Science.gov

Sample records for zone liquefied natural

  1. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.110 Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas... ahead and one mile astern, and 500 yards on each side of any liquefied natural gas carrier (LNGC) vessel...

  2. 33 CFR 165.502 - Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. 165.502 Section 165.502 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.502 Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas...

  3. 33 CFR 165.502 - Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. 165.502 Section 165.502 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.502 Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. 165.1709 Section...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a...

  8. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this section...

  9. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this section...

  10. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this section...

  11. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this section...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... navigable waters within a 1000-yard radius of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tankers during their inbound... Natural Gas tankers while they are moored at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″ N and 151°24′10″ W. (b...

  13. Liquefied Natural Gas Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Chicago Bridge & Iron Company's tanks and associated piping are parts of system for transferring liquefied natural gas from ship to shore and storing it. LNG is a "cryogenic" fluid meaning that it must be contained and transferred at very low temperatures, about 260 degrees below Fahrenheit. Before the LNG can be pumped from the ship to the storage tanks, the two foot diameter transfer pipes must be cooled in order to avoid difficulties associated with sharp differences of temperature between the supercold fluid and relatively warm pipes. Cooldown is accomplished by sending small steady flow of the cryogenic substance through the pipeline; the rate of flow must be precisely controlled or the transfer line will be subjected to undesirable thermal stress.

  14. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a tank vessel as liquefied petroleum gas, liquefied natural gas, or similar liquefied gas products... Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1151 Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro... the sea floor, within a 500 yard radius around any liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) tank vessel that is...

  15. Bibliography on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordin, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    Approximately 600 citations concerning safety of liquefied natural gas and liquid methane are presented. Each entry includes the title, author, abstract, source, description of figures, key references, and major descriptors for retrieving the document. An author index is provided as well as an index of descriptors.

  16. Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook, The

    EIA Publications

    2003-01-01

    The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook was undertaken to characterize the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market and to examine recent trends and future prospects in the LNG market.

  17. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) market and Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Firoz; Alam, Quamrul; Reza, Suman; Khurshid-ul-Alam, S. M.; Saleque, Khondkar; Ahsan, Saifuddin

    2017-06-01

    As low carbon-emitting fossil fuel, the natural gas is mainly used for power generation and industrial applications. It is also used for heating and cooling in commercial and residential buildings as well as in transport industry. Although the natural gas reaches the end-user mainly through pipelines (if gas is available locally), the liquefied form is the most viable alternative to transport natural gas from far away location to the end user. The economic progress in Asia and other parts of the world creates huge demand for energy (oil, gas and coal). As low carbon-emitting fuel, the demand for gas especially in liquefied form is progressively rising. Having 7th largest shale gas reserve (437 trillion cubic feet recoverable), Australia has become one of the world's major natural gas producers and exporters and is expected to continue a dominating role in the world gas market in foreseeable future. This paper reviews Australia's current gas reserve, industries, markets and LNG production capabilities.

  18. Risk management of liquefied natural gas installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, O. H.; Parsons, W. N.; Coutinho, J. De C.

    1976-01-01

    In connection with the construction of four major liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities in New York City, the New York City Fire Commissioner has asked NASA for assistance. It was decided that the Kennedy Space Center should develop a risk management system (RMS) for the use of the New York Fire Department (NYFD). The RMS provides for a published set of safety regulations by the NYFD. A description of the RMS is presented as an example of an application of aerospace technology to a civilian sector, namely LNG facilities.

  19. Fuel tank for liquefied natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A storage tank is provided for storing liquefied natural gas on, for example, a motor vehicle such as a bus or truck. The storage tank includes a metal liner vessel encapsulated by a resin-fiber composite layer. A foam insulating layer, including an outer protective layer of epoxy or of a truck liner material, covers the composite layer. A non-conducting protective coating may be painted on the vessel between the composite layer and the vessel so as to inhibit galvanic corrosion.

  20. Lightweight Tanks for Storing Liquefied Natural Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Single-walled, jacketed aluminum tanks have been conceived for storing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in LNG-fueled motor vehicles. Heretofore, doublewall steel tanks with vacuum between the inner and outer walls have been used for storing LNG. In comparison with the vacuum- insulated steel tanks, the jacketed aluminum tanks weigh less and can be manufactured at lower cost. Costs of using the jacketed aluminum tanks are further reduced in that there is no need for the vacuum pumps heretofore needed to maintain vacuum in the vacuum-insulated tanks.

  1. Clean air program : liquefied natural gas safety in transit operations

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-03-31

    The report examines the safety issues relating to the use of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) in transit service. The safety issues were determined by on-site surveys performed by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, and Science Applications International Corp. (S...

  2. Risk management technique for liquefied natural gas facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, O. H.; Parsons, W. N.

    1975-01-01

    Checklists have been compiled for planning, design, construction, startup and debugging, and operation of liquefied natural gas facilities. Lists include references to pertinent safety regulations. Methods described are applicable to handling of other hazardous materials.

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do Liquefied Natural Gas Trucks Work?

    Liquefied Natural Gas Trucks Work? to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do Liquefied Natural Gas Trucks Work? on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do Liquefied Natural Gas Trucks Work? on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: How Do Liquefied Natural Gas

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in

    ConnecticutA> Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut to someone by E-mail Share , fuels vehicles with natural gas. For information about this project, contact Connecticut Southwestern . Provided by Maryland Public Television Related Videos Photo of a car Hydrogen Powers Fuel Cell Vehicles in

  5. 49 CFR 191.17 - Transmission systems; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. 191.17 Section 191.17 Transportation Other Regulations...; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Annual report. (a) Transmission or Gathering. Each..., 2011. (b) LNG. Each operator of a liquefied natural gas facility must submit an annual report for that...

  6. 49 CFR 191.15 - Transmission systems; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Incident report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... under § 191.5 of this part. (b) LNG. Each operator of a liquefied natural gas plant or facility must... liquefied natural gas facilities: Incident report. 191.15 Section 191.15 Transportation Other Regulations...; gathering systems; and liquefied natural gas facilities: Incident report. (a) Transmission or Gathering...

  7. Liquefied natural gas tender crashworthiness research

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-23

    Research is being conducted to develop technical : information needed to formulate effective natural gas fuel : tender crashworthiness standards. This research is being : performed for the Federal Railroad Administrations (FRAs) : Office of Res...

  8. 76 FR 4417 - Liberty Natural Gas LLC, Liberty Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Deepwater Port License Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [USCG-2010-0993] Liberty Natural Gas LLC, Liberty Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Deepwater Port License Application AGENCY: Maritime Administration... application describes an offshore natural gas deepwater port facility that would be located approximately 16.2...

  9. 75 FR 70350 - Liberty Natural Gas LLC, Liberty Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Deepwater Port License Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [USCG-2010-0993] Liberty Natural Gas LLC, Liberty Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Deepwater Port License Application AGENCY: Maritime Administration... announce they have received an application for the licensing of a natural gas deepwater port and the...

  10. Control method for mixed refrigerant based natural gas liquefier

    DOEpatents

    Kountz, Kenneth J.; Bishop, Patrick M.

    2003-01-01

    In a natural gas liquefaction system having a refrigerant storage circuit, a refrigerant circulation circuit in fluid communication with the refrigerant storage circuit, and a natural gas liquefaction circuit in thermal communication with the refrigerant circulation circuit, a method for liquefaction of natural gas in which pressure in the refrigerant circulation circuit is adjusted to below about 175 psig by exchange of refrigerant with the refrigerant storage circuit. A variable speed motor is started whereby operation of a compressor is initiated. The compressor is operated at full discharge capacity. Operation of an expansion valve is initiated whereby suction pressure at the suction pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 30 psig and discharge pressure at the discharge pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 350 psig. Refrigerant vapor is introduced from the refrigerant holding tank into the refrigerant circulation circuit until the suction pressure is reduced to below about 15 psig, after which flow of the refrigerant vapor from the refrigerant holding tank is terminated. Natural gas is then introduced into a natural gas liquefier, resulting in liquefaction of the natural gas.

  11. 77 FR 16471 - Pipeline Safety: Implementation of the National Registry of Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... Registry of Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas Operators AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts... Register (75 FR 72878) titled: ``Pipeline Safety: Updates to Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas Reporting...

  12. Clean Air Program : Design Guidelines for Bus Transit Systems Using Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as an Alternative Fuel

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-03-01

    The use of alternative fuels to power transit buses is steadily increasing. Several fuels, including Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), and Methanol/Ethanol, are already being used. At present, t...

  13. 75 FR 72877 - Pipeline Safety: Updates to Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas Reporting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... liquid pipelines, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities. These revisions will enhance PHMSA's... of natural gas pipelines, hazardous liquid pipelines, and LNG facilities. Specifically, PHMSA... commodity transported, and type of commodity transported. 8. Modify hazardous liquid operator telephonic...

  14. 77 FR 2126 - Pipeline Safety: Implementation of the National Registry of Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ... Natural Gas Operators AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No...: ``Pipeline Safety: Updates to Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas Reporting Requirements.'' The final rule...

  15. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of... exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? (a) If an engine meets all the... natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas. (2) The engine must have maximum engine power at or above 250 kW...

  16. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of... exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? (a) If an engine meets all the... natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas. (2) The engine must have maximum engine power at or above 250 kW...

  17. Compressed Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Experience

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) contracted with conversion : companies in six states to convert approximately 900 light-duty Federal fleet : vehicles to operate on compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas : (LPG). After...

  18. 76 FR 76698 - Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP; Application To Export Domestic Liquefied Natural Gas to Non-Free...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... Domestic Liquefied Natural Gas to Non-Free Trade Agreement Nations AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE... metric tons per year of domestically produced liquefied natural gas (LNG) (equivalent to approximately... equivalent to approximately 1 Bcf per day of natural gas. DATES: Protests, motions to intervene or notices of...

  19. 76 FR 34212 - Lake Charles Exports, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... facilities that would permit gas to be received by pipeline at the terminal and liquefied for subsequent... the LNG exports in the requested authorization will not have a material impact on domestic natural gas...-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice...

  20. 75 FR 60095 - Sempra LNG Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of... Gas Global Security and Supply, Office of Fossil Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 3E-042, 1000...

  1. Epoxidized natural rubber toughened aqueous resole type liquefied EFB resin: Physical and chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, Umar Adli; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua

    2013-11-01

    A preliminary study on the reaction between aqueous resole type resinified liquefied palm oil empty fruit bunches fibres (RLEFB) with epoxidized natural rubber (ENR). Liquefaction of empty fruit bunches (EFB) is carried out at different ratio of phenol to EFB (P:EFB). Resole type phenolic resin is prepared using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as the catalyst with the ratio of liquefied EFB (LEFB) to formaldehyde (LEFB:F) of 1:1.8. 50% epoxidation of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) is used to react with resole resin by mixing with ENR with aqueous resole resin. The cured resin is characterized with FT-IR and SEM. Aqueous system have been found to be unsuitable medium in the reaction between resin and ENR. This system produced a highly porous product when RLEFB/ENR resin is cured.

  2. Marine transportation of liquefied natural gas. Final report

    SciT

    Curt, R.P.; Delaney, T.D.

    1973-01-01

    This report covers in some detail most of the major areas of consideration involved in the marine carriage of LNG. Some of the fields investigated and reviewed are the world's total energy picture and the particular requirements of natural gas in the United States in the near future. (GRA)

  3. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Import Terminals: Siting, Safety and Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-27

    LNG Natural gas is combustible , so an uncontrolled release of LNG poses a hazard of fire or, in confined spaces, explosion. LNG also poses hazards...ignition source, the evaporating gas in a combustible gas-air concentration will burn above the LNG pool.8 The resulting “pool fire” would spread as the...serious LNG hazard.10 Other Safety Hazards. LNG spilled on water could (theoretically) regasify almost instantly in a “ flameless explosion,” but an Idaho

  4. 77 FR 72840 - CE FLNG, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... States natural gas pipeline system. CE FLNG states that the source of natural gas supply will come from... purchase gas for export from any point in the U.S. interstate pipeline system. CE FLNG states that this... Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced From Domestic Natural Gas Resources to Non-Free Trade...

  5. Analysis of temperature and pressure changes in liquefied natural gas (LNG) cryogenic tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.-S.; Wegrzyn, J.; Prasad, V.

    2004-10-01

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a transportation fuel for heavy vehicles such as trucks and transit buses, to lessen the dependency on oil and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The LNG stations are properly designed to prevent the venting of natural gas (NG) from LNG tanks, which can cause evaporative greenhouse gas emissions and result in fluctuations of fuel flow and changes of fuel composition. Boil-off is caused by the heat added into the LNG fuel during the storage and fueling. Heat can leak into the LNG fuel through the shell of tank during the storage and through hoses and dispensers during the fueling. Gas from tanks onboard vehicles, when returned to LNG tanks, can add additional heat into the LNG fuel. A thermodynamic and heat transfer model has been developed to analyze different mechanisms of heat leak into the LNG fuel. The evolving of properties and compositions of LNG fuel inside LNG tanks is simulated. The effect of a number of buses fueled each day on the possible total fuel loss rate has been analyzed. It is found that by increasing the number of buses, fueled each day, the total fuel loss rate can be reduced significantly. It is proposed that an electric generator be used to consume the boil-off gas or a liquefier be used to re-liquefy the boil-off gas to reduce the tank pressure and eliminate fuel losses. These approaches can prevent boil-off of natural gas emissions, and reduce the costs of LNG as transportation fuel.

  6. [Ecological/hygienic and toxicological evaluation of combustion products of aviation kerosene and liquefied natural gas].

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, R V; Berezin, G I; Raznoschikov, V V

    2006-01-01

    Products of kerosene combustion in the present-day aeroengines contain more than 200 compounds of incomplete combustion, partial oxidation, and thermal decomposition of fuel and oil. Most of these are strong toxicants for humans. Increase of temperature in the turbine engine combustion chamber led to production of very toxic nitrogen oxides. In search for the ecologically safe and less toxic alternative attention of fuel engineers was drawn to liquefied natural gas which compares well and even excels kerosene in ecological, economic and many other respects.

  7. Data on conceptual design of cryogenic energy storage system combined with liquefied natural gas regasification process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inkyu; Park, Jinwoo; Moon, Il

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes data of an integrated process, cryogenic energy storage system combined with liquefied natural gas (LNG) regasification process. The data in this paper is associated with the article entitled "Conceptual Design and Exergy Analysis of Combined Cryogenic Energy Storage and LNG Regasification Processes: Cold and Power Integration" (Lee et al., 2017) [1]. The data includes the sensitivity case study dataset of the air flow rate and the heat exchanging feasibility data by composite curves. The data is expected to be helpful to the cryogenic energy process development.

  8. 78 FR 75337 - Eos LNG LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced From Domestic Natural Gas Resources to Non-Free Trade...- contract authorization to export LNG produced from domestic sources in a volume equivalent to approximately... treatment for trade in natural gas (non-FTA countries) with which trade is not prohibited by U.S. law or...

  9. 78 FR 75339 - Barca LNG LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced From Domestic Natural Gas Resources to Non-Free Trade...- contract authorization to export LNG produced from domestic sources in a volume equivalent to approximately... treatment for trade in natural gas (non-FTA countries) with which trade is not prohibited by U.S. law or...

  10. Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Markets

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    This report responds to a May 29, 2014 request from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) for an update of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) January 2012 study of liquefied natural gas (LNG) export scenarios. This updated study, like the prior one, is intended to serve as an input to be considered in the evaluation of applications to export LNG from the United States under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act, which requires DOE to grant a permit to export domestically produced natural gas unless it finds that such action is not consistent with the public interest. Appendix A provides a copy of the DOE/FE request letter.

  11. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the sea floor, within a 500 yard radius around any liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) tank vessel that is... waters, extending from the surface to the sea floor, within a 500 yard radius around any LHG tank vessel that is moored, or in the process of mooring, at any berth within the Los Angeles or Long Beach port...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the sea floor, within a 500 yard radius around any liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) tank vessel that is... waters, extending from the surface to the sea floor, within a 500 yard radius around any LHG tank vessel that is moored, or in the process of mooring, at any berth within the Los Angeles or Long Beach port...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the sea floor, within a 500 yard radius around any liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) tank vessel that is... waters, extending from the surface to the sea floor, within a 500 yard radius around any LHG tank vessel that is moored, or in the process of mooring, at any berth within the Los Angeles or Long Beach port...

  14. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the sea floor, within a 500 yard radius around any liquefied hazardous gas (LHG) tank vessel that is... waters, extending from the surface to the sea floor, within a 500 yard radius around any LHG tank vessel that is moored, or in the process of mooring, at any berth within the Los Angeles or Long Beach port...

  15. 78 FR 17189 - Trunkline LNG Export, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization to Export Liquefied Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... that would permit gas to be received by pipeline at the terminal and liquefied for subsequent export... the natural gas proposed for export will come from the United States natural gas pipeline system... authorization to construct additional pipeline facilities necessary to provide feed gas to the proposed...

  16. Semi-analytical models of hydroelastic sloshing impact in tanks of liquefied natural gas vessels.

    PubMed

    Ten, I; Malenica, Š; Korobkin, A

    2011-07-28

    The present paper deals with the methods for the evaluation of the hydroelastic interactions that appear during the violent sloshing impacts inside the tanks of liquefied natural gas carriers. The complexity of both the fluid flow and the structural behaviour (containment system and ship structure) does not allow for a fully consistent direct approach according to the present state of the art. Several simplifications are thus necessary in order to isolate the most dominant physical aspects and to treat them properly. In this paper, choice was made of semi-analytical modelling for the hydrodynamic part and finite-element modelling for the structural part. Depending on the impact type, different hydrodynamic models are proposed, and the basic principles of hydroelastic coupling are clearly described and validated with respect to the accuracy and convergence of the numerical results.

  17. 75 FR 62510 - Chevron U.S.A. Inc.; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of... Security and Supply, Office of Fossil Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 3E-042, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW...

  18. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... as if these were nonroad diesel engines. (e) You may request an exemption under this section by... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of..., LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Compliance Provisions § 1048.620 What are the provisions for...

  19. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... as if these were nonroad diesel engines. (e) You may request an exemption under this section by... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of..., LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Compliance Provisions § 1048.620 What are the provisions for...

  20. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... as if these were nonroad diesel engines. (e) You may request an exemption under this section by... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of..., LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Compliance Provisions § 1048.620 What are the provisions for...

  1. 76 FR 33746 - Freeport LNG Development, L.P.; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives... Regulatory Activities, Office of Fossil Energy, P.O. Box 44375, Washington, DC 20026-4375. Hand Delivery or...

  2. 76 FR 2093 - Eni USA Gas Marketing LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of.... Department of Energy (FE-34), Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply, Office of Fossil Energy...

  3. Blanketing effect of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) spillage pool.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yi; Olewski, Tomasz; Vechot, Luc; Mannan, M Sam

    2014-09-15

    With increasing consumption of natural gas, the safety of liquefied natural gas (LNG) utilization has become an issue that requires a comprehensive study on the risk of LNG spillage in facilities with mitigation measures. The immediate hazard associated with an LNG spill is the vapor hazard, i.e., a flammable vapor cloud at the ground level, due to rapid vaporization and dense gas behavior. It was believed that high expansion foam mitigated LNG vapor hazard through warming effect (raising vapor buoyancy), but the boil-off effect increased vaporization rate due to the heat from water drainage of foam. This work reveals the existence of blocking effect (blocking convection and radiation to the pool) to reduce vaporization rate. The blanketing effect on source term (vaporization rate) is a combination of boil-off and blocking effect, which was quantitatively studied through seven tests conducted in a wind tunnel with liquid nitrogen. Since the blocking effect reduces more heat to the pool than the boil-off effect adds, the blanketing effect contributes to the net reduction of heat convection and radiation to the pool by 70%. Water drainage rate of high expansion foam is essential to determine the effectiveness of blanketing effect, since water provides the boil-off effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Economics of liquefied natural gas production, transport and distribution for end use as a transportation fuel

    SciT

    Adkins, R.E.; Sutton, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas vehicles have been operating in the United States for over 30 years. With few exceptions, these vehicles are owned and operated by local gas utilities that utilize the natural gas in the compressed form (CNG), at pressures of up to 3,600 psi. However, the limited range, system weight and the high cost of fueling facilities presents a serious handicap for these compressed fuel systems. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) automotive fuel systems, on the other hand, are a relatively new player in the emerging clean fuels market. While the technical feasibility, safety, and operational suitability of LNG fuel systemsmore » have been demonstrated during the past 20 years, in a variety of test projects including automotive, marine, aviation, and rail systems, little has been done to commercialize or promote this technology. Recent independent cost comparisons and technical evaluations have been conducted by several major transit organizations and national truck fleets with interesting results. They have concluded that LNG automotive fuel systems can meet the performance and operational criteria of their gasoline and diesel fuel systems without compromising vehicle range or imposing unacceptable weight and payload penalties on their vehicles. The purpose of this paper is to further define the economics of LNG production, transportation and distribution costs. The liquefaction of natural gas is a mature technology and was first accomplished by Faraday in 1855. The first large scale plants were installed in the United States in 1941 and this paper provides a summary of the issues and costs associated with the procurement, installation, and operation of modern day natural gas liquefaction systems. There are no technical barriers to building LNG plants where needed. In addition to these {open_quotes}peak shaving{close_quotes} liquefaction plants, operated by utilities, there are many liquefaction plants owned and operated by the industrial gas business sector.« less

  5. Risk Assessment and Risk Governance of Liquefied Natural Gas Development in Gladstone, Australia.

    PubMed

    van der Vegt, R G

    2018-02-26

    This article is a retrospective analysis of liquefied natural gas development (LNG) in Gladstone, Australia by using the structure of the risk governance framework developed by the International Risk Governance Council (IRGC). Since 2010 the port of Gladstone has undergone extensive expansion to facilitate the increasing coal export as well as the new development of three recently completed LNG facilities. Significant environmental and socio-economic impacts and concerns have occurred as a result of these developments. The overall aim of the article, therefore, is to identify the risk governance deficits that arose and to formulate processes capable of improving similar decision-making problems in the future. The structure of the IRGC framework is followed because it represents a broad analytical approach for considering risk assessment and risk governance in Gladstone in ways that include, but also go beyond, the risk approach of the ISO 31000:2009 standard that was employed at the time. The IRGC risk framework is argued to be a consistent and comprehensive risk governance framework that integrates scientific, economic, social, and cultural aspects and advocates the notion of inclusive risk governance through stakeholder communication and involvement. Key aspects related to risk preassessment, risk appraisal, risk tolerability and acceptability, risk management, and stakeholder communication and involvement are considered. The results indicate that the risk governance deficits include aspects related to (i) the risk matrix methodology, (ii) reflecting uncertainties, (iii) cumulative risks, (iv) the regulatory process, and (v) stakeholder communication and involvement. © 2018 Society for Risk Analysis.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of the roll motion behavior of a floating liquefied natural gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, WenHua; Yang, JianMin; Hu, ZhiQiang; Xiao, LongFei; Peng, Tao

    2013-03-01

    The present paper does an experimental and numerical investigation of the hydrodynamic interaction and the response of a single point turret-moored Floating Liquefied Natural Gas (FLNG) system, which is a new type of floating LNG (Liquid Natural Gas) platform that consists of a ship-type FPSO hull equipped with LNG storage tanks and liquefaction plants. In particular, this study focuses on the investigation of the roll response of FLNG hull in free-decay motions, white noise waves and also in irregular waves. Model tests of the FLNG system in 60%H filling condition excited by both white noise waves and irregular waves combined with steady wind and current have been carried out. Response Amplitude Operators (RAOs) and time histories of the responses are obtained for sway, roll and yaw motions. Obvious Low Frequency (LF) components of the roll motions are observed, which may be out of expectation. To facilitate the physical understanding of this phenomenon, we filter the roll motions at the period of 30 s into two parts: the Wave Frequency (WF) motions and the Low Frequency (LF) motions respectively. The results indicate that the LF motions are closely related to the sway and yaw motions. Possible reasons for the presence of the LF motions of roll have been discussed in detail, through the comparison with the sway and yaw motions. As for the numerical part, the simulation of the modeled case is conducted with the help of the software SESAM®. A good agreement between experiments and calculations is reported within the scope of trends. However, the numerical simulations should be further improved for the prediction of the FLNG system in the heading sea.

  7. Evaporation of liquefied natural gas in conditions of compact storage containers heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telgozhayeva, D. S.

    2014-08-01

    Identical by its power, but located in different parts of the external surface of the tank, the heating sources are different intensity heat transfer modes is heating up, respectively, times of vapour pressure rise to critical values. Developed mathematical model and method of calculation can be used in the analysis of conditions of storage tanks for liquefied gases.

  8. Investigation on the heat transfer characteristics during flow boiling of liquefied natural gas in a vertical micro-fin tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Shi, Yumei; Chen, Dongsheng

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the heat transfer characteristics of liquefied natural gas flow boiling in a vertical micro-fin tube. The effect of heat flux, mass flux and inlet pressure on the flow boiling heat transfer coefficients was analyzed. The Kim, Koyama, and two kinds of Wellsandt correlations with different Ftp coefficients were used to predict the flow boiling heat transfer coefficients. The predicted results showed that the Koyama correlation was the most accurate over the range of experimental conditions.

  9. Risks in the transport and storage of liquefied natural gas. Sub-project 5-2: Investigation into building damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouwens, C.; Dragosavic, M.

    The large reserves and increasing use of natural gas as a source of energy have resulted in its storage and transport becoming an urgent problem. Since a liquid of the same mass occupies only a fraction of the volume of a gas, it is economical to store natural gas as a liquid. Liquefied natural gas is stored in insulated tanks and also carried by ship at a temperature of -160 C to 170 C. If a serious accident allows the LNG to escape, a gas cloud forms. The results of a possible explosion from such a gas cloud are studied. The development of a leak, escape and evaporation, size and propagation of the gas cloud, the explosive pressures to be expected and the results on the environment are investigated. Damage to buildings is examined making use of the preliminary conclusions of the other sub-projects and especially the explosive pressures.

  10. Study of Hydrogen Production Method using Latent Heat of Liquefied Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Masaru; Seki, Tatsuyoshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Motomu; Takatani, Yoshiaki

    In recent years, Fuel Cell Electrical Vehicle is expected to improve urban environment. Particularly a hydrogen fuel type FCEV expected for urban use, because its excellent characters such as short startup time, high responsibility and zero emission. On the other hand, as far as hydrogen production is concerned, large amount of CO2 is exhausted into the atmosphere by the process of LNG reforming. In our research, we studied the utilization of LNG latent heat for hydrogen gas production process as well as liquefied hydrogen process. Furthermore, CO2---Capturing as liquid state or solid state from hydrogen gas production process by LNG is also studied. Results of research shows that LNG latent heat is very effect to cool hydrogen gas for conventional hydrogen liquefied process. However, the LNG latent heat is not available for LNG reforming process. If we want to use LNG latent heat for this process, we have to develop new hydrogen gas produce process. In this new method, both hydrogen and CO2 is cooled by LNG directly, and CO2 is removed from the reforming gas. In order to make this method practical, we should develop a new type heat-exchanger to prevent solid CO2 from interfering the performance of it.

  11. Analysis of Influence of Heat Insulation on the Thermal Regime of Storage Tanks with Liquefied Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, Vyacheslav I.; Nagornova, Tatiana A.; Glazyrin, Viktor P.; Shestakov, Igor A.

    2016-02-01

    Is numerically investigated the process of convective heat transfer in the reservoirs of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The regimes of natural convection in a closed rectangular region with different intensity of heat exchange at the external borders are investigated. Is solved the time-dependent system of energy and Navier-Stokes equations in the dimensionless variables "vorticity - the stream function". Are obtained distributions of the hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures, that characterize basic regularities of the processes. The special features of the formation of circulation flows are isolated and the analysis of the temperature distribution in the solution region is carried out. Is shown the influence of geometric characteristics and intensity of heat exchange on the outer boundaries of reservoir on the temperature field in the LNG storage.

  12. Supply chain management and economic valuation of real options in the natural gas and liquefied natural gas industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mulan Xiaofeng

    My dissertation concentrates on several aspects of supply chain management and economic valuation of real options in the natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry, including gas pipeline transportations, ocean LNG shipping logistics, and downstream storage. Chapter 1 briefly introduces the natural gas and LNG industries, and the topics studied in this thesis. Chapter 2 studies how to value U.S. natural gas pipeline network transport contracts as real options. It is common for natural gas shippers to value and manage contracts by simple adaptations of financial spread option formulas that do not fully account for the implications of the capacity limits and the network structure that distinguish these contracts. In contrast, we show that these operational features can be fully captured and integrated with financial considerations in a fairly easy and managerially significant manner by a model that combines linear programming and simulation. We derive pathwise estimators for the so called deltas and structurally characterize them. We interpret them in a novel fashion as discounted expectations, under a specific weighing distribution, of the amounts of natural gas to be procured/marketed when optimally using pipeline capacity. Based on the actual prices of traded natural gas futures and basis swaps, we show that an enhanced version of the common approach employed in practice can significantly underestimate the true value of natural gas pipeline network capacity. Our model also exhibits promising financial (delta) hedging performance. Thus, this model emerges as an easy to use and useful tool that natural gas shippers can employ to support their valuation and delta hedging decisions concerning natural gas pipeline network transport capacity contracts. Moreover, the insights that follow from our data analysis have broader significance and implications in terms of the management of real options beyond our specific application. Motivated by current developments

  13. 75 FR 13644 - TORP Terminal LP, Bienville Offshore Energy Terminal Liquefied Natural Gas Deepwater Port License...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... interconnect pipelines to four existing offshore pipelines (Dauphin Natural Gas Pipeline, Williams Natural Gas Pipeline, Destin Natural Gas Pipeline, and Viosca Knoll Gathering System [VKGS] Gas Pipeline) that connect to the onshore natural gas transmission pipeline system. Natural gas would be delivered to customers...

  14. 18 CFR 157.212 - Synthetic and liquefied natural gas facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... natural gas facilities. 157.212 Section 157.212 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT APPLICATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES... 7 OF THE NATURAL GAS ACT Interstate Pipeline Blanket Certificates and Authorization Under Section 7...

  15. 18 CFR 157.212 - Synthetic and liquefied natural gas facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... natural gas facilities. 157.212 Section 157.212 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT APPLICATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES... 7 OF THE NATURAL GAS ACT Interstate Pipeline Blanket Certificates and Authorization Under Section 7...

  16. Country-Level Life Cycle Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Liquefied Natural Gas Trade for Electricity Generation.

    PubMed

    Kasumu, Adebola S; Li, Vivian; Coleman, James W; Liendo, Jeanne; Jordaan, Sarah M

    2018-02-20

    In the determination of the net impact of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on greenhouse gas emissions, life cycle assessments (LCA) of electricity generation have yet to combine the effects of transport distances between exporting and importing countries, country-level infrastructure in importing countries, and the fuel sources displaced in importing countries. To address this, we conduct a LCA of electricity generated from LNG export from British Columbia, Canada with a three-step approach: (1) a review of viable electricity generation markets for LNG, (2) the development of results for greenhouse gas emissions that account for transport to importing nations as well as the infrastructure required for power generation and delivery, and (3) emissions displacement scenarios to test assumptions about what electricity is being displaced in the importing nation. Results show that while the ultimate magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions associated with natural gas production systems is still unknown, life cycle greenhouse gas emissions depend on country-level infrastructure (specifically, the efficiency of the generation fleet, transmission and distribution losses and LNG ocean transport distances) as well as the assumptions on what is displaced in the domestic electricity generation mix. Exogenous events such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster have unanticipated effects on the emissions displacement results. We highlight national regulations, environmental policies, and multilateral agreements that could play a role in mitigating emissions.

  17. A multi-stage traveling-wave thermoacoustically-driven refrigeration system operating at liquefied natural gas temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, K.; Sun, D. M.; Zhang, J.; Shen, Q.; Zhang, N.

    2017-12-01

    This study proposes a multi-stage travelling-wave thermoacoustically refrigeration system (TAD-RS) operating at liquefied natural gas temperature, which consists of two thermoacoustic engines (TAE) and one thermoacoustic refrigerator (TAR) in a closed-loop configuration. Three thermoacoustic units connect each other through a resonance tube of small cross-sectional area, achieving “self-matching” for efficient thermoacoustic conversion. Based on the linear thermoacoustic theory, a model of the proposed system has been built by using DeltaEC program to show the acoustic field characteristics and performance. It is shown that with pressurized 5 MPa helium as working gas, the TAEs are able to build a stable and strong acoustic field with a frequency of about 85 Hz. When hot end temperature reaches 923 K, this system can provide about 1410 W cooling power at 110 K with an overall exergy efficiency of 15.5%. This study indicates a great application prospect of TAD-RS in the field of natural gas liquefaction with a large cooling capacity and simple structure.

  18. Feasibility study for liquefied natural gas utilization for commercial vehicles on the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in horizontal drilling and fracturing technology in gas shale formations have increased natural gas supply : such that its price has decoupled from petroleum and is likely to remain significantly lower for the foreseeable future. In t...

  19. Natural convection along a heated vertical plate immersed in a nonlinearly stratified medium: application to liquefied gas storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestier, M.; Haldenwang, P.

    We consider free convection driven by a heated vertical plate immersed in a nonlinearly stratified medium. The plate supplies a uniform horizontal heat flux to a fluid, the bulk of which has a stable stratification, characterized by a non-uniform vertical temperature gradient. This gradient is assumed to have a typical length scale of variation, denoted Z0, while 0, and the physical properties of the medium.We then apply the new theory to the natural convection affecting the vapour phase in a liquefied pure gas tank (e.g. the cryogenic storage of hydrogen). It is assumed that the cylindrical storage tank is subject to a constant uniform heat flux on its lateral and top walls. We are interested in the vapour motion above a residual layer of liquid in equilibrium with the vapour. High-precision axisymmetric numerical computations show that the flow remains steady for a large range of parameters, and that a bulk stratification characterized by a quadratic temperature profile is undoubtedly present. The application of the theory permits a comparison of the numerical and analytic results, showing that the theory satisfactorily predicts the primary dynamical and thermal properties of the storage tank.

  20. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas over a nickel catalyst supported on mesoporous alumina xerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Cho, Kyung Min; Park, Sunyoung; Song, In Kyu

    Mesoporous alumina xerogel (A-SG) is prepared by a sol-gel method for use as a support for a nickel catalyst. The Ni/A-SG catalyst is then prepared by an impregnation method, and is applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of the mesoporous alumina xerogel support on the catalytic performance of Ni/A-SG catalyst is investigated. For the purpose of comparison, a nickel catalyst supported on commercial alumina (A-C) is also prepared by an impregnation method (Ni/A-C). Both the hydroxyl-rich surface and the electron-deficient sites of the A-SG support enhance the dispersion of the nickel species on the support during the calcination step. The formation of the surface nickel aluminate phase in the Ni/A-SG catalyst remarkably increases the reducibility and stability of the catalyst. Furthermore, the high-surface area and the well-developed mesoporosity of the Ni/A-SG catalyst enhance the gasification of surface hydrocarbons that are adsorbed in the reaction. In the steam reforming of LNG, the Ni/A-SG catalyst exhibits a better catalytic performance than the Ni/A-C catalyst in terms of LNG conversion and hydrogen production. Moreover, the Ni/A-SG catalyst shows strong resistance toward catalyst deactivation.

  1. Numerical Investigation of a Cavitating Mixing Layer of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Behind a Flat Plate Splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbarimanesh, Saeed; Brinkerhoff, Joshua

    2017-11-01

    The mutual interaction of shear layer instabilities and phase change in a two-dimensional cryogenic cavitating mixing layer is investigated using a numerical model. The developed model employs the homogeneous equilibrium mixture (HEM) approach in a density-based framework to compute the temperature-dependent cavitation field for liquefied natural gas (LNG). Thermal and baroclinic effects are captured via iterative coupled solution of the governing equations with dynamic thermophysical models that accurately capture the properties of LNG. The mixing layer is simulated for vorticity-thickness Reynolds numbers of 44 to 215 and cavitation numbers of 0.1 to 1.1. Attached cavity structures develop on the splitter plate followed by roll-up of the separated shear layer via the well-known Kelvin-Helmholtz mode, leading to streamwise accumulation of vorticity and eventual shedding of discrete vortices. Cavitation occurs as vapor cavities nucleate and grow from the low-pressure cores in the rolled-up vortices. Thermal effects and baroclinic vorticity production are found to have significant impacts on the mixing layer instability and cavitation processes.

  2. Visual simulation of offshore liquefied natural gas (lng) terminals in a decision-making context

    Brian E. Baird; Stephen R. J. Sheppard; Richard C. Smardon

    1979-01-01

    Due to legislation passed in 1977, the Coastal Commission tock part in a study analyzing potential offshore Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) sites and the types of terminals that might occupy those sites. The study had to evaluate the engineering feasibility of siting an LNG receiving terminal offshore in relation to the maximum protection of coastal resource provisions...

  3. Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. liquefied natural gas exports: implications for end uses.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Leslie S; Samaras, Constantine; Griffin, W Michael; Matthews, H Scott

    2015-03-03

    This study analyzes how incremental U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports affect global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We find that exported U.S. LNG has mean precombustion emissions of 37 g CO2-equiv/MJ when regasified in Europe and Asia. Shipping emissions of LNG exported from U.S. ports to Asian and European markets account for only 3.5-5.5% of precombustion life cycle emissions, hence shipping distance is not a major driver of GHGs. A scenario-based analysis addressing how potential end uses (electricity and industrial heating) and displacement of existing fuels (coal and Russian natural gas) affect GHG emissions shows the mean emissions for electricity generation using U.S. exported LNG were 655 g CO2-equiv/kWh (with a 90% confidence interval of 562-770), an 11% increase over U.S. natural gas electricity generation. Mean emissions from industrial heating were 104 g CO2-equiv/MJ (90% CI: 87-123). By displacing coal, LNG saves 550 g CO2-equiv per kWh of electricity and 20 g per MJ of heat. LNG saves GHGs under upstream fugitive emissions rates up to 9% and 5% for electricity and heating, respectively. GHG reductions were found if Russian pipeline natural gas was displaced for electricity and heating use regardless of GWP, as long as U.S. fugitive emission rates remain below the estimated 5-7% rate of Russian gas. However, from a country specific carbon accounting perspective, there is an imbalance in accrued social costs and benefits. Assuming a mean social cost of carbon of $49/metric ton, mean global savings from U.S. LNG displacement of coal for electricity generation are $1.50 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf) of gaseous natural gas exported as LNG ($.028/kWh). Conversely, the U.S. carbon cost of exporting the LNG is $1.80/Mcf ($.013/kWh), or $0.50-$5.50/Mcf across the range of potential discount rates. This spatial shift in embodied carbon emissions is important to consider in national interest estimates for LNG exports.

  4. Final Rule for Standards for Emissions From Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Engines, and Certification Procedures for Aftermarket Conversions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This rule provides emission standards and test procedures for the certification of new natural gasfueled, and liquefied petroleum gasfueled light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, heavy-duty engines and vehicles, and motorcycles.

  5. An assessment of air emissions from liquefied natural gas ships using different power systems and different fuels.

    PubMed

    Afon, Yinka; Ervin, David

    2008-03-01

    The shipping industry has been an unrecognized source of criteria pollutants: nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds, coarse particulate matter (PM10), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and carbon monoxide (CO). Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has traditionally been transported via steam turbine (ST) ships. Recently, LNG shippers have begun using dual-fuel diesel engines (DFDEs) to propel and offload their cargoes. Both the conventional ST boilers and DFDE are capable of burning a range of fuels, from heavy fuel oil to boil-off-gas (BOG) from the LNG load. In this paper a method for estimating the emissions from ST boilers and DFDEs during LNG offloading operations at berth is presented, along with typical emissions from LNG ships during offloading operations under different scenarios ranging from worst-case fuel oil combustion to the use of shore power. The impact on air quality in nonattainment areas where LNG ships call is discussed. Current and future air pollution control regulations for ocean-going vessels (OGVs) such as LNG ships are also discussed. The objective of this study was to estimate and compare emissions of criteria pollutants from conventional ST and DFDE ships using different fuels. The results of this study suggest that newer DFDE ships have lower SO2 and PM2.5/PM10 emissions, conventional ST ships have lower NOx, volatile organic compound, and CO emissions; and DFDE ships utilizing shore power at berth produce no localized emissions because they draw their required power from the local electric grid.

  6. 78 FR 35014 - Orders Granting Authority to Import and Export Natural Gas, and to Import Liquefied Natural Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy... in the attached appendix and may be found on the FE Web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs... of Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities, Docket Room 3E-033, Forrestal Building...

  7. 77 FR 19277 - Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas During...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil... attached appendix and may be found on the FE Web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs... of Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities, Docket Room 3E-033, Forrestal Building...

  8. NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone

    SciT

    A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

    2000-03-08

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturatedmore » Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.« less

  9. Comments on Potential Geologic and Seismic Hazards Affecting Proposed Liquefied Natural Gas Site in Santa Monica Bay, California

    Ross, Stephanie L.; Lee, Homa J.; Parsons, Tom E.; Beyer, Larry A.; Boore, David M.; Conrad, James E.; Edwards, Brian D.; Fisher, Michael A.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Geist, Eric L.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Hough, Susan E.; Kayen, Robert E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Luco, Nicolas; McCrory, Patricia A.; McGann, Mary; Nathenson, Manuel; Nolan, Michael; Petersen, Mark D.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Powell, Charles L.; Ryan, Holly F.; Tinsley, John C.; Wills, Chris J.; Wong, Florence L.; Xu, Jingping

    2008-01-01

    In a letter to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) dated March 25, 2008, Representative Jane Harman (California 36th district) requested advice on geologic hazards that should be considered in the review of a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility off the California coast in Santa Monica Bay. In 2004, the USGS responded to a similar request from Representative Lois Capps, regarding two proposed LNG facilities offshore Ventura County, Calif., with a report summarizing potential geologic and seismic hazards (Ross and others, 2004). The proposed LNG Deepwater Port (DWP) facility includes single point moorings (SPMs) and 35 miles of underwater pipelines. The DWP submersible buoys, manifolds, and risers would be situated on the floor of the southern Santa Monica Basin, in 3,000 feet of water, about 23 miles offshore of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Twin 24-inch diameter pipelines would extend northeastward from the buoys across the basin floor, up the basin slope and across the continental shelf, skirting north around the Santa Monica submarine canyon. Figure 1 provides locations of the project and geologic features. Acronyms are defined in table 1. This facility is being proposed in a region of known geologic hazards that arise from both the potential for strong earthquakes and geologic processes related to sediment transport and accumulation in the offshore environment. The probability of a damaging earthquake (considered here as magnitude 6.5 or greater) in the next 30 years within about 30 miles (50 km) of the proposed pipeline ranges from 16% at the pipeline's offshore end to 48% where it nears land (Petersen, 2008). Earthquakes of this magnitude are capable of producing strong shaking, surface fault offsets, liquefaction phenomena, landslides, underwater turbidity currents and debris flow avalanches, and tsunamis. As part of the DWP license application for the Woodside Natural Gas proposal in Santa Monica Bay (known as the OceanWay Secure Energy Project), Fugro

  10. A methodology for risk analysis based on hybrid Bayesian networks: application to the regasification system of liquefied natural gas onboard a floating storage and regasification unit.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marcelo Ramos; Schleder, Adriana Miralles; Droguett, Enrique López

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an iterative six-step risk analysis methodology based on hybrid Bayesian networks (BNs). In typical risk analysis, systems are usually modeled as discrete and Boolean variables with constant failure rates via fault trees. Nevertheless, in many cases, it is not possible to perform an efficient analysis using only discrete and Boolean variables. The approach put forward by the proposed methodology makes use of BNs and incorporates recent developments that facilitate the use of continuous variables whose values may have any probability distributions. Thus, this approach makes the methodology particularly useful in cases where the available data for quantification of hazardous events probabilities are scarce or nonexistent, there is dependence among events, or when nonbinary events are involved. The methodology is applied to the risk analysis of a regasification system of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on board an FSRU (floating, storage, and regasification unit). LNG is becoming an important energy source option and the world's capacity to produce LNG is surging. Large reserves of natural gas exist worldwide, particularly in areas where the resources exceed the demand. Thus, this natural gas is liquefied for shipping and the storage and regasification process usually occurs at onshore plants. However, a new option for LNG storage and regasification has been proposed: the FSRU. As very few FSRUs have been put into operation, relevant failure data on FSRU systems are scarce. The results show the usefulness of the proposed methodology for cases where the risk analysis must be performed under considerable uncertainty. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. Nature, Humans, and the Coastal Zone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, H. Jesse

    1990-01-01

    Considers the interface of humans and seacoasts over time. Explains how coastal zones are formed and human attempts to defend against sea level changes. Charts the percentage of major world cities that also are ports. Postulates how the greenhouse effect could influence sea level, examining potential human responses to changes in coastal zones.…

  12. Thermodynamic Processes Involving Liquefied Natural Gas at the LNG Receiving Terminals / Procesy termodynamiczne z wykorzystaniem skroplonego gazu ziemnego w terminalach odbiorczych LNG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łaciak, Mariusz

    2013-06-01

    The increase in demand for natural gas in the world, cause that the production of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and in consequences its regasification becoming more common process related to its transportation. Liquefied gas is transported in the tanks at a temperature of about 111K at atmospheric pressure. The process required to convert LNG from a liquid to a gas phase for further pipeline transport, allows the use of exergy of LNG to various applications, including for electricity generation. Exergy analysis is a well known technique for analyzing irreversible losses in a separate process. It allows to specify the distribution, the source and size of the irreversible losses in energy systems, and thus provide guidelines for energy efficiency. Because both the LNG regasification and liquefaction of natural gas are energy intensive, exergy analysis process is essential for designing highly efficient cryogenic installations. Wzrost zapotrzebowania na gaz ziemny na świecie powoduje, że produkcja skroplonego gazu ziemnego (LNG), a w konsekwencji jego regazyfikacja, staje się coraz bardziej powszechnym procesem związanym z jego transportem. Skroplony gaz transportowany jest w zbiornikach w temperaturze około 111K pod ciśnieniem atmosferycznym. Przebieg procesu regazyfikacji niezbędny do zamiany LNG z fazy ciekłej w gazową dla dalszego transportu w sieci, umożliwia wykorzystanie egzergii LNG do różnych zastosowań, między innymi do produkcji energii elektrycznej. Analiza egzergii jest znaną techniką analizowania nieodwracalnych strat w wydzielonym procesie. Pozwala na określenie dystrybucji, źródła i wielkości nieodwracalnych strat w systemach energetycznych, a więc ustalić wytyczne dotyczące efektywnego zużycia energii. Ponieważ zarówno regazyfikacja LNG jak i skraplanie gazu ziemnego są energochłonne, proces analizy egzergii jest niezbędny do projektowania wysoce wydajnych instalacji kriogenicznych.

  13. 78 FR 38024 - Magnolia LNG, LLC; Liquefied Natural Gas Limited; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... land located within Industrial Canal South Shore PLC Tract 475 at the Port of Lake Charles. The... of material to be dredged from the Industrial Canal. The location is zoned for heavy industrial use on an industrial canal off the main Calcasieu River Ship Channel. Magnolia is still in the planning...

  14. A 1 kW-class multi-stage heat-driven thermoacoustic cryocooler system operating at liquefied natural gas temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. M.; Hu, J. Y.; Wu, Z. H.; Luo, E. C.; Xu, J. Y.; Bi, T. J.

    2015-07-01

    This article introduces a multi-stage heat-driven thermoacoustic cryocooler capable of reaching cooling capacity about 1 kW at liquefied natural gas temperature range without any moving mechanical parts. The cooling system consists of an acoustically resonant double-acing traveling wave thermoacoustic heat engine and three identical pulse tube coolers. Unlike other traditional traveling wave thermoacoustic heat engines, the acoustically resonant double-acting thermoacoustic heat engine is a closed-loop configuration consists of three identical thermoacoustic conversion units. Each pulse tube cooler is bypass driven by one thermoacoustic heat engine unit. The device is acoustically completely symmetric and therefore "self-matching" for efficient traveling-wave thermoacoustic conversion. In the experiments, with 7 MPa helium gas as working gas, when the heating temperature reaches 918 K, total cooling capacity of 0.88 kW at 110 K is obtained with a resonant frequency of about 55 Hz. When the heating temperature is 903 K, a maximum total cooling capacity at 130 K of 1.20 kW is achieved, with a thermal-to-cold exergy efficiency of 8%. Compared to previously developed heat-driven thermoacoustic cryocoolers, this device has higher thermal efficiency and higher power density. It shows a good prospect of application in the field of natural gas liquefaction and recondensation.

  15. 77 FR 64964 - Cheniere Marketing, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... displacement. CMI states that it currently is engaged in commercial discussions with CCL to obtain all the... $5.88 billion and $9.52 billion annually through the exportation of natural gas and the displacement...

  16. An Economic Evaluation of Onshore and Floating Liquefied Natural Gas Receiving Terminals: the Case Study of Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giranza, M. J.; Bergmann, A.

    2018-05-01

    Indonesia has abundant natural gas resources, however the primary fuel used for electricity generation is coal and oil. Insufficient natural gas infrastructure with-in the country acts as a barrier to increased natural gas usage. In Indonesia LNG is the most efficient and effective method for distributing natural gas given the difficult geographical conditions, the world’s largest archipelago and located in a deep sea area. The Government is planning to initiate natural gas imports by 2019 to meet the country’s energy demands. In order to allocate adequate amounts of natural gas across the geographic regions Indonesia must build more LNG regasification terminals. The Indonesia government has not yet determined if the additional regasification terminals will be floating or land-based facilities. This paper assesses the two options and identifies which facility attains greater profitability. The financial analysis of investing in the Sorong LNG regasification terminal project is conducted using NPV, IRR, and sensitivity analysis. This analysis demonstrates that FSRU facilities have greater economic viability than onshore LNG regasification facilities. The FSRU project earns greater than a 12% IRR as compared to a negative IRR earned by an onshore project. The government can make the onshore projects viable by increasing the sales fee from US10.00/MMBTU to US10.60/MMBTU.

  17. 77 FR 63806 - Southern LNG Company, L.L.C.; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... pipelines of Southern Natural Gas Company, L.L.C., Elba Express Company, L.L.C., Carolina Gas Transmission Corporation, and the indirect connects with interstate pipelines of Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company... permit gas to be (1) received by pipeline at the Elba Island Terminal, with these pipelines having...

  18. 77 FR 72837 - Golden Pass Products LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ...-Free Trade Agreement Countries for a 25-Year Period AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives...), Office of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities, Office of Fossil Energy, P.O. Box 44375, Washington, DC...

  19. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    SciT

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design ofmore » the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.« less

  20. Thermal analysis elements of liquefied gas storage tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanvarev, I. A.; Krupnikov, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    Tasks of solving energy and resource efficient usage problems, both for oil producing companies and for companies extracting and transporting natural gas, are associated with liquefied petroleum gas technology development. Improving the operation efficiency of liquefied products storages provides for conducting structural, functional, and appropriate thermal analysis of tank parks in the general case as complex dynamic thermal systems.

  1. A conceptual demonstration of freeze desalination-membrane distillation (FD-MD) hybrid desalination process utilizing liquefied natural gas (LNG) cold energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2012-09-01

    The severe global water scarcity and record-high fossil oil price have greatly stimulated the research interests on new desalination technologies which can be driven by renewable energy or waste energy. In this study, a hybrid desalination process comprising freeze desalination and membrane distillation (FD-MD) processes was developed and explored in an attempt to utilize the waste cold energy released from re-gasification of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The concept of this technology was demonstrated using indirect-contact freeze desalination (ICFD) and direct-contact membrane distillation (DCMD) configurations. By optimizing the ICFD operation parameters, namely, the usage of nucleate seeds, operation duration and feed concentration, high quality drinkable water with a low salinity ∼0.144 g/L was produced in the ICFD process. At the same time, using the optimized hollow fiber module length and packing density in the DCMD process, ultra pure water with a low salinity of 0.062 g/L was attained at a condition of high energy efficiency (EE). Overall, by combining FD and MD processes and adopting the optimized operation parameters, the hybrid FD-MD system has been successfully demonstrated. A high total water recovery of 71.5% was achieved, and the water quality obtained met the standard for drinkable water. In addition, with results from specific energy calculation, it was proven that the hybrid process is an energy-saving process and utilization of LNG cold energy could greatly reduce the total energy consumption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG) over nickel catalysts supported on cationic surfactant-templated mesoporous aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Park, Sunyoung; Jung, Ji Chul; Kim, Pil; Chung, Jin Suk; Song, In Kyu

    Two types of mesoporous γ-aluminas (denoted as A-A and A-S) are prepared by a hydrothermal method under different basic conditions using cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) as a templating agent. A-A and A-S are synthesized in a medium of ammonia solution and sodium hydroxide solution, respectively. Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 catalysts (Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S) are then prepared by an impregnation method, and are applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of a mesoporous γ-Al 2O 3 support on the catalytic performance of Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 is investigated. The identity of basic solution strongly affects the physical properties of the A-A and A-S supports. The high surface-area of the mesoporous γ-aluminas and the strong metal-support interaction of supported catalysts greatly enhance the dispersion of nickel species on the catalyst surface. The well-developed mesopores of the Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts prohibit the polymerization of carbon species on the catalyst surface during the reaction. In the steam reforming of LNG, both Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts give better catalytic performance than the nickel catalyst supported on commercial γ-Al 2O 3 (Ni/A-C). In addition, the Ni/A-A catalyst is superior to the Ni/A-S catalyst. The relatively strong metal-support interaction of Ni/A-A catalyst effectively suppresses the sintering of metallic nickel and the carbon deposition in the steam reforming of LNG. The large pores of the Ni/A-A catalyst also play an important role in enhancing internal mass transfer during the reaction.

  3. 78 FR 75359 - Waterway Suitability Assessment for Construction and Operation of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Orange...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... Assessment for Construction and Operation of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... construction to expand or modify marine terminal operations in an existing facility handling Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) OR Liquefied Hazardous Gas (LHG), where the construction, expansion, or modification would...

  4. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordin, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    Bibliography, assembled from computer search of NASA Aerospace Safety Data Bank, including title of report, author, abstract, source, description of figures, key references, and key words or subject terms. Publication is indexed by key subjects and by authors. Items are relevant to design engineers and safety specialists.

  5. Review on airflow in unsaturated zones induced by natural forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Xingxing; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Li, Hailong

    2013-10-01

    Subsurface airflow in unsaturated zones induced by natural forcings is of importance in many environmental and engineering fields, such as environmental remediation, water infiltration and groundwater recharge, coastal soil aeration, mine and tunnel ventilation, and gas exchange between soil and atmosphere. This review synthesizes the published literature on subsurface airflow driven by natural forcings such as atmospheric pressure fluctuations, topographic effect, water table fluctuations, and water infiltration. The present state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms, analytical and numerical models, and environmental and engineering applications related to the naturally occurring airflow is discussed. Airflow induced by atmospheric pressure fluctuations is studied the most because of the applications to environmental remediation and transport of trace gases from soil to atmosphere, which are very important in understanding biogeochemical cycling and global change. Airflow induced by infiltration is also an extensively investigated topic because of its implications in rainfall infiltration and groundwater recharge. Airflow induced by water table fluctuations is important in coastal areas because it plays an important role in coastal environmental remediation and ecological systems. Airflow induced by topographic effect is studied the least. However, it has important applications in unsaturated zone gas transport and natural ventilation of mines and tunnels. Finally, the similarities and differences in the characteristics of the air pressure and airflow are compared and future research efforts are recommended.

  6. Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier

    SciT

    Barclay, John A.; Oseen-Send, Kathryn; Ferguson, Luke

    2016-01-12

    This final report for the DOE Project entitled Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier (AMRL) funded under Grant DE-FG36-08GO18064 to Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy (Heracles/Prometheus) describes an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) prototype designed and built during the period from July 2008 through May 2011. The primary goal of this project was to make significant technical advances toward highly efficient liquefaction of hydrogen. Conventional hydrogen liquefiers at any scale have a maximum FOM of ~0.35 due primarily to the intrinsic difficulty of rapid, efficient compression of either hydrogen or helium working gases. Numerical simulation modeling of high performance AMRL designsmore » indicates certain designs have promise to increase thermodynamic efficiency from a FOM of ~0.35 toward ~0.5 to ~0.6. The technical approach was the use of solid magnetic working refrigerants cycled in and out of high magnetic fields to build an efficient active regenerative magnetic refrigeration module providing cooling power for AMRL. A single-stage reciprocating AMRR with a design temperature span from ~290 K to ~120 K was built and tested with dual magnetic regenerators moving in and out of the conductively-cooled superconducting magnet subsystem. The heat transfer fluid (helium) was coupled to the process stream (refrigeration/liquefaction load) via high performance heat exchangers. In order to maximize AMRR efficiency a helium bypass loop with adjustable flow was incorporated in the design because the thermal mass of magnetic refrigerants is higher in low magnetic field than in high magnetic field. Heracles/Prometheus designed experiments to measure AMRR performance under a variety of different operational parameters such as cycle frequency, magnetic field strength, heat transfer fluid flow rate, amount of bypass flow of the heat transfer fluid while measuring work input, temperature span, cooling capability as a function of cold

  7. Females discriminate against heterospecific sperm in a natural hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Emily R A; Ålund, Murielle; McFarlane, S Eryn; Johnsen, Arild; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-08-01

    When hybridization is maladaptive, species-specific mate preferences are selectively favored, but low mate availability may constrain species-assortative pairing. Females paired to heterospecifics may then benefit by copulating with multiple males and subsequently favoring sperm of conspecifics. Whether such mechanisms for biasing paternity toward conspecifics act as important reproductive barriers in socially monogamous vertebrate species remains to be determined. We use a combination of long-term breeding records from a natural hybrid zone between collared and pied flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis and F. hypoleuca), and an in vitro experiment comparing conspecific and heterospecific sperm performance in female reproductive tract fluid, to evaluate the potential significance of female cryptic choice. We show that the females most at risk of hybridizing (pied flycatchers) frequently copulate with multiple males and are able to inhibit heterospecific sperm performance. The negative effect on heterospecific sperm performance was strongest in pied flycatcher females that were most likely to have been previously exposed to collared flycatcher sperm. We thus demonstrate that a reproductive barrier acts after copulation but before fertilization in a socially monogamous vertebrate. While the evolutionary history of this barrier is unknown, our results imply that there is opportunity for it to be accentuated via a reinforcement-like process. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Atlas of natural hazards in the Hawaiian coastal zone

    Fletcher, Charles H.; Grossman, Eric E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Gibbs, Ann E.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to communicate to citizens and regulatory authorities the history and relative intensity of coastal hazards in Hawaii. This information is the key to the wise use and management of coastal resources. The information contained in this document,we hope,will improve the ability of Hawaiian citizens and visitors to safely enjoy the coast and provide a strong data set for planners and managers to guide the future of coastal resources. This work is largely based on previous investigations by scientific and engineering researchers and county, state, and federal offices and agencies. The unique aspect of this report is that, to the extent possible, it assimilates prior efforts in documenting Hawaiian coastal hazards and combines existing knowledge into a single comprehensive coastal hazard data set. This is by no means the final word on coastal hazards in Hawaii. Every hazardous phenomenon described here, and others such as slope failure and rocky shoreline collapse, need to be more carefully quantified, forecast, and mitigated. Our ultimate goal, of course, is to make the Hawaiian coast a safer place by educating the people of the state, and their leaders, about the hazardous nature of the environment. In so doing, we will also be taking steps toward improved preservation of coastal environments, because the best way to avoid coastal hazards is to avoid inappropriate development in the coastal zone. We have chosen maps as the medium for both recording and communicating the hazard history and its intensity along the Hawaiian coast.Two types of maps are used: 1) smallscale maps showing a general history of hazards on each island and summarizing coastal hazards in a readily understandable format for general use, and 2) a large-scale series of technical maps (1:50,000) depicting coastal sections approximately 5 to 7 miles in length with color bands along the coast ranking the relative intensity of each hazard at the adjacent shoreline.

  9. 49 CFR 173.336 - Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen....336 Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied. (a) Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied... with nitrogen dioxide. Each valve opening must be closed by a solid metal plug with tapered thread...

  10. 49 CFR 173.336 - Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen....336 Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied. (a) Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied... with nitrogen dioxide. Each valve opening must be closed by a solid metal plug with tapered thread...

  11. 49 CFR 173.336 - Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen....336 Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied. (a) Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied... with nitrogen dioxide. Each valve opening must be closed by a solid metal plug with tapered thread...

  12. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Over Nickel-Phosphorus-Alumina Xerogel Catalyst Prepared by a Carbon-Templating Epoxide-Driven Sol-Gel Method.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yongju; Park, Seungwon; Han, Seung Ju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Jinwon; Song, In Kyu

    2016-05-01

    A nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was prepared by a carbon-templating epoxide-driven sol-gel method (denoted as CNPA catalyst), and it was applied to the hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). For comparison, a nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was also prepared by a similar method in the absence of carbon template (denoted as NPA catalyst). The effect of carbon template addition on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the catalysts in the steam reforming of LNG was investigated. Both CNPA and NPA catalysts showed excellent textural properties with well-developed mesoporous structure. However, CNPA catalyst retained a more reducible nickel aluminate phase than NPA catalyst. XRD analysis of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts revealed that nickel sintering on the CNPA catalyst was suppressed compared to that on the NPA catalyst. From H2-TPD and CH4-TPD measurements of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts, it was also revealed that CNPA catalyst with large amount of hydrogen uptake and strong hydrogen-binding sites showed larger amount of methane adsorption than NPA catalyst. In the hydrogen production by steam reforming of LNG, CNPA catalyst with large methane adsorption capacity showed a better catalytic activity than NPA catalyst.

  13. Design Guidelines for Bus Transit Systems Using Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) as an Alternative Fuel.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-09-01

    The use of alternative fuels to power transit buses is steadily increasing. Several fuels, including Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), and Methanol/Ethanol, are already being used in buses. At present, there do not exist co...

  14. Monitoring wetland of Poyang Lake National Nature Reserve zone by remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Xinghua; Fan, Zhewen; Fang, Yu; Yu, Yuping; Zhang, Yun

    2008-10-01

    In order to monitor the wetland of the Poyang Lake national nature reserve zone, we selected three different seasons TM image data which were achieved individually in April 23th in 1988, Nov 2nd in 1994, and Jan 1st in 2000. Based on the band 5, band 4 and band 3of TM image, we divided the land coverage of Poyang Lake national nature reserve zone into three classes--water field, meadow field and the other land use by rule of maximum likelihood. Using the outcome data to make the statistical analysis, combining with the GIS overlay function operation, the land coverage changes of the Poyang Lake national nature reserve zone can be achieved. Clipped by the Poyang Lake national nature reserve zone boundary, the land coverage changes of Poyang Lake national nature reserve zone in three different years can be attained. Compared with the different wetland coverage data in year of 1988, 1994, 2000, the Poyang Lake national nature reserve zone eco-environment can be inferred from it. After analyzing the land coverage changes data, we draw the conclusion that the effort of Poyang Lake national nature reserve administration bureaucracy has worked well in certain sense.

  15. Effect of SiO 2-ZrO 2 supports prepared by a grafting method on hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas over Ni/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Song, In Kyu

    SiO 2-ZrO 2 supports with various zirconium contents are prepared by grafting a zirconium precursor onto the surface of commercial Carbosil silica. Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts are then prepared by an impregnation method, and are applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of SiO 2-ZrO 2 supports on the performance of the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts is investigated. SiO 2-ZrO 2 prepared by a grafting method serves as an efficient support for the nickel catalyst in the steam reforming of LNG. Zirconia enhances the resistance of silica to steam significantly and increases the interaction between nickel and the support, and furthermore, prevents the growth of nickel oxide species during the calcination process through the formation of a ZrO 2-SiO 2 composite structure. The crystalline structures and catalytic activities of the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 catalysts are strongly influenced by the amount of zirconium grafted. The conversion of LNG and the yield of hydrogen show volcano-shaped curves with respect to zirconium content. Among the catalysts tested, the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 (Zr/Si = 0.54) sample shows the best catalytic performance in terms of both LNG conversion and hydrogen yield. The well-developed and pure tetragonal phase of ZrO 2-SiO 2 (Zr/Si = 0.54) appears to play an important role in the adsorption of steam and subsequent spillover of steam from the support to the active nickel. The small particle size of the metallic nickel in the Ni(20 wt.%)/SiO 2-ZrO 2 (Zr/Si = 0.54) catalyst is also responsible for its high performance.

  16. 78 FR 65427 - Pipeline Safety: Reminder of Requirements for Liquefied Petroleum Gas and Utility Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2013-0097] Pipeline Safety: Reminder of Requirements for Liquefied Petroleum Gas and Utility Liquefied Petroleum Gas Pipeline Systems AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...

  17. Apparatus and method for gelling liquefied gasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Adam (Inventor); DiSalvo, Roberto (Inventor); Shepherd, Phillip (Inventor); Kosier, Ryan (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for gelling liquid propane and other liquefied gasses includes a temperature controlled churn mixer, vacuum pump, liquefied gas transfer tank, and means for measuring amount of material entering the mixer. The apparatus and method are particularly useful for the production of high quality rocket fuels and propellants.

  18. 78 FR 44937 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ...-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced From Domestic Natural Gas Resources to Non... equivalent of 101 billion standard cubic feet (Bcf) of natural gas per year), pursuant to the LNG Sale and... States does not have an FTA requiring national treatment for trade in natural gas (non-FTA countries...

  19. 78 FR 44934 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ...-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced From Domestic Natural Gas Resources to Non... equivalent of 88.3 billion standard cubic feet (Bcf) of natural gas per year), pursuant to the LNG Sale and... treatment for trade in natural gas (non-FTA countries) with which trade is not prohibited by U.S. law or...

  20. Fast Oxidation Processes in a Naturally Reduced Aquifer Zone Caused by Dissolved Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. A.; Jemison, N. E.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Bush, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of naturally reduced zones is quite common in alluvial aquifers in the western U.S.A. due to the burial of woody debris in flood plains. The naturally reduced zones are heterogeneously dispersed in such aquifers and are characterized by high concentrations of organic carbon and reduced phases, including iron sulfides and reduced forms of metals, including uranium(IV). The persistence of high concentrations of dissolved uranium(VI) at uranium-contaminated aquifers on the Colorado Plateau has been attributed to slow oxidation of insoluble uranium(IV) mineral phases that are found in association with these natural reducing zones, although there is little understanding of the relative importance of various potential oxidants. Three field experiments were conducted within an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO wherein groundwater associated with naturally reduced zones was pumped into a gas-impermeable tank, mixed with a conservative tracer (Br-), bubbled with a gas phase composed of 97% O2 and 3% CO2, and then returned to the subsurface in the same well from which it was withdrawn. Within minutes of re-injection of the oxygenated groundwater, dissolved uranium(VI) concentrations increased from less than 1 μM to greater than 2.5 μM, demonstrating that oxygen can be an important oxidant for uranium in these field systems if supplied to the naturally reduced zones. Small concentrations of nitrate were also observed in the previously nitrate-free groundwater, and Fe(II) decreased to the detection limit. These results contrast with other laboratory and field results in which oxygen was introduced to systems containing high concentrations of mackinawite (FeS) rather than the more crystalline iron sulfides found in aged, naturally reduced zones. The flux of oxygen to the naturally reduced zones in the alluvial aquifers occurs mainly through interactions between groundwater and gas phases at the water table, and seasonal variations

  1. Soil salinization in different natural zones of intermontane depressions in Tuva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernousenko, G. I.; Kurbatskaya, S. S.

    2017-11-01

    Soil salinization features in semidesert, dry steppe, and chernozemic steppe zones within intermontane depressions in the central part of the Tuva Republic are discussed. Chernozems, chestnut soils, and brown desert-steppe soils of these zones are usually nonsaline. However, salinization of these zonal soils is possible in the case of the presence of salt-bearing parent materials (usually, the derivatives of Devonian deposits). In different natural zones of the intermontane depressions, salt-affected soils are mainly allocated to endorheic lake basins, where they are formed in places of discharge of mineral groundwater, and to river valleys. The composition and content of salts in the natural waters are dictated by the local hydrogeological conditions. The total content of dissolved solids in lake water varies from 1 to 370 g/L; the water is usually of the sulfate-chloride or chloride-sulfate salinity type; in some cases, soda-sulfate water is present. Soil salinity around the lakes is usually of the chloride-sulfate-sodium type; gypsum is often present in the profiles. Chloride salinization rarely predominates in this part of Tuva, because chlorides are easily leached off from the mainly coarse-textured soils. In some cases, the predominance of magnesium over sodium is observed in the composition of dissolved salts, which may be indicative of the cryogenic transformation of soil salts. Soda-saline soils are present in all the considered natural zones on minor areas. It is hardly possible to make unambiguous statements about the dominance of the particular type of salinity in the given natural zones. Zonal salinity patterns are weakly expressed in salinization of hydromorphic soils. However, a tendency for more frequent occurrence of soda-saline soils in steppe landscapes and chloride-sulfate salinization (often, with participation of gypsum) in the dry steppe and semidesert landscapes is observed.

  2. Widespread natural perchlorate in unsaturated zones of the southwest United States

    Rao, Balaji; Anderson, Todd A.; Orris, Greta J.; Rainwater, Ken A.; Rajagopalan, Srinath; Sandvig, Renee M.; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Stonestrom, David A.; Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Jackson, W Andrew

    2007-01-01

    A substantial reservoir (up to 1 kg ha-1) of natural perchlorate is present in diverse unsaturated zones of the arid and semi-arid southwestern United States. The perchlorate co-occurs with meteoric chloride that has accumulated in these soils throughout the Holocene [0 to 10−15 ka (thousand years ago)] and possibly longer periods. Previously, natural perchlorate widely believed to be limited to the Atacama Desert, now appears widespread in steppe-to-desert ecoregions. The perchlorate reservoir becomes sufficiently large to affect groundwater when recharge from irrigation or climate change flushes accumulated salts from the unsaturated zone. This new source may help explain increasing reports of perchlorate in dry region agricultural products and should be considered when evaluating overall source contributions.

  3. Artificial and natural radionuclides in soils of the southern and middle taiga zones of Komi Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznosikov, V. A.; Lodygin, E. D.; Shuktomova, I. I.

    2017-07-01

    Specific activities of artificial (137Cs, 90Sr) and natural (40K, 232Th, 226Ra) radionuclides in background soils of southern and middle taiga of Komi Republic have been estimated with consideration for the landscape-geochemical features of the territory. It has been shown that their accumulation and migration in soils are determined by the following factors: position in relief, texture, and organic matter content. No anomalous zones with increased contents of radionuclides in soils have been revealed.

  4. Storage and mobilization of natural and septic nitrate in thick unsaturated zones, California

    Izbicki, John A.; Flint, Alan L.; O'Leary, David R.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter; Johnson, Russell D.; Clark, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of natural and septic nitrate from the unsaturated zone as a result of managed aquifer recharge has degraded water quality from public-supply wells near Yucca Valley in the western Mojave Desert, California. The effect of nitrate storage and potential for denitrification in the unsaturated zone to mitigate increasing nitrate concentrations were investigated. Storage of water extractable nitrate in unsaturated alluvium up to 160 meters (m) thick, ranged from 420 to 6600 kilograms per hectare (kg/ha) as nitrogen (N) beneath undeveloped sites, from 6100 to 9200 kg/ha as N beneath unsewered sites. Nitrate reducing and denitrifying bacteria were less abundant under undeveloped sites and more abundant under unsewered sites; however, δ15N–NO3, and δ18O–NO3 data show only about 5–10% denitrification of septic nitrate in most samples—although as much as 40% denitrification occurred in some parts the unsaturated zone and near the top of the water table. Storage of nitrate in thick unsaturated zones and dilution with low-nitrate groundwater are the primary attenuation mechanisms for nitrate from septic discharges in the study area. Numerical simulations of unsaturated flow, using the computer program TOUGH2, showed septic effluent movement through the unsaturated zone increased as the number and density of the septic tanks increased, and decreased with increased layering, and increased slope of layers, within the unsaturated zone. Managing housing density can delay arrival of septic discharges at the water table, especially in layered unsaturated alluvium, allowing time for development of strategies to address future water-quality issues.

  5. Storage and mobilization of natural and septic nitrate in thick unsaturated zones, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbicki, John A.; Flint, Alan L.; O'Leary, David R.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter; Johnson, Russell D.; Clark, Dennis A.

    2015-05-01

    Mobilization of natural and septic nitrate from the unsaturated zone as a result of managed aquifer recharge has degraded water quality from public-supply wells near Yucca Valley in the western Mojave Desert, California. The effect of nitrate storage and potential for denitrification in the unsaturated zone to mitigate increasing nitrate concentrations were investigated. Storage of water extractable nitrate in unsaturated alluvium up to 160 meters (m) thick, ranged from 420 to 6600 kilograms per hectare (kg/ha) as nitrogen (N) beneath undeveloped sites, from 6100 to 9200 kg/ha as N beneath unsewered sites. Nitrate reducing and denitrifying bacteria were less abundant under undeveloped sites and more abundant under unsewered sites; however, δ15N-NO3, and δ18O-NO3 data show only about 5-10% denitrification of septic nitrate in most samples-although as much as 40% denitrification occurred in some parts the unsaturated zone and near the top of the water table. Storage of nitrate in thick unsaturated zones and dilution with low-nitrate groundwater are the primary attenuation mechanisms for nitrate from septic discharges in the study area. Numerical simulations of unsaturated flow, using the computer program TOUGH2, showed septic effluent movement through the unsaturated zone increased as the number and density of the septic tanks increased, and decreased with increased layering, and increased slope of layers, within the unsaturated zone. Managing housing density can delay arrival of septic discharges at the water table, especially in layered unsaturated alluvium, allowing time for development of strategies to address future water-quality issues.

  6. Pressures, trends, and impacts in coastal zones: Interactions between socioeconomic and natural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. K.; Subak, S.; Adger, W. N.

    1996-03-01

    This paper assesses the status of coastal zones in the context of expected climate change and its related impacts, as well as current and future socioeconomic pressures and impacts. It is argued that external stresses and shocks relating to sea-level rise and other changes will tend to exacerbate existing environmental pressures and damage in coastal zones. Coastal zones are under increasing stress because of an interrelated set of planning failures including information, economic market, and policy intervention failures. Moves towards integrated coastal zone management are urgently required to guide the coevolution of natural and human systems. Overtly technocentric claims that assessments of vulnerability undertaken to date are overestimates of likely future damages from global warming are premature. While it is the case that forecasts of sea-level rise have been scaled down, much uncertainty remains over, for example, combined storm, sea surge, and other events. In any case, within the socioeconomic analyses of the problem, resource valuations have been at best only partial and have failed to incorporate sensitivity analysis in terms of the discount rates utilized. This would indicate an underestimation of potential damage costs. Overall, a precautionary approach is justified based on the need to act ahead of adequate information acquisition, economically efficient resource pricing and proactive coastal planning.

  7. Apparatus and method for gelling liquefied gasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Adam (Inventor); DiSalvo, Roberto (Inventor); Shepherd, Phillip (Inventor); Kosier, Ryan (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for gelling liquid propane and other liquefied gasses. The apparatus includes a temperature controlled churn mixer, vacuum pump, liquefied gas transfer tank, and means for measuring amount of material entering the mixer. The method uses gelling agents such as silicon dioxide, clay, carbon, or organic or inorganic polymers, as well as dopants such as titanium, aluminum, and boron powders. The apparatus and method are particularly useful for the production of high quality rocket fuels and propellants.

  8. Relating rheology to geometry in large-scale natural shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    diffusion, or metamorphic reactions? (3) In two-phase / polyphase mixtures, does the strong phase generally form a load-bearing framework, favoring constant strain-rate (Voigt) bound behavior, or does the weak phase form through-going strain pathways, favoring constant stress (Reuss) bound behavior, or do the phases remain well mixed, favoring an intermediate behavior (e.g., Tullis et al model)? (4) How do we deal with the rheological effect of water? Is it simply an unconstrained variable in nature? Is the water fugacity model in flow laws adequate? (5) How can we better relate experimental results (often carried out at constant strain-rate, and not reaching microstructural steady state) to deformation in natural shear zones? Rheological observations on well-constrained natural shear zones are helping us answer some of these questions.

  9. 30 CFR 57.4463 - Liquefied petroleum gas use underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Liquefied petroleum gas use underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4463 Liquefied petroleum gas use underground. Use of liquefied petroleum gases underground shall be limited to maintenance work...

  10. 49 CFR 393.69 - Liquefied petroleum gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquefied petroleum gas systems. 393.69 Section... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Fuel Systems § 393.69 Liquefied petroleum gas systems. (a) A fuel system that uses liquefied petroleum gas as a fuel for the operation of a motor vehicle or for the...

  11. Dynamic Simulation of a Helium Liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, R.; Ooba, K.; Nobutoki, M.; Mito, T.

    2004-06-01

    Dynamic behavior of a helium liquefier has been studied in detail with a Cryogenic Process REal-time SimulaTor (C-PREST) at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). The C-PREST is being developed to integrate large-scale helium cryogenic plant design, operation and maintenance for optimum process establishment. As a first step of simulations of cooldown to 4.5 K with the helium liquefier model is conducted, which provides a plant-process validation platform. The helium liquefier consists of seven heat exchangers, a liquid-nitrogen (LN2) precooler, two expansion turbines and a liquid-helium (LHe) reservoir. Process simulations are fulfilled with sequence programs, which were implemented with C-PREST based on an existing liquefier operation. The interactions of a JT valve, a JT-bypass valve and a reservoir-return valve have been dynamically simulated. The paper discusses various aspects of refrigeration process simulation, including its difficulties such as a balance between complexity of the adopted models and CPU time.

  12. Quantification of natural vapor fluxes of trichloroethene in the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    Smith, James A.; Tisdale, Amy K.; Cho, H. Jean

    1996-01-01

    The upward flux of trichloroethene (TCE) vapor through the unsaturated zone above a contaminated, water-table aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, has been studied under natural conditions over a 12-month period. Vertical gas-phase diffusion fluxes were estimated indirectly by measuring the TCE vapor concentration gradient in the unsaturated zone and using Fick's law to calculate the flux. The total gas-phase flux (e.g., the sum of diffusion and advection fluxes) was measured directly with a vertical flux chamber (VFC). In many cases, the upward TCE vapor flux was several orders of magnitude greater than the upward TCE diffusion flux, suggesting that mechanisms other than steady-state vapor diffusion are contributing to the vertical transport of TCE vapors through the unsaturated zone. The measured total flux of TCE vapor from the subsurface to the atmosphere is approximately 50 kg/yr and is comparable in magnitude to the removal rate of TCE from the aquifer by an existing pump-and-treat system and by discharge into a nearby stream. The net upward flux of TCE is reduced significantly during a storm event, presumably due to the mass transfer of TCE from the soil gas to the infiltrating rainwater and its subsequent downward advection. Several potential problems associated with the measurement of total gas-phase fluxes are discussed.

  13. 75 FR 62512 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives... Fossil Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 3E-042, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20585. FOR...

  14. Natural analogues for processes affecting disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckless, J. S.

    2003-04-01

    Natural analogues can contribute to understanding and predicting the performance of subsystems and processes affecting a mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste in several ways. Most importantly, analogues provide tests for various aspects of systems of a repository at dimensional scales and time spans that cannot be attained by experimental study. In addition, they provide a means for the general public to judge the predicted performance of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository in familiar terms such that the average person can assess the anticipated long-term performance and other scientific conclusions. Hydrologists working on the Yucca Mountain Project (currently the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Repository Development) have modeled the flow of water through the vadose zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and particularly the interaction of vadose-zone water with mined openings. Analogues from both natural and anthropogenic examples confirm the prediction that most of the water moving through the vadose zone will move through the host rock and around tunnels. This can be seen both quantitatively where direct comparison between seepage and net infiltration has been made and qualitatively by the excellent degree of preservation of archaeologic artifacts in underground openings. The latter include Paleolithic cave paintings in southwestern Europe, murals and artifacts in Egyptian tombs, painted subterranean Buddhist temples in India and China, and painted underground churches in Cappadocia, Turkey. Natural analogues also suggest that this diversion mechanism is more effective in porous media than in fractured media. Observations from natural analogues are also consistent with the modeled decrease in the percentage of infiltration that becomes seepage with a decrease in amount of infiltration. Finally, analogues, such as tombs that have ben partially filled by mud flows, suggest that the same capillary forces that keep water in the

  15. New Madrid Seismic Zone: a test case for naturally induced seismicity

    SciT

    Nava, S.J.

    1983-09-01

    Induced seismicity caused by man-made events, such as the filling of reservoirs has been well documented. In contrast, naturally induced seismicity has received little attention. It has been shown that a fluctuation of as little as several bars can trigger reservoir induced earthquakes. Naturally occurring phenomena generate similar fluctuations and could trigger earthquakes where the faults in ambient stress field are suitably oriented and close to failure. The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) presents an ideal test case for the study of naturally induced seismicity. The ideal data set for a study of triggering effects must contain a statistically significantmore » number of events, a constant accumulated strain, and a limited focal region. New Madrid earthquakes are well documented from 1974 to the present, down to a magnitude approx. 1.8. They lie in a distinct fault pattern and occur as a reaction to the regional stress regime. A statistical correlation was made between the earthquakes and a variety of different types of loads, to see if New Madrid seismicity could be triggered by natural fluctuations. The types of triggers investigated ranged from solid earth tides to variations in barometric pressure, rainfall, and stages of the Mississippi River. This analysis becomes complex because each factor investigated creates individual stresses, as well as having imbedded in it a reaction to other factors.« less

  16. Microbiota of the ground air layers in natural and industrial zones of the Kola Arctic.

    PubMed

    Korneykova, Maria V; Evdokimova, Galina A

    2018-02-23

    The fungi and bacteria number, as well as the species composition of the fungi in the ground air layer in the European Arctic region of Russia, primarily in the tundra (the Rybachy Peninsula), in the subzone of the northern taiga (the Pasvik State Nature Reserve) and in the industrial areas (the Copper-Nickel Plant "Pechenganickel," the Kandalaksha Aluminum Plant) have been studied. One hundred and ninety-two atmosphere air samples of various ecosystems have been analyzed. The sample collection took place in the summer-autumn period (June, July, September, in 2012-2015) with the aspirator, precipitating microorganisms on the surface of media. The number of microorganisms per 1 m 3 of air was calculated. The portion of the airborne fungi in the ground air layer both in the tundra and in the taiga was higher in comparison with the bacteria, and amounted to 60-77% of the total number colony forming units (CFU). The least number of microorganisms in the investigated period was registered in the Barents Sea coastal atmospheric air, only 11-15 microbial CFU per 1 m 3 . The airborne fungi diversity in the taiga zone was richer than in the tundra. The fungi of the g. Penicillium predominated in both zones air. Bacteria gram-positive (the division Fermicutes) predominated within the bacterial biota. The species Penicillium decumbens, P. raistrickii prevailed in the air of the background tundra zone regions. The representatives of the genus Torula and Sterilia mycelia, P. raistrickii predominated in the taiga zone. Close by the Copper-Nickel Plant (about 3 km), the air bacterial contamination (100-600 CFU per 1 m 3 ) was revealed, with prevailing bacteria gram-negative (the division Gracilicutes). The species Cladosporium oxysporum predominated in the air to the greatest possible extent of the contaminated region due to the emissions of the Kandalaksha Aluminum Plant. The species Gongronella butleri were uppermost due to the emissions of the Copper-Nickel Plant

  17. A novel method of recognizing liquefied honey.

    PubMed

    Płowaś-Korus, Iwona; Masewicz, Łukasz; Szwengiel, Artur; Rachocki, Adam; Baranowska, Hanna Maria; Medycki, Wojciech

    2018-04-15

    The content of glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose and water were determined for multiflorous honey of Great Poland. The measurements were carried out for different fractions of honey and also for the liquefied honey at 40 °C. Water activity and pH were both determined for all samples. A new method of recognizing liquefied honey is proposed based on the water influence on pH and the monosaccharides and disaccharides contents. The simple function of quadratic polynomial enabled to reveal the different character of the liquefied honey. The electrical conductivity behavior of different dry matter samples of honey are presented in the wide range of temperature. The proton spin-lattice relaxation measurements were recorded for the crystalline fraction in the magnetic field range covering the proton Larmor frequencies from 0.01 to 25 MHz and in the wide range of temperature. Heating the honey at 30 °C results in the irreversible molecular structure changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Capillary zone electrophorsis for the analysis of naturally occurring 2-hydroxycitric acids and their lactones.

    PubMed

    Abhijith, B L; Mohan, Moolya; Joseph, David; Haleema, Simimole; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Ibnusaud, Ibrahim

    2017-08-01

    A simple capillary zone electrophoresis method with direct ultraviolet detection has been developed for the analysis of naturally occurring diastereomeric 2-hydroxycitric acid lactones. Using 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer of pH 7, a baseline resolution R s > 3.0 was observed for all organic acids selected for the present study. This method was employed for the quantitative determination of title acids present in the plant sources namely Garcinia cambogia fruit rinds and Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx. Conversion of 2-hydroxycitric acids to their lactones on heating the above plant sources is deliberated. The Hydrolysis of hydroxycitric acid lactones in aqueous solution is reported for the first time. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Rheological Properties of Natural Subduction Zone Interface: Insights from "Digital" Griggs Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidi, P. I.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Moreno, M.; Agard, P.; Oncken, O.; Angiboust, S.

    2017-12-01

    The physical nature of plate locking and its relation to surface deformation patterns at different time scales (e.g. GPS displacements during the seismic cycle) can be better understood by determining the rheological parameters of the subduction interface. However, since direct rheological measurements are not possible, finite element modelling helps to determine the effective rheological parameters of the subduction interface. We used the open source finite element code pTatin to create 2D models, starting with a homogeneous medium representing shearing at the subduction interface. We tested several boundary conditions that mimic simple shear and opted for the one that best describes the Grigg's type simple shear experiments. After examining different parameters, such as shearing velocity, temperature and viscosity, we added complexity to the geometry by including a second phase. This arises from field observations, where shear zone outcrops are often composites of multiple phases: stronger crustal blocks embedded within a sedimentary and/or serpentinized matrix have been reported for several exhumed subduction zones. We implemented a simplified model to simulate simple shearing of a two-phase medium in order to quantify the effect of heterogeneous rheology on stress and strain localization. Preliminary results show different strength in the models depending on the block-to-matrix ratio. We applied our method to outcrop scale block-in-matrix geometries and by sampling at different depths along exhumed former subduction interfaces, we expect to be able to provide effective friction and viscosity of a natural interface. In a next step, these effective parameters will be used as input into seismic cycle deformation models in an attempt to assess the possible signature of field geometries on the slip behaviour of the plate interface.

  20. Two Reactive Zones within Riverbank Aquifers Impact the Accumulation of Arsenic within Permeable Natural Reactive Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappett, P.; Myers, K.; Jewell, K.; Berube, M.; Datta, S.; Hossain, A.; Hosain, A.; Lipsi, M.; Ahmed, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    River stage fluctuations drives river water, rich oxidants, into riverbanks aquifers. When these aquifers are rich in dissolved iron (Fe), iron oxides (FeOOH) precipitate, creating a reactive surface upon which toxic elements such as arsenic (As) may sorb. These Permeable Natural Reactive Barriers (PNRBs) have been studied on the Meghna River. The lack of understanding of what controls their formation and fate could result in dangerous consequences. Pumping of riverbank aquifers for irrigation could re-mobilize toxic concentrations of As into drinking water aquifers. It is important to understand the hydrological, geochemical and biological processes controlling the properties of PNRBs. To this end, monitoring wells and drive-point piezometers were installed orthogonal to the Meghna River in Bangladesh. The dimensions of the shallow aquifer was mapped with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). The monitoring wells and a river gage were instrumented with pressure transducers to record water level fluctuations. Groundwater flows towards the river for most of the year but reverses under the influence of local irrigation pumping in the late dry season and rapidly rising river stage in the early monsoon. Semi-diurnal tides in the dry season have an amplitude of 80 cm. Declining concentrations of conservative dissolved ions towards the river indicated a zone of dilution from river water extending up to 50 m from the river's dry season edge. Dissolved As was produced as groundwater passed through this dilution zone until the final 20 m where As was abruptly removed from solution. This location coincided with a PNRB with enriched solid-phase Fe and Mn within the upper 3 m of sediment. 16S bacterial community DNA was sequenced from the wells and drive-point piezometers to map the distribution of Fe and As reducers and oxidizers. The richest overall biodiversity was found within the PNRB zone. It contained the most oxidizing and reducing species. This evidence suggests

  1. SIMS Investigations on Growth and Sector Zoning in Natural Hydrothermal Quartz: Isotopic and Trace Element Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, E.; Vennemann, T. W.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Meisser, N.

    2014-12-01

    Quartz is the most abundant mineral in the Earth's crust and is found in virtually every geological context. Despite its ubiquity and the detailed studies on the conditions of quartz crystallization, some questions concerning its growth and sector zoning with regard to trace element incorporation and oxygen isotope fractionations and the implications thereof for interpretations on the conditions of formation remain (e.g., Jourdan et al., 2009). This study presents new in-situ measurements of trace element and oxygen isotope ratios on natural hydrothermal quartz from an extensional gold-bearing quartz vein in the western Swiss Alps. The temperature of formation of the veins is estimated by quartz-hematite oxygen isotope thermometry to be about 360°C. A detailed SEM-CL study of this sample shows cyclic lamellar growth, alternating with phases of dissolution that are directly followed by macro-mosaic growth of the quartz, before returning to a cyclic lamellar growth again. Trace element concentrations (measured for Na, K, Li, Al, and Ti) notably showed Al/Si variations of three orders of magnitude and coupled Al and Li variations, likely substituting for Si in different growth zones with lower values in macro-mosaic zones precipitating after the period of dissolution. The oxygen isotope composition of the crystal, in contrast, is homogeneous through all growth zones (δ18O values between 15.6‰ and 16.2‰) indicating that the fluid must have been buffered by the host-rock and/or the source of the fluid remained the same despite the period of quartz dissolution. Furthermore, the temperature during crystallization of the quartz crystal has likely also remained similar. The fact that no variations are measured in oxygen isotope compositions but some variations in trace element contents may suggest that changes in pressure were important during the formation of this quartz crystal. Give the pressure effects on the solubility of quartz (Fournier and Potter, 1982), both

  2. Electronic atlas of the Russian Arctic coastal zone: natural conditions and technogenic risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, D. S.; Rivkin, F. M.; Rachold, V.

    2004-12-01

    The Arctic coast is characterized by a diversity of geological-geomorphological structures and geocryological conditions, which are expected to respond differently to changes in the natural environment and in anthropogenic impacts. At present, oil fields are prospected and developed and permanent and temporary ports are constructed in the Arctic regions of Russia. Thus, profound understanding of the processes involved and measures of nature conservation for the coastal zone of the Arctic Seas are required. One of the main field of Arctic coastal investigations and database formation of coastal conditions is the mapping of the coasts. This poster presents a set of digital maps including geology, quaternary sediments, landscapes, engineering-geology, vegetation, geocryology and a series of regional sources, which have been selected to characterize the Russian Arctic coast. The area covered in this work includes the 200-km-wide band along the entire Russian Arctic coast from the Norwegian boundary in the west to the Bering Strait in the east. Methods included the collection of the majority of available hard copies of cartographic material and their digital formats and the transformation of these sources into a uniform digital graphic format. The atlas consists of environmental maps and maps of engineering-geological zoning. The set of environmental maps includes geology, quaternary sediments, landscapes and vegetation of the Russian Arctic coast at a scale of 1:4000000. The set of engineering-geocryological maps includes a map of engineering-geocryological zoning of the Russian Arctic coast, a map of the intensity of destructive coastal process and a map of industrial impact risk assessment ( 1:8000000 scale). Detailed mapping has been performed for key sites (at a scale of 1:100000) in order to enable more precise estimates of the intensity of destructive coastal process and industrial impact. The engineering-geocryological map of the Russian Arctic coast was

  3. Method and apparatus for pressurizing a liquefied gas

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.

    2005-07-26

    Apparatus providing at least one thermoelectric device for pressurizing a liquefied gas container and methods employing same are disclosed. A thermoelectric device including a heating surface and a cooling surface is used for pressurizing a container by vaporizing liquefied gas within the container by transferring heat energy from a portion of the liquefied gas in contact with the cooling surface to another portion of the liquefied gas in contact with the heating surface of the thermoelectric device to convert some of the liquefied gas to a vapor state. Liquefied gas vapor and/or liquid phase may be supplied by disclosed apparatus and methods. The apparatus may also be used as a vapor pump or a liquid pump, or fluid pump. Methods of operation are also disclosed.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Novolak Phenol Formaldehyde Resin from Liquefied Brown-Rotted Wood

    Gai-Yun Li; Chung-Yun Hse; Te-Fu Qin

    2012-01-01

    The brown-rotted wood was liquefied in phenol with phosphoric acid as catalyst and the resulting liquefied products were condensed with formaldehyde to yield novolak liquefied wood-based phenol formaldehyde resin (LWPF). The results showed that brown-rotted wood could be more easily liquefied than sound wood in phenol. The residue content of liquefied wood decreased...

  5. Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquife

    SciT

    Campbell, K M; K Kukkadapu, R K; Qafoku, N P

    2012-05-23

    Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology and redox processes that occur in these zones, several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a U-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO) were examined. Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for U and Fe content, oxidation state, and mineralogy; reduced S phases; and solid-phase organic C content using a suite of analyticalmore » and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase U concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the U present as U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced S phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and SO4 reduction has occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentrations of solid-phase organic C and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic C concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic C for maintaining reducing conditions and U immobilization.« less

  6. Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciT

    Campbell, Kate M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2012-05-23

    Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology, and redox processes that occur in these zones, we examined several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO). Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for uranium and iron content, oxidation state, and mineralogy, reduced sulfur phases, and solid phase organic carbon content using a suite ofmore » analytical and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase uranium concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the uranium present as reduced U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced sulfur phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and sulfate reduction occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentration of solid phase organic carbon and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic carbon concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic carbon for maintaining reducing conditions and uranium immobilization.« less

  7. Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciT

    Campbell, K. M.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Qafoku, N. P.

    2012-08-01

    Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology and redox processes that occur in these zones, several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a U-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO) were examined. Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for U and Fe content, oxidation state, and mineralogy; reduced S phases; and solid-phase organic C content using a suite of analyticalmore » and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase U concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the U present as U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced S phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and SO 4 reduction has occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentrations of solid-phase organic C and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic C concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic C for maintaining reducing conditions and U immobilization.« less

  8. 29 CFR 779.360 - Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Establishments Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas and Fuel Oil Dealers § 779.360 Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas... an essential ingredient or principal raw material, such as sales of liquefied-petroleum-gas for the...

  9. 29 CFR 779.360 - Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Establishments Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas and Fuel Oil Dealers § 779.360 Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas... an essential ingredient or principal raw material, such as sales of liquefied-petroleum-gas for the...

  10. 29 CFR 779.360 - Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Establishments Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas and Fuel Oil Dealers § 779.360 Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas... an essential ingredient or principal raw material, such as sales of liquefied-petroleum-gas for the...

  11. Carbonate counter pump stimulated by natural iron fertilization in the Polar Frontal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Ian; Schiebel, Ralf; Ziveri, Patrizia; Movellan, Aurore; Lampitt, Richard; Wolff, George A.

    2014-12-01

    The production of organic carbon in the ocean's surface and its subsequent downward export transfers carbon dioxide to the deep ocean. This CO2 drawdown is countered by the biological precipitation of carbonate, followed by sinking of particulate inorganic carbon, which is a source of carbon dioxide to the surface ocean, and hence the atmosphere over 100-1,000 year timescales. The net transfer of CO2 to the deep ocean is therefore dependent on the relative amount of organic and inorganic carbon in sinking particles. In the Southern Ocean, iron fertilization has been shown to increase the export of organic carbon, but it is unclear to what degree this effect is compensated by the export of inorganic carbon. Here we assess the composition of sinking particles collected from sediment traps located in the Polar Frontal Zone of the Southern Ocean. We find that in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions that are characterized by naturally high iron concentrations, fluxes of both organic and inorganic carbon are higher than in regions with no iron fertilization. However, the excess flux of inorganic carbon is greater than that of organic carbon. We estimate that the production and flux of carbonate in naturally iron-fertilized waters reduces the overall amount of CO2 transferred to the deep ocean by 6-32%, compared to 1-4% at the non-fertilized site. We suggest that an increased export of organic carbon, stimulated by iron availability in the glacial sub-Antarctic oceans, may have been accompanied by a strengthened carbonate counter pump.

  12. EnviroAtlas - Percent Stream Buffer Zone As Natural Land Cover for the Conterminous United States

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the percentage of land area within a 30 meter buffer zone along the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) high resolution stream network, and along water bodies such as lakes and ponds that are connected via flow to the streams, that is classified as forest land cover, modified forest land cover, and natural land cover using the 2006 National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) for each Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) 12-digit hydrological unit (HUC) in the conterminous United States. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  13. Mechanical characterization of natural building stones: observation of the fracture process zone by ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvetti, Francesco; Cardani, Giuliana; Meda, Alberto

    1999-09-01

    The cultural heritage of many nations consist of a great variety of structures of high intrinsic value, which are often composed of natural building stones (NBS), as granite, limestone, marble and sandstone. The use of accurate inspection devices, such as laser interferometry, allows us to acquire information regarding the mechanical properties and damage (tensile cracks) of NBS, which represents the first step in the restoration process. In this paper, the potential application of an electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) is shown, with particular attention to the observed displacement field and the crack penetration during laboratory testing. In ESPI, by superimposing a reflected light to a reference digitized image, an interference phenomenon is produced. By comparing two recorded interference patterns (before and after loading), the corresponding deformation can be evaluated. The application of ESPI in several laboratory tests on NBS is presented in this paper. In particular, during bending tests performed on geometrically similar NBS specimens, it was observed that the size and shape of the localized damage zone do not depend on the specimen size. These results allow for an interpretation of the 'size- effect,' which consists of a reduction of nominal strength as the specimen size increases.

  14. 49 CFR 393.69 - Liquefied petroleum gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Protection Association, Battery March Park, Quincy, MA 02269, as follows: (1) A fuel system installed before... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Fuel Systems § 393.69 Liquefied petroleum gas systems. (a) A fuel system that uses liquefied petroleum gas as a fuel for the operation of a motor vehicle or for the...

  15. 46 CFR 188.10-43 - Liquefied flammable gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas. 188.10-43 Section 188.10-43 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-43 Liquefied flammable gas. This term means...

  16. 46 CFR 188.10-43 - Liquefied flammable gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas. 188.10-43 Section 188.10-43 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-43 Liquefied flammable gas. This term means...

  17. 46 CFR 188.10-41 - Liquefied compressed gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquefied compressed gas. 188.10-41 Section 188.10-41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-41 Liquefied compressed gas. This term means...

  18. 46 CFR 188.10-43 - Liquefied flammable gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas. 188.10-43 Section 188.10-43 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-43 Liquefied flammable gas. This term means...

  19. 46 CFR 188.10-43 - Liquefied flammable gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas. 188.10-43 Section 188.10-43 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-43 Liquefied flammable gas. This term means...

  20. 46 CFR 188.10-41 - Liquefied compressed gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquefied compressed gas. 188.10-41 Section 188.10-41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-41 Liquefied compressed gas. This term means...

  1. 46 CFR 188.10-41 - Liquefied compressed gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquefied compressed gas. 188.10-41 Section 188.10-41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-41 Liquefied compressed gas. This term means...

  2. 46 CFR 188.10-43 - Liquefied flammable gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas. 188.10-43 Section 188.10-43 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-43 Liquefied flammable gas. This term means...

  3. 46 CFR 188.10-41 - Liquefied compressed gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquefied compressed gas. 188.10-41 Section 188.10-41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-41 Liquefied compressed gas. This term means...

  4. 46 CFR 188.10-41 - Liquefied compressed gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquefied compressed gas. 188.10-41 Section 188.10-41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-41 Liquefied compressed gas. This term means...

  5. Analogue modelling of inclined, brittle-ductile transpression: Testing analytical models through natural shear zones (external Betics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, L.; Díaz-Azpiroz, M.; Balanyá, J. C.; Expósito, I.; Jiménez-Bonilla, A.; Faccenna, C.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of analytical and analogue models gives new opportunities to better understand the kinematic parameters controlling the evolution of transpression zones. In this work, we carried out a set of analogue models using the kinematic parameters of transpressional deformation obtained by applying a general triclinic transpression analytical model to a tabular-shaped shear zone in the external Betic Chain (Torcal de Antequera massif). According to the results of the analytical model, we used two oblique convergence angles to reproduce the main structural and kinematic features of structural domains observed within the Torcal de Antequera massif (α = 15° for the outer domains and α = 30° for the inner domain). Two parallel inclined backstops (one fixed and the other mobile) reproduce the geometry of the shear zone walls of the natural case. Additionally, we applied digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) method to calculate the velocity field of the incremental deformation. Our results suggest that the spatial distribution of the main structures observed in the Torcal de Antequera massif reflects different modes of strain partitioning and strain localization between two domain types, which are related to the variation in the oblique convergence angle and the presence of steep planar velocity - and rheological - discontinuities (the shear zone walls in the natural case). In the 15° model, strain partitioning is simple and strain localization is high: a single narrow shear zone is developed close and parallel to the fixed backstop, bounded by strike-slip faults and internally deformed by R and P shears. In the 30° model, strain partitioning is strong, generating regularly spaced oblique-to-the backstops thrusts and strike-slip faults. At final stages of the 30° experiment, deformation affects the entire model box. Our results show that the application of analytical modelling to natural transpressive zones related to upper crustal deformation

  6. The Honey Lake fault zone, northeastern California: Its nature, age, and displacement

    SciT

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Grose, T.L.T.

    The Honey Lake fault zone of northeastern California is composed of en echelon, northwest trending faults that form the boundary between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin Ranges provinces. As such the Honey Lake fault zone can be considered part of the Sierra Nevada frontal fault system. It is also part of the Walker Lane of Nevada. Faults of the Honey Lake zone are vertical with right-lateral oblique displacements. The cumulative vertical component of displacement along the fault zone is on the order of 800 m and right-lateral displacement is at least 10 km (6 miles) but could be considerablymore » more. Oligocene to Miocene (30 to 22 Ma) age rhyolite tuffs can be correlated across the zone, but mid-Miocene andesites do not appear to be correlative indicating the faulting began in early to mid-Miocene time. Volcanic rocks intruded along faults of the zone, dated at 16 to 8 Ma, further suggest that faulting in the Honey Lake zone was initiated during mid-Miocene time. Late Quaternary to Holocene activity is indicated by offset of the 12,000 year old Lake Lahontan high stand shoreline and the surface rupture associated with the 1950 Fort Sage earthquake.« less

  7. 75 FR 13755 - Freeport LNG Development, L.P.; Application To Amend Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... Amend Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Application to Amend Blanket Authorization. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the... Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply, Office of Fossil Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 3E-042, 1000...

  8. CO2-efflux measurements for evaluating source zone natural attenuation rates in a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Sihota, Natasha J; Singurindy, Olga; Mayer, K Ulrich

    2011-01-15

    In order to gain regulatory approval for source zone natural attenuation (SZNA) at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites, knowledge regarding the extent of the contamination, its tendency to spread, and its longevity is required. However, reliable quantification of biodegradation rates, an important component of SZNA, remains a challenge. If the rate of CO(2) gas generation associated with contaminant degradation can be determined, it may be used as a proxy for the overall rate of subsurface biodegradation. Here, the CO(2)-efflux at the ground surface is measured using a dynamic closed chamber (DCC) method to evaluate whether this technique can be used to assess the areal extent of the contaminant source zone and the depth-integrated rate of contaminant mineralization. To this end, a field test was conducted at the Bemidji, MN, crude oil spill site. Results indicate that at the Bemidji site the CO(2)-efflux method is able to both delineate the source zone and distinguish between the rates of natural soil respiration and contaminant mineralization. The average CO(2)-efflux associated with contaminant degradation in the source zone is estimated at 2.6 μmol m(-2) s(-1), corresponding to a total petroleum hydrocarbon mineralization rate (expressed as C(10)H(22)) of 3.3 g m(-2) day(-1).

  9. Multi-objective Optimization on Helium Liquefier Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Meng, Y. R.; Liu, L. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Research on optimization of helium liquefier is limited at home and abroad, and most of the optimization is single-objective based on Collins cycle. In this paper, a multi-objective optimization is conducted using genetic algorithm (GA) on the 40 L/h helium liquefier developed by Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Science (TIPC, CAS), steady solutions are obtained in the end. In addition, the exergy loss of the optimized system is studied in the case of with and without liquid nitrogen pre-cooling. The results have guiding significance for the future design of large helium liquefier.

  10. 46 CFR 58.16-7 - Use of liquefied petroleum gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of liquefied petroleum gas. 58.16-7 Section 58.16-7... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Liquefied Petroleum Gases for Cooking and Heating § 58.16-7 Use of liquefied petroleum gas. (a) Cooking equipment using liquefied petroleum gas on vessels of 100 gross tons or more that...

  11. 29 CFR 779.360 - Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas sales. 779.360... Establishments Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas and Fuel Oil Dealers § 779.360 Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas... ultimate consumer of liquefied-petroleum-gas, whether delivered in portable cylinders or in bulk to the...

  12. Vapor-dominated zones within hydrothermal systems: evolution and natural state

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Sorey, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Three conceptual models illustrate the range of hydrothermal systems in which vapor-dominated conditions are found. The first model (model I) represents a system with an extensive near-vaporstatic vapor-dominated zone and limited liquid throughflow and is analogous to systems such as The Geysers, California. Models II and III represent systems with significant liquid throughflow and include steam-heated discharge features at higher elevations and high-chloride springs at lower elevations connected to and fed by a single circulation system at depth. In model II, as in model I, the vapor-dominated zone has a near-vaporstatic vertical pressure gradient and is generally underpressured with respect to local hydrostatic pressure. The vapor-dominated zone in model III is quite different, in that phase separation takes place at pressures close to local hydrostatic and the overall pressure gradient is near hydrostatic. -from Authors

  13. The nature and location of the suture zone in the Rokelide orogen, Sierra Leone: Geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytwyn, Jennifer; Burke, Kevin; Culver, Stephen

    2006-12-01

    The boundaries of the West African Craton mark the location of a continuous suture zone that records Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian oceanic closure. The western part of the circum-West African suture zone extends through the line of outcrop of the Mauritanide, Bassaride and Rokelide mountain belts. Our geochemical analyses are consistent with the idea that igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Rokelide and Southern Mauritanide mountain belts of West Africa occupy a suture zone that records the closing of a Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian ocean basin during the Pan-African orogeny and final assembly of Gondwana. The closing of that basin was marked by the collision between Archean rocks of the Leo massif of the West African Craton and reactivated Archean and Paleoproterozoic rocks that now outcrop nearer to the coast of Africa in Sierra Leone and Liberia. Within the Rokelides, the geochemistry of the Kasewe Hills volcanic rocks and Marampa amphibolite indicate that remnants of an arc system are caught up in the suture zone. The geochemistry of Guingan schists that outcrop along strike of the Rokelides is compatible with the idea that the metamorphosed equivalents of the Marampa and Kasewe Hills arc volcanic rocks extend through the Bassarides and into the Southern Mauritanides.

  14. The Terrorist Threat to Liquefied Natural Gas: Fact or Fiction?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    which is heavily dependent on commerce traversing the strait. At least a dozen LNG tankers pass through the Strait every day.12 Catherine Zara ...terrorism/news/article.php?articleid=236669, April 25, 2007. 13 Catherine Zara Raymond, “Maritime Terrorism in Southeast Asia: Potential Scenarios

  15. Hazards Associated with the Importation of Liquefied Natural Gas,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    The weight placed by decisionmakers on such a study of operational risks must consider the level of effort and the completeness and accuracy of the...rates by release size, category, and origin is desirable, but virtually inestimable at this level of refinement from information now S available. METHODS...accuracy of these predictions. Second , the lack of any significant LNC accident during this period is consistent at some specified confidence level

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Allows for Cleaner

    maintenance facilities to support them. This effort has contributed to millions of dollars saved and more than operation and maintenance of the vehicles. The city constructed a new LNG maintenance facility and then recently retrofitted an existing maintenance facility with the necessary methane detectors, alarms, and

  17. Liquefied natural gas fuel use : basic training manual

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-05-01

    The Urban Mass Transportation Administration's Alternative Fuel Initiative and the Environmental Protection Agency's 1991 regulations on transit bus exhaust emissions has resulted in a number of alternative fueled transit bus research and demonstrati...

  18. VNIR reflectance spectroscopy of natural carbonate rocks: implication for remote sensing identification of fault damage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traforti, Anna; Mari, Giovanna; Carli, Cristian; Demurtas, Matteo; Massironi, Matteo; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) is a common technique used to study the mineral composition of Solar System bodies from remote sensed and in-situ robotic exploration. In the VNIR spectral range, both crystal field and vibrational overtone absorptions can be present with spectral characteristics (i.e. albedo, slopes, absorption band with different positions and depths) that vary depending on composition and texture (e.g. grain size, roughness) of the sensed materials. The characterization of the spectral variability related to the rock texture, especially in terms of grain size (i.e., both the size of rock components and the size of particulates), commonly allows to obtain a wide range of information about the different geological processes modifying the planetary surfaces. This work is aimed at characterizing how the grain size reduction associated to fault zone development produces reflectance variations in rock and mineral spectral signatures. To achieve this goal we present VNIR reflectance analysis of a set of fifteen rock samples collected at increasing distances from the fault core of the Vado di Corno fault zone (Campo Imperatore Fault System - Italian Central Apennines). The selected samples had similar content of calcite and dolomite but different grain size (X-Ray Powder Diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopes analysis). Consequently, differences in the spectral signature of the fault rocks should not be ascribed to mineralogical composition. For each sample, bidirectional reflectance spectra were acquired with a Field-Pro Spectrometer mounted on a goniometer, on crushed rock slabs reduced to grain size <800, <200, <63, <10 μm and on intact fault zone rock slabs. The spectra were acquired on dry samples, at room temperature and normal atmospheric pressure. The source used was a Tungsten Halogen lamp with an illuminated spot area of ca. 0.5 cm2and incidence and emission angles of 30˚ and 0˚ respectively

  19. Natural Disasters in Southeastern Brazil Associated with the South Atlantic Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira Nery, Jonas; Malvestio, Leônidas

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzed rains in southeastern Brazil associated with the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ), which resulted in several disasters over the study area. The study period was from 1976 to 2010 and data were obtained from the National Water Agency (ANA) and Department of Water and Energy (DAEE) of the state of São Paulo. Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) data were also used to analyze SACZ, which is an important dynamics influencing spring and summer in this region. A close relationship between SACZ intensity and economic and life losses in the study area was observed.

  20. Concentration of Natural Gas Hydrate Beneath the Permafrost Zone: Implications for Geochemical and Hydrologic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Waseda, A.; Namikawa, T.

    2004-12-01

    Gas hydrates are ice-like solids made of water molecules containing various gas molecules. The geological evaluations have suggested worldwide methane contents of gas hydrate beneath deep sea floors as well as permafrost-related zones to about twice the total reserves of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon. Scientific and economic interests are increasing in gas hydrate as a new energy resource and a potential greenhouse gas. In 1998 and 2002 Mallik wells were drilled in the Canadian Arctic that clarified the characteristics of gas hydrate-dominant layers at depths from 890 to 1110 m beneath the permafrost zone. Continuous downhole well log data, anomalies of chloride contents in pore waters, core temperature depression as well as visible gas hydrates have confirmed the highly saturated pore-space hydrate as intergranular pore filling within sandy layers, whose saturations are higher than 70% in pore volume. Muddy sediments scarcely contain gas hydrate. The Nankai Trough runs along the Japanese Island, where forearc basins and accretionary prisms developed extensively and BSRs (bottom simulating reflectors) have been recognized widely. The METI Nankai Trough wells in 2000 also revealed the presence of pore-space hydrate filling intergranular pore of sandy layers. It is remarked that there are many similar features in appearance and characteristics between the Mallik and Nankai Trough areas with observations of well-interconnected and highly saturated pore-space hydrate. It is necessary for evaluating subsurface fluid flow behaviors to know both porosity and permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sandy sediments, and measurements of water permeability for them indicate that highly saturated sands may have permeability of a few millidarcies. Subsequent analyses in sedimentology and geochemistry performed on gas hydrate-bearing sands revealed important geologic and sedimentologic controls on the formation and concentration of gas hydrate. It is suggested that the

  1. Quartz grainsize evolution during dynamic recrystallization across a natural shear zone boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Haoran; Platt, John P.

    2018-04-01

    Although it is widely accepted that grainsize reduction by dynamic recrystallization can lead to strain localization, the details of the grainsize evolution during dynamic recrystallization remain unclear. We investigated the bulge size and grainsizes of quartz at approximately the initiation and the completion stages of bulging recrystallization across the upper boundary of a 500 m thick mylonite zone above the Vincent fault in the San Gabriel Mountains, southern California. Within uncertainty, the average bulge size of quartz, 4.7 ± 1.5 μm, is the same as the recrystallized grainsize, 4.5 ± 1.5 μm, at the incipient stage of dynamic recrystallization, and also the same within uncertainties as the recrystallized grainsize when dynamic recrystallization is largely complete, 4.7 ± 1.3 μm. These observations indicate that the recrystallized grainsize is controlled by the nucleation process and does not change afterwards. It is also consistent with the experimental finding that the quartz recrystallized grainsize paleopiezometer is independent of temperature.

  2. Environmentally Safe SRM Strategies Using Liquefied Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massmann, M.; Layton, K.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation includes several SRM strategies to offset global warming using the large scale release of liquefied air (Lair). Lair could be used to cool large atmospheric volumes as it expands from a liquid below minus 300 degrees F (-184 degrees C) into ambient air, which could trigger new clouds or brighten existing clouds. It is hoped that the potential feasibility and benefits of this concept would be found to warrant further development through funded research. A key trait of Lair is its enormous expansion ratio in warming from a cold liquid into ambient air. At sea level, this expansion is about 900 times. At high altitudes such as 50,000 ft (15 km) the same amount of Lair would expand 5,000 times. One strategy for this concept would be to release Lair at 50,000 ft to super-cool existing water vapor into reflective droplets or ice particles. This could create very large clouds thick enough to be highly-reflective and high enough for long residence times. Another strategy to consider for this concept would be to release CCN’s (such as salt particulates) along with Lair. This might enable the formation of clouds where Lair alone is insufficient. Water vapor could also be added to assist in cloud development if necessary. The use of these elements would be non-polluting, enabling the concept to be safely scaled as large as necessary to achieve the desired results without harming the environment. This is extremely important, because it eliminates the risk of environmental damage that is a potential roadblock for most other SRM schemes. Further strategies of this concept would include formation of clouds near the equator to maximize reflected energy, creating clouds over ocean regions so as to minimize weather changes on land, and creating clouds over Arctic regions to minimize the melting of sea ice. Because this concept requires only existing technology to implement, research and implementation timelines could be minimized (unlike most proposed schemes

  3. 46 CFR 58.16-7 - Use of liquefied petroleum gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Liquefied Petroleum Gases for Cooking and Heating § 58.16-7 Use of liquefied petroleum gas. (a) Cooking equipment using liquefied petroleum gas on vessels of 100 gross tons or more that carry passengers for hire must meet the requirements of this subpart. (b) Cooking equipment using...

  4. Characterization of novolac type liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde (LWPF) resin

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    Novolac type liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde (LWPF) resins were synthesized from liquefied wood and formaldehyde. The average molecular weight of the LWPF resin made from the liquefied wood reacted in an atmospheric three neck flask increased with increasing P/W ratio. However, it decreased with increasing phenol/wood ratio when using a sealed Parr reactor. On...

  5. Synthesis and cure kinetics of liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde resins

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2008-01-01

    Wood liquefaction was conducted at a 2/1 phenol/wood ratio in two different reactors: (1) an atmospheric three-necked flask reactor and (2) a sealed Parr reactor. The liquefied wood mixture (liquefied wood, unreacted phenol, and wood residue) was further condensed with formaldehyde under acidic conditions to synthesize two novolac-type liquefied wood/phenol/...

  6. 46 CFR 30.10-39 - Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL. 30.10-39 Section 30.10-39 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-39 Liquefied flammable gas—TB/ALL. The term liquefied flammable gas means any flammable gas...

  7. 46 CFR 30.10-39 - Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL. 30.10-39 Section 30.10-39 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-39 Liquefied flammable gas—TB/ALL. The term liquefied flammable gas means any flammable gas...

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-39 - Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL. 30.10-39 Section 30.10-39 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-39 Liquefied flammable gas—TB/ALL. The term liquefied flammable gas means any flammable gas...

  9. 46 CFR 30.10-39 - Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL. 30.10-39 Section 30.10-39 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-39 Liquefied flammable gas—TB/ALL. The term liquefied flammable gas means any flammable gas...

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-39 - Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquefied flammable gas-TB/ALL. 30.10-39 Section 30.10-39 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-39 Liquefied flammable gas—TB/ALL. The term liquefied flammable gas means any flammable gas...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.720 - Liquefied petroleum gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration....720—Test Fuel Specifications for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Item Value Reference procedure 1 Propane... test fuel must not yield a persistent oil ring when you add 0.3 ml of solvent residue mixture to a...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.720 - Liquefied petroleum gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration....720—Test Fuel Specifications for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Item Value Reference procedure 1 Propane... test fuel must not yield a persistent oil ring when you add 0.3 ml of solvent residue mixture to a...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.720 - Liquefied petroleum gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration....720—Test Fuel Specifications for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Property Value Reference procedure 1 Propane... methods yield different results, use the results from ASTM D1267. 3 The test fuel must not yield a...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.720 - Liquefied petroleum gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration....720—Test Fuel Specifications for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Item Value Reference procedure 1 Propane... test fuel must not yield a persistent oil ring when you add 0.3 ml of solvent residue mixture to a...

  15. Preparation of polyurethane foams using fractionated products in liquefied wood

    Junming Xu; Jianchun Jiang; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2014-01-01

    Liquefaction of sawdust was studied using glycerol and methanol as mix solvents. A new bio-polyol product consisting of high purity multi-hydroxy compounds was obtained by precipitation of the hydrophobic organics from the liquefied product in an aqueous solution. As identified by GC-MS, the dominate components in bio-polyol were glycerol, glycerol derivatives, and...

  16. 30 CFR 57.4463 - Liquefied petroleum gas use underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....4463 Section 57.4463 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4463 Liquefied petroleum...

  17. 30 CFR 57.4463 - Liquefied petroleum gas use underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....4463 Section 57.4463 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4463 Liquefied petroleum...

  18. 30 CFR 57.4463 - Liquefied petroleum gas use underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....4463 Section 57.4463 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4463 Liquefied petroleum...

  19. 30 CFR 57.4463 - Liquefied petroleum gas use underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....4463 Section 57.4463 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4463 Liquefied petroleum...

  20. Evaluating the Performance of Household Liquefied Petroleum Gas Cookstoves

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) cookstoves are considered to be an important solution for mitigating household air pollution; however, their performance has rarely been evaluated. To fill the data and knowledge gaps in this important area, laboratory tests (number of tests: 89) wer...

  1. Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings in humid subtropical climate zone in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2008-05-01

    A thermal comfort field study has been carried out in five cities in the humid subtropical climate zone in China. The survey was performed in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings during the summer season in 2006. There were 229 occupants from 111 buildings who participated in this study and 229 questionnaire responses were collected. Thermal acceptability assessment reveals that the indoor environment in naturally ventilated buildings could not meet the 80% acceptability criteria prescribed by ASHRAE Standard 55, and people tended to feel more comfortable in air-conditioned buildings with the air-conditioned occupants voting with higher acceptability (89%) than the naturally ventilated occupants (58%). The neutral temperatures in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings were 28.3°C and 27.7°C, respectively. The range of accepted temperature in naturally ventilated buildings (25.0˜31.6°C) was wider than that in air-conditioned buildings (25.1˜30.3°C), which suggests that occupants in naturally ventilated buildings seemed to be more tolerant of higher temperatures. Preferred temperatures were 27.9°C and 27.3°C in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings, respectively, both of which were 0.4°C cooler than neutral temperatures. This result suggests that people of hot climates may use words like “slightly cool” to describe their preferred thermal state. The relationship between draught sensation and indoor air velocity at different temperature ranges indicates that indoor air velocity had a significant influence over the occupants’ comfort sensation, and air velocities required by occupants increased with the increasing of operative temperatures. Thus, an effective way of natural ventilation which can create the preferred higher air movement is called for. Finally, the indoor set-point temperature of 26°C or even higher in air-conditioned buildings was confirmed as making people comfortable, which supports the regulation

  2. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Through Appliance Zone Isolation

    SciT

    Fitzgerald, J.; Bohac, D.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the isolation of natural draft combustion appliances from the conditioned space of low-rise residential buildings. It deals with combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage. This subset of houses does not require comprehensive combustion safety tests and simplified prescriptive procedures can be used to address safety concerns. This allows residential energy retrofit contractors inexperienced in advanced combustion safety testing to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofitsmore » including tightening and changes to distribution and ventilation systems to proceed.« less

  3. Marine natural hazards in coastal zone: observations, analysis and modelling (Plinius Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulova, Ira

    2010-05-01

    Giant surface waves approaching the coast frequently cause extensive coastal flooding, destruction of coastal constructions and loss of lives. Such waves can be generated by various phenomena: strong storms and cyclones, underwater earthquakes, high-speed ferries, aerial and submarine landslides. The most famous examples of such events are the catastrophic tsunami in the Indian Ocean, which occurred on 26 December 2004 and hurricane Katrina (28 August 2005) in the Atlantic Ocean. The huge storm in the Baltic Sea on 9 January 2005, which produced unexpectedly long waves in many areas of the Baltic Sea and the influence of unusually high surge created by long waves from high-speed ferries, should also be mentioned as examples of regional marine natural hazards connected with extensive runup of certain types of waves. The processes of wave shoaling and runup for all these different marine natural hazards (tsunami, coastal freak waves, ship waves) are studied based on rigorous solutions of nonlinear shallow-water theory. The key and novel results presented here are: i) parameterization of basic formulas for extreme runup characteristics for bell-shape waves, showing that they weakly depend on the initial wave shape, which is usually unknown in real sea conditions; ii) runup analysis of periodic asymmetric waves with a steep front, as such waves are penetrating inland over large distances and with larger velocities than symmetric waves; iii) statistical analysis of irregular wave runup demonstrating that wave nonlinearity nearshore does not influence on the probability distribution of the velocity of the moving shoreline and its moments, and influences on the vertical displacement of the moving shoreline (runup). Wave runup on convex beaches and in narrow bays, which allow abnormal wave amplification is also discussed. Described analytical results are used for explanation of observed extreme runup of tsunami, freak (sneaker) waves and ship waves on different coasts

  4. Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor

    DOEpatents

    Britten, Jerald A.

    1997-01-01

    A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for 1) cleaning, developing or etching, 2) rinsing, and 3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material.

  5. Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor

    DOEpatents

    Britten, J.A.

    1997-08-26

    A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for (1) cleaning, developing or etching, (2) rinsing, and (3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material. 5 figs.

  6. Solution-mass transfer and grain boundary sliding in mafic shear zones - comparison between experiments and nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Sina; Heilbronner, Renée; Stünitz, Holger; Plümper, Oliver; Drury, Martyn

    2017-04-01

    Grain size sensitive creep (GSSC) mechanisms are widely recognized to be the most efficient deformation mechanisms in shear zones. With or without initial fracturing and fluid infiltration, the onset of heterogeneous nucleation leading to strong grain size reduction is a frequently described process for the initiation of GSSC. Phase mixing due to reaction and heterogeneous nucleation during GSSC impedes grain growth, sustaining small grain sizes as a prerequisite for GSSC. Here we present rock deformation experiments on 'wet' plagioclase - pyroxene mixtures at T=800°C, P=1.0 and 1.5GPa and strain rates of 2e-5 - 2e-6 1/s, performed with a Griggs-type solid medium deformation apparatus. Microstructural criteria are used to show that both, grain boundary sliding (GBS) and solution-mass transfer processes are active and are interpreted to be the dominant strain accommodating processes. Displacement is localized within shear bands formed by fine-grained ( 300 - 500nm) plagioclase (Pl) and the syn-kinematic reaction products amphibole (Amph), quartz (Qz) and zoisite (Zo). We compare our experiments with a natural case - a sheared mafic pegmatite (P-T during deformation 0.7 - 0.9 GPa, 610 - 710 °C; Getsinger et al., 2013) from Northern Norway. Except for the difference in grain size of the experimental and natural samples, microstructures are strikingly alike. The experimental and natural P- and especially T-conditions are very similar. Consequently, extrapolation from experiments to nature must be made without a significant 'temperature-time' trade-off, which is normally taken advantage of when relating experimental to natural strain rates. We will discuss under which assumptions extrapolation to nature in our case is likely feasible. Syn-kinematic reactions during GBS and solution-mass transport are commonly interpreted to result in an ordered (anticlustered) phase mixture. However, phase mixing in our case is restricted: Mixing is extensive between Pl + Zo + Qz and

  7. 40 CFR 80.32 - Controls applicable to liquefied petroleum gas retailers and wholesale purchaser-consumers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Controls applicable to liquefied... Controls and Prohibitions § 80.32 Controls applicable to liquefied petroleum gas retailers and wholesale...,660 gallons of liquefied petroleum gas per month shall equip each pump from which liquefied petroleum...

  8. 40 CFR 80.32 - Controls applicable to liquefied petroleum gas retailers and wholesale purchaser-consumers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Controls applicable to liquefied... Controls and Prohibitions § 80.32 Controls applicable to liquefied petroleum gas retailers and wholesale...,660 gallons of liquefied petroleum gas per month shall equip each pump from which liquefied petroleum...

  9. 40 CFR 80.32 - Controls applicable to liquefied petroleum gas retailers and wholesale purchaser-consumers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Controls applicable to liquefied... Controls and Prohibitions § 80.32 Controls applicable to liquefied petroleum gas retailers and wholesale...,660 gallons of liquefied petroleum gas per month shall equip each pump from which liquefied petroleum...

  10. Capacity enhancement of indigenous expansion engine based helium liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doohan, R. S.; Kush, P. K.; Maheshwari, G.

    2017-02-01

    Development of technology and understanding for large capacity helium refrigeration and liquefaction at helium temperature is indispensable for coming-up projects. A new version of helium liquefier designed and built to provide approximately 35 liters of liquid helium per hour. The refrigeration capacity of this reciprocating type expansion engine machine has been increased from its predecessor version with continuous improvement and deficiency debugging. The helium liquefier has been built using components by local industries including cryogenic Aluminum plate fin heat exchangers. Two compressors with nearly identical capacity have been deployed for the operation of system. Together they consume about 110 kW of electric power. The system employs liquid Nitrogen precooling to enhance liquid Helium yield. This paper describes details of the cryogenic expander design improvements, reconfiguration of heat exchangers, performance simulation and their experimental validation.

  11. Tc(VII) and Cr(VI) Interaction with Naturally Reduced Ferruginous Smectite from a Redox Transition Zone.

    PubMed

    Qafoku, Odeta; Pearce, Carolyn I; Neumann, Anke; Kovarik, Libor; Zhu, Mengqiang; Ilton, Eugene S; Bowden, Mark E; Resch, Charles T; Arey, Bruce W; Arenholz, Elke; Felmy, Andrew R; Rosso, Kevin M

    2017-08-15

    Fe(II)-rich clay minerals found in subsurface redox transition zones (RTZs) can serve as important sources of electron equivalents limiting the transport of redox-active contaminants. While most laboratory reactivity studies are based on reduced model clays, the reactivity of naturally reduced field samples remains poorly explored. Characterization of the clay size fraction of a fine-grained unit from the RTZ interface at the Hanford site, Washington, including mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and Fe(II)/(III) content, indicates that ferruginous montmorillonite is the dominant mineralogical component. Oxic and anoxic fractions differ significantly in Fe(II) natural content, but Fe TOTAL remains constant, demonstrating no Fe loss during its reduction-oxidation cyclings. At native pH of 8.6, the anoxic fraction, despite its significant Fe(II), ∼23% of Fe TOTAL , exhibits minimal reactivity with TcO 4 - and CrO 4 2- and much slower reaction kinetics than those measured in studies with biologically/chemically reduced model clays. Reduction capacity is enhanced by added/sorbed Fe(II) (if Fe(II) SORBED > 8% clay Fe(II) LABILE ); however, the kinetics of this conceptually surface-mediated reaction remain sluggish. Surface-sensitive Fe L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that Fe(II) SORBED and the resulting reducing equivalents are not available in the outermost few nanometers of clay surfaces. Slow kinetics thus appear related to diffusion-limited access to electron equivalents retained within the clay mineral structure.

  12. Detection and Separation of Inorganic Cations in Natural, Potable, and Wastewater Samples Using Capillary Zone Electrophoresis with Indirect UV Detection

    PubMed Central

    Varden, Lara; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi

    2017-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a sensitive and rapid technique for determining traces of inorganic cations in water samples. CZE with indirect UV-diode array detection (CZE-DAD) was utilized to identify several inorganic cations in natural, potable, and wastewater samples. A pH 4.35 background electrolyte system was employed and consisted of 15 mM imidazole, 8 mM malonic acid, 2 mM 18-crown-6 ether as complexing agents, 10% v/v methanol as an organic modifier with indirect absorbance reference at 214 nm. The CZE method involved electromigration injection at 5 kV for 5 s, a separation voltage of 20 kV at 25°C, and a detection wavelength of 280 nm. Six main cations (ammonium NH4+, potassium K+, calcium Ca2+, sodium Na+, magnesium Mg2+, and lead Pb2+) were tested, and all but lead, were detected in the water samples at concentrations between 0.03 and 755 ppm with a detection limit ranging between 0.023 and 0.084 ppm. The successful evaluation of the proposed methodology allowed us to reliably detect and separate six metal ions in different water samples without any pretreatment. All water samples were collected from Northern New York towns and the Raquette River water system, the third longest river in New York State and the largest watershed of the central and western Adirondacks. PMID:29057144

  13. Intense natural selection preceded the invasion of new adaptive zones during the radiation of New World leaf-nosed bats.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Daniela M; Assis, Ana Paula A; Giannini, Norberto P; Marroig, Gabriel

    2017-09-11

    The family Phyllostomidae, which evolved in the New World during the last 30 million years, represents one of the largest and most morphologically diverse mammal families. Due to its uniquely diverse functional morphology, the phyllostomid skull is presumed to have evolved under strong directional selection; however, quantitative estimation of the strength of selection in this extraordinary lineage has not been reported. Here, we used comparative quantitative genetics approaches to elucidate the processes that drove cranial evolution in phyllostomids. We also quantified the strength of selection and explored its association with dietary transitions and specialization along the phyllostomid phylogeny. Our results suggest that natural selection was the evolutionary process responsible for cranial diversification in phyllostomid bats. Remarkably, the strongest selection in the phyllostomid phylogeny was associated with dietary specialization and the origination of novel feeding habits, suggesting that the adaptive diversification of phyllostomid bats was triggered by ecological opportunities. These findings are consistent with Simpson's quantum evolutionary model of transitions between adaptive zones. The multivariate analyses used in this study provides a powerful tool for understanding the role of evolutionary processes in shaping phenotypic diversity in any group on both micro- and macroevolutionary scales.

  14. Liquefied Bleed for Stability and Efficiency of High Speed Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, J. David; Davis, David; Barsi, Stephen J.; Deans, Matthew C.; Weir, Lois J.; Sanders, Bobby W.

    2014-01-01

    A mission analysis code was developed to perform a trade study on the effectiveness of liquefying bleed for the inlet of the first stage of a TSTO vehicle. By liquefying bleed, the vehicle weight (TOGW) could be reduced by 7 to 23%. Numerous simplifying assumptions were made and lessons were learned. Increased accuracy in future analyses can be achieved by: Including a higher fidelity model to capture the effect of rescaling (variable vehicle TOGW). Refining specific thrust and impulse models ( T m a and Isp) to preserve fuel-to-air ratio. Implementing LH2 for T m a and Isp. Correlating baseline design to other mission analyses and correcting vehicle design elements. Implementing angle-of-attack effects on inlet characteristics. Refining aerodynamic performance (to improve L/D ratio at higher Mach numbers). Examining the benefit with partial cooling or densification of the bleed air stream. Incorporating higher fidelity weight estimates for the liquefied bleed system (heat exchange and liquid storage versus bleed duct weights) could be added when more fully developed. Adding trim drag or 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory analysis for higher fidelity. Investigating vehicle optimization for each of the bleed configurations.

  15. Process Control Migration of 50 LPH Helium Liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, U.; Mandal, A.; Das, A.; Behera, M.; Pal, Sandip

    2017-02-01

    Two helium liquefier/refrigerators are operational at VECC while one is dedicated for the Superconducting Cyclotron. The first helium liquefier of 50 LPH capacity from Air Liquide has already completed fifteen years of operation without any major trouble. This liquefier is being controlled by Eurotherm PC3000 make PLC. This PLC has become obsolete since last seven years or so. Though we can still manage to run the PLC system with existing spares, risk of discontinuation of the operation is always there due to unavailability of spare. In order to eliminate the risk, an equivalent PLC control system based on Siemens S7-300 was thought of. For smooth migration, total programming was done keeping the same field input and output interface, nomenclature and graphset. New program is a mix of S7-300 Graph, STL and LAD languages. One to one program verification of the entire process graph was done manually. The total program was run in simulation mode. Matlab mathematical model was also used for plant control simulations. EPICS based SCADA was used for process monitoring. As of now the entire hardware and software is ready for direct replacement with minimum required set up time.

  16. Mathematical simulation of the process of condensing natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tastandieva, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Presents a two-dimensional unsteady model of heat transfer in terms of condensation of natural gas at low temperatures. Performed calculations of the process heat and mass transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tanks of cylindrical shape. The influence of model parameters on the nature of heat transfer. Defined temperature regimes eliminate evaporation by cooling liquefied natural gas. The obtained dependence of the mass flow rate of vapor condensation gas temperature. Identified the possibility of regulating the process of "cooling down" liquefied natural gas in terms of its partial evaporation with low cost energy.

  17. Processing of centrifuged solids from liquefied coal

    SciT

    Weintraub, M.; Akhtar, S.; Yavorsky, P.M.

    The centrifuged residues from coal liquefaction processes present two problems which the Pittsburgh ETC has found to be controllable by thermal processing of the material: the residues contain significant amounts of carbon and oil that should be recovered, and their sticky, malodorous, dough-like nature makes them difficult to handle. This paper reports the results of heat treatments using several types of processing equipment and two different temperature ranges. Pyrolysis in the range of 1,100/sup 0/ to 1,400/sup 0/F yielded 20 to 30 wt % of oil product, depending on the source of the residue and its initial oil content. Lowermore » temperature heating (e.g., 600/sup 0/F) yielded less oil, but did produce a non-sticky friable solid. The percent oil yield was a function of temperature, residence time, and thickness of the layer exposed. A one-eighth inch thick sample became friable in 15 to 30 minutes exposure to 600/sup 0/F, during which time it lost about 13 percent of its weight. The tests included measurements on a steel conveyor belt, which could become the commercial embodiment of this treatment.« less

  18. CO2 leakage monitoring and analysis to understand the variation of CO2 concentration in vadose zone by natural effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joun, Won-Tak; Ha, Seung-Wook; Kim, Hyun Jung; Ju, YeoJin; Lee, Sung-Sun; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2017-04-01

    Controlled ex-situ experiments and continuous CO2 monitoring in the field are significant implications for detecting and monitoring potential leakage from CO2 sequestration reservoir. However, it is difficult to understand the observed parameters because the natural disturbance will fluctuate the signal of detections in given local system. To identify the original source leaking from sequestration reservoir and to distinguish the camouflaged signal of CO2 concentration, the artificial leakage test was conducted in shallow groundwater environment and long-term monitoring have been performed. The monitoring system included several parameters such as pH, temperature, groundwater level, CO2 gas concentration, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, borehole pressure, and rainfall event etc. Especially in this study, focused on understanding a relationship among the CO2 concentration, wind speed, rainfall and pressure difference. The results represent that changes of CO2 concentration in vadose zone could be influenced by physical parameters and this reason is helpful in identifying the camouflaged signal of CO2 concentrations. The 1-D column laboratory experiment also was conducted to understand the sparking-peak as shown in observed data plot. The results showed a similar peak plot and could consider two assumptions why the sparking-peak was shown. First, the trapped CO2 gas was escaped when the water table was changed. Second, the pressure equivalence between CO2 gas and water was broken when the water table was changed. These field data analysis and laboratory experiment need to advance due to comprehensively quantify local long-term dynamics of the artificial CO2 leaking aquifer. Acknowledgement Financial support was provided by the "R&D Project on Environmental Management of Geologic CO2 Storage" from the KEITI (Project Number: 2014001810003)

  19. Tc(VII) and Cr(VI) Interaction with Naturally Reduced Ferruginous Smectite from a Redox Transition Zone

    SciT

    Qafoku, Odeta; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Neumann, Anke

    Fe(II)-rich clay minerals found in subsurface redox transition zones (RTZs) can serve as important source of electron equivalents limiting the transport of redox active contaminants. While most laboratory reactivity studies are based on reduced model clays, the reactivity of naturally reduced clays in field samples remains poorly explored. Characterization of the clay size fraction of a fine-grained unit from RTZ interface at the Hanford site, Washington, including mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and Fe(II)/(III) content, indicates that ferruginous montmorillonite is the dominant mineralogical component. Oxic and anoxic fractions differ significantly in Fe(II) concentration, but FeTOTAL remains constant demonstrating no Fe loss duringmore » reduction-oxidation cycling. At its native pH of 8.6, the anoxic fraction despite its significant Fe(II) (~23% of FeTOTAL), exhibits minimal reactivity with TcO4- and CrO42- and much slower reaction kinetics than that measured in studies with biologically/chemically reduced model clays. Reduction capacity is enhanced by added Fe(II) (if Fe(II)SORBED >8% clay Fe(II)LABILE), however the kinetics of this conceptually surface-mediated reaction remain sluggish. Surface-sensitive Fe L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that Fe(II)SORBED and the resulting reducing equivalents are not available in the outermost few nanometers of clay surfaces. Slow kinetics thus appear related to diffusion-limited access to electron equivalents retained within clay mineral.« less

  20. 46 CFR 97.12-5 - Bulk solid cargoes that may liquefy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bulk solid cargoes that may liquefy. 97.12-5 Section 97... VESSELS OPERATIONS Bulk Solid Cargoes § 97.12-5 Bulk solid cargoes that may liquefy. If the information provided in § 97.12-3(a) or (b) indicates that the bulk solid cargo to be carried is prone to liquefy...

  1. Using 238U/235U ratios to understand the formation and oxidation of reduced uranium solids in naturally reduced zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemison, N.; Johnson, T. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Davis, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Uranium occurs in groundwater primarily as soluble and mobile U(VI), which can be reduced to immobile U(IV), often observed in sediments as uraninite. Numerous U(VI)-contaminated sites, such as the DOE field site in Rifle, CO, contain naturally reduced zones (NRZ's) that have relatively high concentrations of organic matter. Reduction of heavy metals occurs within NRZ's, producing elevated concentrations of iron sulfides and U(IV). Slow, natural oxidation of U(IV) from NRZ's may prolong U(VI) contamination of groundwater. The reduction of U(VI) produces U(IV) with a higher 238U/235U ratio. Samples from two NRZ sediment cores recovered from the Rifle site revealed that the outer fringes of the NRZ contain U(IV) with a high 238U/235U ratio, while lower values are observed in the center . We suggest that as aqueous U(VI) was reduced in the NRZ, it was driven to lower 238U/235U values, such that U(IV) formed in the core of the NRZ reflects a lower 238U/235U. Two oxidation experiments were conducted by injecting groundwater containing between 14.9 and 21.2 mg/L dissolved O2 as an oxidant into the NRZ. The oxidation of U(IV) from this NRZ increased aqueous U(VI) concentrations and caused a shift to higher 238U/235U in groundwater as U(IV) was oxidized primarily on the outer fringes of the NRZ. In total these observations suggest that the stability of solid phase uranium is governed by coupled reaction and transport processes. To better understand various reactive transport scenarios we developed a model for the formation and oxidation of NRZ's utilizing the reactive transport software CrunchTope. These simulations suggest that the development of isotopically heterogeneous U(IV) within NRZ's is largely controlled by permeability of the NRZ and the U(VI) reduction rate. Oxidation of U(IV) from the NRZ's is constrained by the oxidation rate of U(IV) as well as iron sulfides, which can prevent oxidation of U(IV) by scavenging dissolved oxygen.

  2. "The Woods Is a More Free Space for Children to Be Creative; Their Imagination Kind of Sparks out There": Exploring Young Children's Cognitive Play Opportunities in Natural, Manufactured and Mixed Outdoor Preschool Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor preschools are critical for children's play and development. Integrating observational and interview methods, this study examined four-to-five-year-old children's cognitive play experiences in an outdoor preschool with natural, mixed and manufactured zones. The observational results indicated that the natural and mixed zones offered a…

  3. Exposure of a liquefied gas container to an external fire.

    PubMed

    Raj, Phani K

    2005-06-30

    In liquefied gas, bulk-storage facilities and plants, the separation distances between storage tanks and between a tank and a line of adjoining property that can be built are governed by local regulations and/or codes (e.g. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 58, 2004). Separation distance requirements have been in the NFPA 58 Code for over 60 years; however, no scientific foundations (either theoretical or experimental) are available for the specified distances. Even though the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) industry has operated safely over the years, there is a question as to whether the code-specified distances provide sufficient safety to LPG-storage tanks, when they are exposed to large external fires. A radiation heat-transfer-based model is presented in this paper. The temporal variation of the vapor-wetted tank-wall temperature is calculated when exposed to thermal radiation from an external, non-impinging, large, 30.5 m (100 ft) diameter, highly radiative, hydrocarbon fuel (pool) fire located at a specified distance. Structural steel wall of a pressurized, liquefied gas container (such as the ASME LP-Gas tank) begins to lose its strength, when the wall temperature approaches a critical temperature, 810 K (1000 degrees F). LP-Gas tank walls reaching close to this temperature will be a cause for major concern because of increased potential for tank failure, which could result in catastrophic consequences. Results from the model for exposure of different size ASME (LP-Gas) containers to a hydrocarbon pool fire of 30.5 m (100 ft) in diameter, located with its base edge at the separation distances specified by NFPA 58 [NFPA 58, Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code, Table 6.3.1, 2004 ed., National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA, 2004] indicate that the vapor-wetted wall temperature of the containers never reach the critical temperature under common wind conditions (0, 5 and 10 m/s), with the flame tilting towards the tank. This indicates that the

  4. International comparison CCQM-K119 liquefied petroleum gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, P. J.; Downey, M. L.; Atkins, E.; Brown, R. J. C.; Brown, A. S.; Zalewska, E. T.; van der Veen, A. M. H.; Smeulders, D. E.; McCallum, J. B.; Satumba, R. T.; Kim, Y. D.; Kang, N.; Bae, H. K.; Woo, J. C.; Konopelko, L. A.; Popova, T. A.; Meshkov, A. V.; Efremova, O. V.; Kustikov, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Liquefied hydrocarbon mixtures with traceable composition are required in order to underpin measurements of the composition and other physical properties of LPG (liquefied petroleum gas), thus meeting the needs of an increasingly large industrial market. This comparison aims to assess the analytical capabilities of laboratories for measuring the composition of a Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) mixture when sampled in the liquid phase from a Constant Pressure Cylinder. Mixtures contained ethane, propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane, but-1-ene and i-pentane with nominal amount fractions of 2, 71, 9, 4, 10, 3 and 1 cmol mol-1 respectively. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. 46 CFR 61.15-10 - Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking. 61.15-10 Section 61.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PERIODIC TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-10 Liquefied-petroleum-gas...

  6. 46 CFR 111.105-32 - Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers. 111... gas and ammonia carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries bulk liquefied flammable gases or ammonia as a.... (2) The term “gas-dangerous” does not include the weather deck of an ammonia carrier. (c) Each...

  7. 46 CFR 111.105-32 - Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers. 111... gas and ammonia carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries bulk liquefied flammable gases or ammonia as a.... (2) The term “gas-dangerous” does not include the weather deck of an ammonia carrier. (c) Each...

  8. 46 CFR 111.105-32 - Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers. 111... gas and ammonia carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries bulk liquefied flammable gases or ammonia as a.... (2) The term “gas-dangerous” does not include the weather deck of an ammonia carrier. (c) Each...

  9. 46 CFR 111.105-32 - Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers. 111... gas and ammonia carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries bulk liquefied flammable gases or ammonia as a.... (2) The term “gas-dangerous” does not include the weather deck of an ammonia carrier. (c) Each...

  10. 46 CFR 111.105-32 - Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers. 111... gas and ammonia carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries bulk liquefied flammable gases or ammonia as a.... (2) The term “gas-dangerous” does not include the weather deck of an ammonia carrier. (c) Each...

  11. Polyols from microwave liquefied bagasse and its application to rigid polyurethane foam

    Jiulong Xie; Xianglin Zhai; Chung Hse; Todd Shupe; Hui Pan

    2015-01-01

    Bagasse flour (BF) was liquefied using bi-component polyhydric alcohol (PA) as a solventand phosphoric acid as a catalyst in a microwave reactor. The effect of BF to solvent ratio andreaction temperatures on the liquefaction extent and characteristics of liquefied products wereevaluated. The results revealed that almost 75% of the...

  12. Stakeholder Analysis in Utilizing of Environmental Services and Natural Attractions in Tuk Semuncar Utilization Zone of Gunung Merbabu National Park: A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Muhammad Arif; Muhammad, Fuad

    2018-02-01

    Many stakeholders in the utilizing of environmental services and natural attraction of Tuk Semuncar Utilization Zone needs to get the attention of the Gunung Merbabu National Park Officer. The existence of natural resources has an important role for the life of the community, making the complexity of the relationship between various parties who have interests in natural resource management. The existence of stakeholders and their interests should receive attention and be considered to be accommodated as an effort to prevent the occurrence of losses to the conservation area of Gunung Merbabu National Park. Every stakeholder's interest can have a positive and negative impact on other stakeholders. Stakeholder analysis can help in understanding the conflict on the utilizing of environmental services and natural attraction that is happening, as well as input strategy in involving stakeholders for the achievement of goals.

  13. Processes and time scales of magmatic evolution as revealed by Fe-Mg chemical and isotopic zoning in natural olivines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeser, Martin; Dohmen, Ralf; Horn, Ingo; Schuth, Stephan; Weyer, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we applied high-precision in situ Fe and Mg isotope analyses by femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) MC-ICP-MS on chemically zoned olivine xeno- and phenocrysts from intra-plate volcanic regions in order to investigate the magnitude of Fe and Mg isotope fractionation and its suitability to gain information on magma evolution. Our results show that chemical zoning (i.e., Mg#) in magmatic olivines is commonly associated with significant zoning in δ56Fe and δ26Mg (up to 1.7‰ and 0.7‰, respectively). We explored different cases of kinetic fractionation of Fe and Mg isotopes by modeling diffusion in the melt or olivine and simultaneous growth or dissolution. Combining the information of chemical and isotopic zoning in olivine allows to distinguish between various processes that may occur during magma evolution, namely diffusive Fe-Mg exchange between olivine and melt, rapid crystal growth, and Fe-Mg inter-diffusion simultaneous to crystal dissolution or growth. Chemical diffusion in olivine appears to be the dominant process that drives isotope fractionation in magmatic olivine. Simplified modeling of Fe and Mg diffusion is suitable to reproduce both the chemical and the isotopic zoning in most of the investigated olivines and, additionally, provides time information about magmatic processes. For the Massif Central (France), modeling of diffusive re-equilibration of mantle olivines in basanites revealed a short time span (<2 years) between the entrainment of a mantle xenolith in an intra-plate basaltic magma and the eruption of the magma. Furthermore, we determined high cooling rates (on the order of a few tens to hundreds of °C per year) for basanite samples from a single large outcrop in the Massif Central, which probably reflects the cooling of a massive lava flow after eruption. Results from the modeling of Fe and Mg isotope fractionation in olivine point to a systematic difference between βFe and βMg (i.e., βFe/βMg ≈ 2), implying that the

  14. 40 CFR 80.32 - Controls applicable to liquefied petroleum gas retailers and wholesale purchaser-consumers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... petroleum gas retailers and wholesale purchaser-consumers. 80.32 Section 80.32 Protection of Environment... Controls and Prohibitions § 80.32 Controls applicable to liquefied petroleum gas retailers and wholesale...,660 gallons of liquefied petroleum gas per month shall equip each pump from which liquefied petroleum...

  15. 40 CFR 80.32 - Controls applicable to liquefied petroleum gas retailers and wholesale purchaser-consumers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...,660 gallons of liquefied petroleum gas per month shall equip each pump from which liquefied petroleum... liquefied petroleum gas retailer and wholesale purchaser- consumer. Any dispensing pump shown to be... petroleum gas retailers and wholesale purchaser-consumers. 80.32 Section 80.32 Protection of Environment...

  16. Seismic constraints on the nature of lower crustal reflectors beneath the extending Southern Transition Zone of the Colorado Plateau, Arizona

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Howie, John M.; Thompson, George A.

    1992-01-01

    We determine the reflection polarity and exploit variations in P and S wave reflectivity and P wave amplitude versus offset (AVO) to constrain the origin of lower crustal reflectivity observed on new three-component seismic data recorded across the structural transition of the Colorado Plateau. The near vertical incidence reflection data were collected by Stanford University in 1989 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Pacific to Arizona Crustal Experiment that traversed the Arizona Transition Zone of the Colorado Plateau. The results of independent waveform modeling methods are consistent with much of the lower crustal reflectivity resulting from thin, high-impedance layers. The reflection polarity of the cleanest lower crustal events is positive, which implies that these reflections result from high-velocity contrasts, and the waveform character indicates that the reflectors are probably layers less than or approximately equal to 200 m thick. The lower crustal events are generally less reflective to incident S waves than to P waves, which agrees with the predicted behavior of high-velocity mafic layering. Analysis of the P wave AVO character of lower crustal reflections demonstrates that the events maintain a constant amplitude with offset, which is most consistent with a mafic-layering model. One exception is a high-amplitude (10 dB above background) event near the base of lower crustal reflectivity which abruptly decreases in amplitude at increasing offsets. The event has a pronounced S wave response, which along with its negative AVO trend is a possible indication of the presence of fluids in the lower crust. The Arizona Transition Zone is an active but weakly extended province, which causes us to discard models of lower crustal layering resulting from shearing because of the high degree of strain required to create such layers. Instead, we favor horizontal basaltic intrusions as the primary origin of high-impedance reflectors based on (1) The fact that

  17. Production and uses of liquefied atmosphere (CO2) on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is universally accessible on Mars, and can be liquefied and separated from residual atmospheric gases by various compress-refrigeration cycles. Liquid CO2, stored under elevated pressures, can be used as a source of high pressure gas for nighttime power generation at a Martian base powered by solar energy during the daytime. Carbon dioxide can also be used for vehicular power. The extractable energy per unit mass of CO2 can exceed that of commercial lead-acid batteries for operating cycles without heat addition. Improved performance is possible using heat input from the ambient atmosphere or thermochemical agents. A unique vehicular application uses pressurized CO2 as a non-combustion low performance propellant for intermediate distance surface transportation. The thermodynamic properties of CO2 are presented with typical operating cycles for the application classes described above.

  18. Passive force balancing of an active magnetic regenerative liquefier

    DOE PAGES

    Teyber, R.; Meinhardt, K.; Thomsen, E.; ...

    2017-11-02

    Active magnetic regenerators (AMR) have the potential for high efficiency cryogen liquefaction. One active magnetic regenerative liquefier (AMRL) configuration consists of dual magnetocaloric regenerators that reciprocate in a persistent-mode superconducting solenoid. Issues with this configuration are the spatial and temporal magnetization gradients that induce large magnetic forces and winding currents. To solve the coupled problem, we present a force minimization approach using passive magnetic material to balance a dual-regenerator AMR. A magnetostatic model is developed and simulated force waveforms are compared with experimental measurements. A genetic algorithm identifies force-minimizing passive structures with virtually ideal balancing characteristics. Finally, implementation details aremore » investigated which affirm the potential of the proposed methodology.« less

  19. Passive force balancing of an active magnetic regenerative liquefier

    SciT

    Teyber, R.; Meinhardt, K.; Thomsen, E.

    Active magnetic regenerators (AMR) have the potential for high efficiency cryogen liquefaction. One active magnetic regenerative liquefier (AMRL) configuration consists of dual magnetocaloric regenerators that reciprocate in a persistent-mode superconducting solenoid. Issues with this configuration are the spatial and temporal magnetization gradients that induce large magnetic forces and winding currents. To solve the coupled problem, we present a force minimization approach using passive magnetic material to balance a dual-regenerator AMR. A magnetostatic model is developed and simulated force waveforms are compared with experimental measurements. A genetic algorithm identifies force-minimizing passive structures with virtually ideal balancing characteristics. Finally, implementation details aremore » investigated which affirm the potential of the proposed methodology.« less

  20. Passive force balancing of an active magnetic regenerative liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyber, R.; Meinhardt, K.; Thomsen, E.; Polikarpov, E.; Cui, J.; Rowe, A.; Holladay, J.; Barclay, J.

    2018-04-01

    Active magnetic regenerators (AMR) have the potential for high efficiency cryogen liquefaction. One active magnetic regenerative liquefier (AMRL) configuration consists of dual magnetocaloric regenerators that reciprocate in a persistent-mode superconducting solenoid. Issues with this configuration are the spatial and temporal magnetization gradients that induce large magnetic forces and winding currents. To solve the coupled problem, we present a force minimization approach using passive magnetic material to balance a dual-regenerator AMR. A magnetostatic model is developed and simulated force waveforms are compared with experimental measurements. A genetic algorithm identifies force-minimizing passive structures with virtually ideal balancing characteristics. Implementation details are investigated which affirm the potential of the proposed methodology.

  1. Development of a Liquefied Noble Gas Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, Ezra; White, Aaron; Aidala, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Liquefied noble gas detectors have been used for various applications in recent years for detecting neutrinos, neutrons, photons, and potentially dark matter. The University of Michigan is developing a detector with liquid argon to produce scintillation light and ionization electrons. Our data collection method will allow high-resolution energy measurement and spatial reconstruction of detected particles by using multi-pixel silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and a cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire endplate. We have already designed a liquid argon condenser and purification unit surrounded by an insulating vacuum, constructed circuitry for temperature and pressure sensors, and created software to obtain high-accuracy sensor readouts. The status of detector development will be presented. Funded through the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project.

  2. SNS Central Helium Liquefier spare Carbon Bed installation and commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraff, B.; Howell, M.; Kim, S.; Neustadt, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been without major operations downtime since operations were started back in 2006. This system utilizes a vessel filled with activated carbon as the final major component to remove oil vapor from the compressed helium circuit prior to insertion into the system’s cryogenic cold box. The need for a spare carbon bed at SNS due to the variability of carbon media lifetime calculation to adsorption efficiency will be discussed. The fabrication, installation and commissioning of this spare carbon vessel will be presented. The novel plan for connecting the spare carbon vessel piping to the existing infrastructure will be presented.

  3. SNS Central Helium Liquefier spare Carbon Bed installation and commissioning

    SciT

    Degraff, Brian D.; Howell, Matthew P.; Kim, Sang-Ho

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been without major operations downtime since operations were started back in 2006. This system utilizes a vessel filled with activated carbon as the final major component to remove oil vapor from the compressed helium circuit prior to insertion into the system's cryogenic cold box. The need for a spare carbon bed at SNS due to the variability of carbon media lifetime calculation to adsorption efficiency will be discussed. The fabrication, installation and commissioning of this spare carbon vessel will be presented. The novel planmore » for connecting the spare carbon vessel piping to the existing infrastructure will be presented.« less

  4. Clast Rotation and Nature of Strain Localization in Thick Ultramylonites: the El Pichao Shear Zone (Sierra de Quilmes), NW Argentina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, Pavlina; Hunter, Nicholas James; Weinberg, Roberto; Finch, Melanie

    2013-04-01

    Ultramylonite formation is integral to understanding the accommodation of high strain in ductile shear zones, mountain building and crustal movement. The El Pichao Shear Zone (PSZ) is 3-7km thick ductile thrust zone in the Sierra de Quilmes, NW Argentina. Sinistral thrusting along the PSZ has placed granulite facies migmatites of the Tolombón Complex on top of amphibolite metasedimentary rocks of the Agua del Sapo Complex, separated by a sheared granitic body intruded by pegmatites. The fabric varies from protomylonite to ultramylonite. Ultramylonites in the core of the shear zone reach ~1km in thickness. Ultramylonites of this thickness are extremely rare, and thus the El Pichao Shear Zone provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of such high strain rocks. We used microstructural and quantitative textural analysis, quartz crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), clast vorticity and geochemical data to investigate the origin of the thick ultramylonites, and variable strain accommodation associated with the mylonitization process. The mylonitic rocks have granitic composition and consist of a matrix of Bt+Qtz+Ms+Pl+Kfs, Qtz ribbons, mica bands and feldspar porphyroclasts. Feldspar clasts have been variably rotated and their deformation behaviour varies between brittle faulting and partial to complete dynamic recrystallisation. In the ultramylonite Qtz ribbons or strong S-C fabrics are lacking and the matrix tends to be homogeneous with only weak foliation defined by the preferred orientation of micas. There is also a systematic decrease in matrix grain size and mica connectivity towards ultramylonite. Quartz CPO suggests changes in deformation mechanisms associated with strain increase. The transition between mylonite and ultramylonite in the PSZ occurred due to a switch from dominant dislocation creep to dominant diffusion creep. Major and trace element data show no geochemical variation between samples, indicating that the mylonite

  5. Design and laboratory testing of a chamber device to measure total flux of volatile organic compounds from the unsaturated zone under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Fred D; Smith, James A

    2004-11-01

    To determine if an aquifer contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has potential for natural remediation, all natural processes affecting the fate and transport of VOCs in the subsurface must be identified and quantified. This research addresses the quantification of air-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leaving the unsaturated zone soil gas and entering the atmosphere-including the additional flux provided by advective soil-gas movement induced by barometric pumping. A simple and easy-to-use device for measuring VOC flux under natural conditions is presented. The vertical flux chamber (VFC) was designed using numerical simulations and evaluated in the laboratory. Mass-balance numerical simulations based on continuously stirred tank reactor equations (CSTR) provided information on flux measurement performance of several sampling configurations with the final chamber configuration measuring greater than 96% of model-simulated fluxes. A laboratory device was constructed to evaluate the flux chamber under both diffusion-only and advection-plus-diffusion transport conditions. The flux chamber measured an average of 82% of 15 diffusion-only fluxes and an average of 95% of 15 additional advection-plus-diffusion flux experiments. The vertical flux chamber has the capability of providing reliable measurement of VOC flux from the unsaturated zone under both diffusion and advection transport conditions.

  6. Development of a transferline connecting a helium liquefier coldbox and a liquid helium Dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rajendran S.; Rane, Tejas; Chakravarty, Anindya; Joemon, V.

    2017-02-01

    A helium liquefier with demonstrated capacity of 32 1/hr has been developed by BARC. Mumbai. A transferline for two way flow of helium between the helium liquefier coldbox and receiver Dewar has been developed in-house at BARC. Further, a functionally similar, but structurally improved transferline has been developed through a local fabricator. This paper describes and discusses issues related to the development of these cryogenic transferlines. The developed transferlines have been tested with a flow of liquid nitrogen and successfully utilised later in the helium liquefier plant.

  7. Geochemical and isotopic evidences from groundwater and surface water for understanding of natural contamination in chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) endemic zones in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, E A N V; Manthrithilake, H; Pitawala, H M T G A; Dharmagunawardhane, H A; Wijayawardane, R L

    2018-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) is the main health issue in the dry zone of Sri Lanka. Despite many studies carried out, causative factors have not been identified yet clearly. According to the multidisciplinary researches carried out so far, potable water is considered as the main causative factor for CKDu. Hence, the present study was carried out with combined isotopic and chemical methods to understand possible relationships between groundwater; the main drinking water source, and CKDu in four endemic areas in the dry zone. Different water sources were evaluated isotopically ( 2 H, 3 H and 18 O) and chemically from 2013 to 2015. Results revealed that prevalence of CKDu is significantly low with the groundwater replenished by surface water inputs. It is significantly high with the groundwater stagnated as well as groundwater recharged from regional flow paths. Thus, the origin, recharge mechanism and flow pattern of groundwater, as well as geological conditions which would be responsible for natural contamination of groundwater appear as the main causative factors for CKDu. Therefore, detailed investigations should be made in order to identify the element(s) in groundwater contributing to CKDu. The study recommends providing drinking water to the affected zones using water sources associated with surface waters.

  8. Erbium concentration anomaly as an indicator of nuclear activity: Focus on Natural waters in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

    PubMed

    Plausinaitis, Deivis; Prokopchik, Aleksandr; Karaliunas, Algimantas; Bohdan, Leonid; Balashevska, Yuliya

    2018-04-15

    This study focused on measurement of lanthanides in surface water (SW) and ground water (GW) samples from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Results showed that the total lanthanide concentration in SW ranges from 500 to 1100ngL -1 and is about 10 times lower than the GW concentration. The normalized patterns of lanthanide concentrations increase from lighter elements to heavier lanthanides. Concurrently, concentration anomalies of Ce, Eu, and Er are visible. The Er anomaly is the most noticeable and exceeds the theoretical calculation by about 13 times. The Ce and Eu anomalies are likely related to the variety of oxidation states of these elements. Meanwhile, the cause of the Er anomaly is not completely clear, but is likely related to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, since increased concentrations correlate with the distribution of contamination in the zone. 137 Cs activity measurements partially confirm this hypothesis. Simultaneously, there is a relationship between the positive Er anomaly and increase in 235 U concentrations. However, there is no reliable information in the literature that indicates that Er was used in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant before the reactor accident. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Using the natural biodegradation potential of shallow soils for in-situ remediation of deep vadose zone and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Avishai, Lior; Siebner, Hagar; Dahan, Ofer; Ronen, Zeev

    2017-02-15

    In this study, we examined the ability of top soil to degrade perchlorate from infiltrating polluted groundwater under unsaturated conditions. Column experiments designed to simulate typical remediation operation of daily wetting and draining cycles of contaminated water amended with an electron donor. Covering the infiltration area with bentonite ensured anaerobic conditions. The soil remained unsaturated, and redox potential dropped to less than -200mV. Perchlorate was reduced continuously from ∼1150mg/L at the inlet to ∼300mg/L at the outlet in daily cycles. Removal efficiency was between 60 and 84%. No signs of bioclogging were observed during three operation months although occasional iron reduction observed due to excess electron donor. Changes in perchlorate reducing bacteria numbers were inferred from an increased in pcrA gene abundances from ∼10 5 to 10 7 copied per gram at the end of the experiment indicating the growth of perchlorate-reducing bacteria. We proposed that the topsoil may serve as a bioreactor to treat high concentrations of perchlorate from the contaminated groundwater. The treated water that infiltrates from the topsoil through the vadose zone could be used to flush perchlorate from the deep vadose zone into the groundwater where it is retrieved again for treatment in the topsoil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing vulnerability mapping and protection zones of karst spring waters and validating by the joint use of natural and artificial tracers. The case of Auta Spring (Southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, Ana Isabel; Mudarra, Matías; Andreo, Bartolomé

    2016-04-01

    Delineation of protection zones for water supply and implementation of proper land-use practices in surrounding areas are crucial aspects for a sustainable use of valuable drinking water resources. This is even more important in karst aquifers, which are particularly sensitive to contamination, having a very low self-cleaning capacity due to their structure and hydrological behavior. Consequently, specific methodologies adapted to the particular characteristics of karst media are necessary. In this work, an approach for protection zoning of the pilot site of Auta karst spring (southern Spain) is proposed, based on the application of COP+K method for contamination vulnerability and validation of results by natural (organic) tracers of infiltration (NO3-, TOC, intrinsic fluorescence) and by a dye tracer test conducted on June, 2011 (injecting 500 mg uranine). The aquifer drained by Auta spring (8.5 km2) presents a complex geological structure, formed by Jurassic dolostones and limestones highly folded and fractured. Recharge takes place by the infiltration of rainfall through karst landforms and also by losses in an adjacent river when it flows over the carbonate outcrops (dye injection point). Drainage is mainly through several springs located at the southwest, including Auta spring and 5 overflow springs. The source vulnerability map obtained by applying COP+K method can be adopted as the baseline to delineate the protection zones, through the conversion from vulnerability classes to degrees of protection. Dye tracer test and natural tracers of infiltration corroborate that aquifer sectors influenced by the river can be extremely vulnerable to pollution, but also well-developed exokarst features. In fact, slight evidences of pollution have been detected during the study period, with relatively-high NO3- contents and high fluorescence linked to bacteriological activity in Auta spring water. The jointly use of natural and artificial tracers constitute a reliable and

  11. U.S. Natural Gas Markets: Mid-Term Prospects for Natural Gas Supply

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    This service report describes the recent behavior of natural gas markets with respect to natural gas prices, their potential future behavior, the potential future supply contribution of liquefied natural gas and increased access to federally restricted resources, and the need for improved natural gas data.

  12. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  13. Two Heat-Transfer Improvements for Gas Liquefiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.

    2005-01-01

    Two improvements in heat-transfer design have been investigated with a view toward increasing the efficiency of refrigerators used to liquefy gases. The improvements could contribute to the development of relatively inexpensive, portable oxygen liquefiers for medical use. A description of the heat-transfer problem in a pulse-tube refrigerator is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the first improvement. In a pulse-tube refrigerator in particular, one of in-line configuration heat must be rejected from two locations: an aftercooler (where most of the heat is rejected) and a warm heat exchanger (where a small fraction of the total input power must be rejected as heat). Rejection of heat from the warm heat exchanger can be problematic because this heat exchanger is usually inside a vacuum vessel. When an acoustic-inertance tube is used to provide a phase shift needed in the pulse-tube cooling cycle, another problem arises: Inasmuch as the acoustic power in the acoustic-inertance tube is dissipated over the entire length of the tube, the gas in the tube must be warmer than the warm heat exchanger in order to reject heat at the warm heat exchanger. This is disadvantageous because the increase in viscosity with temperature causes an undesired increase in dissipation of acoustic energy and an undesired decrease in the achievable phase shift. Consequently, the overall performance of the pulse-tube refrigerator decreases with increasing temperature in the acoustic-inertance tube. In the first improvement, the acoustic-inertance tube is made to serve as the warm heat exchanger and to operate in an approximately isothermal condition at a lower temperature, thereby increasing the achievable phase shift and the overall performance of the refrigerator. This is accomplished by placing the acoustic-inertance tube inside another tube and pumping a cooling fluid (e.g., water) in the annular space between the tubes. Another benefit of this improvement is added flexibility of

  14. 30 CFR 75.1106-4 - Use of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; general requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-4 Use of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders... properly installed and operated in accordance with specifications for safety prescribed by the manufacturer...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1106-4 - Use of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; general requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-4 Use of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders... properly installed and operated in accordance with specifications for safety prescribed by the manufacturer...

  16. Natural Gas Imports and Exports

    EIA Publications

    2017-01-01

    Natural gas net imports set a record low of 685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) in 2016, continuing a decline for the 10th consecutive year. U.S. exports were more than three times larger than the level 10 years ago as a result of significant infrastructure improvements to natural gas pipelines and liquefied natural gas facilities. These changes are discussed in the U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2016 report.

  17. Vadose zone transport of natural and synthetic estrogen hormones at Penn State's "Living Filter" wastewater irrigation site

    The increase in endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the environment has generated new research focused on the behavior of these compounds in natural soil and water ecosystems. To understand how estrogens behave in the soil environment as a result of 25+ years of wastewater irrigation, soils fro...

  18. Modeling and Diagnostic Software for Liquefying-Fuel Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poll, Scott; Iverson, David; Ou, Jeremy; Sanderfer, Dwight; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a study of five modeling and diagnostic computer programs considered for use in an integrated vehicle health management (IVHM) system during testing of liquefying-fuel hybrid rocket engines in the Hybrid Combustion Facility (HCF) at NASA Ames Research Center. Three of the programs -- TEAMS, L2, and RODON -- are model-based reasoning (or diagnostic) programs. The other two programs -- ICS and IMS -- do not attempt to isolate the causes of failures but can be used for detecting faults. In the study, qualitative models (in TEAMS and L2) and quantitative models (in RODON) having varying scope and completeness were created. Each of the models captured the structure and behavior of the HCF as a physical system. It was noted that in the cases of the qualitative models, the temporal aspects of the behavior of the HCF and the abstraction of sensor data are handled outside of the models, and it is necessary to develop additional code for this purpose. A need for additional code was also noted in the case of the quantitative model, though the amount of development effort needed was found to be less than that for the qualitative models.

  19. Mathematical modeling of a Fermilab helium liquefier coldbox

    SciT

    Geynisman, M.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility is operated 24 hours-a-day to supply 4.6{degrees}K for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider Ring and to recover warm return gases. The centerpieces of the CHL are two independent cold boxes rated at 4000 and 5400 liters/hour with LN{sub 2} precool. These coldboxes are Claude cycle and have identical heat exchangers trains, but different turbo-expanders. The Tevatron cryogenics demand for higher helium supply from CHL was the driving force to investigate an installation of an expansion engine in place of the Joule-Thompson valve. A mathematical model was developed to describe the thermo- and gas-dynamicmore » processes for the equipment included in the helium coldbox. The model is based on a finite element approach, opposite to a global variables approach, thus providing for higher accuracy and conversion stability. Though the coefficients used in thermo- and gas-dynamic equations are unique for a given coldbox, the general approach, the equations, the methods of computations, and most of the subroutines written in FORTRAN can be readily applied to different coldboxes. The simulation results are compared against actual operating data to demonstrate applicability of the model.« less

  20. Tests of cryogenic pigs for use in liquefied gas pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipple, D. L.; Oneal, W. C.

    1982-09-01

    Pipeline pigs are a key element in the design of a proposed spill test facility whose purpose is to evaluate the hazards of large spills of liquefied gaseous fuels (LGFs). A long pipe runs from the LGF storage tanks to the spill point; to produce a rapid spill, the pipe is filled with LGF and a pig will be pneumatically driven through the pipe to force out the LGF quickly and cleanly. Several pig designs were tested in a 6 inch diameter, 420 foot long pipe to evaluate their performance at liquid-nitrogen temperature and compare it with their performance at ambient temperature. For each test, the pig was placed in one end of the pipe and either water or liquid nitrogen was put into the pipe in front of the pig. Then pressurized drive gas, either nitrogen or helium, was admitted to the pipe behind the pig to push the pig and the fluid ahead of it out the exit nozzle. For some tests, the drive gas supply was shut off when the pig was part way through the pipe as a method of velocity control; in these cases, the pressurized gas trapped behind the pig continued to expand until it pushed the pig the remaining distance out of the pipe.

  1. An unusual etiology in cold injury: Liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Kapı, Emin; Bozkurt, Mehmet; Taylan Filinte, Gaye; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Alioğlu, Celal

    2017-05-01

    Cold injury is a condition that causes reversible and irreversible damage when tissues are exposed to cold. This injury occurs due to various etiologies, and the most commonly observed ones include contact with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) used in households, vehicles, and industry. LPG is a type of gas stored in liquid state under high pressure within cylinders. LPG contains a mixture of propane and butane gases. Direct contact of these gases with the tissues has the potential to cause metabolic, toxic, and respiratory damage. In this study, we present the cases of four patients with cold injury in the face and upper extremity caused by a pressurized jet stream of liquid gas that escaped out of the valves of the LPG cylinders. The patients had bullous lesions in the upper extremities and the face and second- and third-degree cold injuries with fibrotic and necrotic areas. The superficial defects secondarily healed with minimal scarring, while the necrotic finger had to be amputated. Cold injury on the skin caused by high-pressure jet streams of liquid gas as in our study is a rare occurrence. Our patients are important cases due to the rare etiology of cold injury.

  2. Evaluation of burn injuries related to liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Tarim, Mehmet Akin

    2014-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is a fuel that is widely used for domestic, agricultural, and industrial purposes. LPG is also commonly used in restaurants, industries, and cars; however, the home continues to be the main site for accidents. In Turkey, the increased usage of LPG as a cooking or heating fuel has resulted in many burn injuries from LPG mishaps. Between January 2000 and June 2011, 56 LPG-burned patients were compared with 112 flame-burned patients. There were no significant differences with respect to the mean age, sex, hospitalization time, and mortality in both groups. In the LPG-caused burn cases, 41 burns (73.2%) occurred at home, seven (12.5) were work-related mishaps, and eight (14.3) were associated with car accidents. The majority of the LPG burns (82%, 46 patients) resulted from a gas leak, and 18% of them were related to the failure to close LPG tubes in the patients' kitchens (10 patients). Burns to the face and neck (82 vs 67%, P = .039) and upper (62 vs 23%, P = .000) and lower (70 vs 45%, P = .002) extremities were significantly higher in LPG-caused burn cases than flame-burned cases. General awareness regarding the risk of LPG and first aid for burns appears to be lacking. The LPG delivery system should be standardized throughout countries that widely use LPG.

  3. Domestic liquefied petroleum gas: are we using a kitchen bomb?

    PubMed

    Paliwal, G; Agrawal, K; Srivastava, R K; Sharma, S

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the aetiological factors and pattern of burns caused by the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). This hospital based study was conducted on consecutive patients admitted with major burns from September 2011 to August 2012. The data was recorded on predesigned data sheet. Age, gender, mode of injury, its exact mechanism, place of incidence, extent of burn and inhalation injury were recorded for every patient. 182 patients with LPG related burn injury were admitted in one year. This is 11% of total burn patients received during the same period (182/1656). 147 incidents caused these burns due to gas leak from various parts of the LPG cooking system. Leakage was either from the cylinder, pipe or stove in 52%, 36% and 2% incidents respectively. Human error accounted for 3% incidents while in 7% the mechanism could not be ascertained. Leakage from 5kg cylinder with pipe was the commonest aetiological factor. There were 14 group casualties with more than one victim involved. LPG related burns are preventable to a large extent. There is a need to improve the safety standards in the LPG stove system. Public awareness needs to be improved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Burn injuries related to liquefied petroleum gas-powered cars.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mehmet; Kulahci, Yalcin; Zor, Fatih; Kapi, Emin

    2008-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), which is used as a type of fuel, is stored as a liquid under high pressure in tanks. Immediate and sudden explosion of these tanks can release a large amount of gas and energy into the environment and can result in serious burns. In this study, the cases of 18 patients injured due to LPG burns in five incidents were examined, along with their epidemiologic features. The authors also investigated the causes of the LPG tank explosions. Inhalation injury was present in 11 cases with varying degrees of severity, and 7 patients subsequently required mechanical ventilation. The explosions resulted from weakening of the tank wall (n = 2), crash impact (n = 2), and gas leakage from the tank (n = 1). LPG-powered cars are becoming more popular because of their lower operational costs. However, LPG tanks can be hazardous in the event of a tank explosion. Burns caused by explosions of the LPG tanks in cars have significant mortality and morbidity. This danger must be taken into account and public awareness must be increased.

  5. Sedimentary pigments and nature of organic matter within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (Indian margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasiq, K. T.; Kurian, S.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sedimentary pigments, carbon and nitrogen content and their stable isotopes were studied in three short cores collected from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (EAS). Nine pigments including chlorophyll a and their degradation products were quantified using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Astaxanthin followed by canthaxanthin and zeaxanthin were the major carotenoids detected in these cores. The total pigment concentration was high in the core collected from 500 m water depth (6.5 μgg-1) followed by 800 m (1.7 μgg-1) and 1100 m (1.1 μgg-1) depths respectively. The organic carbon did not have considerable control on sedimentary pigments preservation. Pigment degradation was comparatively high in the core collected from the 800 m site which depended not only the bottom dissolved oxygen levels, but also on the faunal activity. As reported earlier, the bottom water dissolved oxygen and presence of fauna have good control on the organic carbon accumulation and preservation at Indian margin OMZ sediments. The C/N ratios and δ13C values for all the cores conclude the marine origin of organic matter and δ15N profiles revealed signature of upwelling associated denitrification within the water column.

  6. Volatiles and Fluids in Subduction Zones: Climate Feedback and Trigger Mechanisms for Natural Disasters. An Overview of the Activities of SFB 574.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, T. J.

    2005-12-01

    The special research program SFB 574 at the University of Kiel investigates the role of fluid and volatile recycling in subduction zones along the Central American convergent margin (Guatemala to Panama) through integrated geophysical, geological, volcanological, geochemical, petrological and oceanographic studies. The work is carried out by over 50 scientists within 12 focussed scientific projects, evenly distributed between the tectonics of the subduction zone, the dewatering through the forearc, and the transfer of fluids from the slab to the atmosphere through the arc. During Phase I (2001-2004), we concentrated on a segment of the erosive subduction zone system onshore and offshore Costa Rica and Nicaragua, one of the focus areas for the MARGIN initiatives SubFac and SEIZE. Along this margin, the dip of subduction, the nature of the incoming plate, and magmatic compositions along the volcanic arc are all known to change significantly. In addition to work carried out during cruises and fieldwork from the 1990s, in the past 4 years we have collected new data during a total 10 months of shiptime on the research vessels SONNE and METEOR, and during 20 man-months of fieldwork, mainly in Costa Rica and Nicaragua. In Phase II (2004-2008) we will finish work off Central America, and start working in an accretionary segment of the Chile margin between 32 and 38S. In this presentation I outline some of the main results concentrating on the effect of variable input and on the output at the arc. Key effects include the influence of the Galapagos hotspot on the incoming section (and on the output at the arc), the thickness of the volcanic crust and the effects of mantle serpentinization.

  7. Porosity and Organic Carbon Controls on Naturally Reduced Zone (NRZ) Formation Creating Microbial ';Hotspots' for Fe, S, and U Cycling in Subsurface Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. E.; Janot, N.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have illustrated the importance of Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZs) within saturated sediments for the cycling of metals and redox sensitive contaminants. NRZs can provide a source of reducing equivalents such as reduced organic compounds or hydrogen to stimulate subsurface microbial communities. These NRZ's are typically characterized by low permeability and elevated concentrations of organic carbon and trace metals. However, both the formation of NRZs and their importance to the overall aquifer carbon remineralization is not fully understood. Within NRZs the hydrolysis of particulate organic carbon (POC) and subsequent fermentation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to form low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon (LMW-DOC) provides electron donors necessary for the respiration of Fe, S, and in the case of the Rifle aquifer, U. Rates of POC hydrolysis and subsequent fermentation have been poorly constrained and rates in excess and deficit to the rates of subsurface anaerobic respiratory processes have been suggested. In this study, we simulate the development of NRZ sediments in diffusion-limited aggregates to investigate the physical and chemical conditions required for NRZ formation. Effects of sediment porosity and POC loading on Fe, S, and U cycling on molecular and nanoscale are investigated with synchrotron-based Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are used to characterize the transformations in POC and DOC. Sediment aggregates are inoculated with the natural microbial biota from the Rifle aquifer and population dynamics are monitored by 16S RNA analysis. Overall, establishment of low permeability NRZs within the aquifer stimulate microbial respiration beyond the diffusion-limited zones and can limit the transport of U through a contaminated aquifer. However, the long-term stability of

  8. Liquefied Noble Gas (LNG) detectors for detection of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkel, J. A.; Gozani, T.; Brown, C.; Kwong, J.; McKinsey, D. N.; Shin, Y.; Kane, S.; Gary, C.; Firestone, M.

    2012-03-01

    Liquefied-noble-gas (LNG) detectors offer, in principle, very good energy resolution for both neutrons and gamma rays, fast response time (hence high-count-rate capabilities), excellent discrimination between neutrons and gamma rays, and scalability to large volumes. They do, however, need cryogenics. LNG detectors in sizes of interest for fissionable material detection in cargo are reaching a certain level of maturity because of the ongoing extensive R&}D effort in high-energy physics regarding their use in the search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. The unique properties of LNG detectors, especially those using Liquid Argon (LAr) and Liquid Xenon (LXe), call for a study to determine their suitability for Non-Intrusive Inspection (NII) for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) and possibly for other threats in cargo. Rapiscan Systems Laboratory, Yale University Physics Department, and Adelphi Technology are collaborating in the investigation of the suitability of LAr as a scintillation material for large size inspection systems for air and maritime containers and trucks. This program studies their suitability for NII, determines their potential uses, determines what improvements in performance they offer and recommends changes to their design to further enhance their suitability. An existing 3.1 liter LAr detector (microCLEAN) at Yale University, developed for R&}D on the detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) was employed for testing. A larger version of this detector (15 liters), more suitable for the detection of higher energy gamma rays and neutrons is being built for experimental evaluation. Results of measurements and simulations of gamma ray and neutron detection in microCLEAN and a larger detector (326 liter CL38) are presented.

  9. Evaluating the Performance of Household Liquefied Petroleum Gas Cookstoves.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guofeng; Hays, Michael D; Smith, Kirk R; Williams, Craig; Faircloth, Jerroll W; Jetter, James J

    2018-01-16

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cookstoves are considered to be an important solution for mitigating household air pollution; however, their performance has rarely been evaluated. To fill the data and knowledge gaps in this important area, 89 laboratory tests were conducted to quantify efficiencies and pollutant emissions from five commercially available household LPG stoves under different burning conditions. The mean thermal efficiency (±standard deviation) for the tested LPG cookstoves was 51 ± 6%, meeting guidelines for the highest tier level (Tier 4) under the International Organization for Standardization, International Workshop Agreement 11. Emission factors of CO 2 , CO, THC, CH 4 , and NO x on the basis of useful energy delivered (MJ d ) were 142 ± 17, 0.77 ± 0.55, 130 ± 196, 5.6 ± 8.2, and 46 ± 9 mg/MJ d , respectively. Approximately 90% of the PM 2.5 data were below the detection limit, corresponding to an emission rate below 0.11 mg/min. For those data above the detection limit, the average emission factor was 2.4 ± 1.6 mg/MJ d , with a mean emission rate of 0.20 ± 0.16 mg/min. Under the specified gas pressure (2.8 kPa), but with the burner control set to minimum air flow rate, less complete combustion resulted in a visually yellow flame, and CO, PM 2.5 , EC, and BC emissions all increased. LPG cookstoves met guidelines for Tier 4 for both CO and PM 2.5 emissions and mostly met the World Health Organization Emission Rate Targets set to protect human health.

  10. Mechanisms for Reduction of Natural Waters Technogenic Pollution by Metals due to Complexions with Humus Substances (Zoning: Western Siberia and the European Territory of Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, M. I.

    2017-11-01

    The article described the complexation of metal ions with humus substances in natural waters (small lakes). Humus substances as the major biochemical components of natural water have a significant impact on the forms and migration of metals and the toxicity of natural objects. This article presents the results of large-scale chemical experiments: the study of the structural features (zonal aspects) of humus substances extracted from soil and water natural climatic zones (more than 300 objects) in Russia (European Russia and West Siberia); the influence of structural features on the physic-chemical parameters of humus acids and, in particular, on their complexing ability. The functional specifics of humus matter extracted from soils is estimated using spectrometric techniques. The conditional stability constants for Fe(III), Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Cr(III), Ca(II), Mg(II), Sr(II), and Al(III) are experimentally determined with the electrochemical, spectroscopic analysis methods. The activities of metals are classified according to their affinity to humus compounds in soils and water. The determined conditional stability constants of the complexes are tested by model experiments, and it is demonstrated that Fe and Al ions have higher conditional stability constants than the ions of alkali earth metals, Pb, Cu, and Zn. Furthermore, the influence of aluminium ions and iron on the complexation of copper and lead as well as the influence of lead and copper on complexation of cobalt and nickel have been identified. The metal forms in a large number of lakes are calculated basing on the experiments’ results. The main chemical mechanisms of the distribution of metals by forms in the water of the lakes in European Russia and West Siberia are described.

  11. Effects of a significant New Madrid Seismic Zone event on oil and natural gas pipelines and their cascading effects to critical infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Damon E.

    Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) is a construct that relates preparedness and responsiveness to natural or man-made disasters that involve vulnerable assets deemed essential for the functioning of our economy and society. Infrastructure systems (power grids, bridges, airports, etc.) are vulnerable to disastrous types of events--natural or man-made. Failures of these systems can have devastating effects on communities and entire regions. CIP relates our willingness, ability, and capability to defend, mitigate, and re-constitute those assets that succumb to disasters affecting one or more infrastructure sectors. This qualitative research utilized ethnography and employed interviews with subject matter experts (SMEs) from various fields of study regarding CIP with respect to oil and natural gas pipelines in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. The study focused on the research question: What can be done to mitigate vulnerabilities in the oil and natural gas infrastructures, along with the potential cascading effects to interdependent systems, associated with a New Madrid fault event? The researcher also analyzed National Level Exercises (NLE) and real world events, and associated After Action Reports (AAR) and Lessons Learned (LL) in order to place a holistic lens across all infrastructures and their dependencies and interdependencies. Three main themes related to the research question emerged: (a) preparedness, (b) mitigation, and (c) impacts. These themes comprised several dimensions: (a) redundancy, (b) node hardening, (c) education, (d) infrastructure damage, (e) cascading effects, (f) interdependencies, (g) exercises, and (h) earthquake readiness. As themes and dimensions are analyzed, they are considered against findings in AARs and LL from previous real world events and large scale exercise events for validation or rejection.

  12. Molecular ecology of the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus): Genetic and natural history variation in a hybrid zone

    Neubaum, M.A.; Douglas, M.R.; Douglas, M.E.; O'Shea, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    Several geographically distinct mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages of the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) have been documented in North America. Individuals from 2 of these lineages, an eastern and a western form, co-occur within maternity colonies in Colorado. The discovery of 2 divergent mtDNA lineages in sympatry prompted a set of questions regarding possible biological differences between haplotypes. We captured big brown bats at maternity roosts in Colorado and recorded data on body size, pelage color, litter size, roosting and overwintering behaviors, and local distributions. Wing biopsies were collected for genetic analysis. The ND2 region of the mtDNA molecule was used to determine lineage of the bats. In addition, nuclear DNA (nDNA) intron 1 of the ??-globin gene was used to determine if mtDNA lineages are hybridizing. Eastern and western mtDNA lineages differed by 10.3% sequence divergence and examination of genetic data suggests recent population expansion for both lineages. Differences in distribution occur along the Colorado Front Range, with an increasing proportion of western haplotypes farther south. Results from nDNA analyses demonstrated hybridization between the 2 lineages. Additionally, no outstanding distinctiveness was found between the mtDNA lineages in natural history characters examined. We speculate that historical climate changes separated this species into isolated eastern and western populations, and that secondary contact with subsequent interbreeding was facilitated by European settlement. ?? 2007 American Society of Mammalogists.

  13. Comparison of phosphorus fractions and phosphatase activities in coastal wetland soils along vegetation zones of Yancheng National Nature Reserve, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lidong; Zhang, Yaohong; Shi, Yiming; Liu, Yibo; Wang, Lin; Yan, Ning

    2015-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) fractions and phosphatase activities were measured in 22 coastal wetland soils with typical vegetation successions in Yancheng National Nature Reserve, China. P forms and phosphatase activities varied greatly from site to site even under the same vegetation cover. NH4Cl-P, bicarbonate/dithionite extracted P and NaOH-P were remarkably higher (p < 0.05) in soils with exotic invasive plants, Spartina alterniflora, than in soils with the native species Suaeda salsa, Scirpus mariquete and Phragmites australis. HCl-P and refractory P showed little variation. No significant differences were detected for either alkaline phosphatase (ALAP) or acid phosphatase (ACAP) among the soils. All of the above properties were much higher in soils with plant growth compared to bare flat soils. Regression analysis demonstrated that organic matter (OM), Al, Ca, Fe and total P (TP) were able to explain more than 70% of the variations in the P fractions (except 29% of NH4Cl-P), and OM was the most important contributing factor. ALAP and ACAP were irrelevant to P but were significantly related to TOC, suggesting that carbon was a limiting factor for P mineralization in this area. Owing to its huge biomass and densities, Spartina alterniflora displayed great potential for carbon input, thus facilitating P mineralization and cycling. The results enhance our understanding of P availability differences in this area covered by invasive and native vegetation.

  14. Analysis of Restricted Natural Gas Supply Cases

    EIA Publications

    2004-01-01

    The four cases examined in this study have progressively greater impacts on overall natural gas consumption, prices, and supply. Compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case, the no Alaska pipeline case has the least impact; the low liquefied natural gas case has more impact; the low unconventional gas recovery case has even more impact; and the combined case has the most impact.

  15. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  16. Application of liquefied wood as a new particle board adhesive system.

    PubMed

    Kunaver, Matjaz; Medved, Sergej; Cuk, Natasa; Jasiukaityte, Edita; Poljansek, Ida; Strnad, Tatjana

    2010-02-01

    Different types of southern European hardwoods and softwoods were subjected to a liquefaction process with glycerol/diethylene glycol. The liquefied spruce wood was reacted in a condensation reaction in the hot press with different melamine-formaldehyde and melamine-urea-formaldehyde resin precursors and used as adhesives for wood particle boards. The mechanical properties of these particle boards and the determination of formaldehyde release, proved that addition of 50% of the liquefied wood to such resin precursors caused the product to meet the European standard quality demands for particle boards. Up to 40% reduction of the formaldehyde emission was achieved. The temperature of the press unit was lowered from 180 degrees C to 160 degrees C with no significant influence on the mechanical properties. On the basis of the presented results it was possible to conclude that liquefied wood can be used as substitute for synthetic resin precursors in adhesives that are used for the particle board production.

  17. Subduction zones: Not relevant to present-day problems of waste disposal

    Silver, E.A.

    1972-01-01

    SUBDUCTION zones are considered to be sites of disposal for vast areas of the Earth's surface1, while new surface is generated simultaneously at rise crests2. Bostrom and Sherif3 suggest that the world's industrial and domestic waste be dumped into subduction zones at deep sea trenches to allow nature to complete the recycling process at geologically rapid rates of 5 to 10 cm/yr. They also point out that trenches are often sites of rapid rates of deposition and suggest that the dumped wastes would, speaking geologically, soon be buried. Francis4 suggests that canisters of toxic chemical and radioactive wastes could be dumped onto trench sediments and be expected to sink at rates of 20 m/yr, assuming that the mass of turbidites in the trench fill often spontaneously liquefies on shaking by earthquakes. The assumption is based on the supposed lack of evidence for deformed sediment in trenches. I will argue that the suggestion of Bostrom and Sherif3 is not useful for the next few dozen generations of human populations and will point out observational evidence to show that Francis's4 assumption is incorrectly founded. ?? 1972 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Steam conversion of liquefied petroleum gas and methane in microchannel reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimov, S. V.; Gasenko, O. A.; Fokin, M. I.; Kuznetsov, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    This study presents experimental results of steam conversion of liquefied petroleum gas and methane in annular catalytic reactor - heat exchanger. The steam reforming was done on the Rh/Al2O3 nanocatalyst with the heat applied through the microchannel gap from the outer wall. Concentrations of the products of chemical reactions in the outlet gas mixture are measured at different temperatures of reactor. The range of channel wall temperatures at which the ratio of hydrogen and carbon oxide in the outlet mixture grows substantially is determined. Data on the composition of liquefied petroleum gas conversion products for the ratio S/C = 5 was received for different GHVS.

  19. 49 CFR 173.304b - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... determined as follows: (1) For high pressure liquefied gases, in no case may the filling ratio of the settled... than the vapor pressure of the liquid at 65 °C. (3) For high pressure liquefied gases or gas mixtures... compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles. 173.304b Section 173.304b Transportation Other Regulations...

  20. Bio-based rigid polyurethane foam from liquefied products of wood in the presence of polyhydric alcohols

    Zhifeng Zheng; Hui Pan; Yuanbo Huang; Chung Y. Hse

    2011-01-01

    Rigid polyurethane foams were prepared from the liquefied wood polyols, which was obtained by the liquefaction of southern pine wood in the presence of polyhydric alcohols with sulfuric acid catalyst by using microwave-assistant as an energy source. The properties of liquefied biomass-based polyols and the rigid polyurethane foams were investigated. The results...

  1. Dilute alkali and hydrogen peroxide treatment of microwave liquefied rape straw residue for the extraction of cellulose nanocrystals

    Xingyan Huang; Cornelis F. De Hoop; Feng Li; Jiulong Xie; Chung-Yun Hse; Jinqiu Qi; Yongze Jiang; Yuzhu Chen

    2017-01-01

    Microwave-assisted liquefaction of rape straw in methanol was conducted to collect the liquefied residues for the extraction of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs).The liquefied residue with content of 23.44% from 180∘C/7.5 min was used to fibrillate CNCs with dilute alkali (2% NaOH) and hydrogen peroxide (5% H2O2...

  2. Evaluation of the accessibility of CCA metals in liquefied CCA-treated wood sludge for recovery and reuse

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    CCA-treated wood was liquefied with polyethylene glycol/glycerin and sulfuric acid. The heavy metals were precipitated by Ca(OH)2 from liquefied CCA-treated wood. The original CCA-treated wood and precipitated wood sludge were fractionated by a modified BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure. The purpose of the BCR...

  3. Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinhorst, Sabine; Cannon, Gordon

    1997-01-01

    The fact that two of the original articles by this year's Nobel laureates were published in Nature bears witness to the pivotal role of this journal in documenting pioneering discoveries in all areas of science. The prize for Physiology or Medicine was awarded to immunologists Peter C. Doherty (University of Tennessee) and Rolf M. Zinkernagel (University of Zurich, Switzerland), honoring work that, in the 1970s, laid the foundation for our current understanding of the way in which our immune system differentiates between healthy cells and virus-infected ones that are targeted for destruction (p 465 in the October 10 issue of vol. 383). Three researchers share the Chemistry award for their discovery of C60 buckminsterfullerenes. The work by Robert Curl, Richard Smalley (both at Rice University), and Harry Kroto (University of Sussex, UK) has led to a burst of new approaches to materials development and in carbon chemistry (p 561 of the October 17 issue of vol. 383). This year's Nobel prize in physics went to three U.S. researchers, Douglas Osheroff (Stanford University) and David M. Lee and Robert C. Richardson (Cornell University), who were honored for their work on superfluidity, a frictionless liquid state, of supercooled 3He (p 562 of the October 17 issue of vol. 383).

  4. The Spar Lake strata-Bound Cu-Ag deposit formed across a mixing zone between trapped natural gas and metals-bearing brine

    Hayes, Timothy S.; Landis, Gary P.; Whelan, Joseph F.; Rye, Robert O.; Moscati, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Ore formation at the Spar Lake red bed-associated strata-bound Cu deposit took place across a mixing and reaction zone between a hot oxidized metals-transporting brine and a reservoir of “sour” (H2S-bearing) natural gas trapped in the host sandstones. Fluid inclusion volatile analyses have very high CH4 concentrations (≥1 mol % in most samples), and a sample from the fringe of the deposit has between 18 and 36 mol % CH4. The ratio of CH4/CO2 in fluid inclusions appears to vary regularly across the deposit, with the lowest CH4/CO2 ratios from high-grade chalcocite-bearing ore, and the highest from the chalcopyrite-bearing fringe. The helium R/Ra isotope ratios (0.23–0.98) and concentrations define a mixture between crustal and atmospheric helium. The volatiles in fluid inclusions (CH4, CO2, H2S, SO2, H2, H2O, and other organic gases) and values of fO2 and temperature calculated from the volatiles data all show gradations across the deposit that are completely consistent with such a mixing and reaction zone. Other volatiles from the fluid inclusions (HCl, HF, 3He, Msup>4He, N2, Ar) characterize the brine and give evidence for only shallow crustal fluids with no magmatic influences. The brine entered the gas reservoir from below and along the axis of the deposit and migrated out along bedding to the southwest, northeast, and northwest. Metals-transporting brines may have been fed into the host sandstones from the East Fault, but that remains uncertain. Abundant ore-stage Fe and Mn calcite cements from the reduced fringe have δ13C values as low as −18.4‰, and many values less than −10‰, which indicate that significant carbonate was generated by oxidation of organic carbon from the natural gas. The zone of calcite cements with very low δ13C values approximately envelopes chalcocite-bearing ore. Sulfur isotope data of Cu, Pb, and Fe sulfides and barite indicate derivation of roughly half of the orebody sulfide directly from sour gas H2S. That sour gas H

  5. Improvement of Liquefiable Foundation Conditions Beneath Existing Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    filter zones, and drains. Drilling fluids can cause hydraulic fracturing . These hazards can lead to to piping and hvdraulic fracturing Compression . 7...with results of piping and hydraulic fracturing (Continued) * Site conditions have been classified into three cases; Case 1 is for beneath -d...which could lead to piping and hydraulic fracturing Soil Reinforcement 16. Vibro-replacement See methods 2 and 3 stone and sand columns applicable to

  6. Mapping the distribution of mangrove species in the Core Zone of Mai Po Marshes Nature Reserve, Hong Kong, using hyperspectral data and high-resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mingming; Zhang, Yuanzhi; Wang, Zongming; Song, Kaishan; Ren, Chunying

    2014-12-01

    Mangrove species compositions and distributions are essential for conservation and restoration efforts. In this study, hyperspectral data of EO-1 HYPERION sensor and high spatial resolution data of SPOT-5 sensor were used in Mai Po mangrove species mapping. Objected-oriented method was used in mangrove species classification processing. Firstly, mangrove objects were obtained via segmenting high spatial resolution data of SPOT-5. Then the objects were classified into different mangrove species based on the spectral differences of HYPERION image. The classification result showed that in the top canopy, Kandelia obovata and Avicennia marina dominated Mai Po Marshes Natural Reserve, with area of 196.8 ha and 110.8 ha, respectively, Acanthus ilicifolius and Aegiceras corniculatum were mixed together and living at the edge of channels with an area of 11.7 ha. Additionally, mangrove species shows clearly zonations and associations in the Mai Po Core Zone. The overall accuracy of our mangrove map was 88% and the Kappa confidence was 0.83, which indicated great potential of using hyperspectral and high-resolution data for distinguishing and mapping mangrove species.

  7. Detection and Quantification of Inorganic and Organic Anions in Natural, Potable, and Wastewaters in Northern New York Using Capillary Zone Electrophoresis and Indirect UV Detection

    PubMed Central

    Varden, Lara; Smith, Britannia; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi

    2017-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a sensitive and rapid technique used for determining traces of inorganic and organic anions in potable, natural, and wastewaters. Here, CZE with indirect UV-diode array detection (CZE-DAD) was employed with a background electrolyte system comprising of an Agilent Technologies proprietary basic anion buffer at pH 12.0 and a forensic anion detection method. The limits of detection (LOD) for this method ranged between 3 and 5 ppm and involved hydrodynamic injection of 50 mbar for 6 s with a negative polarity separation voltage of −30 kV at 30°C, a detection wavelength of 350 nm and indirect reference of 275 nm. Fourteen different anions were checked for in the water samples that were examined and included bromide, chloride, thiosulfate, nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, azide, carbonate, fluoride, arsenate, phosphate, acetate, lactate, and silicate. The water samples were collected from Northern New York towns and the Raquette River water system, the third longest river in New York State and the largest watershed of the central and western Adirondacks. The concentrations detected for these anions ranged from <5.0 ppm to 260 ppm. PMID:29057145

  8. Fractionation of heavy metals in liquefied chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood sludge using a modified BCR-sequential extraction procedure

    Hui Pan; Chung-Yun Hse; Robert Gambrell; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood was liquefied with polyethylene glycol/glycerin and sulfuric acid. After liquefaction, most CCA metals (98% As, 92% Cr, and 83% Cu) were removed from liquefied CCA-treated wood by precipitation with calcium hydroxide. The original CCA-treated wood and liquefied CCA-treated wood sludge were fractionated by a modified...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.110 - Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dehydrators or dryers. (13) Ventilation, adequate—when specified for the prevention of fire during normal..., buildings, or separate fire divisions of buildings used exclusively for housing internal combustion engines..., diaphragms, etc., shall be of such quality as to be resistant to the action of liquefied petroleum gas under...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.110 - Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dehydrators or dryers. (13) Ventilation, adequate—when specified for the prevention of fire during normal..., buildings, or separate fire divisions of buildings used exclusively for housing internal combustion engines..., diaphragms, etc., shall be of such quality as to be resistant to the action of liquefied petroleum gas under...

  11. 29 CFR 1910.110 - Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dehydrators or dryers. (13) Ventilation, adequate—when specified for the prevention of fire during normal..., buildings, or separate fire divisions of buildings used exclusively for housing internal combustion engines..., diaphragms, etc., shall be of such quality as to be resistant to the action of liquefied petroleum gas under...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.153 - Liquefied petroleum gas (LP-Gas).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Containers—All vessels, such as tanks, cylinders, or drums, used for transportation or storing liquefied... outlet piping of settling shall be guarded against by a flexible connection or special fitting. (h... known in the industry as “skid tanks”) shall be designed, installed, and used in accordance with these...

  13. 46 CFR 61.15-10 - Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquefied-petroleum-gas piping for heating and cooking. 61.15-10 Section 61.15-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE... piping for heating and cooking. (a) Leak tests as described in paragraph (b) of this section shall be...

  14. 29 CFR 779.360 - Classification of liquefied-petroleum-gas sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... bus fuel and the repair and servicing of trucks and buses used in over-the-road commercial transportation (including parts and accessories for such vehicles). (b) Sales or repairs of tanks. Sales or repairs of tanks for the storage of liquefied-petroleum-gas are recognized as retail in the industry...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... underground coal mine shall be: (1) Placed securely in devices designed to hold the cylinder in place during transit on self-propelled equipment or belt conveyors; (2) Disconnected from all hoses and gages; (3... containers which are specifically designed for holding such cylinders. (c) Liquefied and nonliquefied...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1106-3 - Storage of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES...; requirements. (a) Liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders stored in an underground coal mine shall... falling material, contact with power lines and energized electrical equipment, heat from welding, cutting...

  17. Liquefied Petroleum Gas Industry Profile. Volume l. An Overview of the Industry.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-11-01

    The report provides a broad, factual description of the U.S. liquefied petroleum gas (LP-gas) industry. The basic purpose of the report is to provide analysts and policymakers in government and industry with a comprehensive overview of the LP-gas ind...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1106-3 - Storage of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or soldering, and exposure to flammable liquids. (b) Liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-3 Section 75.1106-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES...

  19. Characterization of biobased polyurethane foams employing lignin fractionated from microwave liquefied switchgrass

    Xingyan Huang; Cornelis F. De Hoop; Jiulong Xie; Chung-Yun Hse; Jinqiu Qi; Tingxing Hu

    2017-01-01

    Lignin samples fractionated from microwave liquefied switchgrass were applied in the preparation of semirigid polyurethane (PU) foams without purification.The objective of this study was to elucidate the influence of lignin in the PU matrix on themorphological, chemical, mechanical, and thermal properties of thePU foams.The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images...

  20. Liquefaction of corn stover and preparation of polyester from the liquefied polyol.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Liu, Yuhuan; Pan, Xuejun; Lin, Xiangyang; Liu, Chengmei; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2006-01-01

    This research investigated a novel process to prepare polyester from corn stover through liquefaction and crosslinking processes. First, corn stover was liquefied in organic solvents (90 wt% ethylene glycol and 10 wt% ethylene carbonate) with catalysts at moderate temperature under atmospheric pressure. The effect of liquefaction temperature, biomass content, and type of catalyst, such as H2SO4, HCl, H3PO4, and ZnCl2, was evaluated. Higher liquefaction yield was achieved in 2 wt% sulfuric acid, 1/4 (w/w) stover to liquefying reagent ratio; 160 degrees C temperature, in 2 h. The liquefied corn stover was rich in polyols, which can be directly used as feedstock for making polymers without further separation or purification. Second, polyester was made from the liquefied corn stover by crosslinking with multifunctional carboxylic acids and/or cyclic acid anhydrides. The tensile strength of polyester is about 5 MPa and the elongation is around 35%. The polyester is stable in cold water and organic solvents and readily biodegradable as indicated by 82% weight loss when buried in damp soil for 10 mo. The results indicate that this novel polyester could be used for the biodegradable garden mulch film production.

  1. Bond quality of phenol-based adhesives containing liquefied creosote-treated wood

    Chung-Yun Hse; Feng Fu; Hui Pan

    2009-01-01

    Liquefaction of spent creosote-treated wood was studied to determine the technological practicability of its application in converting treated wood waste into resin adhesives. A total of 144 plywood panels were fabricated with experimental variables included 2 phenol to wood (P/W) ratios in liquefaction, 6 resin formulations (3 formaldehyde/liquefied wood (F/...

  2. Thermal decomposition characteristics of microwave liquefied rape straw residues using thermogravimetric analysis

    Xingyan Huang; Cornelis F. De Hoop; Jiulong Xie; Chung-Yun Hse; Jinqiu Qi; Yuzhu Chen; Feng Li

    2017-01-01

    The thermal decomposition characteristics of microwave liquefied rape straw residues with respect to liquefaction condition and pyrolysis conversion were investigated using a thermogravimetric (TG) analyzer at the heating rates of 5, 20, 50 °C min-1. The hemicellulose decomposition peak was absent at the derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG...

  3. Polyols from Microwave Liquefied Bagasse and Its Application to Rigid Polyurethane Foam.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiulong; Zhai, Xianglin; Hse, Chung Yun; Shupe, Todd F; Pan, Hui

    2015-12-08

    Bagasse flour (BF) was liquefied using bi-component polyhydric alcohol (PA) as a solvent and phosphoric acid as a catalyst in a microwave reactor. The effect of BF to solvent ratio and reaction temperatures on the liquefaction extent and characteristics of liquefied products were evaluated. The results revealed that almost 75% of the raw bagasse was converted into liquid products within 9 min at 150 °C with a BF to solvent ratio of 1/4. The hydroxyl and acid values of the liquefied bagasse (LB) varied with the liquefied conditions. High reaction temperature combining with low BF to solvent ratio resulted in a low hydroxyl number for the LB. The molecular weight and polydispersity of the LB from reactions of 150 °C was lower compared to that from 125 °C. Rigid polyurethane (PU) foams were prepared from LB and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), and the structural, mechanical and thermal properties of the PU foam were evaluated. The PU foams prepared using the LB from high reaction temperature showed better physical and mechanical performance in comparison to those from low reaction temperature. The amount of PA in the LB has the ability of increasing thermal stability of LB-PU foams. The results in this study may provide fundamental information on integrated utilizations of sugarcane bagasse via microwave liquefaction process.

  4. Polyols from Microwave Liquefied Bagasse and Its Application to Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiulong; Zhai, Xianglin; Hse, Chung Yun; Shupe, Todd F.; Pan, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Bagasse flour (BF) was liquefied using bi-component polyhydric alcohol (PA) as a solvent and phosphoric acid as a catalyst in a microwave reactor. The effect of BF to solvent ratio and reaction temperatures on the liquefaction extent and characteristics of liquefied products were evaluated. The results revealed that almost 75% of the raw bagasse was converted into liquid products within 9 min at 150 °C with a BF to solvent ratio of 1/4. The hydroxyl and acid values of the liquefied bagasse (LB) varied with the liquefied conditions. High reaction temperature combining with low BF to solvent ratio resulted in a low hydroxyl number for the LB. The molecular weight and polydispersity of the LB from reactions of 150 °C was lower compared to that from 125 °C. Rigid polyurethane (PU) foams were prepared from LB and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), and the structural, mechanical and thermal properties of the PU foam were evaluated. The PU foams prepared using the LB from high reaction temperature showed better physical and mechanical performance in comparison to those from low reaction temperature. The amount of PA in the LB has the ability of increasing thermal stability of LB-PU foams. The results in this study may provide fundamental information on integrated utilizations of sugarcane bagasse via microwave liquefaction process. PMID:28793725

  5. Submarine groundwater discharge into the coast revealed by water chemistry of man-made undersea liquefied petroleum gas cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Cho, Byung Wook

    2008-10-01

    SummaryThe occurrence of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) as well as its supply of many nutrients and metals to coastal seawaters is now generally known. However, previous studies have focused on the chemical and radiological analysis of groundwater, surface seawater, shallow marine sediments and their pore waters, as well as the measurement of upward flow through the marine sediments, as end members of the discharge process. In this study, chemical and isotopic analysis results of marine subsurface waters are reported. These were obtained from deep boreholes of an undersea liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) storage cavern, located about 8 km off the western coast of Korea. The cavern is about 130-150 m below the sea bottom, which is covered by a 4.8-19.5 m silty clay stratum. An isotopic composition (δ 2H and δ 18O) of the marine subsurface waters falls on a mixing line between terrestrial groundwater and seawater. Vertical EC profiling at the cavern boreholes revealed the existence of a fresh water zone. An increase in the contents of ferrous iron and manganese and a decrease in levels of nitrate, bicarbonate and cavern seepage were recorded in August 2006, indicating a decreased submarine groundwater flux originating from land, mainly caused by an elevated cavern gas pressure. It is suggested in this study that the main source of fresh waters in the man-made undersea cavern is the submarine groundwater discharge mainly originating from the land.

  6. 75 FR 53371 - Liquefied Natural Gas Facilities: Obtaining Approval of Alternative Vapor-Gas Dispersion Models

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... factors as the approved models, are validated by experimental test data, and receive the Administrator's... stage of the MEP involves applying the model against a database of experimental test cases including..., particularly the requirement for validation by experimental test data. That guidance is based on the MEP's...

  7. 75 FR 38092 - The Dow Chemical Company; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [FE Docket No. 10-57-LNG] The Dow Chemical Company; Application for Blanket... receipt of an application (Application), filed on May 26, 2010, by The Dow Chemical Company (Dow... the United States from foreign sources in an amount up to the equivalent of 390 billion cubic feet...

  8. Consequence Assessment Methods for Incidents Involving Releases From Liquefied Natural Gas Carriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-13

    the downwind direction. The Thomas (1965) correlation is used to calculate flame length . Flame tilt is estimated using an empirical correlation from...follows: From TNO (1997) • Thomas (1963) correlation for flame length • For an experimental LNG pool fire of 16.8-m diameter, a mass burning flux of...m, flame length ranged from 50 to 78 m, and tilt angle from 27 to 35 degrees From Rew (1996) • Work included a review of recent developments in

  9. Comparison of the key mechanisms leading to rollovers in Liquefied Natural Gas using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Antoine; Dadonau, Maksim; Dembele, Siaka; Denissenko, Petr; Wen, Jennifer

    2017-11-01

    Growing demand for the LNG fosters growth of the number of production sites with varying composition and density. Combining different sources of LNG may result in a stably stratified system, in which heat and mass transfer between the layers is limited. Heating of the LNG due to wall thermal conductivity leads to formation of convection cells confined within the layers. While the upper layer can release the extra energy via preferential methane boil-off, the bottom layer cannot and hence becomes superheated. Gradual density equilibration reduces stratification and may eventually lead to a sudden mixing event called ``rollover'', accompanied by violent evaporation of the superheated LNG. Three phenomena are potentially responsible for density equilibration. The first is the growing difference in thermal expansion of the layers due to the reduced ability of the bottom layer to reject heat. The second is the penetration of the heated near-wall boundary layer into the upper layer. The third is the ``entrainment mixing'' occurring at the contact surface between the two layers. The present study uses CFD to compare these mechanisms. Boussinesq approximation and an extended version of the k- ɛ model is used. The code is validated by comparison with a large-scale LNG rollover experiment.

  10. Liquefied natural gas tender crashworthiness in train-to-train collisions

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-04-12

    This paper focuses on technical information to help support : development of alternative static requirements for the train-to-train : collision scenario. The goal of the static requirements is to : provide the same level of crashworthiness as the dyn...

  11. 75 FR 19954 - Cheniere Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [FE Docket No. 10-31-LNG] Cheniere Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket... receipt of an application, filed on March 23, 2010, by Cheniere Marketing, LLC (CMI), requesting blanket... amended to reflect a name change from Cheniere Marketing, Inc to Cheniere Marketing, LLC.\\1\\ \\1\\ Cheniere...

  12. Quartz preferred orientation in naturally deformed mylonitic rocks (Montalto shear zone-Italy): a comparison of results by different techniques, their advantages and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Eugenio; Punturo, Rosalda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Kern, Hartmut; Pezzino, Antonino; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Goswami, Shalini; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2017-10-01

    In the geologic record, the quartz c-axis patterns are widely adopted in the investigation of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) of naturally deformed rocks. To this aim, in the present work, four different methods for measuring quartz c-axis orientations in naturally sheared rocks were applied and compared: the classical universal stage technique, the computer-integrated polarization microscopy method (CIP), the time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction analysis , and the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Microstructural analysis and CPO patterns of quartz, together with the ones obtained for feldspars and micas in mylonitic granitoid rocks, have been then considered to solve structural and geological questions related to the Montalto crustal scale shear zone (Calabria, southern Italy). Results obtained by applying the different techniques are discussed, and the advantages as well as limitations of each method are highlighted. Importantly, our findings suggest that patterns obtained by means of different techniques are quite similar. In particular, for such mylonites, a subsimple shear (40% simple shear vs 60% pure shear) by shape analysis of porphyroclasts was inferred. A general tendency of an asymmetric c-maximum near to the Z direction (normal to foliation) suggesting dominant basal slip, consistent with fabric patterns related to dynamically recrystallization under greenschist facies, is recognized. Rhombohedral slip was likely active as documented by pole figures of positive and negative rhombs (TOF), which reveal also potential mechanical Dauphiné twinning. Results showed that the most complete CPO characterization on deformed rocks is given by the TOF (from which also other quartz crystallographic axes can be obtained as well as various mineral phases may be investigated). However, this use is restricted by the fact that (a) there are very few TOF facilities around the world and (b) there is loss of any domainal reference, since TOF is a

  13. Zone lines

    Kevin T. Smith

    2001-01-01

    Zone lines are narrow, usually dark markings formed in decaying wood. Zone lines are found most frequently in advanced white rot of hardwoods, although they occasionally are associated both with brown rot and with softwoods.

  14. The nature of a deformation zone and fault rock related to a recent rockburst at Western Deep Levels Gold Mine, Witwatersrand Basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, R. A.; Reimold, W. U.; Charlesworth, E. G.; Ortlepp, W. D.

    2001-07-01

    In August 1998, a major deformation zone was exposed over several metres during mining operations on 87 Level (2463 m below surface) at Western Deep Levels Gold Mine, southwest of Johannesburg, providing a unique opportunity to study the products of a recent rockburst. This zone consists of three shear zones, with dip-slip displacements of up to 15 cm, that are oriented near-parallel to the advancing stope face. Jogs and a highly pulverised, cataclastic 'rock-flour' are developed on the displacement surfaces, and several sets of secondary extensional fractures occur on either side of the shear zones. A set of pinnate (feather) joints intersects the fault surfaces perpendicular to the slip vector. Microscopically, the shear zones consist of two pinnate joint sets that exhibit cataclastic joint fillings; quartz grains display intense intragranular fracturing. Secondary, intergranular extension fractures are associated with the pinnate joints. Extensional deformation is also the cause of the breccia fill of the pinnate joints. The initial deformation experienced by this zone is brittle and tensile, and is related to stresses induced by mining. This deformation has been masked by later changes in the stress field, which resulted in shearing. This deformation zone does not appear to be controlled by pre-existing geological features and, thus, represents a 'burst fracture', which is believed to be related to a seismic event of magnitude ML=2.1 recorded in July 1998, the epicentre of which was located to within 50 m of the study locality.

  15. 30 CFR 75.1106-5 - Maintenance and tests of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; accessories and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to maintain torches in a safe operating condition. (d) Tests for leaks on the hose valves or gages of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders shall only be made with a soft brush and soapy water or...

  16. N-loss isotope effects in the Peru oxygen minimum zone studied using a mesoscale eddy as a natural tracer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, Annie; Altabet, Mark A.; Charoenpong, Chawalit N.; Larkum, Jennifer; Hu, Haibei; Bange, Hermann W.; Stramma, Lothar

    2015-06-01

    Mesoscale eddies in Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) have been identified as important fixed nitrogen (N) loss hotspots that may significantly impact both the global rate of N-loss as well as the ocean's N isotope budget. They also represent "natural tracer experiments" with intensified biogeochemical signals that can be exploited to understand the large-scale processes that control N-loss and associated isotope effects (ɛ; the ‰ deviation from 1 in the ratio of reaction rate constants for the light versus heavy isotopologues). We observed large ranges in the concentrations and N and O isotopic compositions of nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and biogenic N2 associated with an anticyclonic mode-water eddy in the Peru OMZ during two cruises in November and December 2012. In the eddy's center where NO3- was nearly exhausted, we measured the highest δ15N values for both NO3- and NO2- (up to ~70‰ and 50‰) ever reported for an OMZ. Correspondingly, N deficit and biogenic N2-N concentrations were also the highest near the eddy's center (up to ~40 µmol L-1). δ15N-N2 also varied with biogenic N2 production, following kinetic isotopic fractionation during NO2- reduction to N2 and, for the first time, provided an independent assessment of N isotope fractionation during OMZ N-loss. We found apparent variable ɛ for NO3- reduction (up to ~30‰ in the presence of NO2-). However, the overall ɛ for N-loss was calculated to be only ~13-14‰ (as compared to canonical values of ~20-30‰) assuming a closed system and only slightly higher assuming an open system (16-19‰). Our results were similar whether calculated from the disappearance of DIN (NO3- + NO2-) or from the appearance of N2 and changes in isotopic composition. Further, we calculated the separate ɛ values for NO3- reduction to NO2- and NO2- reduction to N2 of ~16-21‰ and ~12‰, respectively, when the effect of NO2- oxidation could be removed. These results, together with the relationship between N and O of NO

  17. Investigation of bypass fluid flow in an active magnetic regenerative liquefier

    DOE PAGES

    Holladay, Jamelyn; Teyber, Reed; Meinhardt, Kerry; ...

    2018-05-19

    Active magnetic regenerators (AMR) with second order magnetocaloric materials operating below the Curie temperature have a unique property where the magnetized specific heat is lower than the demagnetized specific heat. The associated thermal mass imbalance allows a fraction of heat transfer fluid in the cold heat exchanger to bypass the magnetized regenerator. This cold bypassed fluid can precool a process stream as it returns to the hot side, thereby increasing the efficiency of liquefaction and reducing the cost of liquid cryogens. In the present work, the net cooling power of an active magnetic regenerative liquefier is investigated as a functionmore » of the bypass flow fraction. In conclusion, experiments are performed at a fixed temperature span yielding a 30% improvement in net cooling power, affirming the potential of bypass flow in active magnetic regenerative liquefiers.« less

  18. Investigation of bypass fluid flow in an active magnetic regenerative liquefier

    SciT

    Holladay, Jamelyn; Teyber, Reed; Meinhardt, Kerry

    Active magnetic regenerators (AMR) with second order magnetocaloric materials operating below the Curie temperature have a unique property where the magnetized specific heat is lower than the demagnetized specific heat. The associated thermal mass imbalance allows a fraction of heat transfer fluid in the cold heat exchanger to bypass the magnetized regenerator. This cold bypassed fluid can precool a process stream as it returns to the hot side, thereby increasing the efficiency of liquefaction and reducing the cost of liquid cryogens. In the present work, the net cooling power of an active magnetic regenerative liquefier is investigated as a functionmore » of the bypass flow fraction. Experiments are performed at a fixed temperature span yielding a 30% improvement in net cooling power, affirming the potential of bypass flow in active magnetic regenerative liquefiers.« less

  19. Investigation of bypass fluid flow in an active magnetic regenerative liquefier

    SciT

    Holladay, Jamelyn; Teyber, Reed; Meinhardt, Kerry

    Active magnetic regenerators (AMR) with second order magnetocaloric materials operating below the Curie temperature have a unique property where the magnetized specific heat is lower than the demagnetized specific heat. The associated thermal mass imbalance allows a fraction of heat transfer fluid in the cold heat exchanger to bypass the magnetized regenerator. This cold bypassed fluid can precool a process stream as it returns to the hot side, thereby increasing the efficiency of liquefaction and reducing the cost of liquid cryogens. In the present work, the net cooling power of an active magnetic regenerative liquefier is investigated as a functionmore » of the bypass flow fraction. In conclusion, experiments are performed at a fixed temperature span yielding a 30% improvement in net cooling power, affirming the potential of bypass flow in active magnetic regenerative liquefiers.« less

  20. An experimental study on dynamic response for MICP strengthening liquefiable sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhiguang; Cheng, Xiaohui; Ma, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The technology of bio-grouting is a new technique for soft ground improvement. Many researchers have carried out a large number of experiments and study on this topic. However, few studies have been carried out on the dynamic response of solidified sand samples, such reducing liquefaction in sand. To study this characteristic of microbial-strengthened liquefiable sandy foundation, a microorganism formula and grouting scheme is applied. After grouting, the solidified samples are tested via dynamic triaxial testing to examine the cyclic performance of solidified sand samples. The results indicate that the solidified sand samples with various strengths can be obtained to meet different engineering requirements, the use of bacteria solution and nutritive salt is reduced, and solidified time is shortened to 1-2 days. Most importantly, in the study of the dynamic response, it is found that the MICP grouting scheme is effective in improving liquefiable sand characteristic, such as liquefaction resistance.

  1. Characterization of microwave liquefied bamboo residue and its potential use in the generation of nanofibrillated cellulosic fiber

    Jiulong Xie; Chung Hse; Chunjie Li; Todd F. Shupe; Tingxing Hu; Jinqiu Qi; Cornelis F. De Hoop

    2016-01-01

    Bamboo raw feedstocks with large particle size (20−80 mesh) were subjected to a microwave liquefaction system, and the liquefied products were separated into biopolyols and liquefied residues. Biopolyols were first analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC−MS), and the main components were sugar derivatives with 2−4 hydroxyl groups and phenolic compounds...

  2. Feasibility Analysis of Liquefying Oxygen Generated from Water Electrolysis Units on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Frank F.

    2009-01-01

    Concepts for liquefying oxygen (O2) generated from water electrolysis subsystems on the Lunar surface were explored. Concepts for O2 liquefaction units capable of generating 1.38 lb/hr (0.63 kg/hr) liquid oxygen (LOX) were developed. Heat and mass balance calculations for the liquefaction concepts were conducted. Stream properties, duties of radiators, heat exchangers and compressors for the selected concepts were calculated and compared.

  3. Physical and mechanical properties of bio-composites from wood particles and liquefied wood resin

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    Compression molded composites were made from wood particles and a liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde co-condensed resin. Based on our previous research, a phenol to wood (P/W) ratio of 2/1 was chosen for this study. The two experimental variables selected were: 1) liquefaction temperature (150o and 180oC) and 2) cooking method (atmospheric and sealed). Panels were...

  4. 76 FR 80553 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Technical Revisions to the Petroleum and Natural Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... facilities 486210 Pipeline transportation of natural gas. Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems. 221210 Natural... and Budget PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration QA/QC quality assurance/quality... distribution pipelines, but also into liquefied natural gas storage or into underground storage. We are...

  5. The optimization on flow scheme of helium liquefier with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Liu, L. Q.

    2017-01-01

    There are several ways to organize the flow scheme of the helium liquefiers, such as arranging the expanders in parallel (reverse Brayton stage) or in series (modified Brayton stages). In this paper, the inlet mass flow and temperatures of expanders in Collins cycle are optimized using genetic algorithm (GA). Results show that maximum liquefaction rate can be obtained when the system is working at the optimal parameters. However, the reliability of the system is not well due to high wheel speed of the first turbine. Study shows that the scheme in which expanders are arranged in series with heat exchangers between them has higher operation reliability but lower plant efficiency when working at the same situation. Considering both liquefaction rate and system stability, another flow scheme is put forward hoping to solve the dilemma. The three configurations are compared from different aspects, they are respectively economic cost, heat exchanger size, system reliability and exergy efficiency. In addition, the effect of heat capacity ratio on heat transfer efficiency is discussed. A conclusion of choosing liquefier configuration is given in the end, which is meaningful for the optimal design of helium liquefier.

  6. The effect of fluorine on the stability of wadsleyite: Implications for the nature and depths of the transition zone in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützner, Tobias; Klemme, Stephan; Rohrbach, Arno; Gervasoni, Fernanda; Berndt, Jasper

    2018-01-01

    The Earth's mantle contains significant amounts of volatile elements, such as hydrogen (H), carbon (C) and the halogens fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl) and bromine (Br) and iodine (I). There is a wealth of knowledge about the global cycling of H and C, but there is only scant data on the concentrations of halogens in different Earth reservoirs and on the behavior of halogens during recycling in subduction zones. Here we focus on the storage potential of F in deeper parts of the Earth's mantle. The transition zone is a region in the Earth's mantle (410-660 km) known for its high water storage capacity, as the high pressure polymorphs of olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite are known to be able to incorporate several per-cent of water. In order to assess potential fractionation between water and F in the transition zone of the Earth's mantle, we set out to investigate the storage capacity of the halogen F in wadsleyite and olivine at transition zone conditions. Experiments were performed in a simplified mantle composition at temperatures from 1400 °C to 1900 °C and pressures from 17 up to 21 GPa in a multi anvil apparatus. The results show that F can shift the olivine-wadsleyite transition towards higher pressure. We find that F has an opposing effect to water, the latter of which extends the transition zone towards lower pressure. Moreover, the F storage capacity of wadsleyite is significantly lower than previously anticipated. F concentrations in wadsleyite range from 1470 ± 60 μg/g to 2110 ± 600 μg/g independent of temperature or pressure. The F storage capacity in wadsleyite is even lower than the F storage capacity of forsterite under transition zone conditions, and the latter can incorporate 3930 ± 140 μg/g F under these conditions. Based on our data we find that the transition zone cannot be a reservoir for F as it is assumed to be for water. Furthermore, we argue that during subduction of a volatile-bearing slab, fractionation of water from F will occur

  7. 78 FR 19696 - Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas, To Import Liquefied Natural Gas, To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ...: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy gives notice that during December 2012, it issued orders... site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/gasregulation/authorizations/Orders-2012.html . They are...

  8. 78 FR 21351 - Orders Granting Authority to Import and Export Natural Gas, To Import Liquefied Natural Gas, To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ...-21-NG AECO GAS STORAGE PARTNERSHIP 13-22-NG OMIMEX CANADA, LTD 13-23-NG AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE... orders are summarized in the attached appendix and may be found on the FE Web site at http://www.fossil...

  9. 78 FR 21349 - Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas, To Export Liquefied Natural Gas, To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ...-187-LNG DYNEGY MARKETING AND TRADE, LLC 13-02-NG PROGAS USA INC 13-03-NG AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE... orders are summarized in the attached appendix and may be found on the FE Web site at http://www.fossil...

  10. 78 FR 46581 - Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas, and To Import Liquefied Natural Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... CANADA, INC 13-74-NG AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy gives notice that during... http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/gasregulation/authorizations/Orders-2012.html . They are also...

  11. 77 FR 12274 - Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas During...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. FE Docket Nos. DOMINION COVE POINT... Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy gives notice that during January 2012, it issued Orders... in the attached appendix and may be found on the FE Web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs...

  12. 77 FR 31838 - Notice of Orders Granting Authority to Import and Export Natural Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ...: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. FE Docket Nos. Prometheus... Resources, Inc 12-42-NG Minnesota Energy Resources Corporation... 12-40-NG SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil... attached appendix and may be found on the FE Web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs...

  13. CO2 Solubility in Natural Rhyolitic Melts at High Pressures - Implications for Carbon Flux in Subduction Zones by Sediment Partial Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M. S.; Dasgupta, R.

    2011-12-01

    Partial melts of subducting sediments is thought to be a critical agent in carrying trace elements and water to arc basalt source regions. For subduction zones that contain significant amount of carbonates in ocean-floor sediments, sediment melts likely also act as a carrier of CO2. However, the CO2 carrying capacity of natural rhyolitic melts at sub-arc depths remains unconstrained. We conducted experiments on a synthetic composition, similar to average, low-degree experimental partial melt of pelitic sediments. The composition was constructed with reagent grade oxides and carbonates, the source of excess CO2. Experiments were conducted between 1 and 3 GPa at 1200 °C in Au80Pd20 capsules using a piston cylinder apparatus with a half-inch BaCO3 assembly at Rice University. Quench products showed glasses with bubbles, the latter suggesting saturation of the melt with a CO2-rich vapor phase. Oxygen fugacity during the experiments was not strictly controlled but the presence of CO2 bubbles and absence of graphite indicates fO2 above the CCO buffer. Major element concentrations of glasses were measured using EPMA. The CO2 and H2O contents of experimental doubly polished (50-110 μm), bubble-free portions of the glass chips were determined using a Thermo Nicolet Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. Spectra were recorded with a resolution of 4 cm-1, 512 scans, from 650 to 4000 cm-1, under a nitrogen purge to eliminate atmospheric gases. Dissolved volatile concentrations were quantified using the Beer-Lambert law and linear molar absorption coefficients from previous studies [1, 2]. Total dissolved carbon dioxide of experimental glasses was determined from the intensity of the ν3 antisymmetric stretch bands of CO32- at 1430 cm-1 and CO2mol at 2348 cm-1. Dissolved water content of experimental glasses was determined from the intensity of O-H stretching at 3520 cm-1. Estimated total CO2 concentrations at 3 GPa are in the range of 1-2 wt%, for melts with H2O contents

  14. Natural radionuclide mobility and its influence on U-Th-Pb dating of secondary minerals from the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Neymark, L.A.; Amelin, Y.V.

    2008-01-01

    Extreme U and Pb isotope variations produced by disequilibrium in decay chains of 238U and 232Th are found in calcite, opal/chalcedony, and Mn-oxides occurring as secondary mineral coatings in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These very slowly growing minerals (mm my-1) contain excess 206Pb and 208Pb formed from excesses of intermediate daughter isotopes and cannot be used as reliable 206Pb/238U geochronometers. The presence of excess intermediate daughter isotopes does not appreciably affect 207Pb/235U ages of U-enriched opal/chalcedony, which are interpreted as mineral formation ages. Opal and calcite from outer (younger) portions of coatings have 230Th/U ages from 94.6 ?? 3.7 to 361.3 ?? 9.8 ka and initial 234U/238U activity ratios (AR) from 4.351 ?? 0.070 to 7.02 ?? 0.12, which indicate 234U enrichment from percolating water. Present-day 234U/238U AR is ???1 in opal/chalcedony from older portions of the coatings. The 207Pb/235U ages of opal/chalcedony samples range from 0.1329 ?? 0.0080 to 9.10 ?? 0.21 Ma, increase with microstratigraphic depth, and define slow long-term average growth rates of about 1.2-2.0 mm my-1, in good agreement with previous results. Measured 234U/238U AR in Mn-oxides, which pre-date the oldest calcite and opal/chalcedony, range from 0.939 ?? 0.006 to 2.091 ?? 0.006 and are >1 in most samples. The range of 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.71156-0.71280) in Mn-oxides overlaps that in the late calcite. These data indicate that Mn-oxides exchange U and Sr with percolating water and cannot be used as a reliable dating tool. In the U-poor calcite samples, measured 206Pb/207Pb ratios have a wide range, do not correlate with Ba concentration as would be expected if excess Ra was present, and reach a value of about 1400, the highest ever reported for natural Pb. Calcite intergrown with opal contains excesses of both 206Pb and 207Pb derived from Rn diffusion and from direct ??-recoil from U-rich opal. Calcite from coatings devoid of opal

  15. Large-Scale Wireless Temperature Monitoring System for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage Tanks

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guangwen; Shen, Yu; Hao, Xiaowei; Yuan, Zongming; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Temperature distribution is a critical indicator of the health condition for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage tanks. In this paper, we present a large-scale wireless temperature monitoring system to evaluate the safety of LPG storage tanks. The system includes wireless sensors networks, high temperature fiber-optic sensors, and monitoring software. Finally, a case study on real-world LPG storage tanks proves the feasibility of the system. The unique features of wireless transmission, automatic data acquisition and management, local and remote access make the developed system a good alternative for temperature monitoring of LPG storage tanks in practical applications. PMID:26393596

  16. 49 CFR 173.313 - UN Portable Tank Table for Liquefied Compressed Gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 28.0 Allowed Normal 0.43 24.5 22.0 20.0 1078 Refrigerant gas, n.o.s. See MAWP definition in § 178.276..., flammable, n.o.s. See MAWP definition in § 178.276(a) Allowed Normal § 173.32(f) 1958 1,2-Dichloro-1,1,2,2... liquefied, n.o.s. See MAWP definition in 178.276(a) Allowed Normal See § 173.32(f) 1969 Isobutane 8.5...

  17. Large-Scale Wireless Temperature Monitoring System for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage Tanks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangwen; Shen, Yu; Hao, Xiaowei; Yuan, Zongming; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-09-18

    Temperature distribution is a critical indicator of the health condition for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage tanks. In this paper, we present a large-scale wireless temperature monitoring system to evaluate the safety of LPG storage tanks. The system includes wireless sensors networks, high temperature fiber-optic sensors, and monitoring software. Finally, a case study on real-world LPG storage tanks proves the feasibility of the system. The unique features of wireless transmission, automatic data acquisition and management, local and remote access make the developed system a good alternative for temperature monitoring of LPG storage tanks in practical applications.

  18. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) poisoning: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, T; Yamamoto, H; Tanegashima, A; Yamamoto, Y; Nishi, K

    1996-10-25

    Two autopsy cases of men who died while connecting a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) pipe are reported. Their blood concentrations of propane (the main content of LPG) were 0.12 and 3.40 mg/100 g, respectively. The cause of death after exposure of LPG has generally been considered to be asphyxia from hypoxia. The large differences in the blood propane levels found here and reported in the literature, however, suggest that direct toxic effects of propane poisoning may be the cause of death in some cases. Propane concentrations and the cause of death are reviewed and discussed.

  19. Separation of chlorogenic acid and concentration of trace caffeic acid from natural products by pH-zone-refining countercurrent chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanyuan; Dong, Genlai; Gu, Yanxiang; Ito, Yoichiro; Wei, Yun

    2013-07-01

    Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid were selected as test samples for separation by the pH-zone-refining countercurrent chromatography (CCC). The separation of these test samples was performed with a two-phase solvent system composed of methyl-tert-butyl-ether/acetonitrile/water at a volume ratio of 4:1:5 v/v/v where trifluoroacetic acid (TFA; 8 mM) was added to the organic stationary phase as a retainer and NH4 OH (10 mM) to the aqueous mobile phase as an eluter. Chlorogenic acid was successfully separated from Flaveria bidentis (L.) Kuntze (F. bidentis) and Lonicerae Flos by pH-zone-refining CCC, a slightly polar two-phase solvent system composed of methyl-tert-butyl-ether/acetonitrile/n-butanol/water at a volume ratio of 4:1:1:5 v/v/v/v was selected where TFA (3 mM) was added to the organic stationary phase as a retainer and NH4 OH (3 mM) to the aqueous mobile phase as an eluter. A 16.2 mg amount of chlorogenic acid with the purity of 92% from 1.4 g of F. bidentis, and 134 mg of chlorogenic acid at the purity of 99% from 1.3 g of crude extract of Lonicerae Flos have been obtained. These results suggest that pH-zone-refining CCC is suitable for the isolation of the chlorogenic acid from the crude extracts of F. bidentis and Lonicerae Flos. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Nature of local magma storage zones and geometry of conduit systems below balsatic eruption sites - Pu'u 'O'o, Kilauea East Rift, Hawaii, example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lionel; Head, James W., III

    1988-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of the well-documented eruptive episodes at Pu'u 'O'o, Kilauea are used to investigate quantitatively the size and shape of the shallow conduit system beneath the vent. The possible geometry of this region is considered. The dynamics of the eruptive episodes is used to place restrictions on the size and shape of the region and thermal calculations are used to show that the geometry is consistent with the region being the fluid residue of the partially cooled, major preepisode 1 dike. The Pu'u 'O'o example is used to illustrate some general properties of shallow magma storage zones.

  1. DDT_ldecin_2: Unraveling the enigmatic nature of the turbulent interaction zone between the circumstellar and interstellar medium around the well-known supergiant Beteleuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decin, L.

    2011-01-01

    Evolved stars are the birthplaces of the interstellar gas and solid dust particles. Such stars lose mass through a stellar wind, which is slow and dusty for cool giants and supergiants, or through impressive supernova explo- sions. However, recent observations with the PACS and SPIRE photometers reveal that the encounter between these slow and dusty winds and the interstellar medium is as spectacular as supernova explosions: multiple arcs, bar-like structures and different kind of instabilities (Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz) are detected. The most outstanding example concerns the well-known supergiant Betelgeuse. However, with the current set of Herschel observations, it is impossible to dene the exact physical mechanism causing the observed infrared emission. We propose to obtain PACS [O I] and HIFI [C II] spectroscopic observations at different pointings in the turbulent wind interaction zone around Betelgeuse. The proposed DDT observations would only take 3.1 hr and would give the astronomical community the rst possibility to study spectroscopically the different dynam- ical and chemical processes partaking in the interaction zone between circumstellar and interstellar material. The derived spectroscopic information will be valuable to the whole community in preparation of OT2.

  2. The second species of Gromia (Protista) from the deep sea: its natural history and association with the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Gooday, Andrew J; Bowser, Samuel S

    2005-06-01

    We describe a gromiid protist Gromia pyriformis sp. nov., from bathyal depths on the Pakistan margin (NE Arabian Sea), an area characterised by a well-developed Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). The new species is smaller (length usually <1 mm) than the only other described deep-sea gromiid species (Gromia sphaerica) or the well-known coastal species Gromia oviformis. Its identification as a gromiid is based on the test-wall ultrastructure. This includes (i) an outer wall (165-300 nm thick) limited by an electron-opaque layer and perforated by pore structures which typically extend through its entire thickness, and (ii) inner "honeycomb membrane" structures which form a discontinuous sheet (18-20 nm thick) lying parallel to the outer wall. An outermost glycocalyx (approximately 75 nm thick), not observed in other gromiid species, is also present and imparts a finely granular appearance to the outer test surface, as seen by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Numerous rod-shaped prokaryotes are attached to the exterior of the glycocalyx. Gromia pyriformis sp. nov. typically occurs above the sediment-water interface, attached to the large arborescent foraminiferan Pelosina sp. It is confined to a very narrow bathymetric zone (approximately 1000 m water depth) in the lower portion of the OMZ, where bottom-water oxygen concentrations are approximately 0.2 ml l(-1).

  3. Influence of collector heat capacity and internal conditions of heat exchanger on cool-down process of small gas liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberimoghaddam, Ali; Bahri Rasht Abadi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    Joule-Thomson cooling systems are commonly used in gas liquefaction. In small gas liquefiers, transient cool-down time is high. Selecting suitable conditions for cooling down process leads to decrease in time and cost. In the present work, transient thermal behavior of Joule-Thomson cooling system including counter current helically coiled tube in tube heat exchanger, expansion valve, and collector was studied using experimental tests and simulations. The experiments were performed using small gas liquefier and nitrogen gas as working fluid. The heat exchanger was thermally studied by experimental data obtained from a small gas liquefier. In addition, the simulations were performed using experimental data as variable boundary conditions. A comparison was done between presented and conventional methods. The effect of collector heat capacity and convection heat transfer coefficient inside the tubes on system performance was studied using temperature profiles along the heat exchanger.

  4. Shake table test of soil-pile groups-bridge structure interaction in liquefiable ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liang; Ling, Xianzhang; Xu, Pengju; Gao, Xia; Wang, Dongsheng

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes a shake table test study on the seismic response of low-cap pile groups and a bridge structure in liquefiable ground. The soil profile, contained in a large-scale laminar shear box, consisted of a horizontally saturated sand layer overlaid with a silty clay layer, with the simulated low-cap pile groups embedded. The container was excited in three El Centro earthquake events of different levels. Test results indicate that excessive pore pressure (EPP) during slight shaking only slightly accumulated, and the accumulation mainly occurred during strong shaking. The EPP was gradually enhanced as the amplitude and duration of the input acceleration increased. The acceleration response of the sand was remarkably influenced by soil liquefaction. As soil liquefaction occurred, the peak sand displacement gradually lagged behind the input acceleration; meanwhile, the sand displacement exhibited an increasing effect on the bending moment of the pile, and acceleration responses of the pile and the sand layer gradually changed from decreasing to increasing in the vertical direction from the bottom to the top. A jump variation of the bending moment on the pile was observed near the soil interface in all three input earthquake events. It is thought that the shake table tests could provide the groundwork for further seismic performance studies of low-cap pile groups used in bridges located on liquefiable groun.

  5. Extraction of Fucoxanthin from Raw Macroalgae excluding Drying and Cell Wall Disruption by Liquefied Dimethyl Ether

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Hideki; Kamo, Yuichi; Machmudah, Siti; Wahyudiono; Goto, Motonobu

    2014-01-01

    Macroalgae are one of potential sources for carotenoids, such as fucoxanthin, which are consumed by humans and animals. This carotenoid has been applied in both the pharmaceutical and food industries. In this study, extraction of fucoxanthin from wet brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifida (water content was 93.2%) was carried out with a simple method using liquefied dimethyl ether (DME) as an extractant in semi-continuous flow-type system. The extraction temperature and absolute pressure were 25 °C and 0.59 MPa, respectively. The liquefied DME was passed through the extractor that filled by U. pinnatifida at different time intervals. The time of experiment was only 43 min. The amount of fucoxanthin could approach to 390 μg/g dry of wet U. pinnatifida when the amount of DME used was 286 g. Compared with ethanol Soxhlet and supercritical CO2 extraction, which includes drying and cell disruption, the result was quite high. Thus, DME extraction process appears to be a good method for fucoxanthin recovery from U. pinnatifida with improved yields. PMID:24796299

  6. Toward establishing a definitive Late-Mid Jurassic (M-series) Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Time Scale through unraveling the nature of Jurassic Quiet Zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, M.; Tivey, M.; Sager, W.

    2017-12-01

    Two major difficulties have hindered improving the accuracy of the Late-Mid Jurassic geomagnetic polarity time scale: a dearth of reliable high-resolution radiometric dates and the lack of a continuous Jurassic geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS) record. We present the latest effort towards establishing a definitive Mid Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (M-series) GPTS model using three high-resolution, multi-level (sea surface [0 km], mid-water [3 km], and near-source [5.2 km]) marine magnetic profiles from a seamount-free corridor adjacent to the Waghenaer Fracture Zone in the western Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ). The profiles show a global coherency in magnetic anomaly correlations between two mid ocean ridge systems (i.e., Japanese and Hawaiian lineations). Their unprecedented high data resolution documents a detailed anomaly character (i.e., amplitudes and wavelengths). We confirm that this magnetic anomaly record shows a coherent anomaly sequence from M29 back in time to M42 with previously suggested from the Japanese lineation in the Pigafetta Basin. Especially noticeable is the M39-M41 Low Amplitude Zone defined in the Pigafetta Bsin, which potentially defines the bounds of JQZ seafloor. We assessed the anomaly source with regard to the crustal architecture, including the effects of Cretaceous volcanism on crustal magnetization and conclude that the anomaly character faithfully represents changes in geomagnetic field intensity and polarity over time and is mostly free of any overprint of the original Jurassic magnetic remanence by later Cretaceous volcanism. We have constructed polarity block models (RMS <5 nT [normalized] between observed and calculated profiles) for each of the survey lines, yielding three potential GPTS candidate models with different source-to-sensor resolutions, from M19-M38, which can be compared to currently available magnetostratigraphic records. The overall polarity reversal rates calculated from each of the models are

  7. 49 CFR 192.1015 - What must a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What must a master meter or small liquefied... a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this subpart? (a) General. No later than August 2, 2011 the operator of a master meter system or a small LPG operator must...

  8. 49 CFR 192.1015 - What must a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What must a master meter or small liquefied... a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this subpart? (a) General. No later than August 2, 2011 the operator of a master meter system or a small LPG operator must...

  9. 49 CFR 192.1015 - What must a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What must a master meter or small liquefied... a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this subpart? (a) General. No later than August 2, 2011 the operator of a master meter system or a small LPG operator must...

  10. 49 CFR 192.1015 - What must a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What must a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this subpart? 192.1015 Section 192.1015 Transportation Other... a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this subpart? (a...

  11. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 180 - Acceptable Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Leakage Tests for Cargo Tanks Transporting Liquefied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptable Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Leakage Tests for Cargo Tanks Transporting Liquefied Compressed Gases B Appendix B to Part 180... Leakage Tests for Cargo Tanks Transporting Liquefied Compressed Gases For internal self-closing stop valve...

  12. Final report on EURAMET.QM-S6/1195: Bilateral comparison of liquefied hydrocarbon mixtures in constant pressure (piston) cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrew S.; Downey, Michael L.; Milton, Martin J. T.; van der Veen, Adriaan M. H.; Zalewska, Ewelina T.; Li, Jianrong

    2013-01-01

    Traceable liquid hydrocarbon mixtures are required in order to underpin measurements of the composition and other physical properties of LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) and LNG (liquefied natural gas), thus meeting the needs of an increasingly large European industrial market. The development of traceable liquid hydrocarbon standards by National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) was still at a relatively early stage at the time this comparison was proposed in 2011. NPL and VSL, who were the only NMIs active in this area, had developed methods for the preparation and analysis of such standards in constant pressure (piston) cylinders, but neither laboratory had Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) for these mixtures. This report presents the results of EURAMET 1195, the first comparison of liquid hydrocarbon mixtures between NMIs, which assessed the preparation and analytical capabilities of NPL and VSL for these mixtures. The comparison operated between August 2011 and January 2012. Each laboratory prepared a liquid hydrocarbon standard with nominally the same composition and these standards were exchanged for analysis. The results of the comparison show a good agreement between the laboratories' results and the comparison reference values for the six components with amount fractions greater than 1.0 cmol/mol (propane, propene, iso-butene, n-butane, iso-butane and 1-butene). Measurement of the three components with lower amount fractions (1,3-butadiene, iso-pentane and n-pentane) proved more challenging. In all but one case, the differences from the comparison reference values for these three components were greater than the expanded measurement uncertainty. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual

  13. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  14. Anthropogenic and natural variability in the composition of sedimentary organic matter of the urbanised coastal zone of Montevideo (Río de la Plata).

    PubMed

    Bueno, C; Brugnoli, E; Bergamino, L; Muniz, P; García-Rodríguez, F; Figueira, R

    2018-01-01

    This study is aimed to identify the different sources of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) within Montevideo coastal zone (MCZ). To this end δ 13 C, δ 15 N and C/N ratio were analysed in surface sediments and a sediment core. Sediment core analysis showed that until ~1950CE SOM was mainly marine, observing a shift towards lower δ 13 C in recent sediments, evidencing an estuarine composition. This trend was associated to the climatic variability, which exerted a major influence on the SOM composition, leading to an increased input of terrigenous material and associated anthropogenic contaminants. Surface sediments collected during different El Niño South Oscillation (ENSO) phases did not show inter-annual variability in SOM composition, which was mainly marine in both eastern and western region of MCZ and estuarine in Montevideo Bay. This spatial pattern provides new insights on the dynamics and factors affecting organic matter sources available for primary consumers along the study region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 46 CFR 13.607 - Requirements to qualify for an STCW endorsement for advanced liquefied gas tanker cargo operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the engine department on liquefied gas tankers; or (iii) A combination of the service in paragraphs (c)(3)(i) and (c)(3)(ii) of this section. (d) Applicants holding an endorsement in advanced oil tanker... any appropriate limitations, without meeting the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 180 - Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Emergency Closure Test for Liquefied Compressed Gases

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Part 180—Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Emergency Closure Test for Liquefied Compressed Gases 1. In performing this test, all internal self-closing stop valves must be opened. Each emergency discharge control... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Emergency Closure...

  17. 49 CFR 173.302b - Additional requirements for shipment of non-liquefied (permanent) compressed gases in UN pressure...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for shipment of non-liquefied (permanent) compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles. 173.302b Section 173.302b Transportation... cylinder. The use of UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (e) Carbon monoxide, compressed UN 1016. Carbon...

  18. 49 CFR 173.302b - Additional requirements for shipment of non-liquefied (permanent) compressed gases in UN pressure...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements for shipment of non-liquefied (permanent) compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles. 173.302b Section 173.302b Transportation... cylinder. The use of UN tubes and MEGCs is not authorized. (e) Carbon monoxide, compressed UN 1016. Carbon...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 180 - Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Emergency Closure Test for Liquefied Compressed Gases

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Test for Liquefied Compressed Gases A Appendix A to Part 180 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Compressed Gases 1. In performing this test, all internal self-closing stop valves must be opened. Each.... 2. On pump-actuated pressure differential internal valves, the three-way toggle valve handle or its...

  20. 49 CFR 173.304b - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or equal to 95 percent of the liquid phase at 50 °C. In addition, the UN pressure receptacle may not be liquid full at 60 °C. The test pressure of the pressure receptacle must be equal to or greater than the vapor pressure of the liquid at 65 °C. (3) For high pressure liquefied gases or gas mixtures...

  1. 49 CFR 173.304b - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or equal to 95 percent of the liquid phase at 50 °C. In addition, the UN pressure receptacle may not be liquid full at 60 °C. The test pressure of the pressure receptacle must be equal to or greater than the vapor pressure of the liquid at 65 °C. (3) For high pressure liquefied gases or gas mixtures...

  2. 49 CFR 173.304b - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... or equal to 95 percent of the liquid phase at 50 °C. In addition, the UN pressure receptacle may not be liquid full at 60 °C. The test pressure of the pressure receptacle must be equal to or greater than the vapor pressure of the liquid at 65 °C. (3) For high pressure liquefied gases or gas mixtures...

  3. 49 CFR 173.304b - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or equal to 95 percent of the liquid phase at 50 °C. In addition, the UN pressure receptacle may not be liquid full at 60 °C. The test pressure of the pressure receptacle must be equal to or greater than the vapor pressure of the liquid at 65 °C. (3) For high pressure liquefied gases or gas mixtures...

  4. Acetaminophen Versus Liquefied Ibuprofen for Control of Pain During Separation in Orthodontic Patients: A Randomized Triple Blinded Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Nik, Tahereh; Shahsavari, Negin; Ghadirian, Hannaneh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical study was to investigate the effectiveness of acetaminophen 650 mg or liquefied ibuprofen 400 mg in pain control of orthodontic patients during separation with an elastic separator. A total of 101 patients with specific inclusion criteria were divided randomly into three groups (acetaminophen, liquefied ibuprofen, and placebo). They were instructed to take their drugs one hour before separator placement and every six hours afterward (five doses in total). They recorded their discomfort on visual analog scales immediately after separator placement, 2 hours later, 6 hours later, at bedtime, and 24 hours after separator placement. Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the mean pain scores between the three groups. Data were collected from 89 patients. The pain increased with time in all groups. Pain scores were statistically lower in the analgesic groups compared with the placebo group (P.value<0.001), but no statistically significant difference was found in mean pain scores between the two drug groups (acetaminophen and liquefied ibuprofen) (P.value=1). Acetaminophen and liquefied ibuprofen have similar potential in pain reduction during separation.

  5. Deep Soil Carbon in the Critical Zone: Amount and Nature of Carbon in Weathered Bedrock, and its Implication for Soil Carbon Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, K. C.; Tian, Z.; Berhe, A. A.; O'Geen, A. T.

    2017-12-01

    Globally, soils store more carbon (C) than the vegetation and the atmosphere combined. Up to 60-80% of the C stored in soils is found in below 30cm soil depth, but there is little data on C storage in weathered bedrock or saprolite. Deep soil organic matter (SOM) can be a mixture of new and old SOM; that is rendered relatively stable due to burial, aggregation, its disconnection from decomposers, and chemical association that organic matter forms with soil minerals. The limited data available on deep SOM dynamics suggests that stock, distribution, and composition of deep SOM are strongly correlated to climate. The overall objective of this research is to investigate how climate regulates OM storage, composition, stability, and stabilization mechanisms. Expecting that the amount of OM stored in deep soil and the stability are a function of soil thickness and availability of weathering products (i.e. reactive minerals), the stock and stability of deep SOM is expected to follow a similar relationship with climate, as does the intensity of weathering. This research is conducted in the NSF funded Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatories that is located along a climosequence, the western slopes of the Sierra Naevada Mountains of California. Here we will present results derived from characterization of soils and weathered bedrock using elemental and stable isotope elemental analysis, and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy to determine OM concentration and functional group level composition of bulk SOM. Our findings show that adding in subsoil and weathered bedrock C stocks increases estimates of soil C stock by 1/3rd to 2/3rd.

  6. Uplifting behavior of shallow buried pipe in liquefiable soil by dynamic centrifuge test.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Liu, Jingwen; Lin, Peng; Ling, Daosheng

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines are widely applied in the so-called lifeline engineerings. It shows according to seismic surveys that the damage from soil liquefaction to underground pipelines was the most serious, whose failures were mainly in the form of pipeline uplifting. In the present study, dynamic centrifuge model tests were conducted to study the uplifting behaviors of shallow-buried pipeline subjected to seismic vibration in liquefied sites. The uplifting mechanism was discussed through the responses of the pore water pressure and earth pressure around the pipeline. Additionally, the analysis of force, which the pipeline was subjected to before and during vibration, was introduced and proved to be reasonable by the comparison of the measured and the calculated results. The uplifting behavior of pipe is the combination effects of multiple forces, and is highly dependent on the excess pore pressure.

  7. Uplifting Behavior of Shallow Buried Pipe in Liquefiable Soil by Dynamic Centrifuge Test

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingwen; Ling, Daosheng

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines are widely applied in the so-called lifeline engineerings. It shows according to seismic surveys that the damage from soil liquefaction to underground pipelines was the most serious, whose failures were mainly in the form of pipeline uplifting. In the present study, dynamic centrifuge model tests were conducted to study the uplifting behaviors of shallow-buried pipeline subjected to seismic vibration in liquefied sites. The uplifting mechanism was discussed through the responses of the pore water pressure and earth pressure around the pipeline. Additionally, the analysis of force, which the pipeline was subjected to before and during vibration, was introduced and proved to be reasonable by the comparison of the measured and the calculated results. The uplifting behavior of pipe is the combination effects of multiple forces, and is highly dependent on the excess pore pressure. PMID:25121140

  8. Sol-gel formed spherical nanostructured titania based liquefied petroleum gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabhajeet, S. R.; Yadav, B. C.; Sonker, Rakesh K.

    2018-05-01

    The present work reports the preparation of Titania(TiO2) thin film by sol-gel technique and its Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) sensing. TiO2 exists in numerous phases possessing different structural properties like amorphous, anatase or anatase/rutile mixed phases. The structural analysis confirmed the formation of TiO2 having an average crystallite size 21 nm. SEM showed the regular and porous surface morphology. The band gap of the material was found as 3.65 eV. This film was employed for LPG sensing and variations in resistance with exposure of LPG were observed. Sensor response (S) as a function of time was calculated and its maximum value was found as 2.8 for 4% vol. of LPG with a response and recovery times of 240 sec and 248 sec respectively.

  9. Au sensitized ZnO nanorods for enhanced liquefied petroleum gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakate, U. T.; Bulakhe, R. N.; Lokhande, C. D.; Kale, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    The zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods have grown on glass substrate by spray pyrolysis deposition (SPD) method using zinc acetate solution. The phase formation, surface morphology and elemental composition of ZnO films have been investigated using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques. The liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sensing response was remarkably improved by sensitization of gold (Au) surface noble metal on ZnO nanorods film. Maximum LPG response of 21% was observed for 1040 ppm of LPG, for pure ZnO nanorods sample. After Au sensitization on ZnO nanorods film sample, the LPG response greatly improved up to 48% at operating temperature 623 K. The improved LPG response is attributed Au sensitization with spill-over mechanism. Proposed model for LPG sensing mechanism discussed.

  10. Ataxia with Parkinsonism and dystonia after intentional inhalation of liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Godani, Massimiliano; Canavese, Francesca; Migliorini, Sonia; Del Sette, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The practice of inhaling liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) to commit suicide is uncommon and almost exclusively a prerogative of the prison population. Numerous cases of sudden deaths caused by intentional propane and/or butane inhalation have been described, but these cases survived and a description of the consequences is very rare. We describe a prisoner who survived after voluntary inhalation of LPG, and who developed ataxia, Parkinsonism, and dystonia. Brain MRI showed bilateral hyperintensity in the basal ganglia and in the cerebellar hemispheres. The clinical evolution and the MRI abnormalities are similar to those described in cases of poisoning by CO where the mechanism of brain injury is related to histotoxic hypoxia. We believe that LPG, considered until now a mixture of gas with low neurotoxic power, may have caused direct toxic damage to the brain, mediated by a mechanism of hypoxia, such as in CO intoxication.

  11. Coastal Evolution in a Mediterranean Microtidal Zone: Mid to Late Holocene Natural Dynamics and Human Management of the Castelló Lagoon, NE Spain.

    PubMed

    Ejarque, Ana; Julià, Ramon; Reed, Jane M; Mesquita-Joanes, Francesc; Marco-Barba, Javier; Riera, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We present a palaeoenvironmental study of the Castelló lagoon (NE Spain), an important archive for understanding long-term interactions between dynamic littoral ecosystems and human management. Combining geochemistry, mineralogy, ostracods, diatoms, pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, charcoal and archaeo-historical datasets we reconstruct: 1) the transition of the lagoon from a marine to a marginal environment between ~3150 cal BC to the 17th century AD; 2) fluctuations in salinity; and 3) natural and anthropogenic forces contributing to these changes. From the Late Neolithic to the Medieval period the lagoon ecosystem was driven by changing marine influence and the land was mainly exploited for grazing, with little evidence for impact on the natural woodland. Land-use exploitation adapted to natural coastal dynamics, with maximum marine flooding hampering agropastoral activities between ~1550 and ~150 cal BC. In contrast, societies actively controlled the lagoon dynamics and become a major agent of landscape transformation after the Medieval period. The removal of littoral woodlands after the 8th century was followed by the expansion of agrarian and industrial activities. Regional mining and smelting activities polluted the lagoon with heavy metals from the ~11th century onwards. The expansion of the milling industry and of agricultural lands led to the channelization of the river Muga into the lagoon after ~1250 cal AD. This caused its transformation into a freshwater lake, increased nutrient load, and the infilling and drainage of a great part of the lagoon. By tracking the shift towards an anthropogenically-controlled system around ~750 yr ago, this study points out Mediterranean lagoons as ancient and heavily-modified systems, with anthropogenic impacts and controls covering multi-centennial and even millennial timescales. Finally, we contributed to the future construction of reliable seashell-based chronologies in NE Spain by calibrating the Banyuls-sur-Mer

  12. Coastal Evolution in a Mediterranean Microtidal Zone: Mid to Late Holocene Natural Dynamics and Human Management of the Castelló Lagoon, NE Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ejarque, Ana; Julià, Ramon; Reed, Jane M.; Mesquita-Joanes, Francesc; Marco-Barba, Javier; Riera, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We present a palaeoenvironmental study of the Castelló lagoon (NE Spain), an important archive for understanding long-term interactions between dynamic littoral ecosystems and human management. Combining geochemistry, mineralogy, ostracods, diatoms, pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, charcoal and archaeo-historical datasets we reconstruct: 1) the transition of the lagoon from a marine to a marginal environment between ~3150 cal BC to the 17th century AD; 2) fluctuations in salinity; and 3) natural and anthropogenic forces contributing to these changes. From the Late Neolithic to the Medieval period the lagoon ecosystem was driven by changing marine influence and the land was mainly exploited for grazing, with little evidence for impact on the natural woodland. Land-use exploitation adapted to natural coastal dynamics, with maximum marine flooding hampering agropastoral activities between ~1550 and ~150 cal BC. In contrast, societies actively controlled the lagoon dynamics and become a major agent of landscape transformation after the Medieval period. The removal of littoral woodlands after the 8th century was followed by the expansion of agrarian and industrial activities. Regional mining and smelting activities polluted the lagoon with heavy metals from the ~11th century onwards. The expansion of the milling industry and of agricultural lands led to the channelization of the river Muga into the lagoon after ~1250 cal AD. This caused its transformation into a freshwater lake, increased nutrient load, and the infilling and drainage of a great part of the lagoon. By tracking the shift towards an anthropogenically-controlled system around ~750 yr ago, this study points out Mediterranean lagoons as ancient and heavily-modified systems, with anthropogenic impacts and controls covering multi-centennial and even millennial timescales. Finally, we contributed to the future construction of reliable seashell-based chronologies in NE Spain by calibrating the Banyuls-sur-Mer

  13. Toxic industrial chemical (TIC) source emissions modeling for pressurized liquefied gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britter, Rex; Weil, Jeffrey; Leung, Joseph; Hanna, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to report current toxic industrial chemical (TIC) source emissions formulas appropriate for use in atmospheric comprehensive risk assessment models so as to represent state-of-the-art knowledge. The focus is on high-priority scenarios, including two-phase releases of pressurized liquefied gases such as chlorine from rail cars. The total mass released and the release duration are major parameters, as well as the velocity, thermodynamic state, and amount and droplet sizes of imbedded aerosols of the material at the exit of the rupture, which are required as inputs to the subsequent jet and dispersion modeling. Because of the many possible release scenarios that could develop, a suite of model equations has been described. These allow for gas, two-phase or liquid storage and release through ruptures of various types including sharp-edged and "pipe-like" ruptures. Model equations for jet depressurization and phase change due to flashing are available. Consideration of the importance of vessel response to a rupture is introduced. The breakup of the jet into fine droplets and their subsequent suspension and evaporation, or rainout is still a significant uncertainty in the overall modeling process. The recommended models are evaluated with data from various TIC field experiments, in particular recent experiments with pressurized liquefied gases. It is found that there is typically a factor of two error in models compared with research-grade observations of mass flow rates. However, biases are present in models' estimates of the droplet size distributions resulting from flashing releases.

  14. Abundance and Utility: For Military Operations, Liquid Fuels Remain a Solid Choice over Natural Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    and combat support vehicles, ships, and aircraft, the adoption of natural gas —whether as compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG...dangers to U.S. forces and vehicles. Natural gas has different flammability properties than traditional liquid fuels, and as CNG tanks are under high...tacticaldefensemedia.com16 | DoD Power & Energy Fall 2014 For Military Operations, Liquid Fuels Remain a Solid Choice over Natural Gas By Bret

  15. Process for liquefying carbonaceous materials of high molecular weight and for separating liquefaction products

    DOEpatents

    Malek, John M.

    1977-01-01

    Process characterized by comprising successively a dissolution zone fed with carbonaceous solids and with a solvent, a high pressure hydrogenation zone provided with a source of hydrogen, and a hydrogenation products separation zone, wherein the improvement consists mainly in chemical upgrading of the liquidform products derived from the separation zone, and recycling a part of the upgraded products to the dissolution zone, this recycled part being of either positively acidic or positively basic properties for enhancing the dissolution - decomposition of base-acid structures present in the carbonaceous solid feed.

  16. Aeration Zone Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, B.

    The International Symposium on Recent Investigations in the Zone of Aeration (RIZA) was organized by the Institute for Hydrogeology and Hydrochemistry of the Technical University of Munich and held October 1-5, 1984, in the lecture halls of the Grosshadern Klinik in Munich, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). P. Udluft, B. Merkel, and K.-H. Prüsl, all of the university, were responsible for the organization of the symposium, which was under the patronage of K.-E. Quentin. There were over 200 participants from 22 different countries, among them Australia, Canada, China, India, and the United States. The topics of the symposium were the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes in the unsaturated zone, the region between the surface and the groundwater level. Here a number of complex processes occur that on the one hand are of natural origin and on the other hand are influenced by human activities in a number of ways.

  17. Organic matter and containment of uranium and fissiogenic isotopes at the Oklo natural reactors

    Nagy, B.; Gauthier-Lafaye, F.; Holliger, P.; Davis, D.W.; Mossman, D.J.; Leventhal, J.S.; Rigali, M.J.; Parnell, J.

    1991-01-01

    SOME of the Precambrian natural fission reactors at Oklo in Gabon contain abundant organic matter1,2, part of which was liquefied at the time of criticality and subsequently converted to a graphitic solid3,4. The liquid organic matter helps to reduce U(VI) to U(IV) from aqueous solutions, resulting in the precipitation of uraninite5. It is known that in the prevailing reactor environments, precipitated uraninite grains incorporated fission products. We report here observations which show that these uraninite crystals were held immobile within the resolidified, graphitic bitumen. Unlike water-soluble (humic) organic matter, the graphitic bituminous organics at Oklo thus enhanced radionu-clide containment. Uraninite encased in solid graphitic matter in the organic-rich reactor zones lost virtually no fissiogenic lan-thanide isotopes. The first major episode of uranium and lead migration was caused by the intrusion of a swarm of adjacent dolerite dykes about 1,100 Myr after the reactors went critical. Our results from Oklo imply that the use of organic, hydrophobic solids such as graphitic bitumen as a means of immobilizing radionuclides in pretreated nuclear waste warrants further investigation. ?? 1991 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. PH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography with a hydrophilic organic/salt-containing two-phase solvent system for preparative separation of polar alkaloids from natural products.

    PubMed

    Zou, Denglang; Du, Yurong; Kuang, Jianyuan; Sun, Shihao; Ma, Jianbin; Jiang, Renwang

    2018-06-08

    This study presents an efficient strategy based on pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography with a hydrophilic organic/salt-containing two-phase system composed of acetonitrile, sodium chloride and water for preparative separation of polar alkaloids from natural products. Acetonitrile-sodium chloride-water system provides a wider range of polarity for polar alkaloids than classical aqueous two-phase systems. It gets rid of the effect of free hydrogen ion, strong ionic strength, hold low viscosity and the sharp retainer border could be formed easily. So acetonitrile-sodium chloride-water system showed great advantages to pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography for polar alkaloids. The separation of polar indole alkaloids from toad venom was selected as an example to show the advantage and practicability of this strategy. An optimized acetonitrile-sodium chloride-water (54%:5%:41%, w%) system was applied in this study, where 10 mM triethylamine (TEA) as the retainer and 15 mM hydrochloric acid (HCl) as the eluter were added. As a result, three polar indole alkaloids, including 19 mg of serotonin, 45 mg of 5-Hydroxy-N'-methyl tryptamine, 33 mg of bufotenine were simultaneously separated from 500 mg of 5% ethanol elution fraction of toad venom on macroporous resin chromatography, with the purity of 91.3%, 97.5% and 89.4%, respectively. Their structures were identified by spectroscopic analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A study on seismic behavior of pile foundations of bridge abutment on liquefiable ground through shaking table tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Mitsuhiko; Tanimoto, Shunsuke; Ishida, Shuichi; Ohsumi, Michio; Hoshikuma, Jun-ichi

    2017-10-01

    There is risk of bridge foundations to be damaged by liquefaction-induced lateral spreading of ground. Once bridge foundations have been damaged, it takes a lot of time for restoration. Therefore, it is important to assess the seismic behavior of the foundations on liquefiable ground appropriately. In this study, shaking table tests of models on a scale of 1/10 were conducted at the large scale shaking table in Public Works Research Institute, Japan, to investigate the seismic behavior of pile-supported bridge abutment on liquefiable ground. The shaking table tests were conducted for three types of model. Two are models of existing bridge which was built without design for liquefaction and the other is a model of bridge which was designed based on the current Japanese design specifications for highway bridges. As a result, the bending strains of piles of the abutment which were designed based on the current design specifications were less than those of the existing bridge.

  20. 76 FR 37828 - Update to Indian Index Zone Price Points

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... to Indian Index Zone Price Points AGENCY: Office of Natural Resources Revenue, Interior. ACTION... (MMS) Minerals Revenue Management) is announcing an update to Indian index zone price points that will remove certain natural gas index prices from the Indian Index Zone calculation. These changes will impact...

  1. Nature and Role of Subducting Sediments on the Megathrust and Forearc Evolution in the 2004 Great Sumatra Earthquake Rupture Zone: Results from Full Waveform Inversion of Long Offset Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Qin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    On active accretionary margins, the nature of incoming sediments defines the locking mechanism on the megathrust, and the development and evolution of the accretionary wedge. Drilling is the most direct method to characterise the nature of these sediments, but the drilling is very expensive, and provide information at only a few locations. In north Sumatra, an IODP drilling is programmed to take place in July-August 2016. We have performed seismic full waveform inversion of 12 km long offset seismic reflection data acquired by WesternGeco in 2006 over a 35 km zone near the subduction front in the 2004 earthquake rupture zone area that provide detailed quantitative information on the characteristics of the incoming sediments. We first downward continue the surface streamer data to the seafloor, which removes the effect of deep water (~5 km) and brings out the refraction arrivals as the first arrivals. We carry out travel time tomography, and then performed full waveform inversion of seismic refraction data followed by the full waveform inversion of reflection data providing detailed (10-20 m) velocity structure. The sediments in this area are 3-5 km thick where the P-wave velocity increases from 1.6 km/s near the seafloor to more than 4.5 km/s above the oceanic crust. The high velocity of sediments above the basement suggests that the sediments are highly compacted, strengthened the coupling near the subduction front, which might have been responsible for 2004 earthquake rupture propagation up to the subduction front, enhancing the tsunami. We also find several thin velocity layers within the sediments, which might be due to high pore-pressure fluid or free gas. These layers might be responsible for the formation of pseudo-decollement within the forearc sediments that acts as a conveyer belt between highly compacted subducting lower sediments and accreted sediments above. The presence of well intact sediments on the accretionary prism supports this interpretation

  2. Engineering the Big Chill: The story of JLab’s Central Helium Liquefier

    SciT

    Westfall, Catherine

    This article tells the story of the Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), one of the US National Laboratories. JLab’s successful superconducting radio frequency accelerator was only possible because a group of JLab engineers successfully tackled a complex of difficulties to build a cryogenic system that included the CHL, a task that required advancing the frontier of cryogenic technology. Ultimately, these cryogenic advances were applied far beyond JLab to the benefit of cutting-edge programs at other US national laboratories (Oak Ridge, Brookhaven, and the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at MSU) as well asmore » NASA. In addition, this innovation story dramatizes the sort of engineer-driven technological problem solving that allows the successful launch and operation of experimental projects. Along the way, the CHL story also provides an important addition to our understanding of the role played by engineers and industry in creating knowledge at physics laboratories.« less

  3. Effect of liquefied petroleum gas on ozone formation in Guadalajara and Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-López, J Luis; Sandoval-Fernández, Julio; González-Ortíz, Emmanuel; Vázquez-García, Marcos; González-Macías, Uriel; Zambrano-García, Angel

    2005-06-01

    Leakages of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are suspected to contribute greatly to ozone (O3) formation in Mexico City. We tested such a hypothesis by outdoor captive-air irradiation (CAI) experiments in the two largest Mexican metropolitan areas: Guadalajara (GMA) in 1997 and Mexico City (MCMA) in 2000. O3 was monitored in each city for 20 days (8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.) in smog chambers containing unaltered morning air or morning air enriched with either commercial LPG or LPG synthetic mixture 60/40 (propane and butane). Tested additions of both components were 35% (by volume) in GMA and 60% (by volume) in MCMA. The addition effects on O3 (max) were compared with effects from diluting LPG components or total nonmethane hydrocarbons (tNMHCs) by 50%. Diluting tNMHCs had the greatest absolute effect at both cities: it lowered O3 (max) by 24% in GMA and 55% in MCMA. Adding commercial LPG increased O3 (max) by 6% in GMA and 28% in MCMA; whereas adding LPG synthetic mixture 60/40 caused a similar increase in O3 (max), 4 and 21% in GMA and MCMA, respectively. Compared with dilution of tNMHCs, dilution of LPG-associated compounds had a smaller decreasing effect on O3 (max), only 4% in GMA and 15% in MCMA. These results show that commercial LPG and LPG synthetic mixture 60/40 affect O3 formation to a lesser extent than estimated previously.

  4. An online ID identification system for liquefied-gas cylinder plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin; Ding, Zhenwen; Han, Lei; Zhang, Hao

    2017-11-01

    An automatic ID identification system for gas cylinders' online production was developed based on the production conditions and requirements of the Technical Committee for Standardization of Gas Cylinders. A cylinder ID image acquisition system was designed to improve the image contrast of ID regions on gas cylinders against the background. Then the ID digits region was located by the CNN template matching algorithm. Following that, an adaptive threshold method based on the analysis of local average grey value and standard deviation was proposed to overcome defects of non-uniform background in the segmentation results. To improve the single digit identification accuracy, two BP neural networks were trained respectively for the identification of all digits and the easily confusable digits. If the single digit was classified as one of confusable digits by the former BP neural network, it was further tested by the later one, and the later result was taken as the final identification result of this single digit. At last, the majority voting was adopted to decide the final identification result for the 6-digit cylinder ID. The developed system was installed on a production line of a liquefied-petroleum-gas cylinder plant and worked in parallel with the existing weighing step on the line. Through the field test, the correct identification rate for single ID digit was 94.73%, and none of the tested 2000 cylinder ID was misclassified through the majority voting.

  5. Liquefied petroleum gas sensor based on manganese (III) oxide and zinc manganese (III) oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shiva; Chauhan, Pratima; Husain, Shahid

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, {{{Mn}}}2{{{O}}}3 and {{{ZnMn}}}2{{{O}}}4 nanoparticles (NPs) are successfully synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method at room temperature and further annealed at 450 °C. The structure, crystallite size, morphology, specific surface area (SSA) and band gap energy have been determined by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS) and UV-visible spectrophotometer. The sensor films of the {{{Mn}}}2{{{O}}}3 NPs and {{{ZnMn}}}2{{{O}}}4 NPs have been fabricated onto glass substrate using spin coater system separately. These sensor films are investigated for different concentrations (200-1200 ppm) of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) at different operating temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 400 °C. A comparative study of gas sensing properties shows that spinel {{{ZnMn}}}2{{{O}}}4 sensor film exhibit excellent response (≈ 80 % ) towards 1000 ppm LPG at 300 °C in comparison to {{{Mn}}}2{{{O}}}3 sensor films. The enhancement in the gas sensing characteristics of {{{ZnMn}}}2{{{O}}}4 sensor film is attributed to the reduced crystallite size, greater SSA, and modification in structure as well as morphology.

  6. Early Leakage Protection System of LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) Based on ATMega 16 Microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriwati; Ikhsan Ilahi, Nur; Musrawati; Baco, Syarifuddin; Suyuti'Andani Achmad, Ansar; Umrianah, Ejah

    2018-04-01

    LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas). LPG is a hydrocarbon gas production from refineries and gas refinery with the major components of propane gas (C3H8) and butane (C4H10). Limit flame (Flammable Range) or also called gas with air. Value Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) is the minimum limit of the concentration of fuel vapor in the air which if there is no source of fire, the gas will be burned. While the value of the Upper Explosive Limit (UEL), which limits the maximum concentration of fuel vapor in the air, which if no source of fire, the gas will be burned. Protection system is a defend mechanism of human, equipment, and buildings around the protected area. Goals to be achieved in this research are to design a protection system against the consequences caused by the leakage of LPG gas based on ATmega16 microcontroller. The method used in this research is to reduce the levels of leaked LPG and turned off the power source when the leakage of LPG is on the verge of explosive limit. The design of this protection system works accurately between 200 ppm up to 10000 ppm, which is still below the threshold of explosive. Thus protecting the early result of that will result in the leakage of LPG gas.

  7. Airflow obstruction among street vendors who refill cigarette lighters with liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Moitra, S; Blanc, P D; Brashier, B B

    2014-09-01

    Manual cigarette lighter refilling with butane/propane admixed liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is a common low-income occupation in India. This practice may cause adverse health effects from LPG exposure among such workers. To assess respiratory status among LPG-exposed workers and non-exposed controls. We quantified the exposure and evaluated respiratory symptoms and lung function among 113 LPG refilling workers (aged 41.9±9.9 years) and 79 controls (aged 40.8±7.2 years). We used multiple linear regression analysis to estimate the LPG exposure response within the group of refilling workers, adjusting for age, height and smoking status. Compared to the controls, the LPG-exposed lighter refillers manifested a 190 ml decrement in 1-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1) (2.55±0.4 vs. 2.26±0.3 l) and a 6% decrement in FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) (both P < 0.05). We found a significantly negative exposure response among the LPG workers: for FVC and FEV1, 44 ml per ml of reported daily LPG use in refilling (P < 0.05). Likely heavy exposure to LPG through manually refilling cigarette lighters is associated with airflow decrements. This adverse effect may be relevant to other occupational groups heavily exposed to volatile hydrocarbons, especially those in marginal employment sectors.

  8. Exergy analysis of large-scale helium liquefiers: Evaluating design trade-offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rijo Jacob; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2014-01-01

    It is known that higher heat exchanger area, more number of expanders with higher efficiency and more involved configuration with multi-pressure compression system increase the plant efficiency of a helium liquefier. However, they involve higher capital investment and larger size. Using simulation software Aspen Hysys v 7.0 and exergy analysis as the tool of analysis, authors have attempted to identify various trade-offs while selecting the number of stages, the pressure levels in compressor, the cold-end configuration, the heat exchanger surface area, the maximum allowable pressure drop in heat exchangers, the efficiency of expanders, the parallel/series connection of expanders etc. Use of more efficient cold ends reduces the number of refrigeration stages and the size of the plant. For achieving reliability along with performance, a configuration with a combination of expander and Joule-Thomson valve is found to be a better choice for cold end. Use of multi-pressure system is relevant only when the number of refrigeration stages is more than 5. Arrangement of expanders in series reduces the number of expanders as well as the heat exchanger size with slight expense of plant efficiency. Superior heat exchanger (having less pressure drop per unit heat transfer area) results in only 5% increase of plant performance even when it has 100% higher heat exchanger surface area.

  9. Engineering the Big Chill: The story of JLab’s Central Helium Liquefier

    DOE PAGES

    Westfall, Catherine

    2014-03-29

    This article tells the story of the Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), one of the US National Laboratories. JLab’s successful superconducting radio frequency accelerator was only possible because a group of JLab engineers successfully tackled a complex of difficulties to build a cryogenic system that included the CHL, a task that required advancing the frontier of cryogenic technology. Ultimately, these cryogenic advances were applied far beyond JLab to the benefit of cutting-edge programs at other US national laboratories (Oak Ridge, Brookhaven, and the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at MSU) as well asmore » NASA. In addition, this innovation story dramatizes the sort of engineer-driven technological problem solving that allows the successful launch and operation of experimental projects. Along the way, the CHL story also provides an important addition to our understanding of the role played by engineers and industry in creating knowledge at physics laboratories.« less

  10. Development of pressure-sensitive dosage forms with a core liquefying at body temperature.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Lisa; Bock, Mona; Wolf, Marieke; Glöckl, Gunnar; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Weitschies, Werner

    2014-04-01

    Pressure-sensitive dosage forms have been developed that are intended for pulsatile delivery of drugs to the proximal small intestine. The novel dosage forms are composed of insoluble shell and either a hard fat W32 or polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1000 core that are both liquidizing at body temperature. The release is triggered by predominant pressure waves such as contractions of the pylorus causing rupture of the shell and an immediate emptying of the liquefied filling containing the active ingredient. In consequence immediately after the trigger has been effective the total amount of the drug is intended to be available for absorption in the upper small intestine. Both core types were coated with a cellulose acetate film that creates a pressure-sensitive shell in which mechanical resistance is depending on the coating thickness. Results of the texture analysis confirmed a correlation between the polymer load of the coating and the mechanical resistance. The dissolution test performed under conditions of physiological meaningful mechanical stress showed that the drug release is triggered by pressure waves of ⩾300 mbar which are representing the maximal pressure occurring during the gastric emptying. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Liquefied Petroleum Gas Monitoring System Based on Polystyrene Coated Long Period Grating

    PubMed Central

    Zotti, Aldobenedetto; Palumbo, Giovanna; Zuppolini, Simona; Consales, Marco; Cutolo, Antonello; Borriello, Anna; Zarrelli, Mauro; Iadicicco, Agostino

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we report the in-field demonstration of a liquefied petroleum gas monitoring system based on optical fiber technology. Long-period grating coated with a thin layer of atactic polystyrene (aPS) was employed as a gas sensor, and an array comprising two different fiber Bragg gratings was set for the monitoring of environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity. A custom package was developed for the sensors, ensuring their suitable installation and operation in harsh conditions. The developed system was installed in a real railway location scenario (i.e., a southern Italian operative railway tunnel), and tests were performed to validate the system performances in operational mode. Daytime normal working operations of the railway line and controlled gas expositions, at very low concentrations, were the searched realistic conditions for an out-of-lab validation of the developed system. Encouraging results were obtained with a precise indication of the gas concentration and external conditioning of the sensor. PMID:29734731

  12. TiO2 Nanorods Decorated with Pd Nanoparticles for Enhanced Liquefied Petroleum Gas Sensing Performance.

    PubMed

    Dhawale, Dattatray S; Gujar, Tanaji P; Lokhande, Chandrakant D

    2017-08-15

    Development of highly sensitive and selective semiconductor-based metal oxide sensor devices to detect toxic, explosive, flammable, and pollutant gases is still a challenging research topic. In the present work, we systematically enhanced the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sensing performance of chemical bath deposited TiO 2 nanorods by decorating Pd nanoparticle catalyst. Surface morphology with elemental mapping, crystal structure, composition and oxidation states, and surface area measurements of pristine TiO 2 and Pd:TiO 2 nanorods was examined by high resolution transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption characterization techniques. LPG sensing performance of pristine TiO 2 and Pd:TiO 2 nanorods was investigated in different LPG concentration and operating temperature ranges. The LPG response of 21% for pristine TiO 2 nanorods is enhanced to 49% after Pd catalyst decoration with reasonably fast response and recovery times. Further, the sensor exhibited long-term stability, which could be due to the strong metal support (Pd:TiO 2 ) interaction and catalytic properties offered by the Pd nanoparticle catalyst. The work described herein demonstrates a general and scalable approach that provides a promising route for rational design of variety of sensor devices for LPG detection.

  13. Polyaniline-Cadmium Ferrite Nanostructured Composite for Room-Temperature Liquefied Petroleum Gas Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotresh, S.; Ravikiran, Y. T.; Tiwari, S. K.; Vijaya Kumari, S. C.

    2017-08-01

    We introduce polyaniline-cadmium ferrite (PANI-CdFe2O4) nanostructured composite as a room-temperature-operable liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sensor. The structure of PANI and the composite prepared by chemical polymerization was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Comparative XRD and FT-IR analysis confirmed CdFe2O4 embedded in PANI matrix with mutual interfacial interaction. The nanostructure of the composite was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. A simple LPG sensor operable at room temperature, exclusively based on spin-coated PANI-CdFe2O4 nanocomposite, was fabricated with maximum sensing response of 50.83% at 1000 ppm LPG. The response and recovery time of the sensor were 50 s and 110 s, respectively, and it was stable over a period of 1 month with slight degradation of 4%. The sensing mechanism is discussed on the basis of the p- n heterojunction barrier formed at the interface of PANI and CdFe2O4.

  14. Kinetic modeling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) reduction of titania in MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tan Wei; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Rezan, Sheikh Abdul; Noor, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Izah Shoparwe, Noor; Alizadeh, Reza; Roohi, Parham

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, reduction of Titania (TiO2) by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)-hydrogen-argon gas mixture was investigated by experimental and kinetic modelling in MATLAB. The reduction experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 1100-1200°C with a reduction time from 1-3 hours and 10-20 minutes of LPG flowing time. A shrinking core model (SCM) was employed for the kinetic modelling in order to determine the rate and extent of reduction. The highest experimental extent of reduction of 38% occurred at a temperature of 1200°C with 3 hours reduction time and 20 minutes of LPG flowing time. The SCM gave a predicted extent of reduction of 82.1% due to assumptions made in the model. The deviation between SCM and experimental data was attributed to porosity, thermodynamic properties and minute thermal fluctuations within the sample. In general, the reduction rates increased with increasing reduction temperature and LPG flowing time.

  15. Application of far infrared rare earth mineral composite materials to liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongbin; Liang, Jinsheng; Ding, Yan; Xu, Anping

    2010-03-01

    Far infrared rare earth mineral composite materials were prepared by the coprecipitation method using tourmaline, cerium acetate, and lanthanum acetate as raw materials. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy show that tourmaline modified with the rare earths La and Ce has a better far infrared emitting performance. Through XRD analysis, we attribute the improved far infrared emission properties of the tourmaline to the unit cell shrinkage of the tourmaline arising from La enhancing the redox properties of nano-CeO2. The effect of the composite materials on the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) was studied by the flue gas analysis and water boiling test. Based on the results, it was found that the composite materials could accelerate the combustion of LPG, and that the higher the emissivity of the rare earth mineral composite materials, the better the effects on combustion of LPG. In all activation styles, both air and LPG to be activated has a best effect, indicating the activations having a cumulative effect.

  16. 77 FR 4028 - Orders Granting, Amending and Vacating Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas and Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ..., L.P 92-35-LNG AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy gives notice that during December... site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/gasregulation/authorizations/Orders-2011.html . They are...

  17. 78 FR 65304 - Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas, and To Import and Export Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... And Electric Company........ 13-95-NG Barclays Bank PLC 13-99-NG AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department... attached appendix and may be found on the FE Web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs...

  18. 78 FR 4401 - Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas, To Import and Export Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... 12-144-NG MC GLOBAL GAS CORPORATION 12-150-NG AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy... on the FE Web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/gasregulation/authorizations/Orders-2012...

  19. 78 FR 44940 - Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas, and To Import and Export Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... 13-64-NG PENTACLES ENERGY, LLLP 13-65-NG AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy gives... found on the FE Web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/gasregulation/authorizations/Orders...

  20. 78 FR 53739 - Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas, To Import and Export Liquefied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of orders. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy gives notice that during July 2013, it issued orders... Web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/gasregulation/authorizations/Orders-2013.html . They...

  1. Design of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle gas cylinder filling semi-physical simulation training and assessment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Zheng, Jianrong; Zhao, Yinghui

    2017-08-01

    With the rapid development of LNG vehicle in China, the operator's training and assessment of the operating skills cannot operate on material objects, because of Vehicle Gas Cylinder's high pressure, flammable and explosive characteristics. LNG Vehicle Gas Cylinder's filling simulation system with semi-physical simulation technology presents the overall design and procedures of the simulation system, and elaborates the realization of the practical analog machine, data acquisition and control system and the computer software, and introduces the design process of equipment simulation model in detail. According to the designed assessment system of the Vehicle Gas Cylinder, it can obtain the operation on the actual cylinder filling and visual effects for the operator, and automatically record operation, the results of real operation with its software, and achieve the operators' training and assessment of operating skills on mobile special equipment.

  2. Guidance on Risk Analysis and Safety Implications of a Large Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Spill Over Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Explosive Materials/Subsystems Don Ragland, Technical Writer/Editor Energy Infrastructure and DER Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800...and the culvert measured 2.4 meters in diameter. From these detonations, the shock wave was felt at a town 22 km from the test site. Vander Molen ...and Nicholls – 1979 [Vander Molen and Nicholls 1979] Experiments were performed to measure the effect of ethane addition to methane air clouds on

  3. 77 FR 55197 - LNG Development Company, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... LNG both on its own behalf and as agent for other parties who hold title to the LNG at the point of... degree from Rockies supply given that the market modeling commissioned by Oregon LNG demonstrates that... LNG requests authorization to export LNG acting on its own behalf or as agent for others. At present...

  4. 78 FR 34084 - Freeport-McMoRan Energy LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ...-Free Trade Agreement Countries for a 30- Year Period AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives... Activities, Office of Fossil Energy, P.O. Box 44375, Washington, DC 20026-4375. Hand Delivery or Private...

  5. Liquefied Natural Gas Storage of Variable Composition / Magazynowanie Skroplonego Gazu Ziemnego O Zmiennym Składzie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łaciak, Mariusz

    2015-03-01

    Thanks to the increasing diversification of LNG supply sources, being a result of the growing number of LNG liquefaction installations over the World, increase of short-term trade contracts and general trend to globally liberalize gas markets, reception terminals have to cope with the broad range of qualitatively diversified LNG deliveries from various sources. Different LNG deliveries potentially have different density caused by different gas composition. Although the LNG composition depends on LNG source, it mainly consists of methane, ethane, propane, butane and trace nitrogen. When a new supply of LNG is transported to the tank, the LNG composition and temperature in the tank can be different from LNG as delivered. This may lead to the liquid stratification in the tank, and consequently the rollover. As a result, LNG rapidly evaporates and the pressure in the tank increases. More and more restrictive safety regulations require fuller understanding of the formation and evolution of layers. The paper is focused on the analysis of liquid stratification in the tank which may take place when storing LNG, and which process leads to the rapid evaporation of considerable quantities of LNG. The aim was to attempt modeling of the process of liquid stratification in an LNG tank. The paper is closed with the results of modelling. Dzięki rosnącej dywersyfikacji źródeł dostaw LNG, spowodowanej zwiększającą się liczbą instalacji skraplania gazu na całym świecie, wzrostem ilości kontraktów krótkoterminowych w handlu i ogólnej tendencji do globalnej liberalizacja rynków gazu, terminale do odbioru muszą radzić sobie z coraz większą gamą różnych jakościowo dostaw LNG z różnych źródeł. Różne dostawy LNG mają potencjalnie inną gęstość dzięki różnym składom gazu. Chociaż kompozycja LNG zależy od źródła, to przede wszystkim składa się z metanu, etanu, propanu, butanu i w śladowych ilościach z azotu. Gdy nowa dostawa LNG jest doprowadzana do zbiornika, skład i temperatura LNG już w zbiorniku może być inny niż dostarczanego. Może to prowadzić do rozwarstwienia cieczy w zbiorniku, a w konsekwencji wystąpienia zjawiska znanego jako "rollover". W wyniku tego zjawiska następuje gwałtowne odparowanie LNG i nagły wzrost ciśnienia w zbiorniku. Coraz bardziej restrykcyjne przepisy dotyczące bezpieczeństwa wymagają pełniejszego zrozumienia zjawiska tworzenia i ewolucji warstw. W artykule przeprowadzono analizę procesu rozwarstwienia cieczy w zbiorniku, mogącego wystąpić podczas magazynowania skroplonego gazu ziemnego, a prowadzącego do gwałtownego odparowania znacznych ilości LNG. Celem była próba modelowania procesu powstawania rozwarstwienia się cieczy w zbiorniku LNG. Przedstawione zostały wyniki modelowania tego zjawiska

  6. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  7. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-27

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  8. Seed zones for maintaining adapted plant populations

    J. Bradley St. Clair; G. Randy Johnson; Vicky J. Erickson; Richard C. Johnson; Nancy L. Shaw

    2007-01-01

    Seed zones delineate areas within which plant materials can be transferred with little risk that they will be poorly adapted to their new location. They ensure successful restoration and revegetation, and help maintain the integrity of natural genetic structure. The value of seed zones is recognized in numerous policy statements from federal and state agencies. Results...

  9. Refueling emissions from cars in Japan: Compositions, temperature dependence and effect of vapor liquefied collection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Refueling emissions from cars available on the Japanese market, which were not equipped with specific controlling devices, were investigated. For the composition analysis, a proton transfer reaction plus switchable reagent ion mass spectrometry (PTR + SRI-MS), which is capable of real-time measurement, was used. In addition, the performance of a vapor liquefied collection system (VLCS), which is a recently developed controlling device, was evaluated and compared with an onboard refueling vapor recovery (ORVR) system. The refueling emission factor of uncontrolled vehicles at 20 °C was 1.02 ± 0.40 g/L in the case dispensing 20 L of fuel. The results of composition analysis indicated that the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) of refueling emissions in Japan was 3.49 ± 0.83. The emissions consist of 80% alkanes and 20% alkenes, and aromatics and di-enes were negligible. C4 alkene had the highest impact on the MIR of refueling emissions. The amounts of refueling emissions were well reproduced by a function developed by MOVE2010 in the temperature range of 5-35 °C. The compositions of the refueling emissions varied in this temperature range, but the change in MIR was negligible. The trapping efficiency of VLCS was the same level as that of the ORVR (over 95%). The MIRs of refueling and evaporative emissions were strongly affected by that of the test fuel. This study and our previous study indicated that MIRbreakthrough ≈ MIRrefueling ≈ MIRfuel + 0.5 and MIRpermeation ≈ MIRfuel. The real-world estimated average MIRfuel in Japan was about 3.0.

  10. Reliability analysis of hydrologic containment of liquefied petroleum gas within unlined rock caverns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Yan, E. C.; Yeh, T. C. J.; Wang, Y.; Liang, Y.; Hao, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Notice that most of the underground liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) storage caverns are constructed in unlined rock caverns (URCs), where the variability of hydraulic properties (in particular, hydraulic conductivity) has significant impacts on hydrologic containment performance. However, it is practically impossible to characterize the spatial distribution of these properties in detail at the site of URCs. This dilemma forces us to cope with uncertainty in our evaluations of gas containment. As a consequence, the uncertainty-based analysis is deemed more appropriate than the traditional deterministic analysis. The objectives of this paper are 1) to introduce a numerical first order method to calculate the gas containment reliability within a heterogeneous, two-dimensional unlined rock caverns, and 2) to suggest a strategy for improving the gas containment reliability. In order to achieve these goals, we first introduced the stochastic continuum representation of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of fractured rock and analyzed the spatial variability of Ks at a field site. We then conducted deterministic simulations to demonstrate the importance of heterogeneity of Ks in the analysis of gas tightness performance of URCs. Considering the uncertainty of the heterogeneity in the real world situations, we subsequently developed a numerical first order method (NFOM) to determine the gas tightness reliability at crucial locations of URCs. Using the NFOM, the effect of spatial variability of Ks on gas tightness reliability was investigated. Results show that as variance or spatial structure anisotropy of Ks increases, most of the gas tightness reliability at crucial locations reduces. Meanwhile, we compare the results of NFOM with those of Monte Carlo simulation, and we find the accuracy of NFOM is mainly affected by the magnitude of the variance of Ks. At last, for improving gas containment reliability at crucial locations at this study site, we suggest that vertical

  11. Electron microprobe study of lunar and planetary zoned plagioclase feldspars: An analytical and experimental study of zoning in plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. K.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Natural and experimentally grown zoned plagioclase feldspars were examined by electron microprobe. The analyses revealed discontinuous, sector, and oscillary chemical zoning superimposed on continuous normal or reverse zoning trends. Postulated mechanisms for the origin of zoning are based on either physical changes external to the magma (P, T, H2O saturation) or kinetic changes internal to the magma (diffusion, supersaturation, growth rate). Comparison of microprobe data on natural zoned plagioclase with zoned plagioclase grown in controlled experiments show that it may be possible to distinguish zonal development resulting from physio-chemical changes to the bulk magma from local kinetic control on the growth of individual crystals.

  12. Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Challenges and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-13

    produced from digesters ─ Animal manure (dairy cows, swine) ─ Waste water treatment facilities > Methane from Landfills > RNG produced from...AGR used in process • Two stage + trim methanation reactor • Dehydration to achieve gas pipeline specifications ~ 70% conversion efficiency 21... digestion of agricultural waste for on-site electricity generation ─Altamont Landfill—Landfill gas (LFG) cleanup for production of liquefied natural gas

  13. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOEpatents

    Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G [Idaho Falls, ID; Turner, Terry D [Ammon, ID; Carney, Francis H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-29

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream.

  14. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D [Ammon, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-22

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates a vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas is used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line or recirculation within the system for further processing.

  15. 49 CFR 173.313 - UN Portable Tank Table for Liquefied Compressed Gases and Chemical Under Pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 28.0 Allowed Normal 0.43 24.5 22.0 20.0 1078 Refrigerant gas, n.o.s. See MAWP definition in § 178.276..., flammable, n.o.s. See MAWP definition in § 178.276(a) Allowed Normal § 173.32(f) 1958 1,2-Dichloro-1,1,2,2... liquefied, n.o.s. See MAWP definition in 178.276(a) Allowed Normal See § 173.32(f) 1969 Isobutane 8.5...

  16. 49 CFR 173.313 - UN Portable Tank Table for Liquefied Compressed Gases and Chemical Under Pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 28.0 Allowed Normal 0.43 24.5 22.0 20.0 1078 Refrigerant gas, n.o.s. See MAWP definition in § 178.276..., flammable, n.o.s. See MAWP definition in § 178.276(a) Allowed Normal § 173.32(f) 1958 1,2-Dichloro-1,1,2,2... liquefied, n.o.s. See MAWP definition in 178.276(a) Allowed Normal See § 173.32(f) 1969 Isobutane 8.5...

  17. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    SciT

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  18. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciT

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results inmore » the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.« less

  19. Preparation of polyurethane foams using liquefied oil palm mesocarp fibre (OPMF) and renewable monomer from waste cooking oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormin, Shaharuddin; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.; Azahari, M. Shafiq M.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this research is the production of polyurethane (PU) foams with biopolyols from liquefied oil palm mesocarp fibre (OPMF) and renewable monomer. Liquefaction of OPMF was studied using polyhydric alcohol (PA) which is PEG-400 as liquefaction solvents in conventional glass flask. In the second part of this paper was obtained the PU foams which presented good results when compared with commercial foams and include polyols from of fossil fuels. PU foams were prepared by mixing liquefied OPMF biopolyol, renewable monomer from waste cooking, additives and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI). Water was used as an environmental friendly blowing agent. The factors that influence the cell structure of foams (i.e., catalyst, surfactant, dosage of blowing agent, and mass ratio of biopolyol to renewable monomer were studied. The synthesized PU foams were characterized by FTIR and SEM. The formulation of the PU foams should be improved, but the results show that is possible the use biopolyols and renewable monomer to produce industrial foams with lower cost.

  20. Technical, economic, and environmental impact study of converting Uzbekistan transportation fleets to natural gas operation. Export trade information

    SciT

    NONE

    1997-04-30

    This study, conducted by Radian International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report assesses the feasibility (technical, economic and environmental) of converting the Uzbek transportation fleets to natural gas operation. The study focuses on the conversion of high fuel use vehicles and locomotives to liquefied natural gas (LNG) and the conversion of moderate fuel use veicles to compressed natural gas (CNG). The report is divided into the following sections: Executive Summary; (1.0) Introduction; (2.0) Country Background; (3.0) Characterization of Uzbek Transportation Fuels; (4.0) Uzbek Vehicle and Locomotive Fleet Characterization; (5.0) Uzbek Natural Gas Vehicle Conversion Shops;more » (6.0) Uzbek Natural Gas Infrastructure; (7.0) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) for Vehicular Fuel in Uzbekistan; (8.0) Economic Feasibility Study; (9.0) Environmental Impact Analysis; References; Appendices A - S.« less

  1. Five-year epidemiology of liquefied petroleum gas-related burns.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ronghua; Wu, Pan; Ho, Jon Kee; Wang, Xingang; Han, Chunmao

    2018-02-01

    The incidence of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)-related burns has increased over recent years, and it has become a serious public health issue in developing countries such as India and Turkey. This paper aims to investigate the epidemiological characteristics of LPG-related burns to provide assistance and suggestions for planning prevention strategies. A 5-year retrospective study was conducted in patients with LPG-related burns admitted to the Department of Burns & Wound Care Center, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, between 1st January 2011 and 31st December 2015. Information obtained for each patient included age, gender, education status, occupation, medical insurance, average hospital cost, length of hospital stay, monthly distribution of incidence, place of burns, mechanism of burns, extent of burns, site of burns, accompanying injuries, and treatment outcomes. For the first 4 years (2011-2014), the yearly incidence of LPG-related burns was at approximately 10% of all burns; however, in the fifth year (2015) alone, there was a surge to 26.94%. A total of 1337 burn patients were admitted during this period. Of these, 195 patients were admitted because of 169 LPG-related accidents; there were 11 accidents involving more than one victim. LPG-related burns occurred most frequently in patients aged 21-60 years (73.85%). The majority of injuries occurred from May to August (56.41%), and the most common place was home (83.08%, 162 patients). Gas leak (81.03%) was the main cause of LPG-related burns, followed by inappropriate operation (7.69%) and cooking negligence (2.05%). The mean burn area was 31.32±25.40% of TBSA. The most common sites of burns were the upper extremities (37.47%), followed by the head/face and neck (24.80%) and lower extremities (19.95%). The most common accompanying injuries included inhalation injury (23.59%), shock (8.71%), and external injury (7.18%). The average hospital stay was 22.90±19.47days (range

  2. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 180 - Acceptable Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Leakage Tests for Cargo Tanks Transporting Liquefied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Leakage Tests for Cargo Tanks Transporting Liquefied Compressed Gases B Appendix B to Part 180... Pt. 180, App. B Appendix B to Part 180—Acceptable Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Leakage Tests for.... (b) Internal Self-Closing Stop Valve Test. An operator of a cargo tank that is not equipped with a...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 180 - Acceptable Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Leakage Tests for Cargo Tanks Transporting Liquefied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acceptable Internal Self-closing Stop Valve... Pt. 180, App. B Appendix B to Part 180—Acceptable Internal Self-closing Stop Valve Leakage Tests for Cargo Tanks Transporting Liquefied Compressed Gases For internal self-closing stop valve leakage testing...

  4. Possible health effects of liquefied petroleum gas on workers at filling and distribution stations of Gaza governorates.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, M M; Al Laham, N A; El Madhoun, R A

    2013-03-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is widely used in the Gaza Strip for domestic purposes, in agriculture and industry and, illegally, in cars. This study aimed to identify possible health effects on workers exposed to LPG in Gaza governorates. Data were collected by a questionnaire interview, and haematological and biochemical analyses of venous blood samples were made from 30 workers at filling and distribution stations and 30 apparently healthy controls. Statistically significant differences were found in all self-reported health-related complaints among LPG workers versus controls. LPG workers had significantly higher values of red blood cell counts, haemoglobin, haematocrit mean corpuscular haemoglobin and platelet counts. They also had significantly higher values of kidney function tests (urea, creatinine and uric acid) and liver function enzyme activities (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase). LPG workers at Gaza Strip petroleum stations are at higher risk for health-related symptoms and clinical abnormalities.

  5. Analysis of proteomic differences between liquefied after-cataracts and normal lenses using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jia-Jia; Huang, Yu-Sen

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze and identify the proteomic differences between liquefied after-cataracts and normal lenses by means of liquefied chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). METHODS Three normal lenses and three liquefied after-cataracts were exposed to depolymerizing reagents to extract the total proteins. Protein concentrations were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The digitized images obtained with a GS-800 scanner were then analyzed with PDQuest7.0 software to detect the differentially-expressed protein spots. These protein spots were cut from the gel using a proteome work spot cutter and subjected to in-gel digestion with trypsin. The digested peptide separation was conducted by LC-MS/MS. RESULTS The 2-DE maps showed that lens proteins were in a pH range of 3-10 with a relative molecular weight of 21-70 kD. The relative molecular weight of the more abundant proteins was localized at 25-50 kD, and the isoelectric points were found to lie between PI 4-9. The maps also showed that the protein level within the liquefied after-cataracts was at 29 points and significantly lower than in normal lenses. The 29 points were identified by LC-MS/MS, and ten of these proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and database queries: beta-crystallin B1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, carbonyl reductase (NADPH) 1, cDNA FLJ55253, gamma-crystallin D, GAS2-like protein 3, sorbitol dehydrogenase, DNA FLJ60282, phosphoglycerate kinase, and filensin. CONCLUSION The level of the ten proteins may play an important role in the development of liquefied after-cataracts. PMID:28944190

  6. Slip Zone versus Damage Zone Micromechanics, Arima-Takasuki Tectonic Line, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. C.; Lin, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Arima-Takasuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) of southern Honshu, Japan is defined by historically active faults and multiple splays producing M7 earthquakes. The damage zone of the ATTL comprises a broad zone of crushed, comminuted and pulverized granite/rhyolite1,2containing cm-scale slip zones and highly comminuted injection veins. In this presentation, prior work on the ATTL fault rocks is extending to include microstructural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) from recent trenching of the primary slip zone, as well as secondary slip zones. This is necessary to adequately characterize the extremely fine-grained material (typically less than 1mm) in both damage and core zones. Damage zone material exhibits generally random textures3 whereas slip zones are macroscopically foliated, and compositionally layered, notwithstanding a fairly homogeneous protolith. The latter reflects fluid-rock interaction during both coseismic and interseismic periods. The slip zones are microstructurally heterogeneous at all scales, comprising not only cataclasites and phyllosilicate (clay)-rich gouge zones, but Fe/Mn pellets or clasts that are contained within gouge. These structures appear to have rolled and would suggest rapid recrystallization and/or growth. A central question related to earthquake recurrence along existing faults is the nature of the gouge. In both near-surface exposures and ongoing drilling at depth, "plastic" or "viscous" gouge zones comprise ultra-fine-grained clay-siliciclastic particles that would not necessarily respond in a simple frictional manner. Depending on whether the plastic nature of these slip zones develops during or after slip, subsequent focusing of slip within them could be complicated. 1 Mitchell, T.A., Ben-Zion, Y., Shimamoto, T., 2011. Ear. Planet. Sci. Lett. 308, 284-297. 2 Lin, A., Yamashita, K, Tanaka, M. J., 2013. Struc. Geol. 48, 3-13. 3 White, J.C., Lin, A. 2016. Proc. AGU Fall Mtg., T42-02 San Francisco.

  7. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  8. The nature of the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) shear zone: Constraints from structural, microstructural and fabric analyses of metamorphic rocks from the Diancang Shan, Ailao Shan and Day Nui Con Voi massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junlai; Tang, Yuan; Tran, My-Dung; Cao, Shuyun; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Zhaochong; Zhao, Zhidan; Chen, Wen

    2012-03-01

    The structural geology, timing of shearing, and tectonic implications of the ASRR shear zone, one of the most striking lineaments in Southeast Asia, have been the topics of extensive studies over the past few decades. The Xuelong Shan (XLS), Diancang Shan (DCS), Ailao Shan (ALS) and Day Nui Con Voi (DNCV) metamorphic massifs along the shear zone have preserved important information on its structural and tectonic evolution. Our field structural analysis, detailed microstructural and fabric analysis, as well as the quartz, sillimanite and garnet fabric studies of the sheared rocks from the massifs demonstrate the dominant roles of three deformation episodes during Cenozoic tectonic evolution in the shear zone. Among the contrasting structural and microstructural associations in the shear zone, D2 structures, which were formed at the brittle to ductile transition during large-scale left-lateral shearing in the second deformation episode, predominate over the structural styles of the other two deformation episodes. Discrete micro-shear zones with intensive grain size reduction compose the characteristic structural style of D2 deformation. In addition, several types of folds (early shearing folds, F21, and late-shearing folds, F22) were formed in the sheared rocks, including discrete to distributed mylonitic foliation, stretching lineation and shear fabrics (e.g., mica fish, domino structures, as well as sigma and delta fabrics). A sequence of microstructures from syn-kinematic magmatic flow, high-temperature solid-state deformation, to brittle-ductile shearing is well-preserved in the syn-kinematic leucocratic intrusions. Deformation structures from the first episode (D1) are characterized by F1 folds and distributed foliations (S1) in rocks due to pure shearing at high temperatures. They are preserved in weakly sheared (D2) rocks along the eastern margin of the ALS belt or in certain low-strain tectonic enclaves within the shear zone. Furthermore, semi

  9. Fifty years of shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Rodney

    2017-04-01

    We are here, of course, because 1967 saw the publication of John Ramsay's famous book. Two years later a memorable field trip from Imperial College to the Outer Hebrides saw John on a bleak headland on the coast of North Uist where a relatively undeformed metadolerite within Lewisian (Precambrian) gneisses contained ductile shear zones with metamorphic fabrics in amphibolite facies. One particular outcrop was very special - a shear zone cutting otherwise completely isotropic, undeformed metadolerite, with an incremental foliation starting to develop at 45° to the deformation zone, and increasing in intensity as it approached the shear direction. Here was proof of the process of simple shear under ductile metamorphic conditions - the principles of simple shear outlined in John Ramsay's 1967 book clearly visible in nature, and verified by Ramsay's mathematical proofs in the eventual paper (Ramsay and Graham, 1970). Later work on the Lewisian on the mainland of Scotland, in South Harris, in Africa, and elsewhere applied Ramsay's simple shear principles more liberally, more imprecisely and on larger scale than at Caisteal Odair, but in retrospect it documented what seems now to be the generality of mid and lower crustal deformation. Deep seismic reflection data show us that on passive margins hyper-stretched continental crust (whether or not cloaked by Seaward Dipping Reflectors) seems to have collapsed onto the mantle. Crustal faults mostly sole out at or above the mantle - so the Moho is a detachment- an 'outer marginal detachment', if you like, and, of course, it must be a ductile shear. On non-volcanic margins this shear zone forms the first formed ocean floor before true sea floor spreading gets going to create real oceanic crust. Gianreto Manatschal, Marcel Lemoine and others realised that the serpentinites described in parts of the Alps are exposed remnants of this ductile shear zone. Associated ophicalcite breccias tell of sea floor exposure, while high

  10. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  11. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  12. Work zone safety analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  13. California tree seed zones

    John M. Buck; Ronald S. Adams; Jerrold Cone; M. Thompson Conkle; William J. Libby; Cecil J. Eden; Michel J. Knight

    1970-01-01

    California forest tree seed zones were established originally by Fowells (1946), with revisions proposed by Roy (1963) and Schubert (1966). The Forest Tree Seed Committee of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, has revised the original zones and updated the recording system described in the earlier reports. Fowells' (1946) Research Note...

  14. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  15. Longleaf pine site zones

    Phillip J. Craul; John S. Kush; William D. Boyer

    2005-01-01

    The authors delineate six major climatic areas of the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) region. They subdivide these areas into 21 site zones, each of which is deemed homogenous with respect to climate, physiography, and soils. The site zones are mapped and their climate, physiography, and soils described. The authors recommend that plantings of...

  16. Iowa Work Zone Fatalities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    From March through November, the Iowa DOT may have up to 500 road construction work zones, and each of the department's maintenance garages may establish one or more short-term work zones per day. Couple that with the work of cities and counties, and...

  17. Life zone investigations in Wyoming

    Cary, Merritt

    1917-01-01

    Wyoming is among the foremost of our States in its wealth of natural scenery, culminating in the grandeur of Yellowstone National Park, one of the wonders of the world. In addition to this distinction it posseses vast open plains and lofty mountains whence flow the headwaters of mighty river systems emptying far away to the west into the Pacific Ocean, to the southeast into the Gulf of Mexico, and to the southwest into the Gulf of California. The various slope exposures of its mountain ranges, the fertility of its intervening valleys or basins, and the aridity of its desert spaces present a study of geographic and vertical distribution of wild life that is in many particulars unique.The study of geographic and vertical distribution of life with the governing factors and attendant problems is valuable as a matter of scientific research and in the attainment of practical knowledge. The Biological Survey has been making detailed investigations of the transcontinental life belts, or zones, of North America for some years, and this work has been carried on with special reference to their practical value. It has become increasingly evident that life zones furnish a fairly accurate index to average climatic conditions and, therefore, are useful as marking the limits of agricultural possibilities, so far as these are dependent upon climate. The knowledge thus gained has been published and made available as the investigations have progressed and the life zones have been mapped.1

  18. Effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza extract with supplemental liquefied calcium on osteoporosis in calcium-deficient ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Bongkyun; Song, Hae Seong; Kwon, Jeong Eun; Cho, Se Min; Jang, Seon-A; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kang, Se Chan

    2017-12-20

    Extracts from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge have been used in traditional Asian medicine to treat coronary heart disease, chronic renal failure, atherosclerosis, myocardial infraction, angina pectoris, myocardial ischemia, dysmenorrheal, neurasthenic insomnia, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-RANK signal effect of the combination of S.miltiorrhiza Bunge (SME) and liquefied calcium (LCa) supplement with ovariectomized (OVX-SML) mice, a osteoporosis animal model. Results were compared to 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) treatment. A total of 70 female ICR strain mice (7 weeks) were randomly divided into 10 groups with 7 mice in each group as follows: (1) sham-operated control mice (sham) received daily oral phosphate-buffered-saline (PBS) of equal volumes through oral administration. (2) OVX mice received a daily oral administration of PBS (OVX). (3) OVX mice treated daily with 50 mg/kg b.w./ day of SME (4) with 100 mg/kg b.w./day of SME or (5) with 200 mg/kg b.w./day of SME via oral administration. (6) OVX mice treated daily with 50 mg/kg b.w./day of SML (7) with 100 mg/kg b.w./day of SML or (8) with 200 mg/kg b.w./day of SML via oral administration. (9) OVX mice treated daily with 10 ml/kg b.w./day of LCa (10) OVX mice received i.p. injections of 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) (0.1 mg/kg b.w./day) three times per week for 12 weeks. micro-CT analysis revealed that oral administration of SML inhibited tibial bone loss, sustained trabecular bone state, and ameliorated bone biochemical markers. In addition, SML administration compared to SEM and LCa reduced serum levels of RANKL, osteocalcin and BALP through increased serum levels of OPG and E 2 in OVX mice. SML also had more beneficial effects on protection of estrogen-dependent bone loss through blocking expression of TRAF6 and NFTAc1 and produces cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor to develop osteoclast differentiation. These data suggest that S. miltiorrhiza Bunge combined with

  19. Study on the thermodynamical and mechanical conditions for the generation of high operating pressures with liquefied gases for low and very low flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieratschker, Willi

    1989-12-01

    An investigation of the thermodynamical and mechanical conditions for extending the flow rate range in the direction of low flow rates with regard to the delivery of liquefied gases at high operating pressures is presented. For low flow rates, the especially critical cavitation problem connected with the pumping of liquefied gases becomes more acute, since with decreasing volume the ratio of heat losses to the hydraulic power becomes ever more unfavorable. A first prototype is designed, produced and investigated to evaluate design-related heat loss and piston seal problems. An approach to the solution is indicated for both problem areas with the application of a new and patented pump principle, and through investigation of a second prototype modified in several respects. By reducing the pump mass when designing the second pump prototype, the nonstationary cooling phase is greatly shortened, so that intermittent pump operation becomes possible when the pump is housed external to the storage tank.

  20. Ice-based altitude distribution of natural radiation annual exposure rate in the Antarctica zone over the latitude range 69 degrees S-77 degrees S using a pair-filter thermoluminescence method.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Kamiyama, T; Fujii, Y; Motoyama, H; Esumi, S

    1995-12-01

    Both ice-based altitude distributions of natural ionizing radiation exposure and the quasi-effective energy of natural radiation over Antartica over the latitude range 69 degrees S - 77 degrees S during approx. 500 days were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The results shows that dependence on altitude above sea level of the exposure rate increases by almost three-fold with each increase of 2000 m of altitude, thus deviating from the general rule stating that the exposure rate should double with each 2000 m. Although the exposure rate shows a dependence on altitude, altitude dependence of the quasi-effective energy of natural radiation over Antartica is not observed. In the present study it is observed that natural radiation occurring over the ice base of Antartica consists mainly of cosmic rays.

  1. Habitable Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, D.; Lota, J.

    2012-12-01

    The location of the habitable zone around a star depends upon stellar luminosity and upon the properties of a potentially habitable planet such as its mass and near-surface volatile inventory. Stellar luminosity generally increases as a star ages whilst planetary properties change through time as a consequence of biological and geological evolution. Hence, the location of the habitable zone changes through time as a result of both stellar evolution and planetary evolution. Using the Earth's Phanerozoic temperature history as a constraint, it is shown that changes in our own habitable zone over the last 540 My have been dominated by planetary evolution rather than solar evolution. Furthermore, sparse data from earlier times suggests that planetary evolution may have dominated habitable zone development throughout our biosphere's history. Hence, the existence of a continuously habitable zone depends upon accidents of complex bio-geochemical evolution more than it does upon relatively simple stellar-evolution. Evolution of the inner margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations. Evolution of the outer margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations.

  2. 18 CFR 154.310 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zones. 154.310 Section 154.310 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Material To Be Filed With Changes...

  3. 18 CFR 154.310 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zones. 154.310 Section 154.310 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Material To Be Filed With Changes...

  4. 18 CFR 154.310 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zones. 154.310 Section 154.310 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Material To Be Filed With Changes...

  5. 18 CFR 154.310 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zones. 154.310 Section 154.310 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Material To Be Filed With Changes...

  6. 18 CFR 154.310 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zones. 154.310 Section 154.310 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Material To Be Filed With Changes...

  7. Book Review: Greening in the Red Zone

    Nancy Falxa-Raymond

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of a crisis, local, often spontaneous stewardship of nature provides a source of social-ecological resilience to individuals, communities, and ecosystems. This is the concept behind Greening in the Red Zone, and one that may be intuitive to many working in urban forestry, community greening, or any of the local nonprofits or...

  8. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  9. The Genomes of the Non-Clearing-Zone-Forming and Natural-Rubber- Degrading Species Gordonia polyisoprenivorans and Gordonia westfalica Harbor Genes Expressing Lcp Activity in Streptomyces Strains▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bröker, Daniel; Dietz, David; Arenskötter, Matthias; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The latex-clearing protein (LcpK30) from the rubber-degrading bacterium Streptomyces sp. strain K30 is involved in the cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene), yielding isoprenoid aldehydes and ketones. Lcp homologues have so far been detected in all investigated clearing-zone-forming rubber-degrading bacteria. Internal degenerated oligonucleotides derived from lcp genes of Streptomyces sp. strain K30 (lcpK30), Streptomyces coelicolor strain A3(2), and Nocardia farcinica strains IFM10152 and E1 were applied in PCR to investigate whether lcp homologues occur also in the non-clearing-zone-forming rubber-utilizing bacteria Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strains VH2 and Y2K, Gordonia alkanivorans strain 44187, and Gordonia westfalica strain Kb1, which grow adhesively on rubber. The 1,230- and 1,224-bp lcp-homologous genes from G. polyisoprenivorans strain VH2 (lcpVH2) and G. westfalica strain Kb1 (lcpKb1) were obtained after screening genomic libraries by degenerated PCR amplification, and their translational products exhibited 50 and 52% amino acid identity, respectively, to LcpK30. Recombinant lcpVH2 and lcpKb1 harboring cells of the non-rubber-degrading Streptomyces lividans strain TK23 were able to form clearing zones and aldehydes on latex overlay-agar plates, thus indicating that lcpVH2 and lcpKb1 encode functionally active proteins. Analysis by gel permeation chromatography demonstrated lower polymer concentrations and molecular weights of the remaining polyisoprenoid molecules after incubation with these recombinant S. lividans strains. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis demonstrated that lcpVH2 was transcribed in cells of G. polyisoprenivorans strain VH2 cultivated in the presence of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) but not in the presence of sodium acetate. Anti-LcpK30 immunoglobulin Gs, which were raised in this study, were rather specific for LcpK30 and did not cross-react with LcpVH2 and LcpKb1. A lcpVH2 disruption mutant was still able to grow with poly(cis-1,4-isoprene

  10. Development of a Measurement and Control System for a 40l/h Helium Liquefier based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, L. Q.; Xu, X. D.; Liu, T.; Li, Q.; Hu, Z. J.; Wang, B. M.; Xiong, L. Y.; Dong, B.; Yan, T.

    A 40l/h Helium Liquefier has been commissioned by the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this Helium Liquefier is developed. Proper sensors are selected, for example, three types of transmitters are adopted respectively according to detailed temperature measurement requirements. Siemens S7-300 PLC CPU315-2PN/DP operates as a master station and three sets of ET200 M DP remote expand I/O operate asslave stations. Profibus-DP field communication is used between the master station and the slave stations. The upper computer HMI(Human Machine Interface) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V7.0. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. A specific control logic for this Helium Liquefier is developed. The control of the suction and discharge pressures of the compressor and the control of the turbo-expanders loop are being discussed in this paper. Following the commissioning phase, the outlet temperature of the second stage turbine has reached 8.6K and the temperature before the throttle valve has reached 13.1K.

  11. Cooking Fuels in Lagos, Nigeria: Factors Associated with Household Choice of Kerosene or Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)

    PubMed Central

    Okwor, Tochi J.; Adetona, Olorunfemi; Akinkugbe, Ayesha O.; Amadi, Casmir E.; Esezobor, Christopher; Adeyeye, Olufunke O.; Ojo, Oluwafemi; Nwude, Vivian N.; Mortimer, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Cooking with dirty-burning fuels is associated with health risk from household air pollution. We assessed the prevalence of and factors associated with the use of cooking fuels, and attitudes and barriers towards use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). This was a cross-sectional, population-based survey conducted in 519 households in Lagos, Nigeria. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain information regarding choice of household cooking fuel and the attitudes towards the use of LPG. Kerosene was the most frequently used cooking fuel (n = 475, 91.5%; primary use n = 364, 70.1%) followed by charcoal (n = 159, 30.6%; primary use n = 88, 17%) and LPG (n = 86, 16.6%; primary use n = 63, 12.1%). Higher level of education, higher income and younger age were associated with LPG vs. kerosene use. Fuel expenditure on LPG was significantly lower than for kerosene (N (Naira) 2169.0 ± 1507.0 vs. N2581.6 ± 1407.5). Over 90% of non-LPG users were willing to switch to LPG but cited safety issues and high cost as potential barriers to switching. Our findings suggest that misinformation and beliefs regarding benefits, safety and cost of LPG are important barriers to LPG use. An educational intervention program could be a cost-effective approach to improve LPG adoption and should be formally addressed through a well-designed community-based intervention study. PMID:29614713

  12. Cooking Fuels in Lagos, Nigeria: Factors Associated with Household Choice of Kerosene or Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG).

    PubMed

    Ozoh, Obianuju B; Okwor, Tochi J; Adetona, Olorunfemi; Akinkugbe, Ayesha O; Amadi, Casmir E; Esezobor, Christopher; Adeyeye, Olufunke O; Ojo, Oluwafemi; Nwude, Vivian N; Mortimer, Kevin

    2018-03-31

    Cooking with dirty-burning fuels is associated with health risk from household air pollution. We assessed the prevalence of and factors associated with the use of cooking fuels, and attitudes and barriers towards use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). This was a cross-sectional, population-based survey conducted in 519 households in Lagos, Nigeria. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain information regarding choice of household cooking fuel and the attitudes towards the use of LPG. Kerosene was the most frequently used cooking fuel ( n = 475, 91.5%; primary use n = 364, 70.1%) followed by charcoal ( n = 159, 30.6%; primary use n = 88, 17%) and LPG ( n = 86, 16.6%; primary use n = 63, 12.1%). Higher level of education, higher income and younger age were associated with LPG vs. kerosene use. Fuel expenditure on LPG was significantly lower than for kerosene ( N (Naira) 2169.0 ± 1507.0 vs. N 2581.6 ± 1407.5). Over 90% of non-LPG users were willing to switch to LPG but cited safety issues and high cost as potential barriers to switching. Our findings suggest that misinformation and beliefs regarding benefits, safety and cost of LPG are important barriers to LPG use. An educational intervention program could be a cost-effective approach to improve LPG adoption and should be formally addressed through a well-designed community-based intervention study.

  13. Start-up and operation strategies on the liquefied food waste anaerobic digestion and a full-scale case application.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shen, Fei; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Liu, Yanping; Zhu, Baoning; Chufo, Akiber; Jaffar, Muhammad; Li, Xiujin

    2014-11-01

    Batch anaerobic digestion was employed to investigate the efficient start-up strategies for the liquefied food waste, and sequencing batch digestion was also performed to determine maximum influent organic loading rate (OLR) for efficient and stable operation. The results indicated that the start-up could be well improved using appropriate wastewater organic load and food-to-microorganism ratios (F/M). When digestion was initialized at low chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration of 20.0 gCOD L(-1), the start-up would go well using lower F/M ratio of 0.5-0.7. The OLR 7.0 gCOD L(-1) day(-1) was recommended for operating the ASBR digestion, in which the COD conversion of 96.7 ± 0.53% and biomethane yield of 3.5 ± 0.2 L gCOD(-1) were achieved, respectively. The instability would occur when OLR was higher than 7.0 gCOD L(-1) day(-1), and this instability was not recoverable. Lipid was suggested to be removed before anaerobic digestion. The anaerobic digestion process in engineering project ran well, and good performance was achieved when the start-up and operational strategies from laboratory study were applied. For case application, stable digestion performance was achieved in a digester (850 m(3) volume) with biogas production of 1.0-3.8 m(3) m(-3) day(-1).

  14. Liquefaction process wherein solvents derived from the material liquefied and containing increased concentrations of donor species are employed

    DOEpatents

    Fant, B. T.; Miller, John D.; Ryan, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein a solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material being liquefied is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the solvent or diluent comprises from about 65 to about 85 wt. % hydroaromatic components. The solvent is prepared by first separating a solvent or diluent distillate fraction from the liquefaction product, subjecting this distillate fraction to hydrogenation and then extracting the naphthenic components from the hydrogenated product. The extracted naphthenic components are then dehydrogenated and hydrotreated to produce additional hydroaromatic components. These components are combined with the solvent or diluent distillate fraction. The solvent may also contain hydroaromatic constituents prepared by extracting naphthenic components from a heavy naphtha, dehydrogenating the same and then hydrotreating the dehydrogenated product. When the amount of solvent produced in this manner exceeds that required for steady state operation of the liquefaction process a portion of the solvent or diluent distillated fraction will be withdrawn as product.

  15. An automatic flow system for NIR screening analysis of liquefied petroleum gas with respect to propane content.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Hebertty V; Barbosa, Mayara F; Nascimento, Elaine C L; Moreira, Pablo N T; Galvão, Roberto K H; Araújo, Mário C U

    2013-03-15

    This paper proposes a NIR spectrometric method for screening analysis of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) samples. The proposed method is aimed at discriminating samples with low and high propane content, which can be useful for the adjustment of burn settings in industrial applications. A gas flow system was developed to introduce the LPG sample into a NIR flow cell at constant pressure. In addition, a gas chromatographer was employed to determine the propane content of the sample for reference purposes. The results of a principal component analysis, as well as a classification study using SIMCA (soft independent modeling of class analogies), revealed that the samples can be successfully discriminated with respect to propane content by using the NIR spectrum in the range 8100-8800 cm(-1). In addition, by using SPA-LDA (linear discriminant analysis with variables selected by the successive projections algorithm), it was found that perfect discrimination can also be achieved by using only two wavenumbers (8215 and 8324 cm(-1)). This finding may be of value for the design of a dedicated, low-cost instrument for routine analyses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Comparative Study of Chemically and Biologically Synthesized MgO Nanomaterial for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirupathi, Rampelly; Solleti, Goutham; Sreekanth, Tirumala; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Venkateswara Rao, Kalagadda

    2018-07-01

    The exceptional chemical and physical properties of nanostructured materials are extremely suitable for designing new and enhanced sensing devices, particularly gas sensors and biosensors. The present work describes the synthesis of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles through two methods: a green synthesis using aloe vera plant extract and a chemical method using a glycine-based solution combustion route. In a single step, the extracted organic molecules from aloe vera plants were used to reduce metal ions by the green method. MgO nanoparticles were coated onto the interdigital electrode using the drop-drying method. The dynamic gas-sensing characteristics were measured for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) at different concentrations and various temperatures. The MgO nanoparticles were characterized by using x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to determine the size and structure of the particles. The product's functional properties were analyzed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy. We found that the LPG sensing behavior of biologically synthesized MgO registers excellent sensitivity at various operating temperatures.

  17. Numerical studies on sizing/ rating of plate fin heat exchangers for a modified Claude cycle based helium liquefier/ refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, M.; Chakravarty, A.; Atrey, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    Performance of modern helium refrigeration/ liquefaction systems depends significantly on the effectiveness of heat exchangers. Generally, compact plate fin heat exchangers (PFHE) having very high effectiveness (>0.95) are used in such systems. Apart from basic fluid film resistances, various secondary parameters influence the sizing/ rating of these heat exchangers. In the present paper, sizing calculations are performed, using in-house developed numerical models/ codes, for a set of high effectiveness PFHE for a modified Claude cycle based helium liquefier/ refrigerator operating in the refrigeration mode without liquid nitrogen (LN2) pre-cooling. The combined effects of secondary parameters like axial heat conduction through the heat exchanger metal matrix, parasitic heat in-leak from surroundings and variation in the fluid/ metal properties are taken care of in the sizing calculation. Numerical studies are carried out to predict the off-design performance of the PFHEs in the refrigeration mode with LN2 pre-cooling. Iterative process cycle calculations are also carried out to obtain the inlet/ exit state points of the heat exchangers.

  18. A Comparative Study of Chemically and Biologically Synthesized MgO Nanomaterial for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirupathi, Rampelly; Solleti, Goutham; Sreekanth, Tirumala; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Venkateswara Rao, Kalagadda

    2018-03-01

    The exceptional chemical and physical properties of nanostructured materials are extremely suitable for designing new and enhanced sensing devices, particularly gas sensors and biosensors. The present work describes the synthesis of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles through two methods: a green synthesis using aloe vera plant extract and a chemical method using a glycine-based solution combustion route. In a single step, the extracted organic molecules from aloe vera plants were used to reduce metal ions by the green method. MgO nanoparticles were coated onto the interdigital electrode using the drop-drying method. The dynamic gas-sensing characteristics were measured for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) at different concentrations and various temperatures. The MgO nanoparticles were characterized by using x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to determine the size and structure of the particles. The product's functional properties were analyzed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy. We found that the LPG sensing behavior of biologically synthesized MgO registers excellent sensitivity at various operating temperatures.

  19. Study of Vapour Cloud Explosion Impact from Pressure Changes in the Liquefied Petroleum Gas Sphere Tank Storage Leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Z. A.; Suhaimi Yeong, A. F. Mohd; Alias, A. B.; Ahmad, M. A.; AbdulBari Ali, S.

    2018-05-01

    This research was carried out to determine the risk impact of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage facilities, especially in the event of LPG tank explosion. In order to prevent the LPG tank explosion from occurring, it is important to decide the most suitable operating condition for the LPG tank itself, as the explosion of LPG tank could affect and cause extensive damage to the surrounding. The explosion of LPG tank usually occurs due to the rise of pressure in the tank. Thus, in this research, a method called Planas-Cuchi was applied to determine the Peak Side-On Overpressure (Po) of the LPG tank during the occurrence of explosion. Thermodynamic properties of saturated propane, (C3H8) have been chosen as a reference and basis of calculation to determine the parameters such as Explosion Energy (E), Equivalent Mass of TNT (WTNT), and Scaled Overpressure (PS ). A cylindrical LPG tank in Feyzin Refinery, France was selected as a case study in this research and at the end of this research, the most suitable operating pressure of the LPG tank was determined.

  20. On-board measurement of emissions from liquefied petroleum gas, gasoline and diesel powered passenger cars in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Chikhi, Saâdane; Boughedaoui, Ménouèr; Kerbachi, Rabah; Joumard, Robert

    2014-08-01

    On-board measurements of unit emissions of CO, HC, NOx and CO₂ were conducted on 17 private cars powered by different types of fuels including gasoline, dual gasoline-liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), gasoline, and diesel. The tests performed revealed the effect of LPG injection technology on unit emissions and made it possible to compare the measured emissions to the European Artemis emission model. A sequential multipoint injection LPG kit with no catalyst installed was found to be the most efficient pollutant reduction device for all of the pollutants, with the exception of the NOx. Specific test results for a sub-group of LPG vehicles revealed that LPG-fueled engines with no catalyst cannot compete with catalyzed gasoline and diesel engines. Vehicle age does not appear to be a determining parameter with regard to vehicle pollutant emissions. A fuel switch to LPG offers many advantages as far as pollutant emissions are concerned, due to LPG's intrinsic characteristics. However, these advantages are being rapidly offset by the strong development of both gasoline and diesel engine technologies and catalyst converters. The LPG's performance on a chassis dynamometer under real driving conditions was better than expected. The enforcement of pollutant emission standards in developing countries is an important step towards introducing clean technology and reducing vehicle emissions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Studies on the sensing behaviour of nanocrystalline CuGa(2)O(4) towards hydrogen, liquefied petroleum gas and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soumya Kanti; Sarkar, Arpita; Pathak, Amita; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2010-06-15

    In the present article, the gas sensing behaviour of nanocrystalline CuGa(2)O(4) towards H(2), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and NH(3) has been reported for the first time. Nanocrystalline powders of CuGa(2)O(4) having average particle sizes in the range of 30-60nm have been prepared through thermal decomposition of an aqueous precursor solution comprising copper nitrate, gallium nitrate and triethanol amine (TEA), followed by calcination at 750 degrees C for 2h. The synthesized nanocrystalline CuGa(2)O(4) powders have been characterised through X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) study, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area measurement. The synthesized CuGa(2)O(4) having spinel structure with specific surface area of 40m(2)/g exhibits maximum sensitivity towards H(2), LPG, and NH(3) at 350 degrees C.

  2. Commissioning and Operational Experience with 1 kW Class Helium Refrigerator/Liquefier for SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhard, C. P.; Sarkar, B.; Misra, Ruchi; Sahu, A. K.; Tanna, V. L.; Tank, J.; Panchal, P.; Patel, J. C.; Phadke, G. D.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2004-06-01

    The helium refrigerator/liquefier (R/L) for the Steady State Super conducting Tokamak (SST-1) has been developed with very stringent specifications for the different operational modes. The total refrigeration capacity is 650 W at 4.5 K and liquefaction capacity of 200 l/h. A cold circulation pump is used for the forced flow cooling of 300 g/s supercritical helium (SHe) for the magnet system (SCMS). The R/L has been designed also to absorb a 200 W transient heat load of the SCMS. The plant consists of a compressor station, oil removal system, on-line purifier, Main Control Dewar (MCD) with associated heat exchangers, cold circulation pump and warm gas management system. An Integrated Flow Control and Distribution System (IFDCS) has been designed, fabricated and installed for distribution of SHe in the toroidal and poloidal field coils as well as liquid helium for cooling of 10 pairs of current leads. A SCADA based control system has been designed using PLC for R/L as well as IFDCS. The R/L has been commissioned and required parameters were achieved confirming to the process. All the test results and commissioning experiences are discussed in this paper.

  3. 77 FR 50926 - Security Zones; Certain Dangerous Cargo Vessels, Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) vessels, which are vessels carrying anhydrous ammonia, liquefied propane gas... Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida. A CDC vessel is one carrying anhydrous ammonia, liquefied... vessel carrying Anhydrous Ammonia (NH3), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), or Ammonium Nitrate (NH4) and...

  4. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  5. Speeds in school zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    School speed zones are frequently requested traffic controls for school areas, based on the common belief : that if the transportation agency would only install a reduced speed limit, then drivers would no longer : speed through the area. This resear...

  6. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  7. Applications of ISES for coastal zone studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    In contrast to the discipline- and process-oriented topics addressed, coastal zone studies are defined geographically by the special circumstances inherent in the interface between land and water. The characteristics of coastal zones which make them worthy of separate consideration are: (1) the dynamic nature of natural and anthropogenic processes taking place; (2) the relatively restricted spatial domain of the narrow land/water interface; and (3) the large proportion of the Earth's population living within coastal zones, and the resulting extreme pressure on natural and human resources. These characteristics place special constraints and priorities on remote sensing applications, even though the applications themselves bear close relation to those addressed by other elements of this report (e.g., oceans, ice, vegetation/land use). The discussion which follows first describes the suite of remote sensing activities relevant to coastal zone studies. Potential Information Sciences Experiment System (ISES) experiments will then be addressed within two general categories: applications of real-time data transmission and applications of onboard data acquisition and processing.

  8. CFD Investigation of Pollutant Emission in Can-Type Combustor Firing Natural Gas, LNG and Syngas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasini, H.; Fadhil, SSA; Mat Zian, N.; Om, NI

    2016-03-01

    CFD investigation of flow, combustion process and pollutant emission using natural gas, liquefied natural gas and syngas of different composition is carried out. The combustor is a can-type combustor commonly used in thermal power plant gas turbine. The investigation emphasis on the comparison of pollutant emission such in particular CO2, and NOx between different fuels. The numerical calculation for basic flow and combustion process is done using the framework of ANSYS Fluent with appropriate model assumptions. Prediction of pollutant species concentration at combustor exit shows significant reduction of CO2 and NOx for syngas combustion compared to conventional natural gas and LNG combustion.

  9. Optimization of Highway Work Zone Decisions Considering Short-Term and Long-Term Impacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    strategies which can minimize the one-time work zone cost. Considering the complex and combinatorial nature of this optimization problem, a heuristic...combination of lane closure and traffic control strategies which can minimize the one-time work zone cost. Considering the complex and combinatorial nature ...zone) NV # the number of vehicle classes NPV $ Net Present Value p’(t) % Adjusted traffic diversion rate at time t p(t) % Natural diversion rate

  10. Mushy zone modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Smith, Richard N.; Marsh, Steven P.; Kuklinski, Robert

    A key element of mushy zone modeling is the description of the microscopic evolution of the lengthscales within the mushy zone and the influence of macroscopic transport processes. This paper describes some recent progress in developing a mean-field statistical theory of phase coarsening in adiabatic mushy zones. The main theoretical predictions are temporal scaling laws that indicate that average lengthscale increases as time 1/3, a self-similar distribution of mushy zone lengthscales based on spherical solid particle shapes, and kinetic rate constants which provide the dependences of the coarsening process on material parameters and the volume fraction of the solid phase. High precision thermal decay experiments are described which verify aspects of the theory in pure material mushy zones held under adiabatic conditions. The microscopic coarsening theory is then integrated within a macroscopic heat transfer model of one-dimensional alloy solidification, using the Double Integral Method. The method demonstrates an ability to predict the influence of macroscopic heat transfer on the evolution of primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings in Al-Cu alloys. Finally, some suggestions are made for future experimental and theoretical studies required in developing comprehensive solidification processing models.

  11. A classification of morphoseismic features in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciT

    Knox, R.; Stewart, D.

    1993-03-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) contains thousands of surface features distributed over 5,000 square miles in four states. These are attributable to some combination of (1) seismically-induced liquefaction (SIL), (2) secondary deformation, and (3) seismically-induced slope failures. Most of these features were produced by the 1811--12 series of great earthquakes, but some predate and some postdate 1811--12. Subsequent non-seismic factors, such as hydrologically-induced liquefaction (HIL), mechanically-induced liquefaction (MIL), human activities, mass wasting, eolian and fluvial processes have modified all of these features. Morphoseismic features are new landforms produced by earthquakes, or are pre-existing landforms modified by them. Involved aremore » complex interrelationships among several variables, including: (1) intensity and duration of seismic ground motion, (2) surface wave harmonics, (3) depth to water table, (4) depth to basement, (5) particle size, composition, and sorting of sediment making up the liquefied (LZ) and non-liquefied zones (NLZ), (6) topographic parameters, and (7) attitudes of beds and lenses susceptible to liquefaction. Morphoseismic features are depicted as results of a time-flow sequence initiated by primary basement disturbances which produce three major categories of surface response: secondary deformation, liquefaction and slope failure. Nine subcategories incorporate features produced by or resulting in: extruded sand, intruded sand, lateral spreading, faulting, subsidence of large areas, uplift of large areas, altered streams, coherent landslides, and incoherent landslides. The total morphoseismic features identified by this classification are 34 in number.« less

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of noise-induced hearing loss among liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cylinder infusion workers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Ju; Chang, Chin-Kuo

    2009-12-01

    We assessed the exposure levels of noise, estimated prevalence, and identify risk factors of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among male workers with a cross-sectional study in a liquefied petroleum gas cylinder infusion factory in Taipei City. Male in-field workers exposed to noise and administrative controls were enrolled in 2006 and 2007. Face-to-face interviews were applied for demographics, employment history, and drinking/smoking habit. We then performed the measurements on noise levels in field and administration area, and hearing thresholds on study subjects with standard apparatus and protocols. Existence of hearing loss > 25 dBHL for the average of 500 Hz, 1 kHz, and 2 kHz was accordingly determined for NIHL. The effects from noise exposure, predisposing characteristics, employment-related factors, and personal habits to NIHL were estimated by univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. A total of 75 subjects were involved in research and 56.8% of in-field workers had NIHL. Between the in-field and administration groups, hearing thresholds on the worse ear showed significant differences at frequencies of 4 k, 6 k, and 8 kHz with aging considered. Adjusted odds ratio for field noise exposure (OR=99.57, 95% CI: 3.53, 2,808.74) and frequent tea or coffee consumption (OR=0.03, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.51) were found significant. Current study addressed NIHL in a specific industry in Taiwan. Further efforts in minimizing its impact are still in need.

  13. Freeway work zone lane capacity.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this report is a capacity analysis of two long-term urban freeway Work Zones. Work Zone #1 : tapered four mainline lanes to two, using two separate tapers; Work Zone #2 tapered two mainline lanes to one. : Work Zone throughput was analyz...

  14. Dike zones on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.; Sukhanov, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Venusian dike zone structures were identified from Venera 15 and 16 radar images. These include: a zone of subparallel rows centered at 30 deg N, 7 deg E; a system of intersecting bands centered at 67 deg N, 284 deg E; polygonal systems in lavas covering the structural base uplift centered at 47 deg N, 200 deg E; a system of light bands in the region of the ring structure centered at 43 deg N, 13 deg E; and a dike band centered at 27 deg N, 36 deg E.

  15. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  16. Arid Zone Hydrology

    Arid zone hydrology encompasses a wide range of topics and hydro-meteorological and ecological characteristics. Although arid and semi-arid watersheds perform the same functions as those in humid environments, their hydrology and sediment transport characteristics cannot be readily predicted by inf...

  17. Zone of intrusion study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-15

    The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF) performed an analysis using LS-DYNA simulation to investigate the zone of intrusion (ZOI) of an NCHRP Report No. 350 2000p pickup truck when impacting a 40-in. high F-shape parapet. : The ZOI for the 40-in...

  18. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  20. Crossing Comfort Zones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison, D. Soyini

    1993-01-01

    Offers a narrative based on a real event, in the form of a "docustory," describing that moment when teaching worked--when, in an instructional setting, communication was "perfect" or "excellent." Describes how three very different students, in a course on the cultures of women of color, moved beyond comfort zones while working together on a class…

  1. Earthquake hazards on the cascadia subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Heaton, T H; Hartzell, S H

    1987-04-10

    Large subduction earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone pose a potential seismic hazard. Very young oceanic lithosphere (10 million years old) is being subducted beneath North America at a rate of approximately 4 centimeters per year. The Cascadia subduction zone shares many characteristics with subduction zones in southern Chile, southwestern Japan, and Colombia, where comparably young oceanic lithosphere is also subducting. Very large subduction earthquakes, ranging in energy magnitude (M(w)) between 8 and 9.5, have occurred along these other subduction zones. If the Cascadia subduction zone is also storing elastic energy, a sequence of several great earthquakes (M(w) 8) or a giant earthquake (M(w) 9) would be necessary to fill this 1200-kilometer gap. The nature of strong ground motions recorded during subduction earthquakes of M(w) less than 8.2 is discussed. Strong ground motions from even larger earthquakes (M(w) up to 9.5) are estimated by simple simulations. If large subduction earthquakes occur in the Pacific Northwest, relatively strong shaking can be expected over a large region. Such earthquakes may also be accompanied by large local tsunamis.

  2. Thermal analysis of the position of the freezing front around an LNG in-ground storage tank with a heat barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, O.; Tanaka, M.

    A technique of controlling the extent of the freezing zone created by in ground liquefied natural gas storage tanks by installing a heat barrier is described. The freezing conditions around three representative tanks after operating the system were compared.

  3. Evaluation of Ohio work zone speed zones process.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to determine the effectiveness of Ohio Department of Transportation processes for establishing work zone speed zones. Researchers observed motorists speed choice upstream of a...

  4. Modelling of the MEA float zone using accelerometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    During a floating zone experiment involving the growth of indium on a recent orbiter mission, (STS 32) oscillation of the zone shapes were observed to occur in response to the background acceleration. An understanding of the nature of the response of the zone shape to forced (g-jitter) oscillations and predictions of its impact on future experiments is of great interest not only to the PI's but to other commercial and academic investigators who plan to fly similar experiments in the orbiter and on space station. Motivated by this, a 15 month study was undertaken to analyze the nature of the g-sensitivity of the STS 32 floating zone crystal growth experiment. Numerical models were used to describe the time-dependent free surface motion of the zone as it responds to the spacecraft residual acceleration. Relevant experimental data concerning the acceleration environment was obtained from the Honeywell in Space Accelerometer (HISA) investigators through MSFC's ACAP program and processed and analyzed. For the indium floating zone experiment, a series of calculations were made using time-dependent axial accelerations g(t). The form of g(t) included simple sinusoidal disturbances as well as actual data (subject to appropriate filtering) measured on the STS 32 mission. Focus was on the calculation of the response of the free surface of the zone as well as the internal flows and internal heat transfer. The influence of solidification on the response of the zone shape was also examined but found to be negligible.

  5. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  6. Natural Childbirth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Natural Childbirth KidsHealth / For Parents / Natural Childbirth What's in this ... the pain, extremely empowering and rewarding. About Natural Childbirth Natural childbirth is a "low-tech" way of ...

  7. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOEpatents

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  8. Crash characteristics at work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    Work zones tend to cause hazardous conditions for drivers and construction workers since they generate conflicts between construction activities and traffic. A clear understanding of the characteristics of work zone crashes will enhance the selection...

  9. Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System water quality modeling and decision support system designed for environmental impact assessment of mixing zones resulting from wastewater discharge from point sources

  10. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  11. Work zone intrusion alarm effectiveness.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-09-01

    16. Abstract : The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) commissioned a study to evaluate how : effective a work zone safety device known as the SonoBlaster! Work Zone Intrusion Alarm would be : in protecting maintenance workers fro...

  12. Trojans in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Dvorak, Rudolf; Erdi, Balint; Sándor, Zsolt

    2005-10-01

    With the aid of numerical experiments we examined the dynamical stability of fictitious terrestrial planets in 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jovian-like planets of extrasolar planetary systems. In our stability study of the so-called "Trojan" planets in the habitable zone, we used the restricted three-body problem with different mass ratios of the primary bodies. The application of the three-body problem showed that even massive Trojan planets can be stable in the 1:1 mean motion resonance. From the 117 extrasolar planetary systems only 11 systems were found with one giant planet in the habitable zone. Out of this sample set we chose four planetary systems--HD17051, HD27442, HD28185, and HD108874--for further investigation. To study the orbital behavior of the stable zone in the different systems, we used direct numerical computations (Lie Integration Method) that allowed us to determine the escape times and the maximum eccentricity of the fictitious "Trojan planets."

  13. Production of acetone butanol (AB) from liquefied corn starch, a commercial substrate, using Clostridium beijerinckii coupled with product recovery by gas stripping.

    PubMed

    Ezeji, Thaddeus C; Qureshi, Nasib; Blaschek, Hans P

    2007-12-01

    A potential industrial substrate (liquefied corn starch; LCS) has been employed for successful acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) production. Fermentation of LCS (60 g l(-1)) in a batch process resulted in the production of 18.4 g l(-1) ABE, comparable to glucose: yeast extract based medium (control experiment, 18.6 g l(-1) ABE). A batch fermentation of LCS integrated with product recovery resulted in 92% utilization of sugars present in the feed. When ABE was recovered by gas stripping (to relieve inhibition) from the fed-batch reactor fed with saccharified liquefied cornstarch (SLCS), 81.3 g l(-1) ABE was produced compared to 18.6 g l(-1) (control). In this integrated system, 225.8 g l(-1) SLCS sugar (487 % of control) was consumed. In the absence of product removal, it is not possible for C. beijerinckii BA101 to utilize more than 46 g l(-1) glucose. A combination of fermentation of this novel substrate (LCS) to butanol together with product recovery by gas stripping may economically benefit this fermentation.

  14. Variations in the kinematics of deformation along the Zagros inclined transpression zone, Iran: Implications for defining a curved inclined transpression zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Partabian, Abdolreza; Faghih, Ali

    2013-03-01

    The combination of inclined collision and plate boundary shape can control the nature of deformation and the sense of shear along a transpression zone. The present study investigated the effects of a boundary zone with curvilinear shape along a transpression zone on the kinematics of deformation. The kinematics of the Zagros transpression zone varies with the orientation of the zone boundary. Detailed structural and microstructural studies showed sinistral sense of shear on the southeastern part of the Zagros inclined transpression zone (Fars Arc), but dextral sense of shear on the northwestern part of the zone. It is inferred that the both senses of shear were developed coevally under a bulk general shear, regional-scale deformation along a curved inclined transpression miming the shape of the Fras Arc of the Zagros and the reentrant of the Bandar Abbas Syntaxis. The Zagros transpression zone formed by inclined continental collision between the Afro-Arabian continent and Iranian microcontinent.

  15. Monitoring of spatiotemporal patterns of Net and Gross Primary Productivity (NPP & GPP) and their ratios (NPP/GPP) derived from MODIS data: assessment natural drivers and their effects on NDVI anomalies in arid and semi-arid zones of Central Asia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aralova, Dildora; Jarihani, Ben; Khujanazarov, Timur; Toderich, Kristina; Gafurov, Dilshod; Gismatulina, Liliya

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that precipitation anomalies and raising of temperature trends were deteriorate affected on large-scale of vegetation surveys in Central Asia (CA). Nowadays, remote sensing techniques can provide estimation of Net and Gross Primary Productivity (NPP & GPP) for regional and global scales, and selected zones in CA (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan) dominated by C4 plants (biomes) what it reveals more accurately simulate C4 carbon. The estimation of NPP & GPP from source (MOD17A2/A3) would be beneficial to determine natural driver factors, whether on rangeland ecosystem is a carbon sink or source, such as a vast area of the selected zones incorporates exacerbate regional drought-risk factors nowadays. Generally, we have combined last available NPP & GPP (2000-2015) with 1 km resolution from MODIS, with investigation of long-term vegetation patterns under Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) with 8 km resolution from AVHRR-GIMMS 3g sources (2001-2015) within aim to estimate potential values of rangeland ecosystems. Interaction ratios of NPP/GPP are integrating more accurately describe carbon sink process under natural or anthropogenic factors, specifically last results of NDVI trends were described as decreasing trends due to climate anomalies, besides the eastern and northern parts of CA (mostly boreal forest zones) where accumulated or indicated of raising trends of NDVI in last three years (2012-2015). Results revealed that, in CA were averaged annually value NDVI ranges from 0.19-0.21; (Kyrgyzstan: 0.23-0.26; Kazakhstan: 0.21-0.24; Tajikistan: 0.19-0.21); and resting countries as low NDVI accumulated areas were Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan ranges 0.13-0.16; Comparing datasets of GPP given the response dynamic change structures of NDVI values and explicit carbon uptake (CO2) in arid ecosystems and average GPPyearlyin CA ranges 2.42 kg C/m2; including to Tajikistan, Uzbekistan (3.09 kg C/m2) and

  16. Temporal Hyporheic Zone Response to Water Table Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Malzone, Jonathan M; Anseeuw, Sierra K; Lowry, Christopher S; Allen-King, Richelle

    2016-03-01

    Expansion and contraction of the hyporheic zone due to temporal hydrologic changes between stream and riparian aquifer influence the biogeochemical cycling capacity of streams. Theoretical studies have quantified the control of groundwater discharge on the depth of the hyporheic zone; however, observations of temporal groundwater controls are limited. In this study, we develop the concept of groundwater-dominated differential hyporheic zone expansion to explain the temporal control of groundwater discharge on the hyporheic zone in a third-order stream reach flowing through glacially derived terrain typical of the Great Lakes region. We define groundwater-dominated differential expansion of the hyporheic zone as: differing rates and magnitudes of hyporheic zone expansion in response to seasonal vs. storm-related water table fluctuation. Specific conductance and vertical hydraulic gradient measurements were used to map changes in the hyporheic zone during seasonal water table decline and storm events. Planar and riffle beds were monitored in order to distinguish the cause of increasing hyporheic zone depth. Planar bed seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone was of a greater magnitude and longer in duration (weeks to months) than storm event expansion (hours to days). In contrast, the hyporheic zone beneath the riffle bed exhibited minimal expansion in response to seasonal groundwater decline compared to storm related expansion. Results indicated that fluctuation in the riparian water table controlled seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone along the planar bed. This groundwater induced hyporheic zone expansion could increase the potential for biogeochemical cycling and natural attenuation. © 2015, National Ground Water Association.

  17. 18 CFR 1304.407 - Development within flood control storage zones of TVA reservoirs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... zones of TVA reservoirs. (a) Activities involving development within the flood control storage zone on TVA reservoirs will be reviewed to determine if the proposed activity qualifies as a repetitive action... (v) The nature and significance of any economic and/or natural resource benefits that would be...

  18. Fibonacci-like zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shubo; Liu, Mengsi; Xia, Tian; Tao, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    We present a new family of diffractive lenses, Fibonacci-like zone plates, generated with a modified Fibonacci sequence. The focusing properties and the evolution of transverse diffraction pattern for the Fibonacci-like zone plates have been analytically investigated both theoretically and experimentally and compared with the corresponding Fresnel zone plates of the same resolution. The results demonstrate that the Fibonacci-like zone plates possess the self-similar property and the multifocal behavior. Furthermore, the Fibonacci-like zone plate beams are found to possess the self-reconstruction property, and would be promising for 3D optical tweezers, laser machining, and optical imaging.

  19. The generalized mean zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; Cheng, Shubo; Tao, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    In this paper a generalized mean zone plate is proposed, which generates twin foci located at the positions satisfying the expression of the generalized mean, which includes the m-golden mean, precious mean, and so on. The generalized mean zone plate can be designed to generate twin foci with various position ratios. The diffraction properties of the generalized mean zone plates have been investigated with simulations and experiments. The results show that the ratio of the positions of the twin foci for the generalized mean zone plate can be designed with the selected zone plate parameters.

  20. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Crepon, M.; Monget, J. M.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Frouin, R.; Cassanet, J.; Wald, L.

    1980-01-01

    The various thermal gradients in the coastal zones of France were mapped with regard to natural phenomena and man made thermal effluents. The mesoscale thermal features of the English Channel, the Bay of Biscay, and the northwestern Mediterranean Sea were also studied. The evolution of the thermal gradients generated by the main estuaries of the French coastal zones was investigated along with the modeling of diurnal heating of the sea surface and its influence on the oceanic surface layers.