Science.gov

Sample records for zone spray booth

  1. Portable Spray Booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Timothy D.; Bardwell, Micheal J.

    1996-01-01

    Portable spray booth provides for controlled application of coating materials with high solvent contents. Includes contoured shroud and carbon filter bed limiting concentration of fumes in vicinity. Designed to substitute spraying for brush application of solvent-based adhesive prior to installing rubber waterproof seals over joints between segments of solid-fuel rocket motor. With minor adjustments and modifications, used to apply other solvent-based adhesives, paints, and like.

  2. Miniature spray-painting booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fee, K. W.

    1970-01-01

    Transparent spray booth provides method for quality painting and repair of surfaces in clean room or other specialized environments. Overspray and virtually all contaminating vapor and odor can be eliminated. Touch-up painting is achieved with spray gun.

  3. M-52 spray booth qualification test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The procedures, performance, and results obtained from the M-52 spray booth qualification test are documented. The test was conducted at Thiokol Corporation, Space Operations, M-52 Inert Parts Preparation facility. The purpose of this testing sequence was to ensure the spray booth would produce flight qualified hardware. The testing sequence was conducted in two series. The first series was conducted under CTP-0142, Revision 1. The second series was conducted in accordance with CTP-0142, Revision 2. The test sequence started with CTP-0142, Revision 1. The series consisted of the contamination removal test and the performance test. The contamination removal test was used to assess the Teflon level in the spray booth. The performance test consisted of painting and Chemloking a forward dome inside the spray booth per flight procedures. During the performance test, two sets of witness panels (case/insulation and steel/epoxy/steel) were prepared and pull tested. The CTP-0142, Revision 2, series of testing consisted of re-testing the steel/epoxy/steel witness panels. The pull tests analysis indicates the results of the tensile tests were comparable to the systems tunnel witness panel database. The exposed panel set and the control panel set average tensile values were above the 1-basis lower limits established on the systems tunnel witness panel database. It is recommended that the M-52 spray booth be qualified for producing flight hardware.

  4. PAINT SPRAY BOOTH DESIGN USING RECIRCULATION/PARTITIONING VENTILATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many spray painting facility operators have been attempting to reduce the discharge of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from paint spray booths to the atmosphere. Some have been able to convert to lower VOC containing paints and coatings such as powder coating, waterborne coatin...

  5. STRATIFICATION OF PARTICULATE AND VOC POLLUTANTS IN PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses flow management as part of a joint EPA/U.S. Air Force program on emissions from paint spray booths. he goal of the program is to identify and develop efficienct and economical emissions control concepts for this source. low management is one potential solution...

  6. PAINT SPRAY BOOTH MODIFICATIONS FOR RECIRCULATION VENTILATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The control of emissions from spray painting operations has historically been cost prohibitive, due to the high exhaust flow rates coupled with low volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) Concentrations. Past studies, conducted by the U.S. EPA and U.S. ...

  7. USERS GUIDE FOR THE CONVERSION OF NAVY PAINT SPRAY BOOTH PARTICULATE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEMS FROM WET TO DRY OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a guide or convrting U.S. Navy paint spray booth particulate emission control systems from wet to dry operation. The use of water curtains for air pollution control of paint spray booths is considered a major source of water and solid waste pol-lution from industria...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart IIIi... - Determination of Capture Efficiency of Automobile and Light-Duty Truck Spray Booth Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... coating, i. 2.5.1You must weigh the blank panel. (Same as in bake oven panel test.) The mass of the blank... spray booth zones being tested. (Different than bake oven panel test.) This weighing must be conducted... and before the bake oven where the coating applied to the panel is cured, 2.5.5.2All of the flash-off...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart IIIi... - Determination of Capture Efficiency of Automobile and Light-Duty Truck Spray Booth Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... coating, i. 2.5.1You must weigh the blank panel. (Same as in bake oven panel test.) The mass of the blank... spray booth zones being tested. (Different than bake oven panel test.) This weighing must be conducted... and before the bake oven where the coating applied to the panel is cured, 2.5.5.2All of the flash-off...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart IIIi... - Determination of Capture Efficiency of Automobile and Light-Duty Truck Spray Booth Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... coating, i. 2.5.1You must weigh the blank panel. (Same as in bake oven panel test.) The mass of the blank... spray booth zones being tested. (Different than bake oven panel test.) This weighing must be conducted... and before the bake oven where the coating applied to the panel is cured, 2.5.5.2All of the flash-off...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart IIIi... - Determination of Capture Efficiency of Automobile and Light-Duty Truck Spray Booth Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... coating, i. 2.5.1You must weigh the blank panel. (Same as in bake oven panel test.) The mass of the blank... spray booth zones being tested. (Different than bake oven panel test.) This weighing must be conducted... and before the bake oven where the coating applied to the panel is cured, 2.5.5.2All of the flash-off...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart IIIi... - Determination of Capture Efficiency of Automobile and Light-Duty Truck Spray Booth Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... coating, i. 2.5.1You must weigh the blank panel. (Same as in bake oven panel test.) The mass of the blank... spray booth zones being tested. (Different than bake oven panel test.) This weighing must be conducted... and before the bake oven where the coating applied to the panel is cured, 2.5.5.2All of the flash-off...

  13. EVALUATION OF INNOVATIVE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND AND HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR U.S. AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of an evaluation of carbon paper adsorption catalytic incineration (CPACI) and fluidized-bed catalytic incineration (FBCI) as control technologies to reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from paint spray booths.

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF SPLIT-FLOW VENTILATION AND RECIRCULATION AS FLOW-REDUCTION METHODS IN AN AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTH - VOLUME II. APPENDICES D-J

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and ...

  15. DEMONSTRATION OF A PAINT SPRAY BOOTH EMISSION CONTROL STRATEGY USING RECIRCULATION/PARTITIONING & UV/OZONE POLLUTION EMISSION CONTROL - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes in detail the source testing, construction, and data reduction/analysis activities that comprise the three phases of a technology demonstration program. Phase I consisted of a detailed baseline evaluation of several paint spray booths operated at the Barstow,...

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF SPLIT-FLOW VENTILATION AND RECIR CULATION AS FLOW-REDUCTION METHODS IN AN AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTH - VOLUME I. MAIN REPORT, APPENDICES A-C

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and ...

  17. COST EFFECTIVE VOC EMISSION CONTROL STARTEGIES FOR MILITARY, AEROSPACE,AND INDUSTRIAL PAINT SPRAY BOOTH OPERATIONS: COMBINING IMPROVED VENTILATION SYSTEMS WITH INNOVATIVE, LOW COST EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a full-scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified for recirculation ventilation; the booth exhaust streams are vented to an innovative volatile organic compound (VOC) emission control system having extremely low operating costs. ...

  18. Toll-Booth Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    NASA's Technology Application Team at Stanford Research Institute searched available information and suggested a transfer of clean-room technology employing the use of the same laminar flow techniques found in environmental control systems of clean rooms used for contamination-free assembly of precision aerospace equipment. That information, from technology originally developed by NASA and the Energy Research & Development Administration was incorporated in the design of a prototype toll booth purifier. The draft-free design includes a "diffusor", which blows clean air out the toll booth doorway, thus retarding the infiltration of contaminated air. The net effect is a decrease in the toll collector's inhalation of exhaust fumes. The Washington Department of Highways installed the prototype system in a toll booth at the Evergreen Point Bridge near Seattle. After a successful two-year test, the department now has equipped all 10 of the bridge's toll booths with the air purifiers.

  19. Auditory Processing Testing: In the Booth versus Outside the Booth.

    PubMed

    Lucker, Jay R

    2017-09-01

    Many audiologists believe that auditory processing testing must be carried out in a soundproof booth. This expectation is especially a problem in places such as elementary schools. Research comparing pure-tone thresholds obtained in sound booths compared to quiet test environments outside of these booths does not support that belief. Auditory processing testing is generally carried out at above threshold levels, and therefore may be even less likely to require a soundproof booth. The present study was carried out to compare test results in soundproof booths versus quiet rooms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether auditory processing tests can be administered in a quiet test room rather than in the soundproof test suite. The outcomes would identify that audiologists can provide auditory processing testing for children under various test conditions including quiet rooms at their school. A battery of auditory processing tests was administered at a test level equivalent to 50 dB HL through headphones. The same equipment was used for testing in both locations. Twenty participants identified with normal hearing were included in this study, ten having no auditory processing concerns and ten exhibiting auditory processing problems. All participants underwent a battery of tests, both inside the test booth and outside the booth in a quiet room. Order of testing (inside versus outside) was counterbalanced. Participants were first determined to have normal hearing thresholds for tones and speech. Auditory processing tests were recorded and presented from an HP EliteBook laptop computer with noise-canceling headphones attached to a y-cord that not only presented the test stimuli to the participants but also allowed monitor headphones to be worn by the evaluator. The same equipment was used inside as well as outside the booth. No differences were found for each auditory processing measure as a function of the test setting or the order in which testing was done

  20. Performance evaluation of mobile downflow booths for reducing airborne particles in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Lo, Li-Ming; Hocker, Braden; Steltz, Austin E; Kremer, John; Feng, H Amy

    2017-11-01

    Compared to other common control measures, the downflow booth is a costly engineering control used to contain airborne dust or particles. The downflow booth provides unidirectional filtered airflow from the ceiling, entraining released particles away from the workers' breathing zone, and delivers contained airflow to a lower level exhaust for removing particulates by filtering media. In this study, we designed and built a mobile downflow booth that is capable of quick assembly and easy size change to provide greater flexibility and particle control for various manufacturing processes or tasks. An experimental study was conducted to thoroughly evaluate the control performance of downflow booths used for removing airborne particles generated by the transfer of powdered lactose between two containers. Statistical analysis compared particle reduction ratios obtained from various test conditions including booth size (short, regular, or extended), supply air velocity (0.41 and 0.51 m/s or 80 and 100 feet per minute, fpm), powder transfer location (near or far from the booth exhaust), and inclusion or exclusion of curtains at the booth entrance. Our study results show that only short-depth downflow booths failed to protect the worker performing powder transfer far from the booth exhausts. Statistical analysis shows that better control performance can be obtained with supply air velocity of 0.51 m/s (100 fpm) than with 0.41 m/s (80 fpm) and that use of curtains for downflow booths did not improve their control performance.

  1. 29 CFR 1910.107 - Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... finishing material. (5) Dry spray booth. A spray booth not equipped with a water washing system as described in subparagraph (4) of this paragraph. A dry spray booth may be equipped with (i) distribution or... it enters the exhaust duct; or (ii) overspray dry filters to minimize dusts; or (iii) overspray dry...

  2. 29 CFR 1910.107 - Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... finishing material. (5) Dry spray booth. A spray booth not equipped with a water washing system as described in subparagraph (4) of this paragraph. A dry spray booth may be equipped with (i) distribution or... it enters the exhaust duct; or (ii) overspray dry filters to minimize dusts; or (iii) overspray dry...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.107 - Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... finishing material. (5) Dry spray booth. A spray booth not equipped with a water washing system as described in subparagraph (4) of this paragraph. A dry spray booth may be equipped with (i) distribution or... it enters the exhaust duct; or (ii) overspray dry filters to minimize dusts; or (iii) overspray dry...

  4. Environmental lead exposure to toll booth workers in Hong Kong

    SciT

    Tan, T.C.; Wong, L.T.L.; Lam, C.W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of workers in the Lion Rock Tunnel toll booths was conducted, as they were regarded as a high risk group in lead exposure due to high density of vehicular traffic. The exposure of the workers to lead was determined by continuous sapling of air around the breathing zone of workers inside the booths. Blood lead concentration of 50 workers showed a mean of 0.65 {mu}mol/L and the mean urine lead concentration was 0.14 {mu}mol/L. Other tests, such as urinary amino-levulinic acid (ALA), erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and hemoglobin concentration (Hb), were also preformed. The blood lead concentrations andmore » other biological parameters of the toll-booth workers were acceptable and may be attributed to the recent legislation to lower the lead content in petrol and to the good preventive measures taken by the management.« less

  5. Time variation in the reaction-zone structure of two-phase spray detonations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. H.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the time-varying detonation structure in a monodisperse spray is presented. The theory identifies experimentally observed reaction-zone overpressures as deriving from blast waves formed therein by the explosive ignition of the spray droplets, and follows in time the motion, change in strength, and interactions of these blast waves with one another, and with the leading shock. The results are compared with experimental data by modeling the motion of a finite-size circular pressure transducer through the theoretical data field in an x-t space.

  6. Durum wheat seedlings in saline conditions: Salt spray versus root-zone salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanò, Carmelina; Bottega, Stefania

    2016-02-01

    Salinity is an increasingly serious problem with a strong negative impact on plant productivity. Though many studies have been made on salt stress induced by high NaCl concentrations in the root-zone, few data concern the response of plants to saline aerosol, one of the main constraints in coastal areas. In order to study more in depth wheat salinity tolerance and to evaluate damage and antioxidant response induced by various modes of salt application, seedlings of Triticum turgidum ssp. durum, cv. Cappelli were treated for 2 and 7 days with salt in the root-zone (0, 50 and 200 mM NaCl) or with salt spray (400 mM NaCl + 0 or 200 mM NaCl in the root-zone). Seedlings accumulated Na+ in their leaves and therefore part of their ability to tolerate high salinity seems to be due to Na+ leaf tissue tolerance. Durum wheat, confirmed as a partially tolerant plant, shows a higher damage under airborne salinity, when both an increase in TBA-reactive material (indicative of lipid peroxidation) and a decrease in root growth were recorded. A different antioxidant response was activated, depending on the type of salt supply. Salt treatment induced a depletion of the reducing power of both ascorbate and glutathione while the highest contents of proline were detected under salt spray conditions. In the short term catalase and ascorbate peroxidase co-operated with glutathione peroxidase in the scavenging of hydrogen peroxide, in particular in salt spray-treated plants. From our data, the durum wheat cultivar Cappelli seems to be sensitive to airborne salinity.

  7. Navy Paint Booth Conversion Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    wastewater, particulate 4 filters, wet scrubbers 20 ABSTRACT (C---I,-H - -,,o , , de If ... n &,d1 * d fvII 1, bI-,k -m This study is an evaluation of...scrubber (water-wall) configuration, are responsible for the production of large amounts of noxious wastewater and gelatinous paint sludge, both forming...their replacement can be quite low, and they may be used in either light, moderate, or high production rate booths. Accordion pleated paper sheet

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SPRAY BOOTH FILTER SYSTEM EFFICIENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes results of research conducted to determine the capability of various dry paint overspray arrestor systems to capture particles as small as about 1 micrometer in surface diameter. The testing used on optical particle counter to determine the concentration of p...

  9. Performance of thermal sprayed aluminium coatings in the splash zone and for riser service

    SciT

    Fischer, K.P.; Rosbrook, T.; Thomason, W.H.

    1994-12-31

    Historically, the coatings used in the splash zone have been either heavy duty coal tar epoxy or a glassflake epoxy. In 1982 Conoco justified a minimum 20 year service life for a sealed thermal sprayed aluminium (TSA) coating for the Hutton TLP risers and tethers. In 1984 the Hutton TLP was installed with 200 microns thickness TSA as the corrosion protection coating and without adding a corrosion allowance. After eight years service the TSA coating on the production risers and tethers is still in good condition. It was noted that the splash zone area was indistinguishable from the remainder ofmore » the inspected components. However, there was a noticeable difference between the production risers and the tethers. The tethers having a vinyl sealer showed a blistered surface while the risers with a silicone sealer did not show any blistering. No corrosion has been observed underneath any of the blisters. The importance of adequate sealers in connection with blistering has been documented by testing. The excellent long term performance of TSA coating in the splash zone has been further documented by the results of field studies published in the last few years. These experiences indicate that TSA coatings properly applied and with the use of specific sealer systems may provide a service life in excess of 30 years with no required maintenance.« less

  10. Spray-on tanning.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Cindy J

    2005-01-01

    The modern formulation of dihydroxyacetone (DHA), the only sunless tanning solution approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is combined with bronzers and moisturizers to deliver a cosmetically acceptable skin color and a natural-looking tan without ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Spray-on tanning products, which deliver this formulation evenly to achieve a full body tan, may be applied in a tanning booth, airbrushed on by a technician, or sprayed on at home, and they appear to offer a generally safe alternative for patients who seek a suntanned appearance.

  11. Visitor center museum display, detail of diorama booth with raised ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Visitor center museum display, detail of diorama booth with raised step; door to electrical door panel at left - Wright Brothers National Memorial Visitor Center, Highway 158, Kill Devil Hills, Dare County, NC

  12. INTERIOR OF ROOF STRUCTURE LOOKING FROM TOP OF PROJECTION BOOTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ROOF STRUCTURE LOOKING FROM TOP OF PROJECTION BOOTH, VIEW FACING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Theater, Yorktown Avenue between Wasp & Saipan Streets, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  13. DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 2016 National Training Conference Exhibit Booths and Poster Displays

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exhibit Booths and Poster Displays for the 2016 National Training Conference on the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and Environmental Conditions in Communities. Identifies presentation topics and speakers for October 19 and 20.

  15. 40 CFR 429.160 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and... Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray booth(s) or...

  16. 40 CFR 429.170 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and... Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray booth(s) or with...

  17. 40 CFR 429.170 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and... Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray booth(s) or with...

  18. 40 CFR 429.170 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and... Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray booth(s) or with...

  19. 40 CFR 429.160 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and... Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray booth(s) or...

  20. 40 CFR 429.160 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and... Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray booth(s) or...

  1. 40 CFR 429.160 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and Fixture... Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray booth(s) or...

  2. 40 CFR 429.170 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and Fixture...; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray booth(s) or with laundry...

  3. 40 CFR 429.170 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and Fixture...; description of the wood furniture and fixture production with water wash spray booth(s) or with laundry...

  4. 40 CFR 429.160 - Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture and Fixture... Applicability; description of the wood furniture and fixture production without water wash spray booth(s) or...

  5. TOILET ROOM IN THE PROJECTION BOOTH. NOTE THE HEXAGONAL FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOILET ROOM IN THE PROJECTION BOOTH. NOTE THE HEXAGONAL FLOOR TILES WITH ACCENTED BORDER AND GLAZED WALL TILES, ALL OF WHICH WERE ORIGINAL/ TYPICAL IN TOILET ROOMS IN THIS FACILITY VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Theater, Hornet Avenue between Enterprise & Pokomoke Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Postscript: Plaut and Booth's (2006) New Simulations--What Have We Learned?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besner, Derek; Borowsky, Ron

    2006-01-01

    This paper comments on the article by Plaut and Booth. Plaut and Booth's first simulation shows that there is essentially perfect discrimination between word and nonwords sharing the same orthographic structure when the simulation is carried out in the way we suggested. We take the view that Plaut and Booth's new simulation work settles little…

  7. Solvent exposure and related work practices amongst apprentice spray painters in automotive body repair workshops.

    PubMed

    Winder, C; Turner, P J

    1992-08-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary study into the health effects of solvents, workplace assessments and airborne solvent vapour monitoring was conducted in 46 spray painting workshops in the Sydney metropolitan area. Breathing-zone samples were taken from 50 apprentices and 14 experienced spray painters. An interview schedule was developed to obtain information about the use of acrylic or two-pack paint systems, the use of engineering controls, the use of personal protective equipment and the availability of material safety data sheets. Contaminants typical of the chemical products used in this industry were encountered (aromatic hydrocarbons, C5-C7 aliphatic hydrocarbons, ketones, esters). The results of airborne solvent monitoring indicate a total solvent exposure in the range 1-99% of a combined Worksafe Australia exposure standard, with a mean of 19%. Solvent exposure was highest when spraying acrylic paint in the open workshop and lowest when spraying two pack paint in a spray booth. Much the same personal protective equipment was available in all workshops, but wide variation in its use was observed. Material safety data sheets were not observed in any of the workshops.

  8. Air cleaning performance of a new environmentally controlled primary crusher operator booth.

    PubMed

    Organiscak, J A; Cecala, A B; Zimmer, J A; Holen, B; Baregi, J R

    2016-02-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) cooperated with 3M Company in the design and testing of a new environmentally controlled primary crusher operator booth at the company's Wausau granite quarry near Wausau, WI. This quarry had an older crusher booth without a central heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system, and without an air filtration and pressurization system. A new replacement operator booth was designed and installed by 3M based on design considerations from past NIOSH research on enclosed cab filtration systems. NIOSH conducted pre-testing of the old booth and post-testing of the new booth to assess the new filtration and pressurization system's effectiveness in controlling airborne dusts and particulates. The booth's dust and particulate control effectiveness is described by its protection factor, expressed as a ratio of the outside to inside concentrations measured during testing. Results indicate that the old booth provided negligible airborne respirable dust protection and low particulate protection from the outside environment. The newly installed booth provided average respirable dust protection factors from 2 to 25 over five shifts of dust sampling with occasional worker ingress and egress from the booth, allowing some unfiltered contaminants to enter the enclosure. Shorter-term particle count testing outside and inside the booth under near-steady-state conditions, with no workers entering or exiting the booth, resulted in protection factors from 35 to 127 on 0.3- to 1.0-μm respirable size particulates under various HVAC airflow operating conditions.

  9. What Tension between Fidelity and Cultural Adaptation? A Reaction to Marsiglia and Booth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, McClain; Torres, Luis R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a reaction to Marsiglia and Booths' paper, "Cultural Adaptation of Interventions in Real Practice Settings." In their paper, Marsiglia and Booth present the difficulty of implementing and replicating evidence-supported treatments, such as randomized clinical trials, among culturally diverse clients. Practitioners working in…

  10. Pipeline active filter utilizing a booth type multiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, Robert (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Multiplier units of the modified Booth decoder and carry-save adder/full adder combination are used to implement a pipeline active filter wherein pixel data is processed sequentially, and each pixel need only be accessed once and multiplied by a predetermined number of weights simultaneously, one multiplier unit for each weight. Each multiplier unit uses only one row of carry-save adders, and the results are shifted to less significant multiplier positions and one row of full adders to add the carry to the sum in order to provide the correct binary number for the product Wp. The full adder is also used to add this product Wp to the sum of products .SIGMA.Wp from preceding multiply units. If m.times.m multiplier units are pipelined, the system would be capable of processing a kernel array of m.times.m weighting factors.

  11. 29 CFR 1917.153 - Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accumulate on electrical installations, wiring shall be in rigid conduit or in boxes containing no taps... pressure. (12) Wiring, motors and equipment in a spray booth shall be of approved explosion-proof type for..., Hazardous Locations. Wiring, motors and equipment within 20 feet (6.1m) of any interior spraying area and...

  12. Air cleaning performance of a new environmentally controlled primary crusher operator booth

    PubMed Central

    Organiscak, J.A.; Cecala, A.B.; Zimmer, J.A.; Holen, B.; Baregi, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) cooperated with 3M Company in the design and testing of a new environmentally controlled primary crusher operator booth at the company’s Wausau granite quarry near Wausau, WI. This quarry had an older crusher booth without a central heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system, and without an air filtration and pressurization system. A new replacement operator booth was designed and installed by 3M based on design considerations from past NIOSH research on enclosed cab filtration systems. NIOSH conducted pre-testing of the old booth and post-testing of the new booth to assess the new filtration and pressurization system’s effectiveness in controlling airborne dusts and particulates. The booth’s dust and particulate control effectiveness is described by its protection factor, expressed as a ratio of the outside to inside concentrations measured during testing. Results indicate that the old booth provided negligible airborne respirable dust protection and low particulate protection from the outside environment. The newly installed booth provided average respirable dust protection factors from 2 to 25 over five shifts of dust sampling with occasional worker ingress and egress from the booth, allowing some unfiltered contaminants to enter the enclosure. Shorter-term particle count testing outside and inside the booth under near-steady-state conditions, with no workers entering or exiting the booth, resulted in protection factors from 35 to 127 on 0.3- to 1.0-μm respirable size particulates under various HVAC airflow operating conditions. PMID:26937052

  13. 29 CFR 1926.66 - Criteria for design and construction of spray booths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the conveyor carrying goods through the high voltage field. (iii) Occurrence of a ground or of an... portable electrical infrared drying apparatus when conforming with the following: (i) Interior (especially...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.66 - Criteria for design and construction of spray booths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the conveyor carrying goods through the high voltage field. (iii) Occurrence of a ground or of an... portable electrical infrared drying apparatus when conforming with the following: (i) Interior (especially...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.66 - Criteria for design and construction of spray booths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the conveyor carrying goods through the high voltage field. (iii) Occurrence of a ground or of an... portable electrical infrared drying apparatus when conforming with the following: (i) Interior (especially...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.66 - Criteria for design and construction of spray booths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... are permanently attached to their bases, supports, or reciprocators, shall be deemed to comply with... that a safe isolation of the process is maintained from plant storage or personnel. Such railings...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.66 - Criteria for design and construction of spray booths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... are permanently attached to their bases, supports, or reciprocators, shall be deemed to comply with... that a safe isolation of the process is maintained from plant storage or personnel. Such railings...

  18. Pure-tone audiometry outside a sound booth using earphone attentuation, integrated noise monitoring, and automation.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, De Wet; Matthysen, Cornelia; Eikelboom, Robert H; Clark, Jackie L; Hall, James W

    2015-01-01

    Accessibility of audiometry is hindered by the cost of sound booths and shortage of hearing health personnel. This study investigated the validity of an automated mobile diagnostic audiometer with increased attenuation and real-time noise monitoring for clinical testing outside a sound booth. Attenuation characteristics and reference ambient noise levels for the computer-based audiometer (KUDUwave) was evaluated alongside the validity of environmental noise monitoring. Clinical validity was determined by comparing air- and bone-conduction thresholds obtained inside and outside the sound booth (23 subjects). Twenty-three normal-hearing subjects (age range, 20-75 years; average age 35.5) and a sub group of 11 subjects to establish test-retest reliability. Improved passive attenuation and valid environmental noise monitoring was demonstrated. Clinically, air-conduction thresholds inside and outside the sound booth, corresponded within 5 dB or less > 90% of instances (mean absolute difference 3.3 ± 3.2 SD). Bone conduction thresholds corresponded within 5 dB or less in 80% of comparisons between test environments, with a mean absolute difference of 4.6 dB (3.7 SD). Threshold differences were not statistically significant. Mean absolute test-retest differences outside the sound booth was similar to those in the booth. Diagnostic pure-tone audiometry outside a sound booth, using automated testing, improved passive attenuation, and real-time environmental noise monitoring demonstrated reliable hearing assessments.

  19. Isocyanate exposures in autobody shop work: the SPRAY study.

    PubMed

    Sparer, Judy; Stowe, Meredith H; Bello, Dhimiter; Liu, Youcheng; Gore, Rebecca J; Youngs, Fred; Cullen, Mark R; Redlich, Carrie A; Woskie, Susan R

    2004-09-01

    Isocyanates, known to cause respiratory sensitization and asthma, are widely used in automotive refinishing where exposures to aliphatic polyisocyanates occur by both inhalation and skin contact. The work reported here, the characterization of isocyanate exposure in the autobody industry, was part of an epidemiologic study of workers in 37 autobody shops in Connecticut. This article describes workplaces, tasks, and controls, and outlines the frequency, duration, and intensity of isocyanate exposures. Personal air samples taken outside of respirators had median concentrations of 66.5 microg NCO/m3 for primer, 134.4 microg (NCO)/m3 for sealer, and 358.5 microg NCO/m3 for clearcoat. Forty-eight percent of primer, 66% of sealer, and 92% of clearcoat samples exceeded the United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive guideline for isocyanate, though none exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommended exposure limit for monomer. Nonisocyanate-containing primers and sealers are used in more than half the shops, but nonisocyanate clearcoats are rare. Eighty-two percent of personal samples taken within a spray booth exceeded the U.K. guideline: 81% of those in downdraft spray booths, 74% in semidowndraft booths, and 92% in crossdraft booths. Only 8% of shops reported that spraying is done exclusively in spray booths. All painters wore some type of respirator. In 30% of shops, painters used supplied air respirators; the rest relied on half face organic vapor cartridge respirators with N95 overspray pads. All shops provided some type of gloves, usually latex, not recommended for isocyanate protection. Despite improvements in autobody shop materials, practices, and controls, there are still opportunities for substantial exposures to isocyanates.

  20. Anthropometric data collection of Portuguese children using 3D body scanning: considerations about the scanning booth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, R.; Carvalho, M. A.; Lopes, H. P.; Xu, B.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents some considerations regarding the scanning booth used in an anthropometric study done with a 3D body scanning technology. The data collected is part of a Ph.D. study conducted in Textile Engineering at University of Minho in Portugal, which aims to develop clothing for overweight and obese Portuguese children aged 2-11 years, of both genders. The challenges faced during data collection are described, and modifications of the scanning booth are proposed. It is possible to conclude that the importance of the scanning booth is key to an efficient anthropometric data collection, including the growth of this technology in the garment industry, Universities Research Institutes involved with anthropometric studies.

  1. The Art of Being Persuaded: Wayne Booth's Mutual Inquiry and the Trust to Listen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Marsha Lee; Dieter, Eric; Dobbins, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    This article examines Wayne C. Booth's legacy as a teacher and scholar through the concept of rhetoric as mutual inquiry that he develops from "Modern Dogma and the Rhetoric of Assent" (1974) through "The Rhetoric of Rhetoric" (2004). Booth's work connects the political and pedagogical in pragmatic and productive ways…

  2. London through Rose-Colored Graphics: Visual Rhetoric and Information Graphic Design in Charles Booth's Maps of London Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Miles A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I examine a historical information graphic--Charles Booth's maps of London poverty (1889-1902)--to analyze the cultural basis of ideas of transparency and clarity in information graphics. I argue that Booth's maps derive their rhetorical power from contemporary visual culture as much as from their scientific authority. The visual…

  3. The Booth Sitters of Santa Fe's Indian Market: Making and Maintaining Authenticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses the burden of non-Native expectation on Native artists, highlighting issues of authenticity, creation, and public display. The author writes about the booth sitters hired by collectors to sit--sometimes all night--and wait for the official opening of the annual Indian Market in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He focuses…

  4. In Tune with Play and Therapy an Interview with Phyllis Booth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Play, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Phyllis Booth is a licensed marriage and family therapist, a licensed clinical professional counselor, a registered play therapist and supervisor, and Clinical Director Emeritus of the Theraplay Institute in Evanston, Illinois. Her professional career includes training in clinical psychology at what is now University of Chicago Medicine, teaching…

  5. Monitoring and Testing the Parts Cleaning Stations, Abrasive Blasting Cabinets, and Paint Booths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Tracee M.

    2004-01-01

    I have the opportunity to work in the Environmental Management Office (EMO) this summer. One of the EMO's tasks is to make sure the Environmental Management System is implemented to the entire Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Environmental Management System (EMS) is a policy or plan that is oriented toward minimizing an organization's impact to the environment. Our EMS includes the reduction of solid waste regeneration and the reduction of hazardous material use, waste, and pollution. With the Waste Management Team's (WMT) help, the EMS can be implemented throughout the NASA Glenn Research Center. The WMT is responsible for the disposal and managing of waste throughout the GRC. They are also responsible for the management of all chemical waste in the facility. My responsibility is to support the waste management team by performing an inventory on parts cleaning stations, abrasive cabinets, and paint booths through out the entire facility. These booths/stations are used throughout the center and they need to be monitored and tested for hazardous waste and material. My job is to visit each of these booths/stations, take samples of the waste, and analyze the samples.

  6. Application of the Booth-Kautzmann method for the determination of N-2 packing leakage

    SciT

    Burkhart, D.M.; Milton, J.W.; Fawcett, S.T.

    1995-06-01

    To accurately determine turbine cycle heat rate, leakage past the N-2 steam seal packing must be determined on turbines with both HP and IP turbines contained within a common high pressure casing. N-2 packing leakage can be determined by the Booth-Kautzmann Method with instrumentation commonly used to determine the HP and IP turbine efficiency. The only additional requirements are changes to the main steam and/or hot reheat steam conditions. This paper discusses the actual test results using the Booth-Kautzmann test procedure on three natural gas fired units. The test results demonstrate the added advantage of having at least three N-2more » test runs, stability requirements for repeatable test runs and test procedures used to determine leakage results. Discussion of the sensitivity of the assumed N-2 enthalpy are also addressed. Utilizing Martins Formula with a series of N-2 Leakage test runs is shown to be a leakage prediction tool and a packing clearance approximation tool. It is concluded that the Booth-Kautzmann Method for determination of N-2 packing leakage should be utilized whenever HP and Ip turbine efficiency is determined. The two or three additional hours invested in the test runs is well worth the information gained on the performance of the N-2 packing.« less

  7. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  8. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  9. Nitroglycerin Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Nitroglycerin spray is used to treat episodes of angina (chest pain) in people who have coronary artery ... in order to prevent the angina from occurring. Nitroglycerin is in a class of medications called vasodilators. ...

  10. Going wireless and booth-less for hearing testing in industry.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Deanna K; Norris, Jesse A; Flynn, Brendan P; Clavier, Odile H

    2017-01-01

    To assess the test-retest variability of hearing thresholds obtained with an innovative, mobile wireless automated hearing-test system (WAHTS) with enhanced sound attenuation to test industrial workers at a worksite as compared to standardised automated hearing thresholds obtained in a mobile trailer sound booth. A within-subject repeated-measures design was used to compare air-conducted threshold tests (500-8000 Hz) measured with the WAHTS in six workplace locations, and a third test using computer-controlled audiometry obtained in a mobile trailer sound booth. Ambient noise levels were measured in all test environments. Twenty workers served as listeners and 20 workers served as operators. On average, the WAHTS resulted in equivalent thresholds as the mobile trailer audiometry at 1000, 2000, 3000 and 8000 Hz and thresholds were within ±5 dB at 500, 4000 and 6000 Hz. Comparable performance may be obtained with the WAHTS in occupational audiometry and valid thresholds may be obtained in diverse test locations without the use of sound-attenuating enclosures.

  11. The Professor as Teacher: Allan Bloom, Wayne Booth, and the Tradition of Teaching at the University of Chicago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrightson, Katherine M.

    1998-01-01

    The University of Chicago (Illinois) has long emphasized teaching as a valued skill, fostering an image focused on the intellectual search for truth and transmission of intellectual values, a stand in opposition to popular relativist theories. Through the writings of Allan Bloom, Wayne Booth, and historical university documents, this model of…

  12. Hundreds of Area Residents Visit the National Lab Booth at the Annual In The Street Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Light-up yo-yos, brightly colored portion plates, and a fast spinner game lured hundreds of area residents to the Frederick National Lab booth at this year’s In The Street festival, where they also heard a message from the lab: Stay healthy through healthy habits.

  13. Agricultural Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    AGDISP, a computer code written for Langley by Continuum Dynamics, Inc., aids crop dusting airplanes in targeting pesticides. The code is commercially available and can be run on a personal computer by an inexperienced operator. Called SWA+H, it is used by the Forest Service, FAA, DuPont, etc. DuPont uses the code to "test" equipment on the computer using a laser system to measure particle characteristics of various spray compounds.

  14. Slurry spray distribution within a simulated laboratory scale spray dryer

    SciT

    Bertone, P.C.

    1979-12-20

    It was found that the distribution of liquid striking the sides of a simulated room temperature spray dryer was not significantly altered by the choice of nozles, nor by a variation in nozzle operating conditions. Instead, it was found to be a function of the spray dryer's configuration. A cocurrent flow of air down the drying cylinder, not possible with PNL's closed top, favorably altered the spray distribution by both decreasing the amount of liquid striking the interior of the cylinder from 72 to 26% of the feed supplied, and by shifting the zone of maximum impact from 1.0 tomore » 1.7 feet from the nozzle. These findings led to the redesign of the laboratory scale spray dryer to be tested at the Savannah River Plant. The diameter of the drying chamber was increased from 5 to 8 inches, and a cocurrent flow of air was established with a closed recycle. Finally, this investigation suggested a drying scheme which offers all the advantages of spray drying without many of its limitations.« less

  15. Modeling metal droplet sprays in spray forming

    SciT

    Muoio, N.G.; Crowe, C.T.; Fritsching, U.

    1995-12-31

    Spray casting is a process whereby a molten metal stream is atomized and deposited on a substrate. The rapid solidification of the metal droplets gives rise to a fine grain structure and improved material properties. This paper presents a simulation for the fluid and thermal interaction of the fluid and droplets in the spray and the effect on the droplet spray pattern. Good agreement is obtained between the measured and predicted droplet mass flux distribution in the spray.

  16. Foliar spray banding characteristics

    A.R. Womac; C.W. Smith; Joseph E. Mulrooney

    2004-01-01

    Foliar spray banding was explored as a means of reducing peticide use compared to broadcast applications. Barious geometric spray patterns and delivery angles of foliar spray bands were investigated to increase spray deposits in a crop row at a constant spray rate of 94 L/ha. Wind-free laboratory results indicated that a banded application using three 65° hollow-cone...

  17. Hair spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002705.htm Hair spray poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair spray poisoning occurs when someone breathes in (inhales) ...

  18. Fixed automated spray technology.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-19

    This research project evaluated the construction and performance of Boschungs Fixed Automated : Spray Technology (FAST) system. The FAST system automatically sprays de-icing material on : the bridge when icing conditions are about to occur. The FA...

  19. Remotely controlled spray gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  20. A spray flamelet/progress variable approach combined with a transported joint PDF model for turbulent spray flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong; Olguin, Hernan; Gutheil, Eva

    2017-05-01

    A spray flamelet/progress variable approach is developed for use in spray combustion with partly pre-vaporised liquid fuel, where a laminar spray flamelet library accounts for evaporation within the laminar flame structures. For this purpose, the standard spray flamelet formulation for pure evaporating liquid fuel and oxidiser is extended by a chemical reaction progress variable in both the turbulent spray flame model and the laminar spray flame structures, in order to account for the effect of pre-vaporised liquid fuel for instance through use of a pilot flame. This new approach is combined with a transported joint probability density function (PDF) method for the simulation of a turbulent piloted ethanol/air spray flame, and the extension requires the formulation of a joint three-variate PDF depending on the gas phase mixture fraction, the chemical reaction progress variable, and gas enthalpy. The molecular mixing is modelled with the extended interaction-by-exchange-with-the-mean (IEM) model, where source terms account for spray evaporation and heat exchange due to evaporation as well as the chemical reaction rate for the chemical reaction progress variable. This is the first formulation using a spray flamelet model considering both evaporation and partly pre-vaporised liquid fuel within the laminar spray flamelets. Results with this new formulation show good agreement with the experimental data provided by A.R. Masri, Sydney, Australia. The analysis of the Lagrangian statistics of the gas temperature and the OH mass fraction indicates that partially premixed combustion prevails near the nozzle exit of the spray, whereas further downstream, the non-premixed flame is promoted towards the inner rich-side of the spray jet since the pilot flame heats up the premixed inner spray zone. In summary, the simulation with the new formulation considering the reaction progress variable shows good performance, greatly improving the standard formulation, and it provides new

  1. Characterization of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C.-P.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that most practical power generation and propulsion systems involve the burning of different types of fuel sprays, taking into account aircraft propulsion, industrial furnaces, boilers, gas turbines, and diesel engines. There has been a lack of data which can serve as a basis for spray model development and validation. A major aim of the present investigation is to fill this gap. Experimental apparatus and techniques for studying the characteristics of fuel sprays are discussed, taking into account two-dimensional still photography, cinematography, holography, a laser diffraction particle sizer, and a laser anemometer. The considered instruments were used in a number of experiments, taking into account three different types of fuel spray. Attention is given to liquid fuel sprays, high pressure pulsed diesel sprays, and coal-water slurry sprays.

  2. Effect of illumination on colour vision testing with Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test: customized colour vision booth versus room illumination.

    PubMed

    Zahiruddin, Kowser; Banu, Shaj; Dharmarajan, Ramya; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran; Vijayan, Deepa; Raman, Rajiv; Sharma, Tarun

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate a customized, portable Farnsworth-Munsell 100 (FM 100) hue viewing booth for compliance with colour vision testing standards and to compare it with room illumination in subjects with normal colour vision (trichromats), subjects with acquired colour vision defects (secondary to diabetes mellitus), and subjects with congenital colour vision defects (dichromats). Discrete wavelengths of the tube in the customized booth were measured using a spectrometer using the normal incident method and were compared with the spectral distribution of sunlight. Forty-eight subjects were recruited for the study and were divided into 3 groups: Group 1, Normal Trichromats (30 eyes); Group 2, Congenital Colour Vision Defects (16 eyes); and Group 3, Diabetes Mellitus (20 eyes). The FM 100 hue test performance was compared using two illumination conditions, booth illumination and room illumination. Total error scores of the classical method in Group 2 as mean+/-SD for room and booth illumination was 243.05+/-85.96 and 149.85+/-54.50 respectively (p=0.0001). Group 2 demonstrated lesser correlation (r=0.50, 0.55), lesser reliability (Cronbach's alpha, 0.625, 0.662) and greater variability (Bland & Altman value, 10.5) in total error scores for the classical method and the moment of inertia method between the two illumination conditions when compared to the other two groups. The customized booth demonstrated illumination meeting CIE standards. The total error scores were overestimated by the classical and moment of inertia methods in all groups for room illumination compared with booth illumination, however overestimation was more significant in the diabetes group.

  3. Quantification and Statistical Modeling—Part I: Breathing-Zone Concentrations of Monomeric and Polymeric 1,6-Hexamethylene Diisocyanate

    PubMed Central

    Fent, Kenneth W.; Gaines, Linda G. Trelles; Thomasen, Jennifer M.; Flack, Sheila L.; Ding, Kai; Herring, Amy H.; Whittaker, Stephen G.; Nylander-French, Leena A.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a repeated exposure-assessment survey for task-based breathing-zone concentrations (BZCs) of monomeric and polymeric 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) during spray painting on 47 automotive spray painters from North Carolina and Washington State. We report here the use of linear mixed modeling to identify the primary determinants of the measured BZCs. Both one-stage (N = 98 paint tasks) and two-stage (N = 198 paint tasks) filter sampling was used to measure concentrations of HDI, uretidone, biuret, and isocyanurate. The geometric mean (GM) level of isocyanurate (1410 μg m−3) was higher than all other analytes (i.e. GM < 7.85 μg m−3). The mixed models were unique to each analyte and included factors such as analyte-specific paint concentration, airflow in the paint booth, and sampler type. The effect of sampler type was corroborated by side-by-side one- and two-stage personal air sampling (N = 16 paint tasks). According to paired t-tests, significantly higher concentrations of HDI (P = 0.0363) and isocyanurate (P = 0.0035) were measured using one-stage samplers. Marginal R2 statistics were calculated for each model; significant fixed effects were able to describe 25, 52, 54, and 20% of the variability in BZCs of HDI, uretidone, biuret, and isocyanurate, respectively. Mixed models developed in this study characterize the processes governing individual polyisocyanate BZCs. In addition, the mixed models identify ways to reduce polyisocyanate BZCs and, hence, protect painters from potential adverse health effects. PMID:19622637

  4. Bear Spray Safety Program

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  5. Effect of grain morphology on gas bubble swelling in UMo fuels – A 3D microstructure dependent Booth model

    SciT

    Hu, Shenyang; Burkes, Douglas; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-11-01

    A three dimensional microstructure dependent swelling model is developed for studying the fission gas swelling kinetics in irradiated nuclear fuels. The model is extended from the Booth model [1] in order to investigate the effect of heterogeneous microstructures on gas bubble swelling kinetics. As an application of the model, the effect of grain morphology, fission gas diffusivity, and spatial dependent fission rate on swelling kinetics are simulated in UMo fuels. It is found that the decrease of grain size, the increase of grain aspect ratio for the grain having the same volume, and the increase of fission gas diffusivity (fissionmore » rate) cause the increase of swelling kinetics. Other heterogeneities such as second phases and spatial dependent thermodynamic properties including diffusivity of fission gas, sink and source strength of defects could be naturally integrated into the model to enhance the model capability.« less

  6. Swine flu (H1N1 influenza): awareness profile of visitors of swine flu screening booths in Belgaum city, Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Viveki, R G; Halappanavar, A B; Patil, M S; Joshi, A V; Gunagi, Praveena; Halki, Sunanda B

    2012-06-01

    The 2009 flu pandemic was a global outbreak of a new strain of H1N1 influenza virus often referred colloquially as "swine flu". The objectives of the study were: (1) To know the sociodemographic and awareness profile of visitors attending swine flu screening booths. (2) To reveal sources of information. The present cross-sectional study was undertaken among the visitors (18 years and above) attending swine flu screening booths organised within the Belgaum city during Ganesh festival from 28-08-2009 to 03-09-2009 by interviewing them using predesigned, pretested structured questionnaire on swine flu. The data was collected and analysed using SPSS software programme for windows (version 16). Chi-square test was applied. Out of 206 visitors, 132 (64.1%) were males and 107 (51.9%) were in the age group of 30-49 years; 183 (88.8%) had heard about swine flu. More than a third of the visitors (38.3%) disclosed that there was a vaccine to prevent swine flu. Majority responded that it could be transmitted by being in close proximity to pigs (49.0%) and by eating pork (51.5%). Newspaper/magazine (64.6%), television (61.7%), and public posters/pamphlets (44.2%) were common sources of information. The present study revealed that doctors/public health workers have played little role in creating awareness in the community. The improved communication between doctors and the community would help to spread correct information about the disease and the role that the community can play in controlling the spread of the disease.

  7. Demonstration of Split-Flow Ventilation and Recirculation as Flow- Reduction Methods in an Air Force Paint Spray Booth. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-27

    of the split-flow and recirculation modifications in typical Air Force painting operations; itwas a proof-of- concept study only. It is recognized...recirculating ventilation. 4 To Implement this flow-reduction concept , it must first be established that recirculation does not cause an accumulation of toxic...ventilation concept . The concentration gradient is determined by height and direction of paint application. If the concentration in the top portion is

  8. Evaluation of Innovative Volatile Organic Compound and Hazardous Air Pollutant Control Technologies for U.S. Air Force Paint Spray Booths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    adsorption/incineration * Membrane vapor separation/condensation * Supercritical fluid oxidation • UV/ozone destruction * Molten salt combustion process...separation/ separate air stream contaminants 9 Oxygenated solvents condensation * Chlorinated hydrocarbons Supercritical fluid * Technology utilizing high...testing or full-scale unit capacity; they are: * Supercritical fluid oxidation • UV/ozone destruction * Molten salt incineration * Infrared incineration

  9. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D [Stuart, FL; Sanders, Stuart A [Palm Beach Gardens, FL

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  10. Spray characteristics of two combined jet atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambour, Y.; Portnoy, D.

    The downstream changes in droplet volume concentration of a vaporizing fuel spray produced by two jet atomizers which form an overlapping zone of influence is theoretically analyzed, employing experimental data of Yule et al. (1982) for a single jet atomizer as initial conditions. One of the atomizers is located below the other at a certain distance downstream. Such an injection geometry can be found in afterburners of modern jet engines. The influence of various vertical and horizontal distances between the two atomizers on the downstream spray characteristics is investigated for a vaporizing kerosene spray in a 'cold' (293 K) and a 'hot' (450 K) environment. The analysis shows how one can control the downstream spray characteristics via the geometry of injection. Such geometrical considerations may be of great importance in the design of afterburner wall geometry and in the reduction of wall thermal damage. The injection geometry may also affect the intensity of the spray distribution which determines the mode of droplet group combustion. The latter plays an important role in improving afterburner combustion efficiency.

  11. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOEpatents

    Byrnes, Larry Edward [Rochester Hills, MI; Kramer, Martin Stephen [Clarkston, MI; Neiser, Richard A [Albuquerque, NM

    2003-08-26

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  12. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  13. An overview of spray drift reduction testing of spray nozzles

    The importance of the development and testing of drift reduction technologies (DRTs) is increasing. Common spray drift reduction technologies include spray nozzles and spray adjuvants. Following draft procedures developed for a DRT program, three spray nozzles were tested under high air speed cond...

  14. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  15. Sumatriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... spray is used to treat the symptoms of migraine headaches (severe, throbbing headaches that sometimes are accompanied ... that cause pain, nausea, and other symptoms of migraine. Sumatriptan does not prevent migraine attacks or reduce ...

  16. Zolmitriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... spray is used to treat the symptoms of migraine headaches (severe, throbbing headaches that sometimes are accompanied ... that cause pain, nausea, and other symptoms of migraine. Zolmitriptan does not prevent migraine attacks or reduce ...

  17. Flunisolide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause ... your thumb. Point the applicator away from your face. If you are using the spray for the ...

  18. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray should not be used ... room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).Unneeded medications should be ...

  19. Fentanyl Sublingual Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Fentanyl sublingual spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  20. Fentanyl Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Fentanyl nasal spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  1. Ipratropium Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... follow these steps: Remove the clear plastic dust cap and the safety clip from the nasal spray ... the other nostril. Replace the clear plastic dust cap and safety clip. If the nasal tip becomes ...

  2. Triamcinolone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... An adult should help children under 12 years old to use triamcinolone nasal spray. Children younger than ... This branded product is no longer on the market. Generic alternatives may be available.

  3. Fluticasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are giving fluticasone nasal spray to a child, you will begin treatment with a lower dose ... the medication and increase the dose if the child's symptoms do not improve. Decrease the dose when ...

  4. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are giving budesonide nasal spray to a child, you will begin treatment with a lower dose ... the medication and increase the dose if the child's symptoms do not improve. Decrease the dose when ...

  5. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects may include any of these symptoms: Dryness, burning, or stinging in the nasal passage.You can ... or your child uses the spray exactly as prescribed to avoid side effects. If you or your ...

  6. Directed spray mast

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Siddall, Alvin A.; Cheng, William Y.; Counts, Kevin T.

    2005-05-10

    Disclosed is an elongated, tubular, compact high pressure sprayer apparatus for insertion into an access port of vessels having contaminated interior areas that require cleaning by high pressure water spray. The invention includes a spray nozzle and a camera adjacent thereto with means for rotating and raising and lowering the nozzle so that areas identified through the camera may be cleaned with a minimum production of waste water to be removed.

  7. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  8. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  9. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for studying the events directly preceding combustion in the liquid fuel sprays are being used to provide information as a function of space and time on droplet size, shape, number density, position, angle of flight and velocity. Spray chambers were designed and constructed for: (1) air-assist liquid fuel research sprays; (2) high pressure and temperature chamber for pulsed diesel fuel sprays; and (3) coal-water slurry sprays. Recent results utilizing photography, cinematography, and calibration of the Malvern particle sizer are reported. Systems for simultaneous measurement of velocity and particle size distributions using laser Doppler anemometry interferometry and the application of holography in liquid fuel sprays are being calibrated.

  10. Liquid spray experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary; McHugh, John

    When waves on the ocean surface interact with a solid object, the result is often a complex pattern of spray. The solid object may be a coastal barrier such as a breakwater, or a ship or drilling rig. Another spray-related case is the presence of large industrial tanks of liquid, and often dangerous liquids, that exist around the world. Tens of thousands of such tanks are rapidly becoming obsolete. Recent experience has shown that when such tanks burst, the resulting spray may shoot several hundreds of meters from the tank. These tanks often have a wall or dam (barrier) surrounding them in an attempt to contain any leakage, catastrophic or otherwise. When the tank bursts it is akin to the dam-break problem. A wall of water rushes forth and impinges on the barrier creating spray. Previous experiments (McHugh and Watt, 1998) considered the related configuration of a solitary wave impinging on a vertical wall. The present experiments more closely model the bursting tank case, and treat the effect of the distance between the tank and barrier. Results show that there is a sweet spot where height and horizontal distance of spray droplets are maximized. This ideal distance between tank and barrier is constant when scaled by the initial tank depth.

  11. Acoustic effects of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Maciej Z.; Przekwas, Andrzej J.

    1994-01-01

    Since the early 1960's, it has been known that realistic combustion models for liquid fuel rocket engines should contain at least a rudimentary treatment of atomization and spray physics. This is of particular importance in transient operations. It has long been recognized that spray characteristics and droplet vaporization physics play a fundamental role in determining the stability behavior of liquid fuel rocket motors. This paper gives an overview of work in progress on design of a numerical algorithm for practical studies of combustion instabilities in liquid rocket motors. For flexibility, the algorithm is composed of semi-independent solution modules, accounting for different physical processes. Current findings are report and future work is indicated. The main emphasis of this research is the development of an efficient treatment to interactions between acoustic fields and liquid fuel/oxidizer sprays.

  12. Controlled overspray spray nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasthofer, W. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A spray system for a multi-ingredient ablative material wherein a nozzle A is utilized for suppressing overspray is described. The nozzle includes a cyclindrical inlet which converges to a restricted throat. A curved juncture between the cylindrical inlet and the convergent portion affords unrestricted and uninterrupted flow of the ablative material. A divergent bell-shaped chamber and adjustable nozzle exit B is utilized which provides a highly effective spray pattern in suppressing overspray to an acceptable level and producing a homogeneous jet of material that adheres well to the substrate.

  13. Samuel Booth | NREL

    on renewable energy and microgrid projects. He is currently leading work to support the Power Africa also currently helping Marine Corps installation Miramar to build the most advanced installation scale

  14. Ocean Spray Lubricates Winds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    According to a new study by two University of California, Berkeley, mathematicians and their Russian colleague, the water droplets kicked up by rough seas serve to lubricate the swirling winds of hurricanes and cyclones, letting them build to speeds approaching 200 miles per hour. Without the lubricating effect of the spray, the mathematicians…

  15. Picosecond imaging of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin; Liou, Larry; Wang, L.; Liang, X.; Galland, P.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results from applying a Kerr-Fourier imaging system to a water/air spray produced by a shear coaxial element are presented. The physics behind ultrafast time-gated optical techniques is discussed briefly. A typical setup of a Kerr-Fourier time gating system is presented.

  16. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is recommended by a doctor. Children 6 to 12 years of age should use oxymetazoline nasal spray carefully and under adult supervision. Oxymetazoline is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. It works by narrowing the blood vessels in the nasal passages.

  17. Thermal spray for commercial shipbuilding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, F. S.

    1997-09-01

    Thermal spraying of steel with aluminum to protect it from corrosion is a technology that has been proven to work in the marine environment. The thermal spray coating system includes a paint sealer that is applied over the thermally sprayed aluminum. This extends the service life of the coating and provides color to the end product. The thermal spray system protects steel both through the principle of isolation (as in painting) and galvanizing. With this dual protection mechanism, steel is protected from corrosion even when the coating is damaged. The thermal- sprayed aluminum coating system has proved the most cost- effective corrosion protection system for the marine environment. Until recently, however, the initial cost of application has limited its use for general application. Arc spray technology has reduced the application cost of thermal spraying of aluminum to below that of painting. Commercial shipbuilders could use this technology to enhance their market position in the marine industry.

  18. Assessment of HIV related risky behaviour: a comparative study of face-to-face interviews and Polling Booth Surveys in the general population of Cotonou, Benin

    PubMed Central

    BÉHANZIN, Luc; DIABATÉ, Souleymane; MINANI, Isaac; LOWNDES, Catherine M.; BOILY, Marie-Claude; LABBÉ, Annie-Claude; ANAGONOU, Séverin; ZANNOU, Djimon Marcel; BUVÉ, Anne; ALARY, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives During the 2008 HIV prevalence survey carried out in the general population of Cotonou, Benin, face-to-face interviews (FTFI) were used to assess risky behaviours for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). We compared sexual behaviours reported in FTFI with those reported in polling booth surveys (PBS) carried out in parallel in an independent random sample of the same population. Methods In PBS, respondents grouped by gender and marital status answered simple questions by putting tokens with question numbers in a green box (affirmative answers) or a red box (negative answers). Both boxes were placed inside a private booth. For each group and question, data were gathered together by type of answer. The structured and gender-specific FTFI guided by trained interviewers included all questions asked during the PBS.. Pearson chi-square or Fisher’s exact test were used to compare FTFI and PBS according to affirmative answers. Results Overall, respondents reported more stigmatized behaviours in PBS than in FTFI: the proportions of both married women and men who reported ever having had commercial sex were 17.4% and 41.6% in PBS versus 1.8% and 19.6% in FTFI, respectively. The corresponding proportions among unmarried women and men were 16.1% and 25.5% in PBS versus 3.9% and 13.0% in FTFI, respectively. The proportion of married women who reported having had extramarital sex since marriage was 23.6% in PBS versus 4.6% in FTFI. Conclusion Polling booth surveys are suitable to monitor reliable HIV/STI risk behaviours. Their use should be expanded in behavioural surveillance. PMID:23723251

  19. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  20. Spatial and temporal distribution of airborne Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki during an aerial spray program for gypsy moth eradication.

    PubMed

    Teschke, K; Chow, Y; Bartlett, K; Ross, A; van Netten, C

    2001-01-01

    We measured airborne exposures to the biological insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk) during an aerial spray program to eradicate gypsy moths on the west coast of Canada. We aimed to determine whether staying indoors during spraying reduced exposures, to determine the rate of temporal decay of airborne concentrations, and to determine whether drift occurred outside the spray zone. During spraying, the average culturable airborne Btk concentration measured outdoors within the spray zone was 739 colony-forming units (CFU)/m3 of air. Outdoor air concentrations decreased over time, quickly in an initial phase with a half time of 3.3 hr, and then more slowly over the following 9 days, with an overall half-time of about 2.4 days. Inside residences during spraying, average concentrations were initially 2-5 times lower than outdoors, but at 5-6 hr after spraying began, indoor concentrations exceeded those outdoors, with an average of 244 CFU/m3 vs. 77 CFU/m3 outdoors, suggesting that the initial benefits of remaining indoors during spraying may not persist as outside air moves indoors with normal daily activities. There was drift of culturable Btk throughout a 125- to 1,000-meter band outside the spray zone where measurements were made, a consequence of the fine aerosol sizes that remained airborne (count median diameters of 4.3 to 7.2 microm). Btk concentrations outside the spray zone were related to wind speed and direction, but not to distance from the spray zone.

  1. An experimental study of air-assist atomizer spray flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chien-Pei; Wang, Geng; Chigier, Norman

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that air-assisted atomizer spray flames encountered in furnaces, boilers, and gas turbine combustors possess a more complex structure than homogeneous turbulent diffusion flames, due to the swirling motion introduced into the fuel and air flows for the control of flame stability, length, combustion intensity, and efficiency. Detailed comparisons are presented between burning and nonburning condition measurements of these flames obtained by nonintrusive light scattering phase/Doppler detection. Spray structure is found to be drastically changed within the flame reaction zone, with changes in the magnitude and shape of drop number density, liquid flux, mean drop size diameter, and drop mean axial velocity radial distributions.

  2. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  3. Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

  4. The structure of evaporating and combusting sprays: Measurements and predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Solomon, A. S. P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus was constructed to provide measurements in open sprays with no zones of recirculation, in order to provide well-defined conditions for use in evaluating spray models. Measurements were completed in a gas jet, in order to test experimental methods, and are currently in progress for nonevaporating sprays. A locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model where interphase transport rates are assumed to be infinitely fast; a separated flow (SF) model which allows for finite interphase transport rates but neglects effects of turbulent fluctuations on drop motion; and a stochastic SF model which considers effects of turbulent fluctuations on drop motion were evaluated using existing data on particle-laden jets. The LHF model generally overestimates rates of particle dispersion while the SF model underestimates dispersion rates. The stochastic SF flow yield satisfactory predictions except at high particle mass loadings where effects of turbulence modulation may have caused the model to overestimate turbulence levels.

  5. Advanced Microstructural Study of Suspension Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlesak, Harry; Pawlowski, Lech; D'Haese, Romain; Laureyns, Jacky; Lampke, Thomas; Bellayer, Severine

    2010-03-01

    Fine, home-synthesized, hydroxyapatite powder was formulated with water and alcohol to obtain a suspension used to plasma spray coatings onto a titanium substrate. The deposition process was optimized using statistical design of 2 n experiments with two variables: spray distance and electric power input to plasma. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine quantitatively the phase composition of obtained deposits. Raman microscopy and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) enabled localization of the phases in different positions of the coating cross sections. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) study associated with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) enabled visualization and analysis of a two-zone microstructure. One zone contained crystals of hydroxyapatite, tetracalcium phosphate, and a phase rich in calcium oxide. This zone included lamellas, usually observed in thermally sprayed coatings. The other zone contained fine hydroxyapatite grains that correspond to nanometric and submicrometric solids from the suspension that were agglomerated and sintered in the cold regions of plasma jet and on the substrate.

  6. Spray-formed tooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, K. M.; Key, J. F.

    The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) has formed a partnership with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a process for the rapid production of low-cost tooling based on spray forming technology developed at the INEL. Phase 1 of the program will involve bench-scale system development, materials characterization, and process optimization. In Phase 2, prototype systems will be designed, constructed, evaluated, and optimized. Process control and other issues that influence commercialization will be addressed during this phase of the project. Technology transfer to USCAR, or a tooling vendor selected by USCAR, will be accomplished during Phase 3. The approach INEL is using to produce tooling, such as plastic injection molds and stamping dies, combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing into a single step. A bulk liquid metal is pressure-fed into a de Laval spray nozzle transporting a high velocity, high temperature inert gas. The gas jet disintegrates the metal into fine droplets and deposits them onto a tool pattern made from materials such as plastic, wax, clay, ceramics, and metals. The approach is compatible with solid freeform fabrication techniques such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing. Heat is extracted rapidly, in-flight, by convection as the spray jet entrains cool inert gas to produce undercooled and semi-solid droplets. At the pattern, the droplets weld together while replicating the shape and surface features of the pattern. Tool formation is rapid; deposition rates in excess of 1 ton/h have been demonstrated for bench-scale nozzles.

  7. On the prediction of spray angle of liquid-liquid pintle injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Li, Qinglian; Xu, Shun; Kang, Zhongtao

    2017-09-01

    The pintle injector is famous for its capability of deep throttling and low cost. However, the pintle injector has been seldom investigated. To get a good prediction of the spray angle of liquid-liquid pintle injectors, theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and experiments were conducted. Under the hypothesis of incompressible and inviscid flow, a spray angle formula was deduced from the continuity and momentum equations based on a control volume analysis. The formula was then validated by numerical and experimental data. The results indicates that both geometric and injection parameters affect the total momentum ratio (TMR) and then influence the spray angle formed by liquid-liquid pintle injectors. TMR is the pivotal non-dimensional number that dominates the spray angle. Compared with gas-gas pintle injectors, spray angle formed by liquid-liquid injectors is larger, which benefits from the local high pressure zone near the pintle wall caused by the impingement of radial and axial sheets.

  8. Spray algorithm without interface construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kadhem Majhool, Ahmed Abed; Watkins, A. P.

    2012-05-01

    This research is aimed to create a new and robust family of convective schemes to capture the interface between the dispersed and the carrier phases in a spray without the need to build up the interface boundary. The selection of the Weighted Average Flux (WAF) scheme is due to this scheme being designed to deal with random flux scheme which is second-order accurate in space and time. The convective flux in each cell face utilizes the WAF scheme blended with Switching Technique for Advection and Capturing of Surfaces (STACS) scheme for high resolution flux limiters. In the next step, the high resolution scheme is blended with the WAF scheme to provide the sharpness and boundedness of the interface by using switching strategy. In this work, the Eulerian-Eulerian framework of non-reactive turbulent spray is set in terms of theoretical proposed methodology namely spray moments of drop size distribution, presented by Beck and Watkins [1]. The computational spray model avoids the need to segregate the local droplet number distribution into parcels of identical droplets. The proposed scheme is tested on capturing the spray edges in modelling hollow cone sprays without need to reconstruct two-phase interface. A test is made on simple comparison between TVD scheme and WAF scheme using the same flux limiter on convective flow hollow cone spray. Results show the WAF scheme gives a better prediction than TVD scheme. The only way to check the accuracy of the presented models is by evaluating the spray sheet thickness.

  9. A New Way to Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA SBIR contract provided the funding for a new nozzle shape to be used in plasma spray techniques. The new design, a bell shape, reduces overspray. The result is a significant decrease in the cost of plasma spraying and a higher quality, more pure coating.

  10. Polling booth surveys: a novel approach for reducing social desirability bias in HIV-related behavioural surveys in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Lowndes, Catherine M; Jayachandran, A A; Banandur, Pradeep; Ramesh, Banadakoppa M; Washington, Reynold; Sangameshwar, B M; Moses, Stephen; Blanchard, James; Alary, Michel

    2012-05-01

    This study compared rates of HIV-related sexual risk behaviours reported in individual face-to-face (FTFI) and group anonymous polling booth (PBS) interviews in India. In PBS, respondents grouped by gender and marital status answered yes/no questions by putting tokens with question numbers in colour-coded containers. Data were subsequently collated for each group as a whole, so responses were not traceable back to individuals. Male and female PBS participants reported substantially higher rates of pre-marital, extra-marital, commercial and anal sex than FTFI participants; e.g. 11 vs. 2% married males reported paying for sex; 6 vs. 1% unmarried males reported homosexual anal sex.

  11. Assessment of HIV-related risky behaviour: a comparative study of face-to-face interviews and polling booth surveys in the general population of Cotonou, Benin.

    PubMed

    Béhanzin, Luc; Diabaté, Souleymane; Minani, Isaac; Lowndes, Catherine M; Boily, Marie-Claude; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Anagonou, Séverin; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Buvé, Anne; Alary, Michel

    2013-11-01

    During the 2008 HIV prevalence survey carried out in the general population of Cotonou, Benin, face-to-face interviews (FTFI) were used to assess risky behaviours for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). We compared sexual behaviours reported in FTFI with those reported in polling booth surveys (PBS) carried out in parallel in an independent random sample of the same population. In PBS, respondents grouped by gender and marital status answered simple questions by putting tokens with question numbers in a green box (affirmative answers) or a red box (negative answers). Both boxes were placed inside a private booth. For each group and question, data were gathered together by type of answer. The structured and gender-specific FTFI guided by trained interviewers included all questions asked during PBS. Pearson χ2 or Fisher's exact test was used to compare FTFI and PBS according to affirmative answers. Overall, respondents reported more stigmatised behaviours in PBS than in FTFI: the proportions of married women and men who reported ever having had commercial sex were 17.4% and 41.6% in PBS versus 1.8% and 19.6% in FTFI, respectively. The corresponding proportions among unmarried women and men were 16.1% and 25.5% in PBS versus 3.9% and 13.0% in FTFI, respectively. The proportion of married women who reported having had extramarital sex since marriage was 23.6% in PBS versus 4.6% in FTFI. PBS are suitable to monitor reliable HIV/STI risk behaviours. Their use should be expanded in behavioural surveillance.

  12. INEL Spray-forming Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, Kevin M.; Key, James F.

    1993-01-01

    Spray forming is a near-net-shape fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is deposited onto a suitably shaped substrate or mold to produce a coherent solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing without sacrificing, and oftentimes substantially improving, product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g., refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Results from several spray forming programs are presented to illustrate the range of capabilities of the technique as well as the accompanying technical and economic benefits. Low-carbon steel strip greater than 0.75 mm thick and polymer membranes for gas/gas and liquid/liquid separations that were spray formed are discussed; recent advances in spray forming molds, dies, and other tooling using low-melting-point metals are described.

  13. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  14. Maintenance of spray humidifiers

    SciT

    Brundrett, G.W.

    1979-02-01

    Recycled water can become a breeding medium for micro-organisms particularly if there is nutrient such as organic dust present. If such micro-organisms and/or their metabolites are injected into the atmosphere in quantity by a spray humidifier then the room occupants are liable to develop flu-like symptoms now known as 'humidifier fever'. The symptoms are worst on re-exposure after an interval and lead to the expression 'Monday sickness'. Any industrial process involving both humidification and organic dust offers a potential breeding ground for the micro-organisms. The most common process combining the two is the stationery and printing industry. Winter humidification ismore » necessary and nutrients in the form of airborne cellulose from the paper are plentiful. Particularly high standards of maintentance, including regular cleaning and prevention of sludge buildup is needed.« less

  15. Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burford, Pattie Lewis

    2011-01-01

    Zinc primer systems are currently used across NASA and AFSPC for corrosion protection of steel. AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of Thermal Spray Coatings (TSCs) as an environmentally preferable alternative. TSCs are approved in NASA-STD-5008 and AFSPC and KSC is currently looking for additional applications in which TSC can be used. Gas Dynamic Spray (GDS, also known as Cold Spray) is being evaluated as a means of repairing TSCs and for areas such as corners and edges where TSCs do not work as well. Other applications could include spot repair/maintenance of steel on structures, facilities, and ground support equipment.

  16. Exposure of spray-men to dieldrin in residual spraying

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, T. E.; Press, J. M.; Wilson, D. Bagster

    1959-01-01

    A study of the exposure of spray-men to dieldrin was made in a pilot scheme of residual spraying in the Taveta-Pare area of East Africa. A detailed work study was completed on the operators, and sources of contamination were enumerated. Filter paper pads were placed on the skin and outside clothing and the pick-up was estimated chemically. A spray-man, while using the daily average of 2.12 kg (4.7 pounds) of dieldrin and observing the protective measures laid down, received a dermal exposure of 1.8 mg of dieldrin per kg of body-weight per day. This was possibly reduced somewhat by washing with soap and water upon completion of each day's work. The sixteen spray-men and assistants were exposed for 180 days per year and there was an interim period of 2 months between spray cycles. No clinical symptoms of poisoning were observed. Comparison is made with certain programmes where dieldrin poisoning has occurred. Attention is drawn to the reduced time of exposure in the Taveta-Pare scheme, personal washing, the great value of protective clothing and of its daily washing in soap and water and the need to use a dilute suspension of wettable powder for spraying. Imagesp16-a PMID:13638786

  17. Modifications Of A Commercial Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial spray gun modified to increase spray rate and make sprayed coats more nearly uniform. Consists of gun head and pneumatic actuator. Actuator opens valves for two chemical components, called "A" and "B," that react to produce foam. Components flow through orifices, into mixing chamber in head. Mixture then flows through control orifice to spray tip. New spray tip tapered to reduce area available for accumulation of foam and makes tip easier to clean.

  18. Evaluation of spray injection patching.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary telephone survey of users of spray injection patching equipment revealed general satisfaction. In addition, a demonstration and follow-up 2-month evaluation of a rented truck-mounted unit convinced Virginia Department of Transportation ...

  19. Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings: Influence of Spraying Power on Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd, S. M.; Abd, M. Z.; Abd, A. N.

    2010-03-01

    The plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are used on metallic implants to enhance the bonding between the implant and bone in human body. The coating process was implemented at different spraying power for each spraying condition. The coatings formed from a rapid solidification of molten and partly molten particles that impact on the surface of substrate at high velocity and high temperature. The study was concentrated on different spraying power that is between 23 to 31 kW. The effect of different power on the coatings microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase composition was evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coatings surface morphology showed distribution of molten, partially melted particles and some micro-cracks. The produced coatings were found to be porous as observed from the cross-sectional morphology. The coatings XRD results indicated the presence of crystalline phase of HA and each of the patterns was similar to the initial powder. Regardless of different spraying power, all the coatings were having similar XRD patterns.

  20. Comparison of the performance between a spray gun and a spray boom in ornamentals.

    PubMed

    Foqué, D; Nuyttens, D

    2011-01-01

    Flemish greenhouse growers predominantly use handheld spray guns and spray lances for their crop protection purposes although these techniques are known for their heavy workload and their high operator exposure risks. Moreover, when these techniques are compared with spray boom equipment, they are often found to be less effective. On the other hand, handheld spraying techniques are less expensive and more flexible to use. Additionally, many Flemish growers are convinced that a high spray volume and spray pressure is needed to assure a good plant protection. The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the spray deposition, penetration and uniformity between a manually pulled horizontal spray boom and a spray gun under controlled laboratory conditions. In total, six different spray application techniques were evaluated. In general, the total deposition results were comparable between the spray boom and the spray gun applications but the boom applications resulted in a more uniform spray distribution over the crop. On a plant level, the spray distribution was not uniform for the different techniques with highest deposits on the upper side of the top leaves. Using spray guns at a higher spray pressure did not improve spray penetration and deposition on the bottom side of the leaves. From the different nozzle types, the XR 80 03 gave the best results. Plant density clearly affected crop penetration and deposition on the bottom side of the leaves.

  1. Asymmetrical bonding in cold spraying of dissimilar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikbakht, R.; Seyedein, S. H.; Kheirandish, S.; Assadi, H.; Jodoin, B.

    2018-06-01

    Characteristics of particle bonding, especially for dissimilar materials, remains a key question in cold spray deposition. There are limited reports in direct correlation to particle/substrate bonding and peripheral shear zones. Cold spraying experiments and numerical simulations are conducted to characterise and analyse the correlation between bonding and peripheral shear zones for asymmetric particle/substrate pairs of intermetallic-forming elements of nickel and titanium. The correlation between metallic bonding and highly strained areas is explored in view of the growth of the intermetallic phase at the particle/substrate interface during subsequent heat treatments. Characterisation of the as-sprayed samples reveal that for the Ni(particle)/Ti(substrate) pair, plastic deformation of the particle is dominating over substrate deformation. However, for the Ti(particle)/Ni(substrate) pair, it is observed that the substrate and particle deform to similar extents. Characterisation of the samples after a brief heat treatment at 700 °C indicate that intermetallic formation, and hence metallurgical bonding of the pairs is more likely to occur at the particle peripheries where the interface areas are highly strained, and rarely achieved at the particle base. Results also reveal that bonding extends from peripheries toward the central part of the interfaces with increasing the impact velocity. The kinetics of interfacial intermetallic formation at peripheral areas and its correlation to particle bonding is discussed in view of deformation-enhanced interdiffusion.

  2. SPRAY CALCINATION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, B.M.

    1963-08-20

    A spray calcination reactor for calcining reprocessin- g waste solutions is described. Coaxial within the outer shell of the reactor is a shorter inner shell having heated walls and with open regions above and below. When the solution is sprayed into the irner shell droplets are entrained by a current of gas that moves downwardly within the inner shell and upwardly between it and the outer shell, and while thus being circulated the droplets are calcined to solids, whlch drop to the bottom without being deposited on the walls. (AEC) H03 H0233412 The average molecular weights of four diallyl phthalate polymer samples extruded from the experimental rheometer were redetermined using the vapor phase osmometer. An amine curing agent is required for obtaining suitable silver- filled epoxy-bonded conductive adhesives. When the curing agent was modified with a 47% polyurethane resin, its effectiveness was hampered. Neither silver nor nickel filler impart a high electrical conductivity to Adiprenebased adhesives. Silver filler was found to perform well in Dow-Corning A-4000 adhesive. Two cascaded hot-wire columns are being used to remove heavy gaseous impurities from methane. This purified gas is being enriched in the concentric tube unit to approximately 20% carbon-13. Studies to count low-level krypton-85 in xenon are continuing. The parameters of the counting technique are being determined. The bismuth isotopes produced in bismuth irradiated for polonium production are being determined. Preliminary data indicate the presence of bismuth207 and bismuth-210m. The light bismuth isotopes are probably produced by (n,xn) reactions bismuth-209. The separation of uranium-234 from plutonium-238 solutions was demonstrated. The bulk of the plutonium is removed by anion exchange, and the remainder is extracted from the uranium by solvent extraction techniques. About 99% of the plutonium can be removed in each thenoyltrifluoroacetone extraction. The viscosity, liquid density, and

  3. Spray Above Enceladus

    2005-11-28

    A fine spray of small, icy particles emanating from the warm, geologically unique province surrounding the south pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus was observed in a Cassini narrow-angle camera image of the crescent moon taken on Jan. 16, 2005. Taken from a high-phase angle of 148 degrees -- a viewing geometry in which small particles become much easier to see -- the plume of material becomes more apparent in images processed to enhance faint signals. Imaging scientists have measured the light scattered by the plume's particles to determine their abundance and fall-off with height. Though the measurements of particle abundance are more certain within 100 kilometers (60 miles) of the surface, the values measured there are roughly consistent with the abundance of water ice particles measured by other Cassini instruments (reported in September, 2005) at altitudes as high as 400 kilometers (250 miles) above the surface. Imaging scientists, as reported in the journal Science on March 10, 2006, believe that the jets are geysers erupting from pressurized subsurface reservoirs of liquid water above 273 degrees Kelvin (0 degrees Celsius). The image at the left was taken in visible green light. A dark mask was applied to the moon's bright limb in order to make the plume feature easier to see. The image at the right has been color-coded to make faint signals in the plume more apparent. Images of other satellites (such as Tethys and Mimas) taken in the last 10 months from similar lighting and viewing geometries, and with identical camera parameters as this one, were closely examined to demonstrate that the plume towering above Enceladus' south pole is real and not a camera artifact. The images were acquired at a distance of about 209,400 kilometers (130,100 miles) from Enceladus. Image scale is about 1 kilometer (0.6 mile) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07760

  4. Zone lines

    Kevin T. Smith

    2001-01-01

    Zone lines are narrow, usually dark markings formed in decaying wood. Zone lines are found most frequently in advanced white rot of hardwoods, although they occasionally are associated both with brown rot and with softwoods.

  5. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    A ground test facility is being established at NASA Lewis Research Center to simulate the environmental and flight conditions needed to study adverse weather effects. One of the most important components is the water spray system which consists of many nozzles fitted on spray bars. Water is injected through air-assisted atomizers to generate uniform size drops to simulate icing in clouds. The primary objective is to provide experimental data on drop size distribution over a wide range of operating conditions. Correlation equations for mean drop size and initial injection parameters are being determined to assist in the design and modification of the Altitude Wind Tunnel. Special emphasis is being placed on the study of the aerodynamic structure of the air-assisted atomizer sprays. Detailed measurements of the variation of drop size distribution and velocity as a function of time and space are being made. Accurate initial and boundary conditions are being provided for computer model evaluation.

  6. Developing a dispersant spraying capability

    SciT

    Gill, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    In developing a national dispersant spraying capability, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has undertaken a modification program to enable the conventional offshore spraying gear to be mounted on almost any vessel of convenience. Smaller, more versatile inshore spraying vessels and pumps have been designed and built. With the popularization of concentrated dispersants, the inshore pumping equipment can be used aboard hovercraft for special application situations. A program of acquiring mobile dispersant storage tanks has been undertaken with auxiliary equipment that will facilitate the shipment of dispersants in bulk by air freight. Work also has commenced on extending the dispersant applicationmore » program to include the CCG fleet of helicopters.« less

  7. "Teaching" an Industrial Robot To Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A. R.; Sweet, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Teaching device, consisting of spacer rod or tube with three-pointed tip and line level, is used during pattern "teach-in" to make sure that robot manipulator holds spray gun perpendicular to surface to be sprayed and at right distance from it. For slanted surfaces angle adapter is added between spacer rod and line-level indicator. Angle is determined by slope of surface to be sprayed, thus allowing a perpendicular spray pattern against even slanted surfaces.

  8. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOEpatents

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  9. Experimental study of flash boiling spray vaporization through quantitative vapor concentration and liquid temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaoming; Hung, David L. S.; Xu, Min

    2014-08-01

    Flash boiling sprays of liquid injection under superheated conditions provide the novel solutions of fast vaporization and better air-fuel mixture formation for internal combustion engines. However, the physical mechanisms of flash boiling spray vaporization are more complicated than the droplet surface vaporization due to the unique bubble generation and boiling process inside a superheated bulk liquid, which are not well understood. In this study, the vaporization of flash boiling sprays was investigated experimentally through the quantitative measurements of vapor concentration and liquid temperature. Specifically, the laser-induced exciplex fluorescence technique was applied to distinguish the liquid and vapor distributions. Quantitative vapor concentration was obtained by correlating the intensity of vapor-phase fluorescence with vapor concentration through systematic corrections and calibrations. The intensities of two wavelengths were captured simultaneously from the liquid-phase fluorescence spectra, and their intensity ratios were correlated with liquid temperature. The results show that both liquid and vapor phase of multi-hole sprays collapse toward the centerline of the spray with different mass distributions under the flash boiling conditions. Large amount of vapor aggregates along the centerline of the spray to form a "gas jet" structure, whereas the liquid distributes more uniformly with large vortexes formed in the vicinity of the spray tip. The vaporization process under the flash boiling condition is greatly enhanced due to the intense bubble generation and burst. The liquid temperature measurements show strong temperature variations inside the flash boiling sprays with hot zones present in the "gas jet" structure and vortex region. In addition, high vapor concentration and closed vortex motion seem to have inhibited the heat and mass transfer in these regions. In summary, the vapor concentration and liquid temperature provide detailed information

  10. A new method for spray deposit assessment

    Chester M. Himel; Leland Vaughn; Raymond P. Miskus; Arthur D. Moore

    1965-01-01

    Solid fluorescent particles suspended in a spray liquid are distributed in direct proportion to the size of the spray droplets. Use of solid fluorescent particles is the basis of a new method for visual recognition of the size and number of droplets impinging on target and nontarget portions of sprayed areas.

  11. Propeller wash effects on spray drift

    Steven J. Thompson; Alvin R. Womac; Joseph Mulrooney; Sidney Deck

    2005-01-01

    for aerial spray application, there is some question if off-target drift (both near and far) is influenced by which boom is spraying and the direction of propeller wash rotation. This information may be useful when switching off one boom close to a field boundary. The effect of alternate boom switching and propeller wash direction on aerial spray drift from a turbine-...

  12. Effects of Known Determinants on Methylene Bisphenyl Isocyanate (MDI) Concentration During Spray-On Truck Bed-Lining Processes.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Nicholas C; Brazile, William J; Finnie, Katie L; Tiger, James P

    2017-08-01

    Occupational exposure to methylene bisphenyl isocyanate (MDI) presents serious worker health concerns as it may lead to short- and long-term health effects such as asthma, airway irritation, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and irritation of skin and mucous membranes. While studies of worker isocyanate exposures during vehicle painting activities are widespread, few studies have investigated the spray-on truck bed-liner (STBL) industry. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of several ventilation system variables and process characteristics in controlling MDI concentrations in the STBL industry. A total of 47 personal air samples were collected for MDI during 18 site visits at nine STBL companies in Colorado and Wyoming. Ventilation system and process characteristics that were assessed included: ventilation system face velocity, airflow, air changes per minute (AC/M), capture velocity, percent of MDI in bed-liner product, application temperature, application pressure, paint booth temperature, paint booth relative humidity, paint booth volume, and quantity of bed-liner product applied. Pearson correlation revealed percentage of MDI in bed-liner product (r = 0.557, n = 14, P < 0.05) and process temperature (r = 0.677, n = 14, P < 0.05) had high positive correlation with MDI concentration. Ventilation system face velocity (r = -0.578, n = 14, P < 0.05) and AC/M (r = -0.657, n = 14, P < 0.05) had high negative correlation with MDI concentration while airflow (r = -0.475, n = 14, P < 0.05) and capture velocity (r = -0.415, n = 14, P = 0.07) had moderate negative correlation with MDI concentration. Multiple linear regression revealed process temperature and capture velocity made a statistically significant and unique contribution in estimating MDI concentration (F (2, 11) = 10.99, P < 0.05) with an adjusted R2 of 0.61, explaining 61% of the variability in MDI concentration. This investigation contributed to an understudied STBL industry by targeting

  13. Effect of 2,4-0 and 2,4,5-T on water quality after a spraying treatment

    Jay S. Krammes; David B. Willets

    1964-01-01

    Stream pollution has not resulted from removing and chemically spraying vegetation at the bottom of Monroe Canyon on the San Dimas Experimental Forest. The riparian zone and intermediate slopes were handsprayed several times with a mixture of 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T herbicide. In another study, brush on side slopes was cut and sprayed. Soil samples taken the first month...

  14. Influence of Cold-Sprayed, Warm-Sprayed, and Plasma-Sprayed Layers Deposition on Fatigue Properties of Steel Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizek, J.; Matejkova, M.; Dlouhy, I.; Siska, F.; Kay, C. M.; Karthikeyan, J.; Kuroda, S.; Kovarik, O.; Siegl, J.; Loke, K.; Khor, Khiam Aik

    2015-06-01

    Titanium powder was deposited onto steel specimens using four thermal spray technologies: plasma spray, low-pressure cold spray, portable cold spray, and warm spray. The specimens were then subjected to strain-controlled cyclic bending test in a dedicated in-house built device. The crack propagation was monitored by observing the changes in the resonance frequency of the samples. For each series, the number of cycles corresponding to a pre-defined specimen cross-section damage was used as a performance indicator. It was found that the grit-blasting procedure did not alter the fatigue properties of the steel specimens (1% increase as compared to as-received set), while the deposition of coatings via all four thermal spray technologies significantly increased the measured fatigue lives. The three high-velocity technologies led to an increase of relative lives to 234% (low-pressure cold spray), 210% (portable cold spray), and 355% (warm spray) and the deposition using plasma spray led to an increase of relative lives to 303%. The observed increase of high-velocity technologies (cold and warm spray) could be attributed to a combination of homogeneous fatigue-resistant coatings and induction of peening stresses into the substrates via the impingement of the high-kinetic energy particles. Given the intrinsic character of the plasma jet (low-velocity impact of semi/molten particles) and the mostly ceramic character of the coating (oxides, nitrides), a hypothesis based on non-linear coatings behavior is provided in the paper.

  15. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S [Oakland, CA; Paul, Phillip H [Livermore, CA; Schoeniger, Luke [Pittsford, NY

    2005-11-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  16. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2002-01-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  17. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    SciT

    Beetz, Charles

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. Inmore » short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.« less

  18. Sprayer technology: reduce spray drift

    Enhancing environmental quality and sustaining the economic viability of food production are keys to sustainable agriculture. Modern vegetable production uses a variety of materials to manage pest problems. Selecting the proper spray nozzle for the application of liquid products is critical to red...

  19. An indoor air quality evaluation in a residential retrofit project using spray polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shen; Ecoff, Scott; Sebroski, John; Miller, Jason; Rickenbacker, Harold; Bilec, Melissa

    2018-05-01

    Understanding of indoor air quality (IAQ) during and after spray polyurethane foam (SPF) application is essential to protect the health of both workers and building occupants. Previous efforts such as field monitoring, micro-chamber/spray booth emission studies, and fate/transport modeling have been conducted to understand the chemical exposure of SPF and guide risk mitigation strategies. However, each type of research has its limitation and can only reveal partial information on the relationship between SPF and IAQ. A comprehensive study is truly needed to integrate the experimental design and analytical testing methods in the field/chamber studies with the mathematical tools employed in the modeling studies. This study aims to bridge this gap and provide a more comprehensive understanding on the impact of SPF to IAQ. The field sampling plan of this research aims to evaluate the airborne concentrations of methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, tris(1-chlor-2-propyl)phosphate (TCPP), trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (Solstice TM ), and airborne particles. Modifications to existing MDI sampling and analytical methods were made so that level of quantification was improved. In addition, key fate and transport modeling input parameters such as air changes per hour and airborne particle size distribution were measured. More importantly, TCPP accumulation onto materials was evaluated, which is important to study the fate and transport of semi-volatile organic compounds. The IAQ results showed that after spray application was completed in the entire building, airborne concentrations decreased for all chemicals monitored. However, it is our recommendation that during SPF application, no one should return to the application site without proper personal protection equipment as long as there are active spray activities in the building. The comparison between this field study and a recent chamber study proved surface sorption

  20. Radiation-Spray Coupling for Realistic Flow Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Asrag, Hossam; Iannetti, Anthony C.

    2011-01-01

    Three Large Eddy Simulations (LES) for a lean-direct injection (LDI) combustor are performed and compared. In addition to the cold flow simulation, the effect of radiation coupling with the multi-physics reactive flow is analyzed. The flame let progress variable approach is used as a subgrid combustion model combined with a stochastic subgrid model for spray atomization and an optically thin radiation model. For accurate chemistry modeling, a detailed Jet-A surrogate mechanism is utilized. To achieve realistic inflow, a simple recycling technique is performed at the inflow section upstream of the swirler. Good comparison is shown with the experimental data mean and root mean square profiles. The effect of combustion is found to change the shape and size of the central recirculation zone. Radiation is found to change the spray dynamics and atomization by changing the heat release distribution and the local temperature values impacting the evaporation process. The simulation with radiation modeling shows wider range of droplet size distribution by altering the evaporation rate. The current study proves the importance of radiation modeling for accurate prediction in realistic spray combustion configurations, even for low pressure systems.

  1. CFD Simulation of Aerial Crop Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Zamri; Qiang, Kua Yong; Mohd, Sofian; Rosly, Nurhayati

    2016-11-01

    Aerial crop spraying, also known as crop dusting, is made for aerial application of pesticides or fertilizer. An agricultural aircraft which is converted from an aircraft has been built to combine with the aerial crop spraying for the purpose. In recent years, many studies on the aerial crop spraying were conducted because aerial application is the most economical, large and rapid treatment for the crops. The main objective of this research is to study the airflow of aerial crop spraying system using Computational Fluid Dynamics. This paper is focus on the effect of aircraft speed and nozzle orientation on the distribution of spray droplet at a certain height. Successful and accurate of CFD simulation will improve the quality of spray during the real situation and reduce the spray drift. The spray characteristics and efficiency are determined from the calculated results of CFD. Turbulence Model (k-ɛ Model) is used for the airflow in the fluid domain to achieve a more accurate simulation. Furthermore, spray simulation is done by setting the Flat-fan Atomizer Model of Discrete Phase Model (DPM) at the nozzle exit. The interaction of spray from each flat-fan atomizer can also be observed from the simulation. The evaluation of this study is validation and grid dependency study using field data from industry.

  2. Predictions of spray combustion interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Solomon, A. S. P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Mean and fluctuating phase velocities; mean particle mass flux; particle size; and mean gas-phase Reynolds stress, composition and temperature were measured in stationary, turbulent, axisymmetric, and flows which conform to the boundary layer approximations while having well-defined initial and boundary conditions in dilute particle-laden jets, nonevaporating sprays, and evaporating sprays injected into a still air environment. Three models of the processes, typical of current practice, were evaluated. The local homogeneous flow and deterministic separated flow models did not provide very satisfactory predictions over the present data base. In contrast, the stochastic separated flow model generally provided good predictions and appears to be an attractive approach for treating nonlinear interphase transport processes in turbulent flows containing particles (drops).

  3. Sprays and Cartan projective connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, D. J.

    2004-10-01

    Around 80 years ago, several authors (for instance H. Weyl, T.Y. Thomas, J. Douglas and J.H.C. Whitehead) studied the projective geometry of paths, using the methods of tensor calculus. The principal object of study was a spray, namely a homogeneous second-order differential equation, or more generally a projective equivalence class of sprays. At around the same time, E. Cartan studied the same topic from a different point of view, by imagining a projective space attached to a manifold, or, more generally, attached to a `manifold of elements'; the infinitesimal `glue' may be interpreted in modern language as a Cartan projective connection on a principal bundle. This paper describes the geometrical relationship between these two points of view.

  4. Modeling the spray casting process

    SciT

    El-Haggar, S.M.; Muoio, N.; Crowe, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    Spray forming is a process in which a liquid metal is atomized into very small droplets and deposited on a substrate. These small droplets cool very rapidly in a high velocity gas jet, giving rise to smaller grain structure and improved mechanical properties. This paper presents a numerical model, based on the trajectory approach, for the velocity and thermal properties of the droplets in the jet and predicts the deposition pattern and the state of the droplets upon contact with the substrate.

  5. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    SciT

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K.; Chun, Jung-Hoon

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets thatmore » can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.« less

  6. Cold Spray for Repair of Magnesium Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    powder material. Other advantages of the Cold Spray process include:  It provides extremely dense coatings with virtually no inclusions or cracks ... crack on insertion of Rosan fitting and does not reclaim the mechanical properties of the Mg alloy. It is expected that the use of Cold Spray coating...Spray process include:  Extremely dense coatings with virtually no inclusions or cracks .  Retains properties and microstructure of initial powder

  7. Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    exploration, and 47 production platforms—will face increased hazards from freezing sea spray. 48 Based on sea spray observations made with a cloud...produce higher waves (e.g., Perrie et al. 2012; Asplin et 65 al. 2012). Such evolving conditions will present new hazards for artificial structures like...wind and waves themselves will create hazards for 68 these structures, my interest here is the attendant sea spray produced. 69 Jones and Andreas

  8. Plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Douglas S.; Folser, George R.

    2006-01-10

    A plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer is provided. The interlayer has particular application in connection with a solid oxide fuel cell used within a power generation system. The fuel cell advantageously comprises an air electrode, a plasma sprayed interlayer disposed on at least a portion of the air electrode, a plasma sprayed electrolyte disposed on at least a portion of the interlayer, and a fuel electrode applied on at least a portion of the electrolyte.

  9. Spray combustion model improvement study, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study involves the development of numerical and physical modeling in spray combustion. These modeling efforts are mainly motivated to improve the physical submodels of turbulence, combustion, atomization, dense spray effects, and group vaporization. The present mathematical formulation can be easily implemented in any time-marching multiple pressure correction methodologies such as MAST code. A sequence of validation cases includes the nonevaporating, evaporating and_burnin dense_sprays.

  10. Dynamic characteristics of pulsed supersonic fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, K.; Matthujak, A.; Takayama, K.; Milton, B. E.; Behnia, M.

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the dynamic characteristics of pulsed, supersonic liquid fuel sprays or jets injected into ambient air. Simple, single hole nozzles were employed with the nozzle sac geometries being varied. Different fuel types, diesel fuel, bio-diesel, kerosene, and gasoline were used to determine the effects of fuel properties on the spray characteristics. A vertical two-stage light gas gun was employed as a projectile launcher to provide a high velocity impact to produce the liquid jet. The injection pressure was around 0.88-1.24 GPa in all cases. The pulsed, supersonic fuel sprays were visualized by using a high-speed video camera and shadowgraph method. The spray tip penetration and velocity attenuation and other characteristics were examined and are described here. An instantaneous spray tip velocity of 1,542 m/s (Mach number 4.52) was obtained. However, this spray tip velocity can be sustained for only a very short period (a few microseconds). It then attenuates very quickly. The phenomenon of multiple high frequency spray pulses generated by a single shot impact and the changed in the angle of the shock structure during the spray flight, which had already been observed in previous studies, is again noted. Multiple shock waves from the conical nozzle spray were also clearly captured.

  11. Effect of spray application technique on spray deposition in greenhouse strawberries and tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Braekman, Pascal; Foque, Dieter; Messens, Winy; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine; Pieters, Jan G; Nuyttens, David

    2010-02-01

    Increasingly, Flemish greenhouse growers are using spray booms instead of spray guns to apply plant protection products. Although the advantages of spray booms are well known, growers still have many questions concerning nozzle choice and settings. Spray deposition using a vertical spray boom in tomatoes and strawberries was compared with reference spray equipment. Five different settings of nozzle type, size and pressure were tested with the spray boom. In general, the standard vertical spray boom performed better than the reference spray equipment in strawberries (spray gun) and in tomatoes (air-assisted sprayer). Nozzle type and settings significantly affected spray deposition and crop penetration. Highest overall deposits in strawberries were achieved using air-inclusion or extended-range nozzles. In tomatoes, the extended-range nozzles and the twin air-inclusion nozzles performed best. Using smaller-size extended-range nozzles above the recommended pressure range resulted in lower deposits, especially inside the crop canopy. The use of a vertical spray boom is a promising technique for applying plant protection products in a safe and efficient way in tomatoes and strawberries, and nozzle choice and setting should be carefully considered.

  12. Effects of nozzle type and spray angle on spray deposition in ivy pot plants.

    PubMed

    Foqué, Dieter; Nuyttens, David

    2011-02-01

    Fewer plant protection products are now authorised for use in ornamental growings. Frequent spraying with the same product or a suboptimal technique can lead to resistance in pests and diseases. Better application techniques could improve the sustainable use of the plant protection products still available. Spray boom systems--instead of the still predominantly used spray guns--might improve crop protection management in greenhouses considerably. The effect of nozzle type, spray pressure and spray angle on spray deposition and coverage in ivy pot plants was studied, with a focus on crop penetration and spraying the bottom side of the leaves in this dense crop. The experiments showed a significant and important effect of collector position on deposition and coverage in the plant. Although spray deposition and coverage on the bottom side of the leaves are generally low, they could be improved 3.0-4.9-fold using the appropriate application technique. When using a spray boom in a dense crop, the nozzle choice, spray pressure and spray angle should be well considered. The hollow-cone, the air-inclusion flat-fan and the standard flat-fan nozzle with an inclined spray angle performed best because of the effect of swirling droplets, droplets with a high momentum and droplet direction respectively. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Wind tunnel and field evaluation of drift from aerial spray applications with multiple spray formulations

    The impact of different spray tank modifiers into an active ingredient spray mixture on spray atomization and in-field behavior under aerial application conditions were examined. Wind tunnel tests demonstrated that active ingredient solutions potentially results in significantly different atomizati...

  14. Spray drift reduction evaluations of spray nozzles using a standardized testing protocol

    The development and testing of drift reduction technologies has come to the forefront of application research in the past few years in the United States. Drift reduction technologies (DRTs) can be spray nozzles, sprayer modifications, spray delivery assistance, spray property modifiers (adjuvants),...

  15. Effect of Ceramic Particle Velocity on Cold Spray Deposition of Metal-Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sova, A.; Kosarev, V. F.; Papyrin, A.; Smurov, I.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, metal-ceramic coatings are cold sprayed taking into account the spray parameters of both metal and ceramic particles. The effect of the ceramic particle velocity on the process of metal-ceramic coating formation and the coating properties is analyzed. Copper and aluminum powders are used as metal components. Two fractions of aluminum oxide and silicon carbide are sprayed in the tests. The ceramic particle velocity is varied by the particle injection into different zones of the gas flow: the subsonic and supersonic parts of the nozzle and the free jet after the nozzle exit. The experiments demonstrated the importance of the ceramic particle velocity for the stability of the process: Ceramic particles accelerated to a high enough velocity penetrate into the coating, while low-velocity ceramic particles rebound from its surface.

  16. Supplementary Microstructural Features Induced During Laser Surface Melting of Thermally Sprayed Inconel 625 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nauman; Voisey, K. T.; McCartney, D. G.

    2014-02-01

    Laser surface melting of thermally sprayed coatings has the potential to enhance their corrosion properties by incorporating favorable microstructural changes. Besides homogenizing the as-sprayed structure, laser melting may induce certain microstructural modifications (i.e., supplementary features) in addition to those that directly improve the corrosion performance. Such features, being a direct result of the laser treatment process, are described in this paper which is part of a broader study in which high velocity oxy-fuel sprayed Inconel 625 coatings on mild-steel substrates were treated with a diode laser and the modified microstructure characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The laser treated coating features several different zones, including a region with a microstructure in which there is a continuous columnar dendritic structure through a network of retained oxide stringers.

  17. Aerial electrostatic spray deposition and canopy penetration in cotton

    Spray deposition on abaxial and adaxial leaf surfaces along with canopy penetration are essential for insect control and foliage defoliation in cotton production agriculture. Researchers have reported that electrostatically charged sprays have increased spray deposit onto these surfaces under widel...

  18. Spray droplet size, drift potential, and risks to nontarget organisms from aerially applied glyphosate for coca control in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Andrew J; Solomon, Keith R; Marshall, E J P

    2009-01-01

    A wind tunnel atomization study was conducted to measure the emission droplet size spectra for water and Glyphos (a glyphosate formulation sold in Colombia) + Cosmo-flux sprays for aerial application to control coca and poppy crops in Colombia. The droplet size spectra were measured in a wind tunnel for an Accu-Flo nozzle (with 16 size 0.085 [2.16 mm] orifices), under appropriate simulated aircraft speeds (up to 333 km/h), using a laser diffraction instrument covering a dynamic size range for droplets of 0.5 to 3,500 microm. The spray drift potential of the glyphosate was modeled using the AGDISP spray application and drift model, using input parameters representative of those occurring in Colombia for typical aerial application operations. The droplet size spectra for tank mixes containing glyphosate and Cosmo-Flux were considerably finer than water and became finer with higher aircraft speeds. The tank mix with 44% glyphosate had a D(v0.5) of 128 microm, while the value at the 4.9% glyphosate rate was 140 microm. These are classified as very fine to fine sprays. Despite being relatively fine, modeling showed that the droplets would not evaporate as rapidly as most similarly sized agricultural sprays because the nonvolatile proportion of the tank mix (active and inert adjuvant ingredients) was large. Thus, longer range drift is small and most drift that does occur will deposit relatively close to the application area. Drift will only occur downwind and, with winds of velocity less than the modeled maximum of 9 km/h, the drift distance would be substantially reduced. Spray drift potential might be additionally reduced through various practices such as the selection of nozzles, tank mix adjuvants, aircraft speeds, and spray pressures that would produce coarser sprays. Species sensitivity distributions to glyphosate were constructed for plants and amphibians. Based on modeled drift and 5th centile concentrations, appropriate no-spray buffer zones (distance from the

  19. Effect of Turning and Ball Burnishing on the Microstructure and Residual Stress Distribution in Stainless Steel Cold Spray Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sova, A.; Courbon, C.; Valiorgue, F.; Rech, J.; Bertrand, Ph.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an experimental study of influence of machining by turning and ball burnishing on the surface morphology, structure and residual stress distribution of cold spray 17-4 PH stainless steel deposits is provided. It is shown that cold spray deposits could be machined by turning under parameters closed to turning of bulk 17-4 PH stainless steel. Ball burnishing process permits to decrease surface roughness. Cross-sectional observation revealed that the turning and ball burnishing process allowed microstructure changes in the coating near-surface zone. In particular, significant particle deformation and particle boundary fragmentation is observed. Measurements of residual stresses showed that residual stresses in the as-spray deposit are compressive. After machining by turning, tensile residual stresses in the near-surface zone were induced. Further surface finishing of turned coating by ball burnishing allowed the establishment of the compressive residual stresses in the coating.

  20. Holodiscus (K. Koch) Maxim.: ocean-spray

    Nancy L. Shaw; Emerenciana G. Hurd; Peter F. Stickney

    2008-01-01

    Holodiscus is a taxonomically complex genus including about 6 species of western North America and northern South America (Hitchcock and others 1961; Ley 1943). The 2 generally recognized North American species (table 1) - creambush ocean-spray and gland ocean-spray - are deciduous, multistemmed shrubs with simple, alternate, deciduous, toothed to shallowly lobed,...

  1. Summary of the Blackmo 88 spray experiment

    D. R. Miller; W. E. Yendol; M. L. McManus; D. E. Anderson; K. Mierzejewski

    1991-01-01

    The Blackmo 88 spray trial experiment was conducted for two primary purposes: To quantify the effects of local micrometeorological processes, in and near the canopy, on the deposition patterns of aerially applied BT in a mature oak forest; To generate a data set containing simultaneous measurements of spray deposition and detailed micrometeorology, in a canopy of known...

  2. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  3. Monitoring Coating Thickness During Plasma Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution video measures thickness accurately without interfering with process. Camera views cylindrical part through filter during plasma spraying. Lamp blacklights part, creating high-contrast silhouette on video monitor. Width analyzer counts number of lines in image of part after each pass of spray gun. Layer-by-layer measurements ensure adequate coat built up without danger of exceeding required thickness.

  4. Effect of Spray Cone Angle on Flame Stability in an Annular Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Kumar, S. Kishore; Chandel, Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Effect of fuel spray cone angle in an aerogas turbine combustor has been studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and full-scale combustor testing. For CFD analysis, a 22.5° sector of an annular combustor is modeled and the governing equations are solved using the eddy dissipation combustion model in ANSYS CFX computational package. The analysis has been carried out at 125 kPa and 303 K inlet conditions for spray cone angles from 60° to 140°. The lean blowout limits are established by studying the behavior of combustion zone during transient engine operation from an initial steady-state condition. The computational study has been followed by testing the practical full-scale annular combustor in an aerothermal test facility. The experimental result is in a good agreement with the computational predictions. The lean blowout fuel-air ratio increases as the spray cone angle is decreased at constant operating pressure and temperature. At higher spray cone angle, the flame and high-temperature zone moves upstream close to atomizer face and a uniform flame is sustained over a wide region causing better flame stability.

  5. Combustion of liquid sprays at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The combustion of pressure atomized fuel sprays in high pressure stagnant air was studied. Measurements were made of flame and spray boundaries at pressures in the range 0.1-9 MPa for methanol and n-pentane. At the higher test pressure levels, critical phenomena are important. The experiments are compared with theoretical predictions based on a locally homogeneous two-phase flow model. The theory correctly predicted the trends of the data, but underestimates flame and spray boundaries by 30-50 percent, indicating that slip is still important for the present experiments (Sauter mean diameters of 30 microns at atmospheric pressure under cold flow conditions). Since the sprays are shorter at high pressures, slip effects are still important even though the density ratio of the phases approach one another as the droplets heat up. The model indicates the presence of a region where condensed water is present within the spray and provides a convenient means of treating supercritical phenomena.

  6. Tapered plug foam spray apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A two-component foam spray gun is readily disassembled for cleaning. It includes a body (1) with reactant (12, 14) and purge gas (16) inlet ports. A moldable valve packing (32) inside the body has a tapered conical interior surface (142), and apertures which match the reactant ports. A valve/tip (40) has a conical outer surface (48) which mates with the valve packing (32). The valve/tip (40) is held in place by a moldable packing washer (34), held at non-constant pressure by a screw (36, 38). The interior of the valve/tip (40) houses a removable mixing chamber (50). The mixing chamber (50) has direct flow orifices (60) and an auxiliary flow path (58, 60) which ameliorate pressure surges. The spray gun can be disassembled for cleaning without disturbing the seal, by removing the valve/tip (40) to the rear, thereby breaking it free of the conical packing. Rotation of the valve/tip (40) relative to the body (1) shuts off the reactant flow, and starts the purge gas flow.

  7. LSPRAY-IV: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    LSPRAY-IV is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray. Some important research areas covered as a part of the code development are: (1) the extension of combined CFD/scalar-Monte- Carlo-PDF method to spray modeling, (2) the multi-component liquid spray modeling, and (3) the assessment of various atomization models used in spray calculations. The current version contains the extension to the modeling of superheated sprays. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers.

  8. Effect of spray angle and spray volume on deposition of a medium droplet spray with air support in ivy pot plants.

    PubMed

    Foqué, Dieter; Pieters, Jan G; Nuyttens, David

    2014-03-01

    Spray boom systems, an alternative to the predominantly-used spray guns, have the potential to considerably improve crop protection management in glasshouses. Based on earlier experiments, the further optimization of the deposits of a medium spray quality extended range flat fan nozzle type using easy adjustable spray boom settings was examined. Using mineral chelate tracers and water sensitive papers, the spray results were monitored at three plant levels, on the upper side and the underside of the leaves, and on some off-target collectors. In addition, the deposition datasets of all tree experiments were compared. The data showed that the most efficient spray distribution with the medium spray quality flat fan nozzles was found with a 30° forward angled spray combined with air support and an application rate of 1000 L ha(-1) . This technique resulted in a more uniform deposition in the dense canopy and increased spray deposition on the lower side of the leaves compared with the a standard spray boom application. Applying 1000 L ha(-1) in two subsequent runs instead of one did not seem to show any added value. Spray deposition can be improved hugely simply by changing some spray boom settings like nozzle type, angling the spray, using air support and adjusting the spray volume to the crop. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Polydisperse effects in jet spray flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Noam; Greenberg, J. Barry

    2018-01-01

    A laminar jet polydisperse spray diffusion flame is analysed mathematically for the first time using an extension of classical similarity solutions for gaseous jet flames. The analysis enables a comparison to be drawn between conditions for flame stability or flame blow-out for purely gaseous flames and for spray flames. It is found that, in contrast to the Schmidt number criteria relevant to gas flames, droplet size and initial spray polydispersity play a critical role in determining potential flame scenarios. Some qualitative agreement for lift-off height is found when comparing predictions of the theory and sparse independent experimental evidence from the literature.

  10. Numerical parametric studies of spray combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    A coupled numerical algorithm has been developed for studies of combustion instabilities in spray-driven liquid rocket engines. The model couples gas and liquid phase physics using the method of fractional steps. Also introduced is a novel, efficient methodology for accounting for spray formation through direct solution of liquid phase equations. Preliminary parametric studies show marked sensitivity of spray penetration and geometry to droplet diameter, considerations of liquid core, and acoustic interactions. Less sensitivity was shown to the combustion model type although more rigorous (multi-step) formulations may be needed for the differences to become apparent.

  11. Laser Doppler velocimeter aerial spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Eberle, W. R.; Howle, R. E.; Shrider, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the location, spatial extent, and relative concentration of airborne spray clouds generated by agricultural aircraft is described. The measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and the results of the flight tests are discussed. The cross section of the aerial spray cloud and the observed location, extent, and relative concentration of the airborne particulates are presented. It is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to track and monitor the transport and dispersion of aerial spray generated by an agricultural aircraft.

  12. Electrical Resistivity of Wire Arc Sprayed Zn and Cu Coatings for In-Mold-Metal-Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.; Liao, X.; Hopmann, Ch; Ochotta, P.

    2018-06-01

    Electrical functionalities can be integrated into plastic parts by integrating thermally sprayed metal coatings into the non-conductive base material. Thermally sprayed conducting tracks for power and signal transmission are one example. In this case, the electrical resistance or resistivity of the coatings should be investigated. Therefore, the electrical resistivity of wire arc sprayed Zn and Cu coatings has been investigated. In case of Zn coatings, spray distance, gas pressure and wire diameter could be identified as significant influencing parameters on the electrical resistivity. In contrast, process gas, gas pressure and voltage do have a significant influence on the electrical resistivity of Cu coatings. Through the use of the In-Mold-Metal-Spraying method (IMMS), thermal degradation can be avoided by transferring thermally sprayed coating from a mold insert onto the plastic part. Therefore, the influence of the transfer process on the electrical resistance of the coatings has also been investigated.

  13. Evaluation of Convergent Spray Technology(TM) Spray Process for Roof Coating Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, J.; Creighton, B.; Hall, T.; Hamlin, K.; Howard, T.

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of(CST) Convergent Spray Technology (Trademark) for the roofing industry. This was accomplished by producing an environmentally compliant coating utilization recycled materials, a CST(Trademark) spray process portable application cart, and hand-held applicator with a CST(Trademark) spray process nozzle. The project culminated with application of this coating to a nine hundred sixty square foot metal for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama.

  14. Supersonic laser spray of aluminium alloy on a ceramic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Lusquiños, F.; Comesaña, R.; Quintero, F.; Pou, J.

    2007-12-01

    Applying a ceramic coating onto a metallic substrate to improve its wear resistance or corrosion resistance has attracted the interest of many researchers during decades. However, only few works explore the possibility to apply a metallic layer onto a ceramic material. This work presents a novel technique to coat ceramic materials with metals: the supersonic laser spraying. In this technique a laser beam is focused on the surface of the precursor metal in such a way that the metal is transformed to the liquid state in the beam-metal interaction zone. A supersonic jet expels the molten material and propels it to the surface of the ceramic substrate. In this study, we present the preliminary results obtained using the supersonic laser spray to coat a commercial cordierite ceramic plate with an Al-Cu alloy using a 3.5 kW CO 2 laser and a supersonic jet of Argon. Coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and interferometric profilometry.

  15. Assessing Reliability of Cold Spray Sputter Targets in Photovoltaic Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardikar, Kedar; Vlcek, Johannes; Bheemreddy, Venkata; Juliano, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Cold spray has been used to manufacture more than 800 Cu-In-Ga (CIG) sputter targets for deposition of high-efficiency photovoltaic thin films. It is a preferred technique since it enables high deposit purity and transfer of non-equilibrium alloy states to the target material. In this work, an integrated approach to reliability assessment of such targets with deposit weight in excess of 50 lb. is undertaken, involving thermal-mechanical characterization of the material in as-deposited condition, characterization of the interface adhesion on cylindrical substrate in as-deposited condition, and developing means to assess target integrity under thermal-mechanical loads during the physical vapor deposition (PVD) sputtering process. Mechanical characterization of cold spray deposited CIG alloy is accomplished through the use of indentation testing and adaptation of Brazilian disk test. A custom lever test was developed to characterize adhesion along the cylindrical interface between the CIG deposit and cylindrical substrate, overcoming limitations of current standards. A cohesive zone model for crack initiation and propagation at the deposit interface is developed and validated using the lever test and later used to simulate the potential catastrophic target failure in the PVD process. It is shown that this approach enables reliability assessment of sputter targets and improves robustness.

  16. Spray nozzle investigation for the Improved Helicopter Icing Spray System (IHISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Andrew A.; Oldenburg, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A contract has been awarded by the U.S. Army to design, fabricate and test a replacement for the existing Helicopter Icing Spray System. Data are shown for extensive bench and icing tunnel test programs used to select and modify an improved spray nozzle. The IHISS, capable of deployment from any CH-47 helicopter, will include new icing spray nozzles and pneumatic pressure source, and a significantly larger water tank and spray boom. The resulting system will provide a significantly larger icing cloud with droplet characteristics closely matching natural icing conditions.

  17. Layered growth with bottom-spray granulation for spray deposition of drug.

    PubMed

    Er, Dawn Z L; Liew, Celine V; Heng, Paul W S

    2009-07-30

    The gap in scientific knowledge on bottom-spray fluidized bed granulation has emphasized the need for more studies in this area. This paper comparatively studied the applicability of a modified bottom-spray process and the conventional top-spray process for the spray deposition of a micronized drug during granulation. The differences in circulation pattern, mode of growth and resultant granule properties between the two processes were highlighted. The more ordered and consistent circulation pattern of particles in a bottom-spray fluidized bed was observed to give rise to layered granule growth. This resulted in better drug content uniformity among the granule batches and within a granule batch. The processes' sensitivities to wetting and feed material characteristics were also compared and found to differ markedly. Less robustness to differing process conditions was observed for the top-spray process. The resultant bottom-spray granules formed were observed to be less porous, more spherical and had good flow properties. The bottom-spray technique can thus be potentially applied for the spray deposition of drug during granulation and was observed to be a good alternative to the conventional technique for preparing granules.

  18. Direct morphological comparison of vacuum plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates were produced using two thermal spray techniques vacuum plasma spraying and detonation gun spraying. X-ray diffraction was used to compare crystallinity and residual stresses in the coatings. Porosity was measured using optical microscopy in conjunction with an image analysis system. Scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness measurements were used to characterise the surface morphologies of the coatings. The vacuum plasma sprayed coatings were found to have a lower residual stress, a higher crystallinity and a higher level of porosity than the detonation gun coatings. It is concluded that consideration needs to be given to the significance of such variations within the clinical context.

  19. Exposures to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate during polyurethane spray painting in the U.S. Air Force.

    PubMed

    Carlton, G N; England, E C

    2000-09-01

    1,6-Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) exposures were measured during polyurethane enamel spray painting at four Air Force bases. Breathing zone samples were collected for HDI monomer and polyisocyanates (oligomers) using three sampling methods: NIOSH Method 5521, the Iso-Chek sampler, and the total aerosol mass method (TAMM). Exposures to HDI monomer are low when compared to current occupational exposure limits; the highest 8-hr time-weighted average (TWA) exposure found was 3.5 micrograms/m3, below the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) of 34 micrograms/m3. HDI oligomer levels were higher; mean task exposures indicated by either the Iso-Chek sampler or TAMM are above the Oregon ceiling limit of 1 mg/m3. Eight-hour TWA exposures, however, were much lower, with only one exceeding the Oregon standard of 0.5 mg/m3. Poor worker practices commonly observed during this study included: standing in downwind positions so paint overspray passed through breathing zones; spraying toward other painters; and using excessive paint spray gun air cap pressures. Workers should stand in upwind orientation relative to the aircraft being painted, causing overspray to move away from the painter's breathing zone; adjust their position to prevent spraying other painters or limit paint application to one worker at a time; and use air cap pressure gauges prior to spraying to limit spray gun air cap pressures and reduce paint overspray generation rates. These improved techniques will result in reduced worker exposures to isocyanates.

  20. Preparation and characterization of sprayed FTO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Lefdil, M.; Diaz, R.; Bihri, H.; Aouaj, M. Ait; Rueda, F.

    2007-06-01

    Fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) thin films have been prepared by spray pyrolysis technique with no further annealing. Films with 2.5% of fluorine grown at 400 °C present a single phase and exhibit a tetragonal structure with lattice parameters a = 4.687 Å and c = 3.160 Å. Scanning electron micrographs showed homogeneous surfaces with average grain size around 190 nm. The films are transparent in the visible zone and exhibit a high reflectance in the near infrared region. The best electrical resistivity was 6.3 × 10-4 Ω cm for FTO with 2.5% of fluorine. The ratio of transmittance in the visible to the sheet resistance are in the 0.57 × 10-2 1.96 × 10-2 {Ω }-1 range.

  1. Partially premixed prevalorized kerosene spray combustion in turbulent flow

    SciT

    Chrigui, M.; Ahmadi, W.; Sadiki, A.

    2010-04-15

    A detailed numerical simulation of kerosene spray combustion was carried out on a partially premixed, prevaporized, three-dimensional configuration. The focus was on the flame temperature profile dependency on the length of the pre-vaporization zone. The results were analyzed and compared to experimental data. A fundamental study was performed to observe the temperature variation and flame flashback. Changes were made to the droplet diameter, kerosene flammability limits, a combustion model parameter and the location of the combustion initialization. Investigations were performed for atmospheric pressure, inlet air temperature of 90 C and a global equivalence ratio of 0.7. The simulations were carriedmore » out using the Eulerian Lagrangian procedure under a fully two-way coupling. The Bray-Moss-Libby model was adjusted to account for the partially premixed combustion. (author)« less

  2. LSPRAY-II: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2004-01-01

    LSPRAY-II is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-II, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  3. LSPRAY-III: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    LSPRAY-III is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-III, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  4. Spray bottle apparatus with pressure multiplying pistons

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Gordon, Norman R.; DeFord, Henry S.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is acted upon the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  5. Spray bottle apparatus with force multiply pistons

    DOEpatents

    Eschbach, Eugene A.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and corresponding piston which is acted upon by the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  6. 21 CFR 524.2482 - Triamcinolone spray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Amount. Apply sufficient pump sprays to uniformly and thoroughly wet the affected areas while avoiding... other day for an additional 14 days (28 days total). (2) Indications for use. For the control of...

  7. 21 CFR 524.2482 - Triamcinolone spray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Amount. Apply sufficient pump sprays to uniformly and thoroughly wet the affected areas while avoiding... other day for an additional 14 days (28 days total). (2) Indications for use. For the control of...

  8. Fuel thermal stability effects on spray characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Nickolaus, D.

    1987-01-01

    The propensity of a heated hydrocarbon fuel toward solids deposition within a fuel injector is investigated experimentally. Fuel is arranged to flow through the injector at constant temperature, pressure, and flow rate and the pressure drop across the nozzle is monitored to provide an indication of the amount of deposition. After deposits have formed, the nozzle is removed from the test rig and its spray performance is compared with its performance before deposition. The spray characteristics measured include mean drop size, drop-size distribution, and radial and circumferential fuel distribution. It is found that small amounts of deposition can produce severe distortion of the fuel spray pattern. More extensive deposition restores spray uniformity, but the nozzle flow rate is seriously curtailed.

  9. LSPRAY-V: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    LSPRAY-V is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with unstructured grids and massively parallel computers. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray encountered over a wide range of operating conditions in modern aircraft engine development. It could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-V, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  10. Dynamics of flare sprays. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Martin, S. F.; Hansen, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable passband filters, multislit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronagraphs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occurred between 1969-1974 it is concluded that (1) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (2) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumable magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the materials draining back down along one or both legs of the loop.

  11. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    PubMed

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations.

  13. Ventilation Guidance for Spray Polyurethane Foam Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Properly designed ventilation can reduce airborne levels of aerosols, mists, and vapors generated during spray application and can help protect SPF applicators, helpers, and others who may be working in adjacent areas.

  14. Atypical Presentations of Methemoglobinemia from Benzocaine Spray

    PubMed Central

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Vierra, Joseph R; Evans, Samuel J

    2011-01-01

    Widely used for local anesthesia, especially prior to endoscopic procedures, benzocaine spray is one of the most common causes of iatrogenic methemoglobinemia. The authors report an atypical case of methemoglobinemia in a woman presenting with pale skin and severe hypoxemia, after a delayed repeat exposure to benzocaine spray. Early recognition and prompt management of methemoglobinemia is needed in order to lessen morbidity and mortality from this entity. PMID:22162610

  15. Atypical presentations of methemoglobinemia from benzocaine spray.

    PubMed

    Tantisattamo, Ekamol; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Vierra, Joseph R; Evans, Samuel J

    2011-06-01

    Widely used for local anesthesia, especially prior to endoscopic procedures, benzocaine spray is one of the most common causes of iatrogenic methemoglobinemia. The authors report an atypical case of methemoglobinemia in a woman presenting with pale skin and severe hypoxemia, after a delayed repeat exposure to benzocaine spray. Early recognition and prompt management of methemoglobinemia is needed in order to lessen morbidity and mortality from this entity.

  16. Laser modification of thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. A.; Fomin, A. D.; Naumkin, A. O.; Pekshev, P. Iu.; Smurov, I. Iu.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental results are reported on the modification of thermally sprayed coatings on steels and aluminum alloys using pulsed YAG and CW CO2 lasers. In particular, results obtained for self-fluxing Ni9CrBSi powders, ZRO2 ceramic, and titanium are examined. It is shown that the laser treatment of thermally sprayed coatings significantly improves their physicomechanical properties; it also makes it possible to obtain refractory coatings on low-melting substrates with good coating-substrate adhesion.

  17. Automatic targeting of plasma spray gun

    DOEpatents

    Abbatiello, Leonard A.; Neal, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    A means for monitoring the material portion in the flame of a plasma spray gun during spraying operations is provided. A collimated detector, sensitive to certain wavelengths of light emission, is used to locate the centroid of the material with each pass of the gun. The response from the detector is then relayed to the gun controller to be used to automatically realign the gun.

  18. Plasma sprayed coatings on crankshaft used steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahu, G.; Munteanu, C.; Istrate, B.; Benchea, M.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma spray coatings may be an alternative to conventional heat treatment of main journals and crankpins of the crankshaft. The applications of plasma coatings are various and present multiple advantages compared to electric arc wire spraying or flame spraying. The study examines the layers sprayed with the following powders: Cr3C2- 25(Ni 20Cr), Al2O3- 13TiO2, Cr2O3-SiO2- TiO2 on the surface of steels used in the construction of a crankshaft (C45). The plasma spray coatings were made with the Spray wizard 9MCE facility at atmospheric pressure. The samples were analyzed in terms of micro and morphological using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Wear tests on samples that have undergone simulates extreme working conditions of the crankshafts. In order to emphasize adherence to the base material sprayed layer, were carried out tests of microscratches and micro-indentation. Results have showed a relatively compact morphological aspect given by the successive coatings with splat-like specific structures. Following the microscratch analysis it can be concluded that Al2O3-13TiO2 coating has a higher purpose in terms of hardness compared to Cr3C2-(Ni 20Cr) and Cr2O3-SiO2- TiO2 powders. Thermal coatings of the deposited powders have increased the mechanical properties of the material. The results stand to confirm that plasma sprayed Al2O3-13TiO2 powder is in fact a efficient solution for preventing mechanical wear, even with a faulty lubrication system.

  19. Nano spray drying for encapsulation of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Arpagaus, Cordin; Collenberg, Andreas; Rütti, David; Assadpour, Elham; Jafari, Seid Mahdi

    2018-05-17

    Many pharmaceuticals such as pills, capsules, or tablets are prepared in a dried and powdered form. In this field, spray drying plays a critical role to convert liquid pharmaceutical formulations into powders. In addition, in many cases it is necessary to encapsulate bioactive drugs into wall materials to protect them against harsh process and environmental conditions, as well as to deliver the drug to the right place and at the correct time within the body. Thus, spray drying is a common process used for encapsulation of pharmaceuticals. In view of the rapid progress of nanoencapsulation techniques in pharmaceutics, nano spray drying is used to improve drug formulation and delivery. The nano spray dryer developed in the recent years provides ultrafine powders at nanoscale and high product yields. In this paper, after explaining the concept of nano spray drying and understanding the key elements of the equipment, the influence of the process parameters on the final powders properties, like particle size, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, drug loading and release, will be discussed. Then, numerous application examples are reviewed for nano spray drying and encapsulation of various drugs in the early stages of product development along with a brief overview of the obtained results and characterization techniques. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical modeling for dilute and dense sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have successfully implemented a numerical model for spray-combustion calculations. In this model, the governing gas-phase equations in Eulerian coordinate are solved by a time-marching multiple pressure correction procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. The droplet-phase equations in Lagrangian coordinate are solved by a stochastic discrete particle technique. In order to simplify the calculation procedure for the circulating droplets, the effective conductivity model is utilized. The k-epsilon models are utilized to characterize the time and length scales of the gas phase in conjunction with turbulent modulation by droplets and droplet dispersion by turbulence. This method entails random sampling of instantaneous gas flow properties and the stochastic process requires a large number of computational parcels to produce the satisfactory dispersion distributions even for rather dilute sprays. Two major improvements in spray combustion modelings were made. Firstly, we have developed a probability density function approach in multidimensional space to represent a specific computational particle. Secondly, we incorporate the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model for handling the dense spray effects. This breakup model is based on the reasonable assumption that atomization and drop breakup are indistinguishable processes within a dense spray near the nozzle exit. Accordingly, atomization is prescribed by injecting drops which have a characteristic size equal to the nozzle exit diameter. Example problems include the nearly homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulent particle dispersion, and the non-evaporating, evaporating, and burning dense sprays. Comparison with experimental data will be discussed in detail.

  1. Development and validation of spray models for investigating diesel engine combustion and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sibendu

    combusting data from Sandia National Laboratory. The KH-ACT model is observed to provide better predictions for spray dispersion, axial velocity decay, sauter mean diameter, and liquid and lift-off length interplay which is attributed to the enhanced primary breakup predicted by this model. In addition, experimentally observed trends with changing nozzle conicity could only be captured by the KH-ACT model. Results further indicate that the combustion under diesel engine conditions is characterized by a double-flame structure with a rich premixed reaction zone near the flame stabilization region and a non-premixed reaction zone further downstream. Finally, the differences in inner nozzle flow and spray characteristics of petrodiesel and biodiesel are quantified. The improved modeling capability developed in this work can be used for extensive diesel engine simulations to further optimize injection, spray, combustion, and emission processes.

  2. CFD simulation of pesticide spray from air-assisted sprayers in an apple orchard: Tree deposition and off-target losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Se-Woon; Zhao, Lingying; Zhu, Heping

    2018-02-01

    The ultimate goal of a pesticide spraying system is to provide adequate coverage on intended canopies with a minimum amount of spray materials and off-target waste. Better spray coverage requires an understanding of the fate and transport of spray droplets carried by turbulent airflows in orchards. In this study, an integrated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to predict displacement of pesticide spray droplets discharged from an air-assisted sprayer, depositions onto tree canopies, and off-target deposition and airborne drift in an apple orchard. Pesticide droplets discharged from a moving sprayer were tracked using the Lagrangian particle transport model, and the deposition model was applied to droplets entering porous canopy zones. Measurements of the droplet deposition and drift in the same orchard were used to validate the model simulations. Good agreement was found between the measured and simulated spray concentrations inside tree canopies and off-target losses (ground deposition and airborne drifts) with the overall relative errors of 22.1% and 40.6%, respectively, under three growth stages. The CFD model was able to estimate the mass balance of pesticide droplets in the orchard, which was practically difficult to investigate by measurements in field conditions. As the foliage of trees became denser, spray deposition inside canopies increased from 8.5% to 65.8% and airborne drift and ground deposition decreased from 25.8% to 7.0% and 47.8% to 21.2%, respectively. Higher wind speed also increased the spray airborne drift downwind of the orchard. This study demonstrates that CFD model can be used to evaluate spray application performance and design and operate sprayers with increased spray efficiencies and reduced drift potentials.

  3. Creep of plasma sprayed zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Logan, W. R.; Adams, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings with three different porosities and different initial particle sizes were deformed in compression at initial loads of 1000, 2000, and 3500 psi and temperatures of 1100 C, 1250 C, and 1400 C. The coatings were stabilized with lime, magnesia, and two different concentrations of yttria. Creep began as soon as the load was applied and continued at a constantly decreasing rate until the load was removed. Temperature and stabilization had a pronounced effect on creep rate. The creep rate for 20% Y2O3-80% ZrO2 was 1/3 to 1/2 that of 8% Y2O3-92% ZrO2. Both magnesia and calcia stabilized ZrO2 crept at a rate 5 to 10 times that of the 20% Y2O3 material. A near proportionality between creep rate and applied stress was observed. The rate controlling process appeared to be thermally activated, with an activation energy of approximately 100 cal/gm mole K. Creep deformation was due to cracking and particle sliding.

  4. Experimental characterization of gasoline sprays under highly evaporating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Mahabat; Sheikh, Nadeem Ahmed; Khalid, Azfar; Lughmani, Waqas Akbar

    2018-05-01

    An experimental investigation of multistream gasoline sprays under highly evaporating conditions is carried out in this paper. Temperature increase of fuel and low engine pressure could lead to flash boiling. The spray shape is normally modified significantly under flash boiling conditions. The spray plumes expansion along with reduction in the axial momentum causes the jets to merge and creates a low-pressure area below the injector's nozzle. These effects initiate the collapse of spray cone and lead to the formation of a single jet plume or a big cluster like structure. The collapsing sprays reduces exposed surface and therefore they last longer and subsequently penetrate more. Spray plume momentum increase, jet plume reduction and spray target widening could delay or prevent the closure condition and limit the penetration (delayed formation of the cluster promotes evaporation). These spray characteristics are investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy, for five and six hole injectors, under various boundary conditions. Six hole injectors produce more collapsing sprays in comparison to five hole injector due to enhanced jet to jet interactions. The spray collapse tendency reduces with increase in injection pressure due high axial momentum of spray plumes. The spray evaporation rates of five hole injector are observed to be higher than six hole injectors. Larger spray cone angles of the six hole injectors promote less penetrating and less collapsing sprays.

  5. Comparision on dynamic behavior of diesel spray and rapeseed oil spray in diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapit, Azwan; Azahari Razali, Mohd; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Jaat, Norrizam; Nizam Mohammad, Akmal; Khalid, Amir

    2017-04-01

    Fuel-air mixing is important process in diesel combustion. It significantly affects the combustion and emission of diesel engine. Biomass fuel has high viscosity and high distillation temperature and may negatively affect the fuel-air mixing process. Thus, study on the spray development and atomization of this type of fuel is important. This study investigates the atomization characteristics and droplet dynamic behaviors of diesel engine spray fuelled by rapeseed oil (RO) and comparison to diesel fuel (GO). Optical observation of RO spray was carried out using shadowgraph photography technique. Single nano-spark photography technique was used to study the characteristics of the spray while dual nano-spark shadowgraph technique was used to study the spray droplet behavior. Using in-house image processing algorithm, the images were processed and the boundary condition of each spray was also studied. The results show that RO has very poor atomization due to the high viscosity nature of the fuel when compared to GO. This is in agreement with the results from spray droplet dynamic behavior studies that shows due to the high viscosity, the RO spray droplets are large in size and travel downward, with very little influence of entrainment effect due to its large kinematic energy.

  6. Spray Drift Reduction Evaluations of Spray Nozzles Using a Standardized Testing Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Drop Size Characteristics in a Spray Using Optical Nonimaging Light-Scattering Instruments,” Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Vol. 14-02, ASTM...Test Method for Determining Liquid Drop Size Characteristics in a Spray Using Optical Non- imaging Light-Scattering Instruments 22. AGDISP Model

  7. EVALUATION OF CONVERGENT SPRAY TECHNOLOGYTM SPRAY PROCESS FOR ROOF COATING APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of Convergent Spray TechnologyTM for the roofing industry. This was accomplished by producing an environmentally compliant coating utilizing recycled materials, a CSTTM spray process portable application cart, a...

  8. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    SciT

    Fusselman, Steve

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from themore » outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to

  9. A laser tomographic investigation of liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Ahseng, C.; Felton, P.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    A light scattering technique is combined with a tomographic transformation to convert line of sight integrated data, measured in sprays, to measurements of droplet size and concentration in volume elements within the spray. The technique is developed and assessed by systematic experiments in axisymmetric sprays generated by twin-fluid atomisers. The good agreement found shows that, provided certain conditions are satisfied by the local spray structure, the technique provides information on spray structure, similar in detail and extent to that derived by photography, but with reduced experimental time. The technique is applied to an investigation of a kerosene spray vaporizing in a hot gas stream.

  10. Multiple-Nozzle Spray Head Applies Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1993-01-01

    Spray head equipped with four-nozzle turret mixes two reactive components of polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foam insulating material and sprays reacting mixture onto surface to be insulated. If nozzle in use becomes clogged, fresh one automatically rotated into position, with minimal interruption of spraying process. Incorporates features recirculating and controlling pressures of reactive components to maintain quality of foam by ensuring proper blend at outset. Also used to spray protective coats on or in ships, aircraft, and pipelines. Sprays such reactive adhesives as epoxy/polyurethane mixtures. Components of spray contain solid-particle fillers for strength, fire retardance, toughness, resistance to abrasion, or radar absorption.

  11. Clinicopathological effects of pepper (oleoresin capsicum) spray.

    PubMed

    Yeung, M F; Tang, William Y M

    2015-12-01

    Pepper (oleoresin capsicum) spray is one of the most common riot-control measures used today. Although not lethal, exposure of pepper spray can cause injury to different organ systems. This review aimed to summarise the major clinicopathological effects of pepper spray in humans. MEDLINE, EMBASE database, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were used to search for terms associated with the clinicopathological effects of pepper spray in humans and those describing the pathophysiology of capsaicin. A phone interview with two individuals recently exposed to pepper spray was also conducted to establish clinical symptoms. Major key words used for the MEDLINE search were "pepper spray", "OC spray", "oleoresin capsicum"; and other key words as "riot control agents", "capsaicin", and "capsaicinoid". We then combined the key words "capsaicin" and "capsaicinoid" with the major key words to narrow down the number of articles. A search with other databases including EMBASE and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was also conducted with the above phrases to identify any additional related articles. All article searches were confined to human study. The bibliography of articles was screened for additional relevant studies including non-indexed reports, and information from these was also recorded. Non-English articles were included in the search. Fifteen articles were considered relevant. Oleoresin capsicum causes almost instantaneous irritative symptoms to the skin, eyes, and respiratory system. Dermatological effects include a burning sensation, erythema, and hyperalgesia. Ophthalmic effects involve blepharospasm, conjunctivitis, peri-orbital oedema, and corneal pathology. Following inhalation, a stinging or burning sensation can be felt in the nose with sore throat, chest tightness, or dyspnoea. The major pathophysiology is neurogenic inflammation caused by capsaicinoid in the pepper spray. There is no antidote for oleoresin capsicum. Treatment consists of

  12. Microalgal cell disruption via ultrasonic nozzle spraying.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Yuan, W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the effect of operating parameters, including ultrasound amplitude, spraying pressure, nozzle orifice diameter, and initial cell concentration on microalgal cell disruption and lipid extraction in an ultrasonic nozzle spraying system (UNSS). Two algal species including Scenedesmus dimorphus and Nannochloropsis oculata were evaluated. Experimental results demonstrated that the UNSS was effective in the disruption of microalgal cells indicated by significant changes in cell concentration and Nile red-stained lipid fluorescence density between all treatments and the control. It was found that increasing ultrasound amplitude generally enhanced cell disruption and lipid recovery although excessive input energy was not necessary for best results. The effect of spraying pressure and nozzle orifice diameter on cell disruption and lipid recovery was believed to be dependent on the competition between ultrasound-induced cavitation and spraying-generated shear forces. Optimal cell disruption was not always achieved at the highest spraying pressure or biggest nozzle orifice diameter; instead, they appeared at moderate levels depending on the algal strain and specific settings. Increasing initial algal cell concentration significantly reduced cell disruption efficiency. In all UNSS treatments, the effectiveness of cell disruption and lipid recovery was found to be dependent on the algal species treated.

  13. Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, K. E.; Lagedrost, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed materials were determined for the following plasma sprayed materials: CaO - stabilized ZrO2, Y2O3 - stabilized ZerO2, Al2O3, HfO2 Mo, nichrome, NiAl, Mo-ZrO2, and MoAl2O3 mixtures. In all cases the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed materials was found to be considerably lower than that of the bulk material. The flash-laser thermal diffusivity technique was used both for diffusivity determination of single-layer materials and to determine the thermal contact resistance at the interface of two-layer specimens.

  14. Thermal spray manual for machinery components

    SciT

    Travis, R.; Ginther, C.; Herbstritt, M.

    1995-12-31

    The Thermal Spray Manual For Machinery Components is a National Shipbuilding Research (SP-7) Project. This Manual is being developed by Puget Sound Naval Shipyard with the help of other government thermal spray facilities and SP-7 panel members. The purpose of the manual is to provide marine repair facilities with a ``how to do`` document that will be ``user friendly`` and known to be technically sound through production experience. The manual`s intent is to give marine repair facilities the ability to maximize the thermal spray process as a repair method for machinery components and to give these facilities guidelines on howmore » to become qualified to receive certification that they meet the requirements of Military Standard 1687A.« less

  15. Computational Analysis of Spray Jet Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Utsav

    There is a boost in the utilization of renewable sources of energy but because of high energy density applications, combustion will never be obsolete. Spray combustion is a type of multiphase combustion which has tremendous engineering applications in different fields, varying from energy conversion devices to rocket propulsion system. Developing accurate computational models for turbulent spray combustion is vital for improving the design of combustors and making them energy efficient. Flamelet models have been extensively used for gas phase combustion because of their relatively low computational cost to model the turbulence-chemistry interaction using a low dimensional manifold approach. This framework is designed for gas phase non-premixed combustion and its implementation is not very straight forward for multiphase and multi-regime combustion such as spray combustion. This is because of the use of a conserved scalar and various flamelet related assumptions. Mixture fraction has been popularly employed as a conserved scalar and hence used to parameterize the characteristics of gaseous flamelets. However, for spray combustion, the mixture fraction is not monotonic and does not give a unique mapping in order to parameterize the structure of spray flames. In order to develop a flamelet type model for spray flames, a new variable called the mixing variable is introduced which acts as an ideal conserved scalar and takes into account the convection and evaporation of fuel droplets. In addition to the conserved scalar, it has been observed that though gaseous flamelets can be characterized by the conserved scalar and its dissipation, this might not be true for spray flamelets. Droplet dynamics has a significant influence on the spray flamelet and because of effects such as flame penetration of droplets and oscillation of droplets across the stagnation plane, it becomes important to accommodate their influence in the flamelet formulation. In order to recognize the

  16. Silver nasal sprays: misleading Internet marketing.

    PubMed

    Gaslin, Michael T; Rubin, Cory; Pribitkin, Edmund A

    2008-04-01

    Long-term use of silver-containing products is associated with a permanent bluish-gray discoloration of the skin known as argyria, but they remain widely available despite several measures by the FDA to regulate them. Several recent case reports have described the occurrence of argyria as a result of using these "natural" products. We used the five most common Internet search engines to find Web sites providing information on silver-containing nasal sprays. Of 49 Web sites analyzed, only 2 (4%) mentioned argyria as a possible complication, although 30 (61%) did caution against long-term use. Eight sites (16%) made specific claims about the health benefits of the product. All 49 sites (100%) provided direct or indirect links to buy silver-containing nasal sprays. We conclude that information about silver-containing nasal sprays on the Internet is misleading and inaccurate. Therefore, otolaryngologists should be aware of the misinformation their patients may be receiving about these products.

  17. Spray Drying of Mosambi Juice in Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. V.; Verma, A.

    2014-01-01

    The studies on spray drying of mosambi juice were carried out with Laboratory spray dryer set-up (LSD-48 MINI SPRAY DRYER-JISL). Inlet and outlet air temperature and maltodextrin (drying agent) concentration was taken as variable parameters. Experiments were conducted by using 110 °C to 140 °C inlet air temperature, 60 °C to 70 °C outlet air temperature and 5-7 % maltodextrin concentration. The free flow powder of mosambi juice was obtained with 7 % maltodextrin at 140 °C inlet air temperature and 60 °C outlet air temperature. Fresh and reconstituted juices were evaluated for vitamin C, titrable acidity and sensory characteristics. The reconstituted juice was found slightly acceptable by taste panel.

  18. Spray Behavior and Atomization Characteristics of Biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Hun; Oh, Young-Taig

    Biodiesel has large amount of oxygen in itself, which make it very efficient in reducing exhaust emission by improving combustion inside an engine. But biodiesel has a low temperature flow problem because it has a high viscosity. In this study, the spray behavior and atomization characteristics were investigated to confirm of some effect for the combination of non-esterification biodiesel and fuel additive WDP and IPA. The process of spray was visualized through the visualization system composed of a halogen lamp and high speed camera, and atomization characteristics were investigated through LDPA. When blending WDP and IPA with biodiesel, atomization and spray characteristics were improved. Through this experimental result, SMD of blended fuel, WDP 25% and biodiesel 75%, was 33.9% reduced at distance 6cm from a nozzle tip under injection pressure 30MPa.

  19. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor); Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  20. The assessment of spray drift damage for ten major crops in Belgium.

    PubMed

    de Schampheleire, M; Spanoghe, P; Steurbaut, W; Nuyttens, D; Sonck, B

    2005-01-01

    According to the Council Directive 91/414/EC pesticide damage should be assessed by considering the risk for persons arising from occupational, non-dietary exposure and risk to the environment. In this research an assessment for the pesticide damage by droplet spray drift was set up. The percentages of spray drift were estimated with the Ganzelmeier drift curves and the IMAG drift calculator. Knowing the percentages of drift and the applied doses of pesticide formulations in a given crop, the human and environmental exposures (water and bottom) were predicted. Thereupon risk indices were calculated for water organisms, soil organisms and bystanders. A risk index is the ratio of a predicted exposure to a toxicological reference value and gives an indication of the incidence and the severity of the adverse effects likely to occur. Considering the risk index it is possible to define the minimal width of an unsprayed field margin or "buffer zone" to reduce this risk at an acceptable level.

  1. Micrometeorological measurements during the Blackmo 88 spray trials

    D. E. Anderson; D. R. Miller; Y. S. Wang; W. E. Yendol; M. L. McManus

    1991-01-01

    Instrumentation was arrayed on a 120 foot tower to detail the local atmospheric conditions during the Blackmo 88 spray experiment. Measurements were continuous for 30 minute periods encompassing each spray pass.

  2. Assessing Pavement Surface Splash and Spray Impact on Road Users

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-10-01

    This TechBrief describes the development of an assessment tool to characterize the propensity of highway sections to generate splash and spray during rainfall and the impact of splash and spray on road users.

  3. Deodorant spray: a newly identified cause of cold burn.

    PubMed

    May, Ulrich; Stirner, Karl-Heinz; Lauener, Roger; Ring, Johannes; Möhrenschlager, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    Two patients encountered a first-degree cold burn after use of a deodorant spray. The spray-nozzle to skin-surface distance was approximately 5 cm, and the spraying lasted approximately 15 seconds. Under laboratory conditions, the deodorant in use was able to induce a decline in temperature of >60 degrees C. These 2 cases highlight a little-known potential for skin damage by deodorant sprays if used improperly.

  4. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  5. Structure of High-Speed Sprays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    red (Appendix B and Ref. 9) and computed (Appendix C and Ref. 10) the drop veloci lies in the farfield of non vaporizing Diesel-type sprays; measured...and Ref. 9) and computed (Appendix C and Ref. 10) the drop velocities in the farfield of non vaporizing Diesel-type sprays; measured (11) (and are...r) e and 41 - ,(r) e Solutions free from singularities on the axis r- O are found to be f, = C , Io(kr) and #I = C , rI,(.r), where C , and Ca are

  6. 77 FR 40550 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Revision for the Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... filtered spray booth and enclosed spray gun cleaner. Maryland's 1997 SIP-approved regulation COMAR 26.11.19... equipment and materials storage such as spray booths, spray guns, and sealed containers for cleaning rags... standards include procedures for cleaning the spray gun equipment for applying automotive coatings. Affected...

  7. Herbicidal drift control: aerial spray equipment, formulations, and supervision.

    H. Gratkowski

    1974-01-01

    Public concern over environmental pollution requires increasingly sophisticated procedures when herbicides are used in silviculture. Many specialized aerial application systems and spray additives have been developed to reduce drift of herbicidal sprays. This publication provides forest-land managers with a brief description of these aerial spray systems and additives...

  8. Alignment Fixtures For Vacuum-Plasma-Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, William H.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Power, Christopher A.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Fixtures for alignment of vacuum-plasma-spray guns built. Each fixture designed to fit specific gun and holds small, battery-powered laser on centerline of gun. Laser beam projects small red dot where centerline intersects surface of workpiece to be sprayed. After laser beam positioned on surface of workpiece, fixture removed from gun and spraying proceeds.

  9. 21 CFR 524.1662a - Oxytetracycline and hydrocortisone spray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxytetracycline and hydrocortisone spray. 524... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1662a Oxytetracycline and hydrocortisone spray. (a) Specifications. Each 3-ounce unit of oxytetracycline hydrochloride and hydrocortisone spray contains 300 milligrams of oxytetracycline...

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Spray Deposition with Water-Sensitive Paper

    Spray droplets, discharged from the lower six nozzles of an airblast sprayer, were sampled on pairs of absorbent filter and water-sensitive papers at nine distances from sprayer. Spray deposition on filter targets were measured by fluorometry and spray distribution on WSP targets were assessed by t...

  11. Effects of nozzle spray angle on droplet size and velocity

    Spray applicators have many choices in selecting a spray nozzle to make an application of an agricultural product. They must balance flowrate, spray pressure, and nozzle type and setup to deliver their agrochemical in the right droplet size for their particular needs. Studies were conducted to det...

  12. VERIFYING THE PERFORMANCE OF PESTICIDE SPRAY DRIFT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of pesticide sprays usually results in formation of small spray droplets which can drift with air currents to nearby sensitive sites. A number of technologies offer the potential to reduce the amount of spray drift from pesticide applications. Acceptance and use of ...

  13. Spatial distribution visualization of PWM continuous variable-rate spray

    Chemical application is a dynamic spatial distribution process, during which spray liquid covers the targets with certain thickness and uniformity. Therefore, it is important to study the 2-D and 3-D (dimensional) spray distribution to evaluate spraying quality. The curve-surface generation methods ...

  14. Evaluation of different flamelet tabulation methods for laminar spray combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yujuan; Wen, Xu; Wang, Haiou; Luo, Kun; Fan, Jianren

    2018-05-01

    In this work, three different flamelet tabulation methods for spray combustion are evaluated. Major differences among these methods lie in the treatment of the temperature boundary conditions of the flamelet equations. Particularly, in the first tabulation method ("M1"), both the fuel and oxidizer temperature boundary conditions are set to be fixed. In the second tabulation method ("M2"), the fuel temperature boundary condition is varied while the oxidizer temperature boundary condition is fixed. In the third tabulation method ("M3"), both the fuel and oxidizer temperature boundary conditions are varied and set to be equal. The focus of this work is to investigate whether the heat transfer between the droplet phase and gas phase can be represented by the studied tabulation methods through a priori analyses. To this end, spray flames stabilized in a three-dimensional counterflow are first simulated with detailed chemistry. Then, the trajectory variables are calculated from the detailed chemistry solutions. Finally, the tabulated thermo-chemical quantities are compared to the corresponding values from the detailed chemistry solutions. The comparisons show that the gas temperature cannot be predicted by "M1" with only a mixture fraction and reaction progress variable being the trajectory variables. The gas temperature can be correctly predicted by both "M2" and "M3," in which the total enthalpy is introduced as an additional manifold. In "M2," variations of the oxidizer temperature are considered with a temperature modification technique, which is not required in "M3." Interestingly, it is found that the mass fractions of the reactants and major products are not sensitive to the representation of the interphase heat transfer in the flamelet chemtables, and they can be correctly predicted by all tabulation methods. By contrast, the intermediate species CO and H2 in the premixed flame reaction zone are over-predicted by all tabulation methods.

  15. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  16. Producing Quantum Dots by Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2006-01-01

    An improved process for making nanocrystallites, commonly denoted quantum dots (QDs), is based on spray pyrolysis. Unlike the process used heretofore, the improved process is amenable to mass production of either passivated or non-passivated QDs, with computer control to ensure near uniformity of size.

  17. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    SciT

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Incmore » developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.« less

  18. Evaporation And Ignition Of Dense Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Simple theoretical model makes useful predictions of trends. Pair of reports presents theoretical model of evaporation and ignition of sprayed liquid fuel. Developed as part of research in combustion of oil and liquid fuels derived from coal, tar sand, and shale in furnace. Work eventually contributes to increase efficiency of combustion and decrease pollution generated by burning of such fuels.

  19. Spray drift reduction test method correlation

    ASTM Standard E609 Terminology Relating to Pesticides defines drift as “The physical movement of an agrochemical through the air at the time of application or soon thereafter to any non or off target site.” Since there are many commercial tank mix adjuvants designed to reduce spray drift, ASTM esta...

  20. Thin spray film thickness measuring technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G.; Kurtz, G. W.

    1971-01-01

    Thin spray film application depths, in the 0.0002 cm to 0.002 cm range, are measured by portable, commercially available, light density measuring device used in conjunction with glass plate or photographic film. Method is automated by using mechanical/electrical control for shutting off film applicator at desired densitometer reading.

  1. Apparatus and method for spraying liquid materials

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, J.L.; Watson, L.D.

    1988-01-21

    A method for spraying liquids involving a flow of gas which shears the liquid. A flow of gas is introduced in a converging-diverging nozzle where it meets and shears the liquid into small particles which are of a size and uniformity which can be controlled through adjustment of pressures and gas velocity. 5 figs.

  2. Apparatus and method for spraying liquid materials

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.; Watson, Lloyd D.

    1990-01-01

    A method for spraying liquids involving a flow of gas which shears the liquid. A flow of gas is introduced in a converging-diverging nozzle where it meets and shears the liquid into small particles which are of a size and uniformity which can be controlled through adjustment of pressures and gas velocity.

  3. Spray combustion experiments and numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Bulzan, Daniel L.; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of commercial aircraft will include turbofan engines with performance significantly better than those in the current fleet. Control of particulate and gaseous emissions will also be an integral part of the engine design criteria. These performance and emission requirements present a technical challenge for the combustor: control of the fuel and air mixing and control of the local stoichiometry will have to be maintained much more rigorously than with combustors in current production. A better understanding of the flow physics of liquid fuel spray combustion is necessary. This paper describes recent experiments on spray combustion where detailed measurements of the spray characteristics were made, including local drop-size distributions and velocities. Also, an advanced combustor CFD code has been under development and predictions from this code are compared with experimental results. Studies such as these will provide information to the advanced combustor designer on fuel spray quality and mixing effectiveness. Validation of new fast, robust, and efficient CFD codes will also enable the combustor designer to use them as additional design tools for optimization of combustor concepts for the next generation of aircraft engines.

  4. Controlling Flows Of Two Ingredients For Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Huel H.

    1995-01-01

    Closed-loop servo control subsystem incorporated, as modification, into system controlling flows of two ingredients mixed and sprayed to form thermally insulating foams on large tanks. Provides steady flows at specified rates. Foams produced smoother and of higher quality. Continued use of system results in substantial reduction in cost stemming from close control of application of foam and consequent reduced use of material.

  5. GAS-ATOMIZED SPRAY SCRUBBER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of fine particle collection efficiency measurements of a gas-atomized spray scrubber, cleaning effluent gas from a No. 7 gray iron cupola. Tests were made at several levels of pressure drop and liquid/gas ratio. Particle size measurements on inlet and out...

  6. Spray Cooling Processes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John P.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2004-01-01

    The present paper reports ongoing work to develop numerical and modeling tools used to design efficient and effective spray cooling processes and to determine characteristic non-dimensional parametric dependence for practical fluids and conditions. In particular, we present data that will delineate conditions towards control of the impingement dynamics of droplets upon a heated substrate germane to practical situations.

  7. Aerial spray adjuvants for herbicidal drift control.

    Gratkowski H.; Stewart R.

    1973-01-01

    Increased public concern about pesticides requires that foresters reduce drift and insure precise application of herbicides to the areas requiring treatment. Drift control is necessary near waterways and other ecologically sensitive areas. This publication discusses available drift control adjuvants for herbicidal sprays. These include invert emulsions, thickening...

  8. X-ray vision of fuel sprays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin

    2005-03-01

    With brilliant synchrotron X-ray sources, microsecond time-resolved synchrotron X-ray radiography and tomography have been used to elucidate the detailed three-dimensional structure and dynamics of high-pressure high-speed fuel sprays in the near-nozzle region. The measurement allows quantitative determination of the fuel distribution in the optically impenetrable region owing to the multiple scattering of visible light by small atomized fuel droplets surrounding the jet. X-radiographs of the jet-induced shock waves prove that the fuel jets become supersonic under appropriate injection conditions and that the quantitative analysis of the thermodynamic properties of the shock waves can also be derived from the most direct measurement. In other situations where extremely axial-asymmetric sprays are encountered, mass deconvolution and cross-sectional fuel distribution models can be computed based on the monochromatic and time-resolved X-radiographic images collected from various rotational orientations of the sprays. Such quantitative analysis reveals the never-before-reported characteristics and most detailed near-nozzle mass distribution of highly transient fuel sprays.

  9. Metallization of Various Polymers by Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Hanqing; Chu, Xin; Vo, Phuong; Yue, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Previous results have shown that metallic coatings can be successfully cold sprayed onto polymeric substrates. This paper studies the cold sprayability of various metal powders on different polymeric substrates. Five different substrates were used, including carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyether ether ketone (PEEK), polyethylenimine (PEI); mild steel was also used as a benchmark substrate. The CFRP used in this work has a thermosetting matrix, and the ABS, PEEK and PEI are all thermoplastic polymers, with different glass transition temperatures as well as a number of distinct mechanical properties. Three metal powders, tin, copper and iron, were cold sprayed with both a low-pressure system and a high-pressure system at various conditions. In general, cold spray on the thermoplastic polymers rendered more positive results than the thermosetting polymers, due to the local thermal softening mechanism in the thermoplastics. Thick copper coatings were successfully deposited on PEEK and PEI. Based on the results, a method is proposed to determine the feasibility and deposition window of cold spraying specific metal powder/polymeric substrate combinations.

  10. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOEpatents

    Page, Steven J.; Mal, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  11. Development of the improved helicopter icing spray system (IHISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Andrew A.; Jenks, Mark D.; Gaitskill, William H.

    1989-01-01

    Boeing Helicopters has been awarded a contract by the U.S. Army to design, fabricate and test a replacement for the existing Helicopter Icing Spray System (HISS). The Improved Hiss (IHISS), capable of deployment from any CH-47D helicopter, will include new icing spray nozzles and pneumatic pressure source, and a significantly larger water tank and spray boom. Results are presented for extensive bench and icing tunnel test programs used to select and modify an improved spray nozzle and validate spray boom aerodynamic characteristics. The resulting system will provide a significantly larger icing cloud with droplet characteristics closely matching natural icing conditions.

  12. Low pressure cold spraying on materials with low erosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikalov, V. S.; Klinkov, S. V.; Kosarev, V. F.

    2017-10-01

    In present work, the erosion-adhesion transition was investigated during cold spraying of aluminum particles on brittle ceramic substrates. Cold spraying was carried out with aid of sonic nozzle, which use allows significantly reducing the gas stagnation pressure without the effect of flow separation inside the nozzle and, accordingly, reducing the velocity of the spraying particles. Two stagnation pressures were chosen. The coating tracks were sprayed at different air temperatures in nozzle pre-chamber under each of regimes. Single sprayed tracks were obtained and their profiles were investigated by optical profilometry.

  13. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  14. [Comparison between methods as polling booth survey and face-to-face interview in understanding the high-risk behavior among HIV-positive clients of female sex workers].

    PubMed

    Wu, Peili; Zhou, Chu; Zhou, Yang; Ren, Xianlong; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Junshi; Deng, Xiaojun; Rou, Keming; Wu, Zunyou

    2015-04-01

    Face-to-face interview (FTFI) and polling booth survey (PBS) were applied to compare the high risk behavior among HIV-positive clients of female sex workers (CFSWs). This study was conducted in antiretroviral therapy (ART) out-patients centers in Hengyang city, where clients who had been informed on their HIV-positive status for 6 months or longer were recruited. FTFI was first used to tackle on 8 sensitive questions related to sexual behavior, followed by PBS to poke on the same questions. Results from FTFI and PBS were then compared. Compared with FIFI, results in the PBS showed higher proportion of participants who reported "having had history of sexually transmitted diseases before knowing that they were infected with HIV" (40.6% vs. 24.2%) but lower proportions on "frequency of having sex with regular sexual partner less than 4 times per month" and "using condoms consistently with regular sexual partners in past 6 months (44.4% vs. 63.0%)". There were no significant differences in the remaining 5 questions shown in the results from the two methods. HIV-positive CFSWs continued to practice unsafe sexual behaviors after knowing their HIV related status. Compared with FTFI, PBS seemed to have revealed higher proportion of unsafe sex behaviors, so as to generated more reliable data. While comparing with PBS, the traditional FTFI might have underestimated the risk behaviors among those HIV-positive CFSWs.

  15. Selective Laser Treatment on Cold-Sprayed Titanium Coatings: Numerical Modeling and Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Astarita, Antonello; Rubino, Felice; Pasquino, Nicola; Aprea, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a selective laser post-deposition on pure grade II titanium coatings, cold-sprayed on AA2024-T3 sheets, was experimentally and numerically investigated. Morphological features, microstructure, and chemical composition of the treated zone were assessed by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Microhardness measurements were also carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the coating. A numerical model of the laser treatment was implemented and solved to simulate the process and discuss the experimental outcomes. Obtained results highlighted the key role played by heat input and dimensional features on the effectiveness of the treatment.

  16. To spray or not to spray? Understanding participation in an indoor residual spray campaign in Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Paz-Soldán, Valerie A; Bauer, Karin M; Hunter, Gabrielle C; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Arriola, Vanessa D; Rivera-Lanas, Daniel; Rodriguez, Geoffrey H; Toledo Vizcarra, Amparo M; Mollesaca Riveros, Lina M; Levy, Michael Z; Buttenheim, Alison M

    2018-01-01

    Current low participation rates in vector control programmes in Arequipa, Peru complicate the control of Chagas disease. Using focus groups (n = 17 participants) and semi-structured interviews (n = 71) conducted in March and May 2013, respectively, we examined barriers to and motivators of household participation in an indoor residual spray (IRS) campaign that had taken place one year prior in Arequipa. The most common reported barriers to participation were inconvenient spray times due to work obligations, not considering the campaign to be necessary, concerns about secondary health impacts (e.g. allergic reactions to insecticides), and difficulties preparing the home for spraying (e.g. moving heavy furniture). There was also a low perception of risk for contracting Chagas disease that might affect participation. The main motivator to participate was to ensure personal health and well-being. Future IRS campaigns should incorporate more flexible hours, including weekends; provide appropriate educational messages to counter concerns about secondary health effects; incorporate peer educators to increase perceived risk to Chagas in community; obtain support from community members and leaders to build community trust and support for the campaign; and assist individuals in preparing their homes. Enhancing community trust in both the need for the campaign and its operations is key.

  17. To spray or not to spray? Understanding participation in an indoor residual spray campaign in Arequipa, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Karin M.; Hunter, Gabrielle C.; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Arriola, Vanessa D.; Rivera-Lanas, Daniel; Rodriguez, Geoffrey H.; Toledo Vizcarra, Amparo M.; Mollesaca Riveros, Lina M.; Levy, Michael Z.; Buttenheim, Alison M.

    2017-01-01

    Current low participation rates in vector control programmes in Arequipa, Peru complicate the control of Chagas disease. Using focus groups (n = 17 participants) and semi-structured interviews (n = 71) conducted in March and May 2013, respectively, we examined barriers to and motivators of household participation in an indoor residual spray (IRS) campaign that had taken place one year prior in Arequipa. The most common reported barriers to participation were inconvenient spray times due to work obligations, not considering the campaign to be necessary, concerns about secondary health impacts (e.g. allergic reactions to insecticides), and difficulties preparing the home for spraying (e.g. moving heavy furniture). There was also a low perception of risk for contracting Chagas disease that might affect participation. The main motivator to participate was to ensure personal health and well-being. Future IRS campaigns should incorporate more flexible hours, including weekends; provide appropriate educational messages to counter concerns about secondary health effects; incorporate peer educators to increase perceived risk to Chagas in community; obtain support from community members and leaders to build community trust and support for the campaign; and assist individuals in preparing their homes. Enhancing community trust in both the need for the campaign and its operations is key. PMID:27189446

  18. Wire Composition: Its Effect on Metal Disintegration and Particle Formation in Twin-Wire Arc-Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.

    2013-03-01

    The wire tips in twin-wire arc-spraying (TWAS) are heated in three different zones. A high-speed camera was used to observe the melting behavior, metal breakup, and particle formation under different operating conditions. In zone (I), the wire tips are melted (liquidus metal) and directly atomized in the form of smaller droplets. Their size is a function of the specific properties of the molten metal and the exerting aerodynamic forces. Zone (II) is directly beneath zone (I) and the origin of the extruded metal sheets at the wire tips. The extruded metal sheets in the case of cored wires are shorter than those observed while using solid wires. In this study, the effects of adjustable parameters and powder filling on melting behavior, particle formation, and process instability were revealed, and a comparison between solid and cored wires was made. The findings can improve the accuracy of the TWAS process modeling.

  19. A novel method to predict the highest hardness of plasma sprayed coating without micro-defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Yukun; Ye, Fuxing; Wang, Feng

    2018-04-01

    The plasma sprayed coatings are stacked by splats, which are regarded generally as the elementary units of coating. Many researchers have focused on the morphology and formation mechanism of splat. However, a novel method to predict the highest hardness of plasma sprayed coating without micro-defects is proposed according to the nanohardness of splat in this paper. The effectiveness of this novel method was examined by experiments. Firstly, the microstructure of splats and coating, meanwhile the 3D topography of the splats were observed by SEM (SU1510) and video microscope (VHX-2000). Secondly, the nanohardness of splats was evaluated by nanoindentation (NHT) in order to be compared with microhardness of coating measured by microhardness tester (HV-1000A). The results show that the nanohardness of splats with diameter of 70 μm, 100 μm and 140 μm were in the scope of 11∼12 GPa while the microhardness of coating were in the range of 8∼9 GPa. Because the splats had not micro-defects such as pores and cracks in the nanohardness evaluated nano-zone, the nanohardness of the splats can be utilized to predict the highest hardness of coating without micro-defects. This method indicates the maximum of sprayed coating hardness and will reduce the test number to get high hardness coating for better wear resistance.

  20. Technology Solutions Case Study: Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing

    SciT

    None

    2013-11-01

    Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks formore » roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. In this project, Building Science Corporation investigated rain and built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.« less

  1. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciT

    None, None

    2013-11-01

    Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks formore » roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. This project directly investigated rain and indirectly investigated built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.« less

  2. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    SciT

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  3. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciT

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results inmore » the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.« less

  4. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley K.; Hoffmann, W. Clint

    2016-01-01

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected. PMID:27684589

  5. Simulation of preburner sprays, volumes 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The present study considered characteristics of sprays under a variety of conditions. Control of these sprays is important as the spray details can control both rocket combustion stability and efficiency. Under the present study Imperial College considered the following: (1) Measurement of the size and rate of spread of the sprays produced by single coaxial airblast nozzles with axial gaseous stream. The local size, velocity, and flux characteristics for a wide range of gas and liquid flowrates were measured, and the results were correlated with the conditions of the spray at the nozzle exit. (2) Examination of the effect of the geometry of single coaxial airblast atomizers on spray characteristics. The gas and liquid tube diameters were varied over a range of values, the liquid tube recess was varied, and the shape of the exit of the gaseous jet was varied from straight to converging. (3) Quantification of the effect of swirl in the gaseous stream on the spray characteristics produced by single coaxial airblast nozzles. (4) Quantification of the effect of reatomization by impingement of the spray on a flat disc positioned around 200 mm from the nozzle exit. This models spray impingement on the turbopump dome during the startup process of the preburner of the SSME. (5) Study of the interaction between multiple sprays without and with swirl in their gaseous stream. The spray characteristics of single nozzles were compared with that of three identical nozzles with their axis at a small distance from each other. This study simulates the sprays in the preburner of the SSME, where there are around 260 elements on the faceplate of the combustion chamber. (6) Design an experimental facility to study the characteristics of sprays at high pressure conditions and at supercritical pressure and temperature for the gas but supercritical pressure and subcritical temperature for the liquid.

  6. Plasma Spray-PVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Deposit Out of the Vapor Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, Konstantin; Gindrat, Malko

    2011-06-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland). Even though it is a thermal spray process, it can deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. The basis of PS-PVD is the low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology that has been well established in industry for several years. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) or low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS), the new proposed process uses a high energy plasma gun operated at a reduced work pressure of 0.1 kPa (1 mbar). Owing to the high energy plasma and further reduced work pressure, PS-PVD is able to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional physical vapor deposition (PVD) technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) coatings. In contrast to EB-PVD, PS-PVD incorporates the vaporized coating material into a supersonic plasma plume. Owing to the forced gas stream of the plasma jet, complex shaped parts such as multi-airfoil turbine vanes can be coated with columnar thermal barrier coatings using PS-PVD. Even shadowed areas and areas which are not in the line of sight of the coating source can be coated homogeneously. This article reports on the progress made by Sulzer Metco in developing a thermal spray process to produce coatings out of the vapor phase. Columnar thermal barrier coatings made of Yttria-stabilized Zircona (YSZ) are optimized to serve in a turbine engine. This process includes not only preferable coating properties such as strain tolerance and erosion

  7. Hair casts due to a deodorant spray.

    PubMed

    Ena, Pasquale; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Chiarolini, Fausto

    2005-11-01

    A 7-year-old girl presented with itching and greyish-white sleeve-like structures in her hair. After ruling out other possible causes for the symptoms, such as nits and dandruff, it was determined that the patient was affected by hair casts. These are small cylindrical structures resembling louse eggs that encircle individual scalp hairs and are easily movable along the hair shafts. It was concluded that she had induced the condition through misuse of a deodorant body spray. Scanning electron microscopy combined with electron dispersive X-ray analysis (X-ray microanalysis) of the hair casts showed the chemical nature of the structures. Some elements present in the composition of the ingredients of the deodorant spray, such as aluminium, chlorine, silicon, magnesium and carbon, were also present in this uncommon type of hair casts.

  8. Spray generators for absorption refrigeration systems

    DOEpatents

    Sibley, Howard W.

    1979-06-19

    A spray generator for an absorption refrigeration system that includes a heat exchanger comprised of a multiplicity of variably spaced heat exchange tubes. The tubes are spaced close together near the top of the heat exchanger and spaced more widely apart near the bottom of the heat exchanger. Dilute absorbent solution is sprayed down through the heat exchanger. The close nesting of the tubes in the top portion of the heat exchanger retards liquid flow and aids heating of the solution. The wide spacing of the tubes in the lower section of the heat exchanger facilitate vapor flow out of the heat exchanger and eliminates liquid "blow-off". The top tubes are covered by a baffle to prevent the liquid solution from splashing out of the heat exchanger off of these top tubes.

  9. Thermal Spray Formation of Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coquill, Scott; Galbraith, Stephen L.; Tuss. Darren L.; Ivosevic, Milan

    2008-01-01

    This innovation forms a sprayable polymer film using powdered precursor materials and an in-process heating method. This device directly applies a powdered polymer onto a substrate to form an adherent, mechanically-sound, and thickness-regulated film. The process can be used to lay down both fully dense and porous, e.g., foam, coatings. This system is field-deployable and includes power distribution, heater controls, polymer constituent material bins, flow controls, material transportation functions, and a thermal spray apparatus. The only thing required for operation in the field is a power source. Because this method does not require solvents, it does not release the toxic, volatile organic compounds of previous methods. Also, the sprayed polymer material is not degraded because this method does not use hot combustion gas or hot plasma gas. This keeps the polymer from becoming rough, porous, or poorly bonded.

  10. Pharmaceutical Particle Engineering via Spray Drying

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This review covers recent developments in the area of particle engineering via spray drying. The last decade has seen a shift from empirical formulation efforts to an engineering approach based on a better understanding of particle formation in the spray drying process. Microparticles with nanoscale substructures can now be designed and their functionality has contributed significantly to stability and efficacy of the particulate dosage form. The review provides concepts and a theoretical framework for particle design calculations. It reviews experimental research into parameters that influence particle formation. A classification based on dimensionless numbers is presented that can be used to estimate how excipient properties in combination with process parameters influence the morphology of the engineered particles. A wide range of pharmaceutical application examples—low density particles, composite particles, microencapsulation, and glass stabilization—is discussed, with specific emphasis on the underlying particle formation mechanisms and design concepts. PMID:18040761

  11. Method and apparatus for spraying molten materials

    DOEpatents

    Glovan, R.J.; Tierney, J.C.; McLean, L.L.; Johnson, L.L.; Nelson, G.L.; Lee, Y.M.

    1996-06-25

    A metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments. 12 figs.

  12. Cold spray nozzle mach number limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodoin, B.

    2002-12-01

    The classic one-dimensional isentropic flow approach is used along with a two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical model to show that the exit Mach number of a cold spray nozzle should be limited due to two factors. To show this, the two-dimensional model is validated with experimental data. Although both models show that the stagnation temperature is an important limiting factor, the one-dimensional approach fails to show how important the shock-particle interactions are at limiting the nozzle Mach number. It is concluded that for an air nozzle spraying solid powder particles, the nozzle Mach number should be set between 1.5 and 3 to limit the negative effects of the high stagnation temperature and of the shock-particle interactions.

  13. Development of process data capturing, analysis and controlling for thermal spray techniques - SprayTracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelber, C.; Marke, S.; Trommler, U.; Rupprecht, C.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal spraying processes are becoming increasingly important in high-technology areas, such as automotive engineering and medical technology. The method offers the advantage of a local layer application with different materials and high deposition rates. Challenges in the application of thermal spraying result from the complex interaction of different influencing variables, which can be attributed to the properties of different materials, operating equipment supply, electrical parameters, flow mechanics, plasma physics and automation. In addition, spraying systems are subject to constant wear. Due to the process specification and the high demands on the produced coatings, innovative quality assurance tools are necessary. A central aspect, which has not yet been considered, is the data management in relation to the present measured variables, in particular the spraying system, the handling system, working safety devices and additional measuring sensors. Both the recording of all process-characterizing variables, their linking and evaluation as well as the use of the data for the active process control presuppose a novel, innovative control system (hardware and software) that was to be developed within the scope of the research project. In addition, new measurement methods and sensors are to be developed and qualified in order to improve the process reliability of thermal spraying.

  14. Water sprays in space retrieval operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freesland, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a ground based vacuum chamber to determine physical properties of water-ice in a space-like environment. Additional ices, alcohol and ammonia, were also studied. An analytical analysis based on the conservation of angular momentum, resulted in despin performance parameters, i.e., total water mass requirements and despin times. The despin and retrieval of a disabled spacecraft was considered to illustrate a potential application of the water spray technique.

  15. Antibacterial characteristics of thermal plasma spray system.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, M; Saviz, Sh; Ghoranneviss, M; Salar Elahi, A

    2018-03-15

    The objective of this study is to investigate antibacterial characteristics of a thermal plasma spray system. For this purpose, copper powder was coated on a handmade atmospheric plasma spraying system made by the stainless steel 316 substrate, which is preheated at different temperatures before spraying. A number of deposition characteristics such as antibacterial characteristics, adhesion strength and hardness of coating, was investigated. All of the spray parameters are fixed except the substrate temperature. The chemical composition was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and back scattering electron microscopy (BSE) were used to show the coating microstructure, its thickness and also the powder micrograph. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) was used to analyze the coating particles. Hardness of the deposition was examined by Vickers tester (HV0.1). Its adhesion strength was declared by cross cut tester (TQC). In addition, the percentage of bactericidal coating was evidenced with Staphylococcus aurous and Escherichia coli bacteria. Study results show that as the substrates temperature increases, the number of splats in the shape of pancake increases, the greatness and percentage of the deposition porosity both decrease. The increment of the substrate temperature leads to more oxidation and makes thicker dendrites on the splat. The enhancement of the substrate temperature also enlarges thickness and efficiency of coating. The interesting results are that antibacterial properties of coatings against the Escherichia coli are more than Staphylococcus aurous bacteria. However the bactericidal percentage of the coatings against Staphylococcus aurous and Escherichia coli bacteria roughly does not change with increasing the substrate temperature. Furthermore, by increment of the substrate temperature, coatings with both high adhesion and hardness are obtained. Accordingly, the temperature of substrate can be an

  16. Liquid-Spray Formulation Of Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1992-01-01

    Scopolamine, fast-acting anticholinergic drug, formulated into drops administered intranasally. Formulation very useful for people who need immediate relief from motion sickness, and they can administer it to themselves. Also used in other clinical situations in which fast-acting anticholinergic medication required. Modified into such other forms as gel preparation, aqueous-base ointment, or aerosol spray or mist; also dispensed in metered-dose delivery system.

  17. Rugged Preheaters For Vacuum Plasma Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, William H.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Sander, Lewis D.; Power, Christopher A.; Sander, Heather L.; Nguyen, Dalton D.

    1994-01-01

    Electric preheater units built to ensure large workpieces to be coated with metals by vacuum plasma spraying heated uniformly to requisite high temperatures by time plasma torch arrives. Units similar to electrical-resistance ribbon heaters in toasters and in some small portable electric "space" heaters. Nichrome resistance-heating ribbons wrapped around ceramic insulating spools on rings and on plates. Round workpiece placed in middle of ring preheater. Plate preheaters stacked as needed near workpiece.

  18. Modeling of spray droplets deformation and breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, E. A.; Yang, H. Q.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A droplet deformation and breakup (DDB) model is proposed to study shear-type mechanism of spray droplets in pure extentional flows. A numerical solution of the DDB model equation is obtained using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta initial-value solver. The predictions of the DDB model as well as semianalytical and the Taylor analogy models are compared with the experimental data (Krzeczkowski, 1980) for shear breakup, which depict the dimensionless deformation of the drop vs dimensionless time.

  19. Vapor generator steam drum spray head

    DOEpatents

    Fasnacht, Jr., Floyd A.

    1978-07-18

    A typical embodiment of the invention provides a combination feedwater and "cooldown" water spray head that is centrally disposed in the lower portion of a nuclear power plant steam drum. This structure not only discharges the feedwater in the hottest part of the steam drum, but also increases the time required for the feedwater to reach the steam drum shell, thereby further increasing the feedwater temperature before it contacts the shell surface, thus reducing thermal shock to the steam drum structure.

  20. Measuring water ingestion from spray exposures.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Martha; Roddick, Felicity; Nguyen, Thang; O'Toole, Joanne; Leder, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Characterisation of exposure levels is an essential requirement of health risk assessment; however for water exposures other than drinking, few quantitative exposure data exist. Thus, regulatory agencies must use estimates to formulate policy on treatment requirements for non-potable recycled water. We adapted the use of the swimming pool chemical cyanuric acid as a tracer of recreational water ingestion to permit detection of small water volumes inadvertently ingested from spray exposures. By using solutions of 700-1000 mg/L cyanuric acid in an experimental spray exposure scenario, we were able to quantify inadvertent water ingestion in almost 70% of participants undertaking a 10 min car wash activity using a high pressure spray device. Skin absorption was demonstrated to be negligible under the experimental conditions, and the measured ingestion volumes ranged from 0.06 to 3.79 mL. This method could be applied to a range of non-potable water use activities to generate exposure data for risk assessment processes. The availability of such empirical measurements will provide greater assurance to regulatory agencies and industry that potential health risks from exposure to non-potable water supplies are well understood and adequately managed to protect public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Density of Spray-Formed Materials

    SciT

    Kevin M. McHugh; Volker Uhlenwinkel; Nils Ellendr

    2008-06-01

    Spray Forming is an advanced materials processing technology that transforms molten metal into a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a substrate. Depending on the application, the spray-formed material may be used in the as-deposited condition or it may undergo post-deposition processing. Regardless, the density of the as-deposited material is an important issue. Porosity is detrimental because it can significantly reduce strength, toughness, hardness and other properties. While it is not feasible to achieve fully-dense material in the as-deposited state, density greater than 99% of theoretical density is possible if the atomization and impact conditions are optimized. Thermal conditionsmore » at the deposit surface and droplet impact angle are key processing parameters that influence the density of the material. This paper examines the factors that contribute to porosity formation during spray forming and illustrates that very high as-deposited density is achieved by optimizing processing parameters.« less

  2. Spray printing of organic semiconducting single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Grigorios-Panagiotis; Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, John E.; Horton, Peter N.; Castro, Fernando A.; Shkunov, Maxim

    2016-11-01

    Single-crystal semiconductors have been at the forefront of scientific interest for more than 70 years, serving as the backbone of electronic devices. Inorganic single crystals are typically grown from a melt using time-consuming and energy-intensive processes. Organic semiconductor single crystals, however, can be grown using solution-based methods at room temperature in air, opening up the possibility of large-scale production of inexpensive electronics targeting applications ranging from field-effect transistors and light-emitting diodes to medical X-ray detectors. Here we demonstrate a low-cost, scalable spray-printing process to fabricate high-quality organic single crystals, based on various semiconducting small molecules on virtually any substrate by combining the advantages of antisolvent crystallization and solution shearing. The crystals' size, shape and orientation are controlled by the sheer force generated by the spray droplets' impact onto the antisolvent's surface. This method demonstrates the feasibility of a spray-on single-crystal organic electronics.

  3. Automated Plasma Spray (APS) process feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetheroff, C. W.; Derkacs, T.; Matay, I. M.

    1981-01-01

    An automated plasma spray (APS) process was developed to apply two layer (NiCrAlY and ZrO2-12Y2O3) thermal barrier coatings to aircraft and stationary gas turbine engine blade airfoils. The APS process hardware consists of four subsystems: a mechanical positioning subsystem incorporating two interlaced six degree of freedom assemblies (one for coating deposition and one for coating thickness monitoring); a noncoherent optical metrology subsystem (for in process gaging of the coating thickness buildup at specified points on the specimen); a microprocessor based adaptive system controller (to achieve the desired overall thickness profile on the specimen); and commerical plasma spray equipment. Over fifty JT9D first stage aircraft turbine blade specimens, ten W501B utility turbine blade specimens and dozens of cylindrical specimens were coated with the APS process in preliminary checkout and evaluation studies. The best of the preliminary turbine blade specimens achieved an overall coating thickness uniformity of 53 micrometers (2.1 mils), much better than is achievable manually. Comparative evaluations of coating thickness uniformity for manually sprayed and APS coated specimens were performed. One of the preliminary turbine blade evaluation specimens was subjected to a torch test and metallographic evaluation. Some cylindrical specimens coated with the APS process survived up to 2000 cycles in subsequent burner rig testing.

  4. Engineering a new class of thermal spray nano-based microstructures from agglomerated nanostructured particles, suspensions and solutions: an invited review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Montavon, G.; Lima, R. S.; Marple, B. R.

    2011-03-01

    From the pioneering works of McPherson in 1973 who identified nanometre-sized features in thermal spray conventional alumina coatings (using sprayed particles in the tens of micrometres size range) to the most recent and most advanced work aimed at manufacturing nanostructured coatings from nanometre-sized feedstock particles, the thermal spray community has been involved with nanometre-sized features and feedstock for more than 30 years. Both the development of feedstock (especially through cryo-milling, and processes able to manufacture coatings structured at the sub-micrometre or nanometre sizes, such as micrometre-sized agglomerates made of nanometre-sized particles for feedstock) and the emergence of thermal spray processes such as suspension and liquid precursor thermal spray techniques have been driven by the need to manufacture coatings with enhanced properties. These techniques result in two different types of coatings: on the one hand, those with a so-called bimodal structure having nanometre-sized zones embedded within micrometre ones, for which the spray process is similar to that of conventional coatings and on the other hand, sub-micrometre or nanostructured coatings achieved by suspension or solution spraying. Compared with suspension spraying, solution precursor spraying uses molecularly mixed precursors as liquids, avoiding a separate processing route for the preparation of powders and enabling the synthesis of a wide range of oxide powders and coatings. Such coatings are intended for use in various applications ranging from improved thermal barrier layers and wear-resistant surfaces to thin solid electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cell systems, among other numerous applications. Meanwhile these processes are more complex to operate since they are more sensitive to parameter variations compared with conventional thermal spray processes. Progress in this area has resulted from the unique combination of modelling activities, the evolution of

  5. Optimization of Fibrin Glue Spray Systems for Ophthalmic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Shyam S.; Champakalakshmi, Ravi; Angunawela, Romesh I.; Tan, Donald T.; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To optimize fibrin glue (FG) spray for ophthalmic surgery using two spray applicators, EasySpray and DuploSpray systems, by varying the distance from point of application and the pressure/flow rate, and to compare the adhesive strength of sutured and sutureless (FG sprayed) conjunctival graft surgery in a rabbit model. Methods FG was sprayed on a 0.2 mm-thick sheet of paper using EasySpray by variously combining application distances of 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 cm with pressures of 10, 15, and 20 psi. DuploSpray was used at the same distances but with varying flow rates of 1 and 2 L/min. Subsequently, FG was sprayed on porcine corneas and FG thickness was analyzed by histology. In addition, adhesive strength of the conjunctival graft (0.5 × 0.5 cm) attached to the rabbit cornea by sutured and sutureless surgery (FG spray) was compared using a tension meter. Results Histology measurements revealed that the FG thickness decreased with increases in distance and pressure of spray using the EasySpray applicator on paper and porcine corneal sections. The adhesive strength of the sutured conjunctival graft (41 ± 4.85 [kilopascal] KPa) was found to be higher than the graft attached by spraying (10 ± 2.3 KPa) and the sequential addition of FG (6 ± 0.714 KPa). Conclusions The EasySpray applicator formed a uniform spread of FG at a distance-pressure combination of 5 cm and 20 psi. The conjunctival graft attached with sutures had higher adhesive strength compared with grafts glued with a spray applicator. Although the adhesive strength of FG applied through the applicator was similar to the drop-wise sequential technique, the former was more cost effective because more samples could be sprayed compared with the sequential manual technique. Translational Relevance The standardization of the spray system for the application of FG in ophthalmology will provide an economical method for delivering consistent healing results after surgery. PMID:24049702

  6. Investigations on the self-excited oscillations in a kerosene spray flame

    SciT

    de la Cruz Garcia, M.; Mastorakos, E.; Dowling, A.P.

    2009-02-15

    A laboratory scale gas turbine type burner at atmospheric pressure and with air preheat was operated with aviation kerosene Jet-A1 injected from a pressure atomiser. Self-excited oscillations were observed and analysed to understand better the relationship between the spray and thermo-acoustic oscillations. The fluctuations of CH{sup *} chemiluminescence measured simultaneously with the pressure were used to determine the flame transfer function. The Mie scattering technique was used to record spray fluctuations in reacting conditions with a high speed camera. Integrating the Mie intensity over the imaged region gave a temporal signal acquired simultaneously with pressure fluctuations and the transfer functionmore » between the light scattered from the spray and the velocity fluctuations in the plenum was evaluated. Phase Doppler anemometry was used for axial velocity and drop size measurements at different positions downstream the injection plane and for various operating conditions. Pressure spectra showed peaks at a frequency that changed with air mass flow rate. The peak for low air mass flow rate operation was at 220 Hz and was associated with a resonance of the supply plenum. At the same global equivalence ratio but at high air mass flow rates, the pressure spectrum peak was at 323 Hz, a combustion chamber resonant frequency. At low air flow rates, the spray fluctuation motion was pronounced and followed the frequency of the pressure oscillation. At high air flow rates, more effective evaporation resulted in a complete disappearance of droplets at an axial distance of about 1/3 burner diameters from the injection plane, leading to a different flame transfer function and frequency of the self-excited oscillation. The results highlight the sensitivity of the self-excited oscillation to the degree of mixing achieved before the main recirculation zone. (author)« less

  7. Workplace exposure and release of ultrafine particles during atmospheric plasma spraying in the ceramic industry.

    PubMed

    Viana, M; Fonseca, A S; Querol, X; López-Lilao, A; Carpio, P; Salmatonidis, A; Monfort, E

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) is a frequently used technique to produce enhanced-property coatings for different materials in the ceramic industry. This work aimed to characterise and quantify the impact of APS on workplace exposure to airborne particles, with a focus on ultrafine particles (UFPs, <100nm) and nanoparticles (<50nm). Particle number, mass concentrations, alveolar lung deposited surface area concentration, and size distributions, in the range 10nm-20μm were simultaneously monitored at the emission source, in the potential worker breathing zone, and in outdoor air. Different input materials (known as feedstock) were tested: (a) micron-sized powders, and (b) suspensions containing submicron- or nano-sized particles. Results evidenced significantly high UFP concentrations (up to 3.3×10 6 /cm 3 ) inside the spraying chamber, which impacted exposure concentrations in the worker area outside the spraying chamber (up to 8.3×10 5 /cm 3 ). Environmental release of UFPs was also detected (3.9×10 5 /cm 3 , outside the exhaust tube). Engineered nanoparticle (ENP) release to workplace air was also evidenced by TEM microscopy. UFP emissions were detected during the application of both micron-sized powder and suspensions containing submicron- or nano-sized particles, thus suggesting that emissions were process- (and not material-) dependent. An effective risk prevention protocol was implemented, which resulted in a reduction of UFP exposure in the worker area. These findings demonstrate the potential risk of occupational exposure to UFPs during atmospheric plasma spraying, and raise the need for further research on UFP formation mechanisms in high-energy industrial processes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Droplet Impact Sub-cavity Histories and PDPA Spray Experiments for Spray Cooling Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, Nicholas Lee

    Spray cooling is a topic of current interest for its ability to uniformly remove high levels of waste heat from densely packed microelectronics. It has demonstrated the ability to achieve very high heat fluxes, up to 500 W/cm2 with water as the coolant, making it an attractive active thermal management tool. Full Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of spray cooling are infeasible due to the complexity of the spray (drops fluxes of 106 drops/cm2-sec) and heater surface physics requiring impractical resources. Thus a Monte-Carlo (MC) spray cooling simulation model based on empirical data is under development to serve as a cost effective design tool. The initial MC model shows promise, but it lacks additional physics necessary to predict accurate heat fluxes based on nozzle conditions and heated surface geometry. This work reports spray and single drop experiments with the goal of computing the volume beneath a droplet impact cavity (the sub-cavity volume) created by a single impinging droplet on an initial liquid layer. A Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) was utilized to characterize a spray of interest in terms of integrated global Weber, Reynolds, and Froude numbers for varying flow conditions. Results showed that the spray droplet diameters decreased and velocities increased with increasing nozzle gage pressure. A relevant test plan for the single drop experiments has been created from the measured PDPA spray profiles combined with residual spray film thickness measurements from literature resulting in: 140≤We≤1,000, 1,200≤ Re≤3,300, and 0.2≤h0*≤1.0. Froude numbers were not able to be matched for the current single drop experiments (spray: 32,800≤Fr≤275,000). Liquid film thicknesses under the cavity formed by a single droplet have been measured versus radius and time via a non-contact optical thickness sensor for the selected range of dimensionless numbers (We, Re, and h0*). Sub-cavity radius histories have also been analyzed

  9. Ternary ceramic thermal spraying powder and method of manufacturing thermal sprayed coating using said powder

    SciT

    Vogli, Evelina; Sherman, Andrew J.; Glasgow, Curtis P.

    The invention describes a method for producing ternary and binary ceramic powders and their thermal spraying capable of manufacturing thermal sprayed coatings with superior properties. Powder contain at least 30% by weight ternary ceramic, at least 20% by weight binary molybdenum borides, at least one of the binary borides of Cr, Fe, Ni, W and Co and a maximum of 10% by weight of nano and submicro-sized boron nitride. The primary crystal phase of the manufactured thermal sprayed coatings from these powders is a ternary ceramic, while the secondary phases are binary ceramics. The coatings have extremely high resistance againstmore » corrosion of molten metal, extremely thermal shock resistance and superior tribological properties at low and at high temperatures.« less

  10. Automated Plasma Spray (APS) process feasibility study: Plasma spray process development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetheroff, C. W.; Derkacs, T.; Matay, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    An automated plasma spray (APS) process was developed to apply two layer (NiCrAlY and ZrO2-12Y2O3) thermal-barrier coatings to aircraft gas turbine engine blade airfoils. The APS process hardware consists of four subsystems: a mechanical blade positioner incorporating two interlaced six-degree-of-freedom assemblies; a noncoherent optical metrology subsystem; a microprocessor-based adaptive system controller; and commercial plasma spray equipment. Over fifty JT9D first stage turbine blades specimens were coated with the APS process in preliminary checkout and evaluation studies. The best of the preliminary specimens achieved an overall coating thickness uniformity of + or - 53 micrometers, much better than is achievable manually. Factors limiting this performance were identified and process modifications were initiated accordingly. Comparative evaluations of coating thickness uniformity for manually sprayed and APS coated specimens were initiated. One of the preliminary evaluation specimens was subjected to a torch test and metallographic evaluation.

  11. Detailed investigation of a vaporising fuel spray. Part 1: Experimental investigation of time averaged spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Boulderstone, R.; Ungut, A.; Felton, P. G.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    A laser tomographic light scattering technique provides rapid and accurate high resolution measurements of droplet sizes, concentrations, and vaporization. Measurements using a computer interfaced thermocouple are presented and it is found that the potential exists for separating gas and liquid temperature measurements and diagnosing local spray density by in situ analysis of the response characteristics of the thermocouple. The thermocouple technique provides a convenient means for measuring mean gas velocity in both hot and cold two phase flows. The experimental spray is axisymmetric and has carefully controlled initial and boundary conditions. The flow is designed to give relatively insignificant transfer of momentum and mass from spray to air flow. The effects of (1) size-dependent droplet dispersion by the turbulence, (2) the initial spatial segregation of droplet sizes during atomization, and (3) the interaction between droplets and coherent large eddies are diagnosed.

  12. Evaporating Spray in Supersonic Streams Including Turbulence Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanyam, M. S.; Chen, C. P.

    2006-01-01

    Evaporating spray plays an important role in spray combustion processes. This paper describes the development of a new finite-conductivity evaporation model, based on the two-temperature film theory, for two-phase numerical simulation using Eulerian-Lagrangian method. The model is a natural extension of the T-blob/T-TAB atomization/spray model which supplies the turbulence characteristics for estimating effective thermal diffusivity within the droplet phase. Both one-way and two-way coupled calculations were performed to investigate the performance of this model. Validation results indicate the superiority of the finite-conductivity model in low speed parallel flow evaporating sprays. High speed cross flow spray results indicate the effectiveness of the T-blob/T-TAB model and point to the needed improvements in high speed evaporating spray modeling.

  13. Studies of Plasma-Sprayed Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilavsky, Jan

    1994-05-01

    Phase transformations and porosity of the plasma sprayed alumina deposits were examined. The dependence of the phase transformations on deposit chemistry was established. Porosity changes during heat treatment were studied and a model for the porosity is proposed. A novel technique in the field of plasma sprayed deposits--small-angle neutron scattering (SANS)--was successfully applied. Deposits were manufactured using the water-stabilized plasma spray system, PAL160, with an input of 160 kW. Phase transformations of the plasma sprayed alumina deposits were studied using XRD and DTA. The deposits were manufactured from 99.9% alumina, alumina-chromia (1.5% Cr_2O_3), gray alumina (3.7% TiO_2) and alumina -titania (17% TiO_2). The addition of chromia increases the temperature of the alpha phase formation by about 40^circ C and the addition of TiO_2 reduces this temperature by about 150^circ C for gray alumina and by about 175^ circC for alumina-titania. The amount of metastable theta phase was found to depend on the chemistry of the feedstock. Porosities of the deposits, made from alumina and gray alumina, were studied using mercury intrusion porosimetry, weighing method (Archimedean porosimetry), image analysis and SANS. Samples were studied in the as -sprayed condition and after heat treatment for 2 hours at 1300^circC and 1500 ^circC. Porosity depends on the deposit chemistry and on the heat treatment and varies from 5% to about 11%. Different porosity measurement techniques yield different results. Surface areas of 1.5 to 7.5 times 10^4 cm^2 /cm^3 (times 10^6 m^{ -1}) were measured using SANS and depend on heat treatment and on the deposit chemistry. The phase transformations can be associated with an increase in pore surface area and decrease in surface area at 1500 ^circC can be associated with sintering. The effective pore radius, R_{ rm eff}, as measured by SANS is a measure of the pore sizes in the 0.08 to 10 μm size range. The R_{rm eff} depends on deposit

  14. High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L Bravo...ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L...Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) L Bravo, CB Ivey, D

  15. Influence of handpiece maintenance sprays on resin bonding to dentin.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Toyotarou; Kameyama, Atsushi; Haruyama, Akiko; Oishi, Takumi; Kukidome, Nobuyuki; Takase, Yasuaki; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the influence of maintenance spray on resin bonding to dentin. The crown of extracted, caries-free human molars was transversally sectioned with a model trimmer to prepare the dentin surfaces from mid-coronal sound dentin, and then uniformly abraded with #600 silicon carbide paper. The dentin surfaces were randomly divided into three groups: oil-free spray group where maintenance cleaner for air bearing handpieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1 s and rinsed with water spray for 30 s; oil-containing spray group where maintenance cleaner for micro motor handpieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1 s and rinsed with water spray for 30 s; and control group where the surface was rinsed with water spray for 30 s and then air-dried. These surfaces were then bonded with Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical), and resin composite (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray Medical) build-up crowns were incrementally constructed on the bonded surfaces. After storage for 24 h in 37°C water, the bonded teeth were sectioned into hour-glass shaped slices (0.7-mm thick) perpendicular to the bonded surfaces. The specimens were then subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test. Maintenance spray-contaminated specimens (oil-free and oil-containing spray groups) showed significantly lower μTBS than control specimens (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between the spray-contaminated groups (P > 0.05). Maintenance spray significantly reduces the bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond to dentin.

  16. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOEpatents

    Pui, David Y.H.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2004-07-20

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  17. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    SciT

    Pui, David Y. H.; Chen, Da-Ren

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  18. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOEpatents

    Pui, David Y. H. [Plymouth, MN; Chen, Da-Ren [Creve Coeur, MO

    2009-03-03

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  19. Resting behaviour of Anopheles stephensi type form to assess its amenability to control malaria through indoor residual spray.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, B N; Srivastava, Aruna; Dash, A P

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to find reasons of ineffectiveness of indoor residual spray to interrupt malaria transmission by investigating the behaviour of two variants of Anopheles stepnesi, viz. type form and mysorensis in rural areas of Rajasthan, India. Both low malarious (DDT spray from 1958 to 1976) and high malarious (DDT spray from 1958 to April 2006) villages were selected for the study in Arid zone district Jodhpur, Rajasthan during March-April 2006. Resting behaviour of the species during all its movement rhythms covering 24 h period related to: (i) swarming/ mating; (ii) pre- and post-biting rest; (iii) after feed resting between hoping movements; (iv) night and day time resting and; (v) diel activity movements in response to temperature changes, were carried out. The results showed that household objects like cupboards, furnitures, hanging clothes, goods stacked on loft, stored clothes, cobwebs and floor were the dominant resting sites both in sprayed and unsprayed villages. About 95 and 97% of An. stephensi preferred to rest on household objects of unsprayed and sprayed villages respectively. There was no significant difference in resting behaviour of the species in both groups of villages (p >0.05). The pre-biting resting time was recorded as 5 to 15 min whereas post-biting resting time lasted for 15 to 25 min. After biting outdoor (in courtyard--open to sky) species starts entering the rooms at around 2330 hrs. It was observed that during III quarter (0100 to 0400 hrs) maximum species entered into the room were 56% in unsprayed and 62% in sprayed villages. Statistically there was no significant difference in the entry of mosquitoes (p >0.05) in both the groups of villages. Before DDT era, An. stephensi was found resting at all heights of the walls inside the human dwellings. Present study revealed that An. stephensi is trying to avoid sprayable surfaces and tend to rest on unsprayable surfaces during all its movement rhythms starting

  20. Spark Ignition of Monodisperse Fuel Sprays. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danis, Allen M.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Namer, Izak

    1987-01-01

    A study of spark ignition energy requirements was conducted with a monodisperse spray system allowing independent control of droplet size, equivalent ratio, and fuel type. Minimum ignition energies were measured for n-heptane and methanol sprays characterized at the spark gap in terms of droplet diameter, equivalence ratio (number density) and extent of prevaporization. In addition to sprays, minimum ignition energies were measured for completely prevaporized mixtures of the same fuels over a range of equivalence ratios to provide data at the lower limit of droplet size. Results showed that spray ignition was enhanced with decreasing droplet size and increasing equivalence ratio over the ranges of the parameters studied. By comparing spray and prevaporized ignition results, the existence of an optimum droplet size for ignition was indicated for both fuels. Fuel volatility was seen to be a critical factor in spray ignition. The spray ignition results were analyzed using two different empirical ignition models for quiescent mixtures. Both models accurately predicted the experimental ignition energies for the majority of the spray conditions. Spray ignition was observed to be probabilistic in nature, and ignition was quantified in terms of an ignition frequency for a given spark energy. A model was developed to predict ignition frequencies based on the variation in spark energy and equivalence ratio in the spark gap. The resulting ignition frequency simulations were nearly identical to the experimentally observed values.

  1. A numerical analysis of flat fan aerial crop spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik Fesal, Siti Natasha; Fawzi, Mas; Omar, Zamri

    2017-09-01

    Spray drift mitigation, in the agriculture aerial spraying literature, and spray quality in the application of plant protection products, still continues as two critical components in evaluating shareholder value. A study on off-target drift and ground deposit onto a 250 m strip were simulated through series of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations. The drift patterns for evaporating droplets were released from a constant aircraft velocity at 30 m/s (60 mph) carrying 20 m swath width spray boom with 12 fan-type nozzles at released height from the ground ranging from 3.7 m to 4.7 m. Droplet trajectories are calculated from the given airspeed with a Lagrangian model for particle dispersion excluding any wind effect perturbation. The proposed CFD’s model predictions agreed well with cited literatures for a wide range of atmospheric stability values. The results revealed that there is considerable increased in spray drift and droplets trajectories with the increased in spray released height. It suggested that a combination of low aircraft spray released height with low airspeed is essential to improve spray quality and maximizing uniform deposition on the target area are significant in minimizing spray drift risks.

  2. Quality characteristic of spray-drying egg white powders.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuang; Zhao, Songning; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Yiding; Liu, Jingbo; Xu, Menglei

    2013-10-01

    Spray drying is a useful method for developing egg process and utilization. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects on spray drying condition of egg white. The optimized conditions were spraying flow 22 mL/min, feeding temperature 39.8 °C and inlet-air temperature 178.2 °C. Results of sulfydryl (SH) groups measurement indicated conformation structure have changed resulting in protein molecule occur S-S crosslinking phenomenon when heating. It led to free SH content decreased during spray drying process. There was almost no change of differential scanning calorimetry between fresh egg white and spray-drying egg white powder (EWP). For a given protein, the apparent SH reactivity is in turn influenced by the physico-chemical characteristics of the reactant. The phenomenon illustrated the thermal denaturation of these proteins was unrelated to their free SH contents. Color measurement was used to study browning level. EWP in optimized conditions revealed insignificant brown stain. Swelling capacity and scanning electron micrograph both proved well quality characteristic of spray-drying EWP. Results suggested spray drying under the optimized conditions present suitable and alternative method for egg processing industrial implementation. Egg food industrialization needs new drying method to extend shelf-life. The purpose of the study was to provide optimal process of healthy and nutritional instant spray-drying EWP and study quality characteristic of spray-drying EWP.

  3. The role of drop velocity in statistical spray description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J. F.; El-Wakil, M. M.; Myers, P. S.; Uyehara, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    The justification for describing a spray by treating drop velocity as a random variable on an equal statistical basis with drop size was studied experimentally. A double exposure technique using fluorescent drop photography was used to make size and velocity measurements at selected locations in a steady ethanol spray formed by a swirl atomizer. The size velocity data were categorized to construct bivariate spray density functions to describe the spray immediately after formation and during downstream propagation. Bimodal density functions were formed by environmental interaction during downstream propagation. Large differences were also found between spatial mass density and mass flux size distribution at the same location.

  4. Balanced-Rotating-Spray Tank-And-Pipe-Cleaning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaxton, Eric A.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.

    1995-01-01

    Spray head translates and rotates to clean entire inner surface of tank or pipe. Cleansing effected by three laterally balanced gas/liquid jets from spray head that rotates about longitudinal axis. Uses much less liquid. Cleaning process in system relies on mechanical action of jets instead of contaminant dissolution. Eliminates very difficult machining needed to make multiple converging/diverging nozzles within one spray head. Makes nozzle much smaller. Basic two-phase-flow, supersonic-nozzle design applied to other spray systems for interior or exterior cleaning.

  5. Characteristics of combustion flame sprayed nickel aluminum using a Coanda Assisted Spray Manipulation collar for off-normal deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Reid S.

    A novel flame spray collar called the Coanda Assisted Spray Manipulation collar (CSM) has been tested for use on the Sulzer Metco 5P II combustion flame spray gun. A comparison study of the stock nozzle and the CSM has been performed by evaluating the porosity, surface roughness, microhardness, tensile strength and microscopy of normal and off-normal sprayed NiAl deposits. The use of the CSM collar resulted in the need to position the sprayed coupons closer to the gun, which in turn affected the particle impact energy and particle temperatures of the NiAl powder. For the CSM, porosities had a larger scatterband, surface roughness was comparably the same, microhardness was lower, and tensile strength was higher. The microscopy analysis revealed a greater presence of unmelted particles and steeper intersplat boundaries for the CSM. For both processes, the porosity and surface roughness increased and the microhardness decreased as the spray angle decreased.

  6. Spray swath patterns of small aircraft and vertical distribution of microbial spray deposits

    W. G. Yendol

    1985-01-01

    Each year in Northeastern United States over 500,000 acres of oak forests are aerially sprayed to prevent massive defoliation by the gypsy moth. In Pennsylvania alone 400,000 acres were proposed for treatment in 1983 with commercial preparation of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt).

  7. The impact of spray adjuvants on solution physical properties and spray droplet size

    Over the past several years, numerous anecdotes from aerial applicators have surfaced indicating observations of increased numbers of fine droplets seen in the applied spray clouds, usually associated with tank mixtures containing of crop oil concentrates and foliar fertilizers. Efforts were made to...

  8. Cryogen spray cooling: Effects of droplet size and spray density on heat removal.

    PubMed

    Pikkula, B M; Torres, J H; Tunnell, J W; Anvari, B

    2001-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective method to reduce or eliminate non-specific injury to the epidermis during laser treatment of various dermatological disorders. In previous CSC investigations, fuel injectors have been used to deliver the cryogen onto the skin surface. The objective of this study was to examine cryogen atomization and heat removal characteristics of various cryogen delivery devices. Various cryogen delivery device types including fuel injectors, atomizers, and a device currently used in clinical settings were investigated. Cryogen mass was measured at the delivery device output orifice. Cryogen droplet size profiling for various cryogen delivery devices was estimated by optically imaging the droplets in flight. Heat removal for various cryogen delivery devices was estimated over a range of spraying distances by temperature measurements in an skin phantom used in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction model. A substantial range of mass outputs were measured for the cryogen delivery devices while heat removal varied by less than a factor of two. Droplet profiling demonstrated differences in droplet size and spray density. Results of this study show that variation in heat removal by different cryogen delivery devices is modest despite the relatively large difference in cryogen mass output and droplet size. A non-linear relationship between heat removal by various devices and droplet size and spray density was observed. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Preparation of cellulose based microspheres by combining spray coagulating with spray drying.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao; Fu, Aiping; Li, Hongliang; Liu, Jingquan; Guo, Peizhi; Zhao, Xiu Song; Xia, Lin Hua

    2014-10-13

    Porous microspheres of regenerated cellulose with size in range of 1-2 μm and composite microspheres of chitosan coated cellulose with size of 1-3 μm were obtained through a two-step spray-assisted approach. The spray coagulating process must combine with a spray drying step to guarantee the formation of stable microspheres of cellulose. This approach exhibits the following two main virtues. First, the preparation was performed using aqueous solution of cellulose as precursor in the absence of organic solvent and surfactant; Second, neither crosslinking agent nor separated crosslinking process was required for formation of stable microspheres. Moreover, the spray drying step also provided us with the chance to encapsulate guests into the resultant cellulose microspheres. The potential application of the cellulose microspheres acting as drug delivery vector has been studied in two PBS (phosphate-buffered saline) solution with pH values at 4.0 and 7.4 to mimic the environments of stomach and intestine, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Progesterone administration by nasal spray in menopausal women: comparison between two different spray formulations.

    PubMed

    Cicinelli, E; Savino, F; Cagnazzo, I; Scorcia, P; Galantino, P

    1992-12-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the bioavailability of progesterone dissolved in almond oil or dimethicone, and administered by nasal spray. Twenty healthy menopausal women were randomly allocated to treatment by four doses of intranasal spray either of a progesterone solution in almond oil, 2 mg/0.1 ml, corresponding to a total dose of approximately 11 mg of progesterone, or a progesterone solution in dimethicone 5 mg/0.1 ml corresponding to a total dose of approximately 28 mg of progesterone. Circulating progesterone levels were calculated at various time intervals following administration. The formulation with almond oil yielded a maximum progesterone concentration (Cmax of 3.75 ng/ml at Tmax = 60 min, and the area under the curve (AUC0-720) value was 1481.6 +/- 343. The formulation with dimethicone yielded a mean Cmax of 1.049 ng/ml at Tmax = 30 min; the AUC0-720 value was 302.06 +/- 37.5. Therefore, bioavailability of progesterone dissolved in almond oil proved to be largely superior compared to the solution in dimethicone. The crucial role of the carrier in the spray formulations is discussed; in addition to ensuring clinical safety, it must have good solubility for progesterone, be fluid enough to enable efficient 'spraying' and also must allow progesterone to be absorbed through the nasal mucosa.

  11. Investigation of Spray Cooling Schemes for Dynamic Thermal Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yata, Vishnu Vardhan Reddy

    This study aims to investigate variable flow and intermittent flow spray cooling characteristics for efficiency improvement in active two-phase thermal management systems. Variable flow spray cooling scheme requires control of pump input voltage (or speed), while intermittent flow spray cooling scheme requires control of solenoid valve duty cycle and frequency. Several testing scenarios representing dynamic heat load conditions are implemented to characterize the overall performance of variable flow and intermittent flow spray cooling cases in comparison with the reference, steady flow spray cooling case with constant flowrate, continuous spray cooling. Tests are conducted on a small-scale, closed loop spray cooling system featuring a pressure atomized spray nozzle. HFE-7100 dielectric liquid is selected as the working fluid. Two types of test samples are prepared on 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm copper substrates with matching size thick film resistors attached onto the opposite side, to generate heat and simulate high heat flux electronic devices. The test samples include: (i) plain, smooth surface, and (ii) microporous surface featuring 100 ?m thick copper-based coating prepared by dual stage electroplating technique. Experimental conditions involve HFE-7100 at atmospheric pressure and 30°C and 10°C subcooling. Steady flow spray cooling tests are conducted at flow rates of 2-5 ml/cm2.s, by controlling the heat flux in increasing steps, and recording the corresponding steady-state temperatures to obtain cooling curves in the form of surface superheat vs. heat flux. Variable flow and intermittent flow spray cooling tests are done at selected flowrate and subcooling conditions to investigate the effects of dynamic flow conditions on maintaining the target surface temperatures defined based on reference steady flow spray cooling performance.

  12. Comparison of skin hydration in combination and single use of common moisturizers (cream, toner, and spray water).

    PubMed

    Yuanxi, Li; Wei, Hua; Lidan, Xiiong; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the moisturization in combination or single use (including seven general applications) of three common moisturizers: cream, toner, and spray water. Groups were set as C: cream only; T: toner only; C+T, T+C: cream or toner applied successively within a few minutes; C-T, C-S: cream applied with repeated toner or spray water every 2 h; T-T: toner applied with repeated toner every 2 h; and N: untreated group. Outcomes were the change in skin hydration from baseline at 2, 4, 6, and 8 h after applications. All treated zones displayed a significantly higher degree of hydration compared with the untreated zone ( p < 0.05). For normal skin (hydration value at baseline >35 a.u.), C-T led to greatest hydration change rate compared with others, followed by C+T, T+C, and C. Those three applications exhibited analogous hydration at each test point ( p > 0.05). The hydration rate of C-S differed slightly from T-T, followed by those four mentioned above, with T being the last. For dry skin (hydration value at baseline <35 a.u.), no statistical significance could be detected between C-T zone and C+T, T+C, and C zones ( p > 0.05), the other results were identical. When cream and toner were applied successively, the application order has little effect on skin hydration. The application of cream only was an effective and brief way to achieve favorable moisturization especially for dry skin. As a complement, repeated application of toner rather than spray water is efficacious for skin hydration.

  13. CFD Modeling of Superheated Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of fuel atomization and vaporization behavior at superheat conditions is identified to be a topic of importance in the design of modern supersonic engines. As a part of the NASA aeronautics initiative, we have undertaken an assessment study to establish baseline accuracy of existing CFD models used in the evaluation of a ashing jet. In a first attempt towards attaining this goal, we have incorporated an existing superheat vaporization model into our spray solution procedure but made some improvements to combine the existing models valid at superheated conditions with the models valid at stable (non-superheat) evaporating conditions. Also, the paper reports some validation results based on the experimental data obtained from the literature for a superheated spray generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from a cylindrical nozzle. The predicted profiles for both gas and droplet velocities show a reasonable agreement with the measured data and exhibit a self-similar pattern similar to the correlation reported in the literature. Because of the uncertainty involved in the specification of the initial conditions, we have investigated the effect of initial droplet size distribution on the validation results. The predicted results were found to be sensitive to the initial conditions used for the droplet size specification. However, it was shown that decent droplet size comparisons could be achieved with properly selected initial conditions, For the case considered, it is reasonable to assume that the present vaporization models are capable of providing a reasonable qualitative description for the two-phase jet characteristics generated by a ashing jet. However, there remains some uncertainty with regard to the specification of certain initial spray conditions and there is a need for experimental data on separate gas and liquid temperatures in order to validate the vaporization models based on the Adachi correlation for a liquid involving R134A.

  14. 77 FR 3598 - Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gentamicin and Betamethasone Spray

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... veterinary prescription use of gentamicin sulfate and betamethasone valerate topical spray in dogs. DATES... prescription use of Gentamicin Topical Spray (gentamicin sulfate and betamethasone valerate) in dogs. Sparhawk...

  15. Fundamental Studies of Droplet Interactions in Dense Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-31

    correlations for the drag coefficients, Nusselt numbers, and Sherwood numbers for hydrocarbon fuel droplets in dense sprays were obtained. 14. SUBJECYTEM...tions for the drag coefficients, Nusselt numbers, and Sherwood numbers for hydrocarbon fuel droplets in dense sprays were obtained. Nomenclature a...the drag coefficient, lift coefficient, moment coefficient, Nusselt number, Sherwood number, and vaporization rates are different from those of an

  16. Malathion aerial spray controls the pine needle -sheath miner

    Robert E. Stevens

    1966-01-01

    A water emulsion malathion spray, applied by helicopter at the rate of 1 lb. of insecticide in 25 gallons of water, effectively controlled the pine needle-sheath miner (Zelleria haimbachi Busck). Numbers of insects in the sprayed area were reduced by 98.6 percent 24 hours after treatment.

  17. Assessment of spray deposition with water-sensitive paper cards

    Spatial distributions of spray droplets discharged from an airblast sprayer, were sampled on pairs of absorbent paper (AP) and water-sensitive paper (WSP) targets at several distances from the sprayer. Spray solutions, containing a fluorescent tracer, were discharged from two size nozzles to achiev...

  18. Arc spray fabrication of metal matrix composite monotape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, L. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Arc metal spraying is used to spray liquid metal onto an array of high strength fibers that were previously wound onto a large drum contained inside a controlled atmosphere chamber. This chamber is first evacuated to remove gaseous contaminants and then backfilled with a neutral gas up to atmospheric pressure. This process is used to produce a large size metal matrix composite monotape.

  19. Toward a Universal Sea Spray Source Function (UNISOURCE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    Toward a Universal Sea Spray Source Function ( UNISOURCE ) Gerrit de Leeuw TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory P.O. Box 96864 2509 JG The...00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Toward a Universal Sea Spray Source Function ( UNISOURCE ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  20. Spray spectrum modifications through changes in airspeed to minimize drift

    Management of droplet size is one of the key components to minimizing spray drift, which can be accomplished in-flight by changing airspeed. Studies were conducted measuring spray droplet spectra parameters across airspeeds ranging from 100-140 mph (in 5 mph increments). In general the volume medi...

  1. The preparation of steatite suspension for spray drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jirousek, L.; Spicak, K.

    1983-01-01

    Liquifying agents were investigated for preparation of highly concentrated steatite suspensions which are to be spray-dried. Organic additives for improving the molding properties and strength of green compacts are described. Demands on properties of the spray-dried granules are defined with regard to shrinkage of the molded compacts.

  2. Optimal Spray Application Rates for Ornamental Nursery Liner Production

    Spray deposition and coverage at different application rates for nursery liners of different sizes were investigated to determine the optimal spray application rates. Experiments were conducted on two and three-year old red maple liners. A traditional hydraulic sprayer with vertical booms was used t...

  3. Mathematical simulation of surface heating during plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovich, V. I.; Giorbelidze, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    A mathematical model of temperature distribution over the flat ‘coating-substrate’ system section during plasma spraying, taking into account a plasma gun travel and coating buildup has been developed. It has been shown that the temperature value in the near-surface layer of the sprayed coating during the plasma gun passage can significantly exceed the temperature values in underlayers.

  4. Method to synthesize and produce thin films by spray pyrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Squillante, Michael R.

    1982-06-22

    Forming a film by spraying onto a heated substrate an atomized solution containing the appropriate salt of a constituent element of the film and a highly soluble (i.e., greater than 1 M) organic acid in sufficient amount to reduce the oxidation state of at least one solute element of the spray solution after contacting the heated substrate.

  5. Directed Foliar Sprays of Forestry Herbicides for Loblolly Pine Release

    James H. Miller

    1990-01-01

    Directed foliar sprays are lowcost alternatives to aerial applications of herbicides for releasing pines from competing hardwoods and shrubs (Thomas et al. 1989, Lowery 1981).Directed sprays also could be used in site-preparation treatments, pre-commercial thinnings, hardwood regeneration management, and cover maintenance of wildlife openings, scenic vistas, and...

  6. Bird mortality after spraying for Dutch elm disease with DDT

    Wurster, C.F.; Wurster, D.H.; Strickland, W.N.

    1965-01-01

    In Hanover, New Hampshire, where elms were sprayed with DDT, 151 dead birds were found; 10 dead birds were found in Norwich, Vermont, where no DDT was used. Chemical analyses of dead birds, observation of symptoms of DDT poisoning, and a population decline after spraying all indicate severe mortality among certain species in Hanover.

  7. Pesticide spray application, behavior, and assessment: workshop proceedings

    Richard B. Roberts

    1976-01-01

    Experts from relevant disciplines exchanged information on three important problems of pesticide spray technology. The four papers presented are Physical Parameters Relating to Pesticide Applications by N. B. Akesson and W. E. Yates; The Micrometeorology and Physics of Spray Particle Behavior by H. E. Cramer and D. G. Boyle;

  8. Two intelligent spraying systems developed for tree crop production

    Precision pesticide application technologies are needed to achieve efficient and effective spray deposition on target areas and minimize off-target losses. Two variable-rate intelligent sprayers were developed as an introduction of new generation sprayers for tree crop applications. The first spraye...

  9. Precipitation Behavior and Quenching Sensitivity of a Spray Deposited Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Qian; Xiao, Zhu; Wang, Mingpu

    2017-01-01

    Precipitation behavior and the quenching sensitivity of a spray deposited Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr alloy during isothermal heat treatment have been studied systematically. Results demonstrate that both the hardness and the ultimate tensile strength of the studied alloy decreased with the isothermal treatment time at certain temperatures. More notably, the hardness decreases rapidly after the isothermal heat treatment. During isothermal heat treatment processing, precipitates readily nucleated in the medium-temperature zone (250–400 °C), while the precipitation nucleation was scarce in the low-temperature zone (<250 °C) and in the high-temperature zone (>400 °C). Precipitates with sizes of less than ten nanometers would contribute a significant increase in yield strength, while the ones with a larger size than 300 nm would contribute little strengthening effect. Quenching sensitivity is high in the medium-temperature zone (250–400 °C), and corresponding time-temperature-property (TTP) curves of the studied alloy have been established. PMID:28925964

  10. Investigations on the Behavior of HVOF and Cold Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on T22 Boiler Steel in Actual Boiler Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Niraj; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya; Karthikeyan, J.

    2012-01-01

    High temperature corrosion accompanied by erosion is a severe problem, which may result in premature failure of the boiler tubes. One countermeasure to overcome this problem is the use of thermal spray protective coatings. In the current investigation high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and cold spray processes have been used to deposit commercial Ni-20Cr powder on T22 boiler steel. To evaluate the performance of the coatings in actual conditions the bare as well as the coated steels were subjected to cyclic exposures, in the superheater zone of a coal fired boiler for 15 cycles. The weight change and thickness loss data were used to establish kinetics of the erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction, surface and cross-sectional field emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS) and x-ray mapping techniques were used to analyse the as-sprayed and corroded specimens. The HVOF sprayed coating performed better than its cold sprayed counterpart in actual boiler environment.

  11. Acute respiratory syndrome after inhalation of waterproofing sprays: a posteriori exposure-response assessment in 102 cases.

    PubMed

    Vernez, David; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; De-Batz, Alice; Droz, Pierre; Lazor, Romain

    2006-05-01

    Waterproofing agents are widely used to protect leather and textiles in both domestic and occupational activities. An outbreak of acute respiratory syndrome following exposure to waterproofing sprays occurred during the winter 2002-2003 in Switzerland. About 180 cases were reported by the Swiss Toxicological Information Centre between October 2002 and March 2003, whereas fewer than 10 cases per year had been recorded previously. The reported cases involved three brands of sprays containing a common waterproofing mixture, that had undergone a formulation change in the months preceding the outbreak. A retrospective analysis was undertaken in collaboration with the Swiss Toxicological Information Centre and the Swiss Registries for Interstitial and Orphan Lung Diseases to clarify the circumstances and possible causes of the observed health effects. Individual exposure data were generated with questionnaires and experimental emission measurements. The collected data was used to conduct numeric simulation for 102 cases of exposure. A classical two-zone model was used to assess the aerosol dispersion in the near- and far-field during spraying. The resulting assessed dose and exposure levels obtained were spread on large scales, of several orders of magnitude. No dose-response relationship was found between exposure indicators and health effects indicators (perceived severity and clinical indicators). Weak relationships were found between unspecific inflammatory response indicators (leukocytes, C-reactive protein) and the maximal exposure concentration. The results obtained disclose a high interindividual response variability and suggest that some indirect mechanism(s) predominates in the respiratory disease occurrence. Furthermore, no threshold could be found to define a safe level of exposure. These findings suggest that the improvement of environmental exposure conditions during spraying alone does not constitute a sufficient measure to prevent future outbreaks of

  12. Inhalational and dermal exposures during spray application of biocides.

    PubMed

    Berger-Preiss, Edith; Boehncke, Andrea; Könnecker, Gustav; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Holthenrich, Dagmar; Koch, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Data on inhalational and potential dermal exposures during spray application of liquid biocidal products were generated. On the one hand, model experiments with different spraying devices using fluorescent tracers were carried out to investigate the influence of parameters relevant to the exposure (e.g. spraying equipment, nozzle size, direction of application). On the other hand, measurements were performed at selected workplaces (during disinfection operations in food and feed areas; pest control operations for private, public and veterinary hygiene; wood protection and antifouling applications) after application of biocidal products such as Empire 20, Responsar SC, Omexan-forte, Actellic, Perma-forte; Fendona SC, Pyrethrum mist; CBM 8, Aldekol Des 03, TAD CID, Basileum, Basilit. The measurements taken in the model rooms demonstrated dependence of the inhalation exposure on the type of spraying device used, in the following order: "spraying with low pressure" < "airless spraying" < "fogging" indicating that the particle diameter of the released spray droplets is the most important parameter. In addition inhalation exposure was lowest when the spraying direction was downward. Also for the potential dermal exposure, the spraying direction was of particular importance: overhead spraying caused the highest contamination of body surfaces. The data of inhalational and potential dermal exposures gained through workplace measurements showed considerable variation. During spraying procedures with low-pressure equipments, dose rates of active substances inhaled by the operators ranged from 7 to 230 microg active substance (a.s.)/h. An increase in inhaled dose rates (6-33 mg a.s./h) was observed after use of high application volumes/time unit during wood protection applications indoors. Spraying in the veterinary sector using medium-pressure sprayers led to inhaled dose rates between 2 and 24mga.s./h. The highest inhaled dose rates were measured during fogging (114 mg a

  13. The Influence of Shaping Air Pressure of Pneumatic Spray Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenzhuo; Chen, Yan; Pan, Haiwei; Zhang, Weiming; Li, Bo

    2018-02-01

    The shaping air pressure is a very important parameter in the application of pneumatic spray gun, and studying its influence on spray flow field and film thickness distribution has practical values. In this paper, Euler-Lagrangian method is adopted to describe the two-phase spray flow of pneumatic painting process, and the air flow fields, spray patterns and dynamic film thickness distributions were obtained with the help of the computational fluid dynamics code—ANSYS Fluent. Results show that with the increase of the shaping air pressure, the air phase flow field spreads in the plane perpendicular to the shaping air hole plane, the spray pattern becomes narrower and flatter, and the width of the dynamic film increases with the reduced maximum value of the film thickness. But the film thickness distribution seems to change little with the shaping air pressure decreasing from 0.6bar to 0.9bar.

  14. Thermal Spraying of Bioactive Polymer Coatings for Orthopaedic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebbi, A.; Stokes, J.

    2012-06-01

    Flame sprayed biocompatible polymer coatings, made of biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymers, were investigated as single coatings on titanium and as top coatings on plasma sprayed Hydroxyapatite. Biocompatible polymers can act as drug carriers for localized drug release following implantation. The polymer matrix consisted of a biodegradable polymer, polyhydroxybutyrate 98%/ polyhydroxyvalerate 2% (PHBV) and a non-biodegradable polymer, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Screening tests were performed to determine the suitable range of spraying parameters, followed by a Design of Experiments study to determine the effects of spraying parameters on coating characteristics (thickness, roughness, adhesion, wettability), and to optimize the coating properties accordingly. Coatings characterization showed that optimized flame sprayed biocompatible polymers underwent little chemical degradation, did not produce acidic by-products in vitro, and that cells proliferated well on their surface.

  15. Preliminary Design of Aerial Spraying System for Microlight Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Zamri; Idris, Nurfazliawati; Rahim, M. Zulafif

    2017-10-01

    Undoubtedly agricultural is an important sector because it provides essential nutrients for human, and consequently is among the biggest sector for economic growth worldwide. It is crucial to ensure crops production is protected from any plant diseases and pests. Thus aerial spraying system on crops is developed to facilitate farmers to for crops pests control and it is very effective spraying method especially for large and hilly crop areas. However, the use of large aircraft for aerial spaying has a relatively high operational cost. Therefore, microlight aircraft is proposed to be used for crops aerial spraying works for several good reasons. In this paper, a preliminary design of aerial spraying system for microlight aircraft is proposed. Engineering design methodology is adopted in the development of the aerial sprayer and steps involved design are discussed thoroughly. A preliminary design for the microlight to be attached with an aerial spraying system is proposed.

  16. Spray drying of fruit and vegetable juices--a review.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anjali; Singh, Satya Vir

    2015-01-01

    The main cause of spray drying is to increase the shelf life and easy handling of juices. In the present paper, the studies carried out so far on spray drying of various fruits and vegetables are reported. The major fruit juices dried are mango, banana, orange, guava, bayberry, watermelon, pineapple, etc. However, study on vegetable juices is limited. In spray drying, the major optimized parameters are inlet air temperature, relative humidity of air, outlet air temperature, and atomizer speed that are given for a particular study. The juices in spray drying require addition of drying agents that include matlodextrin, liquid glucose, etc. The drying agents are added to increase the glass transition temperature. Different approaches for spray dryer design have also been discussed in the present work.

  17. [Investigation on Spray Drying Technology of Auricularia auricular Extract].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rong; Chen, Hui; Xie, Yuan; Chen, Peng; Wang, Luo-lin

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of spray drying technology of Auricularia auricular extract and its optimum process. On the basis of single factor test, with the yield of dry extract and the content of polysaccharide as indexes, orthogonal test method was used to optimize the spray drying technology on the inlet air temperature, injection speed and crude drug content. Using ultraviolet spectrophotometry, thin layer chromatography(TLC) and pharmacodynamics as indicators, extracts prepared by traditional alcohol precipitation drying process and spray drying process were compared. Compared with the traditional preparation method, the extract prepared by spray drying had little differences from the polysaccharide content, TLC and the function of reducing TG and TC, and its optimum technology condition were as follows: The inlet air temperature was 180 °C, injection speed was 10 ml/min and crude drugs content was 0. 4 g/mL. Auricularia auricular extract by spray drying technology is stable and feasible with high economic benefit.

  18. Efficacy of clobetasol spray: factors beyond patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Tina; Koo, John; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-02-01

    Clobetasol 0.05% spray, a topical clobetasol propionate, is a non-greasy formulation that has shown increased clinical efficacy in a head-to-head comparison with foam formulation. Moreover, available data from randomized, controlled, double-blind trials suggests that clobetasol spray is, in fact, slightly more effective than most, if not all, other preparations of clobetasol. The fact that clobetasol spray is exceptionally easy to comply with may have played a major role in this outcome; however, other factors must be considered. These include vehicle metamorphosis post-application as well as vehicle and excipient effects on stratum corneum permeability. Basic concepts in topical drug delivery and how they apply to this spray vehicle may further explain the greater efficacy of clobetasol spray.

  19. Thermal Spray Maps: Material Genomics of Processing Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Andrew Siao Ming; Sanpo, Noppakun; Sesso, Mitchell L.; Kim, Sun Yung; Berndt, Christopher C.

    2013-10-01

    There is currently no method whereby material properties of thermal spray coatings may be predicted from fundamental processing inputs such as temperature-velocity correlations. The first step in such an important understanding would involve establishing a foundation that consolidates the thermal spray literature so that known relationships could be documented and any trends identified. This paper presents a method to classify and reorder thermal spray data so that relationships and correlations between competing processes and materials can be identified. Extensive data mining of published experimental work was performed to create thermal spray property-performance maps, known as "TS maps" in this work. Six TS maps will be presented. The maps are based on coating characteristics of major importance; i.e., porosity, microhardness, adhesion strength, and the elastic modulus of thermal spray coatings.

  20. Plasma Spraying of Ceramics with Particular Difficulties in Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Schlegel, N.; Guignard, A.; Jarligo, M. O.; Rezanka, S.; Hospach, A.; Vaßen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging new applications and growing demands of plasma-sprayed coatings initiate the development of new materials. Regarding ceramics, often complex compositions are employed to achieve advanced material properties, e.g., high thermal stability, low thermal conductivity, high electronic and ionic conductivity as well as specific thermo-mechanical properties and microstructures. Such materials however, often involve particular difficulties in processing by plasma spraying. The inhomogeneous dissociation and evaporation behavior of individual constituents can lead to changes of the chemical composition and the formation of secondary phases in the deposited coatings. Hence, undesired effects on the coating characteristics are encountered. In this work, examples of such challenging materials are investigated, namely pyrochlores applied for thermal barrier coatings as well as perovskites for gas separation membranes. In particular, new plasma spray processes like suspension plasma spraying and plasma spray-physical vapor deposition are considered. In some cases, plasma diagnostics are applied to analyze the processing conditions.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Suspension HVOF Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, M.; Moghtadernejad, S.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme is used to simulate suspension high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying process. The mass, momentum, energy, and species equations are solved together with the realizable k-ɛ turbulence model to simulate the gas phase. Suspension is assumed to be a mixture of solid particles [mullite powder (3Al2O3·2SiO2)], ethanol, and ethylene glycol. The process involves premixed combustion of oxygen-propylene, and non-premixed combustion of oxygen-ethanol and oxygen-ethylene glycol. One-step global reaction is used for each mentioned reaction together with eddy dissipation model to compute the reaction rate. To simulate the droplet breakup, Taylor Analogy Breakup model is applied. After the completion of droplet breakup, and solvent evaporation/combustion, the solid suspended particles are tracked through the domain to determine the characteristics of the coating particles. Numerical simulations are validated against the experimental results in the literature for the same operating conditions. Seven or possibly eight shock diamonds are captured outside the nozzle. In addition, a good agreement between the predicted particle temperature, velocity, and diameter, and the experiment is obtained. It is shown that as the standoff distance increases, the particle temperature and velocity reduce. Furthermore, a correlation is proposed to determine the spray cross-sectional diameter and estimate the particle trajectories as a function of standoff distance.

  2. Convergent spray process for environmentally friendly coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Conventional spray application processes have poor transfer efficiencies, resulting in an exorbitant loss in materials, solvents, and time. Also, with ever tightening Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations and Occupational Safety and Health Administration requirements, the low transfer efficiencies have a significant impact on the quantities of materials and solvents that are released into the environment. High solids spray processes are also limited by material viscosities, thus requiring many passes over the surface to achieve a thickness in the 0.125 -inch range. This results in high application costs and a negative impact on the environment. Until recently, requirements for a 100 percent solid sprayable, environmentally friendly, lightweight thermal protection system that can be applied in a thick (greater than 0.125 inch) single-pass operation exceeded the capability of existing systems. Such coatings must be applied by hand lay-up techniques, especially for thermal and/or fire protection systems. The current formulation of these coatings has presented many problems such as worker safety, environmental hazards, waste, high cost, and application constraints. A system which can apply coatings without using hazardous materials would alleviate many of these problems. Potential applications include the aerospace thermal protective specialty coatings, chemical and petroleum industries that require fire-protection coatings that resist impact, chemicals, and weather. These markets can be penetrated by offering customized coatings applied by automated processes that are environmentally friendly.

  3. Impact Response of Thermally Sprayed Metal Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J. L.; Hall, A. C.; Moore, N. W.; Pautz, S. D.; Franke, B. C.; Scherzinger, W. M.; Brown, D. W.

    2017-06-01

    Gas-gun experiments have probed the impact response of tantalum specimens that were additively manufactured using a controlled thermal spray deposition process. Velocity interferometer (VISAR) diagnostics provided time-resolved measurements of sample response under one-dimensional (i . e . , uniaxial strain) shock compression to peak stresses ranging between 1 and 4 GPa. The acquired wave-profile data have been analyzed to determine the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), Hugoniot equation of state, and high-pressure yield strength of the thermally deposited samples for comparison to published baseline results for conventionally wrought tantalum. The effects of composition, porosity, and microstructure (e . g . , grain/splat size and morphology) are assessed to explain differences in the dynamic mechanical behavior of spray-deposited versus conventional material. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Spray-on transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sarah A

    2015-02-01

    Transdermal drug delivery possesses superior advantages over other routes of administration, particularly minimizing first-pass metabolism. Transdermal drug delivery is challenged by the barrier nature of skin. Numerous technologies have been developed to overcome the relatively low skin permeability, including spray-on transdermal systems. A transdermal spray-on system (TSS) usually consists of a solution containing the drug, a volatile solvent and in many cases a chemical penetration enhancer. TSS promotes drug delivery via the complex interplay between solvent evaporation and drug-solvent drag into skin. The volatile solvent carries the drug into the upper layers of the stratum corneum, and as the volatile solvent evaporates, an increase in the thermodynamic activity of the drug occurs resulting in an increased drug loading in skin. TSS is easily applied, delivering flexible drug dosage and associated with lower incidence of skin irritation. TSS provides a fast-drying product where the volatile solvent enables uniform drug distribution with minimal vehicle deposition on skin. TSS ensures precise dose administration that is aesthetically appealing and eliminates concerns of residual drug associated with transdermal patches. Furthermore, it provides a better alternative to traditional transdermal products due to ease of product development and manufacturing.

  5. A Method to Predict the Thickness of Poorly-Bonded Material Along Spray and Spray-Layer Boundaries in Cold Spray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangfan; Hamada, Yukitaka; Otobe, Katsunori; Ando, Teiichi

    2017-02-01

    Multi-traverse CS provides a unique means for the production of thick coatings and bulk materials from powders. However, the material along spray and spray-layer boundaries is often poorly bonded as it is laid by the leading and trailing peripheries of the spray that carry powder particles with insufficient kinetic energy. For the same reason, the splats in the very first layer deposited on the substrate may not be bonded well either. A mathematical spray model was developed based on an axisymmetric Gaussian mass flow rate distribution and a stepped deposition yield to predict the thickness of such poorly-bonded layers in multi-traverse CS deposition. The predicted thickness of poorly-bonded layers in a multi-traverse Cu coating falls in the range of experimental values. The model also predicts that the material that contains poorly bonded splats could exceed 20% of the total volume of the coating.

  6. Current implications of past DDT indoor spraying in Oman.

    PubMed

    Booij, Petra; Holoubek, Ivan; Klánová, Jana; Kohoutek, Jiří; Dvorská, Alice; Magulová, Katarína; Al-Zadjali, Said; Čupr, Pavel

    2016-04-15

    In Oman, DDT was sprayed indoors during an intensive malaria eradication program between 1976 and 1992. DDT can remain for years after spraying and is associated with potential health risk. This raises the concern for human exposure in areas where DDT was used for indoor spraying. Twelve houses in three regions with a different history of DDT indoor spraying were chosen for a sampling campaign in 2005 to determine p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (p,p'-DDD) levels in indoor air, dust, and outdoor soil. Although DDT was only sprayed indoor, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were also found in outdoor soil. The results indicate that release and exposure continue for years after cessation of spraying. The predicted cancer risk based on concentrations determined in 2005, indicate that there was still a significant cancer risk up to 13 to 16years after indoor DDT spraying. A novel approach, based on region-specific half-lives, was used to predict concentrations in 2015 and showed that more than 21years after spraying, cancer risk for exposure to indoor air, dust, and outdoor soil are acceptable in Oman for adults and young children. The model can be used for other locations and countries to predict prospective exposure of contaminants based on indoor experimental measurements and knowledge about the spraying time-schedule to extrapolate region-specific half-lives and predict effects on the human population years after spraying. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of the Characteristics and Performance of Flurbiprofen 8.75 mg Spray for Sore Throat.

    PubMed

    Veale, David; Shephard, Adrian; Adams, Verity; Lidster, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Sore throat sprays provide targeted relief by delivering the active ingredient directly to the site of pain. Different sprays vary in characteristics, thus affecting delivery of the active ingredient to the throat, which can impact compliance. The characteristics and performance of FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY were compared with 12 other sprays. Parameters assessed included spray angle and pattern, droplet size distribution, shot weight uniformity and shot weight throughout life. Among all sprays tested WICK Sulagil Halsspray had the smallest spray angle (46°) and also the smallest diameter spray pattern (X=32.8 mm; Y=34.4 mm). Thiovalone® Buccal Spray Suspension had both the largest spray angle (82°) and largest diameter spray pattern (X=62.6 mm; Y=78.0 mm). Hasco Sept® Aerosol Spray had the smallest droplet size (Dv90=118.4 μm) whereas OKi infiammazione e dolore® 0.16% spray had the largest (Dv90=214.34 μm). In terms of shot weight uniformity, TANTUM® VERDE GOLA 0.25% spray showed the least variation (2% RSD) between shots and UNIBEN Aerosol Spray the most (23.4% RSD). Shot weight throughout life studies showed that FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY had the least deviation from shot weight (1.77%) whereas OKi infiammazione e dolore® 0.16% spray deviated the most (44.9%). FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY had the second smallest spray angle/pattern and droplet size distribution and also the least variation in shot weight. Different sore throat sprays vary in different attributes, affecting delivery of the active ingredient. FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY performed well overall, ranking first among all sprays tested, and providing a dose which is targeted and uniformly delivered throughout the life of the bottle. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. The study on the interdependence of spray characteristics and evaporation history of fuel spray in high temperature air crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. Y.; Chin, J. S.

    1986-06-01

    A numerical calculation method is used to predict the variation of the characteristics of fuel spray moving in a high temperature air crossflow, mainly, Sauter mean diameter SMD, droplet size distribution index N of Rosin-Rammler distribution and evaporation percentage changing with downstream distance X from the nozzle. The effect of droplet heat-up period evaporation process and forced convection are taken into full account; thus, the calculation model is a very good approximation to the process of spray evaporation in a practical combustor, such as ramjet, aero-gas turbine, liquid propellant rocket, diesel and other liquid fuel-powered combustion devices. The changes of spray characteristics N, SMD and spray evaporation percentage with air velocity, pressure, temperature, fuel injection velocity, and the initial spray parameters are presented.

  9. An evaluation of the electric arc spray and (HPPS) processes for the manufacturing of high power plasma spraying MCrAIY coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacriste, D.; Goubot, N.; Dhers, J.; Ducos, M.; Vardelle, A.

    2001-06-01

    The high power plasma torch (PlazJet) can be used to spray refractory ceramics with high spray rates and deposition efficiency. It can provide dense and hard coating with high bond strengths. When manufacturing thermal barrier coatings, the PlazJet gun is well adapted to spraying the ceramic top coat but not the MCrAIY materials that are used as bond coat. Arc spraying can compete with plasma spraying for metallic coatings since cored wires can be used to spray alloys and composites. In addition, the high production rate of arc spraying enables a significant decrease in coating cost. This paper discusses the performances of the PlazJet gun, and a twin-wire are spray system, and compares the properties and cost of MCrAIY coatings made with these two processes. For arc spraying, the use of air or nitrogen as atomizing gas is also investigated.

  10. Cold spray NDE for porosity and other process anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, S. W.; Larche, M. R.; Prowant, M. S.; Suter, J. D.; Lareau, J. P.; Jiang, X.; Ross, K. A.

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes a technology review of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods that can be applied to cold spray coatings. Cold spray is a process for depositing metal powder at high velocity so that it bonds to the substrate metal without significant heating that would be likely to cause additional residual tensile stresses. Coatings in the range from millimeters to centimeters are possible at relatively high deposition rates. Cold spray coatings that may be used for hydroelectric components that are subject to erosion, corrosion, wear, and cavitation damage are of interest. The topic of cold spray NDE is treated generally, however, but may be considered applicable to virtually any cold spray application except where there are constraints of the hydroelectric component application that bear special consideration. Optical profilometry, eddy current, ultrasound, and hardness tests are shown for one set of good, fair, and poor nickel-chrome (NiCr) on 304 stainless steel (304SS) cold spray samples to demonstrate inspection possibilities. The primary indicator of cold spray quality is the cold spray porosity that is most directly measured with witness-sample destructive examinations (DE)—mostly photo-micrographs. These DE-generated porosity values are correlated with optical profilometry, eddy current, ultrasound, and hardness test NDE methods to infer the porosity and other information of interest. These parameters of interest primarily include: • Porosity primarily caused by improper process conditions (temperature, gas velocity, spray standoff, spray angle, powder size, condition, surface cleanliness, surface oxide, etc.) • Presence/absence of the cold spray coating including possible over-sprayed voids • Coating thicknessOptical profilometry measurements of surface roughness trended with porosity plus, if compared with a reference measurement or reference drawing, would provide information on the coating thickness. Ultrasound could provide similar

  11. Dilation Behavior of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano Lopez, Miryan Lorena

    Thermal Spray (TS) is a very versatile manufacturing process to deposit thick coatings on a variety of substrates. Coatings are used in protective (i.e. wear, chemical attack, high temperature, etc.) and functional (i.e. sensors) applications. TS coatings have a unique lamellar microstructure as a result of the overlapping of millions of molten and partially-molten particles. During processing, high deformation by impact, high temperature, and rapid solidification lead to a complex hierarchical material system that contains a high amount of microstructural defects. The presence of defects in the microstructure contribute to differences in property values in comparison to bulk materials. Thermal stresses and residual strains arise from processing, thermal gradients and thermal exposure. Evaluation of thermal properties, in this case, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is of vital importance to enhance coating performance. In this dissertation, expansion measurements of various metals, alloys, ceramics, and cermet coatings; were carried out using various techniques (push rod dilatometry, x-ray diffraction XRD, digital image correlation DIC, and curvature method) to determine the dilation behavior at the atomic, micro- and macro-scale levels. The main results were. 1) Mathematical models (Turner and Kerner) used for composite materials, successfully predicted the CTE property of a TS coating where the primary phase is the coating material and the secondary phases can be oxides, precipitates, etc. (formed as a byproduct of the spraying process). CTE was found not to be affected by porosity. 2) Despite the anisotropic behavior characteristic of TS coatings, the experimental results shown that CTE results to be reasonable isotropic within the scope of this study. 3) The curvature method was found to be an alternative technique to obtain the CTE, as well as the Young's modulus of coating in a bi-material strip, with good approximation. 4) An anomalous expansion

  12. Coanda-Assisted Spray Manipulation Collar for a Commercial Plasma Spray Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabey, K.; Smith, B. L.; Whichard, G.; McKechnie, T.

    2011-06-01

    A Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) collar was retrofitted to a Praxair SG-100 plasma spray gun. The CSM device makes it possible to change the direction of (vector) the plasma jet and powder without moving the gun. The two-piece retrofit device replaces the standard faceplate. Two separate collars were tested: one designed for small vector angles and one for larger vector angles. It was demonstrated that the small-angle device could modify the trajectory of zirconia powder up to several degrees. Doing so could realign the plasma with the powder resulting in increased powder temperature and velocity. The large-angle device was capable of vectoring the plasma jet up to 45°. However, the powder did not vector as much. Under large-angle vectoring, the powder velocity and temperature decreased steadily with vector angle. Both devices were tested using a supersonic configuration to demonstrate that CSM is capable of vectoring supersonic plasmas.

  13. Vision-aided Monitoring and Control of Thermal Spray, Spray Forming, and Welding Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agapakis, John E.; Bolstad, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Vision is one of the most powerful forms of non-contact sensing for monitoring and control of manufacturing processes. However, processes involving an arc plasma or flame such as welding or thermal spraying pose particularly challenging problems to conventional vision sensing and processing techniques. The arc or plasma is not typically limited to a single spectral region and thus cannot be easily filtered out optically. This paper presents an innovative vision sensing system that uses intense stroboscopic illumination to overpower the arc light and produce a video image that is free of arc light or glare and dedicated image processing and analysis schemes that can enhance the video images or extract features of interest and produce quantitative process measures which can be used for process monitoring and control. Results of two SBIR programs sponsored by NASA and DOE and focusing on the application of this innovative vision sensing and processing technology to thermal spraying and welding process monitoring and control are discussed.

  14. Spray visualization of alternative fuels at hot ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2017-11-01

    Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) has gained significant interest as drop-in alternative jet fuel owing to its cleaner combustion characteristics. The physical and evaporation properties of GTL fuels are different from those of the conventional jet fuels. Those differences will have an effect on the spray, and in turn, the combustion performance. In this study, the non-reacting near nozzle spray dynamics such as spray cone angle, liquid sheet breakup and liquid velocity of GTL fuel will be investigated and compared with those of the conventional jet fuel. This work is a follow up of the preliminary study performed at atmospheric ambient conditions where differences were observed in the near nozzle spray characteristics between the fuels. Whereas, in this study the spray visualization will be performed in a hot and inert environment to account for the difference in evaporation characteristics of the fuels. The spray visualization images will be captured using the shadowgraph technique. A rigorous statistical analysis of the images will be performed to compare the spray dynamics between the fuels.

  15. Characterization and Analysis of Paper Spray Ionization of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Aliaga-Aguilar, Hugo

    2018-01-01

    Paper spray ionization has arisen relatively recently as a complement and alternative to electro- and nanospray ionization with silica capillaries. A majority of the work in the present literature focuses on the chemical aspect of paper spray. In order to study the physical and phenomenological facet of its implementation, we measured current and voltage distributions of Taylor cones. To study transport phenomena on filter paper, we addressed the behavior of large, sparingly soluble tetraalkylammonium ions, which are usually used as mobility standards, in paper spray. The variation of intensity with time of monomers and dimers of these ions was measured with a differential mobility analyzer and compared with that produced by contamination in the paper. At the same time, we evaluated the proficiency of different paper spray techniques for protein analysis using nano spray as a reference. Experiments suggest that Taylor cones in paper spray are subject to hysteresis, whereas transport phenomena in the porous substrate notably affects the ionization of the sample. Additionally, we observed that paper spray tends to favor lower charge states in proteins. Graphical Abstract.

  16. Developments in the formulation and delivery of spray dried vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Gaurav; Have, Rimko Ten; Soema, Peter C; Frijlink, Henderik; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Kersten, Gideon

    2017-10-03

    Spray drying is a promising method for the stabilization of vaccines, which are usually formulated as liquids. Usually, vaccine stability is improved by spray drying in the presence of a range of excipients. Unlike freeze drying, there is no freezing step involved, thus the damage related to this step is avoided. The edge of spray drying resides in its ability for particles to be engineered to desired requirements, which can be used in various vaccine delivery methods and routes. Although several spray dried vaccines have shown encouraging preclinical results, the number of vaccines that have been tested in clinical trials is limited, indicating a relatively new area of vaccine stabilization and delivery. This article reviews the current status of spray dried vaccine formulations and delivery methods. In particular it discusses the impact of process stresses on vaccine integrity, the application of excipients in spray drying of vaccines, process and formulation optimization strategies based on Design of Experiment approaches as well as opportunities for future application of spray dried vaccine powders for vaccine delivery.

  17. Process optimization of ultrasonic spray coating of polymer films.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sanjukta; Keller, Stephan S; Alstrøm, Tommy S; Boisen, Anja; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-06-11

    In this work we have performed a detailed study of the influence of various parameters on spray coating of polymer films. Our aim is to produce polymer films of uniform thickness (500 nm to 1 μm) and low roughness compared to the film thickness. The coatings are characterized with respect to thickness, roughness (profilometer), and morphology (optical microscopy). Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is used to do a full factorial design of experiments with selected process parameters such as temperature, distance between spray nozzle and substrate, and speed of the spray nozzle. A mathematical model is developed for statistical analysis which identifies the distance between nozzle and substrate as the most significant parameter. Depending on the drying of the sprayed droplets on the substrate, we define two broad regimes, "dry" and "wet". The optimum condition of spraying lies in a narrow window between these two regimes, where we obtain a film of desired quality. Both with increasing nozzle-substrate distance and temperature, the deposition moves from a wet state to a dry regime. Similar results are also achieved for solvents with low boiling points. Finally, we study film formation during spray coating with poly (D,L-lactide) (PDLLA). The results confirm the processing knowledge obtained with PVP and indicate that the observed trends are identical for spraying of other polymer films.

  18. Calculations for reproducible autologous skin cell-spray grafting.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Vives, Roger; Young, Matthew T; Zhu, Toby; Beiriger, Justin; Pekor, Chris; Ziembicki, Jenny; Corcos, Alain; Rubin, Peter; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2016-12-01

    Non-cultured, autologous cell-spray grafting is an alternative to mesh grafting for larger partial- and deep partial-thickness burn wounds. The treatment uses a suspension of isolated cells, from a patient's donor site skin tissue, and cell-spray deposition onto the wound that facilitates re-epithelialization. Existing protocols for therapeutic autologous skin cell isolation and cell-spray grafting have defined the donor site area to treatment area ratio of 1:80, substantially exceeding the coverage of conventional mesh grafting. However, ratios of 1:100 are possible by maximizing the wound treatment area with harvested cells from a given donor site skin tissue according to a given burn area. Although cell isolation methods are very well described in the literature, a rational approach addressing critical aspects of these techniques are of interest in planning clinical study protocols. We considered in an experimental study the cell yield as a function of the donor site skin tissue, the cell density for spray grafting, the liquid spray volume, the sprayed distribution area, and the percentage of surface coverage. The experimental data was then used for the development of constants and mathematical equations to give a rationale for the cell isolation and cell-spray grafting processes and in planning for clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Developments in the formulation and delivery of spray dried vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kanojia, Gaurav; Have, Rimko ten; Soema, Peter C.; Frijlink, Henderik; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Kersten, Gideon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spray drying is a promising method for the stabilization of vaccines, which are usually formulated as liquids. Usually, vaccine stability is improved by spray drying in the presence of a range of excipients. Unlike freeze drying, there is no freezing step involved, thus the damage related to this step is avoided. The edge of spray drying resides in its ability for particles to be engineered to desired requirements, which can be used in various vaccine delivery methods and routes. Although several spray dried vaccines have shown encouraging preclinical results, the number of vaccines that have been tested in clinical trials is limited, indicating a relatively new area of vaccine stabilization and delivery. This article reviews the current status of spray dried vaccine formulations and delivery methods. In particular it discusses the impact of process stresses on vaccine integrity, the application of excipients in spray drying of vaccines, process and formulation optimization strategies based on Design of Experiment approaches as well as opportunities for future application of spray dried vaccine powders for vaccine delivery. PMID:28925794

  20. Skin Sterility After Application of a Vapocoolant Spray Part 2.

    PubMed

    Mlynek, Karolina; Lyahn, Hwang; Richards, Bryson; Schleicher, William; Bassiri Gharb, Bahar; Procop, Gary; Tuohy, Marion; Zins, James

    2015-08-01

    Refrigerant sprays have been used for pain relief at the time of minor office procedures. However, their sterility remains in question. This study investigates the microbiologic effect of this vapocoolant when sprayed after 70 % isopropyl alcohol skin preparation. In 50 healthy volunteers, three skin culture samples were collected: Group 1 prior to alcohol application; Group 2 after preparation with alcohol, and Group 3 after preparation with alcohol followed with vapocoolant spray. Samples were cultured in a blinded fashion and analyzed after 5 days of incubation. Gram staining was performed when cultures were positive. Bacterial growth was found in 98 % of samples prior to any skin preparation. This was reduced to 54 % after alcohol use (Group 2). Spraying with the skin refrigerant further reduced bacterial growth to 46 % (Group 3). The results showed a significant reduction in the number of positive bacterial cultures following skin preparation with alcohol and when alcohol prep was followed by vapocoolant spray (p < 0.001) compared to initial cultures. No statistical difference was observed between Groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.74). The use of the vapocoolant spray does not compromise the sterility of the skin following alcohol prep. Both 70 % isopropyl alcohol antiseptic preparation and skin preparation followed by vapocoolant spray significantly reduce skin colonization when compared to unprepared skin (p < 0.001).

  1. Influence of Bondcoat Spray Process on Lifetime of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M.; Markocsan, N.; Li, X.-H.; Östergren, L.

    2017-12-01

    Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) manufactured by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is of high commercial interest as SPS has been shown capable of producing highly porous columnar microstructures similar to the conventionally used electron beam-physical vapor deposition. However, lifetime of SPS coatings needs to be improved further to be used in commercial applications. The bondcoat microstructure as well as topcoat-bondcoat interface topography affects the TBC lifetime significantly. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of different bondcoat deposition processes for SPS topcoats. In this work, a NiCoCrAlY bondcoat deposited by high velocity air fuel (HVAF) was compared to commercial vacuum plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY and PtAl diffusion bondcoats. All bondcoat variations were prepared with and without grit blasting the bondcoat surface. SPS was used to deposit the topcoats on all samples using the same spray parameters. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue testing. Isothermal heat treatment was performed to study bondcoat oxidation over time. The effect of bondcoat deposition process and interface topography on lifetime in each case has been discussed. The results show that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition in SPS TBCs.

  2. Influence of Bondcoat Spray Process on Lifetime of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M.; Markocsan, N.; Li, X.-H.; Östergren, L.

    2018-01-01

    Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) manufactured by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is of high commercial interest as SPS has been shown capable of producing highly porous columnar microstructures similar to the conventionally used electron beam-physical vapor deposition. However, lifetime of SPS coatings needs to be improved further to be used in commercial applications. The bondcoat microstructure as well as topcoat-bondcoat interface topography affects the TBC lifetime significantly. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of different bondcoat deposition processes for SPS topcoats. In this work, a NiCoCrAlY bondcoat deposited by high velocity air fuel (HVAF) was compared to commercial vacuum plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY and PtAl diffusion bondcoats. All bondcoat variations were prepared with and without grit blasting the bondcoat surface. SPS was used to deposit the topcoats on all samples using the same spray parameters. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue testing. Isothermal heat treatment was performed to study bondcoat oxidation over time. The effect of bondcoat deposition process and interface topography on lifetime in each case has been discussed. The results show that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition in SPS TBCs.

  3. To Spray or Not to Spray: A Decision Analysis of Coffee Berry Borer in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Integrated pest management strategies were adopted to combat the coffee berry borer (CBB) after its arrival in Hawaii in 2010. A decision tree framework is used to model the CBB integrated pest management recommendations, for potential use by growers and to assist in developing and evaluating management strategies and policies. The model focuses on pesticide spraying (spray/no spray) as the most significant pest management decision within each period over the entire crop season. The main result from the analysis suggests the most important parameter to maximize net benefit is to ensure a low initial infestation level. A second result looks at the impact of a subsidy for the cost of pesticides and shows a typical farmer receives a positive net benefit of $947.17. Sensitivity analysis of parameters checks the robustness of the model and further confirms the importance of a low initial infestation level vis-a-vis any level of subsidy. The use of a decision tree is shown to be an effective method for understanding integrated pest management strategies and solutions. PMID:29065464

  4. The Cold Gas-Dynamic Spray and Characterization of Microcrystalline and Nanocrystalline Copper Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    cold gas-dynamic spray process are well understood, the effects of feedstock powder microstructure and composition on the deposition process remain...The Relationship between Powder Zinc Content and Porosity .....74  5.  Compositional Variability as a Side Effect of the Cold Spray Deposition Process ...to expect in cold spray deposited copper coatings based on common spray parameters. Ning et

  5. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Rumination Using Fixed-Time Delivery of a Flavor Spray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, David A.; Register, Martisa; Register, Stanley; Bajagic, Vedrana; Neidert, Pamela L.

    2009-01-01

    A functional analysis suggested that rumination exhibited by an adult with autism was maintained by automatic reinforcement. Next, a preference assessment with three flavor sprays (i.e., flavored sprays used by dieters) showed that apple pie spray was most preferred. Finally, the effects of fixed-time delivery of the apple pie spray on levels of…

  6. Initial and continued effects of a release spray in a coastal Oregon Douglas-fir plantation.

    Richard E. Miller; Edmund L. Obermeyer

    1996-01-01

    Portions of a 4-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) plantation were sprayed with herbicide. Five years after spraying, we established 18 plots and used several means to determine retrospectively that six plots probably received full spray treatment and six others received no spray. Various...

  7. 46 CFR 34.25-20 - Spray nozzles-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spray nozzles-T/ALL. 34.25-20 Section 34.25-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Water Spray Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.25-20 Spray nozzles—T/ALL. (a) Spray nozzles shall be of an approved type. ...

  8. 46 CFR 34.25-20 - Spray nozzles-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spray nozzles-T/ALL. 34.25-20 Section 34.25-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Water Spray Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.25-20 Spray nozzles—T/ALL. (a) Spray nozzles shall be of an approved type. ...

  9. Effects of spray mixtures on droplet size under aerial application conditions and implications on drift

    The use of simulated and mimic sprays for atomization studies in high speed wind tunnels allows researchers to limit the amount of active ingredients used in spray tests; however, it is important that these simulated and mimic sprays have the same physical and atomization characteristics of spray co...

  10. A fluorescent imaging technique for quantifying spray deposits on plant leaves

    Because of the unique characteristics of electrostatically-charged sprays, use of traditional methods to quantify deposition from these sprays has been challenging. A new fluorescent imaging technique was developed to quantify spray deposits from electrostatically-charged sprays on natural plant lea...

  11. Use of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition Towards Time-resolved Image Analysis of Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    High-speed movies of optically dense sprays exiting a Gas-Centered Swirl Coaxial (GCSC) injector are subjected to image analysis to determine spray...sequence prior to image analysis . Results of spray morphology including spray boundary, widths, angles and boundary oscillation frequencies, are

  12. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-Song; Li, Guo-Xiu; Jia, Tao-Ming

    2017-01-05

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern's Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu's, Varde's and Merrigton's model). It is found that the Merrigton's model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton's model is fitted with experimental results.

  13. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-song; Li, Guo-xiu; Jia, Tao-ming

    2017-01-01

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern’s Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu’s, Varde’s and Merrigton’s model). It is found that the Merrigton’s model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton’s model is fitted with experimental results. PMID:28054555

  14. Skin sterility after application of ethyl chloride spray.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, Daniil; Gehrmann, Robin; Tan, Virak

    2012-01-18

    Ethyl chloride topical anesthetic spray is labeled as nonsterile, yet it is widely used during injection procedures performed in an outpatient setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the sterility of ethyl chloride topical anesthetic spray applied before an injection. Our a priori hypothesis was that application of the spray after the skin has been prepared would not alter the sterility of the injection site. We conducted a prospective, blinded, controlled study to assess the effect of ethyl chloride spray on skin sterility. Fifteen healthy adult subjects (age, twenty-three to sixty-one years) were prepared for mock injections into both shoulders and both knees, although no injection was actually performed. Three culture samples were obtained from each site on the skin: one before skin preparation with isopropyl alcohol, one after skin preparation and before application of ethyl chloride, and one after ethyl chloride had been sprayed on the site. In addition, the sterility of the ethyl chloride was tested directly by inoculating cultures with spray from the bottles. Growth occurred in 70% of the samples obtained before skin preparation, 3% of the samples obtained after skin preparation but before application of ethyl chloride, and 5% of the samples obtained after the injection site had been sprayed with ethyl chloride. The percentage of positive cultures did not increase significantly after application of ethyl chloride (p = 0.65). Spraying of ethyl chloride directly on agar plates resulted in growth on 13% of these plates compared with 11% of the control plates; this difference was also not significant (p = 0.80). Although ethyl chloride spray is not sterile, its application did not alter the sterility of the injection sites in the shoulder and knee.

  15. Application of external axis in thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guoyou; Wang, Wei; Chen, Tao; Hui, Chun

    2018-05-01

    Industrial robots are widely used nowadays in the process of thermal spraying, human work can be largely replaced due to the high-efficient, security, precision and repeatability of industrial robot. As offering the convenience to industrial product, Robots have some natural deficiencies because of its mechanical linkages of six-axis. When robot performs a series of stage of production, it could be hard to move to the next one because one of his axis reaches a maximum value. For this reason, external axis is added to robot system to extend the reachable space of robot axis. This paper concerns to the application of external axis and the different methods of programming the robot with work-holding external axis in the virtual environment. Experiments demonstrate the coating layer on the regular workpiece is uniform.

  16. Thallium Bromide Deposited Using Spray Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, E. S.; Mulato, M.

    2012-08-01

    Spray coating was used to produce thallium bromide samples on glass substrates. The influence of several fabrication parameters on the final structural properties of the samples was investigated. Substrate position, substrate temperature, solution concentration, carrying gas, and solution flow were varied systematically, the physical deposition mechanism involved in each case being discussed. Total deposition time of about 3.5 h can lead to 62-μm-thick films, comprising completely packed micrometer-sized crystalline grains. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the samples. On the basis of the experimental data, the optimum fabrication conditions were identified. The technique offers an alternative method for fast, cheap fabrication of large-area devices for the detection of high-energy radiation, i.e., X-rays and γ-rays, in medical imaging.

  17. Diagnostics of thermal spraying plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Coudert, J. F.; Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.; Denoirjean, A.

    1992-06-01

    The development of diagnostic techniques for dc plasma spraying is reviewed with attention given to the need for thick highly reproducible coatings of good quality for aeronautic and other uses. Among the techniques examined are fast cameras, laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), enthalpy probes, and emission spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is given to the effect of arc fluctuations on the spectroscopic measurements, and a method is introduced for obtaining temperature and species density of vapor clouds traveling with each particle in flight. Coating properties can be deduced from data on single particles, and statistical approaches are often unreliable without added data on surface temperature and particle velocity. Also presented is a method for deriving the temperature evolution of a cooled splat and successive layers and passes. These methods are of interest to the control of adhesion and cohesion in coatings for critical aerospace applications.

  18. Progress in Advanced Spray Combustion Code Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan

    1993-01-01

    A multiyear project to assemble a robust, muitiphase spray combustion code is now underway and gradually building up to full speed. The overall effort involves several university and government research teams as well as Rocketdyne. The first part of this paper will give an overview of the respective roles of the different participants involved, the master strategy, the evolutionary milestones, and an assessment of the state-of-the-art of various key components. The second half of this paper will highlight the progress made to date in extending the baseline Navier-Stokes solver to handle multiphase, multispecies, chemically reactive sub- to supersonic flows. The major hurdles to overcome in order to achieve significant speed ups are delineated and the approaches to overcoming them will be discussed.

  19. Topical haemoglobin spray for diabetic foot ulceration.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Sharon Dawn

    The development and subsequent deterioration of diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is a common occurrence across all healthcare divides, concerning all patient groups, age, gender and social environments. It increases demand on clinical resources and creates unnecessary hardship for patients. Chronic DFU is challenging to prevent and notoriously difficult to manage owing to the complex nature of the patient and the disease itself. The improvement of oxygenation to many chronic wound groups is gaining momentum across wound care; particularly in those wounds such as DFU that present with circulatory, oxygen-deficient scenarios. A descriptive evaluation was undertaken in an acute clinical setting where a spray solution containing purified haemoglobin was used in a cohort of 20 patients who presented with chronic (>12 weeks) DFU. Standard wound care was undertaken by 18 health professionals with no changes to products, devices or practice before evaluation. All wounds received the addition of the product on eight set occasions over a 4-week period and the resulting data correlated in regards to the set outcomes of wound surface area reduction, ease of use, adverse events and patient acceptability. At 4 weeks all wounds had demonstrated positive wound reduction, there were no adverse events, all patients and clinicians found the product acceptable and easy to use. Interestingly, although not a set outcome, all wounds commenced the evaluation with wound-bed slough present and at 4 weeks 100% were deemed slough free. At a further 4-week review no patients wounds had regressed. The incorporation of a haemoglobin spray solution within this cohort of DFU resulted in a positive improvement in wound healing and slough elimination. Further work in this area is recommended to increase the evidence.

  20. Japan's research on particle clouds and sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Jun'ichi

    1995-01-01

    Most of energy used by us is generated by combustion of liquid and solid fuels. These fuels are burned in combustors mainly as liquid sprays and pulverized solids, respectively. A knowledge of the combustion processes in combustors is needed to achieve proper designs that have stable operation, high efficiency, and low emission levels. However, current understanding of liquid and solid particle cloud combustion is far from complete. If combustion experiments for these fuels are performed under a normal gravity field, some experimental difficulties are encountered. These difficulties encountered include, that since the particles fall by the force of gravity it is impossible to stop the particles in the air, the falling speeds of particles are different from each other, and are depend on the particle size, the flame is lifted up and deformed by the buoyancy force, and natural convection makes the flow field more complex. Since these experimental difficulties are attributable to the gravity force, a microgravity field can eliminate the above problems. This means that the flame propagation experiments in static homogeneous liquid and solid particle clouds can be carried out under a microgravity field. This will provide much information for the basic questions related to combustion processes of particle clouds and sprays. In Japan, flame propagation processes in the combustible liquid and solid particle clouds have been studied experimentally by using a microgravity field generated by a 4.5 s dropshaft, a 10 s dropshaft, and by parabolic flight. Described in this presentation are the recent results of flame propagations studies in a homogeneous liquid particle cloud, in a mixture of liquid particles/gas fuel/air, in a PMMA particle cloud, and in a pulverized coal particle cloud.

  1. Thermal Expansion of Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S V.; Palczer, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic Cu-8%Cr, Cu-26%Cr, Cu-8%Cr-1%Al, NiAl and NiCrAlY monolithic coatings were fabricated by vacuum plasma spray deposition processes for thermal expansion property measurements between 293 and 1223 K. The corrected thermal expansion, (DL/L(sub 0) varies with the absolute temperature, T, as (DL/L(sub 0) = A(T - 293)(sup 3) + BIT - 293)(sup 2) + C(T - 293) + D, where, A, B, C and D are thermal, regression constants. Excellent reproducibility was observed for all of the coatings except for data obtained on the Cu-8%Cr and Cu-26%Cr coatings in the first heat-up cycle, which deviated from those determined in the subsequent cycles. This deviation is attributed to the presence of residual stresses developed during the spraying of the coatings, which are relieved after the first heat-up cycle. In the cases of Cu-8%Cr and NiAl, the thermal expansion data were observed to be reproducible for three specimens. The linear expansion data for Cu-8% Cr and Cu-26%Cr agree extremely well with rule of mixture (ROM) predictions. Comparison of the data for the Cu-8%Cr coating with literature data for Cr and Cu revealed that the thermal expansion behavior of this alloy is determined by the Cu-rich matrix. The data for NiAl and NiCrAlY are in excellent agreement with published results irrespective of composition and the methods used for processing the materials. The implications of these results on coating GRCop-84 copper alloy combustor liners for reusable launch vehicles are discussed.

  2. Oral Flurbiprofen Spray for Posttonsillectomy Pain.

    PubMed

    Muderris, Togay; Gul, Fatih; Yalciner, Gokhan; Babademez, Mehmet Ali; Bercin, Sami; Kiris, Muzaffer

    2016-07-01

    Tonsillectomy is still one of the most common surgical procedures, but there exists no standard guideline for pain management after tonsillectomy. Our aim is to determine whether oral spray of flurbiprofen reduces pain and has an influence on other morbid outcomes following tonsillectomy. Prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled. Patients at Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. This study was performed on 84 patients (45 in flurbiprofen group, 39 in placebo group) who underwent tonsillectomy. The patients were randomly chosen, and each used oral spray of flurbiprofen 3 times daily or placebo solution at the same regimen. Efficacy was assessed by changes in Numeric Pain Rating Scale. Data were collected at postoperative days 1, 3, 5, and 7 for pain, bleeding, and healing. Data for Mallampati scores were also collected. There were no significant difference between groups with respect to the demographic data. The flurbiprofen group had statistically significant lower pain scores at days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (P = .000, P = .002, P = .001, P = .000, respectively). On days 3 and 7, pain scores were significantly different between different Mallampati groups (P = .049, P = .015, respectively). The flurbiprofen group required less analgesic than the placebo group during the study period on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (P = .001, P = .001, P = .03, P = .001, respectively). Healing and side effects were not significantly different between the groups. In this study, topical use of flurbiprofen may reduce posttonsillectomy pain without any evidence of additional complications. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  3. Droplet size and velocity distributions for spray modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. P.; Watkins, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Methods for constructing droplet size distributions and droplet velocity profiles are examined as a basis for the Eulerian spray model proposed in Beck and Watkins (2002,2003) [5,6]. Within the spray model, both distributions must be calculated at every control volume at every time-step where the spray is present and valid distributions must be guaranteed. Results show that the Maximum Entropy formalism combined with the Gamma distribution satisfy these conditions for the droplet size distributions. Approximating the droplet velocity profile is shown to be considerably more difficult due to the fact that it does not have compact support. An exponential model with a constrained exponent offers plausible profiles.

  4. A simulation technique for predicting thickness of thermal sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goedjen, John G.; Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Leissler, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The complexity of many of the components being coated today using the thermal spray process makes the trial and error approach traditionally followed in depositing a uniform coating inadequate, thereby necessitating a more analytical approach to developing robotic trajectories. A two dimensional finite difference simulation model has been developed to predict the thickness of coatings deposited using the thermal spray process. The model couples robotic and component trajectories and thermal spraying parameters to predict coating thickness. Simulations and experimental verification were performed on a rotating disk to evaluate the predictive capabilities of the approach.

  5. Program Models A Laser Beam Focused In An Aerosol Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Monte Carlo analysis performed on packets of light. Program for Analysis of Laser Beam Focused Within Aerosol Spray (FLSPRY) developed for theoretical analysis of propagation of laser pulse optically focused within aerosol spray. Applied for example, to analyze laser ignition arrangement in which focused laser pulse used to ignite liquid aerosol fuel spray. Scattering and absorption of laser light by individual aerosol droplets evaluated by use of electromagnetic Lorenz-Mie theory. Written in FORTRAN 77 for both UNIX-based computers and DEC VAX-series computers. VAX version of program (LEW-16051). UNIX version (LEW-16065).

  6. Plasma sprayed Fe(76)Nd(16)B(8) permanent magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, R. A.; Anderson, C. D.; Flanagan, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Thin coatings (0.16 mm) and thick coatings (0.50 mm) of Fe(76)Nd(16)B(8) were deposited on stainless-steel substrates by low pressure plasma spraying. Microscopic examination of the coatings in a light microscope revealed excessive porosity, but good bonding to the substrate. Fracture cross sections examined in a scanning electron microscope showed the grains to be equiaxed and approximately 1 micron or less in diameter in the as-sprayed condition. The intrinsic coercivities of the as-sprayed coatings varied from 5.8 to 10.9 kOe. The effects of postspray heat treatments on the intrinsic coercivity are also given.

  7. Exergy analysis of encapsulation of photochromic dye by spray drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çay, A.; Akçakoca Kumbasar, E. P.; Morsunbul, S.

    2017-10-01

    Application of exergy analysis methodology for encapsulation of photochromic dyes by spray drying was presented. Spray drying system was investigated considering two subsystems, the heater and the dryer sections. Exergy models for each subsystem were proposed and exergy destruction rate and exergy efficiency of each subsystem and the whole system were computed. Energy and exergy efficiency of the system were calculated to be 5.28% and 3.40%, respectively. It was found that 90% of the total exergy inlet was destroyed during encapsulation by spray drying and the exergy destruction of the heater was found to be higher.

  8. Fracture Behaviour of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzbender, Jürgen; Wakui, Takashi; Wessel, Egbert; Steinbrech, Rolf W.

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of plasma sprayed yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) are increasingly utilised for heat exposed components of advanced gas turbines1,2. An important reason for the application of zirconia coatings is the low thermal conductivity of this ceramic material which is further diminished in a TBC by the high concentration of spraying induced microstructural defects, e.g. crack-shaped defects between and within the spraying splats. Thus with TBCs on gas cooled turbine components stiff temperature gradients can be realised as an important prerequisite for an increased thermal efficiency of the energy conversion process.

  9. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  10. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  11. Work zone safety analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  12. California tree seed zones

    John M. Buck; Ronald S. Adams; Jerrold Cone; M. Thompson Conkle; William J. Libby; Cecil J. Eden; Michel J. Knight

    1970-01-01

    California forest tree seed zones were established originally by Fowells (1946), with revisions proposed by Roy (1963) and Schubert (1966). The Forest Tree Seed Committee of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, has revised the original zones and updated the recording system described in the earlier reports. Fowells' (1946) Research Note...

  13. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  14. Longleaf pine site zones

    Phillip J. Craul; John S. Kush; William D. Boyer

    2005-01-01

    The authors delineate six major climatic areas of the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) region. They subdivide these areas into 21 site zones, each of which is deemed homogenous with respect to climate, physiography, and soils. The site zones are mapped and their climate, physiography, and soils described. The authors recommend that plantings of...

  15. Iowa Work Zone Fatalities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    From March through November, the Iowa DOT may have up to 500 road construction work zones, and each of the department's maintenance garages may establish one or more short-term work zones per day. Couple that with the work of cities and counties, and...

  16. A Comparison of Fuel Sprays from Several Types of Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the tests results of a series of tests made of the sprays from 14 fuel injection nozzles of 9 different types, the sprays being injected into air at atmospheric density and at 6 and 14 times atmospheric density. High-speed spark photographs of the sprays from each nozzle at each air density were taken at the rate of 2,000 per second, and from them were obtained the dimensions of the sprays and the rates of spray-tip penetration. The sprays were also injected against plasticine targets placed at different distances from the nozzles, and the impressions made in the plasticine were used as an indication of the distribution of the fuel within the spray. Cross-sectional sketches of the different types of sprays are given showing the relative sizes of the spray cores and envelopes. The characteristics of the sprays are compared and discussed with respect to their application to various types of engines.

  17. Effect of spray volume on the deposition, viability and infectivity of entomopathogenic nematodes in a foliar spray on vegetables.

    PubMed

    Brusselman, Eva; Beck, Bert; Pollet, Sabien; Temmerman, Femke; Spanoghe, Pieter; Moens, Maurice; Nuyttens, David

    2012-10-01

    Spray volume can influence the amount of free water on the leaf surface and subsequently the ability of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) to move. In this study, an investigation was made of the effect of spray volume (548, 730 and 1095 L ha(-1) ) on the deposition, viability and infectivity of EPNs against Galleria mellonella on savoy cabbage, cauliflower and leek. Increasing spray volume decreased nematode deposition on 7.1 cm2 leek leaf discs at a 15° angle with the spray nozzle. Although the number of living nematodes observed on leek after 240 min of exposure was not significantly different between the low-volume application (548 L ha(-1) ) and the high-volume application (1095 L ha(-1) ), a greater infectivity was obtained in the latter application. The higher number of droplets deposited on the leek discs in the high-volume application may have stimulated nematode movement. No significant effect of spray volume was observed on the relative deposition of Steinernema carpocapsae on the bottom side of cauliflower and savoy cabbage leaf discs. In spite of the low S. carpocapsae deposition on the bottom side of the savoy cabbage discs, high infectivity was obtained against G. mellonella. Using the lowest spray volume on savoy cabbage, infectivity decreased with increasing exposure time, while infectivity was not affected by exposure time when a spray volume of 730 L ha(-1) or more was used. Spray volume is an important application parameter, as it affects nematode infectivity. Future research should investigate the effect of spray volume in the field and its influence on the effect of adjuvants. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Liquid Fertilizer Spraying Performance Using A Knapsack Power Sprayer On Soybean Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatot, P.; Anang, R.

    2018-05-01

    An effort for increasing soybean production can be conducted by applying liquid fertilizer on soybean cultivation field. The objective of this research was to determine liquid fertilizer spraying performance using knapsack power sprayer TASCO TF-900 on a soybean cultivation field. Performances test were conducted in the Laboratory of Spraying Test and on a soybean cultivation field to determine (1) effective spraying width, (2) droplets diameter, (3) droplets density, (4) effective spraying discharge rate, and (5) effective field capacity of spraying. The research was conducted using 2 methods: (1) one-nozzle spraying, and (2) four- nozzles spraying. Results of the research showed that at a constant pressure of 900 kPa effective spraying width using one-nozzle spraying and four-nozzles spraying were 0.62 m and 1.10 m. A bigger effective spraying width was resulted in a bigger average effective spraying discharge rate and average effective spraying field capacity of 4.52 l/min and 83.92 m2/min on forward walking speed range of 0.94 m/s up to 1.77 m/s. On the contrary, bigger effective spraying width was result in bigger droplets diameter of 502.73 μm and a smaller droplets density of 98.39 droplets/cm2, whereas smaller effective spraying width was resulted in a smaller droplets diameter of 367.09 μm and a bigger droplets density of 350.53 droplets/cm2. One-nozzle spraying method produced a better spraying quality than four-nozzles spraying method, although four-nozzles spraying was resulted in a bigger effective field capacity of spraying.

  19. Spray nozzle designs for agricultural aviation applications. [relation of drop size to spray characteristics and nozzle efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. W.; Putnam, A. A.; Gieseke, J. A.; Golovin, M. N.; Hale, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques of generating monodisperse sprays and information concerning chemical liquids used in agricultural aviation are surveyed. The periodic dispersion of liquid jet, the spinning disk method, and ultrasonic atomization are the techniques discussed. Conceptually designed spray nozzles for generating monodisperse sprays are assessed. These are based on the classification of the drops using centrifugal force, on using two opposing liquid laden air jets, and on operating a spinning disk at an overloaded flow. Performance requirements for the designs are described and estimates of the operational characteristics are presented.

  20. A composition joint PDF method for the modeling of spray flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses an extension of the probability density function (PDF) method to the modeling of spray flames to evaluate the limitations and capabilities of this method in the modeling of gas-turbine combustor flows. The comparisons show that the general features of the flowfield are correctly predicted by the present solution procedure. The present solution appears to provide a better representation of the temperature field, particularly, in the reverse-velocity zone. The overpredictions in the centerline velocity could be attributed to the following reasons: (1) the use of k-epsilon turbulence model is known to be less precise in highly swirling flows and (2) the swirl number used here is reported to be estimated rather than measured.

  1. Repulsive Interaction of Sulfide Layers on Compressor Impeller Blades Remanufactured Through Plasma Spray Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.; Zhou, D.; Wang, Y. L.; Huang, H. H.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the repulsive interaction of sulfide layers on compressor impeller blades remanufactured through plasma spray welding (PSW). Sulfide layers on the blades made of FV(520)B steel were prepared through multifarious corrosion experiments, and PSW was utilized to remanufacture blade specimens. The specimens were evaluated through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, 3D surface topography, x-ray diffraction, ImageJ software analysis, Vicker's micro-hardness test and tensile tests. Results showed a large number of sulfide inclusions in the fusion zone generated by sulfide layers embodied into the molten pool during PSW. These sulfide inclusions seriously degraded the mechanical performance of the blades remanufactured through PSW.

  2. Formation of Fiber Materials by Pneumatic Spraying of Polymers in Viscous-Flow States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysak, I. A.; Malinovskaya, T. D.; Lysak, G. V.; Potekaev, A. I.; Kulagina, V. V.; Tazin, D. I.

    2017-02-01

    Using a novel ejection spraying unit and relying on new approaches, fibers are formed by the method of pneumatic melt blowing of polycarbonate, polypropylene, and polyethylene terephthalate. The proposed approach is based on the concepts of atomization of the polymer melt flow as a preferential regime for fibermaterial formation. From the analysis of the values of numerical characteristics in the zone of atomization and the physical background of the criteria under study a conclusion is drawn that the essential role in destruction of the jet belongs to the formation of a boundary layer in the melt under the action of friction forces, followed by its separation. An assumption is made on the prevailing action of the separating destruction of the melt jet via the mechanism of `skinning' of the boundary layer of the melt due to a shorter time of its persistence compared to the development of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  3. Influence of liquid-volume and airflow rates on spray application quality and homogeneity in super-intensive olive tree canopies.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Rodríguez-Lizana, Antonio; Gil, Emilio; Agüera-Vega, J; Gil-Ribes, Jesús A

    2015-12-15

    Olive is a key crop in Europe, especially in countries around the Mediterranean Basin. Optimising the parameters of a spray is essential for sustainable pesticide use, especially in high-input systems, such as the super-intensive hedgerow system. Parameters may be optimised by adjusting the applied volume and airflow rate of sprays, in addition to the liquid to air proportion and the relationship between air velocity and airflow rate. Two spray experiments using a commercial airblast sprayer were conducted in a super-intensive orchard to study how varying the liquid volume rate (testing volumes of 182, 619, and 1603 l ha(-1)) and volumetric airflow rate (with flow rates of 11.93, 8.90, and 6.15 m(3) s(-1)) influences the coverage parameters and the amount and distribution of deposits in different zones of the canopy.. Our results showed that an increase in the application volume raised the mean deposit and percentage coverage, but decreased the application efficiency, spray penetration, and deposit homogeneity. Furthermore, we found that the volumetric airflow rate had a lower influence on the studied parameters than the liquid volume; however, an increase in the airflow rate improved the application efficiency and homogeneity to a certain threshold, after which the spray quality decreased. This decrease was observed in the high-flow treatment. Our results demonstrate that intermediate liquid volume rates and volumetric airflow rates are required for the optimal spraying of pesticides on super-intensive olive crops, and would reduce current pollution levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of a locally homogeneous model of spray evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    A model of spray evaporation which employs a second-order turbulence model in conjunction with the locally homogeneous flow approximation, which implies infinitely fast interphase transport rates is presented. Measurements to test the model were completed for single phase constant and variable density jets, as well as an evaporating spray in stagnant air. Profiles of mean velocity, composition, temperature and drop size distribution as well as velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress, were measured within the spray. Predictions were in agreement with measurements in single phase flows and also with many characteristics of the spray, e.g. flow width, radial profiles of mean and turbulent quantities, and the axial rate of decay of mean velocity and mixture fraction.

  5. 21 CFR 740.12 - Feminine deodorant sprays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... all over the body. (b) The label of a feminine deodorant spray shall bear the following statement... itching skin. Persistent, unusual odor or discharge may indicate conditions for which a physician should...

  6. 8. HIGH POWER SPRAY IN MEN'S PACK ROOM. Hot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. HIGH POWER SPRAY IN MEN'S PACK ROOM. - Hot Springs National Park Bathhouse Row, Maurice Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  7. 9. HIGH POWER SPRAY IN MEN'S STEAM ROOM. Hot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. HIGH POWER SPRAY IN MEN'S STEAM ROOM. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  8. Method and apparatus for heat extraction by controlled spray cooling

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Christopher Francis; Meeks, Ellen; Kee, Robert; McCarty, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Two solutions to the problem of cooling a high temperature, high heat flux surface using controlled spray cooling are presented for use on a mandrel. In the first embodiment, spray cooling is used to provide a varying isothermal boundary layer on the side portions of a mandrel by providing that the spray can be moved axially along the mandrel. In the second embodiment, a spray of coolant is directed to the lower temperature surface of the mandrel. By taking advantage of super-Leidenfrost cooling, the temperature of the high temperature surface of the mandrel can be controlled by varying the mass flux rate of coolant droplets. The invention has particular applicability to the field of diamond synthesis using chemical vapor deposition techniques.

  9. Machinability of Al 6061 Deposited with Cold Spray Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldwell, Barry; Kelly, Elaine; Wall, Ronan; Amaldi, Andrea; O'Donnell, Garret E.; Lupoi, Rocco

    2017-10-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques such as cold spray are translating from research laboratories into more mainstream high-end production systems. Similar to many additive processes, finishing still depends on removal processes. This research presents the results from investigations into aspects of the machinability of aluminum 6061 tubes manufactured with cold spray. Through the analysis of cutting forces and observations on chip formation and surface morphology, the effect of cutting speed, feed rate, and heat treatment was quantified, for both cold-sprayed and bulk aluminum 6061. High-speed video of chip formation shows changes in chip form for varying material and heat treatment, which is supported by the force data and quantitative imaging of the machined surface. The results shown in this paper demonstrate that parameters involved in cold spray directly impact on machinability and therefore have implications for machining parameters and strategy.

  10. Calibrating and Evaluating Boomless Spray Systems for Applying Forest Herbicides

    Michael A. Wehr; Russell W. Johnson; Robert L. Sajdak

    1985-01-01

    Describes a testing procedure used to calibrate and evaluate agricultureal boomless spray systems. Tests allow the user to obtain dependable and satisfactory results when used in actual forest situations.

  11. [Experimental evaluation of the spraying disinfection efficiency on dental models].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Fu, Yuan-fei; Xu, Kan

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the disinfect effect after spraying a new kind of disinfectant on the dental plaster models. The germ-free plaster samples, which were smeared with bacteria compound including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus were sprayed with disinfectants (CaviCide) and glutaraldehyde individually. In one group(5 minutes later) and another group(15 minutes later), the colonies were counted for statistical analysis after sampling, inoculating, and culturing which were used for evaluation of disinfecting efficiency. ANOVA was performed using SPSS12.0 software package. All sample bacteria were eradicated after spraying disinfectants(CaviCide) within 5 minutes and effective bacteria control was retained after 15 minutes. There was significant difference between the disinfecting efficiency of CaviCide and glutaraldehyde. The effect of disinfection with spraying disinfectants (CaviCide) on dental models is quick and effective.

  12. Some Characteristics of Fuel Sprays from Open Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Lee, D W

    1930-01-01

    The penetration and cone-angle of fuel sprays from open nozzles were recorded with the NACA Spray Photography Equipment. The results show that for injection systems in which the rate of pressure rise at the discharge orifice is high, open nozzles give spray-tip velocities and penetrations which compare favorably with those of closed nozzles. The spray cone-angle was the same for all tests, although open nozzles having different orifice diameters were used, and one nozzle was used both as an open and as a closed nozzle. In designing a fuel system using open nozzles, particular care must be taken to avoid air pockets. The check valve should be placed close to the discharge orifice.

  13. Systematization of material consumption norms in spray-coating

    SciT

    Lelyukh, I.M.

    1995-03-01

    Regulating the consumption of materials is particularly important in the economics and organization of spray-coating operations. Three main factors are taken into account when establishing norms for the consumption of the materials of the coating: the physicomechanical and chemical properties of the particles; the shape of the substrate; the dimensions of the substrate. The most important parameters of the spraying regime are the velocity and temperature of the particles. Given the same velocity, the optimum particle kinetic energy for producing a strong bond with the substrate depends on particle shape and size and the density of the materials being spray-coated.more » These parameters determine the heating of the particles in the plasma jet or, in the case of the use of a detonation gun, during collision with the surface of the part. Powders of fragmented or drop shape are used to obtain coatings by spraying.« less

  14. Sprayed shielding of plastic-encapsulated electronic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, A. N.

    1969-01-01

    Metallic coating directly sprayed on electronic modules provides simple and reliable lightweight protection against radio frequency interference. A plasma arc may be used. Aluminum and copper are the most effective metals.

  15. Spray Penetration with a Simple Fuel Injection Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Harold E; Beardsley, Edward G

    1926-01-01

    The purpose of the tests covered by this report was to obtain specific information on the rate of penetration of the spray from a simple injection nozzle, having a single orifice with a diameter of 0.015 inch when injecting into compressed gases. The results have shown that the effects of both chamber and fuel pressures on penetration are so marked that the study of sprays by means of high-speed photography or its equivalent is necessary if the effects are to be appreciated sufficiently to enable rational analysis. It was found for these tests that the negative acceleration of the spray tip is approximately proportional to the 1.5 power of the instantaneous velocity of the spray tip.

  16. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH PIPE BEING SPRAYED WITH ZINC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH PIPE BEING SPRAYED WITH ZINC COATING. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Coating, Painting, Lining & Packaging Building, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Measurement Of Water Sprays Generated By Airplane Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental investigation conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to measure rate of flow and trajectory of water spray generated by tire operating on flooded runway. Potential application to both aircraft and automotive industries, with particular application to manufacturers of tires.

  18. On the spray pulsations of the effervescent atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlkvik, Marek; Knizat, Branislav

    2018-06-01

    The presented paper focuses on the comparison of the two effervescent atomizer configurations—the outside-in-gas (OIG) and the outside-in-liquid (OIL). The comparison was based on the spray pulsation assessment by different methods. The atomizers were tested under the same operating conditions given by the constant injection pressure (0.14 MPa) and the gas to the liquid mass ratio (GLR) varying from 2.5 to 5%. The aqueous maltodextrin solution was used as the working liquid (μ = 60 and 146 mPa·s). We found that the time-averaging method does not provide sufficient spray quality description. Based on the cumulative distribution function (CDF) we found that the OIG atomizer generated the spray with non-uniform droplet size distribution at all investigated GLRs. Exceptionally large droplets were present even in the spray which appeared stable when was analyzed by the time-averaging method.

  19. 40 CFR 61.146 - Standard for spraying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Microscopy, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) For spray-on application of materials..., subpart E, 40 CFR part 763, section 1, Polarized Light Microscopy, on equipment and machinery, except as...

  20. 40 CFR 61.146 - Standard for spraying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Microscopy, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) For spray-on application of materials..., subpart E, 40 CFR part 763, section 1, Polarized Light Microscopy, on equipment and machinery, except as...

  1. 40 CFR 61.146 - Standard for spraying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Microscopy, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) For spray-on application of materials..., subpart E, 40 CFR part 763, section 1, Polarized Light Microscopy, on equipment and machinery, except as...

  2. 40 CFR 61.146 - Standard for spraying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Microscopy, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) For spray-on application of materials..., subpart E, 40 CFR part 763, section 1, Polarized Light Microscopy, on equipment and machinery, except as...

  3. 40 CFR 61.146 - Standard for spraying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Microscopy, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) For spray-on application of materials..., subpart E, 40 CFR part 763, section 1, Polarized Light Microscopy, on equipment and machinery, except as...

  4. Some Characteristics of Fuel Sprays at Low-injection Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests conducted at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, Langley Field, Va., to determine some of the characteristics of the fuel sprays obtained from an 0.008-inch and a 0.020-inch open nozzle when injection pressures from 100 to 500 pounds per square inch were used. Fuel oil and gasoline were injected into air at densities of atmospheric land 0.325 pound per cubic foot. It was found that the penetration rate at these low pressures was about the same as the rate obtained with higher pressures. Spray cone-angles were small and individual oil drops were visible in all the sprays. Gasoline and fuel oil sprays had similar characteristics.

  5. Process evaluation of spray injection method for asphalt surface repair

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-12-18

    One method of reducing manpower without cutting production in highway maintenance is to use the spray injection method for asphalt surface repair. Although the benefits of using this method have been well documented by previous research such as the S...

  6. 21 CFR 740.12 - Feminine deodorant sprays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.12 Feminine deodorant sprays. (a) For... misbranded under section 602(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The use of any word or words...

  7. 21 CFR 740.12 - Feminine deodorant sprays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.12 Feminine deodorant sprays. (a) For... misbranded under section 602(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The use of any word or words...

  8. 21 CFR 740.12 - Feminine deodorant sprays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.12 Feminine deodorant sprays. (a) For... misbranded under section 602(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The use of any word or words...

  9. 21 CFR 740.12 - Feminine deodorant sprays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.12 Feminine deodorant sprays. (a) For... misbranded under section 602(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The use of any word or words...

  10. Habitable Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, D.; Lota, J.

    2012-12-01

    The location of the habitable zone around a star depends upon stellar luminosity and upon the properties of a potentially habitable planet such as its mass and near-surface volatile inventory. Stellar luminosity generally increases as a star ages whilst planetary properties change through time as a consequence of biological and geological evolution. Hence, the location of the habitable zone changes through time as a result of both stellar evolution and planetary evolution. Using the Earth's Phanerozoic temperature history as a constraint, it is shown that changes in our own habitable zone over the last 540 My have been dominated by planetary evolution rather than solar evolution. Furthermore, sparse data from earlier times suggests that planetary evolution may have dominated habitable zone development throughout our biosphere's history. Hence, the existence of a continuously habitable zone depends upon accidents of complex bio-geochemical evolution more than it does upon relatively simple stellar-evolution. Evolution of the inner margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations. Evolution of the outer margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations.

  11. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  12. Toward a Universal Sea Spray Source Function (UNISOURCE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    Toward a Universal Sea Spray Source Function ( UNISOURCE ) Gerrit de Leeuw TNO Defense, Safety and Security P.O. Box 96864 2509 JG The Hague...2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Toward a Universal Sea Spray Source Function ( UNISOURCE ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 APPROACH As part of UNISOURCE , field

  13. Centrifuge Testing of a Partially-Confined FC-72 Spray

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    induced body forces. Heat transfer associated with closed - loop spray cooling will be affected by acceleration body forces, the extent of which is not...impingement cooling, spray cooling, heat pipes , loop heat pipes , carbon foam impregnated with phase-change materials, and combinations of the above...reduced gravity and elevated gravity experiments to help prove viability of pulsating heat pipes (PHPs) for space applications. The PHPs, filled

  14. Plant canopy characteristics effect on spray deposition

    While it is common for applicators to standardize their application parameters to minimize changes in settings during a season, this practice does not necessarily provide the best delivery when targeting different types of plant canopies and different zones within the canopy. The objective of this w...

  15. Spray ignition measurements in a constant volume combustion vessel under engine-relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Varun

    Pressure-based and optical diagnostics for ignition delay (ID) measurement of a diesel spray from a multi-hole nozzle were investigated in a constant volume combustion vessel (CVCV) at conditions similar to those in a conventional diesel engine at the start of injection (SOI). It was first hypothesized that compared to an engine, the shorter ID in a CVCV was caused by NO, a byproduct of premixed combustion. The presence of a significant concentration of NO+NO2 was confirmed experimentally and by using a multi-zone model of premixed combustion. Experiments measuring the effect of NO on ID were performed at conditions relevant to a conventional diesel engine. Depending on the temperature regime and the nature of the fuel, NO addition was found to advance or retard ignition. Constant volume ignition simulations were capable of describing the observed trends; the magnitudes were different due to the physical processes involved in spray ignition, not modeled in the current study. The results of the study showed that ID is sensitive to low NO concentrations (<100 PPM) in the low-temperature regime. A second source of uncertainty in pressure-based ID measurement is the systematic error associated with the correction used to account for the speed of sound. Simultaneous measurements of volumetric OH chemiluminescence (OHC) and pressure during spray ignition found the OHC to closely resemble the pressure-based heat release rate for the full combustion duration. The start of OHC was always found to be shorter than the pressure-based ID for all fuels and conditions tested by 100 ms. Experiments were also conducted measuring the location and timing of high-temperature ignition and the steady-state lift-off length by high-speed imaging of OHC during spray ignition. The delay period calculated using the measured ignition location and the bulk average speed of sound was in agreement with the delay between OHC and the pressure-based ID. Results of the study show that start of OHC

  16. Bullous cryothermic dermatitis artefacta induced by deodorant spray abuse.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, A; Bender, A; Hertl, M; König, A

    2011-08-01

    Dermatitis artefacta belongs to a broad spectrum of factitious diseases of lesions usually self-induced by patients. Here we report a surprisingly effective induction of blisters and thermic dermatitis by excessive abuse of common deodorant sprays. We evaluated the clinical course and outcome in three patients with dermatitis artefacta induced by deodorant spray. A 12-year-old boy only admitted the abuse of deodorant spray after psychiatric intervention. Two adults (21-year-old and 37-year-old women) had borderline personality disorder and frankly reported the urge to induce pain by spraying for at least 100 s at a short distance. Bullous dermatitis was the acute presenting sign in all patients. The bullae were found on the extensor surfaces of the extremities, with a distribution of older lesions showing erosions and scarring and fresh lesions with intact bullae with a diameter of 3-15 cm. After searching for the causative agent and removal of the deodorant spray, clinical outcome showed a healing without and with scars. Cryo-damage by abuse of common deodorant sprays seems to become a popular mechanism by which an impressive bullous dermatitis can be artificially induced. Dermatologists and psychiatrist should be aware of this method of injury. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  17. Spray Characterization of Gas-to-Liquid Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza; GTL jet fuel Consortium Team

    2012-11-01

    Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (SPK) fuel obtained from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has grabbed the global attention due to its cleaner combustion characteristics. GTL fuels are expected to meet the vital qualities such as atomization, combustion and emission characteristics of conventional jet fuels. It is imperative to understand fuel atomization in order to gain insights on the combustion and emission aspects of an alternative fuel. In this work spray characteristics of GTL-SPK, which could be used as a drop-in fuel in aircraft gas turbine engines, is studied. This work outlines the spray experimental facility, the methodology used and the results obtained using two SPK's with different chemical compositions. The spray characteristics, such as droplet size and distribution, are presented at three differential pressures across a simplex nozzle and compared with that of the conventional Jet A-1 fuel. Experimental results clearly show that although the chemical composition is significantly different between SPK's, the spray characteristics are not very different. This could be attributed to the minimal difference in fluid properties between the SPK's. Also, the spray characteristics of SPK's show close resemblance to the spray characteristics of Jet A-1 fuel.

  18. Droplet-surface Impingement Dynamics for Intelligent Spray Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Kizito, John P.; Tryggvason, Gretar; Berger, Gordon M.; Mozes, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    Spray cooling has high potential in thermal management and life support systems by overcoming the deleterious effect of microgravity upon two-phase heat transfer. In particular spray cooling offers several advantages in heat flux removal that include the following: 1. By maintaining a wetted surface, spray droplets impinge upon a thin fluid film rather than a dry solid surface 2. Most heat transfer surfaces will not be smooth but rough. Roughness can enhance conductive cooling, aid liquid removal by flow channeling. 3. Spray momentum can be used to a) substitute for gravity delivering fluid to the surface, b) prevent local dryout and potential thermal runaway and c) facilitate liquid and vapor removal. Yet high momentum results in high We and Re numbers characterizing the individual spray droplets. Beyond an impingement threshold, droplets splash rather than spread. Heat flux declines and spray cooling efficiency can markedly decrease. Accordingly we are investigating droplet impingement upon a) dry solid surfaces, b) fluid films, c) rough surfaces and determining splashing thresholds and relationships for both dry surfaces and those covered by fluid films. We are presently developing engineering correlations delineating the boundary between splashing and non-splashing regions.

  19. Kinematic Optimization of Robot Trajectories for Thermal Spray Coating Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Sihao; Liang, Hong; Cai, Zhenhua; Liao, Hanlin; Montavon, Ghislain

    2014-12-01

    Industrial robots are widely used in the field of thermal spray nowadays. Due to their characteristics of high-accuracy and programmable flexibility, spraying on complex geometrical workpieces can be realized in the equipped spray room. However, in some cases, the robots cannot guarantee the process parameters defined by the robot movement, such as the scanning trajectory, spray angle, relative speed between the torch and the substrate, etc., which have distinct influences on heat and mass transfer during the generation of any thermally sprayed coatings. In this study, an investigation on the robot kinematics was proposed to find the rules of motion in a common case. The results showed that the motion behavior of each axis of robot permits to identify the motion problems in the trajectory. This approach allows to optimize the robot trajectory generation in a limited working envelop. It also minimizes the influence of robot performance to achieve a more constant relative scanning speed which is represented as a key parameter in thermal spraying.

  20. Probing a Spray Using Frequency-Analyzed Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael H.; Rhys, Noah O.

    2008-01-01

    Frequency-analyzed laser-light scattering (FALLS) is a relatively simple technique that can be used to measure principal characteristics of a sheet of sprayed liquid as it breaks up into ligaments and then the ligaments break up into droplets. In particular, through frequency analysis of laser light scattered from a spray, it is possible to determine whether the laser-illuminated portion of the spray is in the intact-sheet region, the ligament region, or the droplet region. By logical extension, it is possible to determine the intact length from the location of the laser beam at the transition between the intact-sheet and ligament regions and to determine a breakup frequency from the results of the frequency analysis. Hence, FALLS could likely be useful both as a means of performing research on sprays in general and as a means of diagnostic sensing in diverse applications in which liquid fuels are sprayed. Sprays are also used for drying and to deposit paints and other coating materials.

  1. Anomalous Epitaxial Growth in Thermally Sprayed YSZ and LZ Splats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2017-08-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are essentially layered materials, and lamellar interfaces are of great importance to coatings' performances. In the present study, to investigate the microstructures and defect features at thermally sprayed coating interfaces, homoepitaxial 8 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and heteroepitaxial lanthanum zirconia (LZ) films were fabricated. The epitaxial interfaces were examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) in detail. As a result, we report, for the first time, an anomalous incommensurate homoepitaxial growth with mismatch-induced dislocations in thermally sprayed YSZ splats to create a homointerface. We also find the anomalous heteroepitaxial growth in thermally sprayed LZ splats. The mechanism of the anomalous incommensurate growth was analyzed in detail. Essentially, it is a pseudo-heteroepitaxy because of the lattice mismatch between the film and the locally heated substrate, as the locally heated substrate is significantly strained by its cold surroundings. Moreover, the super-high-density dislocations were found in the interfacial region, which resulted from sufficient thermal fluctuations and extremely rapid cooling rates. Both the anomalous lattice mismatch and super-high-density dislocations lead to weak interfaces and violent cracking in thermally sprayed coatings. These were also the essential differences between the conventional and the present epitaxy by thermal spray technique.

  2. Characterization of fully functional spray-on antibody thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Jhon; Magaña, Sonia; Lim, Daniel V.; Schlaf, Rudy

    2014-02-01

    The authors recently demonstrated that fully functional Escherichia coli O157:H7 antibody thin films can be prepared using a simple pneumatic nebulizer on glass surface [1]. This paper focuses on the investigation of the morphology and physical properties of these films with the aim to better understand their performance. A series of E. coli O157:H7 antibody spray-on thin films were investigated by ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), immunoassays, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscope (AFM) and contact angle analysis. These data were compared to measurements on films prepared with the biotin-avidin covalent bonding scheme. The investigation showed that films created by a 2 min pneumatic spray deposition time can capture antigens similar as the avidin-biotin wet-chemical method. The results also suggests that an influential factor for the comparable capture cell ability between sprayed and covalent films is an increased antibody surface coverage for the sprayed films (non-equilibrium technique), which compensates for the lack of its antibody orientation. There was no significant antibody denaturation detected on any of the sprayed films. Both techniques led to the formation of cluster-aggregates, a factor that seems unavoidable due to the natural tendency of protein to cluster. The avidin-biotin bridge films generally had a higher roughness, which manifested itself in a higher wettability compared to the sprayed films.

  3. Cold Spray Repair of Martensitic Stainless Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccoli, M.; Cornacchia, G.; Maestrini, D.; Marconi, G. P.; Roberti, R.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of using cold spray as repair technique of martensitic stainless steel components was evaluated through laboratory investigations. An austenitic stainless steel feedstock powder was chosen, instead of soft metals powders like nickel, copper, or aluminum, used for repairing components made in light alloy or cast iron. The present study directly compares the microstructure, the residual stresses, and the micro-hardness of repairs obtained by cold spray and by TIG welding, that is commonly used as repair technique in large steel components. XRD and optical metallographic analysis of the repairs showed that cold spray offers some advantages, inducing compressive residual stresses in the repair and avoiding alterations of the interface between repair and base material. For these reasons, a heat treatment after the cold spray repair is not required to restore the base material properties, whereas a post-weld heat treatment is needed after the welding repair. Cold spray repair also exhibits a higher micro-hardness than the welding repair. In addition, the cavitation erosion resistance of a cold spray coating was investigated through ultrasonic cavitation tests, and the samples worn surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Visitors stop at the Orbital Sciences booth during Space Congress Week, held April 29-May 2, 2003, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The Space Congress is an international conference that gathers attendees from the scientific community, the space industry workforce, educators and local supporting industries. This year's event commemorated the 40th anniversary of the Kennedy Space Center and the Centennial of Flight. The theme for the Space Congress was "Linking the Past to the Future: A Celebration of Space."

    2003-04-30

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Visitors stop at the Orbital Sciences booth during Space Congress Week, held April 29-May 2, 2003, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The Space Congress is an international conference that gathers attendees from the scientific community, the space industry workforce, educators and local supporting industries. This year's event commemorated the 40th anniversary of the Kennedy Space Center and the Centennial of Flight. The theme for the Space Congress was "Linking the Past to the Future: A Celebration of Space."

  5. Micromechanics of Spray-On Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the thermo-mechanical response of the Space Shuttle External Tank spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) material is critical, to NASA's Return to Flight effort. This closed-cell rigid polymeric foam is used to insulate the metallic Space Shuttle External Tank, which is at cryogenic temperatures immediately prior to and during lift off. The shedding of the SOFI during ascent led to the loss of the Columbia, and eliminating/minimizing foam lass from the tank has become a priority for NASA as it seeks to resume scheduled space shuttle missions. Determining the nature of the SOFI material behavior in response to both thermal and mechanical loading plays an important role as any structural modeling of the shedding phenomenon k predicated on knowledge of the constitutive behavior of the foam. In this paper, the SOFI material has been analyzed using the High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells (HFGMC) micromechanics model, which has recently been extended to admit a triply-periodic 3-D repeating unit cell (RUC). Additional theoretical extensions that mere made in order to enable modeling of the closed-cell-foam material include the ability to represent internal boundaries within the RUC (to simulated internal pores) and the ability to impose an internal pressure within the simulated pores. This latter extension is crucial as two sources contribute to significant internal pressure changes within the SOFI pores. First, gas trapped in the pores during the spray process will expand or contract due to temperature changes. Second, the pore pressure will increase due to outgassing of water and other species present in the foam skeleton polymer material. With HFGMC's new pore pressure modeling capabilities, a nonlinear pressure change within the simulated pore can be imposed that accounts for both of these sources, in addition to stmdar&-thermal and mechanical loading; The triply-periodic HFGMC micromechanics model described above was implemented within NASA GRC's MAC

  6. Evaluation of mechanical properties of Aluminum-Copper cold sprayed and alloy 625 wire arc sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashirzadeh, Milad

    This study examines microstructural-based mechanical properties of Al-Cu composite deposited by cold spraying and wire arc sprayed nickel-based alloy 625 coating using numerical modeling and experimental techniques. The microhardness and elastic modulus of samples were determined using the Knoop hardness technique. Hardness in both transverse and longitudinal directions on the sample cross-sections has been measured. An image-based finite element simulation algorithm was employed to determine the mechanical properties through an inverse analysis. In addition mechanical tests including, tensile, bending, and nano-indentation tests were performed on alloy 625 wire arc sprayed samples. Overall, results from the experimental tests are in relatively good agreement for deposited Al-Cu composites and alloy 625 coating. However, results obtained from numerical simulation are significantly higher in value than experimentally obtained results. Examination and comparison of the results are strong indications of the influence of microstructure characteristics on the mechanical properties of thermally spray deposited coatings.

  7. Particle size distribution of aerosols sprayed from household hand-pump sprays containing fluorine-based and silicone-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Isama, Kazuo; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Japan has published safety guideline on waterproof aerosol sprays. Furthermore, the Aerosol Industry Association of Japan has adopted voluntary regulations on waterproof aerosol sprays. Aerosol particles of diameter less than 10 µm are considered as "fine particles". In order to avoid acute lung injury, this size fraction should account for less than 0.6% of the sprayed aerosol particles. In contrast, the particle size distribution of aerosols released by hand-pump sprays containing fluorine-based or silicone-based compounds have not been investigated in Japan. Thus, the present study investigated the aerosol particle size distribution of 16 household hand-pump sprays. In 4 samples, the ratio of fine particles in aerosols exceeded 0.6%. This study confirmed that several hand-pump sprays available in the Japanese market can spray fine particles. Since the hand-pump sprays use water as a solvent and their ingredients may be more hydrophilic than those of aerosol sprays, the concepts related to the safety of aerosol-sprays do not apply to the hand pump sprays. Therefore, it may be required for the hand-pump spray to develop a suitable method for evaluating the toxicity and to establish the safety guideline.

  8. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  9. Speeds in school zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    School speed zones are frequently requested traffic controls for school areas, based on the common belief : that if the transportation agency would only install a reduced speed limit, then drivers would no longer : speed through the area. This resear...

  10. Optical study of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings deposited at different spray distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belka, R.; Kowalski, S.; Żórawski, W.

    2017-08-01

    Series of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings deposited on titanium substrate at different spray (plasma gun to workpiece) distance were investigated. The optical methods as dark field confocal microscopy, Raman/PL and UV-VIS spectroscopy were used for study the influence of deposition process on structural degradation of HA precursor. The hydroxyl group concentration was investigated by study the OH mode intensity in the Raman spectra. Optical absorption coefficients at near UV region were analyzed by Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy. PL intensity observed during Raman measurement was also considered as relation to defects concentration and degradation level. It was confirmed the different gunsubstrate distance has a great impact on structure of deposited HA ceramics.

  11. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  12. Effect of Spray Distance on Microstructure and Tribological Performance of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite-Titania Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Xu, Haifeng; Geng, Xin; Wang, Jingjing; Xiao, Jinkun; Zhu, Peizhi

    2016-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-titania (TiO2) composite coatings prepared on Ti6Al4V alloy surface can combine the excellent mechanical property of the alloy substrate and the good biocompatibility of the coating material. In this paper, HA-TiO2 composite coatings were deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates using suspension plasma spray (SPS). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier infrared absorption spectrometry and friction tests were used to analyze the microstructure and tribological properties of the obtained coatings. The results showed that the spray distance had an important influence on coating microstructure and tribological performance. The amount of decomposition phases decreased as the spray distance increased. The increase in spray distance from 80 to 110 mm improved the crystalline HA content and decreased the wear performance of the SPS coatings. In addition, the spray distance had a big effect on the coating morphology due to different substrate temperature resulting from different spray distance. Furthermore, a significant presence of OH- and CO3 2- was observed, which was favorable for the biomedical applications.

  13. The structure of dilute combusting sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Solomon, A. S. P.; Faeth, F. M.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of drop processes in a turbulent flame is described. The experiments involved a monodisperse (105 and 180 micro m initial diameter) stream of methanol drops injected at the base of a turbulent methane-fueled diffusion flame burning in still air. The following measurements were made: mean and fluctuating phase velocities, mean drop number flux, drop-size distributions and mean gas-phase temperatures. Measurements were compared with predictions of two separated flow models: (1) deterministic separated flow, where drop-turbulence interactions are ignored; and (2) stochastic separated flow, where drop-turbulence interactions are considered using random-walk computations. The stochastic separated flow analysis yielded best agreement with measurements, since it provides for turbulent dispersion of drops which was important for present test conditions (and probably for most combusting sprays as well). Distinguishing the presence or absence of envelope flames around the drops, however, was relatively unimportant for present test conditions, since the drops spent most of their lifetime in fuel-rich regions of the flow where this distinction is irrelevant.

  14. Agricultural Spray Drift Concentrations in Rainwater, Stemflow ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In order to study spray drift contribution to non-targeted habitats, pesticide concentrations were measured in stemflow (water flowing down the trunk of a tree during a rain event), rainfall, and amphibians in an agriculturally impacted wetland area near Tifton, Georgia, USA. Agricultural fields and sampling locations were located on the University of Georgia's Gibbs research farm. Samples were analyzed for >150 pesticides and over 20 different pesticides were detected in these matrices. Data indicated that herbicides (metolachlor and atrazine) and fungicides (tebuconazole) were present with the highest concentrations in stemflow, followed by those in rainfall and amphibian tissue samples. Metolachlor had the highest frequency of detection and highest concentration in rainfall and stemflow samples. Higher concentrations of pesticides were observed in stemflow for a longer period than rainfall. Furthermore, rainfall and stemflow concentrations were compared against aquatic life benchmarks and environmental water screening values to determine if adverse effects would potentially occur for non-targeted organisms. Of the pesticides detected, several had concentrations that exceeded the aquatic life benchmark value. The majority of the time mixtures were present in the different matrices, making it difficult to determine the potential adverse effects that these compounds will have on non-target species, due to unknown potentiating effects. These data help assess the

  15. Experiments on Spray from a Rolling Tire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovich, Charles; Browand, Fred

    2010-11-01

    A novel laboratory apparatus has been built to understand the mechanisms and statistics of droplet production for spray emerging from a rolling tire. Using high-speed imaging, water passing through a single circumferential groove was observed to leave the tire contact patch in the form of a liquid sheet of non-uniform thickness. The sheet breaks into droplets as a result of several, organized instabilities. Measurements for the breakup length of the liquid sheet showed a dependence on Weber number proportional to We-1/6, for Weber numbers of 2700, 10900 and 24400. A technique to identify and size water droplets was developed and the distribution of droplet sizes was determined as a function of Weber number. At We = 2700, droplet sizes between 80 and 9000μm were detected, with a mean diameter near 800μm. Both the range of droplet sizes and the mean diameter were found to decrease with increasing Weber number as (approximately) We-1/2. Correlation Image Velocimetry (CIV) was used to estimate the distribution of droplet velocities as a function of droplet size. The spread of droplet velocities about the tire peripheral speed is strongly correlated with droplet size. The spread can be estimated by a simple physical model incorporating rigid droplets subject to gravity and drag.

  16. Combined cannabinoid therapy via an oromucosal spray.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jordi

    2006-08-01

    Extensive basic science research has identified the potential therapeutic benefits of active compounds extracted from the Cannabis sativa L. plant (the cannabinoids). It is recognized that a significant proportion of patients suffering with the debilitating symptoms of pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis or other conditions smoke cannabis despite the legal implications and stigma associated with this controlled substance. GW Pharmaceuticals have developed Sativex (GW- 1,000-02), a combined cannabinoid medicine that delivers and maintains therapeutic levels of two principal cannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), via an oromucosal pump spray, that aims to minimize psychotropic side effects. Sativex has proved to be well tolerated and successfully self-administered and self-titrated in both healthy volunteers and patient cohorts. Clinical assessment of this combined cannabinoid medicine has demonstrated efficacy in patients with intractable pain (chronic neuropathic pain, pain due to brachial plexus nerve injury, allodynic peripheral neuropathic pain and advanced cancer pain), rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (bladder problems, spasticity and central pain), with no significant intoxication-like symptoms, tolerance or withdrawal syndrome.

  17. Numerical Study of Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhpanah, Amirsaman; Coyle, Thomas W.; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-01-01

    A numerical study of suspension plasma spraying is presented in the current work. The liquid suspension jet is replaced with a train of droplets containing the suspension particles injected into the plasma flow. Atomization, evaporation, and melting of different components are considered for droplets and particles as they travel toward the substrate. Effect of different parameters on particle conditions during flight and upon impact on the substrate is investigated. Initially, influence of the torch operating conditions such as inlet flow rate and power is studied. Additionally, effect of injector parameters like injection location, flow rate, and angle is examined. The model used in the current study takes high-temperature gradients and non-continuum effects into account. Moreover, the important effect of change in physical properties of suspension droplets as a result of evaporation is included in the model. These mainly include variations in heat transfer properties and viscosity. Utilizing this improved model, several test cases have been considered to better evaluate the effect of different parameters on the quality of particles during flight and upon impact on the substrate.

  18. Aircraft cabin water spray disbenefits study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Porter, Kent W.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of utilizing a cabin water spray system (CWSS) as a means of increasing passenger evacuation and survival time following an accident has received considerable publicity and has been the subject of testing by the regulatory agencies in both the United States and Europe. A test program, initiated by the CAA in 1987, involved the regulatory bodies in both Europe and North America in a collaborative research effort to determine the benefits and 'disbenefits' (disadvantages) of a CWSS. In order to obtain a balanced opinion of an onboard CWSS, NASA, and FAA requested the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group to investigate the potential 'disbenefits' of the proposed system from the perspective of the manufacturer and an operator. This report is the result of a year-long, cost-sharing contract study between the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, NASA, and FAA. Delta Air Lines participated as a subcontract study team member and investigated the 'return to service' costs for an aircraft that would experience an uncommanded operation of a CWSS without the presence of fire. Disbenefits identified include potential delays in evacuation, introduction of 'common cause failure' in redundant safety of flight systems, physiological problems for passengers, high cost of refurbishment for inadvertent discharge, and potential to negatively affect other safety systems.

  19. Microstructural characteristics of plasma sprayed nanostructured partially stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Rogerio Soares

    Thermal barrier coatings have been extensively applied in the aerospace industry in turbines and rocket engines as an insulation system. Partially stabilized zirconia, due to its high thermal stability and low thermal conductivity at high temperatures has been traditionally employed as the ceramic element of the thermal barrier coating system. Different approaches have been taken in order to improve the performance of these coatings. Nanostructured materials are promising an interesting future in the beginning of the 21st century. Due to its enhanced strain to failure and superplasticity new applications may be accomplished or the limits of materials utilization may be placed at higher levels. Single nanostructured particles can not be thermal sprayed by conventional thermal spray equipment. Due to its low mass, they would be deviated to the periphery of the thermal spray jet. To overcome this characteristic, single nanostructured particles were successively agglomerated into large microscopic particles, with particle size distribution similar to the conventional feedstocks for thermal spray equipment. Agglomerated nanostructured particles of partially stabilized zirconia were plasma sprayed in air with different spray parameters. According to traditional thermal spray procedure, the feedstock has to be melted in the thermal spray jet in order to achieve the necessary conditions for adhesion and cohesion on the substrate. Due to the nature of the nanostructured particles, a new step has to be taken in the thermal spray processing; particle melting has to be avoided in order to preserve the feedstock nanostructure in the coating overall microstructure. In this work, the adhesion/cohesion system of nanostructured coatings is investigated and clarified. A percentage of molten particles will retain and hold the non-molten agglomerated nanostructured particles in the coating overall microstructure. Controlling the spray parameters it was possible to produce coatings

  20. Promoting effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on accumulation of sugar and phenolics in berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on zinc deficient soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang-Zheng; Liu, Mei-Ying; Meng, Jiang-Fei; Chi, Ming; Xi, Zhu-Mei; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2015-02-02

    The effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on berry development of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on arid zone Zn-deficient soils was investigated over two consecutive seasons, 2013 and 2014. Initial zinc concentration in soil and vines, photosynthesis at three berry developmental stages, berry weight, content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity, phenolics and expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout the stages were measured. Foliage sprayed zinc sulfate showed promoting effects on photosynthesis and berry development of vines and the promotion mainly occurred from veraison to maturation. Zn treatments enhanced the accumulation of total soluble solids, total phenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins and anthocyanins in berry skin, decreasing the concentration of titratable acidity. Furthermore, foliage sprayed zinc sulfate could significantly influence the expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout berry development, and the results of expression analysis supported the promotion of Zn treatments on phenolics accumulation. This research is the first comprehensive and detailed study about the effect of foliage sprayed Zn fertilizer on grape berry development, phenolics accumulation and gene expression in berry skin, providing a basis for improving the quality of grape and wine in Zn-deficient areas.

  1. HP LT Variscan metamorphism in the Cubito-Moura schists (Ossa-Morena Zone, southern Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Simancas, José Fernando; Azor, Antonio; Azañón, José Miguel; González-Lodeiro, Francisco; Fonseca, Paulo

    2006-12-01

    Multi-equilibrium thermobarometry shows that low-grade metapelites (Cubito-Moura schists) from the Ossa-Morena Zone underwent HP-LT metamorphism from 340-370 °C at 1.0-0.9 GPa to 400-450 °C at 0.8-0.7 GPa. These HP-LT equilibriums were reached by parageneses including white K mica, chlorite and chloritoid, which define the earliest schistosity (S 1) in these rocks. The main foliation in the schists is a crenulation cleavage (S 2), which developed during decompression from 0.8-0.7 to 0.4-0.3 GPa at increasing temperatures from 400-450 °C to 440-465 °C. Fe 3+ in chlorite decreased greatly during prograde metamorphism from molar fractions of 0.4 determined in syn-S 1 chlorites down to 0.1 in syn-S 2 chlorites. These new data add to previous findings of eclogites in the Moura schists indicating that a pile of allochtonous rocks situated next to the Beja-Acebuches oceanic amphibolites underwent HP-LT metamorphism during the Variscan orogeny. To cite this article: G. Booth-Rea et al., C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  2. Influence of Feedstock Materials and Spray Parameters on Thermal Conductivity of Wire-Arc-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. H.; Zhou, Z.; Wang, G. H.; He, D. Y.; Bobzin, K.; Zhao, L.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-03-01

    To manufacture a protective coating with high thermal conductivity on drying cylinders in paper production machines, a FeCrB-cored wire was developed, and the spraying parameters for wire-arc spraying were optimized in this study. The conventional engineering materials FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings were produced as the reference coatings under the same experimental condition. It has been shown that the oxide content in coating influences the thermal conductivity of coating significantly. The FeCrB coating exhibits a relative higher thermal conductivity due to the lower oxide content in comparison with conventional FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings. Moreover, the oxidation of in-flight particles can be reduced by decreasing the standoff distance contributing to the increase in the thermal conductivity of coating. Total energy consumption of a papermaking machine can be significantly reduced if the coatings applied to dryer section exhibit high thermal conductivity. Therefore, the FeCrB coating developed in this study is a highly promising coating system for drying cylinders regarding the improved thermal conductivity and low operation costs in paper production industry.

  3. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciT

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng, E-mail: wsc33333@163.com; Tong, Hui

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surfacemore » of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.« less

  4. The influence of spray properties on intranasal deposition.

    PubMed

    Foo, Mow Yee; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Su, Wei-Chung; Donovan, Maureen D

    2007-01-01

    While numerous devices, formulations, and spray characteristics have been shown to influence nasal deposition efficiency, few studies have attempted to identify which of these interacting factors plays the greatest role in nasal spray deposition. The deposition patterns of solutions with a wide range of surface tensions and viscosities were measured using an MRI-derived nasal cavity replica. The resulting spray plumes had angles between 29 degrees and 80 degrees and contained droplet sizes (D(v50)) from 37-157 microm. Each formulation contained rhodamine 590 as a fluorescent marker for detection. Administration angles of 30 degrees , 40 degrees , or 50 degrees above horizontal were tested to investigate the role of user technique on nasal deposition. The amount of spray deposited within specific regions of the nasal cavity was determined by disassembling the replica and measuring the amount of rhodamine retained in each section. Most of the spray droplets were deposited onto the anterior region of the model, but sprays with small plume angles were capable of reaching the turbinate region with deposition efficiencies approaching 90%. Minimal dependence on droplet size, viscosity, or device was observed. Changes in inspiratory flow rate (0-60 L/min) had no significant effect on turbinate deposition efficiency. Both plume angle and administration angle were found to be important factors in determining deposition efficiency. For administration angles of 40 degrees or 50 degrees , maximal turbinate deposition efficiency (30-50%) occurred with plume angles of 55-65 degrees , whereas a 30 degrees administration angle gave an approximately 75% deposition efficiency for similar plume angles. Deposition efficiencies of approximately 90% could be achieved with plume angles <30 degrees using 30 degrees administration angles. Both the plume angle and administration angle are critical factors in determining deposition efficiency, while many other spray parameters, including

  5. Towards fully spray coated organic light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilissen, Koen; Stryckers, Jeroen; Manca, Jean; Deferme, Wim

    2014-10-01

    Pi-conjugated polymer light emitting devices have the potential to be the next generation of solid state lighting. In order to achieve this goal, a low cost, efficient and large area production process is essential. Polymer based light emitting devices are generally deposited using techniques based on solution processing e.g.: spin coating, ink jet printing. These techniques are not well suited for cost-effective, high throughput, large area mass production of these organic devices. Ultrasonic spray deposition however, is a deposition technique that is fast, efficient and roll to roll compatible which can be easily scaled up for the production of large area polymer light emitting devices (PLEDs). This deposition technique has already successfully been employed to produce organic photovoltaic devices (OPV)1. Recently the electron blocking layer PEDOT:PSS2 and metal top contact3 have been successfully spray coated as part of the organic photovoltaic device stack. In this study, the effects of ultrasonic spray deposition of polymer light emitting devices are investigated. For the first time - to our knowledge -, spray coating of the active layer in PLED is demonstrated. Different solvents are tested to achieve the best possible spray-able dispersion. The active layer morphology is characterized and optimized to produce uniform films with optimal thickness. Furthermore these ultrasonic spray coated films are incorporated in the polymer light emitting device stack to investigate the device characteristics and efficiency. Our results show that after careful optimization of the active layer, ultrasonic spray coating is prime candidate as deposition technique for mass production of PLEDs.

  6. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Jurns, J.; Chato, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  7. Development & characterization of alumina coating by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Jobin; Scaria, Abyson; Kurian, Don George

    2018-03-01

    Ceramic coatings are applied on metals to prevent them from oxidation and corrosion at room as well as elevated temperatures. The service environment, mechanisms of protection, chemical and mechanical compatibility, application method, control of coating quality and ability of the coating to be repaired are the factors that need to be considered while selecting the required coating. The coatings based on oxide materials provides high degree of thermal insulation and protection against oxidation at high temperatures for the underlying substrate materials. These coatings are usually applied by the flame or plasma spraying methods. The surface cleanliness needs to be ensured before spraying. Abrasive blasting can be used to provide the required surface roughness for good adhesion between the substrate and the coating. A pre bond coat like Nickel Chromium can be applied on to the substrate material before spraying the oxide coating to avoid chances of poor adhesion between the oxide coating and the metallic substrate. Plasma spraying produces oxide coatings of greater density, higher hardness, and smooth surface finish than that of the flame spraying process Inert gas is often used for generation of plasma gas so as to avoid the oxidation of the substrate material. The work focuses to develop, characterize and optimize the parameters used in Al2O3 coating on transition stainless steel substrate material for minimizing the wear rate and maximizing the leak tightness using plasma spray process. The experiment is designed using Taguchi’s L9 orthogonal array. The parameters that are to be optimized are plasma voltage, spraying distance and the cooling jet pressure. The characterization techniques includes micro-hardness and porosity tests followed by Grey relational analysis of the results.

  8. Hydrogen no-vent fill testing in a 5 cubic foot (142 liter) tank using spray nozzle and spray bar liquid injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 38 hydrogen no-vent fill tests were performed in this test series using various size spray nozzles and a spray bar with different hole sizes in a 5 cubic foot receiver tank. Fill levels of 90 percent by volume or greater were achieved in 26 of the tests while maintaining a receiver tank pressure below 30 psia. Spray nozzles were mounted at the top of the tank, whereas, the spray bar was centered in the tank axially. The spray nozzle no-vent fills demonstrated tank pressure and temperature responses comparable to previous test series. Receiver tank pressure responses for the spray bar configuration were similar to the spray nozzle tests with the pressure initially rising rapidly, then leveling off as vapor condenses onto the discharging liquid streams, and finally ramping up near the end of the test due to ullage compression. Both liquid injection techniques tested were capable of filling the receiver tank to 90 percent under variable test conditions. Comparisons between the spray nozzle and spray bar configurations for well matched test conditions indicate the spray nozzle injection technique is more effective in minimizing the receiving tank pressure throughout a no-vent fill compared to the spray bar under normal gravity conditions.

  9. Optical investigation of the interaction of an automotive spray and thin films by utilization of a high-pressure spin coater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seel, Kevin; Reddemann, Manuel A.; Kneer, Reinhold

    2018-03-01

    Although the interaction of automotive sprays with thin films is of high technical relevance for IC engine applications, fundamental knowledge about underlying physical mechanisms is still limited. This work presents a systematic study of the influence of the film's initial thickness—homogeneously spread over a flat wall before the initial spray impingement—on film surface structures and thickness after the interaction. For this purpose, interferometric film thickness measurements and complementary high-speed visualizations are used. By gradually increasing the initial film thickness on a micrometer scale, a shift from a regime of liquid deposition (increasing film thickness with respect to initial film thickness) to a regime of liquid removal (decreasing film thickness with respect to initial film thickness) is observed at the stagnation zone of the impinging spray. This transition is accompanied by the formation of radially propagating surface waves, transporting liquid away from the stagnation zone. Wavelengths and amplitudes of the surface waves are increased with increasing initial film thickness.

  10. Mushy zone modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Smith, Richard N.; Marsh, Steven P.; Kuklinski, Robert

    A key element of mushy zone modeling is the description of the microscopic evolution of the lengthscales within the mushy zone and the influence of macroscopic transport processes. This paper describes some recent progress in developing a mean-field statistical theory of phase coarsening in adiabatic mushy zones. The main theoretical predictions are temporal scaling laws that indicate that average lengthscale increases as time 1/3, a self-similar distribution of mushy zone lengthscales based on spherical solid particle shapes, and kinetic rate constants which provide the dependences of the coarsening process on material parameters and the volume fraction of the solid phase. High precision thermal decay experiments are described which verify aspects of the theory in pure material mushy zones held under adiabatic conditions. The microscopic coarsening theory is then integrated within a macroscopic heat transfer model of one-dimensional alloy solidification, using the Double Integral Method. The method demonstrates an ability to predict the influence of macroscopic heat transfer on the evolution of primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings in Al-Cu alloys. Finally, some suggestions are made for future experimental and theoretical studies required in developing comprehensive solidification processing models.

  11. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  12. Presence of electrostatically adsorbed polysaccharides improves spray drying of liposomes.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Ayse; Özçelik, Beraat; Sramek, Martin; Gibis, Monika; Kohlus, Reinhard; Weiss, Jochen

    2013-02-01

    Spray drying of liposomes with conventional wall materials such as maltodextrins often yields nonfunctional powders, that is, liposomes break down during drying and rehydration. Electrostatically coating the surface of liposomes with a charged polymer prior to spray drying may help solve this problem. Anionic lecithin liposomes (approximately 400 nm) were coated with lower (approximately 500 kDa, LMW-C) or higher (approximately 900 kDa, HMW-C) molecular weight cationic chitosan using the layer-by-layer depositing method. Low (DE20, LMW-MD) or high molecular weight (DE2, HMW-MD) maltodextrin was added as wall material to facilitate spray drying. If surfaces of liposomes (1%) were completely covered with chitosan (0.4%), no bridging or depletion flocculation would occur, and mean particle diameters would be approximately 500 nm. If maltodextrins (20%) were added to uncoated liposomes, extensive liposomal breakdown would occur making the system unsuitable for spray drying. No such aggregation or breakdown was observed when maltodextrin was added to chitosan-coated liposomes. Size changed little or even decreased slightly depending on the molecular weight of maltodextrin added. Scanning electron microscopy images of powders containing chitosan-coated liposomes revealed that their morphologies depended on the type of maltodextrin added. Powders prepared with LMW-MD contained mostly spherical particles while HMW-MD powders contained particles with concavities and dents. Upon redispersion, coated liposomes yielded back dispersions with particle size distributions similar to the original ones, except for LMW-C coated samples that had been spray dried with HMW-MD which yielded aggregates (approximately 30 μm). Results show that coating of liposomes with an absorbing polymer allows them to be spray dried with conventional maltodextrin wall materials. Liposomes have attracted considerable attention in the food and agricultural, biomedical industries for the delivery of

  13. Spray combustion under oscillatory pressure conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, H. R.; Santoro, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    The performance and stability of liquid rocket engines is often argued to be significantly impacted by atomization and droplet vaporization processes. In particular, combustion instability phenomena may result from the interactions between the oscillating pressure field present in the rocket combustor and the fuel and oxidizer injection process. Few studies have been conducted to examine the effects of oscillating pressure fields on spray formation and its evolution under rocket engine conditions. The pressure study is intended to address the need for such studies. In particular, two potentially important phenomena are addressed in the present effort. The first involves the enhancement of the atomization process for a liquid jet subjected to an oscillating pressure field of known frequency and amplitude. The objective of this part of the study is to examine the coupling between the pressure field and or the resulting periodically perturbed velocity field on the breakup of the liquid jet. In particular, transverse mode oscillations are of interest since such modes are considered of primary importance in combustion instability phenomena. The second aspect of the project involves the effects of an oscillating pressure on droplet coagulation and secondary atomization. The objective of this study is to examine the conditions under which phenomena following the atomization process are affected by perturbations to the pressure or velocity fields. Both coagulation and represent a coupling mechanism between the pressure field and the energy release process in rocket combustors. It is precisely this coupling which drives combustion instability phenomena. Consequently, the present effort is intended to provide the fundamental insights needed to evaluate these processes as important mechanisms in liquid rocket instability phenomena.

  14. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  15. Hemodynamic instability following airway spray cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pedoto, Alessia; Desiderio, Dawn; Amar, David; Downey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Spray cryotherapy (SCT) of airway lesions is used to effectively palliate respiratory symptoms related to airway obstruction but significant intraoperative hemodynamic complications have been noted. We reviewed the experience at a single institution using SCT for the treatment of obstructive airway tumors. Methods A retrospective review of a single institution experience with intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamic complications associated with SCT was performed. Descriptive statistics were performed. Results Between June 2009 and April 2010, 34 treatment sessions were performed on 28 patients. Median age was 60 years (range, 15–88 years). Tumor characteristics were as follows: 13 primary lung cancers (43%), 11 pulmonary metastases (50%), 1 direct extension of an esophageal cancer (3%) and 2 benign pulmonary lesions (7%). Twenty-one tumors (75%) were distal to the carina; 14 (50%) were >95% occlusive. Median procedure length was 78 min (range, 15–176 min). Eleven sessions (31%) led to severe hypotension and/or bradycardia, with 2 patients requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation. One patient died intraoperatively after cardiac arrest; a second patient was stable intra-operatively but died within 24 h of SCT. Four patients required reintubation and short-term mechanical ventilation. Conclusions Unpredictable life-threatening hemodynamic instability can follow endobronchial SCT. We propose that the most likely cause is pulmonary venous gaseous emboli entering the right heart, the coronary arteries and the systemic circulation. Although SCT may offer advantages over airway laser therapy (such as no risk of fire and rapid hemostasis), further study is needed to delineate the relative likelihood of therapeutic benefit versus catastrophic complications. PMID:27763916

  16. Freeway work zone lane capacity.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this report is a capacity analysis of two long-term urban freeway Work Zones. Work Zone #1 : tapered four mainline lanes to two, using two separate tapers; Work Zone #2 tapered two mainline lanes to one. : Work Zone throughput was analyz...

  17. Evaluation of a locally homogeneous flow model of spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C. P.; Szekely, G. A., Jr.; Faeth, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    A model of spray combustion which employs a second-order turbulence model was developed. The assumption of locally homogeneous flow is made, implying infinitely fast transport rates between the phase. Measurements to test the model were completed for a gaseous n-propane flame and an air atomized n-pentane spray flame, burning in stagnant air at atmospheric pressure. Profiles of mean velocity and temperature, as well as velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress, were measured in the flames. The predictions for the gas flame were in excellent agreement with the measurements. The predictions for the spray were qualitatively correct, but effects of finite rate interphase transport were evident, resulting in a overstimation of the rate development of the flow. Predictions of spray penetration length at high pressures, including supercritical combustion conditions, were also completed for comparison with earlier measurements. Test conditions involved a pressure atomized n-pentane spray, burning in stagnant air at pressures of 3, 5, and 9 MPa. The comparison between predictions and measurements was fair. This is not a very sensitive test of the model, however, and further high pressure experimental and theoretical results are needed before a satisfactory assessment of the locally homogeneous flow approximation can be made.

  18. Milestones in Functional Titanium Dioxide Thermal Spray Coatings: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardon, M.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Titanium dioxide has been the most investigated metal oxide due to its outstanding performance in a wide range of applications, chemical stability and low cost. Coating processes that can produce surfaces based on this material have been deeply studied. Nevertheless, the necessity of coating large areas by means of rapid manufacturing processes renders laboratory-scale techniques unsuitable, leading to a noteworthy interest from the thermal spray (TS) community in the development of significant intellectual property and a large number of scientific publications. This review unravels the relationship between titanium dioxide and TS technologies with the aim of providing detailed information related to the most significant achievements, lack of knowhow, and performance of TS TiO2 functional coatings in photocatalytic, biomedical, and other applications. The influence of thermally activated techniques such as atmospheric plasma spray and high-velocity oxygen fuel spray on TiO2 feedstock based on powders and suspensions is revised; the influence of spraying parameters on the microstructural and compositional changes and the final active behavior of the coating have been analyzed. Recent findings on titanium dioxide coatings deposited by cold gas spray and the capacity of this technology to prevent loss of the nanostructured anatase metastable phase are also reviewed.

  19. Measurement of Spray Drift with a Specifically Designed Lidar System.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, Eduard; Torrent, Xavier; Planas de Martí, Santiago; Solanelles, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Masip, Joan; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2016-04-08

    Field measurements of spray drift are usually carried out by passive collectors and tracers. However, these methods are labour- and time-intensive and only provide point- and time-integrated measurements. Unlike these methods, the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique allows real-time measurements, obtaining information with temporal and spatial resolution. Recently, the authors have developed the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for spray drift monitoring. This prototype is based on a 1534 nm erbium-doped glass laser and an 80 mm diameter telescope, has scanning capability, and is easily transportable. This paper presents the results of the first experimental campaign carried out with this instrument. High coefficients of determination (R² > 0.85) were observed by comparing lidar measurements of the spray drift with those obtained by horizontal collectors. Furthermore, the lidar system allowed an assessment of the drift reduction potential (DRP) when comparing low-drift nozzles with standard ones, resulting in a DRP of 57% (preliminary result) for the tested nozzles. The lidar system was also used for monitoring the evolution of the spray flux over the canopy and to generate 2-D images of these plumes. The developed instrument is an advantageous alternative to passive collectors and opens the possibility of new methods for field measurement of spray drift.

  20. Effect of natural windbreaks on drift reduction in orchard spraying.

    PubMed

    Wenneker, M; Heijne, B; van de Zande, J C

    2005-01-01

    In the Netherlands windbreaks are commonly grown to protect orchards against wind damage and to improve micro-climate. Natural windbreaks of broad-leaved trees can also reduce the risk of surface water contamination caused by spray drift during orchard spraying. Spray drift from pesticide applications is a major concern in the Netherlands, especially drift into water courses. So far, several drift reducing measures have been accepted by water quality control organisations and the Board for the Authorization of Pesticides (CTB), e.g. presence of a windbreak (i.e. 70% drift reduction at early season and 90% drift reduction at full leaf, respectively before and after first of May). From the experiments it was concluded that the risk of drift contamination is high during the early developmental stages of the growing season. The 70% drift reduction at early season as determined in previous experiments, appears to be valid only for windbreaks with a certain degree of developed leaves. At full leaf stage 80-90% drift reduction by the windbreak was measured. The use of evergreen windbreaks or wind-break species that develop in early season can reduce the risk of drift contamination considerably. Also, the combination of drift reducing methods, such as one-sided spraying of the last tree row and a windbreak is an effective method to reduce spray drift in the Netherlands in early season.