safety zones within the Captain of the Port Detroit Zone. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of life and property on navigable waters during each event. This action...

  10. 75 FR 19304 - Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Detroit Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... zones for annual events in the Captain of the Port Detroit zone. This proposed rule adds events not... proposed rule will add additional events not previously published in the regulations found in 33 CFR 165...-AA00 Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Detroit Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard...

  11. WorkZoneQ user guide for two-lane freeway work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    WorkZoneQ was developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to implement the results of the previous study, : Queue and Users Costs in Highway Work Zones. This report contains the WorkZoneQ user guide. WorkZoneQ : consists of eight Excel ...

  12. 78 FR 24679 - Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ...-AA00 Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard... zones for fireworks displays within the Captain of the Port (COTP) Long Island Sound (LIS) Zone. This... Sector Long Island Sound. DATES: This rule is effective from April 27, 2013, until June 22, 2013. This...

  13. 76 FR 44803 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... USCG-2009-1081 New Orleans, LA Safety Zone (Part 165)..... 12/23/2009 USCG-2009-1084 Rio Vista, CA...-1096 Port Portland Zone......... Safety Zone (Part 165)..... 7/3/2010 USCG-2009-0040 La Push, WA Safety...-0950 Madisonville, LA Safety Zone (Part 165)..... 12/31/2009 USCG-2009-0951 Lower Mississippi River...

  14. A fingerprint of the epileptogenic zone in human epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Grinenko, Olesya; Li, Jian; Mosher, John C; Wang, Irene Z; Bulacio, Juan C; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Nair, Dileep; Najm, Imad; Leahy, Richard M; Chauvel, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Defining a bio-electrical marker for the brain area responsible for initiating a seizure remains an unsolved problem. Fast gamma activity has been identified as the most specific marker for seizure onset, but conflicting results have been reported. In this study, we describe an alternative marker, based on an objective description of interictal to ictal transition, with the aim of identifying a time-frequency pattern or 'fingerprint' that can differentiate the epileptogenic zone from areas of propagation. Seventeen patients who underwent stereoelectroencephalography were included in the study. Each had seizure onset characterized by sustained gamma activity and were seizure-free after tailored resection or laser ablation. We postulated that the epileptogenic zone was always located inside the resection region based on seizure freedom following surgery. To characterize the ictal frequency pattern, we applied the Morlet wavelet transform to data from each pair of adjacent intracerebral electrode contacts. Based on a visual assessment of the time-frequency plots, we hypothesized that a specific time-frequency pattern in the epileptogenic zone should include a combination of (i) sharp transients or spikes; preceding (ii) multiband fast activity concurrent; with (iii) suppression of lower frequencies. To test this hypothesis, we developed software that automatically extracted each of these features from the time-frequency data. We then used a support vector machine to classify each contact-pair as being within epileptogenic zone or not, based on these features. Our machine learning system identified this pattern in 15 of 17 patients. The total number of identified contacts across all patients was 64, with 58 localized inside the resected area. Subsequent quantitative analysis showed strong correlation between maximum frequency of fast activity and suppression inside the resection but not outside. We did not observe significant discrimination power using only the maximum

  15. A fingerprint of the epileptogenic zone in human epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Grinenko, Olesya; Li, Jian; Mosher, John C; Wang, Irene Z; Bulacio, Juan C; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Nair, Dileep; Najm, Imad; Leahy, Richard M; Chauvel, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Defining a bio-electrical marker for the brain area responsible for initiating a seizure remains an unsolved problem. Fast gamma activity has been identified as the most specific marker for seizure onset, but conflicting results have been reported. In this study, we describe an alternative marker, based on an objective description of interictal to ictal transition, with the aim of identifying a time-frequency pattern or ‘fingerprint’ that can differentiate the epileptogenic zone from areas of propagation. Seventeen patients who underwent stereoelectroencephalography were included in the study. Each had seizure onset characterized by sustained gamma activity and were seizure-free after tailored resection or laser ablation. We postulated that the epileptogenic zone was always located inside the resection region based on seizure freedom following surgery. To characterize the ictal frequency pattern, we applied the Morlet wavelet transform to data from each pair of adjacent intracerebral electrode contacts. Based on a visual assessment of the time-frequency plots, we hypothesized that a specific time-frequency pattern in the epileptogenic zone should include a combination of (i) sharp transients or spikes; preceding (ii) multiband fast activity concurrent; with (iii) suppression of lower frequencies. To test this hypothesis, we developed software that automatically extracted each of these features from the time-frequency data. We then used a support vector machine to classify each contact-pair as being within epileptogenic zone or not, based on these features. Our machine learning system identified this pattern in 15 of 17 patients. The total number of identified contacts across all patients was 64, with 58 localized inside the resected area. Subsequent quantitative analysis showed strong correlation between maximum frequency of fast activity and suppression inside the resection but not outside. We did not observe significant discrimination power using

  16. Coupling of Coastal Zone Color Scanner data to a physical-biological model of the southeastern U.S. continental shelf ecosystem. I - CZCS data description and Lagrangian particle tracing experiments. II - An Eulerian model. III - Nutrient and phytoplankton fluxes and CZCS data assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishizaka, Joji

    1990-01-01

    Surface phytoplankton biomass of the southeastern U.S. continental shelf area is discussed based on coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) images obtained in April 1980. Data of chlorophyll distributions are analyzed in conjunction with concurrent flow and temperature fields. Lagrangian particle tracing experiments show that the particles move consistently with the evolution of the chlorophyll patterns. A four-component physical-biological model for a horizontal plane at a nominal depth of 17 m is presented. Model simulations using various physical-biological dynamics and boundary conditions show that the variability of chlorophyll distributions is controlled by horizontal advection. Phytoplankton and nutrient fluxes, calculated using the model, show considerable variability with time. The chlorophyll distributions obtained from the CZCS images are assimilated into the model to improve the phytoplankton flux estimates.

  17. Carbon dynamics in the Elbe land-ocean transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Thorben; Weiss, Andreas; Hartmann, Jens

    2010-05-01

    nitrate and phosphate concentrations as well as dissolved inorganic carbon. Presented analysis is used to develop a new spatial framework for quantification of carbon dynamics especially addressing sinks and sources of carbon in the land-ocean transition zone of the river Elbe. References Chen, C.-T.A. and Borges, A.V. (2009), „Reconciling opposing views on carbon cycling in the coastal ocean: Continental shelves as sinks and near-shore ecosystems as sources of atmospheric CO2', Deep-Sea Research II (56), 578-590. Cole, J. and Prairie, Y. and Caraco, N. and McDowell, W. and Tranvik, L. and Striegl, R. and Duarte, C. and Kortelainen, P. and Downing, J. and Middelburg, J. and Melack, J. (2007), "Plumbing the Global Carbon Cycle: Integrating Inland Waters into the Terrestrial Carbon Budget", Ecosystems 10 (1), 172-185.

  18. Coastal Zone Color Scanner studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, J.

    1988-01-01

    Activities over the past year have included cooperative work with a summer faculty fellow using the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) imagery to study the effects of gradients in trophic resources on coral reefs in the Caribbean. Other research included characterization of ocean radiances specific to an acid-waste plume. Other activities include involvement in the quality control of imagery produced in the processing of the global CZCS data set, the collection of various other data global sets, and the subsequent data comparison and analysis.

  19. New Radiation Zones on Jupiter

    2017-12-11

    This graphic shows a new radiation zone surrounding Jupiter, located just above the atmosphere near the equator, that has been discovered by NASA's Juno mission. The new radiation zone is depicted here as a glowing blue area around the planet's middle. This radiation zone includes energetic hydrogen, oxygen and sulfur ions moving at close to the speed of light (referred to as "relativistic" speeds). It resides inside Jupiter's previously known radiation belts. The zone was identified by the mission's Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI), enabled by Juno's unique close approach to the planet during the spacecraft's science flybys (2,100 miles or 3,400 kilometers from the cloud tops). Juno scientists believe the particles creating this region of intense radiation are derived from energetic neutral atoms -- that is, fast-moving atoms without an electric charge -- coming from the tenuous gas around Jupiter's moons Io and Europa. The neutral atoms then become ions -- atoms with an electric charge -- as their electrons are stripped away by interaction with the planet's upper atmosphere. (This discovery is discussed further in an issue of the journal Geophysical Research Letters [Kollmann et al. (2017), Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, 5259-5268].) Juno also has detected signatures of a population of high-energy, heavy ions in the inner edges of Jupiter's relativistic electron radiation belt. This radiation belt was previously understood to contain mostly electrons moving at near light speed. The signatures of the heavy ions are observed at high latitude locations within the electron belt -- a region not previously explored by spacecraft. The origin and exact species of these heavy ions is not yet understood. Juno's Stellar Reference Unit (SRU-1) star camera detects the signatures of this population as extremely high noise in images collected as part of the mission's radiation monitoring investigation. The locations where the heavy ions were detected are

  20. BASS-II Experiment

    2014-08-02

    Image taken on card 8 during BASS-II flame test session with reduced O2 partial pressure. Session conducted on GMT 213. The Burning and Suppression of Solids - II (BASS-II) investigation examines the burning and extinction characteristics of a wide variety of fuel samples in microgravity. The BASS-II experiment will guide strategies for materials flammability screening for use in spacecraft as well as provide valuable data on solid fuel burning behavior in microgravity. BASS-II results contribute to the combustion computational models used in the design of fire detection and suppression systems in microgravity and on Earth.

  1. 49 CFR 222.43 - What notices and other information are required to create or continue a quiet zone?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What notices and other information are required to... June 24, 2005, the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or § 222.42 of this part shall be served no later than June 3, 2005. (ii) If the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or § 222...

  2. 49 CFR 222.43 - What notices and other information are required to create or continue a quiet zone?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What notices and other information are required to... June 24, 2005, the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or 222.42 of this part shall be served no later than June 3, 2005. (ii) If the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or 222.42...

  3. 49 CFR 222.43 - What notices and other information are required to create or continue a quiet zone?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What notices and other information are required to... June 24, 2005, the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or § 222.42 of this part shall be served no later than June 3, 2005. (ii) If the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or § 222...

  4. 49 CFR 222.43 - What notices and other information are required to create or continue a quiet zone?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What notices and other information are required to... June 24, 2005, the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or § 222.42 of this part shall be served no later than June 3, 2005. (ii) If the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or § 222...

  5. 49 CFR 222.43 - What notices and other information are required to create or continue a quiet zone?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What notices and other information are required to... June 24, 2005, the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or § 222.42 of this part shall be served no later than June 3, 2005. (ii) If the Notice of Quiet Zone Continuation under § 222.41 or § 222...

  6. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial community in a simulator of the human gastrointestinal tract showed a colon region-specific microbiota modulation for two plant-derived polysaccharide blends.

    PubMed

    Marzorati, Massimo; Maignien, Lois; Verhelst, An; Luta, Gabriela; Sinnott, Robert; Kerckhof, Frederiek Maarten; Boon, Nico; Van de Wiele, Tom; Possemiers, Sam

    2013-02-01

    The combination of a Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem with ad hoc molecular techniques (i.e. pyrosequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR) allowed an evaluation of the extent to which two plant polysaccharide supplements could modify a complex gut microbial community. The presence of Aloe vera gel powder and algae extract in product B as compared to the standard blend (product A) improved its fermentation along the entire simulated colon. The potential extended effect of product B in the simulated distal colon, as compared to product A, was confirmed by: (i) the separate clustering of the samples before and after the treatment in the phylogenetic-based dendrogram and OTU-based PCoA plot only for product B; (ii) a higher richness estimator (+33 vs. -36 % of product A); and (iii) a higher dynamic parameter (21 vs. 13 %). These data show that the combination of well designed in vitro simulators with barcoded pyrosequencing is a powerful tool for characterizing changes occurring in the gut microbiota following a treatment. However, for the quantification of low-abundance species-of interest because of their relationship to potential positive health effects (i.e. bifidobacteria or lactobacilli)-conventional molecular ecological approaches, such as PCR-DGGE and qPCR, still remain a very useful complementary tool.

  7. Fault zone structure and seismic reflection characteristics in zones of slow slip and tsunami earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Henrys, Stuart; Sutherland, Rupert; Barker, Daniel; Wallace, Laura; Holden, Caroline; Power, William; Wang, Xiaoming; Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Downes, Gaye

    2015-04-01

    Over the last couple of decades we have learned that a whole spectrum of different fault slip behaviour takes place on subduction megathrust faults from stick-slip earthquakes to slow slip and stable sliding. Geophysical data, including seismic reflection data, can be used to characterise margins and fault zones that undergo different modes of slip. In this presentation we will focus on the Hikurangi margin, New Zealand, which exhibits marked along-strike changes in seismic behaviour and margin characteristics. Campaign and continuous GPS measurements reveal deep interseismic coupling and deep slow slip events (~30-60 km) at the southern Hikurangi margin. The northern margin, in contrast, experiences aseismic slip and shallow (<10-15 km) slow slip events (SSE) every 18-24 months with equivalent moment magnitudes of Mw 6.5-6.8. Updip of the SSE region two unusual megathrust earthquakes occurred in March and May 1947 with characteristics typical of tsunami earthquakes. The Hikurangi margin is therefore an excellent natural laboratory to study differential fault slip behaviour. Using 2D seismic reflection, magnetic anomaly and geodetic data we observe in the source areas of the 1947 tsunami earthquakes i) low amplitude interface reflectivity, ii) shallower interface relief, iii) bathymetric ridges, iv) magnetic anomaly highs and in the case of the March 1947 earthquake v) stronger geodetic coupling. We suggest that this is due to the subduction of seamounts, similar in dimensions to seamounts observed on the incoming Pacific plate, to depths of <10 km. We propose a source model for the 1947 tsunami earthquakes based on geophysical data and find that extremely low rupture velocities (c. 300 m/s) are required to model the observed large tsunami run-up heights (Bell et al. 2014, EPSL). Our study suggests that subducted topography can cause the nucleation of moderate earthquakes with complex, low velocity rupture scenarios that enhance tsunami waves, and the role of

  8. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of normal fault zones: Thal Fault Zone, Suez Rift, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppard, Christopher William

    propagation and early linkage of the precursor fault strands at depth before the fault segment broke surface, followed by the accumulation of displacement on the linked fault segment with minimal lateral propagation. This style of fault growth contrasts conventional fault growth models by which growth occurs through incremental increases in both displacement and length through time. The evolution of normal fault populations and fault zones exerts a first- order control on basin physiography and sediment supply, and therefore, the architecture and distribution of coeval syn-rift stratigraphy. The early syn-rift continental, Abu Zenima Formation, to shallow marine, Nukhul Formation show a pronounced westward increase in thickness controlled by the series of synthetic and antithetic faults up to 3 km west of present day Thai fault. The orientation of these faults controlled the location of fluvial conglomerates, sandstones and mudstones that shifted to the topographic lows created. The progressive localisation of displacement onto the Sarbut El Gamal fault segment during rift-climax resulted in an overall change in basin geometry. Accelerated subsidence rates led to sedimentation rates being outpaced by subsidence resulting in the development of a marine, sediment-starved, underfilled hangingwall depocentre characterised by slope-to-basinal depositional environments, with a laterally continuous slope apron in the immediate hangingwall, and point-sourced submarine fans. Controls on the spatial distribution, three dimensional architecture, and facies stacking patterns of coeval syn-rift deposits are identified as: I) structural style of the evolution and linkage of normal fault populations, ii) basin physiography, iii) evolution of drainage catchments, iv) bedrock lithology, and v) variations in sea/lake level.

  9. Characterizing multiple timescales of stream and storage zone interaction that affect solute fate and transport in streams

    Choi, Jungyill; Harvey, Judson W.; Conklin, Martha H.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of contaminants in streams and rivers is affected by exchange and biogeochemical transformation in slowly moving or stagnant flow zones that interact with rapid flow in the main channel. In a typical stream, there are multiple types of slowly moving flow zones in which exchange and transformation occur, such as stagnant or recirculating surface water as well as subsurface hyporheic zones. However, most investigators use transport models with just a single storage zone in their modeling studies, which assumes that the effects of multiple storage zones can be lumped together. Our study addressed the following question: Can a single‐storage zone model reliably characterize the effects of physical retention and biogeochemical reactions in multiple storage zones? We extended an existing stream transport model with a single storage zone to include a second storage zone. With the extended model we generated 500 data sets representing transport of nonreactive and reactive solutes in stream systems that have two different types of storage zones with variable hydrologic conditions. The one storage zone model was tested by optimizing the lumped storage parameters to achieve a best fit for each of the generated data sets. Multiple storage processes were categorized as possessing I, additive; II, competitive; or III, dominant storage zone characteristics. The classification was based on the goodness of fit of generated data sets, the degree of similarity in mean retention time of the two storage zones, and the relative distributions of exchange flux and storage capacity between the two storage zones. For most cases (>90%) the one storage zone model described either the effect of the sum of multiple storage processes (category I) or the dominant storage process (category III). Failure of the one storage zone model occurred mainly for category II, that is, when one of the storage zones had a much longer mean retention time (ts ratio > 5.0) and when the dominance of

  10. On the Nature of Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Candidates. II. The Case of Cetus II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, Blair C.; Jerjen, Helmut; Kim, Dongwon; Schirmer, Mischa

    2018-04-01

    We obtained deep Gemini GMOS-S g, r photometry of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidate Cetus II with the aim of providing stronger constraints on its size, luminosity, and stellar population. Cetus II is an important object in the size–luminosity plane, as it occupies the transition zone between dwarf galaxies and star clusters. All known objects smaller than Cetus II (r h ∼ 20 pc) are reported to be star clusters, while most larger objects are likely dwarf galaxies. We found a prominent excess of main-sequence stars in the color–magnitude diagram of Cetus II, best described by a single stellar population with an age of 11.2 Gyr, metallicity of [Fe/H] = ‑1.28 dex, an [α/Fe] = 0.0 dex at a heliocentric distance of 26.3 ± 1.2 kpc. As well as being spatially located within the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream, these properties are well matched to the Sagittarius galaxy’s Population B stars. Interestingly, like our recent findings on the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidate Tucana V, the stellar field in the direction of Cetus II shows no evidence of a concentrated overdensity despite tracing the main sequence for over six magnitudes. These results strongly support the picture that Cetus II is not an ultra-faint stellar system in the Milky Way halo, but made up of stars from the Sagittarius tidal stream.

  11. Polyhedral protein cages encase synaptic vesicles and participate in their attachment to the active zone.

    PubMed

    Zampighi, G A; Fisher, R S

    1997-08-01

    In an effort to elucidate the interactions between synaptic vesicles and the membrane of the active zone, we have investigated the structure of interneuronal asymmetric synapses in the neocortex of adult rats using thin-sectioning, freeze-fracture, and negative staining electron microscopy. We identified three subtypes of spherical synaptic vesicles. Type I were agranular vesicles of 47.5 +/- 3.8 nm (mean SD, n = 24) in diameter usually seen aggregated in clusters in the presynaptic bouton. Type II synaptic vesicles were composed of a approximately 45-nm-diameter lipid bilayer sphere encased in a cage 77 +/- 4.6 nm (mean SD, n = 42) in diameter. The cage was composed of open-faced pentamers 20-22 nm/side arranged as a regular polyhedron. Type II caged vesicles were found in clusters at the boutons, adhered to the active zone, and were also present in axons. Type III synaptic vesicles appeared as electron-dense spheres 60-75 nm in diameter abutted to the membrane of the active zone. Clathrin-coated vesicles and pits of 116.6 +/- 9 nm (mean SD, n = 14) in diameter were also present in both the pre- and postsynaptic sides. Freeze-fracture showed that some intrinsic membrane proteins in the active zone were arranged as pentamers exhibiting the same dimension of those forming cages (approximately 22 nm/side). From these data, we concluded that: (a) the presynaptic bouton contains a heterogeneous population of "caged" and "plain" synaptic vesicles and (b) type II synaptic vesicles bind to receptors in the active zone. Therefore, current models of transmitter release should take into account the substantial heterogeneity of the vesicle population and the binding of vesicular cages to the membrane of the active zone.

  12. Multichannel imager for littoral zone characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobna, Yuliya; Schoonmaker, Jon; Dirbas, Joe; Sofianos, James; Boucher, Cynthia; Gilbert, Gary

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes an approach to utilize a multi-channel, multi-spectral electro-optic (EO) system for littoral zone characterization. Advanced Coherent Technologies, LLC (ACT) presents their EO sensor systems for the surf zone environmental assessment and potential surf zone target detection. Specifically, an approach is presented to determine a Surf Zone Index (SZI) from the multi-spectral EO sensor system. SZI provides a single quantitative value of the surf zone conditions delivering an immediate understanding of the area and an assessment as to how well an airborne optical system might perform in a mine countermeasures (MCM) operation. Utilizing consecutive frames of SZI images, ACT is able to measure variability over time. A surf zone nomograph, which incorporates targets, sensor, and environmental data, including the SZI to determine the environmental impact on system performance, is reviewed in this work. ACT's electro-optical multi-channel, multi-spectral imaging system and test results are presented and discussed.

  13. Vegetation zones in changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belda, Michal; Holtanova, Eva; Halenka, Tomas; Kalvova, Jaroslava

    2017-04-01

    Climate patterns analysis can be performed for individual climate variables separately or the data can be aggregated using e.g. some kind of climate classification. These classifications usually correspond to vegetation distribution in the sense that each climate type is dominated by one vegetation zone or eco-region. Thus, the Köppen-Trewartha classification provides integrated assessment of temperature and precipitation together with their annual cycle as well. This way climate classifications also can be used as a convenient tool for the assessment and validation of climate models and for the analysis of simulated future climate changes. The Köppen-Trewartha classification is applied on full CMIP5 family of more than 40 GCM simulations and CRU dataset for comparison. This evaluation provides insight on the GCM performance and errors for simulations of the 20th century climate. Common regions are identified, such as Australia or Amazonia, where many state-of-the-art models perform inadequately. Moreover, the analysis of the CMIP5 ensemble for future under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 is performed to assess the climate change for future. There are significant changes for some types in most models e.g. increase of savanna and decrease of tundra for the future climate. For some types significant shifts in latitude can be seen when studying their geographical location in selected continental areas, e.g. toward higher latitudes for boreal climate. Quite significant uncertainty can be seen for some types. For Europe, EuroCORDEX results for both 0.11 and 0.44 degree resolution are validated using Köppen-Trewartha types in comparison to E-OBS based classification. ERA-Interim driven simulations are compared to both present conditions of CMIP5 models as well as their downscaling by EuroCORDEX RCMs. Finally, the climate change signal assessment is provided using the individual climate types. In addition to the changes assessed similarly as for GCMs analysis in terms of the area

  14. Crustal growth in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Katharina; Castro, Antonio; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    There is a broad interest in understanding the physical principles leading to arc magmatisim at active continental margins and different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the composition and evolution of the continental crust. It is widely accepted that water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle allowing for "flux melting" of the hydrated mantle. However, relamination of subducted crustal material to the base of the continental crust has been recently suggested to account for the growth and composition of the continental crust. We use petrological-thermo-mechanical models of active subduction zones to demonstrate that subduction of crustal material to sublithospheric depth may result in the formation of a tectonic rock mélange composed of basalt, sediment and hydrated /serpentinized mantle. This rock mélange may evolve into a partially molten diapir at asthenospheric depth and rise through the mantle because of its intrinsic buoyancy prior to emplacement at crustal levels (relamination). This process can be episodic and long-lived, forming successive diapirs that represent multiple magma pulses. Recent laboratory experiments of Castro et al. (2013) have demonstrated that reactions between these crustal components (i.e. basalt and sediment) produce andesitic melt typical for rocks of the continental crust. However, melt derived from a composite diapir will inherit the geochemical characteristics of its source and show distinct temporal variations of radiogenic isotopes based on the proportions of basalt and sediment in the source (Vogt et al., 2013). Hence, partial melting of a composite diapir is expected to produce melt with a constant major element composition, but substantial changes in terms of radiogenic isotopes. However, crustal growth at active continental margins may also involve accretionary processes by which new material is added to the continental crust. Oceanic plateaus and other

  15. Kepler Small Habitable Zone Planets

    2015-07-23

    Of the 1,030 confirmed planets from Kepler, a dozen are less than twice the size of Earth and reside in the habitable zone of their host stars. In this diagram, the sizes of the exoplanets are represented by the size of each sphere. These are arranged by size from left to right, and by the type of star they orbit, from the M stars that are significantly cooler and smaller than the sun, to the K stars that are somewhat cooler and smaller than the sun, to the G stars that include the sun. The sizes of the planets are enlarged by 25 times compared to the stars. The Earth is shown for reference. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19827

  16. 33 CFR 3.05-35 - Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-35 Section 3.05-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-35 Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Long Island Sound's office is located in New...

  17. 33 CFR 3.05-35 - Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-35 Section 3.05-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-35 Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Long Island Sound's office is located in New...

  18. 33 CFR 3.55-15 - Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-15 Section 3.55-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-15 Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector San Diego's office is located in San Diego, CA. The...

  19. 33 CFR 3.25-20 - Sector North Carolina Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.25-20 Section 3.25-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fifth Coast Guard District § 3.25-20 Sector North Carolina Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector North Carolina's office is located in Wilmington, NC...

  20. 33 CFR 3.05-35 - Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-35 Section 3.05-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-35 Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Long Island Sound's office is located in New...

  1. 33 CFR 3.55-15 - Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-15 Section 3.55-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-15 Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector San Diego's office is located in San Diego, CA. The...

  2. 33 CFR 3.05-20 - Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-20 Section 3.05-20 Navigation and Navigable... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-20 Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Southeastern New England's office is...

  3. 33 CFR 3.65-15 - Sector Columbia River Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.65-15 Section 3.65-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-15 Sector Columbia River Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Columbia River's office is located in Astoria...

  4. 33 CFR 3.05-35 - Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-35 Section 3.05-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-35 Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Long Island Sound's office is located in New...

  5. 33 CFR 3.55-15 - Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-15 Section 3.55-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-15 Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector San Diego's office is located in San Diego, CA. The...

  6. 33 CFR 3.05-20 - Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-20 Section 3.05-20 Navigation and Navigable... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-20 Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Southeastern New England's office is...

  7. 33 CFR 3.55-15 - Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-15 Section 3.55-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-15 Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector San Diego's office is located in San Diego, CA. The...

  8. 33 CFR 3.25-20 - Sector North Carolina Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.25-20 Section 3.25-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fifth Coast Guard District § 3.25-20 Sector North Carolina Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector North Carolina's office is located in Wilmington, NC...

  9. 33 CFR 3.25-20 - Sector North Carolina Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.25-20 Section 3.25-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fifth Coast Guard District § 3.25-20 Sector North Carolina Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector North Carolina's office is located in Wilmington, NC...

  10. 33 CFR 3.65-15 - Sector Columbia River Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.65-15 Section 3.65-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-15 Sector Columbia River Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Columbia River's office is located in Astoria...

  11. 33 CFR 3.05-20 - Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-20 Section 3.05-20 Navigation and Navigable... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-20 Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Southeastern New England's office is...

  12. 33 CFR 3.05-20 - Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-20 Section 3.05-20 Navigation and Navigable... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-20 Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Southeastern New England's office is...

  13. 33 CFR 3.55-15 - Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-15 Section 3.55-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eleventh Coast Guard District § 3.55-15 Sector San Diego Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector San Diego's office is located in San Diego, CA. The...

  14. 33 CFR 3.65-15 - Sector Columbia River Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.65-15 Section 3.65-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-15 Sector Columbia River Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Columbia River's office is located in Astoria...

  15. 33 CFR 3.05-35 - Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-35 Section 3.05-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-35 Sector Long Island Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Long Island Sound's office is located in New...

  16. 33 CFR 3.65-15 - Sector Columbia River Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.65-15 Section 3.65-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-15 Sector Columbia River Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Columbia River's office is located in Astoria...

  17. 33 CFR 3.05-20 - Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.05-20 Section 3.05-20 Navigation and Navigable... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES First Coast Guard District § 3.05-20 Sector Southeastern New England Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Southeastern New England's office is...

  18. 33 CFR 3.25-20 - Sector North Carolina Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.25-20 Section 3.25-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fifth Coast Guard District § 3.25-20 Sector North Carolina Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector North Carolina's office is located in Wilmington, NC...

  19. Beta-Zone parapapillary atrophy and the velocity of glaucoma progression.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christopher C; De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo V; Prata, Tiago S; Tello, Celso; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M

    2010-05-01

    Beta-Zone parapapillary atrophy (PPA) occurs more commonly in eyes with glaucoma. Rates of glaucomatous visual field (VF) progression in eyes with and without beta-zone PPA at the time of baseline assessment were compared. Retrospective, comparative study. Two hundred forty-five patients from the New York Glaucoma Progression Study. Subjects with glaucomatous optic neuropathy and repeatable VF loss were assessed for eligibility. Eyes with a Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II (HRT) examination, at least 5 visual field tests after the HRT in either eye, optic disc photographs, and <6 diopters of myopia were enrolled. beta-Zone PPA was defined as a region of chorioretinal atrophy with visible sclera and choroidal vessels adjacent to the optic disc. Global rates of VF progression were determined by automated pointwise linear regression analysis. Univariate analysis included age, gender, ethnicity, central corneal thickness (CCT), refractive error, baseline mean deviation, baseline intraocular pressure (IOP), mean IOP, IOP fluctuation, disc area, rim area, rim area-to-disc area ratio, beta-zone PPA area, beta-zone PPA area-to-disc area ratio, and presence or absence of beta-zone PPA. The relationship between beta-zone PPA and the rate and risk of glaucoma progression. Two hundred forty-five eyes of 245 patients (mean age, 69.6+/-12.3 years) were enrolled. The mean follow-up was 4.9+/-1.4 years and the mean number of VFs after HRT was 9.3+/-2.7. beta-Zone PPA was present in 146 eyes (65%). Eyes with beta-zone PPA progressed more rapidly (-0.84+/-0.8 dB/year) than eyes without it (-0.51+/-0.6 dB/year; P<0.01). Multivariate regression showed significant influence of mean IOP (hazard ratio [HR], 1.11; P<0.01), IOP fluctuation (HR, 1.17; P = 0.02), and presence of beta-zone PPA (HR, 2.59; P<0.01) on VF progression. Moderate (0.5-1.5 dB/year; P = 0.01) and fast (>1.5 dB/year; P = 0.08) global rates of progression occurred more commonly in eyes with beta-zone PPA than in eyes

  20. The habitable zone and extreme planetary orbits.

    PubMed

    Kane, Stephen R; Gelino, Dawn M

    2012-10-01

    The habitable zone for a given star describes the range of circumstellar distances from the star within which a planet could have liquid water on its surface, which depends upon the stellar properties. Here we describe the development of the habitable zone concept, its application to our own solar system, and its subsequent application to exoplanetary systems. We further apply this to planets in extreme eccentric orbits and show how they may still retain life-bearing properties depending upon the percentage of the total orbit which is spent within the habitable zone. Key Words: Extrasolar planets-Habitable zone-Astrobiology.

  1. Specialized zones of development in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors propose using the term "distal elongation zone" (DEZ) rather than "postmitotic isodiametric growth zone" to refer to the group of cells between the apical meristem and the elongation zone in plant roots. Reasons presented for the change are that the proposed DEZ includes many cells that are still dividing, most cells in the region are not isodiametric, and the pattern of cell expansion in this region varies with position in the region. Cells in the DEZ respond to gravistimulation, mechanical impedance, electrotropic stimulation, water stress, and auxin. Differences in gene expression patterns between DEZ cells and cells in the main elongation zone are noted.

  2. Type II universal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  3. Zebrin II compartmentation of the cerebellum in a basal insectivore, the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec Echinops telfairi

    PubMed Central

    Sillitoe, Roy V; Künzle, Heinz; Hawkes, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum is histologically uniform. However, underlying the simple laminar architecture is a complex arrangement of parasagittal stripes and transverse zones that can be revealed by the expression of zebrin II/aldolase C. The cerebellar cortex of rodents, for example, is organized into four transverse zones: anterior, central, posterior and nodular. Within the anterior and posterior zones, parasagittal stripes of Purkinje cells expressing zebrin II alternate with those that do not. Zonal boundaries appear to be independent of cerebellar lobulation. To explore this model further, and to broaden our understanding of the evolution of cerebellar patterning, zebrin II expression has been studied in the cerebellum of the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi), a basal insectivore with a lissiform cerebellum with only five lobules. Zebrin II expression in the tenrec reveals an array of four transverse zones as in rodents, two with homogeneous zebrin II expression, two further subdivided into stripes, that closely resembles the expression pattern described in other mammals. We conclude that a zone-and-stripe organization may be a common feature of the mammalian cerebellar vermis and hemispheres, and that zonal boundaries and cerebellar lobules and fissures form independently. PMID:14529046

  4. Evaluation of work zone speed limits : an objective and subjective analysis of work zones in Missouri.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-02-01

    This study objectively and subjectively examined speed characteristics and driver compliance with the posted speed limit : in Missouri work zones. The objective evaluation collected vehicle speeds from four work zones with different : configurations ...

  5. Synthesis of research on work zone delays and simplified application of QuickZone analysis tool.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to synthesize the latest information on work zone safety and management and identify case studies in which FHWAs decision support tool QuickZone or other appropriate analysis tools could be applied. The results ...

  6. The historical trend in float zone crystal diameters and power requirements for float zoned silicon crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The power needed to zone silicon crystals by radio frequency heating was analyzed. The heat loss mechanisms are examined. Curves are presented for power as a function of crystal diameter for commercial silicon zoning.

  7. Reductive dechlorination in recalcitrant sources of chloroethenes in the transition zone between aquifers and aquitards.

    PubMed

    Puigserver, Diana; Herrero, Jofre; Torres, Mònica; Cortés, Amparo; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Kuntze, Kevin; Parker, Beth L; Carmona, José M

    2016-09-01

    In the transition zone between aquifers and basal aquitards, the perchloroethene pools at an early time in their evolution are more recalcitrant than those elsewhere in the aquifer. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that the biodegradation of chloroethenes from aged pools (i.e., pools after decades of continuous groundwater flushing and dissolution) of perchloroethene is favored in the transition zone. A field site was selected where an aged pool exists at the bottom of a transition zone. Two boreholes were drilled to obtain sediment and groundwater samples to perform chemical, isotopic, molecular, and clone library analyses and microcosm experiments. The main results were as follows: (i) the transition zone is characterized by a high microbial richness; (ii) reductively dechlorinating microorganisms are present and partial reductive dechlorination coexists with denitrification, Fe and Mn reduction, and sulfate reduction; (iii) reductively dechlorinating microorganisms were also present in the zone of the aged pool; (v) the high concentrations of perchloroethene in this zone resulted in a decrease in microbial richness; (vi) however, the presence of fermenting microorganisms supplying electrons for the reductively dechlorinating microorganisms prevented the reductive dechlorination to be inhibited. These findings suggest that biostimulation and/or bioaugmentation could be applied to promote complete reductive dechlorination and to enhance the dissolution of more nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL).

  8. Probing the end of reionization with the near zones of z ≳ 6 QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Laura C.; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Puchwein, Ewald

    2015-11-01

    QSO near zones are an important probe of the ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z ˜ 6-7, at the end of reionization. We present here high-resolution cosmological 3D radiative transfer simulations of QSO environments for a wide range of host halo masses, 1010-12.5 M⊙. Our simulated near zones reproduce both the overall decrease of observed near-zone sizes at 6 < z < 7 and their scatter. The observable near-zone properties in our simulations depend only very weakly on the mass of the host halo. The size of the H II region expanding into the IGM is generally limited by (super-)Lyman Limit systems loosely associated with (low-mass) dark matter haloes. This leads to a strong dependence of near-zone size on direction and drives the large observed scatter. In the simulation centred on our most massive host halo, many sightlines show strong red damping wings even for initial volume averaged neutral hydrogen fractions as low as ˜10-3. For QSO lifetimes long enough to allow growth of the central supermassive black hole while optically bright, we can reproduce the observed near zone of ULAS J1120+0641 only with an IGM that is initially neutral. Our results suggest that larger samples of z > 7 QSOs will provide important constraints on the evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction and thus on how late reionization ends.

  9. Marine Group II Archaea, potentially important players in the global ocean carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Xie, Wei; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Marine Group (MG) I (currently known as Thaumarchaeota) and MG II Archaea were first reported over two decades ago. While significant progress has been made on MG I microbiology and ecology, the progress on MG II has been noticeably slower. The common understanding is that while MG I mainly function as chemolithoautotrophs and occur predominantly in the deep ocean, MG II reside mostly in the photic zone and live heterotrophically. Studies to date have shown that MG II are abundant in the marine aquatic environment and display great seasonal and spatial variation and phylogenetic diversity. They also show unique patterns of organic carbon degradation and their energy requirements may be augmented by light in the photic zone. However, no pure culture of MG II has been obtained and thus their precise ecological role remains elusive. PMID:26528260

  10. 77 FR 42176 - Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Detroit Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... fireworks launch site located at position 41-34'-18.10'' N, 082-51'-18.70'' W (NAD 83). This zone will be... fireworks launch site located at position 41-39'- 19'' N, 082-48'-57'' W (NAD 83). This zone will be...'' W (NAD 83). This zone will be enforced one evening during the first week in July. The safety zone...

  11. 77 FR 9528 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0087] Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Waterway Security Zone in Commencement Bay, Tacoma, Washington from 6 a.m. on February 17, 2012, through 11...

  12. 78 FR 57485 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0087] Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Security Zone in Commencement Bay, Tacoma, Washington from 6 a.m. on September 12, 2013 through 11:59 p.m...

  13. 78 FR 54588 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0087] Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Security Zone in Commencement Bay, Tacoma, Washington from 6:00 a.m. on September 2, 2013 through 11:59 p.m...

  14. 75 FR 50700 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, and Drawbridge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Morgan City--07-012 New Iberia, LO Safety Zones (Parts 147 and 10/2/2007 165). COTP Morgan City--07-014... Iberia, LO Safety Zones (Parts 147 and 10/11/2007 165). COTP San Francisco Bay 06-013 Carquinez Strait...-0043 Savannah, GA Security zones (Part 165)..... 1/24/2008 USCG-2008-0050 Atchafalaya Bay, LO...

  15. 77 FR 75559 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Event in Captain of the Port New York Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-1064] Safety Zone; Fireworks Event in Captain of the Port New York Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce a safety zone in the Captain of the Port New...

  16. 33 CFR 165.503 - Security Zone; Captain of the Port Hampton Roads Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Port Hampton Roads Zone. 165.503 Section 165.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... § 165.503 Security Zone; Captain of the Port Hampton Roads Zone. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  17. 33 CFR 165.503 - Security Zone; Captain of the Port Hampton Roads Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Port Hampton Roads Zone. 165.503 Section 165.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.503 Security Zone; Captain of the Port Hampton Roads Zone. (a) Definitions. As used in this... been authorized by the Captain of the Port (COTP), Hampton Roads, Virginia to act on his or her behalf...

  18. Seed zones and breeding zones for sugar pine in southwestern Oregon.

    Robert K. Campbell; Albert I. Sugano

    1987-01-01

    Provisional seed zones and breeding zones were developed for sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Dougl.) in southwestern Oregon. Zones are based on a map of genetic variation patterns obtained by evaluating genotypes of trees from 142 locations in the region. Genotypes controlling growth vigor and growth rhythm were assessed in a common garden. Within...

  19. 78 FR 25410 - Safety Zone; Tall Ship Safety Zones; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration, Great Lakes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0192] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Tall Ship Safety Zones; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration, Great Lakes AGENCY... 2013 and the War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration. These safety zones will ensure the safety of...

  20. 76 FR 41073 - Security Zones; Sector Southeastern New England Captain of the Port Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    .... ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing security zones around cruise ships in the... creates security zones for all navigable waters around certain cruise ships in the Southeastern New... temporary security zone regulation in Sec. 165.T01-0864. On April 5, 2011, we published a notice of proposed...

  1. 75 FR 63714 - Security Zone: Passenger Vessels, Sector Southeastern New England Captain of the Port Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ..., in the aggregate, or by the private sector of $100,000,000 (adjusted for inflation) or more in any... Security Zone: Passenger Vessels, Sector Southeastern New England Captain of the Port Zone AGENCY: Coast... moving security zones around passenger vessels in the Sector Southeastern New England Captain of the Port...

  2. 75 FR 21990 - Safety Zone; Extended Debris Removal in the Lake Champlain Bridge Construction Zone (Between...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Extended Debris Removal in the Lake Champlain Bridge Construction Zone (Between... surrounding the Lake Champlain Bridge construction zone between Chimney Point, VT and Crown Point, NY. This... of debris from the old Crown Point bridge demolition. The debris must be cleared from the navigable...

  3. Seed zones for maintaining adapted plant populations

    J. Bradley St. Clair; G. Randy Johnson; Vicky J. Erickson; Richard C. Johnson; Nancy L. Shaw

    2007-01-01

    Seed zones delineate areas within which plant materials can be transferred with little risk that they will be poorly adapted to their new location. They ensure successful restoration and revegetation, and help maintain the integrity of natural genetic structure. The value of seed zones is recognized in numerous policy statements from federal and state agencies. Results...

  4. Generalized provisional seed zones for native plants

    Andrew D. Bower; J. Bradley St.Clair; Vicky Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Deploying well-adapted and ecologically appropriate plant materials is a core component of successful restoration projects. We have developed generalized provisional seed zones that can be applied to any plant species in the United States to help guide seed movement. These seed zones are based on the intersection of high-resolution climatic data for winter minimum...

  5. 78 FR 15883 - Standard Time Zone Boundaries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ...] RIN 2105-AE20 Standard Time Zone Boundaries AGENCY: Office of the Secretary (OST), Department of... time zone boundaries regulations to reflect changes that Congress made to the Uniform Time Act. The... has made several amendments to the Uniform Time Act, 15 U.S.C. 260-267. Consequently, the Department's...

  6. Stabilization of a salamander moving hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Visser, Michaël; de Leeuw, Maarten; Zuiderwijk, Annie; Arntzen, Jan W

    2017-01-01

    When related species meet upon postglacial range expansion, hybrid zones are frequently formed. Theory predicts that such zones may move over the landscape until equilibrium conditions are reached. One hybrid zone observed to be moving in historical times (1950-1979) is that of the pond-breeding salamanders Triturus cristatus and Triturus marmoratus in western France. We identified the ecological correlates of the species hybrid zone as elevation, forestation, and hedgerows favoring the more terrestrial T. marmoratus and pond density favoring the more aquatic T. cristatus . The past movement of the zone of ca. 30 km over three decades has probably been driven by the drastic postwar reduction of the "bocage" hedgerow landscape, favoring T. cristatus over T. marmoratus . No further hybrid zone movement was observed from 1979 to the present. To explain the changing dynamics of the hybrid zone, we propose that it stalled, either because an equilibrium was found at an altitude of ca. 140 m a.s.l. or due to pond loss and decreased population densities. While we cannot rule out the former explanation, we found support for the latter. Under agricultural intensification, ponds in the study area are lost at an unprecedented rate of 5.5% per year, so that remaining Triturus populations are increasingly isolated, hampering dispersal and further hybrid zone movement.

  7. A broader classification of damage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Dimmen, V.; Rotevatn, A.; Sanderson, D. J.

    2017-09-01

    Damage zones have previously been classified in terms of their positions at fault tips, walls or areas of linkage, with the latter being described in terms of sub-parallel and synchronously active faults. We broaden the idea of linkage to include structures around the intersections of non-parallel and/or non-synchronous faults. These interaction damage zones can be divided into approaching damage zones, where the faults kinematically interact but are not physically connected, and intersection damage zones, where the faults either abut or cross-cut. The damage zone concept is applied to other settings in which strain or displacement variations are taken up by a range of structures, such as at fault bends. It is recommended that a prefix can be added to a wide range of damage zones, to describe the locations in which they formed, e.g., approaching, intersection and fault bend damage zone. Such interpretations are commonly based on limited knowledge of the 3D geometries of the structures, such as from exposure surfaces, and there may be spatial variations. For example, approaching faults and related damage seen in outcrop may be intersecting elsewhere on the fault planes. Dilation in intersection damage zones can represent narrow and localised channels for fluid flow, and such dilation can be influenced by post-faulting stress patterns.

  8. EPA Region 1 No Discharge Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This dataset details No Discharge Zones (NDZ) for New England. Boaters may not discharge waste into these areas. Boundaries were determined mostly by Federal Register Environmental Documents in coordination with Massachusetts Coastal Zone Management (MA CZM) and EPA Region 1 Office of Ecosystem Protection (OEP) staff.

  9. 46 CFR 76.25-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkling System, Details § 76.25-5 Zoning. (a) The automatic sprinkling system shall be divided into separate... more than 250 sprinkler heads. (c) The sprinkling zone may cover more than one deck, in which case, the...

  10. 46 CFR 76.25-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkling System, Details § 76.25-5 Zoning. (a) The automatic sprinkling system shall be divided into separate... more than 250 sprinkler heads. (c) The sprinkling zone may cover more than one deck, in which case, the...

  11. 46 CFR 76.25-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkling System, Details § 76.25-5 Zoning. (a) The automatic sprinkling system shall be divided into separate... more than 250 sprinkler heads. (c) The sprinkling zone may cover more than one deck, in which case, the...

  12. 46 CFR 76.25-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkling System, Details § 76.25-5 Zoning. (a) The automatic sprinkling system shall be divided into separate... more than 250 sprinkler heads. (c) The sprinkling zone may cover more than one deck, in which case, the...

  13. 46 CFR 76.25-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkling System, Details § 76.25-5 Zoning. (a) The automatic sprinkling system shall be divided into separate... more than 250 sprinkler heads. (c) The sprinkling zone may cover more than one deck, in which case, the...

  14. Interactive Map | USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map

    Choose Basemap: Terrain Road Map Satellite Image Turn on Basemap Roads and Labels Zone Color Transparency menu to switch between Terrain, Road Map, and Satellite Image. Turn on Basemap Roads and Labels Click option is available only for Terrain and Satellite Image basemap choices. Zone Color Transparency The

  15. Efforts to update firefighter safety zone guidelines

    Bret Butler

    2009-01-01

    One of the most critical decisions made on wildland fires is the identification of suitable safety zones for firefighters during daily fire management operations. To be effective (timely, repeatable, and accurate), these decisions rely on good training and judgment, but also on clear, concise guidelines. This article is a summary of safety zone guidelines and the...

  16. What's New | USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map

    water may provide milder winter weather and be in a warmer zone. Climate Change Climate changes are year), changes in zones are not reliable evidence of whether there has been global warming. Compared a result of a more recent averaging period (1974-1986 vs. 1976-2005). However, some of the changes

  17. Nature, Humans, and the Coastal Zone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, H. Jesse

    1990-01-01

    Considers the interface of humans and seacoasts over time. Explains how coastal zones are formed and human attempts to defend against sea level changes. Charts the percentage of major world cities that also are ports. Postulates how the greenhouse effect could influence sea level, examining potential human responses to changes in coastal zones.…

  18. 33 CFR 2.28 - Contiguous zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contiguous zone. 2.28 Section 2.28 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL JURISDICTION Jurisdictional Terms § 2.28 Contiguous zone. (a) For the purposes of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33...

  19. 33 CFR 165.30 - Security zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security zones. 165.30 Section 165.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Security Zones § 165.30...

  20. 33 CFR 165.30 - Security zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security zones. 165.30 Section 165.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Security Zones § 165.30...

  1. 33 CFR 165.30 - Security zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security zones. 165.30 Section 165.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Security Zones § 165.30...

  2. 33 CFR 165.30 - Security zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security zones. 165.30 Section 165.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Security Zones § 165.30...

  3. 46 CFR 76.35-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-5 Zoning. (a) The zoning of the manual alarm system shall meet the same requirements as for the electric fire detecting system, § 76.27-5. (b) [Reserved] ...

  4. 46 CFR 76.35-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-5 Zoning. (a) The zoning of the manual alarm system shall meet the same requirements as for the electric fire detecting system, § 76.27-5. (b) [Reserved] ...

  5. 46 CFR 76.35-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-5 Zoning. (a) The zoning of the manual alarm system shall meet the same requirements as for the electric fire detecting system, § 76.27-5. (b) [Reserved] ...

  6. 46 CFR 76.35-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-5 Zoning. (a) The zoning of the manual alarm system shall meet the same requirements as for the electric fire detecting system, § 76.27-5. (b) [Reserved] ...

  7. 46 CFR 76.35-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Manual Alarm System, Details § 76.35-5 Zoning. (a) The zoning of the manual alarm system shall meet the same requirements as for the electric fire detecting system, § 76.27-5. (b) [Reserved] ...

  8. Evaluation of work zone enhancement software programs.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-09-01

    The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) is looking for software tools that can assist in : developing effective plans to manage and communicate work zone activities. QuickZone, CA4PRS, : VISSIM, and Spreadsheet models are the tools that MoD...

  9. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  10. Future float zone development in industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandfort, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The present industrial requirements for float zone silicon are summarized. Developments desired by the industry in the future are reported. The five most significant problems faced today by the float zone crystal growth method in industry are discussed. They are economic, large diameter, resistivity uniformity, control of carbon, and swirl defects.

  11. Work Zone Intrusion Report Interface Design

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-02-02

    While necessary for roadways, work zones present a safety risk to crew. Half of road workers deaths between 2005 and 2010 were due to collisions with motorists intruding on the work zone. Therefore, addressing intrusions is an important step for ensu...

  12. Work zone performance measures pilot test.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-01

    Currently, a well-defined and validated set of metrics to use in monitoring work zone performance do not : exist. This pilot test was conducted to assist state DOTs in identifying what work zone performance : measures can and should be targeted, what...

  13. Zone edge effects with variable rate irrigation

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems may offer solutions to enhance water use efficiency by addressing variability within a field. However, the design of VRI systems should be considered to maximize application uniformity within sprinkler zones, while minimizing edge effects between such zones alo...

  14. 78 FR 44014 - Safety Zones; Tall Ship Safety Zones; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration, Great Lakes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    .... LAWRENCE II, UNICORN, and the WINDY. The Ninth District Commander has determined that the War of 1812..., PEACEMAKER, PLAYFAIR, PRIDE OF BALTIMORE II, RED WITCH, SORLANDET, ST. LAWRENCE II, UNICORN, and the WINDY...

  15. Terrestrial Zone Exoplanets and Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Brenda

    2018-01-01

    One of the most exciting results from ALMA has been the detection of significant substructure within protoplanetary disks that can be linked to planet formation processes. For the first time, we are able to observe the process of assembly of material into larger bodies within such disks. It is not possible, however, for ALMA to probe the growth of planets in protoplanetary disks at small radii, i.e., in the terrestrial zone, where we expect rocky terrestrial planets to form. In this regime, the optical depths prohibit observation at the high frequencies observed by ALMA. To probe the effects of planet building processes and detect telltale gaps and signatures of planetary mass bodies at such small separations from the parent star, we require a facility of superior resolution and sensitivity at lower frequencies. The ngVLA is just such a facility. We will present the fundamental science that will be enabled by the ngVLA in protoplanetary disk structure and the formation of planets. In addition, we will discuss the potential for an ngVLA facility to detect the molecules that are the building blocks of life, reaching limits well beyond those reachable with the current generation of telescopes, and also to determine whether such planets will be habitable based on studies of the impact of stars on their nearest planetary neighbours.

  16. Chaotic Zones around Rotating Small Bodies

    SciT

    Lages, José; Shevchenko, Ivan I.; Shepelyansky, Dima L., E-mail: jose.lages@utinam.cnrs.fr

    Small bodies of the solar system, like asteroids, trans-Neptunian objects, cometary nuclei, and planetary satellites, with diameters smaller than 1000 km usually have irregular shapes, often resembling dumb-bells or contact binaries. The spinning of such a gravitating dumb-bell creates around it a zone of chaotic orbits. We determine its extent analytically and numerically. We find that the chaotic zone swells significantly if the rotation rate is decreased; in particular, the zone swells more than twice if the rotation rate is decreased 10 times with respect to the “centrifugal breakup” threshold. We illustrate the properties of the chaotic orbital zones in examples ofmore » the global orbital dynamics about asteroid 243 Ida (which has a moon, Dactyl, orbiting near the edge of the chaotic zone) and asteroid 25143 Itokawa.« less

  17. UV Habitable Zones Further Constrain Possible Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Where should we search for life in the universe? Habitable zones are traditionallydetermined based on the possibility of liquid water existing on a planet but ultraviolet (UV) radiation also plays a key role.The UV Habitable ZoneSchematic showing how the traditional habitable zones location and width changes around different types of stars. The UV habitable zone also hasdifferent locations and widths depending on the mass and metallicity of the star. [NASA/Kepler Mission/Dana Berry]Besides the presence of liquid water, there are other things life may need to persist. For life as we know it, one important elementis moderate UV radiation: if a planet receives too little UV flux, many biological compounds cant be synthesized. If it receives too much, however, then terrestrial biological systems (e.g. DNA) can be damaged.To determinethe most likely place to findpersistent life, we should therefore look for the region where a stars traditional habitable zone, within which liquid water is possible, overlaps with its UV habitable zone, within which the UV flux is at the right level to support life.Relationship between the stellar mass and location of the boundaries of the traditional and UV habitable zones for a solar-metallicity star. din and dout denote inner and outer boundaries, respectively. ZAMS and TMS denote when the star joins and leaves the main sequence, respectively. The traditional and UV habitable zones overlap only for stars of 11.5 solar masses. [Adapted from Oishi and Kamaya 2016]Looking for OverlapIn a recent study, two scientists from the National Defense Academy of Japan, Midori Oishi and Hideyuki Kamaya, explored howthe location of this UV habitable zone and that of its overlap with the traditional habitable zone might be affected by a stars mass and metallicity.Oishi and Kamaya developed a simple evolutional model of the UV habitable zone in stars in the mass range of 0.084 solar masses with metallicities of roughly solar metallicity (Z=0.02), a

  18. Trading Zones in Early Modern Europe.

    PubMed

    Long, Pamela O

    2015-12-01

    This essay adopts the concept of trading zones first developed for the history of science by Peter Galison and redefines it for the early modern period. The term "trading zones" is used to mean arenas in which substantive and reciprocal communication occurred between individuals who were artisanally trained and learned (university-trained) individuals. Such trading zones proliferated in the sixteenth century. They tended to arise in certain kinds of places and not in others, but their existence must be determined empirically. The author's work on trading zones differs from the ideas of Edgar Zilsel, who emphasized the influence of artisans on the scientific revolution. In contrast, in this essay, the mutual influence of artisans and the learned on each other is stressed, and translation is used as a modality that was important to communication within trading zones.

  19. [Variability of vegetation growth season in different latitudinal zones of North China: a monitoring by NOAA NDVI and MSAVI].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Li, Xiaobing; Han, Ruibo; Ge, Yongqin

    2006-12-01

    In this study, North China was latitudinally divided into five zones, i.e., 32 degrees - 36 degrees N (Zone I), 36 degrees - 40 degrees N (Zone II), 40 degrees - 44 degrees N (Zone III), 44 degrees - 48 degrees N (Zone IV) and 48 degrees - 52 degrees N (Zone V), and the NOAA/ AVHRR NDVI and MSAVI time-series images from 1982 to 1999 were smoothed with Savitzky-Golay filter algorithm. Based on the EOF analysis, the principal components of NDVI and MSAVI for the vegetations in different latitudinal zones of North China were extracted, the annual beginning and ending dates and the length of growth season in 1982 - 1999 were estimated, and the related parameters were linearly fitted, aimed to analyze the variability of vegetation growth season. The results showed that the beginning date of the growth season in different zones tended to be advanced, while the ending date tended to be postponed with increasing latitude. The length of the growth season was also prolonged, with the prolonging time exceeded 10 days.

  20. Microbial mineral colonization across a subsurface redox transition zone

    DOE PAGES

    Converse, Brandon J.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; ...

    2015-08-28

    Here our study employed 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing to examine the hypothesis that chemolithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) would preferentially colonize the Fe(II)-bearing mineral biotite compared to quartz sand when the minerals were incubated in situ within a subsurface redox transition zone (RTZ) at the Hanford 300 Area site in Richland, WA, USA. The work was motivated by the recently documented presence of neutral-pH chemolithotrophic FeOB capable of oxidizing structural Fe(II) in primary silicate and secondary phyllosilicate minerals in 300 Area sediments and groundwater (Benzine et al., 2013). Sterilized portions of sand+biotite or sand alone were incubated in situ formore » 5 months within a multilevel sampling (MLS) apparatus that spanned a ca. 2-m interval across the RTZ in two separate groundwater wells. Parallel MLS measurements of aqueous geochemical species were performed prior to deployment of the minerals. Contrary to expectations, the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed no significant difference in microbial communities that colonized the sand+biotite vs. sand-only deployments. Both mineral-associated and groundwater communities were dominated by heterotrophic taxa, with organisms from the Pseudomonadaceae accounting for up to 70% of all reads from the colonized minerals. These results are consistent with previous results indicating the capacity for heterotrophic metabolism (including anaerobic metabolism below the RTZ) as well as the predominance of heterotrophic taxa within 300 Area sediments and groundwater. Although heterotrophic organisms clearly dominated the colonized minerals, several putative lithotrophic (NH 4 +, H 2, Fe(II), and HS - oxidizing) taxa were detected in significant abundance above and within the RTZ. Such organisms may play a role in the coupling of anaerobic microbial metabolism to oxidative pathways with attendant impacts on elemental cycling and redox-sensitive contaminant behavior in the vicinity of the

  1. Complications at the Proximal Landing Zone of Endovascular Stent Grafts Deployed in Surgically Replaced Ascending Aorta.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Vamshi K; Herget, Eric J; Appoo, Jehangir J

    2016-11-01

    The ascending aorta, with its hostile angulations and forces, is the next frontier in the evolution of endovascular surgery. Type II hybrid arch repair, involving surgical replacement of the ascending aorta, arch debranching, and stent graft deployment in the ascending aortic graft, offers an opportunity to study the behavior of an endovascular prosthesis in the ascending aorta. We report complications seen at the proximal landing zone after type II hybrid arch repair. A dedicated imaging protocol was used to monitor 20 consecutive patients who underwent type II hybrid arch repair at a single center from June 2009 to July 2014. Mean age was 66 years (range, 47 to 82 years). Mean imaging follow-up was 34 months (range, 12 to 64 months). There was 1 operative death (5%). Bird beaking (>5 mm of nonapposition) of the stent graft at the proximal landing zone occurred in 12 patients, and >20 mm of bird beaking occurred in 7 patients. Proximal landing zone complications occurred in 4 patients (20%), comprising 2 type Ia endoleaks, 1 graft migration, and 1 graft infolding detected on postoperative days 4, 11, 5, and 755, respectively. Three patients underwent endovascular reintervention for proximal landing zone complications. There were no late deaths. Thoracic aortic stent grafts may be prone to proximal landing zone complications when deployed in the ascending aorta. Bird beaking is common when endografts are deployed in the Dacron (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) ascending aorta. Angulation issues will likely need to be overcome by stent graft refinement to enable future closed chest approaches to the ascending aorta. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Western Shallow Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California:

    SciT

    Carey, K.B.

    1987-09-01

    The general Reservoir Study of the Western Shallow Oil Zone was prepared by Evans, Carey and Crozier as Task Assignment 009 with the United States Department of Energy. This study, Appendix II addresses the first Wilhelm Sands and its sub unites and pools. Basic pressure, production and assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made by Evans, Carey and Crozier for independent verification. This study has identified the petrophysical properties and the past productive performance of the reservoir. Primary reserves have beenmore » determined and general means of enhancing future recovery have been suggested. It is hoped that this volume can now additionally serve as a take off point for exploitation engineers to develop specific programs toward the end.« less

  3. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    in 2013: Electromagnetic Environments and Effects and Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance . Reliability Growth Testing started in June...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 SDB II December 2013 SAR April 16, 2014 17:24:29...Framework EMC - Electromagnetic Compatibility EMI - Electromagnetic Interference GESP - GIG Enterprise Service Profiles GIG - Global Information Grid i.e

  4. ASDIR-II. Volume II. Program Description

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    in ASDIR. INPUT: Engine description, gas properties and case definition (See ASDIR-II, Volume I, User’s Manual). OIWPUT: Primarily the information...conditions Special surface cooling flow conditions Exhaust system surface properties The predictions provided by the progi un for the combination of a...nonattenuated by the atmosphere Optional exhaust system information which can be requested from the program is: Internal fluid flow properties Surface

  5. 19 CFR 146.44 - Zone-restricted status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zone-restricted status. 146.44 Section 146.44... TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Status of Merchandise in a Zone § 146.44 Zone-restricted status. (a) General. Merchandise taken into a zone for the sole purpose of exportation, destruction (except...

  6. 49 CFR 71.12 - Hawaii-Aleutian zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii-Aleutian zone. 71.12 Section 71.12 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.12 Hawaii-Aleutian zone. The seventh zone, the Hawaii-Aleutian standard time zone, includes the entire State of Hawaii and...

  7. TUM Critical Zone Observatory, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völkel, Jörg; Eden, Marie

    2014-05-01

    Founded 2011 the TUM Critical Zone Observatory run by the Technische Universität München and partners abroad is the first CZO within Germany. TUM CZO is both, a scientific as well as an education project. It is a watershed based observatory, but moving behind this focus. In fact, two mountainous areas are integrated: (1) The Ammer Catchment area as an alpine and pre alpine research area in the northern limestone Alps and forelands south of Munich; (2) the Otter Creek Catchment in the Bavarian Forest with a crystalline setting (Granite, Gneiss) as a mid mountainous area near Regensburg; and partly the mountainous Bavarian Forest National Park. The Ammer Catchment is a high energy system as well as a sensitive climate system with past glacial elements. The lithology shows mostly carbonates from Tertiary and Mesozoic times (e.g. Flysch). Source-to-sink processes are characteristic for the Ammer Catchment down to the last glacial Ammer Lake as the regional erosion and deposition base. The consideration of distal depositional environments, the integration of upstream and downstream landscape effects are characteristic for the Ammer Catchment as well. Long term datasets exist in many regards. The Otter Creek catchment area is developed in a granitic environment, rich in saprolites. As a mid mountainous catchment the energy system is facing lower stage. Hence, it is ideal comparing both of them. Both TUM CZO Catchments: The selected catchments capture the depositional environment. Both catchment areas include historical impacts and rapid land use change. Crosscutting themes across both sites are inbuilt. Questions of ability to capture such gradients along climosequence, chronosequence, anthroposequence are essential.

  8. GOJJAM ZONE, WESTERN AMHARA, ETHIOPIA.

    PubMed

    Andualem, Mulusew

    2016-07-01

    Female genital mutilation is one of the harmful traditional practices among women and girls. More than 130 million girls and women live today who have undergone female genital mutilation. In Ethiopia, a high prevalence (74.3% national and 68.5% in Amhara region) has been reported. This study was aimed to identify determinant factors of female genital mutilation practices in East Gojjam Zone, Western Amhara, Ethiopia community based cross sectional study was conducted among 730 women aged 15-49 years and having children < 5 years old in September, 2014. Data were collected using a pretested interviewer administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to describe study objectives, and bivariate and multivariate analysis to identify determinant factors to female genital mutilation. 718 women and 805 daughters participated in the study. FGM prevalence was 689 (96%) and 403 (49%) among women and daughters< 5 years of age, respectively. Type1 and type 2 FGMs were common and daughters <1 years of age exhibited 91% female genital mutilation. Daughters' age, parent education level, residence, women circumcision history, culture, health education, frequent health extension workers follow up and participation in anti FGM interventions were risk factors to female genital mutilation practice. Female genital mutilation practices continues to be a major problem to women and daughter <5 years of age in the study area. A number of factors were associated with FGM practices including daughters’ age, parent education level, residence, health education, culture, mothers circumcision history, frequent health extensions workers follow up and participation in anti FGM interventions were determinants to higher FGM practices.

  9. A Volcanic Hydrogen Habitable Zone

    SciT

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa, E-mail: rmr277@cornell.edu

    The classical habitable zone (HZ) is the circular region around a star in which liquid water could exist on the surface of a rocky planet. The outer edge of the traditional N{sub 2}–CO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O HZ extends out to nearly ∼1.7 au in our solar system, beyond which condensation and scattering by CO{sub 2} outstrips its greenhouse capacity. Here, we show that volcanic outgassing of atmospheric H{sub 2} can extend the outer edge of the HZ to ∼2.4 au in our solar system. This wider volcanic-hydrogen HZ (N{sub 2}–CO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O–H{sub 2}) can be sustained as long as volcanic H{submore » 2} output offsets its escape from the top of the atmosphere. We use a single-column radiative-convective climate model to compute the HZ limits of this volcanic hydrogen HZ for hydrogen concentrations between 1% and 50%, assuming diffusion-limited atmospheric escape. At a hydrogen concentration of 50%, the effective stellar flux required to support the outer edge decreases by ∼35%–60% for M–A stars. The corresponding orbital distances increase by ∼30%–60%. The inner edge of this HZ only moves out ∼0.1%–4% relative to the classical HZ because H{sub 2} warming is reduced in dense H{sub 2}O atmospheres. The atmospheric scale heights of such volcanic H{sub 2} atmospheres near the outer edge of the HZ also increase, facilitating remote detection of atmospheric signatures.« less

  10. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  11. Comparing two-zone models of dust exposure.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachael M; Simmons, Catherine E; Boelter, Fred W

    2011-09-01

    The selection and application of mathematical models to work tasks is challenging. Previously, we developed and evaluated a semi-empirical two-zone model that predicts time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations (Ctwa) of dust emitted during the sanding of drywall joint compound. Here, we fit the emission rate and random air speed variables of a mechanistic two-zone model to testing event data and apply and evaluate the model using data from two field studies. We found that the fitted random air speed values and emission rate were sensitive to (i) the size of the near-field and (ii) the objective function used for fitting, but this did not substantially impact predicted dust Ctwa. The mechanistic model predictions were lower than the semi-empirical model predictions and measured respirable dust Ctwa at Site A but were within an acceptable range. At Site B, a 10.5 m3 room, the mechanistic model did not capture the observed difference between PBZ and area Ctwa. The model predicted uniform mixing and predicted dust Ctwa up to an order of magnitude greater than was measured. We suggest that applications of the mechanistic model be limited to contexts where the near-field volume is very small relative to the far-field volume.

  12. Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II

    MedlinePlus

    Sipple syndrome; MEN II; Pheochromocytoma - MEN II; Thyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma; Parathyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma ... The cause of MEN II is a defect in a gene called RET. This defect causes many tumors to appear in the same ...

  13. Defining the Fresnel zone for broadband radiation.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Jeremy; Mittleman, Daniel

    2002-11-01

    The concept of the Fresnel zone is central to many areas of imaging. In tomographic imaging, the transverse spatial resolution can be limited by the size of the first Fresnel zone, usually defined only for monochromatic radiation. With the increasing prevalence of broadband tomographic imaging systems, a generalization of this concept is required. Here, a proposed generalization is described in the context of femtosecond optics, and experimentally verified using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Based on this definition, a simple zone plate design is demonstrated.

  14. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOEpatents

    Schiffbauer, William H.; Ganoe, Carl W.

    1999-01-01

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  15. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOEpatents

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1999-08-17

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

  16. Ionized gas at the edge of the central molecular zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.; Velusamy, T.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The edge of the central molecular zone (CMZ) is the location where massive dense molecular clouds with large internal velocity dispersions transition to the surrounding more quiescent and lower CO emissivity region of the Galaxy. Little is known about the ionized gas surrounding the molecular clouds and in the transition region. Aims: We determine the properties of the ionized gas at the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E using observations of N+ and C+. Methods: We observed a small portion of the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E with spectrally resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine structure lines at six positions with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA and in [C ii] using Herschel HIFI on-the-fly strip maps. We use the [N ii] spectra along with a radiative transfer model to calculate the electron density of the gas and the [C ii] maps to illuminate the morphology of the ionized gas and model the column density of CO-dark H2. Results: We detect two [C ii] and [N ii] velocity components, one along the line of sight to a CO molecular cloud at - 207 km s-1 associated with Sgr E and the other at -174 km s-1 outside the edge of another CO cloud. From the [N ii] emission we find that the average electron density is in the range of ~5 to 21 cm-3 for these features. This electron density is much higher than that of the disk's warm ionized medium, but is consistent with densities determined for bright diffuse H ii nebula. The column density of the CO-dark H2 layer in the -207 km s-1 cloud is ~1-2 × 1021 cm-2 in agreement with theoretical models. The CMZ extends further out in Galactic radius by ~7 to 14 pc in ionized gas than it does in molecular gas traced by CO. Conclusions: The edge of the CMZ likely contains dense hot ionized gas surrounding the neutral molecular material. The high fractional abundance of N+ and high electron density require an intense EUV field with a photon flux of order 106 to 107 photons cm-2 s-1, and/or efficient proton charge exchange with

  17. 33 CFR 3.35-40 - Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-40 Section 3.35-40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-40 Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone...

  18. 33 CFR 3.35-10 - Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-10 Section 3.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-10 Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and...

  19. 33 CFR 3.40-10 - Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.40-10 Section 3.40-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eighth Coast Guard District § 3.40-10 Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and...

  20. 33 CFR 3.40-10 - Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.40-10 Section 3.40-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eighth Coast Guard District § 3.40-10 Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and...

  1. 33 CFR 3.35-40 - Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-40 Section 3.35-40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-40 Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone...

  2. 33 CFR 3.40-10 - Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.40-10 Section 3.40-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eighth Coast Guard District § 3.40-10 Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and...

  3. 33 CFR 3.85-15 - Sector Anchorage: Western Alaska Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine Safety Unit Valdez: Prince William Sound Marine Inspection and Captain of the Port Zones. 3.85-15 Section 3.85-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventeenth Coast Guard District § 3.85-15 Sector Anchorage...

  4. 33 CFR 3.85-15 - Sector Anchorage: Western Alaska Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine Safety Unit Valdez: Prince William Sound Marine Inspection and Captain of the Port Zones. 3.85-15 Section 3.85-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventeenth Coast Guard District § 3.85-15 Sector Anchorage...

  5. 33 CFR 3.35-10 - Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-10 Section 3.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-10 Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and...

  6. 33 CFR 3.35-40 - Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-40 Section 3.35-40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-40 Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone...

  7. 33 CFR 3.85-15 - Sector Anchorage: Western Alaska Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine Safety Unit Valdez: Prince William Sound Marine Inspection and Captain of the Port Zones. 3.85-15 Section 3.85-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventeenth Coast Guard District § 3.85-15 Sector Anchorage...

  8. 33 CFR 3.35-10 - Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-10 Section 3.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-10 Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and...

  9. 33 CFR 3.40-10 - Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.40-10 Section 3.40-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eighth Coast Guard District § 3.40-10 Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and...

  10. 33 CFR 3.85-15 - Sector Anchorage: Western Alaska Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine Safety Unit Valdez: Prince William Sound Marine Inspection and Captain of the Port Zones. 3.85-15 Section 3.85-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventeenth Coast Guard District § 3.85-15 Sector Anchorage...

  11. 33 CFR 3.85-15 - Sector Anchorage: Western Alaska Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zones; Marine Safety Unit Valdez: Prince William Sound Marine Inspection and Captain of the Port Zones. 3.85-15 Section 3.85-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters... INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventeenth Coast Guard District § 3.85-15 Sector Anchorage...

  12. 33 CFR 3.35-10 - Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-10 Section 3.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-10 Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and...

  13. 33 CFR 3.35-40 - Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-40 Section 3.35-40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-40 Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone...

  14. 33 CFR 3.35-40 - Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-40 Section 3.35-40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-40 Sector Key West Marine Inspection Zone...

  15. 33 CFR 3.65-15 - Sector Portland Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.65-15 Section 3.65-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-15 Sector Portland Marine Inspection Zone...

  16. 33 CFR 3.35-10 - Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.35-10 Section 3.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-10 Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and...

  17. 33 CFR 3.40-10 - Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.40-10 Section 3.40-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Eighth Coast Guard District § 3.40-10 Sector Mobile Marine Inspection Zone and...

  18. SAGE II V7

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-09-06

    ... The series of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE I, II, and III) are satellite-based solar occultation ... significantly more shortwave radiation than previously thought. Clouds in a Clear Sky Scientists have detected a nearly ...

  19. Digital optical computer II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilfoyle, Peter S.; Stone, Richard V.

    1991-12-01

    OptiComp is currently completing a 32-bit, fully programmable digital optical computer (DOC II) that is designed to operate in a UNIX environment running RISC microcode. OptiComp's DOC II architecture is focused toward parallel microcode implementation where data is input in a dual rail format. By exploiting the physical principals inherent to optics (speed and low power consumption), an architectural balance of optical interconnects and software code efficiency can be achieved including high fan-in and fan-out. OptiComp's DOC II program is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO), NASA space station group and Rome Laboratory (USAF). This paper not only describes the motivational basis behind DOC II but also provides an optical overview and architectural summary of the device that allows the emulation of any digital instruction set.

  20. Proton Improvement Plan II

    SciT

    Fermilab

    Fermilab's Proton Improvement Plan II will generate the world’s most powerful high-energy neutrino beam for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and position Fermilab as the world leader in accelerator-based neutrino research.