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Sample records for zone thallium-201 redistribution

  1. [Performance of Thallium 201 rest-redistribution spect to predict viability in recent myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Coll, Claudia; González, Patricio; Massardo, Teresa; Sierralta, Paulina; Humeres, Pamela; Jofré, Josefina; Yovanovich, Jorge; Aramburú, Ivonne; Brugère, Solange; Chamorro, Hernán; Ramírez, Alfredo; Kunstmann, Sonia; López, Héctor

    2002-03-01

    The detection of viability after acute myocardial infarction is primordial to select the most appropriate therapy, to decrease cardiac events and abnormal remodeling. Thallium201 SPECT is one of the radionuclide techniques used to detect viability. To evaluate the use of Thallium201 rest-redistribution SPECT to detect myocardial viability in reperfused patients after a recent myocardial infarction. Forty one patients with up to of 24 days of evolution of a myocardial infarction were studied. All had angiographically demonstrated coronary artery disease and were subjected to a successful thrombolysis, angioplasty or bypass grafting. SPECT Thallium201 images were acquired at rest and after 4 h of redistribution. These results were compared with variations in wall motion score, studied at baseline and after 3 or 4 months with echocardiography. The sensitivity of rest-redistribution Thallium201 SPECT, to predict recovery of wall motion was 91% when patient analysis was performed and 79% when segmental analysis was done in the culprit region. The figures for specificity were 56 and 73% respectively. Rest-distribution Thallium201 SPECT has an excellent sensitivity to predict myocardial viability in recent myocardial infarction. The data obtained in this study is similar to that reported for chronic coronary artery disease.

  2. Normalization of reverse redistribution of thallium-201 with procainamide pretreatment in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Nii, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Nomoto, J.

    1991-03-01

    Stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Reverse redistribution phenomenon was observed in the absence of coronary artery disease. This seems to be the first report of normalization of this phenomenon in association with reversion of accessory pathway to normal atrioventricular conduction after pretreatment with procainamide.

  3. Myocardial viability assessment after acute myocardial infarction: low-dose dobutamine echocardiography versus rest-redistribution thallium-201 SPECT.

    PubMed

    Castini, D; Bestetti, A; Garbin, M; Di Leo, C; Bigi, R; Sponzilli, C; Concardi, G; Gioventù, M; Tarolo, G L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1999-09-01

    The presence of tissue viability is of great importance in the prognostic work-up of patients recovering from acute myocardial infarction. However, uncertainty still exists concerning the optimal tool for its assessment. The present study was undertaken in order to compare low-dose dobutamine echocardiography and rest-redistribution thallium SPECT for predicting late improvement of regional left ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction. Fifteen patients undergoing coronary angiography, low-dose dobutamine echocardiography and rest-redistribution thallium SPECT after thrombolyzed anterior acute myocardial infarction were studied. A 3 month follow-up echocardiogram was performed in all patients and 9 underwent coronary revascularization. A significant (> or = 70%) residual stenosis of the infarct-related artery was present in 14 patients, whilst a total occlusion was observed in 1. At 3 month follow-up, 41% of the dyssynergic segments improved. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for late wall motion improvement was 61, 89 and 77% for low-dose dobutamine echocardiography and, respectively, 76, 45 and 58% for rest-redistribution thallium SPECT. Tissue viability was detected in 65 and 31% of dyssynergic segments by rest-redistribution thallium SPECT and low-dose dobutamine echocardiography, respectively (p < 0.001). The agreement between the two techniques was 48%. Low-dose dobutamine echocardiography is more accurate than rest-redistribution thallium SPECT for predicting 3 month wall motion improvement in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction, mainly due to its significantly better specificity.

  4. Assessment of myocardial viability by dynamic tomographic iodine 123 iodophenylpentadecanoic acid imaging: comparison with rest-redistribution thallium 201 imaging.

    PubMed

    Iskandrian, A S; Powers, J; Cave, V; Wasserleben, V; Cassell, D; Heo, J

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the ability of dynamic 123I-labeled iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) imaging to detect myocardial viability in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction caused by coronary artery disease. Serial 180-degree single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images (five sets, 8 minutes each) were obtained starting 4 minutes after injection of 2 to 6 mCi 123I at rest in 21 patients with LV dysfunction (ejection fraction [EF] 34% +/- 11%). The segmental uptake was compared with that of rest-redistribution 201Tl images (20 segments/study). The number of perfusion defects (reversible and fixed) was similar by IPPA and thallium (11 +/- 5 vs 10 +/- 5 segments/patient; difference not significant). There was agreement between IPPA and thallium for presence or absence (kappa = 0.78 +/- 0.03) and nature (reversible, mild fixed, or severe fixed) of perfusion defects (kappa = 0.54 +/- 0.04). However, there were more reversible IPPA defects than reversible thallium defects (7 +/- 4 vs 3 +/- 4 segments/patient; p = 0.001). In 14 patients the EF (by gated pool imaging) improved after coronary revascularization from 33% +/- 11% to 39% +/- 12% (p = 0.002). The number of reversible IPPA defects was greater in the seven patients who had improvement in EF than in the patients without such improvement (10 +/- 4 vs 5 +/- 4 segments/patient; p = 0.075). 123I-labeled IPPA SPECT imaging is a promising new technique for assessment of viability. Reversible defects predict recovery of LV dysfunction after coronary revascularization.

  5. Thallium-201 scintigraphy in the diagnosis and management of myocardial sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, C.L.; Ossorio, M.A.; Roy, T.M.

    1990-03-01

    We have described three patients with clinical evidence of myocardial sarcoidosis to illustrate the utility of thallium-201 scintigraphy in demonstrating the myocardial lesions. Both the symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals studied showed the characteristic reverse redistribution phenomenon. No abnormalities were seen during the exercise phase of the thallium study, but myocardial defects were detected in each patient when repeat studies were obtained at rest six hours later. Steroid therapy resolved the defects in each case. We propose thallium-201 scintigraphy of the heart as a safe and useful tool for documenting myocardial involvement in sarcoidosis and following the effects of therapy.

  6. Reversibility by dipyridamole of thallium-201 myocardial scan defects in patients with sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tellier, P.; Paycha, F.; Antony, I.

    1988-08-01

    In order to clarify the significance of anginal pain and myocardial thallium-201 scan defects in cardiac sarcoidosis, the pharmacologic effect of dipyridamole on myocardial perfusion was assessed by planar thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in patients with sarcoidosis. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was performed at rest and after 0.56 mg/kg intravenous dipyridamole during four minutes in 16 patients with sarcoidosis. The myocardial scan (45-degree and 70-degree left anterior oblique, and anterior views) was divided into 15 segments. Results were evaluated by the number of segmental defects and with a global perfusion score (from 0 to 60) by a semi-quantitative index depending on themore » size and severity of myocardial thallium-201 defects. Thirteen of the 16 patients showed partial or total reversion of their thallium-201 defects on redistribution scanning either at rest or after dipyridamole. The mean (+/- SD) number of myocardial perfusion defects that were present in all the patients decreased from 5.31 +/- 1.78 at rest to 3.25 +/- 2.52 after redistribution (p less than 0.001) and to 2.19 +/- 2.10 after dipyridamole (p less than 0.001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 53.2 +/- 3.0 at rest to 56.2 +/- 2.9 after redistribution (p less than 0.001) and to 57.2 +/- 2.7 after dipyridamole (p less than 0.001). A significant correlation (r = 0.82, p less than 0.001) was found between the increase of global perfusion score on redistribution and after dipyridamole. The reversibility of myocardial scan defects is a common finding in sarcoidosis. It makes unlikely the role of scar fibrosis or extensive confluent granulomas as a mechanism for such defects. The effect of dipyridamole suggests the presence of reversible disorders lying at the coronary microvascular level.« less

  7. A look at 15 years of planar thallium-201 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.

    1989-09-01

    Extensive experience has been accumulated over the past 15 years regarding planar thallium-201 imaging. Quantitation of technically superior images provides a high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CAD. In addition, planar thallium-201 images provide very important prognostic information in different clinical situations. Although single photon emission computerized tomography offers potential theoretical advantages over planar imaging, because of the problems involved in reconstruction, specifically the creation of artifacts, it may not be the ideal imaging modality in all situations. Good quality planar thallium-201 imaging still has an important role in clinical cardiology today. 144 references.

  8. [The development of a computer model in the quantitative assessment of thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Raineri, M; Traina, M; Rotolo, A; Candela, B; Lombardo, R M; Raineri, A A

    1993-05-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy is a widely used noninvasive procedure for the detection and prognostic assessment of patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease. Thallium uptake can be evaluated by a visual analysis or by a quantitative interpretation. Quantitative scintigraphy enhances disease detection in individual coronary arteries, provides a more precise estimate of the amount of ischemic myocardium, distinguishing scar from hypoperfused tissue. Due to the great deal of data, analysis, interpretation and comparison of thallium uptake can be very complex. We designed a computer-based system for the interpretation of quantitative thallium-201 scintigraphy data uptake. We used a database (DataEase 4.2-DataEase Italia). Our software has the following functions: data storage; calculation; conversion of numerical data into different definitions classifying myocardial perfusion; uptake data comparison; automatic conclusion; comparison of different scintigrams for the same patient. Our software is made up by 4 sections: numeric analysis, descriptive analysis, automatic conclusion, clinical remarks. We introduced in the computer system appropriate information, "logical paths", that use the "IF ... THEN" rules. The software executes these rules in order to analyze the myocardial regions in the 3 phases of scintigraphic analysis (stress, redistribution, re-injection), in the 3 projections (LAO 45 degrees, LAT,ANT), considering our uptake cutoff, obtaining, finally, the automatic conclusions. For these reasons, our computer-based system could be considered a real "expert system".

  9. The value and throughput of rest Thallium-201/stress Technetium -99m sestamibi dual-isotope myocardial SPECT.

    PubMed

    Okudan, Berna; Smitherman, Thomas C

    2004-06-01

    Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is an established method in cardiology for the diagnosis and evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD). Thallium-201 and Tc-99m sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging has been widely accepted as non-invasive diagnostic procedure for detection of CAD, risk stratification and myocardial viability assessment. But, standard Tl-201 redistribution and same day or 2-day rest/stress Tc-99m sestamibi protocols are time-consuming. Hence, the dual isotope rest thallium-201/stress technetium-99m sestamibi gated single-photon emission tomography protocol has gained increasing popularity for these applications. Combining the use of thallium-201 with technetium-99m agents permits optimal image resolution and simultaneous assessment of viability. Dual-isotope imaging may be separate or simultaneous acquisition set-up. The more rapid completion of these studies is appreciated as an advantage by patients, technologists, interpreting and referring physicians, nurses and hospital management. Simultaneous imaging has the potential advantages of precise pixel registration and artifacts, if present, are identical in both thallium and sestamibi, and require only one set of imaging. Also, there are some disadvantages of spillover of activity from the Tc-99m to the Tl-201 window. Fortunately, despite this problem it can be overcome. Separate acquisition dual isotope also has some disadvantages. Difference in defect resolution in attenuation and scatter between T-201 and Tc-99m sestamibi potentially results in interpretation problems. But, studies about cost-effectiveness of dual isotope imaging showed that some selective elimination of the rest studies may decrease the cost of the nuclear procedures and should be considered in the current care health system.

  10. AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma: findings on thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Rosen, M.P.; Baum, A.

    1988-12-01

    No simple, noninvasive method is available for evaluating extracutaneous Kaposi sarcoma in AIDS patients or for following the tumor's response to treatment. We report our preliminary experience with thallium-201 scintigraphy in nine AIDS patients with proved Kaposi sarcoma. Eight of the nine had abnormal uptake of the radionuclide in skin, lymph nodes, oral cavity, vagina, and lungs. Only four of the nine had cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma at the time of scanning. All cutaneous and mucosal lesions were thallium avid. Two of the six patients with thallium-avid nodes underwent nodal biopsy. Both biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of Kaposi sarcoma. Cutaneous Kaposimore » sarcoma developed later in one of these patients, showing the efficacy of thallium scintigraphy for the early detection of extracutaneous lesions. These preliminary results show thallium avidity in Kaposi sarcoma involving the skin and various extracutaneous sites (lymph nodes, lung, mucosa, and vagina). Thallium scintigraphy is a potentially useful procedure for detecting extracutaneous Kaposi sarcoma in AIDS patients.« less

  11. Evaluation of muscular lesions in connective tissue diseases: thallium 201 muscular scans

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, G.; Guillet, J.; Sanciaume, C.

    1988-04-01

    We performed thallium 201 muscle scans to assess muscular involvement in 40 patients with different connective tissue diseases (7 with dermatomyositis, 7 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 12 with progressive systemic scleroderma, 2 with calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome, 3 with monomelic scleroderma, 6 with morphea, and 3 with Raynaud's disease). Only 12 of these patients complained of fatigability and/or myalgia. Electromyography was performed and serum levels of muscle enzymes were measured in all patients. Comparison of thallium 201 exercise recording with the other tests revealed that scan sensitivity is greater than electromyographic and serum musclemore » enzymes levels. Thallium 201 scans showed abnormal findings in 32 patients and revealed subclinical lesions in 18 patients, while electromyography findings were abnormal in 25 of these 32 patients. Serum enzyme levels were raised in only 8 patients. Thallium 201 scanning proved to be a useful guide for modifying therapy when laboratory data were conflicting. It was useful to evaluate treatment efficacy. Because our data indicate a 100% positive predictive value, we believe that thallium 201 scanning should be advised for severe systemic connective tissue diseases with discordant test results.« less

  12. Exercise testing and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the clinical evaluation of patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Poyatos, M.E.; Suarez, L.; Lerman, J.

    1986-10-01

    In 58 patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome (WPW), we performed exercise stress testing in order to investigate the incidence of normalization of the auriculo-ventricular conduction and the ST-segment changes. For a more accurate evaluation of the latter, exercise and redistribution radionuclide images with Thallium-201 were obtained in 18 cases. Forty-nine had type A and nine had type B of WPW. Forty-eight had permanent, four had alternant and six had no pre-excitation (PE) when they started the test. Mean maximal functional capacity, mean maximal heart rate and mean maximal double product were not different when compared to an age-matched controlmore » group. Of the 48 patients who began the test with PE, in 23 (48%) it disappeared while PE persisted in 25 (52%). In 16 cases the disappearance of the PE was sudden and in seven it was progressive. Pre-excitation persisted in 39.5% of patients with type A and in 88.8% with type B (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression was observed in 76.6% of patients with PE and in 28.6% of cases without PE (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression occurred in 44.8% of patients with type A and in 100% of cases with type B (p less than 0.05). Transient abnormal Thallium-201 scans were observed in 62.5% of patients without PE and in 20% with PE. No patients showed exertional arrhythmias. This study suggests the possibility of measuring the duration of the refractory period of the accessory pathway in those patients n which the PE disappears suddenly, at a given heart rate.« less

  13. Revision of gonadal radiation dose to man from thallium-201

    SciTech Connect

    Hosain, P.; Hosain, F.

    1981-06-01

    Thallium-201 as thallous chloride is now routinely used for myocardial imaging. We observed a biological translocation of T1-201 leading to a gradual increase in the concentration of radioactivity in the testes which facilitated testicular imaging. The initial distribution of intravenously injected tracer dose is greatly dependent on the distribution of cardiac output, but its metabolic fate is analogous to the potassium ion. We have extensively studied the kinetics of thallium in rats, and also carried out limited comparative studies in different species. An attempt was also made to compare the uptake values that could be obtained in dogs by quantitativemore » imaging and by autopsy. Separation of scrotum, epididymis and testes revealed that the increase in uptake occurred predominantly in the testes. The uptake increased with time for about 1 day, and after 2 days it declined with a biological half-life of approximately 2 days. The later phase of testicular clearance was similar to the rate of clearance from other organs. The testicular uptake of T1-201 was highest in rats: the initial value at 10 to 15 min was 0.48 +- 0.09% of the injected dose which increased to 1.77 +- 0.20% by 1 day. The initial uptake in mice was low (0.18 +- 0.06%) but it increased to about 4 folds by 1 day. Values in human, extrapolated from limited quantitative imaging, was similar to mice. These studies indicated the need for the revision of the gonadal radiation dose to man. Calculations show, contrary to the accepted value of about 0.5 rads/mCi, an approximate value of 1.5 rads/mCi is more realistic.« less

  14. Thallium-201 per rectum for the diagnosis of cirrhosis in patients with asymptomatic chronic hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    D'Arienzo, A.; Celentano, L.; Scuotto, A.

    1988-07-01

    In normal subjects, thallium-201, administered per rectum, is taken up mainly by the liver (heart/liver ratio in normal subjects: 0.04 to 0.12). It has been claimed that an increased heart/liver ratio is suggestive of portal-caval shunting and portal hypertension. To evaluate the possibility of using thallium-201 as a test to diagnose cirrhosis, we administered this substance per rectum to 33 patients with biochemical evidence, but no clinical symptoms, of liver disease. Laparoscopy and liver biopsy revealed chronic active hepatitis without cirrhosis in 18 patients, and chronic active hepatitis with cirrhosis in the others. The results of conventional liver function testsmore » were similar in both groups. A significant difference, however, was found between the means of fasting serum bile acid concentrations (9.8 +/- 3.2 and 18.3 +/- 4.2 microM per liter) in chronic active hepatitis without cirrhosis and cirrhotic patients, and between the means of the heart/liver ratios 20 min after thallium-201 administration (heart/liver: 0.09 +/- 0.03 and 0.54 +/- 0.13, respectively). Unlike the serum bile acid concentration which gave some overlapping values, the thallium-201 test clearly distinguished the chronic active hepatitis without cirrhosis group from the cirrhotics. In the cirrhotic group, there was a significant correlation between the heart/liver ratio and signs of portal hypertension such as esophageal varices, increased diameter of the vena porta and hypersplenism. The thallium-201 test is therefore useful in discriminating between chronic active hepatitis with and without cirrhosis in clinically asymptomatic subjects with biochemical evidence of moderate liver function impairment. A heart/liver uptake ratio much higher than normal (above 0.30) strongly suggests the development of hepatic cirrhosis.« less

  15. Myocardial contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma as evaluated by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, L.; Rouby, J.J.; Viars, P.

    1988-07-01

    Fifty five patients suffering from blunt chest trauma were studied to assess the diagnosis of myocardial contusion using thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy. Thirty-eight patients had consistent scintigraphic defects and were considered to have a myocardial contusion. All patients with scintigraphic defects had paroxysmal arrhythmias and/or ECG abnormalities. Of 38 patients, 32 had localized ST-T segment abnormalities; 29, ST-T segment abnormalities suggesting involvement of the same cardiac area as scintigraphic defects; 21, echocardiographic abnormalities. Sixteen patients had segmental hypokinesia involving the same cardiac area as the scintigraphic defects. Fifteen patients had clinical signs suggestive of myocardial contusion and scintigraphic defects. Almostmore » 70 percent of patients with blunt chest trauma had scintigraphic defects related to areas of myocardial contusion. When thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy directly showed myocardial lesion, two-dimensional echocardiography and standard ECG detected related functional consequences of cardiac trauma.« less

  16. Prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy in patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.; Russo, D.J.; Russo, D.

    The prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy was evaluated in patients with a chest pain syndrome. The prevalence of cardiac events during follow-up was related to the pretest (that is, before stress scintigraphy) likelihood of coronary artery disease determined on the basis of symptoms, age, sex and stress electrocardiography. In a consecutive series of 344 patients who had adequate thallium-201 stress scintigrams, 95 had unequivocally normal studies by quantitative analysis. The pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease in the 95 patients had a bimodal distribution. During a mean follow-up period of 22 +/- 3 months, no patientmore » died. Three patients (3%) had a cardiac event: two of these patients (pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease 54 and 94%) had a nonfatal myocardial infarction 8 and 22 months, respectively, after stress scintigraphy, and one patient (pretest likelihood 98%) underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty 16 months after stress scintigraphy for persisting anginal complaints. Three patients were lost to follow-up; all three had a low pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease. It is concluded that patients with chest pain and normal findings on quantitative thallium-201 scintigraphy have an excellent prognosis. Cardiac events are rare (infarction rate 1% per year) and occur in patients with a moderate to high pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease.« less

  17. Qualitative evaluation of coronary flow during anesthetic induction using thallium-201 perfusion scans

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, B.; Henkin, R.E.; Glisson, S.N.

    Qualitative distribution of coronary flow using thallium-201 perfusion scans immediately postintubation was studied in 22 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass surgery. Ten patients received a thiopental (4 mg/kg) and halothane induction. Twelve patients received a fentanyl (100 micrograms/kg) induction. Baseline thallium-201 perfusion scans were performed 24 h prior to surgery. These scans were compared with the scans performed postintubation. A thallium-positive scan was accepted as evidence of relative hypoperfusion. Baseline hemodynamic and ECG data were obtained prior to induction of anesthesia. These data were compared with the data obtained postintubation. Ten patients developed postintubation thallium-perfusion scan defects (thallium-positivemore » scan), even though there was no statistical difference between their baseline hemodynamics and hemodynamics at the time of intubation. There was no difference in the incidence of thallium-positive scans between those patients anesthetized by fentanyl and those patients anesthetized with thiopental-halothane. The authors conclude that relative hypoperfusion, and possibly ischemia, occurred in 45% of patients studied, despite stable hemodynamics, and that the incidence of these events was the same with two different anesthetic techniques.« less

  18. Exercise thallium-201 perfusion scintigraphy in the assessment of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmarian, J.J.; Verani, M.S.

    1991-05-21

    Exercise thallium-201 perfusion scintigraphy has been used extensively over the last decade for the detection and localization of coronary artery disease. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a refinement of presently available techniques, offering improved identification over planar imaging of individual vessel stenosis and quantification of the extent of abnormally perfused myocardium. In this review, the planar and SPECT techniques are discussed in light of the most recently published large patient series, and with regard to the many factors that affect the sensitivity and specificity of perfusion imaging in identifying coronary artery disease. The clinical implications of exercise perfusion scintigraphymore » and its future applications in cardiology practice are discussed.67 references.« less

  19. Patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can safely undergo intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, J; Simbartl, L; Render, M L; Snow, E; Chaney, C; Nishiyama, H; Rauf, G C; Wexler, L F

    1998-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are usually excluded from intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 testing. We developed a nurse-administered protocol to screen and pretreat patients so they could be safely tested. We prospectively screened patients referred for intravenous dipyridamole thallium testing and retrospectively reviewed a comparison group of patients who had undergone intravenous dipyridamole testing before our bronchospasm protocol. We studied 492 consecutive patients referred for intravenous dipyridamole thallium testing, separating those with complete data (n = 451) into two groups: group A (n = 72), patients assessed to be at risk for intravenous dipyridamole-induced bronchospasm who received our bronchospasm treatment protocol; and group B (n = 379), patients assessed to be free of risk, who did not receive our bronchospasm protocol. Group C (n = 89) was a retrospective comparison group of patients who had undergone intravenous dipyridamole testing before initiation of the protocol. Patients were considered at risk for an adverse event if any of the following were present: peak flow < or =400 ml at the time of the test (spirometry by nurse) that increased to >400 ml after bronchodilator treatment, wheezing audible with stethoscope, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma or dyspnea on exertion at less than four blocks, or resting respiratory rate >18 breaths/min. The test was considered contraindicated if resting oxygen saturation was <85%, respiratory rate < or =36 breaths/min, or peak flow measured by peak flowmeter <400 ml after bronchodilator inhalant (albuterol or metaproterenol sulfate by spacer) at a dose of up to six puffs. One minute after injections of thallium-201, patients at risk were given 50 mg aminophylline by slow intravenous injection. We looked for major and minor adverse effects and divided them into three categories: (1) minor events (transient headache, abdominal discomfort, or nausea

  20. Relationship between regional myocardial blood flow and thallium-201 distribution in the presence of coronary artery stenosis and dipyridamole-induced vasodilation.

    PubMed Central

    Mays, A E; Cobb, F R

    1984-01-01

    This study assesses the relationship between the distribution of thallium-201 and myocardial blood flow during coronary vasodilation induced by intravenous dipyridamole in canine models of partial and complete coronary artery stenosis. 10 dogs were chronically instrumented with catheters in the left atrium and aorta and with a balloon occluder and electromagnetic flow probe on the proximal left circumflex coronary artery. Regional myocardial blood flow was measured during control conditions with radioisotope-labeled microspheres, and the phasic reactive hyperemic response to a 20-s transient occlusion was then recorded. Dipyridamole was then infused intravenously until phasic coronary blood flow increased to match peak hyperemic values. The left circumflex coronary artery was either partially occluded to reduce phasic blood flow to control values (group 1) or it was completely occluded (group 2), and thallium-201 and a second microsphere label were injected. 5 min later, the animals were sacrificed, the left ventricle was sectioned into 1-2-g samples, and thallium-201 activity and regional myocardial blood flow were measured. Curvilinear regression analyses between thallium-201 localization and myocardial blood flow during dipyridamole infusion demonstrated a slightly better fit to a second- as compared with a first-order model, indicating a slight roll-off of thallium activity as myocardial blood flow increases. During the dipyridamole infusion, the increases in phasic blood flow, the distributions of regional myocardial blood flow, and the relationships between thallium-201 localization and regional blood flow were comparable to values previously observed in exercising dogs with similar occlusions. These data provide basic validation that supports the use of intravenous dipyridamole and thallium-201 as an alternative to exercise stress and thallium-201 for evaluating the effects of coronary occlusive lesions on the distribution of regional myocardial blood flow

  1. Myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201: correlation with coronary arteriography and electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonard; Wald, Robert W.; Feiglin, David H.I.; Morch, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201 and electrocardiography with the subject at rest and undergoing submaximal treadmill exercise were performed in 19 men and 3 women. Selective coronary arteriography and left ventriculography showed that 7 had normal coronary arteries and 15 had coronary artery disease. The 11 persons with electrocardiographic evidence of an old myocardial infarct (q waves) had a perfusion defect at rest in the area of the infarct and a segmental abnormality of wall motion apparent on the left ventriculogram corresponding to the perfusion defect. Myocardial perfusion imaging and electrocardiography were equally sensitive in detecting coronary artery disease in exercising individuals: perfusion defects were noted in 7 of the 15 persons with coronary artery disease, and diagnostic ST-segment depression was present in 8 of the 15. Combination of the results of the two tests with exercise permitted the identification of 11 of the 15 persons and improved the sensitivity. Combination of the results of rest and exercise imaging and electrocardiography permitted the identification of 94% of the patients with coronary artery disease. Myocardial perfusion imaging with 201TI in the subject at rest is a sensitive indicator of previous myocardial infarction. Imaging after the subject has exercised is a useful adjunct to conventional exercise electrocardiography, especially in those whose exercise electrocardiogram is non-interpretable. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:630487

  2. Thallium-201 for cardiac stress tests: residual radioactivity worries patients and security.

    PubMed

    Geraci, Matthew J; Brown, Norman; Murray, David

    2012-12-01

    A 47-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department (ED) in duress and stated he was "highly radioactive." There were no reports of nuclear disasters, spills, or mishaps in the local area. This report discusses the potential for thallium-201 (Tl-201) patients to activate passive radiation alarms days to weeks after nuclear stress tests, even while shielded inside industrial vehicles away from sensors. Characteristics of Tl-201, as used for medical imaging, are described. This patient was twice detained by Homeland Security Agents and searched after he activated radiation detectors at a seaport security checkpoint. Security agents deemed him not to be a threat, but they expressed concern regarding his health and level of personal radioactivity. The patient was subsequently barred from his job and sent to the hospital. Tl-201 is a widely used radioisotope for medical imaging. The radioactive half-life of Tl-201 is 73.1h, however, reported periods of extended personal radiation have been seen as far out as 61 days post-administration. This case describes an anxious, but otherwise asymptomatic patient presenting to the ED with detection of low-level personal radiation. Documentation should be provided to and carried by individuals receiving radionuclides for a minimum of five to six half-lives of the longest-lasting isotope provided. Patients receiving Tl-201 should understand the potential for security issues; reducing probable tense moments, confusion, and anxiety to themselves, their employers, security officials, and ED staff. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. IQ-SPECT for thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging: effect of normal databases on quantification.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Takahiro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Okuda, Koichi; Yoneyama, Hiroto; Matsuo, Shinro; Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Kinuya, Seigo

    2017-07-01

    Although IQ-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides rapid acquisition and attenuation-corrected images, the unique technology may create characteristic distribution different from the conventional imaging. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of IQ-SPECT using Japanese normal databases (NDBs) with that of the conventional SPECT for thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). A total of 36 patients underwent 1-day 201 Tl adenosine stress-rest MPI. Images were acquired with IQ-SPECT at approximately one-quarter of the standard time of conventional SPECT. Projection data acquired with the IQ-SPECT system were reconstructed via an ordered subset conjugate gradient minimizer method with or without scatter and attenuation correction (SCAC). Projection data obtained using the conventional SPECT were reconstructed via a filtered back projection method without SCAC. The summed stress score (SSS) was calculated using NDBs created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group, and scores were compared between IQ-SPECT and conventional SPECT using the acquisition condition-matched NDBs. The diagnostic performance of the methods for the detection of coronary artery disease was also compared. SSSs were 6.6 ± 8.2 for the conventional SPECT, 6.6 ± 9.4 for IQ-SPECT without SCAC, and 6.5 ± 9.7 for IQ-SPECT with SCAC (p = n.s. for each comparison). The SSS showed a strong positive correlation between conventional SPECT and IQ-SPECT (r = 0.921 and p < 0.0001), and the correlation between IQ-SPECT with and without SCAC was also good (r = 0.907 and p < 0.0001). Regarding diagnostic performance, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 80.8, 78.9, and 79.4%, respectively, for the conventional SPECT; 80.8, 80.3, and 82.0%, respectively, for IQ-SPECT without SCAC; and 88.5, 86.8, and 87.3%, respectively, for IQ-SPECT with SCAC, respectively. The area under the curve obtained via receiver operating

  4. Cardiac phase-synchronized myocardial thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography using list mode data acquisition and iterative tomographic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Vemmer, T; Steinbüchel, C; Bertram, J; Eschner, W; Kögler, A; Luig, H

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether data acquisition in the list mode and iterative tomographic reconstruction would render feasible cardiac phase-synchronized thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography (SPET) of the myocardium under routine conditions without modifications in tracer dose, acquisition time, or number of steps of the a gamma camera. Seventy non-selected patients underwent 201T1 SPET imaging according to a routine protocol (74 MBq/2 mCi 201T1, 180 degrees rotation of the gamma camera, 32 steps, 30 min). Gamma camera data, ECG, and a time signal were recorded in list mode. The cardiac cycle was divided into eight phases, the end-diastolic phase encompassing the QRS complex, and the end-systolic phase the T wave. Both phase- and non-phase-synchronized tomograms based on the same list mode data were reconstructed iteratively. Phase-synchronized and non-synchronized images were compared. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether or not coronary artery disease had been definitely diagnosed prior to SPET imaging. The numbers of patients in both groups demonstrating defects visible on the phase-synchronized but not on the non-synchronized images were compared. It was found that both postexercise and redistribution phase tomograms were suited for interpretation. The changes from end-diastolic to end-systolic images allowed a comparative assessment of regional wall motility and tracer uptake. End-diastolic tomograms provided the best definition of defects. Additional defects not apparent on non-synchronized images were visible in 40 patients, six of whom did not show any defect on the non-synchronized images. Of 42 patients in whom coronary artery disease had been definitely diagnosed, 19 had additional defects not visible on the non-synchronized images, in comparison to 21 of 28 in whom coronary artery disease was suspected (P < 0.02; chi 2). It is concluded that cardiac phase-synchronized 201T1 SPET of the myocardium was

  5. Normal results of post-race thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging in marathon runners with elevated serum MB creatine kinase levels

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, A.J.; Silverman, L.M.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-10-01

    Elevated cardiac enzyme values in asymptomatic marathon runners after competition can arise from skeletal muscle through exertional rhabdomyolysis, silent injury to the myocardium, or a combined tissue source. Peak post-race levels of the MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase are similar to values in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Previously reported normal results of infarct-avid myocardial scintigraphy with technetium 99m pyrophosphate in runners after competition suggest a non-cardiac source but cannot exclude silent injury to the myocardium. Therefore, thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in runners immediately after competition together with determination of sequential cardiac enzyme levels. Among 15 runnersmore » tested, the average peak in serum MB creatine kinase 24 hours after the race was 128 IU/liter with a cumulative MB creatine kinase release of 117 IU/liter; these values are comparable to those in patients with acute transmural myocardial infarction. Thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphic results were normal in five runners randomly selected from those who volunteered for determination of sequential blood levels. It is concluded that elevations of serum MB creatine kinase in marathon runners arise from a skeletal muscle source and that thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy is useful to assess runners for myocardial injury when clinical questions arise.« less

  6. Exercise thallium-201 tomographic scintigraphy in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease: emphasis on the effect of exercise level.

    PubMed

    Huang, P J; Chieng, P U; Lee, Y T; Chiang, F T; Tseng, Y Z; Liau, C S; Tseng, C D; Su, C T; Lien, W P

    1992-11-01

    Exercise thallium-201 imaging using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was evaluated in 154 patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease (CAD) and in 25 normal subjects. Of the 154 patients with CAD, 134 (87%) had abnormal thallium images. By contrast, only 77 (50%) patients had ischemic ST-segment depression (p < 0.001). Among 25 normal subjects, 20 had normal exercise SPECT images. The specificity of exercise SPECT imaging (80% or 20/25) in excluding patients with CAD was not significantly higher than that of exercise electrocardiography (76% or 19/25). For the detection of individual vessel involvement by analysis of territories of perfusion abnormalities, the sensitivity and specificity of exercise SPECT were 72% and 96% for the left anterior descending, 78% and 85% for the right coronary, and 47% and 98% for the left circumflex artery. Ninety (group 1) of the 154 patients with CAD achieved adequate exercise end points (ischemic ST-segment depression or > 85% of maximal predicted heart rate) and 64 (group 2) did not. Exercise SPECT showed significantly more perfusion abnormalities in group 1 than in group 2 (96% vs 75%, p < 0.001). We conclude that: (1) exercise SPECT thallium imaging is more sensitive than exercise electrocardiography for detecting patients with CAD; (2) the sensitivity of the test is affected by the level of exercise; and (3) it is valuable in the identification of individual vessel involvement.

  7. [Diagnosis of myocardial infarction by cine MR imaging--a comparative study with thallium-201 myocardial SPECT].

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, H

    1993-01-25

    The usefulness of cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated in 41 patients with acute (4 cases), subacute (21 cases) and chronic (16 cases) myocardial infarctions on the basis of the findings of thallium-201 myocardial SPECT. The overall rate of diagnostic accordance between cine MR imaging and SPECT was 85.0% (408/480). It was highest at the middle of the left ventricle (89.0%, 146/164) and lowest at the base (82.7%, 129/156). Measurement of wall thickness using the images printed on films was possible in 87.1% of segments (418/480). There was a significant difference in end-diastolic wall thickness and %-thickening between the infarcted and non-infarcted sites except for the base of the left ventricle. However, diastolic wall thinning was not remarkable in acute cases of less than one week after onset. In these cases %-thickening may be useful. Partial volume averaging on MR imaging and the inaccuracy of SPECT findings at the base also made meaningful comparison difficult. The most important diagnostic findings of myocardial infarction on cine MR imaging were end-diastolic wall thinning and abnormal motion such as akinesis and dyskinesis. It is concluded that cine MR imaging is a useful noninvasive examination method for evaluating the status of cardiac function in myocardial infarction.

  8. Relation between thallium-201/iodine 123-BMIPP subtraction and fluorine 18 deoxyglucose polar maps in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Hasegawa, S; Yamaguchi, H; Yoshioka, J; Uehara, T; Nishimura, T

    2000-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown discrepancies in the distribution of thallium-201 and iodine 123-beta-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Myocardial uptake of fluorine 18 deoxyglucose (FDG) is increased in the hypertrophic area in HCM. We examined whether the distribution of a Tl-201/BMIPP subtraction polar map correlates with that of an FDG polar map. We normalized to maximum count each Tl-201 and BMIPP bull's-eye polar map of 6 volunteers and obtained a standard Tl-201/BMIPP subtraction polar map by subtracting a normalized BMIPP bull's-eye polar map from a normalized Tl-201 bull's-eye polar map. The Tl-201/BMIPP subtraction polar map was then applied to 8 patients with HCM (mean age 65+/-12 years) to evaluate the discrepancy between Tl-201 and BMIPP distribution. We compared the Tl-201/BMIPP subtraction polar map with an FDG polar map. In patients with HCM, the Tl-201/BMIPP subtraction polar map showed a focal uptake pattern in the hypertrophic area similar to that of the FDG polar map. By quantitative analysis, the severity score of the Tl-201/BMIPP subtraction polar map was significantly correlated with the percent dose uptake of the FDG polar map. These results suggest that this new quantitative method may be an alternative to FDG positron emission tomography for the routine evaluation of HCM.

  9. Zone plate method for electronic holographic display using resolution redistribution technique.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Junya

    2011-07-18

    The resolution redistribution (RR) technique can increase the horizontal viewing-zone angle and screen size of electronic holographic display. The present study developed a zone plate method that would reduce hologram calculation time for the RR technique. This method enables calculation of an image displayed on a spatial light modulator by performing additions of the zone plates, while the previous calculation method required performing the Fourier transform twice. The derivation and modeling of the zone plate are shown. In addition, the look-up table approach was introduced for further reduction in computation time. Experimental verification using a holographic display module based on the RR technique is presented.

  10. Myocardial infarction size and location: a comparative study of epicardial isopotential mapping, thallium-201 scintigraphy, electrocardiography and vectorcardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Toyama, S.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, T.

    1987-07-01

    Based on epicardial isopotential mapping (the Ep Map), which was calculated from body surface isopotential mapping (the Body Map) with Yamashita's method, using the finite element technique, we predicted the location and size of the abnormal depolarized area (the infarcted area) in 19 clinical cases of anterior and 18 cases of inferoposterior infarction. The prediction was done using Toyama's diagnostic method, previously reported. The accuracy of the prediction by the Ep Map was assessed by comparing it with findings from thallium-201 scintigraphy (SCG), electrocardiography (ECG) and vectorcardiography (VCG). In all cases of anterior infarction, the location of the abnormal depolarizedmore » areas determined on the Ep Map, which was localized at the anterior wall along the anterior intraventricular septum, agreed with the location of the abnormal findings obtained by SCG, ECG and VCG. For all inferoposterior infarction cases, the abnormal depolarized areas were localized at the posterior wall and the location also coincided with that of the abnormal findings obtained by SCG, ECG and VCG. Furthermore, we ranked and ordered the size of the abnormal depolarized areas, which were predicted by the Ep Map for both anterior and inferoposterior infarction cases. In the cases of anterior infarction, the order of the size of the abnormal depolarized area by the Ep Map was correlated to the size of the abnormal findings by SCG, as well as to the results from Selvester's QRS scoring system in ECG and to the angle of the maximum QRS vector in the horizontal plane in VCG.« less

  11. Detection of right ventricular pressure overloading by thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy. Results in 57 patients with chronic respiratory diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzenblum, E.; Moyses, B.; Dickele, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The diagnostic value of thallium 201 (/sup 201/Tl) myocardial imaging was studied in 57 patients with chronic respiratory diseases, most with COPD (n . 46), by comparing the results to hemodynamic findings. In healthy subjects, the right ventricle (RV) is not visualized; therefore, any recorded activity of the RV was considered as indicating RV hypertrophy due to RV pressure overloading (RVPO). RV activity was graded from 0 (no activity) to 3 (activity greater than or equal to that of the left ventricle). Patients were divided into three groups according to the level of the pulmonary artery mean pressure (PPA): PPAmore » less than or equal to 20 mm Hg (no pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) ) . group 1, n . 20; PPA ranging from 21 to 30 mm Hg (mild to moderate PAH) . group 2, n . 20; PPA greater than 30 mm Hg (marked PAH) . group 3, n . 17. RV was visualized in 14 patients in group 3 (82 percent) and in 13 patients in group 2 (65 percent). For all patients with PAH (2 + 3) the sensitivity of /sup 201/Tl imaging for the diagnosis of RVPO was of 73 percent, higher than that of ECG and echocardiography (both 51 percent). The sensitivity of /sup 201/Tl, even if moderate (65 percent) was better than that of ECG (30 percent) or echo (40 percent) in patients with mild-to-moderate PAH (group 2). A high RV activity (grade 3) was observed in only three patients. The specificity of this method (obtained from results in group 1) was of 80 percent vs 89 percent for echo and 100 percent for ECG. These results suggest that 201Tl myocardial imaging is a rather sensitive method and could be of interest for the noninvasive diagnosis of RVPO in COPD patients.« less

  12. Visualisation of exercise-induced ischaemia of the right ventricle by thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, J.; Takeishi, Y.; Abe, S.; Tomoike, H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Exercise thallium-201 (201T1) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been used to detect potential ischaemia in the left ventricular myocardium but not in the right ventricle. The purpose of this study was to establish the clinical usefulness of a right ventricular polar map of 201T1 SPECT for visualisation of exercise-induced right ventricular ischaemia. METHODS: Myocardial 201T1 SPECT was obtained immediately after treadmill exercise in 97 patients with suspected coronary artery disease. A region of interest was placed over the right ventricle (RV) on post-stress transaxial images. Short axis images of this region were generated and reconstructed as a bull's eye polar map. Normal ranges of RV 201T1 uptake were determined in 12 patients with normal coronary arteries. Scintigraphic criteria for identifying RV perfusion abnormality were derived from 25 patients with right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis greater than 75%. These criteria were applied to 60 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease. RESULTS: Perfusion defects in the RV were larger in patients with proximal RCA stenosis than in those with distal RCA stenosis (mean (SD) 28 (16)% v 6 (5)%, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the RV polar map for the detection of proximal RCA stenosis were 67% (8/12) and 98% (47/48), respectively. RV perfusion defects became undetectable in 9 patients who had successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty to a proximal RCA lesion. CONCLUSIONS: A right ventricular polar map display was useful for visualising exercise-induced right ventricular ischaemia. Images PMID:9038692

  13. Nuclear cardiology. I - Radionuclide angiographic assessment of left ventricular contraction: uses, limitations and future directions. II - The role of myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 in diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenheimer, M.M.; Banka, V.S.; Helfant, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of radionuclide angiography is reviewed. First pass and gated equilibrium methods for determining left ventricular contraction are compared. Some clinical applications of radionuclide angiography are then examined, including the detection of discrete versus diffuse asynergy and the assessment of myocardial infarction. The second part of this work reviews the uses and limitations of thallium-201 perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of the acute and chronic manifestations of coronary heart disease. Theoretical and technical considerations of thallium-201 imaging are reviewed along with the clinical implications of the technique.

  14. Myocardial perfusion imaging with technetium-99m SQ30217: Comparison with thallium-201 and coronary anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W.; Johnson, L.L.; Blood, D.K.

    1989-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion in ten normal volunteers and 20 patients with coronary artery disease documented by recent coronary arteriography was studied with 99mTc-labeled SQ30217 and /sup 201/TI. Plantar /sup 201/TI imaging followed standard treadmill exercise and planar SQ30217 imaging followed upright bicycle exercise, performed to angina, or the same double product achieved on the treadmill test. Upright anterior, 30 degrees left anterior oblique, and 60 degrees left anterior oblique images were obtained for 3, 6, and 9 min, respectively, starting 2 min after injection of 15 mCi of 99mTc SQ30217. A second 15-mCi dose was injected at rest approximately 2 hrmore » later, and the same imaging protocol was followed. No adverse reactions or laboratory abnormalities attributable to SQ30217 were observed. All scans on the normal volunteers were interpreted as normal. Qualitative readings of both tests were equally sensitive for detecting patients with coronary disease (SQ30217 - 16/20, TI - 17/20, p = NS) and identifying abnormal vessels (SQ30217 - 19/45, TI - 21/45, p = NS). Both agents were falsely positive in 1/15 vessels. Ten vascular regions showed persistent abnormalities on resting SQ30217 scans; eight of these were distal to stenoses of at least 90% and three were also abnormal on thallium redistribution images. Hepatic uptake of SQ30217 obscured inferoapical segments in some views in 14/20 patients but did not interfere with abnormal vessel identification.« less

  15. Cardiac involvement in facio-scapulo-humeral muscular dystrophy: a family study using Thallium-201 single-photon-emission-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Faustmann, P M; Farahati, J; Rupilius, B; Dux, R; Koch, M C; Reiners, C

    1996-12-01

    Fifteen persons from two consecutive generations of one family affected with facio-scapulo-humeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) were clinically and neurophysiologically examined. Diagnostic muscle biopsies were obtained from two members. Linkage analysis showed that all four affected members of the family inherit the same 4q35 haplotype giving a lod score of z = +1.44. Six family members were examined by ECG at rest and under stress, by two-dimensional echocardiography, and by cardiac Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computed tomography (Tl-201-SPECT) under dobutamine stress and at rest. Abnormal reduced Tl-201 uptake in cardiac SPECT was only found in the affected members of the family. Therefore we suggest that cardiac Tl-201-SPECT abnormalities in FSHD reflect cardiomyogenic changes in this type of muscular disease.

  16. p-Tertbutylcalix[4]arene nanoemulsion: preparation, characterization and comparative evaluation of its decontamination efficacy against Technetium-99m, Iodine-131 and Thallium-201.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sudha; Sharma, Navneet; Ojha, Himanshu; Shivkumar, Hosakote Gurumalappa; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to develop p-tertbutylcalix[4]arene o/w nanoemulsion for decontamination of radioisotopes from skin. Formulation was characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), multi-photon confocal microscopy techniques and in vitro dissolution studies. In vivo evaluation of nano-emulsion was done using nuclear medicine technique. Stability studies and dermal toxicity studies were also carried out. Comparative decontamination efficacy (DE) studies were performed on synthetic human tissue equivalent material and Sprague Dawley rat against three commonly used medical radioisotopes, i.e., Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc), Iodine-131 ((131)I) and Thallium-201 ((201)Tl). Decontamination was performed using cotton swabs soaked in nanoemulsion at different time intervals of contaminants exposure. Whole body imaging and static counts were recorded using gamma camera before and after each decontamination attempt data was analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and found to be statistically significant (p<0.05). DE of the nanoemulsion loaded with p-tertbutylcalix[4]arene was observed to be 88±5%, 90±3% and 89±3% for (99m)Tc, (131)I and (201)Tl respectively. Dermal toxicity studies revealed no significant differences between treated and control animals. Skin histopathology slides with and without API (Active pharmaceutical ingredients) also found to be comparable. p-Tertbutylcalix[4]arene loaded nanoemulsion shows great promise for skin decontamination against broad ranges of radiological contaminants besides being stable and safe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Semiquantitative Analysis Using Thallium-201 SPECT for Differential Diagnosis Between Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis After Gamma Knife Surgery for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Shigeo, E-mail: shigeo-m@mui.biglobe.ne.jp; Shuto, Takashi; Takase, Hajime

    Purpose: Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography ({sup 201}Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayedmore » ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. Results: A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with {sup 201}Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P<.0001), but not in ER (P=.372), between the tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis groups, and no significant differences between metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas in all indices (P=.926 for ER, P=.263 for DR, and P=.826 for RI). Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that RI was the most informative index with the optimum threshold of 0.775, which provided 82.8% sensitivity, 83.7% specificity, and 82.8% accuracy. Conclusions: Semiquantitative analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the

  18. Effects of atrial fibrillation on myocardial washout rate of thallium-201 on myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Satoshi; Nitta, Kazuhiro; Sumimoto, Yoji; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Ishibashi, Ken; Fukuda, Yukihiro; Kihara, Yasuki

    2018-04-20

    Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with thallium (Tl)-201 is an established modality for evaluating myocardial ischemia. We assessed the effects of atrial fibrillation (AF) on the myocardial washout rate (WR) of Tl-201 on myocardial perfusion SPECT. A total of 231 patients with no evidence of myocardial ischemia were enrolled retrospectively in this study. Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of the ECG at the time of myocardial perfusion SPECT. The mean myocardial WR of Tl-201 was calculated from the stress and the redistribution Bull's eye maps. There were 34 patients with AF and 197 patients with sinus rhythm. There were no significant differences in clinical variables, except for older age and higher heart rate in patients with AF. Myocardial WR of Tl-201 was significantly lower in patients with AF than those with sinus rhythm (46±12 vs. 51±8%, P=0.03). Multivariate analysis including these factors showed that female sex (β=0.18, P=0.02), AF (β=-0.14 P=0.03), hemoglobin (β=-0.18, P<0.01), and serum creatinine (β=0.24, P<0.01) were determinants of myocardial WR of Tl-201. Our data suggest that AF is associated with reduced myocardial WR of Tl-201 on myocardial perfuison SPECT.

  19. Comparison of conventional and cadmium-zinc-telluride single-photon emission computed tomography for analysis of thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging: an exploratory study in normal databases for different ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Masaru; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Taniguchi, Yasuyo; Shibutani, Takayuki

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the differences in thallium-201-chloride (thallium-201) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) scans evaluated by conventional anger-type single-photon emission computed tomography (conventional SPECT) versus cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT (CZT SPECT) imaging in normal databases for different ethnic groups. MPI scans from 81 consecutive Japanese patients were examined using conventional SPECT and CZT SPECT and analyzed with the pre-installed quantitative perfusion SPECT (QPS) software. We compared the summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS), and summed difference score (SDS) for the two SPECT devices. For a normal MPI reference, we usually use Japanese databases for MPI created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, which can be used with conventional SPECT but not with CZT SPECT. In this study, we used new Japanese normal databases constructed in our institution to compare conventional and CZT SPECT. Compared with conventional SPECT, CZT SPECT showed lower SSS (p < 0.001), SRS (p = 0.001), and SDS (p = 0.189) using the pre-installed SPECT database. In contrast, CZT SPECT showed no significant difference from conventional SPECT in QPS analysis using the normal databases from our institution. Myocardial perfusion analyses by CZT SPECT should be evaluated using normal databases based on the ethnic group being evaluated.

  20. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 with a novel multifocal collimator SPECT/CT: IQ-SPECT versus conventional protocols in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Wakabayash, Hiroshi; Okuda, Koichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-06-01

    A novel multifocal collimator, IQ-SPECT (Siemens) consists of SMARTZOOM, cardio-centric and 3D iterative SPECT reconstruction and makes it possible to perform MPI scans in a short time. The aims are to delineate the normal uptake in thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT in each acquisition method and to compare the distribution between new and conventional protocol, especially in patients with normal imaging. Forty patients (eight women, mean age of 75 years) who underwent myocardial perfusion imaging were included in the study. All patients underwent one-day protocol perfusion scan after an adenosine-stress test and at rest after administering (201)Tl and showed normal results. Acquisition was performed on a Symbia T6 equipped with a conventional dual-headed gamma camera system (Siemens ECAM) and with a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator. Imaging was performed with a conventional system followed by IQ-SPECT/computed tomography (CT). Reconstruction was performed with or without X-ray CT-derived attenuation correction (AC). Two nuclear physicians blinded to clinical information interpreted all myocardial perfusion images. A semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion was analyzed by a 17-segment model with a 5-point visual scoring. The uptake of each segment was measured and left ventricular functions were analyzed by QPS software. IQ-SPECT provided good or excellent image quality. The quality of IQ-SPECT images without AC was similar to those of conventional LEHR study. Mid-inferior defect score (0.3 ± 0.5) in the conventional LEHR study was increased significantly in IQ-SPECT with AC (0 ± 0). IQ-SPECT with AC improved the mid-inferior decreased perfusion shown in conventional images. The apical tracer count in IQ-SPECT with AC was decreased compared to that in LEHR (0.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.5 ± 0.7, p < 0.05). The left ventricular ejection fraction from IQ-SPECT was significantly higher than that from the LEHR collimator (p = 0.0009). The images of IQ-SPECT acquired in a

  1. Increased horizontal viewing zone angle of a hologram by resolution redistribution of a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Yuki

    2008-07-01

    The narrow viewing zone angle is one of the problems associated with electronic holography. We propose a technique that enables the ratio of horizontal and vertical resolutions of a spatial light modulator (SLM) to be altered. This technique increases the horizontal resolution of a SLM several times, so that the horizontal viewing zone angle is also increased several times. A SLM illuminated by a slanted point light source array is imaged by a 4f imaging system in which a horizontal slit is located on the Fourier plane. We show that the horizontal resolution was increased four times and that the horizontal viewing zone angle was increased approximately four times.

  2. The influence of irrigation-induced water table fluctuation on iron redistribution and arsenic immobilization within the unsaturation zone.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zeyong; Xie, Xianjun; Pi, Kunfu; Wang, Yanxin; Li, Junxia; Qian, Kun

    2018-05-08

    Given the long-term potential risk of arsenic (As)-contaminated agricultural soil to public health, the redistribution of iron (Fe) and immobilization of As within the unsaturation zone during irrigation and consequent water table fluctuations were studied via a column experiment and corresponding geochemical modeling. Experimental results show that As and Fe accumulated significantly at the top of the column during irrigation. A tremendous increase in As and Fe accumulation rates exists after water table recovery. It was deduced that Fe(II) and As(III) were oxidized directly by O 2 at the period of low water table. But the production of hydroxyl radical (OH) was promoted at the period of high water table due to the oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II). The generated OH further accelerate the oxidation of Fe(II) and As(III). Moreover, the combination of As and Fe is more stronger at the top of the column due to the transformation of combined states of As from surface complexation into surface precipitation with the growth of Fe(III) minerals. This study details the processes and mechanisms of As and Fe immobilization within the unsaturation zone during different irrigation periods and accordingly provides some insights to mitigate As accumulation in topsoil. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Redistribution of iron and titanium in subduction zones: insights from high-pressure serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, Rosalind; Evans, Katy; Reddy, Steven; Lester, Gregory

    2017-04-01

    The redox state, quantity and composition of subduction zone fluids influence the transport and precipitation of elements including those which are redox-sensitive, of economic importance such as Cu, Au and Ag, and those considered to be immobile, which include Fe3+. However, subduction zone fluids remain poorly understood. The redox state of Fe in high-pressure ultramafic rocks, which host a significant proportion of Fe3+, can be used to provide an insight into Fe cycling and constrain the composition of subduction zone fluids. In this work, a combination of the study of oxide and silicate mineral textures, interpretation of mineral parageneses, mineral composition data, and the whole rock geochemistry of high-pressure retrogressed ultramafic rocks from the Zermatt-Saas Zone constrains the distribution of iron and titanium, and oxidation state of iron, to provide constraints on fluids at depth in subduction zones. Oxide minerals host the bulk of the iron, particularly Fe3+. The increase in mode of magnetite during initial retrogression is most consistent with oxidation of existing iron within the samples during the infiltration of an oxidising fluid since it is difficult to reconcile addition of Fe3+ with the known limited solubility of this species. These fluids may be sourced from hybrid samples and/or serpentinites at greater depths. However, high Ti contents are not typical of serpentinites and additionally cannot be accounted for by simple mixing of a depleted mantle protolith with the nearby Allalin gabbro. Titanium-rich samples are suggested to result from fluid-facilitated hybridisation of gabbro and serpentinite protoliths prior to peak metamorphism, and provides the tantalising possibility that Ti, an element generally perceived as immobile, has been added to the rock during this process. If Ti addition has occurred, then the introduction of Fe3+, also generally considered to be immobile, cannot be disregarded. Aluminosilicate complexing could provide a

  4. Assessing mobility and redistribution patterns of sand and oil agglomerates in the surf zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Long, Joesph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Thompson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates that formed in the surf zone following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill continued to cause beach re-oiling 3 years after initial stranding. To understand this phenomena and inform operational response now and for future spills, a numerical method to assess the mobility and alongshore movement of these “surface residual balls” (SRBs) was developed and applied to the Alabama and western Florida coasts. Alongshore flow and SRB mobility and potential flux were used to identify likely patterns of transport and deposition. Results indicate that under typical calm conditions, cm-size SRBs are unlikely to move alongshore, whereas mobility and transport is likely during storms. The greater mobility of sand compared to SRBs makes burial and exhumation of SRBs likely, and inlets were identified as probable SRB traps. Analysis of field data supports these model results.

  5. Critical Zone Weathering and Your Smartphone: Understanding How Mineral Decomposition and Colloid Redistribution Can Generate Rare Earth Element Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, C.; Foley, N.

    2014-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE's) are crucial in the manufacture of smartphones and many other high tech devices. Increasing global demand and relatively narrow geographic sourcing have promoted interest in understanding REE deposit genesis and distribution. Highly weathered, clay-hosted, ion-exchange type deposits in southern China are the source of much of the world's production of the more valuable heavy REEs. Such deposits form as REE-bearing minerals weather and REEs released to solution in ionic form are retained by negatively charged exchange sites on clay minerals. We are investigating the potential for ion-exchange REE deposits in the Piedmont of the southeastern United States, where slow erosion rates have preserved thick (up to 20 m) regolith, as required for such deposits. The Liberty Hill pluton outcrops as coarse-grained biotite-amphibole granite and quartz monzonite over nearly 400 km2 in South Carolina, and has an age of 305 Ma (new SHRIMP ion microprobe zircon age). In weathered profiles over the pluton, ion-exchangeable REE content ranges from 8 to 580 ppm and accounts for 2 to 80% of bulk REE content. Elemental and heavy mineral distributions suggest the wide ranging differences in leachability may be attributable to the amount and distribution of resistant REE-bearing phases (e.g., monazite) relative to more easily weathered phases (e.g., allanite) in the parent granite. The REEs show little mobility within the regolith, indicating the effectiveness of the ion-exchange retention mechanism. In contrast, vertical redistribution of colloidal material shows maximum accumulations at ~1 m depth, as traced by the newly developed dual-phase (colloids vs. solution) mass balance model. The contrast suggests redistributed colloidal material has minimal influence on REE mobilization or retention. Conditions and processes necessary for ion-exchange REE deposit development exist in the Piedmont, but their presence will depend upon favorable parent rock mineralogy.

  6. Resuspension and redistribution of radionuclides during grassland and forest fires in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: part II. Modeling the transport process.

    PubMed

    Yoschenko, V I; Kashparov, V A; Levchuk, S E; Glukhovskiy, A S; Khomutinin, Yu V; Protsak, V P; Lundin, S M; Tschiersch, J

    2006-01-01

    To predict parameters of radionuclide resuspension, transport and deposition during forest and grassland fires, several model modules were developed and adapted. Experimental data of controlled burning of prepared experimental plots in the Chernobyl exclusion zone have been used to evaluate the prognostic power of the models. The predicted trajectories and elevations of the plume match with those visually observed during the fire experiments in the grassland and forest sites. Experimentally determined parameters could be successfully used for the calculation of the initial plume parameters which provide the tools for the description of various fire scenarios and enable prognostic calculations. In summary, the model predicts a release of some per thousand from the radionuclide inventory of the fuel material by the grassland fires. During the forest fire, up to 4% of (137)Cs and (90)Sr and up to 1% of the Pu isotopes can be released from the forest litter according to the model calculations. However, these results depend on the parameters of the fire events. In general, the modeling results are in good accordance with the experimental data. Therefore, the considered models were successfully validated and can be recommended for the assessment of the resuspension and redistribution of radionuclides during grassland and forest fires in contaminated territories.

  7. Verifiable Secret Redistribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    but they are not trusted with secret. Thus, we require a protocol for redistribution without reconstruction of the secret . We also require...verification that the new shareholders have valid shares (ones that can be used to reconstruct the secret ). We present a new protocol to perform non...secret to shareholders in Shamir’s (m,n) threshold scheme (one in which we require m of n shares to reconstruct the secret ), and wish to redistribute the

  8. Education, Meritocracy and Redistribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souto-Otero, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between education, meritocracy and redistribution. It first questions the meritocratic ideal highlighting how it relates to normative expectations that do not hold fully neither in their logic nor in practice. It then complements the literature on persistent inequalities by focusing on the opportunities for…

  9. Kinetics and dosimetry of thallium-201 in human testes

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D.V.; Shepstone, B.J.; Wilkins, H.B.

    Thallous chloride ({sup 201}Tl) is a well-known imaging agent. It has been shown to accumulate in the testes. In view of this, the testicular kinetics of {sup 201}Tl is investigated in humans and the absorbed dose to the organ calculated. Thallous chloride {sup 201}Tl was injected intravenously into four patients for myocardial perfusion studies. After clinical evaluation, the testicular uptake and clearance of {sup 201}Tl were monitored for about 1 wk using a gamma camera. Testicular uptake of {sup 201}Tl was rapid with a mean biological uptake half-time of 0.67 hr and mean biological clearance half-time of 280 hr. Themore » mean maximum testicular uptake of {sup 201}Tl was about 0.4% of the injected activity. These data were utilized to calculate the average absorbed dose to the testes. The absorbed dose to the testes was calculated to be 3.5 x 10{sup {minus}4} Gy/MBq (1.3 rad/mCi) of injected activity. When the relative biological effectiveness of the Auger emitter {sup 201}Tl is taken into account, the equivalent dose to the testes is 9.5 x 10{sup {minus}4} Sv/MBq (3.5 rem/mCi). 14 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.« less

  10. Population redistribution in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, A

    1984-07-01

    One of the major consequences of the reorganization of Nigeria from 4 states into 12 states in 1967 and then into 19 states in the late 1970s was the redistribution of the Nigerian population. Prior to 1967 Nigeria's rural population migrated primarily to the 4 state capitals of Kaduna, Ibadan, Enugu, Benin City and to the federal capital of Lagos. The creation of additional states, each with their own capital, provided new urban environments where migrants from rural areas were afforded opportunities for employment and social mobility. Between 1960-1980, World Bank estimates indicate that 1) population in Nigerian cityes of over 500,000 population increased from 22-57%; 2) the number of cities with a population of 500,000 or more increased from 2 to 9 and 3) the urban population increased from 13-20%. Given Nigeria's estimated population growth rate of 3.6%/year, it is imperative that the goverment continue its decentralization efforts. Tables show 1) population by region based on the 1963 census; 2) estimated population of the 19 state capitals for 1963 and 1975; and 3) estimated population of the areas included in each of the 19 states for 196o, 1977, 1979, and 19819

  11. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  12. Population Redistribution in the Midwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Curtis C., Ed.; And Others

    The nine chapters in the book focus on the 1970s' metropolitan to nonmetropolitan migration stream and address both population patterns and processes and the impacts and policy issues associated with the resulting population redistribution in the Midwest. Peter A. Morrison places the Midwest in the national context of changing population structure…

  13. Redistribution of caveolae during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Boucrot, Emmanuel; Howes, Mark T.; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Parton, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Caveolae form a specialized platform within the plasma membrane that is crucial for an array of important biological functions, ranging from signaling to endocytosis. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and 3D fast spinning-disk confocal imaging to follow caveola dynamics for extended periods, and electron microscopy to obtain high resolution snapshots, we found that the vast majority of caveolae are dynamic with lifetimes ranging from a few seconds to several minutes. Use of these methods revealed a change in the dynamics and localization of caveolae during mitosis. During interphase, the equilibrium between the arrival and departure of caveolae from the cell surface maintains the steady-state distribution of caveolin-1 (Cav1) at the plasma membrane. During mitosis, increased dynamics coupled to an imbalance between the arrival and departure of caveolae from the cell surface induces a redistribution of Cav1 from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments. These changes are reversed during cytokinesis. The observed redistribution of Cav1 was reproduced by treatment of interphase cells with nocodazole, suggesting that microtubule rearrangements during mitosis can mediate caveolin relocalization. This study provides new insights into the dynamics of caveolae and highlights precise regulation of caveola budding and recycling during mitosis. PMID:21625007

  14. Representation and redistribution in federations

    PubMed Central

    Dragu, Tiberiu; Rodden, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Many of the world's most populous democracies are political unions composed of states or provinces that are unequally represented in the national legislature. Scattered empirical studies, most of them focusing on the United States, have discovered that overrepresented states appear to receive larger shares of the national budget. Although this relationship is typically attributed to bargaining advantages associated with greater legislative representation, an important threat to empirical identification stems from the fact that the representation scheme was chosen by the provinces. Thus, it is possible that representation and fiscal transfers are both determined by other characteristics of the provinces in a specific country. To obtain an improved estimate of the relationship between representation and redistribution, we collect and analyze provincial-level data from nine federations over several decades, taking advantage of the historical process through which federations formed and expanded. Controlling for a variety of country- and province-level factors and using a variety of estimation techniques, we show that overrepresented provinces in political unions around the world are rather dramatically favored in the distribution of resources. PMID:21555553

  15. Representation and redistribution in federations.

    PubMed

    Dragu, Tiberiu; Rodden, Jonathan

    2011-05-24

    Many of the world's most populous democracies are political unions composed of states or provinces that are unequally represented in the national legislature. Scattered empirical studies, most of them focusing on the United States, have discovered that overrepresented states appear to receive larger shares of the national budget. Although this relationship is typically attributed to bargaining advantages associated with greater legislative representation, an important threat to empirical identification stems from the fact that the representation scheme was chosen by the provinces. Thus, it is possible that representation and fiscal transfers are both determined by other characteristics of the provinces in a specific country. To obtain an improved estimate of the relationship between representation and redistribution, we collect and analyze provincial-level data from nine federations over several decades, taking advantage of the historical process through which federations formed and expanded. Controlling for a variety of country- and province-level factors and using a variety of estimation techniques, we show that overrepresented provinces in political unions around the world are rather dramatically favored in the distribution of resources.

  16. Redistributive effects in public health care financing.

    PubMed

    Honekamp, Ivonne; Possenriede, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    This article focuses on the redistributive effects of different measures to finance public health insurance. We analyse the implications of different financing options for public health insurance on the redistribution of income from good to bad health risks and from high-income to low-income individuals. The financing options considered are either income-related (namely income taxes, payroll taxes, and indirect taxes), health-related (co-insurance, deductibles, and no-claim), or neither (flat fee). We show that governments who treat access to health care as a basic right for everyone should consider redistributive effects when reforming health care financing.

  17. Subsurface application enhances benefits of manure redistribution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sustainable nutrient management requires redistribution of livestock manure from nutrient-excess areas to nutrient-deficit areas. Field experiments were conducted to assess agronomic and environmental effects of different poultry litter application methods (surface vs. subsurface) and timings (fall ...

  18. Tsunami mitigation - redistribution of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama

    2017-04-01

    Tsunamis are water waves caused by the displacement of a large volume of water, in the deep ocean or a large lake, following an earthquake, landslide, underwater explosion, meteorite impacts, or other violent geological events. On the coastline, the resulting waves evolve from unnoticeable to devastating, reaching heights of tens of meters and causing destruction of property and loss of life. Over 225,000 people were killed in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami alone. For many decades, scientists have been studying tsunami, and progress has been widely reported in connection with the causes (1), forecasting (2), and recovery (3). However, none of the studies ratifies the approach of a direct mitigation of tsunamis, with the exception of mitigation using submarine barriers (e.g. see Ref. (4)). In an attempt to open a discussion on direct mitigation, I examine the feasibility of redistributing the total energy of a very long surface ocean (gravity) wave over a larger space through nonlinear resonant interaction with two finely tuned acoustic-gravity waves (see Refs. (5-8)). Theoretically, while the energy input in the acoustic-gravity waves required for an effective interaction is comparable to that in a tsunami (i.e. impractically large), employing the proposed mitigation technique the initial tsunami amplitude could be reduced substantially resulting in a much milder impact at the coastline. Moreover, such a technique would allow for the harnessing of the tsunami's own energy. Practically, this mitigation technique requires the design of highly accurate acoustic-gravity wave frequency transmitters or modulators, which is a rather challenging ongoing engineering problem. References 1. E. Bryant, 2014. Tsunami: the underrated hazard. Springer, doi:10.1007/978-3-319- 06133-7. 2. V. V. Titov, F. I. Gonza`lez, E. N. Bernard, M. C. Eble, H. O. Mofjeld, J. C. Newman, A. J. Venturato, 2005. Real-Time Tsunami Forecasting: Challenges and Solutions. Nat. Hazards 35:41-58, doi:10

  19. Evaluation of thallium-201 scanning for detection of latent coronary artery disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Deboer, L.; Jhingran, S.

    1978-01-01

    The use of thallium imaging as a noninvasive method to accurately screen shuttle passengers for latent coronary artery disease was investigated. All radionuclide procedures were performed using an Anger type camera with a high resolution collimator. A minimum of 200,000 counts were collected for each image using a 20% window centered on the 69-83 keV X-rays. For the images obtained following injection with the patient at rest, the testing was begun 10 minutes after injection. Injections of TT during exercise were made at a point near the termination of the treadmill procedure as determined by either the appearance of ST segment changes on the electrocardiogram consistant with subendocardial ischemia, the appearance of angina-like chest pain in the patient or fatigue in the patient which required cessation of the test. The severity of heart disease was based on the medical history, physical exam, exercise electrocardiograms, chest X-rays and the coronary arteriogram.

  20. False-negative dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial imaging after caffeine infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, P.; Corstens, F.H.; Aengevaeren, W.R.

    1991-08-01

    The vasodilator effect of intravenously administered dipyridamole may be caused by an increase in endogenous plasma adenosine levels. The authors evaluated the effect of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, on the diagnostic results of dipyridamole-201Tl myocardial imaging in eight patients with coronary artery disease. Caffeine infusion significantly attenuated the dipyridamole-induced fall in blood pressure and the accompanied increase in heart rate. The infusion of dipyridamole alone resulted in chest pain and ST-segment depressions on the electrocardiogram in four patients, whereas none of these problems occurred when the tests were repeated after caffeine. In six of eight patients, caffeine was responsiblemore » for false-negative dipyridamole-201Tl tests. Semiquantitive scores of the dipyridamole-induced 201Tl perfusion defects were decreased by caffeine from 9.0 {plus minus} 0.9 to 2.0 {plus minus} 1.1 points (p less than 0.05). Computerized analysis revealed a caffeine-mediated reduction in the percent reversibility of the images from 46% {plus minus} 16% to 6% {plus minus} 10% (p less than 0.05). They conclude that the use of caffeinated products prior to dipyridamole-201Tl testing may be responsible for false-negative findings.« less

  1. Noninvasive ergonovine maleate provocative testing for coronary artery spasm: the need for routine thallium-201 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shanes, J.G.; Krone, R.J.; Fisher, K.

    1983-01-01

    We administered ergonovine and used both electrocardiographic monitoring and thallium-/sup 201/ (/sup 201/Tl) imaging to detect reversible ischemia in 100 patients. Patients already established as having coronary artery spasm and those with nonbypassed, proximal, high-grade coronary artery stenosis were excluded. No complication occurred in any patient. The use of thallium imaging in addition to electrocardiographic monitoring resulted in a higher degree of sensitivity than did ECG monitoring alone. Fourteen patients demonstrated evidence of coronary artery spasm as documented by /sup 201/Tl imaging but of the 14, significant ECG changes occurred in only 50%, and classic ST segment elevation in 21%.more » Thus, in carefully selected patients the noninvasive provocation of coronary spasm can be accomplished safely, but ECG monitoring must be combined with thallium-/sup 201/ imaging to achieve an acceptable degree of sensitivity.« less

  2. Exposure to inequality affects support for redistribution.

    PubMed

    Sands, Melissa L

    2017-01-24

    The distribution of wealth in the United States and countries around the world is highly skewed. How does visible economic inequality affect well-off individuals' support for redistribution? Using a placebo-controlled field experiment, I randomize the presence of poverty-stricken people in public spaces frequented by the affluent. Passersby were asked to sign a petition calling for greater redistribution through a "millionaire's tax." Results from 2,591 solicitations show that in a real-world-setting exposure to inequality decreases affluent individuals' willingness to redistribute. The finding that exposure to inequality begets inequality has fundamental implications for policymakers and informs our understanding of the effects of poverty, inequality, and economic segregation. Confederate race and socioeconomic status, both of which were randomized, are shown to interact such that treatment effects vary according to the race, as well as gender, of the subject.

  3. Exposure to inequality affects support for redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Melissa L.

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of wealth in the United States and countries around the world is highly skewed. How does visible economic inequality affect well-off individuals’ support for redistribution? Using a placebo-controlled field experiment, I randomize the presence of poverty-stricken people in public spaces frequented by the affluent. Passersby were asked to sign a petition calling for greater redistribution through a “millionaire’s tax.” Results from 2,591 solicitations show that in a real-world-setting exposure to inequality decreases affluent individuals’ willingness to redistribute. The finding that exposure to inequality begets inequality has fundamental implications for policymakers and informs our understanding of the effects of poverty, inequality, and economic segregation. Confederate race and socioeconomic status, both of which were randomized, are shown to interact such that treatment effects vary according to the race, as well as gender, of the subject. PMID:28069960

  4. Simulating the Dependence of Aspen on Redistributed Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderquist, B.; Kavanagh, K.; Link, T. E.; Seyfried, M. S.; Winstral, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    In mountainous regions across the western USA, the distribution of aspen (Populus tremuloides) is often directly related to heterogeneous soil moisture subsidies resulting from redistributed snow. With decades of climate and precipitation data across elevational and precipitation gradients, the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in southwest Idaho provides a unique opportunity to study the relationship between aspen and redistributed snow. Within the RCEW, the total amount of precipitation has not changed in the past 50 years, but there are sharp declines in the percentage of the precipitation falling as snow. As shifts in the distribution of available moisture continue, future trends in aspen net primary productivity (NPP) remain uncertain. In order to assess the importance of snowdrift subsidies, NPP of three aspen stands was simulated at sites spanning elevational and precipitation gradients using the biogeochemical process model BIOME-BGC. At the aspen site experiencing the driest climate and lowest amount of precipitation from snow, approximately 400 mm of total precipitation was measured from November to March of 2008. However, peak measured snow water equivalent (SWE) held in drifts directly upslope of this stand was approximately 2100 mm, 5 times more moisture than the uniform winter precipitation layer initially assumed by BIOME-BGC. BIOME-BGC simulations in dry years forced by adjusted precipitation data resulted in NPP values approximately 30% higher than simulations assuming a uniform precipitation layer. Using BIOME-BGC and climate data from 1985-2011, the relationship between simulated NPP and measured basal area increments (BAI) improved after accounting for redistributed snow, indicating increased simulation representation. In addition to improved simulation capabilities, soil moisture data, diurnal branch water potential, and stomatal conductance observations at each site detail the use of soil moisture in the rooting zone and the onset

  5. Subsurface application enhances benefits of manure redistribution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sustainable nutrient management requires redistribution of livestock manure from nutrient-excess areas to nutrient-deficit areas. Field experiments were conducted to assess agronomic (i.e., corn yield) and environmental (i.e., ammonia volatilization and surface nutrient losses) effects of different ...

  6. Cognitive ability and the demand for redistribution.

    PubMed

    Mollerstrom, Johanna; Seim, David

    2014-01-01

    Empirical research suggests that the cognitively able are politically more influential than the less able, by being more likely to vote and to assume leadership positions. This study asks whether this pattern matters for public policy by investigating what role a person's cognitive ability plays in determining his preferences for redistribution of income among citizens in society. To answer this question, we use a unique Swedish data set that matches responses to a tailor-made questionnaire to administrative tax records and to military enlistment records for men, with the latter containing a measure of cognitive ability. On a scale of 0 to 100 percent redistribution, a one-standard-deviation increase in cognitive ability reduces the willingness to redistribute by 5 percentage points, or by the same amount as a $35,000 increase in mean annual income. We find support for two channels mediating this economically strong and statistically significant relation. First, higher ability is associated with higher income. Second, ability is positively correlated with the view that economic success is the result of effort, rather than luck. Both these factors are, in turn, related to lower demand for redistribution.

  7. Cognitive Ability and the Demand for Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Mollerstrom, Johanna; Seim, David

    2014-01-01

    Empirical research suggests that the cognitively able are politically more influential than the less able, by being more likely to vote and to assume leadership positions. This study asks whether this pattern matters for public policy by investigating what role a person's cognitive ability plays in determining his preferences for redistribution of income among citizens in society. To answer this question, we use a unique Swedish data set that matches responses to a tailor-made questionnaire to administrative tax records and to military enlistment records for men, with the latter containing a measure of cognitive ability. On a scale of 0 to 100 percent redistribution, a one-standard-deviation increase in cognitive ability reduces the willingness to redistribute by 5 percentage points, or by the same amount as a $35,000 increase in mean annual income. We find support for two channels mediating this economically strong and statistically significant relation. First, higher ability is associated with higher income. Second, ability is positively correlated with the view that economic success is the result of effort, rather than luck. Both these factors are, in turn, related to lower demand for redistribution. PMID:25343713

  8. 13 CFR 309.2 - Redistributions under part 307.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Redistributions under part 307. 309.2 Section 309.2 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE REDISTRIBUTIONS OF INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE § 309.2 Redistributions under part 307. (a) A Recipient...

  9. Redistributive effects of Swedish health care finance.

    PubMed

    Gerdtham, U G; Sundberg, G

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigates the redistributive effects of the Swedish health care financing system in 1980 and 1990 for four different financial sources: county council taxes, payroll taxes, direct payments and state grants. The redistributive effects are decomposed into vertical, horizontal and 'reranking' segments for each of the four financial sources. The data used are based on probability samples of the Swedish population, from the Level of Living Survey (LNU) from 1981 and 1991. The paper concludes that the Swedish health care financing system is weakly progressive, although direct payments are regressive. There is some horizontal inequity and 'reranking', which mainly comes from the county council taxes, since those tax rates vary for each county council. The implication is that, to some extent, people with equal incomes are treated unequally.

  10. Constituent Redistribution in U-Zr Metallic Fuel Using the Advanced Fuel Performance Code BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Jack D.; Unal, Cetin; Matthews, Christopher

    2016-09-30

    Previous work done by Galloway, et. al. on EBR-II ternary (U-Pu-Zr) fuel constituent redistribution yielded accurate simulation data for the limited data sets of Zr redistribution. The data sets included EPMA scans of two different irradiated rods. First, T179, which was irradiated to 1.9 at% burnup, was analyzed. Second, DP16, which was irradiated to 11 at% burnup, was analyzed. One set of parameters that most accurately represented the zirconium profiles for both experiments was determined. Since the binary fuel (U-Zr) has previously been used as the driver fuel for sodium fast reactors (SFR) as well as being the likely drivermore » fuel if a new SFR is constructed, this same process has been initiated on the binary fuel form. From limited binary EPMA scans as well as other fuel characterization techniques, it has been observed that zirconium redistribution also occurs in the binary fuel, albeit at a reduced rate compared to observation in the ternary fuel, as noted by Kim et. al. While the rate of redistribution has been observed to be slower, numerous metallographs of U-Zr fuel show distinct zone formations.« less

  11. Vertical Redistribution of Ocean Salt Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Liu, C.; Ponte, R. M.; Piecuch, C. G.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean salinity is an important proxy for change and variability in the global water cycle. Multi-decadal trends have been observed in both surface and subsurface salinity in the past decades, and are usually attributed to the change in air-sea freshwater flux. Although air-sea freshwater flux, a major component of the global water cycle, certainly contributes to the change in surface and upper ocean salinity, the salt redistribution inside the ocean can affect the surface and upper ocean salinity as well. Also, the mechanisms controlling the surface and upper ocean salinity changes likely depend on timescales. Here we examined the ocean salinity changes as well as the contribution of the vertical redistribution of salt with a 20-year dynamically consistent and data-constrained ocean state estimate (ECCO: Estimating Circulation and Climate of the Ocean). A decrease in the spatial mean upper ocean salinity and an upward salt flux inside the ocean were observed. These findings indicate that over 1992-2011, surface freshwater fluxes contribute to the decrease in spatial mean upper ocean salinity and are partly compensated by the vertical redistribution of salt inside the ocean. Between advection and diffusion, the two major processes determining the vertical exchange of salt, the advective term at different depths shows a downward transport, while the diffusive term is the dominant upward transport contributor. These results suggest that the salt transport in the ocean interior should be considered in interpreting the observed surface and upper ocean salinity changes, as well as inferring information about the changes in the global water cycle.

  12. Role of nuclear cardiology in evaluating the total ischemic burden in coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1987-03-09

    Goals of exercise radionuclide imaging are to: enhance sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of coronary artery disease (CAD) detection; noninvasively assess extent and severity of functionally significant CAD; determine prognosis so that specific therapeutic strategies can be more rationally implemented; detect silent ischemia in asymptomatic subjects or in patients with known CAD with a higher degree of specificity than can be accomplished by electrocardiogram stress testing alone; evaluate the response to therapeutic interventions aimed at enhancing coronary blood flow. Two major radionuclide techniques are currently used in evaluating the total ischemic burden in patients with CAD. These are myocardial perfusionmore » imaging with either thallium-201 or rubidium-82, and radionuclide angiography performed after administration of technetium-99m. Areas of diminished thallium-201 activity on early postexercise images are abnormal and represent either areas of stress-induced ischemia or myocardial scar. To differentiate between the two, delayed images are obtained to determine if the initial postexercise defect either persists or demonstrates redistribution. Defects demonstrating redistribution represent transient ischemia, whereas areas of previous infarction or scar usually appear as persistent defects. Patients with left main or 3-vessel CAD usually show multiple thallium-201 redistribution defects in more than 1 vascular supply region, a phenomenon often associated with abnormal lung thallium-201 uptake.« less

  13. Precipitate Redistribution during Creep of Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect

    S. Schlegel; S. Hopkins; E. Young

    2009-12-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are being considered for applications within advanced nuclear power generation systems due to their high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. Alloy 617, a candidate for use in heat exchangers, derives its strength from both solid solution strengthening and the precipitation of carbide particles. However, during creep, carbides that are supposed to retard grain boundary motion are found to dissolve and re-precipitate on boundaries in tension. To quantify the redistribution, we have used electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy to analyze the microstructure of 617 after creep testing at 900 and 1000°C. The data were analyzed with respectmore » to location of the carbides (e.g., intergranular vs. intragranular), grain boundary character, and precipitate type (i.e., Cr-rich or Mo-rich). We find that grain boundary character is the most important factor in carbide distribution; some evidence of preferential distribution to boundaries in tension is also observed at higher applied stresses. Finally, the results suggest that the observed redistribution is due to the migration of carbides to the boundaries and not the migration of boundaries to the precipitates.« less

  14. Organizations of food redistribution and rescue.

    PubMed

    Mousa, T Y; Freeland-Graves, J H

    2017-11-01

    Food insecurity affects 13.4% of the USA population, despite the fact that 30-40% of all food is deposited in a landfill. Food rescue nutrition is the process of redistribution of surplus food to the impoverished. The aim of this study is to document the extent of involvement of organizations in food rescue nutrition. In this cross-sectional study, a survey about organizations involved in food rescue nutrition was developed, validated, and then tested. Directors of 100 organizations involved in food rescue nutrition from eight Southwestern States in the USA participated in this research. These organizations provided an average of 2 million kg of food to more than 40,000 clients each month. Food assistance programs had an average of eight workers and 3081 volunteers. In addition to food, these organizations provided other services such as clothing, clinical, and childcare. The agencies encountered several challenges, including lack of resources that resulted in reducing food portions and turning away clients. The extent of involvement of community-based programs in food rescue nutrition was strong in eight Southwestern states in the USA. Organizations involved in food redistribution helped alleviate food insecurity in their clients. Sustainability of these charitable networks was dependent on availability of resources and sufficient volunteers. Health professionals should encourage these organizations by providing support through donations of time, money, and/or food. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The global warming hiatus: Slowdown or redistribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiao-Hai; Boyer, Tim; Trenberth, Kevin; Karl, Thomas R.; Xie, Shang-Ping; Nieves, Veronica; Tung, Ka-Kit; Roemmich, Dean

    2016-11-01

    Global mean surface temperatures (GMST) exhibited a smaller rate of warming during 1998-2013, compared to the warming in the latter half of the 20th Century. Although, not a "true" hiatus in the strict definition of the word, this has been termed the "global warming hiatus" by IPCC (2013). There have been other periods that have also been defined as the "hiatus" depending on the analysis. There are a number of uncertainties and knowledge gaps regarding the "hiatus." This report reviews these issues and also posits insights from a collective set of diverse information that helps us understand what we do and do not know. One salient insight is that the GMST phenomenon is a surface characteristic that does not represent a slowdown in warming of the climate system but rather is an energy redistribution within the oceans. Improved understanding of the ocean distribution and redistribution of heat will help better monitor Earth's energy budget and its consequences. A review of recent scientific publications on the "hiatus" shows the difficulty and complexities in pinpointing the oceanic sink of the "missing heat" from the atmosphere and the upper layer of the oceans, which defines the "hiatus." Advances in "hiatus" research and outlooks (recommendations) are given in this report.

  16. CancerNet redistribution via WWW.

    PubMed

    Quade, G; Püschel, N; Far, F

    1996-01-01

    CancerNet from the National Cancer Institute contains nearly 500 ASCII-files, updated monthly, with up-to-date information about cancer and the "Golden Standard" in tumor therapy. Perl scripts are used to convert these files to HTML-documents. A complex algorithm, using regular expression matching and extensive exception handling, detects headlines, listings and other constructs of the original ASCII-text and converts them into their HTML-counterparts. A table of contents is also created during the process. The resulting files are indexed for full-text search via WAIS. Building the complete CancerNet WWW redistribution takes less than two hours with a minimum of manual work. For 26,000 requests of information from our service per month the average costs for the worldwide delivery of one document is about 19 cents.

  17. Charge Redistribution from Anomalous Magnetovorticity Coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Hattori, Koichi; Yin, Yi

    2016-10-05

    Here, we investigate novel transport phenomena in a chiral fluid originated from an interplay between a vorticity and strong magnetic field, which induces a redistribution of vector charges in the system and an axial current along the magnetic field. The corresponding transport coefficients are obtained from an energy-shift argument for the chiral fermions in the lowest Landau level due to a spin-vorticity coupling and also from diagrammatic computations on the basis of the linear response theory. Based on consistent results from both methods, we also observe that the transport coefficients are proportional to the anomaly coefficient and are independent ofmore » temperature and chemical potential. Finally, we speculate that these transport phenomena are connected to quantum anomaly.« less

  18. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reallotment and redistribution of funds. 98.64 Section 98.64 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to the...

  19. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reallotment and redistribution of funds. 98.64 Section 98.64 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to the...

  20. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reallotment and redistribution of funds. 98.64 Section 98.64 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to the...

  1. Redistributing Wealth to Families: The Advantages of the MYRIADE Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legendre, Francois; Lorgnet, Jean-Paul; Thibault, Florence

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to shed light on the main characteristics of the French system for redistributing wealth to families through tax revenues and social transfers. For the purposes of this exercise, the authors used the MYRIADE microsimulation model, which covers most of the redistribution system, though it is limited to monetary flows such as family…

  2. Redistribution on the thallium scan in myocardial sarcoidosis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Makler, P.T.; Lavine, S.J.; Denenberg, B.S.

    1981-05-01

    Resting and redistribution thallium studies were performed in four young patients with sarcoidosis to evaluate the possibility of myocardial involvement. In each case the resting scan showed marked defects that resolved on the redistribution studies. In a different patient population, these results would have implied significant coronary artery disease.

  3. Copper regulates primary root elongation through PIN1-mediated auxin redistribution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong-Mei; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2013-05-01

    The heavy metal copper (Cu) is an essential microelement required for normal plant growth and development, but it inhibits primary root growth when in excess. The mechanism underlying how excess Cu functions in this process remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that a higher concentration of CuSO4 inhibited primary root elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings by affecting both the elongation and meristem zones. In the meristem zone, meristematic cell division potential was reduced by excess Cu. Further experiments showed that Cu can modulate auxin distribution, resulting in higher auxin activities in both the elongation and meristem zones of Cu-treated roots based on DR5::GUS expression patterns. This Cu-mediated auxin redistribution was shown to be responsible for Cu-mediated inhibition of primary root elongation. Additional genetic and physiological data demonstrated that it was PINFORMED1 (PIN1), but not PIN2 or AUXIN1 (AUX1), that regulated this process. However, Cu-induced hydrogen peroxide accumulation did not contribute to Cu-induced auxin redistribution for inhibition of root elongation. When the possible role of ethylene in this process was analyzed, Cu had a similar impact on the root elongation of both the wild type and the ein2-1 mutant, implying that Cu-mediated inhibition of primary root elongation was not due to the ethylene signaling pathway.

  4. Redistribution of fast ions during sawtooth reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaulmes, F.; Westerhof, E.; de Blank, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    In a tokamak-based fusion power plant, possible scenarios may include regulated sawtooth oscillations to remove thermalized helium from the core of the plasma. During a sawtooth crash, the helium ash and other impurities trapped in the core are driven by the instability to an outer region. However, in a fusion plasma, high energy ions will represent a significant population. We thus study the behaviour of these energetic particles during a sawtooth. This paper presents the modelling of the redistribution of fast ions during a sawtooth reconnection event in a tokamak plasma. Along the lines of the model for the evolution of the flux surfaces during a sawtooth collapse described in Ya.I. Kolesnichenko and Yu.V. Yakovenko 1996 Nucl. Fusion 36 159, we have built a time-dependent electromagnetic model of a sawtooth reconnection. The trajectories of the ions are described by a complete gyro-orbit integration. The fast particles were evolved from specific initial parameters (given energy and uniform spread in pitch) or distributed initially according to a slowing-down distribution created by fusion reactions. Our modelling is used to understand the main equilibrium parameters driving the motions during the collapse and to determine the evolution of the distribution function of energetic ions when different geometries of reconnection are considered.

  5. An efficient and guaranteed stable numerical method for continuous modeling of infiltration and redistribution with a shallow dynamic water table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wencong; Ogden, Fred L.; Steinke, Robert C.; Talbot, Cary A.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a one-dimensional numerical method to simulate infiltration and redistribution in the presence of a shallow dynamic water table. This method builds upon the Green-Ampt infiltration with Redistribution (GAR) model and incorporates features from the Talbot-Ogden (T-O) infiltration and redistribution method in a discretized moisture content domain. The redistribution scheme is more physically meaningful than the capillary weighted redistribution scheme in the T-O method. Groundwater dynamics are considered in this new method instead of hydrostatic groundwater front. It is also computationally more efficient than the T-O method. Motion of water in the vadose zone due to infiltration, redistribution, and interactions with capillary groundwater are described by ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions to these equations are computationally less expensive than solutions of the highly nonlinear Richards' (1931) partial differential equation. We present results from numerical tests on 11 soil types using multiple rain pulses with different boundary conditions, with and without a shallow water table and compare against the numerical solution of Richards' equation (RE). Results from the new method are in satisfactory agreement with RE solutions in term of ponding time, deponding time, infiltration rate, and cumulative infiltrated depth. The new method, which we call "GARTO" can be used as an alternative to the RE for 1-D coupled surface and groundwater models in general situations with homogeneous soils with dynamic water table. The GARTO method represents a significant advance in simulating groundwater surface water interactions because it very closely matches the RE solution while being computationally efficient, with guaranteed mass conservation, and no stability limitations that can affect RE solvers in the case of a near-surface water table.

  6. Water savings of redistributing global crop production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kyle; Seveso, Antonio; Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Human demand for crop production is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as a result of population growth, richer diets and biofuel use. For food production to keep pace, unprecedented amounts of resources - water, fertilizers, energy - will be required. This has led to calls for 'sustainable intensification' in which yields are increased on existing croplands while seeking to minimize impacts on water and other agricultural resources. Recent studies have quantified aspects of this, showing that there is a large potential to improve crop yields and increase harvest frequencies to better meet human demand. Though promising, both solutions would necessitate large additional inputs of water and fertilizer in order to be achieved under current technologies. However, the question of whether the current distribution of crops is, in fact, the best for realizing maximized production has not been considered to date. To this end, we ask: Is it possible to minimize water demand by simply growing crops where soil and climate conditions are best suited? Here we use maps of agro-ecological suitability - a measure of physical and chemical soil fertility - for 15 major food crops to identify differences between current crop distributions and where they can most suitably be planted. By redistributing crops across currently cultivated lands, we determine what distribution of crops would maintain current calorie production and agricultural value while minimizing the water demand of crop production. In doing this, our study provides a novel tool for policy makers and managers to integrate food security, environmental sustainability, and rural livelihoods by improving the use of freshwater resources without compromising crop calorie production or rural livelihoods.

  7. Bombardment-induced segregation and redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Wiedersich, H.

    During ion bombardment, a number of processes can alter the compositional distribution and microstructure in near-surface regions of alloys. The relative importance of each process depends principally on the target composition, temperature, and ion characteristics. In addition to displacement mixing leading to a randomization of atomic locations, and preferential loss of alloying elements by sputtering, which are dominant at relatively low temperatures, several thermally-activated processes, including radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and Gibbsian adsorption, also play important roles. At elevated temperatures, nonequilibrium point defects induced by ion impacts become mobile and tend to anneal out by recombination and diffusion to extended sinks, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and free surfaces. The high defect concentrations, far exceeding the thermodynamic equilibrium values, can enhance diffusion-controlled processes, while persistent defect fluxes, originating from the spatial non-uniformity in defect production and annihilation, give rise to local redistribution of alloy constituents because of radiation-induced segregation. Moreover, when the alloy is maintained at high temperature, Gibbsian adsorption, driven by the reduction in free energy of the system, occurs even without irradiation; it involves a compositional perturbation in a few atom layers near the alloy surface. The combination of these processes leads to the complex development of a compositionally-modified layer in the subsurface region. Considerable progress has been made recently in identifying and understanding the relative contributions from the individual processes under various irradiation conditions. In the present paper, selected examples of these different phenomena and their synergistic effects on the evolution of the near-surface compositions of alloys during sputtering and ion implantation at elevated temperatures are discussed.

  8. Projecting the Dependence of Sage-steppe Vegetation on Redistributed Snow in a Warming Climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderquist, B.; Kavanagh, K.; Link, T. E.; Seyfried, M. S.; Strand, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    In mountainous regions, the redistribution of snow by wind can increase the effective precipitation available to vegetation. Moisture subsidies caused by drifting snow may be critical to plant productivity in semi-arid ecosystems. However, with increasing temperatures, the distribution of precipitation is becoming more uniform as rain replaces drifting snow. Understanding the ecohydrological interactions between sagebrush steppe vegetation communities and the heterogeneous distribution of soil moisture is essential for predicting and mitigating future losses in ecosystem diversity and productivity in regions characterized by snow dominated precipitation regimes. To address the dependence of vegetation productivity on redistributed snow, we simulated the net primary production (NPP) of aspen, sagebrush, and C3 grass plant functional types spanning a precipitation phase (rain:snow) gradient in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed and Critical Zone Observatory (RCEW-CZO). The biogeochemical process model Biome-BGC was used to simulate NPP at three sites located directly below snowdrifts that provide melt water late into the spring. To assess climate change impacts on future plant productivity, mid-century (2046-2065) NPP was simulated using the average temperature increase from the Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogs (MACA) data set under the RCP 8.5 emission scenario. At the driest site, mid-century projections of decreased snow cover and increased growing season evaporative demand resulted in limiting soil moisture up to 30 and 40 days earlier for aspen and sage respectively. While spring green up for aspen occurred an average of 13 days earlier under climate change scenarios, NPP remained negative up to 40 days longer during the growing season. These results indicate that the loss of the soil moisture subsidy stemming from prolonged redistributed snow water resources can directly influence ecosystem productivity in the rain:snow transition zone.

  9. A mass-balance model to separate and quantify colloidal and solute redistributions in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, C.R.; Chadwick, O.A.; Hartshorn, A.S.; Khomo, L.M.; Chorover, J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of weathering and pedogenesis have long used calculations based upon low solubility index elements to determine mass gains and losses in open systems. One of the questions currently unanswered in these settings is the degree to which mass is transferred in solution (solutes) versus suspension (colloids). Here we show that differential mobility of the low solubility, high field strength (HFS) elements Ti and Zr can trace colloidal redistribution, and we present a model for distinguishing between mass transfer in suspension and solution. The model is tested on a well-differentiated granitic catena located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Ti and Zr ratios from parent material, soil and colloidal material are substituted into a mixing equation to quantify colloidal movement. The results show zones of both colloid removal and augmentation along the catena. Colloidal losses of 110kgm-2 (-5% relative to parent material) are calculated for one eluviated soil profile. A downslope illuviated profile has gained 169kgm-2 (10%) colloidal material. Elemental losses by mobilization in true solution are ubiquitous across the catena, even in zones of colloidal accumulation, and range from 1418kgm-2 (-46%) for an eluviated profile to 195kgm-2 (-23%) at the bottom of the catena. Quantification of simultaneous mass transfers in solution and suspension provide greater specificity on processes within soils and across hillslopes. Additionally, because colloids include both HFS and other elements, the ability to quantify their redistribution has implications for standard calculations of soil mass balances using such index elements. ?? 2011.

  10. 76 FR 62642 - Digital Broadcast Television Redistribution Control; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [DA 11-1432] Digital Broadcast Television Redistribution Control; Corrections AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Technical amendment. SUMMARY: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is correcting a final rule that appeared in the...

  11. Emerging investigator series: As( v ) in magnetite: incorporation and redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Huhmann, Brittany L.; Neumann, Anke; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2017-01-01

    As coprecipitated with magnetite remained incorporated over time whereas sorbed As was redistributed and became increasingly incorporated into magnetite, both the absence and presence of aqueous Fe(ii).

  12. Simulating the Dependence of Sagebrush Steppe Vegetation on Redistributed Snow in a Semi-Arid Watershed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderquist, B.; Kavanagh, K.; Link, T. E.; Strand, E. K.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    In mountainous regions across the western USA, the composition of aspen (Populus tremuloides) and sagebrush steppe plant communities is often closely related to heterogeneous soil moisture subsidies resulting from redistributed snow. With decades of climate and precipitation data across elevational and precipitation gradients, the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) and critical zone observatory (CZO) in southwest Idaho provides a unique opportunity to study the relationship between vegetation types and redistributed snow. Within the RCEW, the total amount of precipitation has remained unchanged over the past 50 years, however the percentage of the precipitation falling as snow has declined by approximately 4% per decade at mid-elevation sites. As shifts in precipitation phase continue, future trends in vegetation composition and net primary productivity (NPP) of different plant functional types remains a critical question. We hypothesize that redistribution of snow may supplement drought sensitive species like aspen more so than drought tolerant species like mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata spp. vaseyana). To assess the importance of snowdrift subsidies on sagebrush steppe vegetation, NPP of aspen, shrub, and grass species was simulated at three sites using the biogeochemical process model BIOME-BGC. Each site is located directly downslope from snowdrifts providing soil moisture inputs to aspen stands and neighboring vegetation. Drifts vary in size with the largest containing up to four times the snow water equivalent (SWE) of a uniform precipitation layer. Precipitation inputs used by BIOME-BGC were modified to represent the redistribution of snow and simulations were run using daily climate data from 1985-2013. Simulated NPP of annual grasses at each site was not responsive to subsidies from drifting snow. However, at the driest site, aspen and shrub annual NPP was increased by as much as 44 and 30%, respectively, with the redistribution of

  13. Comparison of personnel radiation dosimetry from myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: Technetium-99m-sestamibi versus thallium-201

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, C.M.; Dworkin, H.J.

    1993-07-01

    The whole-body and hand radiation doses to our technical staff were retrospectively compared for three distinct 4-mo periods when either 201TI or 99mTc-sestamibi were exclusively used for stress myocardial perfusion imaging. During the initial 4-mo period when 99mTc-sestamibi replaced 201TI, the mean whole-body film badge readings increased from 100 to 450 microSv/mo (p < 0.001) for nuclear medicine technologists (n = 10) and from 240 to 560 microSv/mo (p < 0.05) for radiopharmacy technologists (n = 2). Mean TLD readings to the hands also increased, although the differences were not statistically significant for the nuclear medicine technologists. Noninvasive cardiology staffmore » were monitored with film badges and the mean whole-body film badge reading, when 99mTc-sestamibi was the imaging agent, was 360 microSv per month. Radiation reduction methods that decreased radiation exposure to staff were utilized. The most effective included the use of a lead face shield and lead lined storage container in the noninvasive imaging area, handling spills by shielding instead of decontamination and methods to reduce time spent in close proximity to the patient.« less

  14. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  15. Overload cascading failure on complex networks with heterogeneous load redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yueyi; Xing, Xiaoyun; Li, Menghui; Zeng, An; Wang, Yougui

    2017-09-01

    Many real systems including the Internet, power-grid and financial networks experience rare but large overload cascading failures triggered by small initial shocks. Many models on complex networks have been developed to investigate this phenomenon. Most of these models are based on the load redistribution process and assume that the load on a failed node shifts to nearby nodes in the networks either evenly or according to the load distribution rule before the cascade. Inspired by the fact that real power-grid tends to place the excess load on the nodes with high remaining capacities, we study a heterogeneous load redistribution mechanism in a simplified sandpile model in this paper. We find that weak heterogeneity in load redistribution can effectively mitigate the cascade while strong heterogeneity in load redistribution may even enlarge the size of the final failure. With a parameter θ to control the degree of the redistribution heterogeneity, we identify a rather robust optimal θ∗ = 1. Finally, we find that θ∗ tends to shift to a larger value if the initial sand distribution is homogeneous.

  16. Overcoming the stauchwall: Viscoelastic stress redistribution and the start of full-depth gliding snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelt, P.; Feistl, T.; Bühler, Y.; Buser, O.

    2012-08-01

    When a full-depth tensile crack opens in the mountain snowcover, internal forces are transferred from the fracture crown to the stauchwall. The stauchwall is located at the lower limit of a gliding zone and must carry the weight of the snowcover. The stauchwall can fail, leading to full-depth snow avalanches, or, it can withstand the stress redistribution. The snowcover often finds a new static equilibrium, despite the initial crack. We present a model describing how the snowcover reacts to the sudden transfer of the forces from the crown to the stauchwall. Our goal is to find the conditions for failure and the start of full-depth avalanches. The model balances the inertial forces of the gliding snowcover with the viscoelastic response of the stauchwall. We compute stresses, strain-rates and deformations during the stress redistribution and show that a new equilibrium state is not found directly, but depends on the viscoelastic properties of the snow, which are density and temperature dependent. During the stress redistribution the stauchwall encounters stresses and strain-rates that can be much higher than at the final equilibrium state. Because of the excess strain-rates, the stauchwall can fail in brittle compression before reaching the new equilibrium. Snow viscosity and the length of the gliding snow region are the two critical parameters governing the transition from stable snowpack gliding to avalanche flow. The model reveals why the formation of gliding snow avalanches is height invariant and how technical measures to prevent snowpack glide can be optimized to improve avalanche mitigation.

  17. Soil Organic Carbon Redistribution by Water Erosion – The Role of CO2 Emissions for the Carbon Budget

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Cammeraat, Erik L. H.; Romeijn, Paul; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    A better process understanding of how water erosion influences the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is sorely needed to unravel the role of soil erosion for the carbon (C) budget from local to global scales. The main objective of this study was to determine SOC redistribution and the complete C budget of a loess soil affected by water erosion. We measured fluxes of SOC, dissolved organic C (DOC) and CO2 in a pseudo-replicated rainfall-simulation experiment. We characterized different C fractions in soils and redistributed sediments using density fractionation and determined C enrichment ratios (CER) in the transported sediments. Erosion, transport and subsequent deposition resulted in significantly higher CER of the sediments exported ranging between 1.3 and 4.0. In the exported sediments, C contents (mg per g soil) of particulate organic C (POC, C not bound to soil minerals) and mineral-associated organic C (MOC) were both significantly higher than those of non-eroded soils indicating that water erosion resulted in losses of C-enriched material both in forms of POC and MOC. The averaged SOC fluxes as particles (4.7 g C m−2 yr−1) were 18 times larger than DOC fluxes. Cumulative emission of soil CO2 slightly decreased at the erosion zone while increased by 56% and 27% at the transport and depositional zone, respectively, in comparison to non-eroded soil. Overall, CO2 emission is the predominant form of C loss contributing to about 90.5% of total erosion-induced C losses in our 4-month experiment, which were equal to 18 g C m−2. Nevertheless, only 1.5% of the total redistributed C was mineralized to CO2 indicating a large stabilization after deposition. Our study also underlines the importance of C losses by particles and as DOC for understanding the effects of water erosion on the C balance at the interface of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24802350

  18. Redistributing wealth to families: the advantages of the MYRIADE model.

    PubMed

    Legendre, François; Lorgnet, Jean-Paul; Thibault, Florence

    2005-10-01

    This study aims to shed light on the main characteristics of the French system for redistributing wealth to families through tax revenues and social transfers. For the purposes of this exercise, the authors used the MYRIADE microsimulation model, which covers most of the redistribution system, though it is limited to monetary flows such as family benefits, housing allowances, minimum social welfare payments, income tax, and tax on furnished accommodation. The authors used a particular methodology to highlight the way this redistribution works; rather than calculate the difference between each family's disposable income and their gross primary income, they opted to isolate the variation in disposable income that could be attributed to the youngest member of each family where there is at least one child under the age of 25. The average increase in disposable income that this child contributes to his or her family amounts to in200 per month.

  19. Medicare financing and redistribution in british columbia, 1992 and 2002.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Kimberlyn

    2007-05-01

    Equity in healthcare in British Columbia is defined as the provision of services based on need rather than ability to pay and a separation of contributions to financing from the use of services. Physician and hospital services in Canada are financed mainly through general tax revenues, and there is a perception that this financing is progressive. This paper uses Gini coefficients, concentration indexes and Kakwani indexes of progressivity to assess the progressivity of medicare financing in British Columbia in 1992 and 2002. It also measures the overall redistributive effect of medicare services, considering both contributions to financing and use of hospital and physician services. The conclusion is that medicare does redistribute across income groups, but this redistribution is the result solely of the positive correlation between health status and income; financing is nearly proportionate across income groups, but use is higher among lower-income groups. Informed public debate requires a better understanding of these concepts of equity.

  20. Helical undulator based on partial redistribution of uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balal, N.; Bandurkin, I. V.; Bratman, V. L.; Fedotov, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    A new type of helical undulator based on redistribution of magnetic field of a solenoid by ferromagnetic helix has been proposed and studied both in theory and experiment. Such undulators are very simple and efficient for promising sources of coherent spontaneous THz undulator radiation from dense electron bunches formed in laser-driven photo-injectors.

  1. Anthropogenic radionuclides for estimating rates of soil redistribution by wind

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erosion of soil by wind and water is a degrading process that affects millions of hectares worldwide. Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons and the resulting fallout of anthropogenic radioisotopes, particularly Cesium 137, has made possible the estimation of mean soil redistribution rates. The pe...

  2. Anthropogenic radioisotopes to estimate rates of soil redistribution by wind

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erosion of soil by wind and water is a degrading process that affects millions of hectares worldwide. Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons and the resulting fallout of anthropogenic radioisotopes, particularly Cesium 137, has made possible the estimation of mean soil redistribution rates. The pe...

  3. Decentralisation and Interregional Redistribution in the Italian Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Irene; Zanardi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential impact of the reform designed to decentralise public education in Italy, currently under discussion, on interregional redistribution. The central government has always played a prominent financial and administrative role in the provision of compulsory education in Italy. This has had a strong…

  4. Modeling Water Redistribution in a Near-Surface Arid Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Berli, M.; Dijkema, J.; Koonce, J.

    2017-12-01

    Desert soils cover about one third of the Earth's land surface and play an important role in the ecology and hydrology of arid environments. Despite their large extend, relatively little is known about their near-surface (top centimeters to meter) water dynamics. Recent studies by Koonce (2016) and Dijkema et al. (2017) shed light on the water dynamics of near-surface arid soil but also revealed some of the challenges to simulate the water redistribution in arid soils. The goal of this study was to improve water redistribution simulations in near-surface arid soils by employing more advanced hydraulic conductivity functions. Expanding on the work by Dijkema et al. (2017), we used a HYDRUS-1D model with different hydraulic conductivity functions to simulate water redistribution within the soil as a function of precipitation, evaporation and drainage. Model calculations were compared with measured data from the SEPHAS weighing lysimeters in Boulder City, NV. Preliminary results indicate that water redistribution simulations of near-surface arid soils can be improved by using hydraulic conductivity functions that can capture capillary, film and vapor flow, like for example the Peter-Durner-Iden (PDI) model.

  5. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... will be based on the State's financial report to ACF for the Child Care and Development Fund (ACF-696... Section 98.64 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to the...

  6. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... will be based on the State's financial report to ACF for the Child Care and Development Fund (ACF-696... Section 98.64 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to the...

  7. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water by neotropical savanna trees.

    Treesearch

    Fabian G. Scholz; Sandra J. Bucci; Guillermo Goldstein; et al.

    2002-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of water transport by the roots of eight dominant Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) allowed bidirectional measurements of sap flow. The patterns of sap flow observed during the dry season in species with dimorphic roots systems were consistent with the occurrence of hydraulic redistribution of soil water, the movement of water from moist to drier...

  8. Redistribution, Recognition and Representation: Working against Pedagogies of Indifference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Keddie, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on an Australian government-commissioned research study that documented classroom pedagogies in 24 Queensland schools. The research created the model of "productive pedagogies", which conjoined what Nancy Fraser calls a politics of redistribution, recognition and representation. In this model pedagogies are…

  9. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST: TWEAKING THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) has recently been documented in Pacific Northwest forests, but the controls governing this process and its importance to shallow-rooted species are poorly understood. Our objective in this study was to manipulate the soil-root system to tease apart ...

  10. ORBIT modelling of fast particle redistribution induced by sawtooth instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doohyun; Podestà, Mario; Poli, Francesca; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2017-10-01

    Initial tests on NSTX-U show that introducing energy selectivity for sawtooth (ST) induced fast ion redistribution improves the agreement between experimental and simulated quantities, e.g. neutron rate. Thus, it is expected that a proper description of the fast particle redistribution due to ST can improve the modelling of ST instability and interpretation of experiments using a transport code. In this work, we use ORBIT code to characterise the redistribution of fast particles. In order to simulate a ST crash, a spatial and temporal displacement is implemented as ξ (ρ , t , θ , ϕ) = ∑ξmn (ρ , t) cos (mθ + nϕ) to produce perturbed magnetic fields from the equilibrium field B-> , δB-> = ∇ × (ξ-> × B->) , which affect the fast particle distribution. From ORBIT simulations, we find suitable amplitudes of ξ for each ST crash to reproduce the experimental results. The comparison of the simulation and the experimental results will be discussed as well as the dependence of fast ion redistribution on fast ion phase space variables (i.e. energy, magnetic moment and toroidal angular momentum). Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. CXCR2 inverse agonism detected by arrestin redistribution.

    PubMed

    Kredel, Simone; Wolff, Michael; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Moepps, Barbara; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Gierschik, Peter; Kistler, Barbara; Heilker, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    To study CXCR2 modulated arrestin redistribution, the authors employed arrestin as a fusion protein containing either the Aequorea victoria-derived enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or a recently developed mutant of eqFP611, a red fluorescent protein derived from Entacmaea quadricolor. This mutant, referred to as RFP611, had earlier been found to assume a dimeric quarternary structure. It was therefore employed in this work as a "tandem" (td) construct for pseudo-monomeric fusion protein labeling. Both arrestin fusion proteins, containing either td-RFP611 (Arr-td-RFP611) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP; Arr-EGFP), were found to colocalize with internalized fluorescently labeled Gro-alpha a few minutes after Gro-alpha addition. Intriguingly, however, Arr-td-RFP611 and Arr-EGFP displayed distinct cellular distribution patterns in the absence of any CXCR2-activating ligand. Under these conditions, Arr-td-RFP611 showed a largely homogeneous cytosolic distribution, whereas Arr-EGFP segregated, to a large degree, into granular spots. These observations indicate a higher sensitivity of Arr EGFP to the constitutive activity of CXCR2 and, accordingly, an increased arrestin redistribution to coated pits and endocytic vesicles. In support of this interpretation, the authors found the known CXCR2 antagonist Sch527123 to act as an inverse agonist with respect to Arr-EGFP redistribution. The inverse agonistic properties of Sch527123 were confirmed in vitro in a guanine nucleotide binding assay, revealing an IC(50) value similar to that observed for Arr-EGFP redistribution. Thus, the redistribution assay, when based on Arr-EGFP, enables the profiling of antagonistic test compounds with respect to inverse agonism. When based on Arr-td-RFP611, the assay may be employed to study CXCR2 agonism or neutral antagonism.

  12. Intrahepatic Flow Redistribution in Patients Treated with Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.spreafico@istitutotumori.mi.it; Morosi, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.morosi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Maccauro, Marco, E-mail: marco.maccauro@istitutotumori.mi.it

    2015-04-15

    IntroductionIn planning Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y)-radioembolizations, strategy problems arise in tumours with multiple arterial supplies. We aim to demonstrate that tumours can be treated via one main feeding artery achieving flow redistribution by embolizing accessory vessels.MethodsOne hundred {sup 90}Y-radioembolizations were performed on 90 patients using glass microspheres. In 19 lesions/17 patients, accessory branches were found feeding a minor tumour portion and embolized. In all 17 patients, the assessment of the complete perfusion was obtained by angiography and single photon emission computerized tomography–computerized tomography (SPECT–CT). Dosimetry, toxicity, and tumor response rate of the patients treated after flow redistribution were compared with themore » 83 standard-treated patients. Seventeen lesions in 15 patients with flow redistribution were chosen as target lesions and evaluated according to mRECIST criteria.ResultsIn all patients, the complete tumor perfusion was assessed immediately before radioembolization by angiography in all patients and after the {sup 90}Y-infusion by SPECT–CT in 15 of 17 patients. In the 15 assessable patients, the response rate in their 17 lesions was 3 CR, 8 PR, and 6 SD. Dosimetric and toxicity data, as well tumour response rate, were comparable with the 83 patients with regular vasculature.ConclusionsAll embolization procedures were performed successfully with no complications, and the flow redistribution was obtained in all cases. Results in term of toxicity, median dose administered, and radiological response were comparable with standard radioembolizations. Our findings confirmed the intratumoral flow redistribution after embolizing the accessory arteries, which makes it possible to treat the tumour through its single main feeding artery.« less

  13. Soil organic carbon redistribution by water erosion: An experimental rainfall simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Cammeraat, Erik; Romeijn, Paul; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Water erosion influences the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) in landscapes and there is a strong need to better understand these processes with respect to the carbon (C) budget, from local to global scales. We present a study in which the total carbon budget of a loess soil under erosion was determined in an experimental set-up. We measured fluxes of SOC, dissolved organic C (DOC) and CO2 in a climate controlled pseudo-replicated rainfall-simulation laboratory experiment. This approach has been rarely followed to integrate all components of the C budget in one experiment. We characterized different C fractions in soils and redistributed sediments using density fractionation and determined C enrichment ratios (CER) in the transported sediments. Erosion, transport and subsequent deposition resulted in a significantly higher CER of the sediments exported ranging between 1.3 and 4.0. In the exported sediments, C contents (mg per g soil) of particulate organic C (POC, C not bound to soil minerals) and mineral-associated organic C (MOC) were both significantly higher than those of non-eroded soils indicating that water erosion resulted in losses of C-enriched material both in forms of POC and MOC. The averaged SOC fluxes as particles (4.7 g C m-2 yr-1) were 18 times larger than DOC fluxes. Cumulative emission of soil CO2 slightly decreased at the erosion zone while increased by 27% at the deposition zone in comparison to non-eroded soils. Overall, CO2 emission was the predominant form of C loss contributing to about 90.5% of total erosion-induced C losses in our 4-month experiment. However, only 1.5 % of redistributed C was mineralized highlighting that the C sink induced by deposition is much larger than previously assumed. Our study also underlines the importance of C losses by particles and as DOC for understanding effects of water erosion on the C balance at the interface of terrestrial and aquatic systems. Furthermore our study revealed that the sediment

  14. Zone lines

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith

    2001-01-01

    Zone lines are narrow, usually dark markings formed in decaying wood. Zone lines are found most frequently in advanced white rot of hardwoods, although they occasionally are associated both with brown rot and with softwoods.

  15. 47 CFR 73.9001 - Redistribution control of digital television broadcasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Redistribution control of digital television... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Digital Broadcast Television Redistribution Control § 73.9001 Redistribution control of digital television broadcasts. Licensees of TV broadcast stations may utilize the...

  16. 13 CFR 309.1 - Redistributions under parts 303, 305 and 306.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Redistributions under parts 303, 305 and 306. 309.1 Section 309.1 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE REDISTRIBUTIONS OF INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE § 309.1 Redistributions under parts 303, 305...

  17. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  18. Solute redistribution in dendritic solidification with diffusion in the solid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of solute redistribution during dendritic solidification with diffusion in the solid has been performed using numerical techniques. The extent of diffusion is characterized by the instantaneous and average diffusion parameters. These parameters are functions of the diffusion Fourier number, the partition ratio and the fraction solid. Numerical results are presented as an approximate model, which is used to predict the average diffusion parameter and calculate the composition of the interdendritic liquid during solidification.

  19. Assessing income redistributive effect of health financing in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Mulenga, Arnold; Ataguba, John Ele-Ojo

    2017-09-01

    Ensuring an equitable health financing system is a major concern particularly in many developing countries. Internationally, there is a strong debate to move away from excessive reliance on direct out-of-pocket (OOP) spending towards a system that incorporates a greater element of risk pooling and thus affords greater protection for the poor. This is a major focus of the move towards universal health coverage (UHC). Currently, Zambia with high levels of poverty and income inequality is implementing health sector reforms for UHC through a social health insurance scheme. However, the way to identify the health financing mechanisms that are best suited to achieving this goal is to conduct empirical analysis and consider international evidence on funding universal health systems. This study assesses, for the first time, the progressivity of health financing and how it impacts on income inequality in Zambia. Three broad health financing mechanisms (general tax, a health levy and OOP spending) were considered. Data come from the 2010 nationally representative Zambian Living Conditions and Monitoring Survey with a sample size of 19,397 households. Applying standard methodologies, the findings show that total health financing in Zambia is progressive. It also leads to a statistically significant reduction in income inequality (i.e. a pro-poor redistributive effect estimated at 0.0110 (p < 0.01)). Similar significant pro-poor redistribution was reported for general taxes (0.0101 (p < 0.01)) and a health levy (0.0002 (p < 0.01)). However, the redistributive effect was not significant for OOP spending (0.0006). These results further imply that health financing redistributes income from the rich to the poor with a greater potential via general taxes. This points to areas where government policy may focus in attempting to reduce the high level of income inequality and to improve equity in health financing towards UHC in Zambia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. Cascading failures in interdependent systems under a flow redistribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingrui; Arenas, Alex; Yaǧan, Osman

    2018-02-01

    Robustness and cascading failures in interdependent systems has been an active research field in the past decade. However, most existing works use percolation-based models where only the largest component of each network remains functional throughout the cascade. Although suitable for communication networks, this assumption fails to capture the dependencies in systems carrying a flow (e.g., power systems, road transportation networks), where cascading failures are often triggered by redistribution of flows leading to overloading of lines. Here, we consider a model consisting of systems A and B with initial line loads and capacities given by {LA,i,CA ,i} i =1 n and {LB,i,CB ,i} i =1 n, respectively. When a line fails in system A , a fraction of its load is redistributed to alive lines in B , while remaining (1 -a ) fraction is redistributed equally among all functional lines in A ; a line failure in B is treated similarly with b giving the fraction to be redistributed to A . We give a thorough analysis of cascading failures of this model initiated by a random attack targeting p1 fraction of lines in A and p2 fraction in B . We show that (i) the model captures the real-world phenomenon of unexpected large scale cascades and exhibits interesting transition behavior: the final collapse is always first order, but it can be preceded by a sequence of first- and second-order transitions; (ii) network robustness tightly depends on the coupling coefficients a and b , and robustness is maximized at non-trivial a ,b values in general; (iii) unlike most existing models, interdependence has a multifaceted impact on system robustness in that interdependency can lead to an improved robustness for each individual network.

  1. Cascading failures in interdependent systems under a flow redistribution model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingrui; Arenas, Alex; Yağan, Osman

    2018-02-01

    Robustness and cascading failures in interdependent systems has been an active research field in the past decade. However, most existing works use percolation-based models where only the largest component of each network remains functional throughout the cascade. Although suitable for communication networks, this assumption fails to capture the dependencies in systems carrying a flow (e.g., power systems, road transportation networks), where cascading failures are often triggered by redistribution of flows leading to overloading of lines. Here, we consider a model consisting of systems A and B with initial line loads and capacities given by {L_{A,i},C_{A,i}}_{i=1}^{n} and {L_{B,i},C_{B,i}}_{i=1}^{n}, respectively. When a line fails in system A, a fraction of its load is redistributed to alive lines in B, while remaining (1-a) fraction is redistributed equally among all functional lines in A; a line failure in B is treated similarly with b giving the fraction to be redistributed to A. We give a thorough analysis of cascading failures of this model initiated by a random attack targeting p_{1} fraction of lines in A and p_{2} fraction in B. We show that (i) the model captures the real-world phenomenon of unexpected large scale cascades and exhibits interesting transition behavior: the final collapse is always first order, but it can be preceded by a sequence of first- and second-order transitions; (ii) network robustness tightly depends on the coupling coefficients a and b, and robustness is maximized at non-trivial a,b values in general; (iii) unlike most existing models, interdependence has a multifaceted impact on system robustness in that interdependency can lead to an improved robustness for each individual network.

  2. Resource redistribution in polydomous ant nest networks: local or global?

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Daniel W.; Robinson, Elva J.H.

    2014-01-01

    An important problem facing organisms in a heterogeneous environment is how to redistribute resources to where they are required. This is particularly complex in social insect societies as resources have to be moved both from the environment into the nest and between individuals within the nest. Polydomous ant colonies are split between multiple spatially separated, but socially connected, nests. Whether, and how, resources are redistributed between nests in polydomous colonies is unknown. We analyzed the nest networks of the facultatively polydomous wood ant Formica lugubris. Our results indicate that resource redistribution in polydomous F. lugubris colonies is organized at the local level between neighboring nests and not at the colony level. We found that internest trails connecting nests that differed more in their amount of foraging were stronger than trails between nests with more equal foraging activity. This indicates that resources are being exchanged directly from nests with a foraging excess to nests that require resources. In contrast, we found no significant relationships between nest properties, such as size and amount of foraging, and network measures such as centrality and connectedness. This indicates an absence of a colony-level resource exchange. This is a clear example of a complex behavior emerging as a result of local interactions between parts of a system. PMID:25214755

  3. Role of Sink Density in Nonequilibrium Chemical Redistribution in Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, Enrique Saez; Senninger, Oriane; Caro, Alfredo; ...

    2018-03-08

    Nonequilibrium chemical redistribution in open systems submitted to external forces, such as particle irradiation, leads to changes in the structural properties of the material, potentially driving the system to failure. Such redistribution is controlled by the complex interplay between the production of point defects, atomic transport rates, and the sink character of the microstructure. In this work, we analyze this interplay by means of a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) framework with an underlying atomistic model for the Fe-Cr model alloy to study the effect of ideal defect sinks on Cr concentration profiles, with a particular focus on the role ofmore » interface density. We observe that the amount of segregation decreases linearly with decreasing interface spacing. Within the framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes, a general analytical model is derived and assessed against the KMC simulations to elucidate the structure-property relationship of this system. Interestingly, in the kinetic regime where elimination of point defects at sinks is dominant over bulk recombination, the solute segregation does not directly depend on the dose rate but only on the density of sinks. Furthermore, this model provides new insight into the design of microstructures that mitigate chemical redistribution and improve radiation tolerance.« less

  4. Role of Sink Density in Nonequilibrium Chemical Redistribution in Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Enrique Saez; Senninger, Oriane; Caro, Alfredo

    Nonequilibrium chemical redistribution in open systems submitted to external forces, such as particle irradiation, leads to changes in the structural properties of the material, potentially driving the system to failure. Such redistribution is controlled by the complex interplay between the production of point defects, atomic transport rates, and the sink character of the microstructure. In this work, we analyze this interplay by means of a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) framework with an underlying atomistic model for the Fe-Cr model alloy to study the effect of ideal defect sinks on Cr concentration profiles, with a particular focus on the role ofmore » interface density. We observe that the amount of segregation decreases linearly with decreasing interface spacing. Within the framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes, a general analytical model is derived and assessed against the KMC simulations to elucidate the structure-property relationship of this system. Interestingly, in the kinetic regime where elimination of point defects at sinks is dominant over bulk recombination, the solute segregation does not directly depend on the dose rate but only on the density of sinks. Furthermore, this model provides new insight into the design of microstructures that mitigate chemical redistribution and improve radiation tolerance.« less

  5. Electromagnetic Field Redistribution in Metal Nanoparticle on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, Keke; Liu, Anping; Wei, Dapeng; Yu, Keke; Sun, Xiaonan; Yan, Sheng; Huang, Yingzhou

    2018-04-25

    Benefiting from the induced image charge on metal film, the light energy is confined on a film surface under metal nanoparticle dimer, which is called electromagnetic field redistribution. In this work, electromagnetic field distribution of metal nanoparticle monomer or dimer on graphene is investigated through finite-difference time-domain method. The results point out that the electromagnetic field (EM) redistribution occurs in this nanoparticle/graphene hybrid system at infrared region where light energy could also be confined on a monolayer graphene surface. Surface charge distribution was analyzed using finite element analysis, and surface-enhanced Raman spectrum (SERS) was utilized to verify this phenomenon. Furthermore, the data about dielectric nanoparticle on monolayer graphene demonstrate this EM redistribution is attributed to strong coupling between light-excited surface charge on monolayer graphene and graphene plasmon-induced image charge on dielectric nanoparticle surface. Our work extends the knowledge of monolayer graphene plasmon, which has a wide range of applications in monolayer graphene-related film.

  6. The impact of water vapor diodes on soil water redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuangji; Ankeny, Mark; Horton, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Diurnal soil temperature fluctuations are the prime cause for subsurface water vapor fluxes. In arid and semi-arid areas, water vapor flux is the dominant means of soil water redistribution. The directions of water vapor flux shift from upward to downward diurnally following the variations of the soil thermal gradient. A water vapor diode (WVD), acting as a check valve, allows water vapor flux in one direction but heat flux in both directions. By installing a subsurface WVD, it is possible to impose direction-controlled vapor fluxes, and WVDs can be used to accumulate or remove water in particular soil layers. The egg carton shape, with pores situated at selected peaks and valleys, is a possible design for WVDs. In this study, we provide the concept and the properties of the ideal WVDs, and we discuss four WVD configurations to control soil water redistribution. Numerical simulation is used to evaluate the impacts of the ideal WVDs. The results indicate that WVDs can increase local water contents by at least 0.1 m3m-3 in a silt loam. For a fixed initial water and thermal condition, the effect of WVDs is related to the deployment depth and distance between two consecutive WVDs. WVDs can be used to manipulate soil water redistribution and accumulate water at specific depths to support plant growth. The numerical simulation results indicate the potential effectiveness of the ideal WVDs, and field tests should be performed to determine their function under specific soil conditions.

  7. Role of Sink Density in Nonequilibrium Chemical Redistribution in Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Enrique; Senninger, Oriane; Caro, Alfredo; Soisson, Frédéric; Nastar, Maylise; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2018-03-01

    Nonequilibrium chemical redistribution in open systems submitted to external forces, such as particle irradiation, leads to changes in the structural properties of the material, potentially driving the system to failure. Such redistribution is controlled by the complex interplay between the production of point defects, atomic transport rates, and the sink character of the microstructure. In this work, we analyze this interplay by means of a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) framework with an underlying atomistic model for the Fe-Cr model alloy to study the effect of ideal defect sinks on Cr concentration profiles, with a particular focus on the role of interface density. We observe that the amount of segregation decreases linearly with decreasing interface spacing. Within the framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes, a general analytical model is derived and assessed against the KMC simulations to elucidate the structure-property relationship of this system. Interestingly, in the kinetic regime where elimination of point defects at sinks is dominant over bulk recombination, the solute segregation does not directly depend on the dose rate but only on the density of sinks. This model provides new insight into the design of microstructures that mitigate chemical redistribution and improve radiation tolerance.

  8. Role of Silica Redistribution in the Rate-State Behavior of Megathrusts: Field Observations and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D. M.; Den Hartog, S. A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of ancient fault zones and results of high temperature friction experiments indicate that silica redistribution influences the rate (response to velocity increases) and state (time-dependent healing) behavior of megathrusts. The Kodiak Accretionary Complex in Alaska has four shear zones that record plate boundary deformation: the Ghost Rocks mélange, the Uganik thrust, the Uyak mélange, and the central belt of the Kodiak Formation. All these examples of underplated rocks represent top-toward-the-trench shear zones that extend along the plate margin for 100's of kms. The first three examples were accreted within the seismogenic zone and record a progressive history from stratal disruption and particulate flow to localized shearing on pervasive web-like arrays of scaly microfaults in shales. Microfaults show evidence for silica dissolution and local reprecipitation in dilational stepovers and in intensely veined sandstone blocks. The fourth example (the central belt) was accreted further downdip, and these rocks have pervasive, regularly spaced en echelon quartz vein systems. Microstructures within veins indicate periodic cracking and sealing during progressive simple shear. Silica depletion zones adjacent to veins indicate diffusive transport of silica in response to local chemical potential gradients. A simple 1-D transport-kinetics model indicates that cracks in this case could be filled with quartz in less than a year and in as little as a week. Rock friction experiments on lithologies similar to Kodiak examples depict three distinct regimes of frictional behavior as a function of increasing temperature, with velocity weakening in a T range that can be related to the seismogenic zone. These three regimes are predicted by a model for gouge deformation that includes thermally activated pressure solution during shear of quartz grains embedded in a foliated matrix. The slip instabilities that characterize the seismogenic zone may therefore be related

  9. Post-fire redistribution of soil carbon and nitrogen at a grassland-shrubland ecotone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Guan; Li, Junran; Ravi, Sujith; Dukes, David; Gonzales, Howell B.; Sankey, Joel B.

    2018-01-01

    The rapid conversion of grasslands into shrublands has been observed in many arid and semiarid regions worldwide. Studies have shown that fire can provide certain forms of reversibility for shrub-grass transition due to resource homogenization and shrub mortality, especially in the early stages of shrub encroachment. Field-level post-fire soil resource redistribution has rarely been tested. Here we used prescribed fire in a shrubland-grassland transition zone in the northern Chihuahuan Desert to test the hypothesis that fire facilitates the remobilization of nutrient-enriched soil from shrub microsites to grass and bare microsites and thereby reduces the spatial heterogeneity of soil resources. Results show that the shrub microsites had the lowest water content compared to grass and bare microsites after fire, even when rain events occurred. Significant differences of total soil carbon (TC) and total soil nitrogen (TN) among the three microsites disappeared one year after the fire. The spatial autocorrelation distance increased from 1~2 m, approximately the mean size of an individual shrub canopy, to over 5 m one year after the fire for TC and TN. Patches of high soil C and N decomposed one year after the prescribed fire. Overall, fire stimulates the transfer of soil C and N from shrub microsites to nutrient-depleted grass and bare microsites. Such a redistribution of soil C and N, coupled with the reduced soil water content under the shrub canopies, suggests that fire might influence the competition between shrubs and grasses, leading to a higher grass, compared to shrub, coverage in this ecotone.

  10. [Biodistribution and Postmortem Redistribution of Emamectin Benzoate in Intoxicated Mice].

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei-wei; Lin, Yu-cai; Lu, Yan-xu

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the lethal blood level, the target organs and tissues, the toxicant storage depots and the postmortem redistribution in mice died of emamectin benzoate poisoning. The mice model of emamectin benzoate poisoning was established via intragastric injection. The main poisoning symptoms and the clinical death times of mice were observed and recorded dynamically in the acute poisoning group as well as the sub-acute poisoning death group. The pathological and histomorphological changes of organs and tissues were observed after poisoning death. The biodistribution and postmortem redistribution of emamectin benzoate in the organs and tissues of mice were assayed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 0h, 24h, 48h and 72h after death. The lethal blood concentrations and the concentrations of emamectin benzoate were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at different time points after death. The symptoms of nervous and respiratory system were observed within 15-30 min after intragastric injection. The average time of death was (45.8 ± 7.9) min in the acute poisoning group and (8.0 ± 1.4) d in the sub-acute poisoning group, respectively. The range of acute lethal blood level was 447.164 0-524.463 5 mg/L. The pathological changes of the organs and tissues were observed via light microscope and immunofluorescence microscope. The changes of emamectin benzoate content in the blood, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney and brain of poisoning mice showed regularity within 72 h after death (P < 0.05). The target organs of emamectin benzoate poisoning include heart, liver, kidney, lung, brain and contact position (stomach). The toxicant storage depots are kidney and liver. There is emamectin benzoate postmortem redistribution in mice.

  11. Carbon redistribution by erosion processes in an intensively disturbed catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Martínez-Mena, María; Pérez Cutillas, Pedro; de Vente, Joris; Barberá, Gonzalo G.; Mosch, Wouter; Navarro Cano, Jose Antonio; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how organic carbon moves with sediments along the fluvial system is crucial to close catchment scale carbon budgets. Especially challenging is the analysis of organic carbon dynamics during fluvial transport in heterogeneous, fragile and disturbed environments with ephemeral and intense hydrological pulses, typical of Mediterranean conditions. This paper explores the catchment scale organic carbon redistribution by lateral flows in extreme Mediterranean environmental conditions from a geomorphological perspective. The study area is a catchment (Cárcavo) in SE Spain with a semiarid climate, erodible lithologies, shallow soils, and highly disturbed by agricultural terraces, land levelling, reforestations and construction of check-dams. To increase understanding of erosion induced catchment scale organic carbon redistribution, we studied the subcatchments of 8 check-dams distributed along the catchment main channel in detail. We determined 137Cs, physicochemical characteristics and organic carbon pools of soils and sediments deposited behind each check-dam, performed spatial analysis of properties of the catchment and buffer areas around check-dams, and carried out geomorphological analysis of the slope-channel connections. Soils showed very low Total Organic Carbon (TOC) values oscillating between 15.2 and 4.4 g Kg-1 for forest and agricultural soils, respectively. Sediments mobilized by erosion were poor in TOC compared to the eroded (forest) soils (6.6±0.7 g Kg-1), and the redistribution of organic carbon through the catchment, especially of the Mineral Associated Organic Carbon (MAC) pool, showed the same pattern as clay particles and 137Cs. The TOC erosion rates (0.031±0.03 Mg ha-1 y-1) were comparable to others reported for subhumid Mediterranean catchments and to those modelled worldwide for pasture land. Those lateral fluxes were equivalent to 10.4 % of the TOC stock from the topsoil at the moment of the check-dam construction and

  12. Ozone production potential following convective redistribution of biomass burning emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Scala, John R.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    1992-01-01

    The effects of deep convection on the potential for forming ozone in the free troposphere have been simulated for regions where the trace gas composition is influenced by biomass burning. Cloud photochemical and dynamic simulations based on observations in the 1980 and 1985 Brazilian campaigns form the basis of a sensitivity study of the ozone production potential under differing conditions. It is seen that there is considerably more ozone formed in the middle and upper troposphere when convection has redistributed hydrocarbons, NO(x), and CO compared to the example of no convection.

  13. Frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom

    SciTech Connect

    Casini, R.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, M.; Manso Sainz, R.

    2014-08-20

    We present a generalized frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom in an arbitrary magnetic field. This result is derived within a new formulation of the quantum problem of coherent scattering of polarized radiation by atoms in the collisionless regime. The general theory, which is based on a diagrammatic treatment of the atom-photon interaction, is still a work in progress. However, the results anticipated here are relevant enough for the study of the magnetism of the solar chromosphere and of interest for astrophysics in general.

  14. Redistribution of resonance radiation. II - The effect of magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omont, A.; Cooper, J.; Smith, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    Previously obtained results for scattering of radiation in the presence of collisions are restated in a density matrix formalism which employs an irreducible-tensor description of the radiation field. This formalism is particularly useful for problems associated with radiative transfer theory. The redistribution is then extended to include the effect of a weak magnetic field. By averaging over a finite bandwidth which is on the order of the Doppler width, simplified expressions of physical significance for the scattering in the Doppler core and the Lorentz wings are obtained. Expressions are also obtained for the corresponding source function of radiative transfer theory.

  15. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of themore » SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. -- Highlights: •Puromycin exhibits the O-propargyl-puromycin effect. •Puromycin induces SUMO redistribution upon proteasome inhibition. •Ubiquitin and RNF4 accumulate at PML-nuclear bodies with SUMO-2/3. •The ubiquitin family may function in nuclear sequestration of immature proteins.« less

  16. Heat-induced redistribution of surface oxide in uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swissa, Eli; Shamir, Noah; Mintz, Moshe H.; Bloch, Joseph

    1990-09-01

    The redistribution of oxygen and uranium metal at the vicinity of the metal-oxide interface of native and grown oxides due to vacuum thermal annealing was studied for uranium and uranium-chromium alloy using Auger depth profiling and metallographic techniques. It was found that uranium metal is segregating out through the uranium oxide layer for annealing temperatures above 450°C. At the same time the oxide is redistributed in the metal below the oxide-metal interface in a diffusion like process. By applying a diffusion equation of a finite source, the diffusion coefficients for the process were obtained from the oxygen depth profiles measured for different annealing times. An Arrhenius like behavior was found for the diffusion coefficient between 400 and 800°C. The activation energy obtained was Ea = 15.4 ± 1.9 kcal/mole and the pre-exponential factor, D0 = 1.1 × 10 -8cm2/ s. An internal oxidation mechanism is proposed to explain the results.

  17. Roots bridge water to nutrients: a study of utilizing hydraulic redistribution through root systems to extract nutrients in the dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    The rhizosphere is the region of soil that surrounds by individual plant roots. While its small volume and narrow region compared to bulk soil, the rhizosphere regulates numerous processes that determine physical structure, nutrient distribution, and biodiversity of soils. One of the most important and distinct functions of the rhizosphere is the capacity of roots to bridge and redistribute soil water from wet soil layers to drier layers. This process was identified and defined as hydraulic lift or hydraulic redistribution, a passive process driven by gradients in water potentials and it has attracted much research attention due to its important role in global water circulation and agriculture security. However, while previous studies mostly focused on the hydrological or physiological impacts of hydraulic redistribution, limited research has been conducted to elucidate its role in nutrient cycling and uptake. In this study, we aim to test the possibility of utilizing hydraulic redistribution to facilitate the nutrient movement and uptake from resource segregated zone. Our overarching hypothesis is that plants can extract nutrients from the drier but nutrient-rich regions by supplying sufficient amounts of water from the wet but nutrient-deficient regions. To test our hypothesis, we designed split-root systems of tomatoes with unequal supply of water and nutrients in different root compartments. More specifically, we transplanted tomato seedlings into sand or soil mediums, and grew them under conditions with alternate 12-h lightness and darkness. We continuously monitored the temperature, water and nutrient content of soils in these separated compartments. The above and below ground biomass were also quantified to evaluate the impacts on the plant growth. The results were compared to a control with evenly supply of water and nutrients to assess the plant growth, nutrient leaching and uptake without hydraulic redistribution.

  18. Automatic generation of efficient array redistribution routines for distributed memory multicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaswamy, Shankar; Banerjee, Prithviraj

    1994-01-01

    Appropriate data distribution has been found to be critical for obtaining good performance on Distributed Memory Multicomputers like the CM-5, Intel Paragon and IBM SP-1. It has also been found that some programs need to change their distributions during execution for better performance (redistribution). This work focuses on automatically generating efficient routines for redistribution. We present a new mathematical representation for regular distributions called PITFALLS and then discuss algorithms for redistribution based on this representation. One of the significant contributions of this work is being able to handle arbitrary source and target processor sets while performing redistribution. Another important contribution is the ability to handle an arbitrary number of dimensions for the array involved in the redistribution in a scalable manner. Our implementation of these techniques is based on an MPI-like communication library. The results presented show the low overheads for our redistribution algorithm as compared to naive runtime methods.

  19. The redistributive effect of health care finance in twelve OECD countries.

    PubMed

    van Doorslaer, E; Wagstaff, A; van der Burg, H; Christiansen, T; Citoni, G; Di Biase, R; Gerdtham, U G; Gerfin, M; Gross, L; Häkinnen, U; John, J; Johnson, P; Klavus, J; Lachaud, C; Lauritsen, J; Leu, R; Nolan, B; Pereira, J; Propper, C; Puffer, F; Rochaix, L; Schellhorn, M; Sundberg, G; Winkelhake, O

    1999-06-01

    The OECD countries finance their health care through a mixture of taxes, social insurance contributions, private insurance premiums and out-of-pocket payments. The various payment sources have very different implications for both vertical and horizontal equity and on redistributive effect which is a function of both. This paper presents results on the income redistribution consequences of the health care financing mixes adopted in twelve OECD countries by decomposing the overall income redistributive effect into a progressivity, horizontal inequity and reranking component. The general finding of this study is that the vertical effect is much more important than horizontal inequity and reranking in determining the overall redistributive effect but that their relative importance varies by source of payment. Public finance sources tend to have small positive redistributive effects and less differential treatment while private financing sources generally have (larger) negative redistributive effects which are to a substantial degree caused by differential treatment.

  20. Modeling Microgravity Induced Fluid Redistribution Autoregulatory and Hydrostatic Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J. G.; Werner, C.; Nelson, E. S.; Feola, A.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Space flight induces a marked cephalad (headward) redistribution of blood and interstitial fluid potentially resulting in a loss of venous tone and reduction in heart muscle efficiency upon introduction into the microgravity environment. Using various types of computational models, we are investigating how this fluid redistribution may induce intracranial pressure changes, relevant to reported reductions in astronaut visual acuity, part of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Methods: We utilize a lumped parameter cardiovascular system (CVS) model, augmented by compartments comprising the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) space, as the primary tool to describe how microgravity, and the associated lack of hydrostatic gradient, impacts fluid redistribution. Models of ocular fluid pressures and biomechanics then accept the output of the above model as boundary condition input to allow more detailed, local analysis (see IWS Abstract by Ethier et al.). Recently, we enhanced the capabilities our previously reported CVS model through the implementation of robust autoregulatory mechanisms and a more fundamental approach to the implementation of hydrostatic mechanisms. Modifying the approach of Blanco et al., we implemented auto-regulation in a quasi-static manner, as an averaged effect across the span of one heartbeat. This approach reduced the higher frequency perturbations from the regulatory mechanism and was intended to allow longer simulation times (days) than models that implement within-beat regulatory mechanisms (minutes). A more fundamental approach to hydrostatics was implemented by a quasi-1D approach, in which compartment descriptions include compartment length, orientation and relative position, allowed for modeling of body orientation, relative body positioning and, in the future, alternative gravity environments. At this time the inclusion of hydrostatic mechanisms supplies additional capabilities to train and validate the CVS model

  1. Impact of hydraulic redistribution on multispecies vegetation water use in a semi-arid ecosystem: An experimental and modeling synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Kumar, P.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Scott, R. L.; Hendryx, S. M.; Sanchez-Canete, E. P.; Minor, R. L.; Colella, A.

    2017-12-01

    A key challenge in critical zone science is to understand and predict the interaction between aboveground and belowground ecohydrologic processes. One of the links that facilitates the interaction is hydraulic redistribution (HR), a phenomenon by which roots serve as preferential pathways for water movement from wet to dry soil layers. We use a multi-layer canopy model in conjunction with experimental data to examine the influence of HR on eco-hydrologic processes, such as transpiration, soil evaporation, and soil moisture, which characterize the competitive and facilitative dynamics between velvet mesquite and understory bunchgrass. Both measured and simulated results show that hydraulic descent (HD) dominates sap flux during the wet monsoon season, whereas hydraulic lift (HL) occurs between precipitation events. About 17% of precipitation is absorbed as soil-moisture, with the rest of the precipitation returning to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration. In the wet season, 13% of precipitation is transferred to deep soil (>2m) through mesquite roots, and in the dry season, 9% of this redistributed water is transported back to shallow soil depth (<0.5m). Assuming water supplied through HR is well-mixed with moisture transported directly through the soil matrix and supports vegetation evapotranspiration, HR supports about 47% of mesquite transpiration and 9% of understory transpiration. Through modeling and experimental synthesis, this study demonstrates that in the dry land ecosystem of southwestern U.S., Mesquite exhibits competitive advantage over understory bunchgrass through HR.

  2. Centripetal myosin redistribution in thrombin-stimulated platelets. Relationship to platelet Factor 4 secretion.

    PubMed

    Painter, R G; Ginsberg, M H

    1984-11-01

    redistributes the myosinrich structure and organelle zone. Conceivably this inward force may not only accelerate granule-granule fusion to form intracellular secretory vacuoles, but may also provide aid in their extrusion toward the platelet plasma membrane.

  3. Spacecraft Spin Rate Change due to Propellant Redistribution Between Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyu Hong

    1984-09-01

    A bubble trapped in the liquid manifold of INTELSAT IV F-7 spacecraft caused a mass imbalance between the System 1 propellant tanks and a wobble half angle of 0.38 degree to 0.48 degree. A maneuver in May 14, 1980 passed the bubble through the axial jet and allowed propellant to redistribute. A 0.2 rpm change in spin rate was observed with an exponential decay time constant of 6 minutes. In this paper, moment of inertia, tank geometry and hydrodynamics models are derived to match the observed spin rate data. The values of the total mass of the propellant considered were 16, 19 and 20 Kgs with corresponding mass imbalances of 14.3, 15 and 15.1 Kgs, respectively. The result shows excellent agreement with observed spin rate data but it was necessary to assume a greater mass of hydrazine in the tanks than propellant accounting indicated.

  4. From microscopic taxation and redistribution models to macroscopic income distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; Modanese, Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    We present here a general framework, expressed by a system of nonlinear differential equations, suitable for the modeling of taxation and redistribution in a closed society. This framework allows one to describe the evolution of income distribution over the population and to explain the emergence of collective features based on knowledge of the individual interactions. By making different choices of the framework parameters, we construct different models, whose long-time behavior is then investigated. Asymptotic stationary distributions are found, which enjoy similar properties as those observed in empirical distributions. In particular, they exhibit power law tails of Pareto type and their Lorenz curves and Gini indices are consistent with some real world ones.

  5. Numerical simulation of abutment pressure redistribution during face advance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klishin, S. V.; Lavrikov, S. V.; Revuzhenko, A. F.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation data on the abutment pressure redistribution in rock mass during face advance, including isolines of maximum shear stress and pressure epures. The stress state of rock in the vicinity of a breakage heading is calculated by the finite element method using a 2D nonlinear model of a structurally heterogeneous medium with regard to plasticity and internal self-balancing stress. The thus calculated stress field is used as input data for 3D discrete element modeling of the process. The study shows that the abutment pressure increases as the roof span extends and that the distance between the face breast and the peak point of this pressure depends on the elastoplastic properties and internal self-balancing stress of a rock medium.

  6. Landform Erosion and Volatile Redistribution on Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey Morgan; Howard, Alan D.; McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, Paul M.; Wood, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    We have been modeling landscape evolution on the Galilean satellites driven by volatile transport. Our work directly addresses some of the most fundamental issues pertinent to deciphering icy Galilean satellite geologic histories by employing techniques currently at the forefront of terrestrial, martian, and icy satellite landscape evolution studies [e.g., 1-6], including modeling of surface and subsurface energy and volatile exchanges, and computer simulation of long-term landform evolution by a variety of processes. A quantitative understanding of the expression and rates of landform erosion, and of volatile redistribution on landforms, is especially essential in interpreting endogenic landforms that have, in many cases, been significantly modified by erosion [e.g., 7-9].

  7. Income Redistribution Predicts Greater Life Satisfaction Across Individual, National, and Cultural Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Felix

    2017-08-03

    The widening income gap between the rich and the poor has important social implications. Governmental-level income redistribution through tax and welfare policies presents an opportunity to reduce income inequality and its negative consequences. The current longitudinal studies examined whether within-region changes in income redistribution over time relate to life satisfaction. Moreover, I examined potential moderators of this relationship to test the strong versus weak hypotheses of income redistribution. The strong hypothesis posits that income redistribution is beneficial to most. The weak hypothesis posits that income redistribution is beneficial to some and damaging to others. Using a nationally representative sample of 57,932 German respondents from 16 German states across 30 years (Study 1) and a sample of 112,876 respondents from 33 countries across 24 years (Study 2), I found that within-state and within-nation changes in income redistribution over time were associated with life satisfaction. The models predicted that a 10% reduction in Gini through income redistribution in Germany increased life satisfaction to the same extent as an 37% increase in annual income (Study 1), and a 5% reduction in Gini through income redistribution increased life satisfaction to the same extent as a 11% increase in GDP (Study 2). These associations were positive across individual, national, and cultural characteristics. Increases in income redistribution predicted greater satisfaction for tax-payers and welfare-receivers, for liberals and conservatives, and for the poor and the rich. These findings support the strong hypothesis of income redistribution and suggest that redistribution policies may play an important role in societal well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Compositional redistribution during casting of Hg sub 0.8 Cd sub 0.2 Te alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Perry, G. L. E.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of Hg(0.8)Cd(0.2)Te ingots was cast both vertically and horizontally under well-defined thermal conditions by using a two-zone furnace with isothermal heat-pipe liners. The main objective of the experiments was to establish correlations between casting parameters and compositional redistribution and to develop ground-based data for a proposed flight experiment of casting of Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys under reduced gravity conditions. The compositional variations along the axial and radial directions were determined by precision density measurements, infrared transmission spectra, and X-ray energy dispersion spectrometry. Comparison between the experimental results and a numerical simulation of the solidification process of Hg(0.8)Cd(0.2)Te is described.

  9. Soil quality and water redistribution influences on plant production over low hillslopes on reclaimed mined land

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A basic part of soils’ delivery of ecosystem services is the interaction between plant growth response to soil quality (SQ) factors at point scale and water redistribution effects at hillslope scale. To study the influence of SQ-indicator properties and water redistribution, we examined hillslope pr...

  10. Managing consequences of climate-driven species redistribution requires integration of ecology, conservation and social science.

    PubMed

    Bonebrake, Timothy C; Brown, Christopher J; Bell, Johann D; Blanchard, Julia L; Chauvenet, Alienor; Champion, Curtis; Chen, I-Ching; Clark, Timothy D; Colwell, Robert K; Danielsen, Finn; Dell, Anthony I; Donelson, Jennifer M; Evengård, Birgitta; Ferrier, Simon; Frusher, Stewart; Garcia, Raquel A; Griffis, Roger B; Hobday, Alistair J; Jarzyna, Marta A; Lee, Emma; Lenoir, Jonathan; Linnetved, Hlif; Martin, Victoria Y; McCormack, Phillipa C; McDonald, Jan; McDonald-Madden, Eve; Mitchell, Nicola; Mustonen, Tero; Pandolfi, John M; Pettorelli, Nathalie; Possingham, Hugh; Pulsifer, Peter; Reynolds, Mark; Scheffers, Brett R; Sorte, Cascade J B; Strugnell, Jan M; Tuanmu, Mao-Ning; Twiname, Samantha; Vergés, Adriana; Villanueva, Cecilia; Wapstra, Erik; Wernberg, Thomas; Pecl, Gretta T

    2018-02-01

    Climate change is driving a pervasive global redistribution of the planet's species. Species redistribution poses new questions for the study of ecosystems, conservation science and human societies that require a coordinated and integrated approach. Here we review recent progress, key gaps and strategic directions in this nascent research area, emphasising emerging themes in species redistribution biology, the importance of understanding underlying drivers and the need to anticipate novel outcomes of changes in species ranges. We highlight that species redistribution has manifest implications across multiple temporal and spatial scales and from genes to ecosystems. Understanding range shifts from ecological, physiological, genetic and biogeographical perspectives is essential for informing changing paradigms in conservation science and for designing conservation strategies that incorporate changing population connectivity and advance adaptation to climate change. Species redistributions present challenges for human well-being, environmental management and sustainable development. By synthesising recent approaches, theories and tools, our review establishes an interdisciplinary foundation for the development of future research on species redistribution. Specifically, we demonstrate how ecological, conservation and social research on species redistribution can best be achieved by working across disciplinary boundaries to develop and implement solutions to climate change challenges. Future studies should therefore integrate existing and complementary scientific frameworks while incorporating social science and human-centred approaches. Finally, we emphasise that the best science will not be useful unless more scientists engage with managers, policy makers and the public to develop responsible and socially acceptable options for the global challenges arising from species redistributions. © 2017 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  11. Local redistribution of blood under the effect of fixation stress against a background of hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalev, O. A.; Lysak, V. F.; Severovostokova, V. I.; Shermetevskaya, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    Fixation stress was used as a model of emotional disturbance. The effect of previous restrictions on mobility on the local redistribution of blood resulting from fixation stress was examined. Disturbances in carbohydrate which result from prolonged hypokinesia was studied. Radioactivity was used to determine the local redistribution of blood. Modified factor analysis was used to study the results of the experiment.

  12. Redistribution kinetics of Ga and Al substitutions in yttrium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röschmann, P.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the octahedral-tetrahedral site redistribution rate of Ga or Al and Fe in YIG in the temperature range 773 to 1523 K. The activation energy for the cation transfer decreases with increasing the oxygen vacancy concentration by annealing. A screening model describes qualitatively the effects of enhanced cation redistribution.

  13. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and...) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.24 Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. (a) May FNS...

  14. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and... FOOD PROGRAM § 247.24 Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. (a) May FNS... agency must use 95 percent of its original caseload allocation to be eligible for additional caseload...

  15. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and... FOOD PROGRAM § 247.24 Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. (a) May FNS... agency must use 95 percent of its original caseload allocation to be eligible for additional caseload...

  16. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and... FOOD PROGRAM § 247.24 Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. (a) May FNS... agency must use 95 percent of its original caseload allocation to be eligible for additional caseload...

  17. Hydraulic redistribution in a Douglas-fir forest: lessons from system manipulations.

    Treesearch

    J. Renée Brooks; Frederick C. Meinzer; Jeffery M. Warren; Jean-Christophe Domec; Rob Coulombe

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) occurs in many ecosystems; however, key questions remain about its consequences at the ecosystem level. The objectives of the present study were to quantify seasonal variation in HR and its driving force, and to manipulate the soil-root system to elucidate physiological components controlling HR and utilization of redistributed water. In...

  18. 47 CFR 76.1909 - Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Redistribution control of unencrypted digital... Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content. (a) For the purposes of this section, the terms unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content, EIT, PMT, broadcast flag, covered...

  19. Inequality and Redistribution Policy Issues: Principles and Swedish Experience; Comment on Lindbeck's Paper [and] Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindbeck, Assar

    Alternative methods of redistribution policy in mixed economies are compared in this paper. The paper deals with the objectives, methods, and problems in redistribution policy. The chief objective is to highlight principles and general problems, drawing heavily on the experiences of Sweden. This country is chosen as a case study since attempts to…

  20. Development Planning and Population Growth and Redistribution in the Republic of Iraq.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Attar, M. E.; Salman, A. D.

    Utilizing the 1947, 1957, and l965 census data and the 1970 preliminary population count, the relationship between population growth and redistribution and development planning in Iraq was examined. Trends in rural-urban population growth, migration, and population redistribution were examined as they pertained to the socioeconomic development…

  1. Adsorption isotherms of water on mica: redistribution and film growth.

    PubMed

    Malani, Ateeque; Ayappa, K G

    2009-01-29

    Adsorption isotherms of water on muscovite mica are obtained using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations over a wide range of relative vapor pressures, p/p(0) at 298 K. Three distinct stages are observed in the adsorption isotherm. A sharp rise in the water coverage occurs for 0 < p/p(0) < 0.1. This is followed by a relatively slow increase in the coverage for 0.1 < or = p/p(0) < or = 0.7. Above p/p(0) = 0.7, a second increase in the coverage occurs due to the adsorption of water with bulklike features. The derived film thickness and isotherm shape for the simple point charge (SPC) water model is in excellent agreement with recent experiments of Balmer et al. [ Langmuir 2008 , 24 , 1566 ]. A novel observation is the significant redistribution of water between adsorbed layers as the water film develops. This redistribution is most pronounced for 0.1 < or = p/p(0) < or = 0.7, where water is depleted from the inner layers and film growth is initiated on the outer layer. During this stage, potassium hydration is found to play a dominant role in the rearrangement of water near the mica surface. The analysis of structural features reveals a strongly bound first layer of water molecules occupying the ditrigonal cavities between the potassium ions. In-plane structure of oxygen in the second layer, which forms part of the first hydration shell of potassium, reveals a liquidlike structure with the oxygen-oxygen pair correlation function displaying features similar to bulk water. Isosteric heats of adsorption were found to be in good agreement with the differential microcalorimetric data of Rakhmatkariev ( Clays Clay Miner. 2006 , 54 , 402 ), over the entire range of pressures investigated. Both SPC and extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water models were found to yield qualitatively similar adsorption and structural characteristics, with the SPC/E model predicting lower coverages than the SPC model for p/p(0) > 0.7.

  2. Does Aggregation Affect the Redistribution and Quality of Eroded SOC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaxian; Kuhn, Nikolaus

    2015-04-01

    A substantial amount of literature has discussed the impacts of soil erosion on global carbon cycling. However, numerous gaps in our knowledge remain unaddressed, for instance, the biogeochemical fate of displaced SOC during transport being one of them. The transport distance and the quality of eroded SOC are the two major factors that determine its fate. Previous laboratory-based research had demonstrated that the effects of aggregation can potentially shorten the transport distance of eroded SOC. The mineralization potential of SOC also differs in sediment fractions of different likely transport distances. It is therefore essential to examine the transport distance and quality of eroded SOC under field conditions with natural rainfall as the agent of erosion. Soil samples from a silty clay soil from Switzerland and a sandy soil from Denmark, were collected in the field this summer after natural rainfall events. The soil from Switzerland was sampled from a field of maize in St. Ursanne (47°20' N 7°09' E) on August 6th, 2014 after a natural rainfall event. A depositional fan consisting of aggregated sediment was formed outside the lower edge of the field. The sandy soil from Denmark was sampled from a farm in Foulum (56°30' N, 9°35' W) on September 4, 2014, after a series of natural rainfall events. Soil samples were collected at different topographic positions along the two slopes. All the soil samples from the two farms were fractionated by a settling tube. Bulk soil from Switzerland and Denmark was also dispersed by ultrasound. The SOC contents of all bulk soils and associated fractions were determined using a carbon analyzer Leco 612 at 1000°C. The quality of SOC in different settling fractions collected from various topographic positions were also determined by stable isotopes of C and N (13C and 15N). Our results show that 1) the aggregate specific SOC distribution evidently differs from the mineral particle specific SOC distribution, indicating that re-distribution

  3. Visualising landscape evolution: the effects of resolution on soil redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoorl, Jeroen M.; Claessens, Lieven; (A) Veldkamp, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Landscape forming processes such as erosion by water, land sliding by water and gravity or ploughing by gravity, are closely related to resolution and land use changes. These processes may be controlled and influenced by multiple bio-physical and socio-economic driving factors, resulting in a complex multi-scale system. Consequently, land use changes should not be analysed in isolation without accounting for both on-site and off-site effects of these landscape processes in landscapes where water driven and or gravity driven processes are very active,. Especially the visualisation of these on- and off-site effects as a movie of evolving time series and changes is a potential valuable possibility in DEM modelling approaches. To investigate the interactions between land use, land use change, resolution of DEMs and landscape processes, a case study for the Álora region in southern Spain will presented, mainly as movies of modelling time-series, Starting from a baseline scenario of land use change, different levels of resolutions, interactions and feedbacks are added to the coupled LAPSUS model framework: Quantities and spatial patterns of both land use change and soil redistribution are compared between the baseline scenario without interactions and with each of the interaction mechanisms implemented consecutively. All as a function of spatial resolution. Keywords: LAPSUS; land use change; soil erosion, movie;

  4. Cascading failures in interconnected networks with dynamical redistribution of loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhuang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Hujiang

    2015-09-01

    Cascading failures of loads in isolated networks and coupled networks have been studied in the past few years. In most of the corresponding results, the topologies of the networks are destroyed. Here, we present an interconnected network model considering cascading failures based on the dynamic redistribution of flow in the networks. Compared with the results of single scale-free networks, we find that interconnected scale-free networks have higher vulnerability. Additionally, the network heterogeneity plays an important role in the robustness of interconnected networks under intentional attacks. Considering the effects of various coupling preferences, the results show that there are almost no differences. Finally, the application of our model to the Beijing interconnected traffic network, which consists of a subway network and a bus network, shows that the subway network suffers more damage under the attack. Moreover, the interconnected traffic network may be more exposed to damage after initial attacks on the bus network. These discussions are important for the design and optimization of interconnected networks.

  5. Omaha Soil Mixing Study: Redistribution of Lead in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Urban soils within the Omaha Lead Superfund Site have been contaminated with lead (Pb) from atmospheric deposition of particulate materials from lead smelting and recycling activities. In May of 2009 the Final Record of Decision stated that any residential soil exceeding the preliminary remediation goal (PRG; 400 mgPb kg-1soil) would be excavated, backfilled and re-vegetated. The remedial action entailed excavating contaminated soil in the top 12 inches and excavation could stop when the concentration of soil Pb was less than 400 mg kg-1 in the top 12 inches, or less than 1200 mg kg-1 at depths greater than 1 ft. After removal of the contaminated soil, clean backfill was applied and a grass lawn was replanted. A depth of 12 inches was based on the assumption that Pb-contaminated soil at depth greater than 1 ft would not represent a future risk (ASTDR Health Consult, 2004). This assumption was based on the principal that mixing and other factors encountered during normal excavation practices would not result in Pb surface concentrations greater than the PRG. The goal of the current study was to investigate the redistribution of Pb in remediated residential surface soils after typical homeowner earth-disturbing activities in the OLS Site. Of specific interest to the region for protection of human health is determining whether soil mixing associated with normal homeowner excavation practices results in surface Pb concentrations greater than the preliminary r

  6. Redistribution of boron in leaves reduces boron toxicity.

    PubMed

    Reid, Robert J; Fitzpatrick, Kate L

    2009-11-01

    High soil boron (B) concentrations lead to the accumulation of B in leaves, causing the development of necrotic regions in leaf tips and margins, gradually extending back along the leaf. Plants vary considerably in their tolerance to B toxicity, and it was recently discovered that one of the tolerance mechanisms involved extrusion of B from the root. Expression of a gene encoding a root B efflux transporter was shown to be much higher in tolerant cultivars. In our current research we have shown that the same gene is also upregulated in leaves. However, unlike in the root, the increased activity of the B efflux transporter in the leaves cannot reduce the tissue B concentration. Instead, we have shown that in tolerant cultivars, these transporters redistribute B from the intracellular phase where it is toxic, into the apoplast which is much less sensitive to B. These results provide an explanation of why different cultivars with the same leaf B concentrations can show markedly different toxicity symptoms. We have also shown that rain can remove a large proportion of leaf B, leading to significant improvements of growth of both leaves and roots.

  7. On the Compton scattering redistribution function in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Różańska, A.; Majczyna, A.; Należyty, M.

    2017-08-01

    Compton scattering is the dominant opacity source in hot neutron stars, accretion discs around black holes and hot coronae. We collected here a set of numerical expressions of the Compton scattering redistribution functions (RFs) for unpolarized radiation, which are more exact than the widely used Kompaneets equation. The principal aim of this paper is the presentation of the RF by Guilbert, which is corrected for the computational errors in the original paper. This corrected RF was used in the series of papers on model atmosphere computations of hot neutron stars. We have also organized four existing algorithms for the RF computations into a unified form ready to use in radiative transfer and model atmosphere codes. The exact method by Nagirner & Poutanen was numerically compared to all other algorithms in a very wide spectral range from hard X-rays to radio waves. Sample computations of the Compton scattering RFs in thermal plasma were done for temperatures corresponding to the atmospheres of bursting neutron stars and hot intergalactic medium. Our formulae are also useful to study the Compton scattering of unpolarized microwave background radiation in hot intracluster gas and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We conclude that the formulae by Guilbert and the exact quantum mechanical formulae yield practically the same RFs for gas temperatures relevant to the atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars, T ≤ 108 K.

  8. Polar motion excitation analysis due to global continental water redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, L.; Schuh, H.

    2006-10-01

    We present the results obtained when studying the hydrological excitation of the Earth‘s wobble due to global redistribution of continental water storage. This work was performed in two steps. First, we computed the hydrological angular momentum (HAM) time series based on the global hydrological model LaD (Land Dynamics model) for the period 1980 till 2004. Then, we compared the effectiveness of this excitation by analysing the residuals of the geodetic time series after removing atmospheric and oceanic contributions with the respective hydrological ones. The emphasis was put on low frequency variations. We also present a comparison of HAM time series from LaD with respect to that one from a global model based on the assimilated soil moisture and snow accumulation data from NCEP/NCAR (The National Center for Environmental Prediction/The National Center for Atmospheric Research) reanalysis. Finally, we evaluate the performance of LaD model in closing the polar motion budget at seasonal periods in comparison with the NCEP and the Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) models.

  9. Stress redistribution and damage in interconnects caused by electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiras, Stefanie Ruth

    Electromigration has long been recognized as a phenomenon that induces mass redistribution in metals which, when constrained, can lead to the creation of stress. Since the development of the integrated circuit, electromigration. in interconnects, (the metal lines which carry current between devices in integrated circuits), has become a reliability concern. The primary failure mechanism in the interconnects is usually voiding, which causes electrical resistance increases in the circuit. In some cases, however, another failure mode occurs, fracture of the surrounding dielectric driven by electromigration induced compressive stresses within the interconnect. It is this failure mechanism that is the focus of this thesis. To study dielectric fracture, both residual processing stresses and the development of electromigration induced stress in isolated, constrained interconnects was measured. The high-resolution measurements were made using two types of piezospectroscopy, complemented by finite element analysis (FEA). Both procedures directly measured stress in the underlying or neighboring substrate and used FEA to determine interconnect stresses. These interconnect stresses were related to the effected circuit failure mode through post-test scanning electron microscopy and resistance measurements taken during electromigration testing. The results provide qualitative evidence of electromigration driven passivation fracture, and quantitative analysis of the theoretical model of the failure, the "immortal" interconnect concept.

  10. Postmortem redistribution of tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol.

    PubMed

    Costa, Isabel; Oliveira, Ana; Guedes de Pinho, Paula; Teixeira, Helena Maria; Moreira, Roxana; Carvalho, Félix; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Tramadol is a widely used analgesic opioid for moderate-to-severe pain due to its efficacy and safety. Although tramadol induces less adverse effects compared with other opioids, an increased number of documented cases of dependence, abuse, intentional overdose or intoxication have been described. In fatal intoxication, the interpretation of the probable cause of death often relies on the measurement of the tramadol concentration in blood. However, postmortem redistribution (PMR) may affect the results and therefore bias the autopsy report. In the present study, the postmortem cardiac and femoral blood samples from 15 cases of fatal tramadol intoxication were obtained to assess the PMR of tramadol and its main active metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol (M1). Toxicological analysis was performed by the gas chromatography-electron impact-mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) method, previously developed and validated for the quantification of both analytes. The cardiac-to-femoral blood ratios of 1.40 and 1.28 were obtained for tramadol and M1, respectively. Results were compared with those in the literature and it was possible to conclude that femoral blood should be considered for quantitative interpretations in fatal cases of tramadol intoxication.

  11. Managing fleet capacity effectively under second-hand market redistribution.

    PubMed

    Quillérou, Emmanuelle; Roudaut, Nolwenn; Guyader, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Fishing capacity management policies have been traditionally implemented at national level with national targets for capacity reduction. More recently, capacity management policies have increasingly targeted specific fisheries. French fisheries spatially vary along the French coastline and are associated to specific regions. Capacity management policies, however, ignore the capital mobility associated with second-hand vessel trade between regions. This is not an issue for national policies but could limit the effectiveness of regional capacity management policies. A gravity model and a random-effect Poisson regression model are used to analyze the determinants and spatial extent of the second-hand market in France. This study is based on panel data from the French Atlantic Ocean between 1992 and 2009. The trade flows between trading partners is found to increase with their sizes and to be spatially concentrated. Despite the low trade flows between regions, a net impact analysis shows that fishing capacity is redistributed by the second-hand market to regions on the Channel and Aquitaine from central regions. National capacity management policies (constructions/destructions) have induced a net decrease in regional fleet capacity with varying magnitude across regions. Unless there is a change of policy instruments or their scale of implementation, the operation of the second-hand market decreases the effectiveness of regional capacity management policies in regions on the Channel and Aquitaine.

  12. Lead sequestration and species redistribution during soil organic matter decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroth, A.W.; Bostick, B.C.; Kaste, J.M.; Friedland, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) maintains a dynamic chemical environment in the forest floor that can impact metal speciation on relatively short timescales. Here we measure the speciation of Pb in controlled and natural organic (O) soil horizons to quantify changes in metal partitioning during SOM decomposition in different forest litters. We provide a link between the sequestration of pollutant Pb in O-horizons, estimated by forest floor Pb inventories, and speciation using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When Pb was introduced to fresh forest Oi samples, it adsorbed primarily to SOM surfaces, but as decomposition progressed over two years in controlled experiments, up to 60% of the Pb was redistributed to pedogenic birnessite and ferrihydrite surfaces. In addition, a significant fraction of pollutant Pb in natural soil profiles was associated with similar mineral phases (???20-35%) and SOM (???65-80%). Conifer forests have at least 2-fold higher Pb burdens in the forest floor relative to deciduous forests due to more efficient atmospheric scavenging and slower organic matter turnover. We demonstrate that pedogenic minerals play an important role in surface soil Pb sequestration, particularly in deciduous forests, and should be considered in any assessment of pollutant Pb mobility. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  13. Hydraulic redistribution: limitations for plants in saline soils.

    PubMed

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Veneklaas, Erik J; Barrett-Lennard, Edward G; Colmer, Timothy D

    2017-10-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR), the movement of water from wet to dry patches in the soil via roots, occurs in different ecosystems and plant species. By extension of the principle that HR is driven by gradients in soil water potential, HR has been proposed to occur for plants in saline soils. Despite the inherent spatial patchiness and salinity gradients in these soils, the lack of direct evidence of HR in response to osmotic gradients prompted us to ask the question: are there physical or physiological constraints to HR for plants in saline environments? We propose that build-up of ions in the root xylem sap and in the leaf apoplast, with the latter resulting in a large predawn disequilibrium of water potential in shoots compared with roots and soil, would both impede HR. We present a conceptual model that illustrates how processes in root systems in heterogeneous salinity with water potential gradients, even if equal to those in non-saline soils, will experience a dampened magnitude of water potential gradients in the soil-plant continuum, minimizing or preventing HR. Finally, we provide an outlook for understanding the relevance of HR for plants in saline environments by addressing key research questions on plant salinity tolerance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Gravitropism: interaction of sensitivity modulation and effector redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    Our increasing capabilities for quantitative hormone analysis and automated high resolution growth studies have allowed a reassessment of the classical Cholodny-Went hypothesis of gravitropism. According to this hypothesis, gravity induces redistribution of auxin toward the lower side of the organ and this causes the growth asymmetry that leads to reorientation. Arguments against the Cholodny-Went hypothesis that were based primarily on concerns over the timing and magnitude of the development of hormone asymmetry are countered by recent evidence that such asymmetry develops early and is sufficiently large to account for curvature. Thus, it appears that the Cholodny-Went hypothesis is fundamentally valid. However, recent comparative studies of the kinetics of curvature and the timing of the development of hormone asymmetry indicate that this hypothesis alone cannot account for the intricacies of the gravitropic response. It appears that time-dependent gravity-induced changes in hormone sensitivity as well as changes in sensitivity of the gravity receptor play important roles in the response.

  15. Gravitropism: Interaction of Sensitivity Modulation and Effector Redistribution 1

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Our increasing capabilities for quantitative hormone analysis and automated high resolution growth studies have allowed a reassessment of the classical Cholodny-Went hypothesis of gravitropism. According to this hypothesis, gravity induces redistribution of auxin toward the lower side of the organ and this causes the growth asymmetry that leads to reorientation. Arguments against the Cholodny-Went hypothesis that were based primarily on concerns over the timing and magnitude of the development of hormone asymmetry are countered by recent evidence that such asymmetry develops early and is sufficiently large to account for curvature. Thus, it appears that the Cholodny-Went hypothesis is fundamentally valid. However, recent comparative studies of the kinetics of curvature and the timing of the development of hormone asymmetry indicate that this hypothesis alone cannot account for the intricacies of the gravitropic response. It appears that time-dependent gravity-induced changes in hormone sensitivity as well as changes in sensitivity of the gravity receptor play important roles in the response. PMID:11537485

  16. Redistribution of boron in leaves reduces boron toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Kate L

    2009-01-01

    High soil boron (B) concentrations lead to the accumulation of B in leaves, causing the development of necrotic regions in leaf tips and margins, gradually extending back along the leaf. Plants vary considerably in their tolerance to B toxicity, and it was recently discovered that one of the tolerance mechanisms involved extrusion of B from the root. Expression of a gene encoding a root B efflux transporter was shown to be much higher in tolerant cultivars. In our current research we have shown that the same gene is also upregulated in leaves. However, unlike in the root, the increased activity of the B efflux transporter in the leaves cannot reduce the tissue B concentration. Instead, we have shown that in tolerant cultivars, these transporters redistribute B from the intracellular phase where it is toxic, into the apoplast which is much less sensitive to B. These results provide an explanation of why different cultivars with the same leaf B concentrations can show markedly different toxicity symptoms. We have also shown that rain can remove a large proportion of leaf B, leading to significant improvements of growth of both leaves and roots. PMID:20009556

  17. Climate velocity and the future global redistribution of marine biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Molinos, Jorge; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Schoeman, David S.; Brown, Christopher J.; Kiessling, Wolfgang; Moore, Pippa J.; Pandolfi, John M.; Poloczanska, Elvira S.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Burrows, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Anticipating the effect of climate change on biodiversity, in particular on changes in community composition, is crucial for adaptive ecosystem management but remains a critical knowledge gap. Here, we use climate velocity trajectories, together with information on thermal tolerances and habitat preferences, to project changes in global patterns of marine species richness and community composition under IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5. Our simple, intuitive approach emphasizes climate connectivity, and enables us to model over 12 times as many species as previous studies. We find that range expansions prevail over contractions for both RCPs up to 2100, producing a net local increase in richness globally, and temporal changes in composition, driven by the redistribution rather than the loss of diversity. Conversely, widespread invasions homogenize present-day communities across multiple regions. High extirpation rates are expected regionally (for example, Indo-Pacific), particularly under RCP8.5, leading to strong decreases in richness and the anticipated formation of no-analogue communities where invasions are common. The spatial congruence of these patterns with contemporary human impacts highlights potential areas of future conservation concern. These results strongly suggest that the millennial stability of current global marine diversity patterns, against which conservation plans are assessed, will change rapidly over the course of the century in response to ocean warming.

  18. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Terrestrial vegetation redistribution and carbon balance under climate change

    PubMed Central

    Lucht, Wolfgang; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Erbrecht, Tim; Heyder, Ursula; Cramer, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Background Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) compute the terrestrial carbon balance as well as the transient spatial distribution of vegetation. We study two scenarios of moderate and strong climate change (2.9 K and 5.3 K temperature increase over present) to investigate the spatial redistribution of major vegetation types and their carbon balance in the year 2100. Results The world's land vegetation will be more deciduous than at present, and contain about 125 billion tons of additional carbon. While a recession of the boreal forest is simulated in some areas, along with a general expansion to the north, we do not observe a reported collapse of the central Amazonian rain forest. Rather, a decrease of biomass and a change of vegetation type occurs in its northeastern part. The ability of the terrestrial biosphere to sequester carbon from the atmosphere declines strongly in the second half of the 21st century. Conclusion Climate change will cause widespread shifts in the distribution of major vegetation functional types on all continents by the year 2100. PMID:16930462

  20. [Effects of rainfall intensity on rainfall infiltration and redistribution in soil on Loess slope land].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Shao, Ming'an

    2006-12-01

    With simulation test, this paper studied the patterns of rainfall infiltration and redistribution in soil on typical Loess slope land, and analyzed the quantitative relations between the infiltration and redistribution and the movement of soil water and mass, with rainfall intensity as the main affecting factor. The results showed that rainfall intensity had significant effects on the rainfall infiltration and water redistribution in soil, and the microcosmic movement of soil water. The larger the rainfall intensity, the deeper the wetting front of rainfall infiltration and redistribution was, and the wetting front of soil water redistribution had a slower increase velocity than that of rainfall infiltration. The power function of the wetting front with time, and also with rainfall intensity, was fitted well. There was also a quantitative relation between the wetting front of rainfall redistribution and the duration of rainfall. The larger the rainfall intensity, the higher the initial and steady infiltration rates were, and the cumulative infiltration increased faster with time. Moreover, the larger the rainfall intensity, the smaller the wetting front difference was at the top and the end of the slope. With the larger rainfall intensity, both the difference of soil water content and its descending trend between soil layers became more obvious during the redistribution process on slope land.

  1. Predicting and mapping malaria under climate change scenarios: the potential redistribution of malaria vectors in Africa.

    PubMed

    Tonnang, Henri E Z; Kangalawe, Richard Y M; Yanda, Pius Z

    2010-04-23

    Malaria is rampant in Africa and causes untold mortality and morbidity. Vector-borne diseases are climate sensitive and this has raised considerable concern over the implications of climate change on future disease risk. The problem of malaria vectors (Anopheles mosquitoes) shifting from their traditional locations to invade new zones is an important concern. The vision of this study was to exploit the sets of information previously generated by entomologists, e.g. on geographical range of vectors and malaria distribution, to build models that will enable prediction and mapping the potential redistribution of Anopheles mosquitoes in Africa. The development of the modelling tool was carried out through calibration of CLIMEX parameters. The model helped estimate the potential geographical distribution and seasonal abundance of the species in relation to climatic factors. These included temperature, rainfall and relative humidity, which characterized the living environment for Anopheles mosquitoes. The same parameters were used in determining the ecoclimatic index (EI). The EI values were exported to a GIS package for special analysis and proper mapping of the potential future distribution of Anopheles gambiae and Anophles arabiensis within the African continent under three climate change scenarios. These results have shown that shifts in these species boundaries southward and eastward of Africa may occur rather than jumps into quite different climatic environments. In the absence of adequate control, these predictions are crucial in understanding the possible future geographical range of the vectors and the disease, which could facilitate planning for various adaptation options. Thus, the outputs from this study will be helpful at various levels of decision making, for example, in setting up of an early warning and sustainable strategies for climate change and climate change adaptation for malaria vectors control programmes in Africa.

  2. Compositional redistribution in alloy films under high-voltage electron microscope irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Nghi Q.; Leaf, O. K.; Minkoff, M.

    1983-10-01

    The problem of nonequilibrium segregation in alloy films under high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) irradiation at elevated temperatures is re-examined in the present work, taking into account the damage-rate gradients caused by radial variation in the electron flux. Axial and radial compositional redistributions in model solid solutions, representative of concentrated Ni-Cu, Ni-Al and Ni-Si alloys, were calculated as a function of time, temperature, and film thickness, using a kinetic theory of segregation in binary alloys. The numerical results were achieved by means of a new software package (DISPL2) for solving convection-diffusion-kinetics problems with general orthogonal geometries. It was found that HVEM irradiation-induced segregation in thin films consists of two stages. Initially, due to the proximity of the film surfaces as sinks for point defects, the usual axial segregation (to surfaces) occurs at relatively short irradiation times, and rapidly attains quasi-steady state. Then, radial segregation becomes more and more competitive, gradually affecting the kinetics of axial segregation. At a given temperature, the buildup time to steady state is much longer in the present situation than in the simple case of one-dimensional segregation with uniform defect production. Changes in the alloy composition occur in a much larger zone than the irradiated volume. As a result, the average alloy composition within the irradiated region can differ greatly from that of the unirradiated alloy. The present calculations may be useful in the interpretation of the kinetics of certain HVEM irradiation-induced processes in alloys.

  3. Calorie increase and water savings of redistributing global crop production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. F.; Seveso, A.; Rulli, M. C.; D'Odorico, P.

    2015-12-01

    Human demand for crop production is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as a result of population growth, richer diets and biofuel use. In order for food production to keep pace, unprecedented amounts of resources - water, fertilizers, energy - will be required. This has led to calls for 'sustainable intensification' in which yields are increased on existing croplands while seeking to minimize impacts on water and other agricultural resources. Recent studies have quantified aspects of this, showing that there is a large potential to improve crop yields and increase harvest frequencies to better meet human demand. Though promising, both solutions would necessitate large additional inputs of water and fertilizer in order to be achieved under current technologies. However, the question of whether the current distribution of crops is, in fact, the best for realizing maximized production has not been considered to date. To this end, we ask: Is it possible to increase calorie production and minimize water demand by simply growing crops where soil and climate conditions are best suited? Here we use maps of agro-ecological suitability - a measure of physical and chemical soil fertility - for 15 major food crops to identify differences between current crop distributions and where they can most suitably be planted. By redistributing crops across currently cultivated lands, we determine the potential improvement in calorie production as well as the associated change in water demand. We also consider what distribution of crops would maintain current calorie production while minimizing crop water demand. In doing all of this, our study provides a novel tool for improving crop calorie production without necessarily increasing resource demands.

  4. The mechanics of erosion on soil organic redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, T.

    2014-12-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is an important constituent of the earth's fabric derived from the breakdown of above ground plant litter, plant rhizomes and root exudates in the form of organic by-products. Stocks of SOC can be affected by a variety of natural and human-induced drivers, including climate and land management practices which collectively could affect intrinsic and extrinsic factors related to SOC, for example, soil texture, soil microclimate, and biomass accumulation rates . In intensely managed agricultural landscapes (IMLs), i.e., regions of significant land use change where significant degradation of SOC has been reported due to soil erosion, enhancing the sequestration or storage potential of SOC is of paramount importance to the ecosystem well-being of these landscapes. A literature review reveals that aspects of the SOC research have received considerable attention in the bioegeochemical, ecological, and agricultural disciplines because available SOC stocks within a soil column affect the evolution of key soil biogeochemical constituents. However, at the landscape scale the quantitative assessment of the SOC storage potential suffers in parts from lack of understanding of the collective effects that tillage and water-driven erosion have on the transport and burial of the eroded SOC. In this study an integrative process-based modeling framework that couples an established biogeochemical soil column model with a physically-based, landscape oriented watershed model capable of replicating the collective erosion effects on the mobilization and redistribution of SOC is developed. All simulations are conducted in an agricultural watershed in the U.S. Midwest Clear Creek, IA which has experienced intense agriculture since the beginning of the century to also assess the legacy effects that land use change and SOC initialization periods have on current SOC stock estimations.

  5. Can hydraulically redistributed water assist surrounding seedlings during summer drought?

    PubMed

    Muler, A L; van Etten, E J B; Stock, W D; Howard, K; Froend, R H

    2018-05-12

    Plant interaction studies provide a good understanding of the roles of key species, which can assist restoration of natural ecosystems. Among the interactions, facilitation and competition are known to affect ecosystem structure and function. We investigated whether a deep-rooted species could positively affect surrounding seedlings through hydraulic redistribution during dry months. We conducted two experiments in which seedlings from two species were growing together or isolated from source plants (field experiment) and where plants were isolated from source plants that were connected to or separated from a water table (glasshouse experiment). Survival, growth, water relations and soil water content were measured. We also applied δ 2 H enriched water adjacent to, or into, the roots of source plants to track water movement between plants. Soil water content was higher in shallow layers where source plants could interact with seedlings (field) and when accessing water tables (glasshouse). Seedlings from all treatments had an increase in leaf δ 2 H. Seedlings of Banksia attenuata that were isolated from source plants had the highest survival, growth and stomatal conductance rates. Seedlings of Gompholobium tomentosum presented higher stomatal conductance rates when growing with source plants than when isolated from them during the first months, but this relationship reversed towards the end of summer. These results suggest that source plants and seedlings competed, but the influence of facilitation and competition might change during the year, at least for the shallow-rooted species. Therefore, competition for water and/or other limiting factors must be considered when planning ecological restoration in such areas.

  6. [Task redistribution in Dutch dental care in relation to dental hygienists' job satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Jerkovic, K; van Offenbeek, M A G; van der Schans, C P

    2010-05-01

    In research into a professional cross-section of dental hygienists, we studied the extent to which task redistribution has an influence on job satisfaction. The research among randomly chosen dental hygienists consisted of questions about organizational and personal characteristics, the set of assigned tasks, task characteristics and job satisfaction. The respondents were divided into 3 clusters which differed in the breadth of their sets of tasks. Although prevention and periodontology services remain the core tasks in dental hygienists' jobs, the degree of task redistribution differed strongly from cluster to cluster. Respondents with a considerable degree of task redistribution experienced the most task variation, but scored significantly lower on the task characteristics autonomy, feedback, task identity and task importance. This explains why redistribution does not directly correspond with a greater degree of job satisfaction. Moreover, it is precisely the dental hygienists with a broad set of tasks who are significantly less satisfied with their salary than those with a traditional set of tasks.

  7. Report: EPA Could Improve Its Redistribution of Superfund Payments to Specific Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2006-P-00027, July 31, 2006. EPA did not make timely redistributions of Superfund coop agreement, interagency agreement, and small purchase payments from the general site identifier “WQ” to the specific Superfund sites or other site identifiers.

  8. Unequal views of inequality: Cross-national support for redistribution 1985-2011.

    PubMed

    VanHeuvelen, Tom

    2017-05-01

    This research examines public views on government responsibility to reduce income inequality, support for redistribution. While individual-level correlates of support for redistribution are relatively well understood, many questions remain at the country-level. Therefore, I examine how country-level characteristics affect aggregate support for redistribution. I test explanations of aggregate support using a unique dataset combining 18 waves of the International Social Survey Programme and European Social Survey. Results from mixed-effects logistic regression and fixed-effects linear regression models show two primary and contrasting effects. States that reduce inequality through bundles of tax and transfer policies are rewarded with more supportive publics. In contrast, economic development has a seemingly equivalent and dampening effect on public support. Importantly, the effect of economic development grows at higher levels of development, potentially overwhelming the amplifying effect of state redistribution. My results therefore suggest a fundamental challenge to proponents of egalitarian politics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnostic value of thallium-201 myocardial perfusion IQ-SPECT without and with computed tomography-based attenuation correction to predict clinically significant and insignificant fractional flow reserve

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Haruki; Takahashi, Teruyuki; Ohashi, Norihiko; Tanaka, Koichi; Okada, Takenori; Kihara, Yasuki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to clarify the predictive value of fractional flow reserve (FFR) determined by myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using thallium (Tl)-201 IQ-SPECT without and with computed tomography-based attenuation correction (CT-AC) for patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). We assessed 212 angiographically identified diseased vessels using adenosine-stress Tl-201 MPI-IQ-SPECT/CT in 84 consecutive, prospectively identified patients with stable CAD. We compared the FFR in 136 of the 212 diseased vessels using visual semiquantitative interpretations of corresponding territories on MPI-IQ-SPECT images without and with CT-AC. FFR inversely correlated most accurately with regional summed difference scores (rSDS) in images without and with CT-AC (r = −0.584 and r = −0.568, respectively, both P < .001). Receiver-operating characteristics analyses using rSDS revealed an optimal FFR cut-off of <0.80 without and with CT-AC. Although the diagnostic accuracy of FFR <0.80 did not significantly differ, FFR ≥0.82 was significantly more accurate with, than without CT-AC. Regions with rSDS ≥2 without or with CT-AC predicted FFR <0.80, and those with rSDS ≤1 without and with CT-AC predicted FFR ≥0.81, with 73% and 83% sensitivity, 84% and 67% specificity, and 79% and 75% accuracy, respectively. Although limited by the sample size and the single-center design, these findings showed that the IQ-SPECT system can predict FFR at an optimal cut-off of <0.80, and we propose a novel application of CT-AC to MPI-IQ-SPECT for predicting clinically significant and insignificant FFR even in nonobese patients. PMID:29390486

  10. Comparison of americium-241 and technetium-99m as transmission sources for attenuation correction of thallium-201 SPECT imaging of the heart.

    PubMed

    Ficaro, E P; Fessler, J A; Rogers, W L; Schwaiger, M

    1994-04-01

    This study compares the ability of 241Am and 99mTc to estimate 201Tl attenuation maps while minimizing the loss in the precision of the emission data. A triple-head SPECT system with either an 241Am or 99mTc line source opposite a fan-beam collimator was used to estimate attenuation maps of the thorax of an anthropomorphic phantom. Linear attenuation values at 75 keV for 201Tl were obtained by linear extrapolation of the measured values from 241Am and 99mTc. Lung and soft-tissue estimates from both isotopes showed excellent agreement to within 3% of the measured values for 201Tl. Linear extrapolation did not yield satisfactory estimates for bone from either 241Am (+11.7%) or 99mTc (-15.3%). Patient data were used to estimate the dependence of crosstalk on patient size. Contamination from 201Tl in the transmission window was 5-6 times greater for 241Am compared to 99mTc, while the contamination in the 201Tl data in the transmission-emission detector head (head 1) was 4-5 times greater for 99mTc compared to 241Am. No contamination was detected in the 201Tl emission data of heads 2 and 3 from 241Am, whereas the 99mTc produced a small crosstalk component giving a signal-to-crosstalk ratio near 20:1. Measurements with a fillable chest phantom estimated the mean error introduced into the data from the removal of the crosstalk. Based on the measured data, 241Am is a suitable transmission source for simultaneous transmission-emission tomography for 201Tl cardiac studies.

  11. Biokinetics of radiolabeled Iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (I-123-IPPA) and thallium-201 in a rabbit model of chronic myocardial infarction measured using a series of thermoluminescent dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medich, David Christopher

    1997-09-01

    The biokinetics of Iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (123I-IPPA) during a chronic period of myocardial infarction were determined and compared to 201Tl. IPPA was assessed as a perfusion and metabolic tracer in the scintigraphic diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The myocardial clearance kinetics were measured by placing a series of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) on normal and infarcted tissue to measure the local myocardial activity content over time. The arterial blood pool activity was fit to a bi-exponential function for 201Tl and a tri-exponential function for 123I-IPPA to estimate the left ventricle contribution to TLD response. At equilibrium, the blood pool contribution was estimated experimentally to be less than 5% of the total TLD response. The method was unable to resolve the initial uptake of the imaging agent due in part to the 2 minute TLD response integration time and in part to the 30 second lag time for the first TLD placement. A noticeable disparity was observed between the tracer concentrations of IPPA in normal and ischemic tissue of approximately 2:1. The fitting parameters (representing the biokinetic eigenvalue rate constants) were related to the fundamental rate constants of a recycling biokinetic model. The myocardial IPPA content within normal tissue was elevated after approximately 130 minutes post injection. This phenomenon was observed in all but one (950215) of the IPPA TLD kinetics curves.

  12. Combined thallium-201 and dynamic iodine-123 iodophenylpentadecanoic acid single-photon emission computed tomography in patients after acute myocardial infarction with effective reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Richter, W S; Beckmann, S; Cordes, M; Schuppenhauer, T; Schartl, M; Munz, D L

    2000-12-01

    Considerable derangements of energy metabolism are to be expected during ischemia and reperfusion. In ischemic myocardium, the oxidative degradation of carbohydrates is shifted toward the anaerobic production of lactate and the oxidation of fatty acids is suppressed. The aim of this study was to examine the uptake and metabolism of iodine-123 (123I) iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) in stunned myocardium. In 15 patients, SPECT with 201Tl and 123I IPPA as well as echocardiography with low-dose dobutamine stimulation were performed 12 +/- 5 days after myocardial infarction with reperfusion. Follow-up echocardiography was carried out 24 +/- 8 days later for documentation of functional improvement. Uptake of 201Tl and 123I IPPA were obtained in five left ventricular segments, and dynamic SPECT imaging was used for calculation of the fast and the slow components of the biexponential myocardial 123I IPPA clearance. Wall motion improved in 14 of 26 dysfunctional segments (54%). Stunned segments were characterized by a reduced 123I IPPA extraction, a shorter half-life of the fast, and a longer half-life of the slow clearance component. All parameters of the combined 201Tl/123I IPPA study predicted functional recovery with similar accuracies (area under the receiver operator characteristic curves between 0.68 and 0.76; p = NS). Analysis of 201Tl uptake alone could not predict functional recovery in this study. Stunned myocardium is characterized by a disturbance of fatty acid metabolism. For prediction of functional improvement, 123I IPPA imaging added significant diagnostic information.

  13. Effects of income redistribution on the evolution of cooperation in spatial public goods games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zhenhua; Wang, Baokui; Du, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Income redistribution is the transfer of income from some individuals to others directly or indirectly by means of social mechanisms, such as taxation, public services and so on. Employing a spatial public goods game, we study the influence of income redistribution on the evolution of cooperation. Two kinds of evolutionary models are constructed, which describe local and global redistribution of income respectively. In the local model, players have to pay part of their income after each PGG and the accumulated income is redistributed to the members. While in the global model, all the players pay part of their income after engaging in all the local PGGs, which are centred on himself and his nearest neighbours, and the accumulated income is redistributed to the whole population. We show that the cooperation prospers significantly with increasing income expenditure proportion in the local redistribution of income, while in the global model the situation is opposite. Furthermore, the cooperation drops dramatically from the maximum curvature point of income expenditure proportion. In particular, the intermediate critical points are closely related to the renormalized enhancement factors.

  14. Growing Season Conditions Mediate the Dependence of Aspen on Redistributed Snow Under Climate Change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderquist, B.; Kavanagh, K.; Link, T. E.; Seyfried, M. S.; Strand, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    Precipitation regimes in many semiarid ecosystems are becoming increasingly dominated by winter rainfall as a result of climate change. Across these regions, snowpack plays a vital role in the distribution and timing of soil moisture availability. Rising temperatures will result in a more uniform distribution of soil moisture, advanced spring phenology, and prolonged growing seasons. Productive and wide ranging tree species like aspen, Populus tremuloides, may experience increased vulnerability to drought and mortality resulting from both reduced snowpack and increased evaporative demand during the growing season. We simulated the net primary production (NPP) of aspen stands spanning the rain:snow transition zone in the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory (RCCZO) in southwest Idaho, USA. Within the RCCZO, the total amount of precipitation has remained unchanged over the past 50 years, however the percentage of the precipitation falling as snow has declined by approximately 4% per decade at mid-elevation sites. The biogeochemical process model Biome-BGC was used to simulate aspen NPP at three stands located directly below snowdrifts that provide melt water late into the spring. After adjusting precipitation inputs to account for the redistribution of snow, we assessed climate change impacts on future aspen productivity. Mid-century (2046-2065) aspen NPP was simulated using temperature projections from a multi-model average under high emission conditions using the Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogs (MACA) data set. While climate change simulations indicated over a 20% decrease in annual NPP for some years, NPP rates for other mid-century years remained relatively unchanged due to variations in growing season conditions. Mid-century years with the largest decreases in NPP typically showed increased spring transpiration rates resulting from earlier leaf flush combined with warmer spring conditions. During these years, the onset of drought stress occurred

  15. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  16. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  17. Catchment-scale redistribution of lithogenic solutes and black carbon over three years following wildfire in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmann, M. A.; Root, R.; Abrell, L.; Schwartz, C. J.; Chorover, J.

    2017-12-01

    Wildfire represents a disturbance that is becoming more prevalent as climate shifts to hotter and drier conditions in the southwestern US. It has profound and potentially long-term effects on the physical, chemical and microbiological properties of soil, including immediate surface deposition of lithogenic elements and incompletely combusted organic matter (i.e., black carbon or BC) previously held in biomass. The long residence time of BC mitigates oxidative release of carbon to the atmosphere and thus has implications for long-term climate forcing. Immediately following the 2013 Thompson Ridge wildfire in the Jemez River Basin Critical Zone Observatory, we sampled 22 soil profiles across a zero order basin at finely resolved depth intervals to 40 cm. Samples were collected again 12 and 24 months following the fire to assess redistribution of solutes and BC in the two years following fire. Water extractable anions, cations and carbon were measured for each sample and maps were generated by geostatistical interpolation. Additionally, the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) molecular marker method was employed for a selection of samples to quantify and characterize the BC content of the existing soil organic carbon pool as a function of landscape position and time. The `pulsed' deposition of water-soluble ions and BC followed pre-fire vegetation structure as indicated by solution chemistry data for years one and two displaying elevated solute concentrations in surface depths proximal to dense vegetation. Vertical and lateral redistribution of the water extractable elements and BC were consistent with wetting front propagation and topographic trends (driven by erosion, overland flow and lateral subsurface flow). BC depth profiles indicate vertical infiltration and lateral transport with burial, the latter associated with surface erosion of sediment, as mechanisms for redistribution.

  18. The redistributional impact of Canada's Employment Insurance Program, 1992–2002.

    PubMed

    Finnie, Ross; Irvine, Ian

    2011-01-01

    For a decade or so starting in the early 1990s, Canada’s major income support programs underwent substantial reform. Meanwhile, the economy first lingered in a deep recession and then recovered with a period of strong growth. This paper focuses on how the distributional impact of Employment Insurance (EI) evolved during this period. We find that EI was strongly redistributive throughout the whole period with respect to the earnings of individuals, and somewhat less so for family income. But we also show that the distribution of benefits and contributions changed substantially over time, becoming less redistributive. Somewhat counter-intuitively, both the benefit and contribution sides of the program are shown to be redistributive, even though the contribution structure is regressive. These findings are relevant in the current context, as the economy struggles with a combination of high unemployment and fiscal pressures on government spending.

  19. Residential relocation and regional redistribution of the elderly in the USA and Germany.

    PubMed

    Serow, W J; Friedrich, K; Haas, W H

    1996-01-01

    "This paper reviews some of the principal differences and similarities in the migration and spatial redistribution behavior of the older populations of the USA and of Germany.... The paper is divided into three distinct parts. The paper first reviews actual and prospective redistribution of the older population, with regard to interregional shifts of population as well as to changes in concentration along an urban-rural continuum. Following these macroscopic elements, the paper then moves to a presentation of the results of two ex post facto surveys (one taken in the USA and the other in Germany) of recent older movers in order to compare the motivations expressed for the move and the present degree of satisfaction with it. The concluding section considers the implications of redistribution at both geographic levels and of mover satisfaction in light of political developments as they are presently unfolding in Europe." excerpt

  20. Post-igneous redistribution of components in eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Martinez, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    In our analyses, we utilize a microdrilling technique that removes 40 to 100 micron diameter cores from mineral grains in thin sections analyzed by microprobe. The cores are then analyzed by INAA using the technique of Lindstrom. Three eucrites were selected for application of this analytical technique: monomict breccias Pasamonte and Stannern and unbrecciated EET90020. Pasamonte is among the most unequilibrated of the eucrites on the basis of zoning in pyroxenes and is considered to be an igneous rock not significantly affected by metamorphism. Stannern has igneous texture but its pyroxenes indicate some re-equilibration, although little, if any, recrystallization. EET90020 has a granulite texture and has been substantially recrystallized. Our sample of Pasamonte contains several clasts of different grain sizes ranging from glass to fine grained with diabasic texture containing lathy plagioclase, unexsolved pigeonite, and mesostasis. Cores were taken of the glass and from minerals and mesostases in six lithic clasts which normally allowed sampling of more than one phase per clast. Our sample of Stannern is also a breccia but with little difference in grain size between clasts and matrix. The plagioclase and pigeonite are blocky, twinned, and exsolved and coexist with a bit of mesostasis. Cores were taken of plagioclase and pigeonite with no attempt to distinguish separate clasts. EET90020 is a granular mixture of twinned plagioclase and pigeonite having rather uniform size and many triple junctions. Several cores were taken of both phases. Both clear and cloudy grains of plagioclase and pyroxene were sampled in all three eucrites.

  1. Food flows in the United Kingdom: The potential of surplus food redistribution to reduce waste.

    PubMed

    Facchini, Elisa; Iacovidou, Eleni; Gronow, Jan; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2017-12-07

    The increasing amount of food waste generated as a direct consequence of its excessive production, mismanagement, and wasteful behaviors represents a real challenge in promoting resource efficiency. In the United Kingdom (UK), the lack of robust mass flow data hinders the ability both to understand and address food waste challenges and to devise long-term sustainable prevention strategies. In recognition of these challenges, this paper seeks to (i) provide insights into the UK's annual estimates of food mass flows, including imports, exports, distribution, consumption, surplus food production, and final disposal; and (ii) scrutinize the uptake and redistribution of surplus food as a potential food waste prevention strategy. Evidence collected from several enterprises and community-led initiatives in the UK, and London specifically, supports that there is an increasing potential of making a shift towards food redistribution and reuse. Further analysis has shown that the outreach of food redistribution initiatives in the UK is currently limited, possibly because redistribution efforts remain largely fragmented and independent from each other. It is concluded that a national commitment could be instrumental in encouraging the roll-out of this practice, and governmental support through fiscal incentives could lead to the development of a larger and coherent surplus food redistribution system, ultimately enabling food waste prevention and recovery of food's multidimensional value. This paper deals with the topical issue of the increasing amount of food waste generated as a direct consequence of excessive production, mismanagement, and wasteful behavior, representing a real challenge in achieving sustainability and resource efficiency. Currently, only a small fraction of food is redistributed back into the system. Yet, a considerable fraction of food waste generated is edible; thus, better planning, storage, and coordination amongst the different stakeholders in the food

  2. Notch sensitivity and stress redistribution in three ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, T.J.; He, M.Y.; Evans, A.G.

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) depend upon inelastic mechanisms to diffuse stress concentrations associated with holes, notches, and cracks. These mechanisms consist of fiber debonding and pullout, multiple matrix cracking, and shear band formation. In order to understand these effects, experiments have bee conducted on several double-edge-notched CMCs that exhibit different stress redistribution mechanisms. Stresses have been measured an d mechanisms identified by using a combination of methods including X0-ray imaging, edge replication, and thermoelastic analysis. Multiple matrix cracking was found to be the most effective stress redistribution mechanism.

  3. A mathematical model on water redistribution mechanism of the seismonastic movement of Mimosa pudica.

    PubMed

    Kwan, K W; Ye, Z W; Chye, M L; Ngan, A H W

    2013-07-02

    A theoretical model based on the water redistribution mechanism is proposed to predict the volumetric strain of motor cells in Mimosa pudica during the seismonastic movement. The model describes the water and ion movements following the opening of ion channels triggered by stimulation. The cellular strain is related to the angular velocity of the plant movement, and both their predictions are in good agreement with experimental data, thus validating the water redistribution mechanism. The results reveal that an increase in ion diffusivity across the cell membrane of <15-fold is sufficient to produce the observed seismonastic movement. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Extensions to decomposition of the redistributive effect of health care finance.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hai

    2009-10-01

    The total redistributive effect (RE) of health-care finance has been decomposed into vertical, horizontal and reranking effects. The vertical effect has been further decomposed into tax rate and tax structure effects. We extend this latter decomposition to the horizontal and reranking components of the RE. We also show how to measure the vertical, horizontal and reranking effects of each component of the redistributive system, allowing analysis of the RE of health-care finance in the context of that system. The methods are illustrated with application to the RE of health-care financing in Canada.

  5. Pulmonary blood flow redistribution by increased gravitational force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Chornuk, M. A.; Self, D. A.; Kallas, H. J.; Burns, J. W.; Bernard, S.; Polissar, N. L.; Glenny, R. W.

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the influence of gravity on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow (PBF) using increased inertial force as a perturbation. PBF was studied in unanesthetized swine exposed to -Gx (dorsal-to-ventral direction, prone position), where G is the magnitude of the force of gravity at the surface of the Earth, on the Armstrong Laboratory Centrifuge at Brooks Air Force Base. PBF was measured using 15-micron fluorescent microspheres, a method with markedly enhanced spatial resolution. Each animal was exposed randomly to -1, -2, and -3 Gx. Pulmonary vascular pressures, cardiac output, heart rate, arterial blood gases, and PBF distribution were measured at each G level. Heterogeneity of PBF distribution as measured by the coefficient of variation of PBF distribution increased from 0.38 +/- 0.05 to 0.55 +/- 0.11 to 0.72 +/- 0.16 at -1, -2, and -3 Gx, respectively. At -1 Gx, PBF was greatest in the ventral and cranial and lowest in the dorsal and caudal regions of the lung. With increased -Gx, this gradient was augmented in both directions. Extrapolation of these values to 0 G predicts a slight dorsal (nondependent) region dominance of PBF and a coefficient of variation of 0.22 in microgravity. Analysis of variance revealed that a fixed component (vascular structure) accounted for 81% and nonstructure components (including gravity) accounted for the remaining 19% of the PBF variance across the entire experiment (all 3 gravitational levels). The results are inconsistent with the predictions of the zone model.

  6. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  7. Ill-defined causes of death in Brazil: a redistribution method based on the investigation of such causes

    PubMed Central

    França, Elisabeth; Teixeira, Renato; Ishitani, Lenice; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Cortez-Escalante, Juan José; de Morais, Otaliba Libânio; Szwarcwald, Célia Landman

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a method of redistributing ill-defined causes of death (IDCD) based on the investigation of such causes. METHODS In 2010, an evaluation of the results of investigating the causes of death classified as IDCD in accordance with chapter 18 of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) by the Mortality Information System was performed. The redistribution coefficients were calculated according to the proportional distribution of ill-defined causes reclassified after investigation in any chapter of the ICD-10, except for chapter 18, and used to redistribute the ill-defined causes not investigated and remaining by sex and age. The IDCD redistribution coefficient was compared with two usual methods of redistribution: a) Total redistribution coefficient, based on the proportional distribution of all the defined causes originally notified and b) Non-external redistribution coefficient, similar to the previous, but excluding external causes. RESULTS Of the 97,314 deaths by ill-defined causes reported in 2010, 30.3% were investigated, and 65.5% of those were reclassified as defined causes after the investigation. Endocrine diseases, mental disorders, and maternal causes had a higher representation among the reclassified ill-defined causes, contrary to infectious diseases, neoplasms, and genitourinary diseases, with higher proportions among the defined causes reported. External causes represented 9.3% of the ill-defined causes reclassified. The correction of mortality rates by the total redistribution coefficient and non-external redistribution coefficient increased the magnitude of the rates by a relatively similar factor for most causes, contrary to the IDCD redistribution coefficient that corrected the different causes of death with differentiated weights. CONCLUSIONS The proportional distribution of causes among the ill-defined causes reclassified after investigation was not similar to the original distribution of defined causes. Therefore

  8. Ill-defined causes of death in Brazil: a redistribution method based on the investigation of such causes.

    PubMed

    França, Elisabeth; Teixeira, Renato; Ishitani, Lenice; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Cortez-Escalante, Juan José; Morais Neto, Otaliba Libânio de; Szwarcwald, Célia Landman

    2014-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a method of redistributing ill-defined causes of death (IDCD) based on the investigation of such causes. METHODS In 2010, an evaluation of the results of investigating the causes of death classified as IDCD in accordance with chapter 18 of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) by the Mortality Information System was performed. The redistribution coefficients were calculated according to the proportional distribution of ill-defined causes reclassified after investigation in any chapter of the ICD-10, except for chapter 18, and used to redistribute the ill-defined causes not investigated and remaining by sex and age. The IDCD redistribution coefficient was compared with two usual methods of redistribution: a) Total redistribution coefficient, based on the proportional distribution of all the defined causes originally notified and b) Non-external redistribution coefficient, similar to the previous, but excluding external causes. RESULTS Of the 97,314 deaths by ill-defined causes reported in 2010, 30.3% were investigated, and 65.5% of those were reclassified as defined causes after the investigation. Endocrine diseases, mental disorders, and maternal causes had a higher representation among the reclassified ill-defined causes, contrary to infectious diseases, neoplasms, and genitourinary diseases, with higher proportions among the defined causes reported. External causes represented 9.3% of the ill-defined causes reclassified. The correction of mortality rates by the total redistribution coefficient and non-external redistribution coefficient increased the magnitude of the rates by a relatively similar factor for most causes, contrary to the IDCD redistribution coefficient that corrected the different causes of death with differentiated weights. CONCLUSIONS The proportional distribution of causes among the ill-defined causes reclassified after investigation was not similar to the original distribution of defined causes. Therefore

  9. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results inmore » the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.« less

  10. Sonic logging for detecting the excavation disturbed and fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Chang, Y. F.; Liu, J. W.; Tseng, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    This study presents a new sonic logging method to detect the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) and fracture zones in a tunnel. The EDZ is a weak rock zone where its properties and conditions have been changed by excavation, which results such as fracturing, stress redistribution and desaturation in this zone. Thus, the EDZ is considered as a physically less stable and could form a continuous and high-permeable pathway for groundwater flow. Since EDZ and fracture zone have the potential of affecting the safety of the underground openings and repository performance, many studies were conducted to characterize the EDZ and fracture zone by different methods, such as the rock mass displacements and strain measurements, seismic refraction survey, seismic tomography and hydraulic test, etc. In this study, we designed a new sonic logging method to explore the EDZ and fracture zone in a tunnel at eastern Taiwan. A high power and high frequency sonic system was set up which includes a two hydrophones pitch-catch technique with a common-offset immersed in water-filled uncased wells and producing a 20 KHz sound to scan the well rock. Four dominant sonic events were observed in the measurements, they are refracted P- and S-wave along the well rock, direct water wave and the reverberation in the well water. Thus the measured P- and S-wave velocities, the signal-to-noise ratio of the refraction and the amplitudes of reverberation along the well rock were used as indexes to determine the EDZ and fracture zone. Comparing these indexes with core samples shows that significant changes in the indexes are consistent with the EDZ and fracture zone. Thus, the EDZ and fracture zone can be detected by this new sonic method conclusively.

  11. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water during summer drought in two contrasting Pacific Northwest coniferous forests.

    Treesearch

    J. Renee Brooks; Frederick C. Meinzer; Rob Coulombe; Jillian Gregg

    2002-01-01

    The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots and its impact on soil water balance were estimated by monitoring time courses of soil water status and multiple depths and root sap flow under drought conditions in a dry ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) ecosystem and in a moist Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga...

  12. Inequality and redistribution behavior in a give-or-take game

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Michael M.; Scheve, Kenneth F.

    2018-01-01

    Political polarization and extremism are widely thought to be driven by the surge in economic inequality in many countries around the world. Understanding why inequality persists depends on knowing the causal effect of inequality on individual behavior. We study how inequality affects redistribution behavior in a randomized “give-or-take” experiment that created equality, advantageous inequality, or disadvantageous inequality between two individuals before offering one of them the opportunity to either take from or give to the other. We estimate the causal effect of inequality in representative samples of German and American citizens (n = 4,966) and establish two main findings. First, individuals imperfectly equalize payoffs: On average, respondents transfer 12% of the available endowments to realize more equal wealth distributions. This means that respondents tolerate a considerable degree of inequality even in a setting in which there are no costs to redistribution. Second, redistribution behavior in response to disadvantageous and advantageous inequality is largely asymmetric: Individuals who take from those who are richer do not also tend to give to those who are poorer, and individuals who give to those who are poorer do not tend to take from those who are richer. These behavioral redistribution types correlate in meaningful ways with support for heavy taxes on the rich and the provision of welfare benefits for the poor. Consequently, it seems difficult to construct a majority coalition willing to back the type of government interventions needed to counter rising inequality. PMID:29555734

  13. Everyone Is on Welfare: "The Role of Redistribution in Social Policy" Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovitz, Mimi

    1983-01-01

    Uses Titmuss's model of three welfare systems to analyze how the rapidly expanding system of tax benefits available to middle- and upper-income groups parallels the social welfare system for the poor. Operating as a shadow welfare state, the tax benefits system contributes to the upward redistribution of income. (Author/JAC)

  14. 47 CFR 76.1909 - Redistribution control of unencrypted digital terrestrial broadcast content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... content. Where a multichannel video programming distributor retransmits unencrypted digital terrestrial... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Redistribution control of unencrypted digital... (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Encoding Rules § 76.1909...

  15. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER IN TWO OLD-GROWTH CONIFEROUS FORESTS: QUANTIFYING PATTERNS AND CONTROLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although hydraulic redistribution of soil water (HR) by roots is a widespread phenomenon, the processes governing spatial and temporal patterns of HR are not well understood. We incorporated soil/plant biophysical properties into a simple model based on Darcy's law to predict sea...

  16. Correlation of interplanetary-space B sub z field fluctuations and trapped-particle redistribution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, G. K.; Pellat, R.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations in correlation with trapped particle fluctuations are discussed. From observations of particle-redistribution effects, properties of the magnetospheric electric field are derived. The obtained results suggest that the interplanetary B(sub z) field fluctuations might represent a strong driving source for particle diffusion.

  17. Redistributive Taxation vs. Education Subsidies: Fostering Equality and Social Mobility in an Intergenerational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Redistributive taxation and education subsidies are common policies intended to foster education attendance of poor children. However, this paper shows that in an intergenerational framework, these policies can raise social mobility only for some investment situations but not in general. I also study the impact of both policies on the aggregate…

  18. Redistribution spurs growth by using a portfolio effect on risky human capital.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Jan; Paetzel, Fabian; Schweitzer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate by mathematical analysis and systematic computer simulations that redistribution can lead to sustainable growth in a society. In accordance with economic models of risky human capital, we assume that dynamics of human capital is modeled as a multiplicative stochastic process which, in the long run, leads to the destruction of individual human capital. When agents are linked by fully redistributive taxation the situation might turn to individual growth in the long run. We consider that a government collects a proportion of income and reduces it by a fraction as costs for administration (efficiency losses). The remaining public good is equally redistributed to all agents. Sustainable growth is induced by redistribution despite the losses from the random growth process and despite administrative costs. Growth results from a portfolio effect. The findings are verified for three different tax schemes: proportional tax, taking proportionally more from the rich, and proportionally more from the poor. We discuss which of these tax schemes performs better with respect to maximize growth under a fixed rate of administrative costs, and the governmental income. This leads us to general conclusions about governmental decisions, the relation to public good games with free riding, and the function of taxation in a risk-taking society.

  19. Dark Play as a Misrecognized Need for Redistributing (Digital) Goods: An Example from an Egalitarian Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadownik, Alicja R

    2017-01-01

    This article contextualizes the dark sides of play from a cultural-historical perspective using Fraser's theory of social justice based on the concepts of recognition and redistribution. Through a micro-ethnographic analysis of a kindergarten's daily life and play situations between 2 five-year-old girls, the article describes the dark play from a…

  20. Fiscal Impacts and Redistributive Effects of the New Federalism on Michigan School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, C. Philip; Kim, Taewan

    1990-01-01

    The fiscal impacts and redistribution effects of the recently enacted (1981) federal education block grant on 525 elementary and secondary school districts in Michigan were examined using a quasi-experimental time-series design and multiple regression and analysis of covariance techniques. Implications of changes in federal policy are discussed.…

  1. In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey M. Warren; J. Renée Brooks; Maria I. Dragila; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal increases in water potential and water content in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux, a process termed hydraulic redistribution (HR). However, unsaturated liquid or vapor flux of water between soil layers independent of roots also contributes to the daily recovery in water content, confounding efforts to determine the actual...

  2. Educational Policy and the Drug Problem--A Redistributive Politics Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P.

    1975-01-01

    The drug problem exists as a cluster of problems affecting broad interests or groups. The issues are redistributive in that everything relates to everything else. It seems apparent that a cluster of policies and programs need development as well as genuine citizen participation in the formulation of these policies. (Author)

  3. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER DURING SUMMER DROUGHT IN TWO CONTRASTING PACIFIC NORTHWEST CONIFEROUS FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots and its impact on soil water balance were estimated by monitoring time courses of soil water status at multiple depths and root sap flow during droughted conditions in a dry ponderosa pine ecosystem and a moist Doug...

  4. Cesium 137-Its applications for understanding soil redistribution and deposition patterns on the landscape

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the 1960s research began on the application of fallout radionuclides to determine sediment deposition and soil redistribution rates and patterns in agricultural and natural ecosystems. This research was based on the use of fallout 137Cesium (137Cs) from nuclear weapon tests deposited worldwide d...

  5. Hydraulic redistribution by two semi-arid shrub species: Implications for Sahelianagro-ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution is the process of passive water movement from deeper moist soil to shallower dry soil layers using plant roots as conduits. Results from this study indicate that this phenomenon exists among two shrub species (Guiera senegalensis and Piliostigma reticulat...

  6. Hydraulic redistribution of water from Pinus ponderosa trees to seedlings: evidence for an ectomycorrhizal pathway.

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey M. Warren; J. Renee Brooks; Frederick C. Meinzer; Joyce L. Eberhart

    2008-01-01

    Although there is strong evidence for hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by trees, it is not known if common myconhizal networks (CMN) can facilitate HR from mature trees to seedlings under field conditions. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seedlings were planted into root-excluding 61-micron mesh barrier chambers buried in an old-growth...

  7. Redistribution Spurs Growth by Using a Portfolio Effect on Risky Human Capital

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Jan; Paetzel, Fabian; Schweitzer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate by mathematical analysis and systematic computer simulations that redistribution can lead to sustainable growth in a society. In accordance with economic models of risky human capital, we assume that dynamics of human capital is modeled as a multiplicative stochastic process which, in the long run, leads to the destruction of individual human capital. When agents are linked by fully redistributive taxation the situation might turn to individual growth in the long run. We consider that a government collects a proportion of income and reduces it by a fraction as costs for administration (efficiency losses). The remaining public good is equally redistributed to all agents. Sustainable growth is induced by redistribution despite the losses from the random growth process and despite administrative costs. Growth results from a portfolio effect. The findings are verified for three different tax schemes: proportional tax, taking proportionally more from the rich, and proportionally more from the poor. We discuss which of these tax schemes performs better with respect to maximize growth under a fixed rate of administrative costs, and the governmental income. This leads us to general conclusions about governmental decisions, the relation to public good games with free riding, and the function of taxation in a risk-taking society. PMID:23390505

  8. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  9. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water in two old-growth coniferous forests: quantifying patterns and controls.

    Treesearch

    J.M. Warren; F.C. Meinzer; J.R. Brooks; J.-C. Domec; R. Coulombe

    2006-01-01

    We incorporated soil/plant biophysical properties into a simple model to predict seasonal trajectories of hydraulic redistribution (HR). We measured soil water content, water potential root conductivity, and climate across multiple years in two old-growth coniferous forests. The HR variability within sites (0 to 0.5 mm/d) was linked to spatial patterns of roots, soil...

  10. Converging patterns of uptake and hydraulic redistribution of soil water in contrasting woody vegetation types.

    Treesearch

    F.C. Meinzer; J.R. Brooks; S. Bucci; G. Goldstein; F.G. Scholz; J.M. Arren

    2004-01-01

    We used concurrent measurements of soil water content and soil water potential (Ψsoil) to assess the effects of Ψsoil on uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by roots during seasonal drought cycles at six sites characterized by differences in the types and amounts of woody vegetations and...

  11. Potential redistribution of tree species habitat under five climate change scenarios in the eastern US

    Treesearch

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha M. Prasad; Anantha M. Prasad

    2002-01-01

    Global climate change could have profound effects on the Earth's biota, including large redistributions of tree species and forest types. We used DISTRIB, a deterministic regression tree analysis model, to examine environmental drivers related to current forest-species distributions and then model potential suitable habitat under five climate change scenarios...

  12. Development and validity of a new model for assessing pressure redistribution properties of support surfaces.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Junko; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi; Okuwa, Mayumi; Nakatani, Toshio; Konya, Chizuko; Sakamoto, Jirou

    2011-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common problem, especially in older patients. In Japan, most institutionalized older people are malnourished and show extreme bony prominence (EBP). EBP is a significant factor in the development of pressure ulcers due to increased interface pressure concentrated at the skin surface over the EBP. The use of support surfaces is recommended for the prophylaxis of pressure ulcers. However, the present equivocal criteria for evaluating the pressure redistribution of support surfaces are inadequate. Since pressure redistribution is influenced by physique and posture, evaluations using human subjects are limited. For this reason, models that can substitute for humans are necessary. We developed a new EBP model based on the anthropometric measurements, including pelvic inclination, of 100 bedridden elderly people. A comparison between the pressure distribution charts of our model and bedridden elderly subjects demonstrated that maximum contact pressure values, buttock contact pressure values, and bone prominence rates corresponded closely. This indicates that the model provides a good approximation of the features of elderly people with EBP. We subsequently examined the validity of the model through quantitative assessment of pressure redistribution functions consisting of immersion, envelopment, and contact area change. The model was able to detect differences in the hardness of urethane foam, differences in the internal pressure of an air mattress, and sequential changes during the pressure switching mode. These results demonstrate the validity of our new buttock model in evaluating pressure redistribution for a variety of surfaces. Copyright © 2010 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nocturnal increases in water potential (ψ) and water content () in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux into the soil, a process termed hydraulic lift or hydraulic redistribution (HR). We have previously reported HR values up to ~0.29 mm day-1 in the ...

  14. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION IN A DOUGLAS-FIR FOREST: LESSONS FROM SYSTEM MANIPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) has been shown to slow drying of surface soils during drought in Pacific Northwest forests, but the controls governing this process and its importance to shallow-rooted species are poorly understood. Our objective in this study was to manipulate the...

  15. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION IN A DOUGLAS-FIR FOREST: LESSONS FROM SYSTEM MANIPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) occurs in many ecosystems; however, key questions remain about its consequences at the ecosystem level. The objectives of the present study were to quantify seasonal variation in HR and its driving force, and to manipulate the soil-root system to e...

  16. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER: ECOSYSTEM IMPLICATIONS FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical process of hydraulic redistribution (HR) is driven by competing soil, tree and atmospheric water potential gradients, and may delay severe water stress for roots and other biota associated with the upper soil profile. We monitored soil moisture characteristics across...

  17. CONVERGING PATTERNS OF UPTAKE AND HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER IN CONTRASTING WOODY VEGETATION TYPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used concurrent measurements of soil water content and soil water potential (Ysoil) to assess the effects of Ysoil on uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by roots during seasonal drought cycles in six sites characterized by different types and amounts of woo...

  18. Hydraulic redistribution by two semi-arid shrub species: implications for Sahelian agro-ecosystems

    Treesearch

    F. Kizito; M.I. Dragila; M. Sene; J.R. Brooks; F.C. Meinzer; I. Diedhiou; M. Diouf; A. Lufafa; R.P. Dick; J. Selker; R. Cuenca

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic redistribution is the process of passive water movement from deeper moist soil to shallower dry soil layers using plant roots as conduits. Results from this study indicate that this phenomenon exists among two shrub species (Guiera senegalensis and Piliostigma reticulatum) that co-exist with annual food crops in...

  19. Impacts of hydraulic redistribution on grass-tree competition versus facilitation in a semiarid savanna

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    -A long-standing ambition in ecosystem science has been to understand the relationship between ecosystem community composition, structure and function. Differential water use and hydraulic redistribution have been proposed as one mechanism that might allow for the coexistence of overstory woody plan...

  20. CONTAMINANT REDISTRIBUTION CAN CONFOUND INTERPRETATION OF OIL-SPILL BIOREMEDIATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical redistribution of oil between the inside and outside of experimental plots can affect the results of bioremediation field studies that are conducted on shorelines contaminated by real oil spills. Because untreated oil from the surrounding beach will enter the plot, ...

  1. Knowing One's Lot in Life versus Climbing the Social Ladder: The Formation of Redistributive Preferences in Urban China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Russell; Mishra, Vinod; Qian, Xiaolei

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines, how individual preferences for redistribution in general and redistribution to improve access to education, improve social protection for the poor, reduce income inequality and reduce unemployment depend on beliefs about what determines one's lot in life and self-assessed prospects for climbing the social ladder in urban…

  2. Extending the timescale for using beryllium 7 measurements to document soil redistribution by erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walling, D. E.; Schuller, P.; Zhang, Y.; Iroumé, A.

    2009-02-01

    The need for spatially distributed information on soil mobilization, transfer, and deposition within the landscape by erosion has focused attention on the potential for using fallout radionuclides (i.e., 137Cs, excess 210Pb, and 7Be) to document soil redistribution rates. Whereas 137Cs and excess 210Pb are used to estimate medium- and longer-term erosion rates (i.e., approximately 45 years and 100 years, respectively), 7Be, by virtue of its short half-life (53 days), provides potential for estimating short-term soil redistribution on bare soils. However, the approach commonly used with this radionuclide means that it can only be applied to individual events or short periods of heavy rain. In addition, it is also frequently difficult to ensure that the requirement for spatially uniform 7Be inventories across the study area immediately prior to the study period is met. If the existing approach is applied to longer periods with several rainfall events (e.g., several weeks or more) soil redistribution is likely to be substantially underestimated. These problems limit the potential for using the 7Be approach, particularly in investigations where there is a need to assemble representative information on soil redistribution occurring during the entire wet season. This paper reports the development of a new or refined model for converting radionuclide measurements to estimates of soil redistribution (conversion model) for use with 7Be measurements, which permits much longer periods to be studied. This refined model aims to retain much of the simplicity of the existing approach, but takes account of the temporal distribution of both 7Be fallout and erosion during the study period and of the evolution of the 7Be depth distribution during this period. The approach was successfully tested using 7Be measurements from a study of short-term soil redistribution undertaken within an area of recently harvested forest located near Valdivia in Southern Chile. The study period extended

  3. Topographic Metric Predictions of Soil redistribution and Organic Carbon Distribution in Croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccarty, G.; Li, X.

    2017-12-01

    Landscape topography is a key factor controlling soil redistribution and soil organic carbon (SOC) distribution in Iowa croplands (USA). In this study, we adopted a combined approach based on carbon () and cesium (137Cs) isotope tracers, and digital terrain analysis to understand patterns of SOC redistribution and carbon sequestration dynamics as influenced by landscape topography in tilled cropland under long term corn/soybean management. The fallout radionuclide 137Cs was used to estimate soil redistribution rates and a Lidar-derived DEM was used to obtain a set of topographic metrics for digital terrain analysis. Soil redistribution rates and patterns of SOC distribution were examined across 560 sampling locations at two field sites as well as at larger scale within the watershed. We used δ13C content in SOC to partition C3 and C4 plant derived C density at 127 locations in one of the two field sites with corn being the primary source of C4 C. Topography-based models were developed to simulate SOC distribution and soil redistribution using stepwise ordinary least square regression (SOLSR) and stepwise principal component regression (SPCR). All topography-based models developed through SPCR and SOLSR demonstrated good simulation performance, explaining more than 62% variability in SOC density and soil redistribution rates across two field sites with intensive samplings. However, the SOLSR models showed lower reliability than the SPCR models in predicting SOC density at the watershed scale. Spatial patterns of C3-derived SOC density were highly related to those of SOC density. Topographic metrics exerted substantial influence on C3-derived SOC density with the SPCR model accounting for 76.5% of the spatial variance. In contrast C4 derived SOC density had poor spatial structure likely reflecting the substantial contribution of corn vegetation to recently sequestered SOC density. Results of this study highlighted the utility of topographic SPCR models for scaling

  4. The impact of soil redistribution on SOC pools in a Mediterranean agroforestry catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Laura; Gaspar, Leticia; Lizaga, Iván; Navas, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Soil redistribution processes play an important role influencing the spatial distribution patterns of soil and associated soil organic carbon (SOC) at landscape scale. Information on drivers of SOC dynamics is key for evaluating both soil degradation and SOC stability that can affect soil quality and sustainability. 137Cs measurements provide a very effective tool to infer spatial patterns of soil redistribution and quantify soil redistribution rates in different landscapes, but to date these data are scarce in mountain Mediterranean agroecosystems. We evaluate the effect of soil redistribution on SOC and SOC pools in relation to land use in a Mediterranean mountain catchment (246 ha). To this purpose, two hundred and four soil bulk cores were collected on a 100 m grid in the Estaña lakes catchment located in the central sector of the Spanish Pyrenees (31T 4656250N 295152E). The study area is an agroforestry and endorheic catchment characterized by the presence of evaporite dissolution induced dolines, some of which host permanent lakes. The selected landscape is representative of rainfed areas of Mediterranean continental climate with erodible lithology and shallow soils, and characterized by an intense anthropogenic activity through cultivation and water management. The cultivated and uncultivated areas are heterogeneously distributed. SOC and SOC pools (the active and decomposable fraction, ACF and the stable carbon fraction SCF) were measured by the dry combustion method and soil redistribution rates were derived from 137Cs measurements. The results showed that erosion predominated in the catchment, most of soil samples were identified as eroded sites (n=114) with an average erosion rate of 26.9±51.4 Mg ha-1 y-1 whereas the mean deposition rate was 13.0±24.2 Mg ha-1 y-1. In cultivated soils (n=54) the average of soil erosion rate was significantly higher (78.5±74.4 Mg ha-1 y-1) than in uncultivated soils (6.8±10.4 Mg ha-1 y-1). Similarly, the mean of soil

  5. Household perceptions towards a redistributive policy across health insurance funds in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Chomi, Eunice N; Mujinja, Phares G M; Hansen, Kristian; Kiwara, Angwara D; Enemark, Ulrika

    2015-03-15

    The Tanzanian health insurance system comprises multiple health insurance funds targeting different population groups but which operate in parallel, with no mechanisms for redistribution across the funds. Establishing such redistributive mechanisms requires public support, which is grounded on the level of solidarity within the country. The aim of this paper is to analyse the perceptions of CHF, NHIF and non-member households towards cross-subsidisation of the poor as an indication of the level of solidarity and acceptance of redistributive mechanisms. This study analyses data collected from a survey of 695 households relating to perceptions of household heads towards cross-subsidisation of the poor to enable them to access health services. Kruskal-Wallis test is used to compare perceptions by membership status. Generalized ordinal logistic regression models are used to identify factors associated with support for cross-subsidisation of the poor. Compared to CHF and NHIF households, non-member households expressed the highest support for subsidised CHF membership for the poor. The odds of expressing support for subsidised CHF membership are higher for NHIF households and non-member households, households that are wealthier, whose household heads have lower education levels, and have sick members. The majority of households support a partial rather than fully subsidised CHF membership for the poor and there were no significant differences by membership status. The odds of expressing willingness to contribute towards subsidised CHF membership are higher for households that are wealthier, with young household heads and have confidence in scheme management. The majority may support a redistributive policy, but there are indications that this support and willingness to contribute to its achievement are influenced by the perceived benefits, amount of subsidy considered, and trust in scheme management. These present important issues for consideration when designing

  6. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment ofmore » one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  7. Collective religiosity and the gender gap in attitudes towards economic redistribution in 86 countries, 1990-2008.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Castillo, Antonio M; Fernández, Juan J; Valiente, Celia; Mayrl, Damon

    2016-05-01

    What is the relationship between gender and the demand for redistribution? Because, on average, women face more economic deprivation than men, in many countries women favor redistribution more than men. However, this is not the case in a number of other countries, where women do not support redistribution more than men. To explain this cross-national paradox, we stress the role of collective religiosity. In many religions, theological principles both militate against public policies designed to redistribute income, and also promote traditionally gendered patterns of work and family involvement. Hence, we hypothesize that, in those countries where religion remains influential either through closer church-state ties or an intensely religious population, men and women should differ less in their attitudes towards redistribution. Drawing upon the World Values Survey, we estimate three-level regression models that test our religiosity-based approach and two alternative explanations in 86 countries and 175 country-years. The results are consistent with our hypothesis. Moreover, in further support of our theoretical approach, societal religiosity undermines pro-redistribution preferences more among women than men. Our findings suggest that collective religiosity matters more to the gender gap in redistributive attitudes than traditional political and labor force factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Understanding re-distribution of road deposited particle-bound pollutants using a Bayesian Network (BN) approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Wijesiri, Buddhi; Hong, Nian; Zhu, Panfeng; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2018-05-08

    Road deposited pollutants (build-up) are continuously re-distributed by external factors such as traffic and wind turbulence, influencing stormwater runoff quality. However, current stormwater quality modelling approaches do not account for the re-distribution of pollutants. This undermines the accuracy of stormwater quality predictions, constraining the design of effective stormwater treatment measures. This study, using over 1000 data points, developed a Bayesian Network modelling approach to investigate the re-distribution of pollutant build-up on urban road surfaces. BTEX, which are a group of highly toxic pollutants, was the case study pollutants. Build-up sampling was undertaken in Shenzhen, China, using a dry and wet vacuuming method. The research outcomes confirmed that the vehicle type and particle size significantly influence the re-distribution of particle-bound BTEX. Compared to heavy-duty traffic in commercial areas, light-duty traffic dominates the re-distribution of particles of all size ranges. In industrial areas, heavy-duty traffic re-distributes particles >75 μm, and light-duty traffic re-distributes particles <75 μm. In residential areas, light-duty traffic re-distributes particles >300 μm and <75 μm and heavy-duty traffic re-distributes particles in the 300-150 μm range. The study results provide important insights to improve stormwater quality modelling and the interpretation of modelling outcomes, contributing to safeguard the urban water environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biodiversity redistribution under climate change: Impacts on ecosystems and human well-being.

    PubMed

    Pecl, Gretta T; Araújo, Miguel B; Bell, Johann D; Blanchard, Julia; Bonebrake, Timothy C; Chen, I-Ching; Clark, Timothy D; Colwell, Robert K; Danielsen, Finn; Evengård, Birgitta; Falconi, Lorena; Ferrier, Simon; Frusher, Stewart; Garcia, Raquel A; Griffis, Roger B; Hobday, Alistair J; Janion-Scheepers, Charlene; Jarzyna, Marta A; Jennings, Sarah; Lenoir, Jonathan; Linnetved, Hlif I; Martin, Victoria Y; McCormack, Phillipa C; McDonald, Jan; Mitchell, Nicola J; Mustonen, Tero; Pandolfi, John M; Pettorelli, Nathalie; Popova, Ekaterina; Robinson, Sharon A; Scheffers, Brett R; Shaw, Justine D; Sorte, Cascade J B; Strugnell, Jan M; Sunday, Jennifer M; Tuanmu, Mao-Ning; Vergés, Adriana; Villanueva, Cecilia; Wernberg, Thomas; Wapstra, Erik; Williams, Stephen E

    2017-03-31

    Distributions of Earth's species are changing at accelerating rates, increasingly driven by human-mediated climate change. Such changes are already altering the composition of ecological communities, but beyond conservation of natural systems, how and why does this matter? We review evidence that climate-driven species redistribution at regional to global scales affects ecosystem functioning, human well-being, and the dynamics of climate change itself. Production of natural resources required for food security, patterns of disease transmission, and processes of carbon sequestration are all altered by changes in species distribution. Consideration of these effects of biodiversity redistribution is critical yet lacking in most mitigation and adaptation strategies, including the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Observation of instability-induced current redistribution in a spherical-torus plasma.

    PubMed

    Menard, J E; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaye, S M; LeBlanc, B P; Levinton, F M; Medley, S S; Sabbagh, S A; Stutman, D; Tritz, K; Yuh, H

    2006-09-01

    A motional Stark effect diagnostic has been utilized to reconstruct the parallel current density profile in a spherical-torus plasma for the first time. The measured current profile compares favorably with neoclassical theory when no large-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities are present in the plasma. However, a current profile anomaly is observed during saturated interchange-type instability activity. This apparent anomaly can be explained by redistribution of neutral beam injection current drive and represents the first observation of interchange-type instabilities causing such redistribution. The associated current profile modifications contribute to sustaining the central safety factor above unity for over five resistive diffusion times, and similar processes may contribute to improved operational scenarios proposed for ITER.

  11. Tropical storm redistribution of Saharan dust to the upper troposphere and ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbener, Stephen R.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Heever, Susan C.; Twohy, Cynthia H.

    2016-10-01

    As a tropical cyclone traverses the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), the storm will spatially redistribute the dust from the SAL. Dust deposited on the surface may affect ocean fertilization, and dust transported to the upper levels of the troposphere may impact radiative forcing. This study explores the relative amounts of dust that are vertically redistributed when a tropical cyclone crosses the SAL. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was configured to simulate the passage of Tropical Storm Debby (2006) through the SAL. A dust mass budget approach has been applied, enabled by a novel dust mass tracking capability of the model, to determine the amounts of dust deposited on the ocean surface and transferred aloft. The mass of dust removed to the ocean surface was predicted to be nearly 2 orders of magnitude greater than the amount of dust transported to the upper troposphere.

  12. Nonequilibrium distribution functions in electron transport: decoherence, energy redistribution and dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmann, Thomas; Ujsághy, Orsolya; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2018-04-01

    A new statistical model for the combined effects of decoherence, energy redistribution and dissipation on electron transport in large quantum systems is introduced. The essential idea is to consider the electron phase information to be lost only at randomly chosen regions with an average distance corresponding to the decoherence length. In these regions the electron's energy can be unchanged or redistributed within the electron system or dissipated to a heat bath. The different types of scattering and the decoherence leave distinct fingerprints in the energy distribution functions. They can be interpreted as a mixture of unthermalized and thermalized electrons. In the case of weak decoherence, the fraction of thermalized electrons show electrical and thermal contact resistances. In the regime of incoherent transport the proposed model is equivalent to a Boltzmann equation. The model is applied to experiments with carbon nanotubes. The excellent agreement of the model with the experimental data allows to determine the scattering lengths of the system.

  13. Induced metal redistribution and bioavailability enhancement in contaminated river sediment during in situ biogeochemical remediation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Zhang, Zhen; Mao, Yanqing; Yan, Dickson Y S

    2016-04-01

    In situ sediment remediation using Ca(NO3)2 or CaO2 for odor mitigation and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and organic pollutant (such as TPH and PAHs) removal was reported in many studies and fieldwork. Yet, the associated effects on metal mobilization and potential distortion in bioavailability were not well documented. In this study, contaminated river sediment was treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 in bench studies. Through the investigation of AVS removal, organic matter removal, the changes in sediment oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), microbial activity, and other indigenous parameters, the effects on metal bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and fraction redistribution in sediment were evaluated. The major mechanisms for sediment treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 are biostimulation with indigenous denitrifying bacteria and chemical oxidation, respectively. After applying Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2, the decreases of metal concentrations in the treated sediment were insignificant within a 35-day incubation period. However, the [SEMtot-AVS]/f OC increased near to the effective boundary of toxicity (100 μmol g(-1) organic carbon (OC)), indicating that both bioavailability and bioaccessibility of metals (Cu, Zn, and Ni) to benthic organisms are enhanced after remediation. Metals were found redistributed from relatively stable fractions (oxidizable and residual fractions) to weakly bound fractions (exchangeable and reducible fractions), and the results are in line with the enhanced metal bioavailability. Compared with Ca(NO3)2, CaO2 led to higher enhancement in metal bioavailability and bioaccessibility, and more significant metal redistribution, probably due to its stronger chemical reactive capacity to AVS and sediment organic matter. The reactions in CaO2-treated sediment would probably shift from physicochemical to biochemical heterotrophic oxidation for sediment organic matter degradation. Therefore, further investigation on the long-term metal redistribution and associated

  14. Implications of sediment redistribution on modeled sea-level changes over millennial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Sea level is a critical link in feedbacks among topography, tectonics, and climate. Over millennial timescales, changes in sea level reshape river networks, regulate organic carbon burial, influence sediment deposition, and set moving boundary conditions for landscape evolution. Sea-level changes influence tectonics by regulating rates and patterns of erosion and deposition, which perturb the surface loads that drive geodynamic processes at depth. These interactions are complex because sea-level changes are influenced by the geomorphic processes that they themselves modify, since sediment redistribution deforms the gravitational and crustal elevation fields that define sea level. A recent advance in understanding the coupling between sea level, tectonics, and topography was the incorporation of sediment redistribution into a gravitationally self-consistent sea-level model, which permits the computation of sea-level responses to erosion and deposition (Dalca et al., 2013, Geophysical Journal International). Here I use this model to quantify changes in sea level resulting from the erosion of some of the most rapidly eroding sites on Earth and the deposition of sediment offshore. These model results show that the sea-level fingerprints of sediment redistribution are strongly variable in space, and that they can represent a significant component of the total sea level change since the last interglacial. This work provides a basis for understanding a fundamental driver of landscape evolution at some of Earth's most geomorphically dynamic sites, and thus aids investigation of the couplings among tectonics, climate, and topography. References Dalca A.V., Ferrier K.L., Mitrovica J.X., Perron J.T., Milne G.A., Creveling J.R., 2013. On postglacial sea level - III. Incorporating sediment redistribution. Geophysical Journal International, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt089.

  15. [Rural-urban population redistribution between 1970 and 1980 (a micro-regional analysis)].

    PubMed

    Costa, M A

    1982-01-01

    Changes in rural-urban population distribution in Brazil from 1970 to 1980 are analyzed using census data. Trends examined include spatial redistribution throughout the country, rapid urbanization, the decline in the size of the rural population in the state of Parana, agricultural expansion in the northern and central-western regions, and the increase of the rural population within metropolitan areas. (summary in ENG)

  16. Hydraulic redistribution study in two native tree species of agroforestry parklands of West African dry savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayala, Jules; Heng, Lee Kheng; van Noordwijk, Meine; Ouedraogo, Sibiri Jean

    2008-11-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) in karité ( Vitellaria paradoxa) and néré ( Parkia biglobosa) tree species was studied by monitoring the soil water potential ( ψs) using thermocouple psychrometers at four compass directions, various distances from trees and at different soil depths (max depth 80 cm) during the dry seasons of 2004 and 2005. A modified WaNuLCAS model was then used to infer the amount of water redistribued based on ψs values. Tree transpiration rate was also estimated from sap velocity using thermal dissipative probes (TDP) and sapwood area, and the contribution of hydraulically redistributed water in tree transpiration was determined. The results revealed on average that 46% of the psychrometer readings under karité and 33% under néré showed the occurrence of HR for the two years. Soil under néré displayed significantly lower fluctuations of ψs (0.16 MPa) compared to soil under karité (0.21 MPa). The results of this study indicated that the existence of HR leads to a higher ψs in the plant rhizosphere and hence is important for soil water dynamics and plant nutrition by making more accessible the soluble elements. The simulation showed that the amount of water redistributed would be approximately 73.0 L and 247.1 L per tree per day in 2005 for karité and néré, and would represent respectively 60% and 53% of the amount transpired a day. Even though the model has certainly overestimated the volume of water hydraulically redistributed by the two species, this water may play a key role in maintaining fine root viability and ensuring the well adaptation of these species to the dry areas. Therefore, knowledge of the extent of such transfers and of the seasonal patterns is required and is of paramount importance in parkland systems both for trees and associated crops.

  17. Control of electron transport routes through redox-regulated redistribution of respiratory complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu-Ning; Bryan, Samantha J.; Huang, Fang; Yu, Jianfeng; Nixon, Peter J.; Rich, Peter R.; Mullineaux, Conrad W.

    2012-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, respiratory electron transport takes place in close proximity to photosynthetic electron transport, because the complexes required for both processes are located within the thylakoid membranes. The balance of electron transport routes is crucial for cell physiology, yet the factors that control the predominance of particular pathways are poorly understood. Here we use a combination of tagging with green fluorescent protein and confocal fluorescence microscopy in live cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 to investigate the distribution on submicron scales of two key respiratory electron donors, type-I NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). When cells are grown under low light, both complexes are concentrated in discrete patches in the thylakoid membranes, about 100–300 nm in diameter and containing tens to hundreds of complexes. Exposure to moderate light leads to redistribution of both NDH-1 and SDH such that they become evenly distributed within the thylakoid membranes. The effects of electron transport inhibitors indicate that redistribution of respiratory complexes is triggered by changes in the redox state of an electron carrier close to plastoquinone. Redistribution does not depend on de novo protein synthesis, and it is accompanied by a major increase in the probability that respiratory electrons are transferred to photosystem I rather than to a terminal oxidase. These results indicate that the distribution of complexes on the scale of 100–300 nm controls the partitioning of reducing power and that redistribution of electron transport complexes on these scales is a physiological mechanism to regulate the pathways of electron flow. PMID:22733774

  18. A kinematic model for the evolution of the Eastern California Shear Zone and Garlock Fault, Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Timothy H.; Xie, Surui

    2018-07-01

    The Eastern California shear zone in the Mojave Desert, California, accommodates nearly a quarter of Pacific-North America plate motion. In south-central Mojave, the shear zone consists of six active faults, with the central Calico fault having the fastest slip rate. However, faults to the east of the Calico fault have larger total offsets. We explain this pattern of slip rate and total offset with a model involving a crustal block (the Mojave Block) that migrates eastward relative to a shear zone at depth whose position and orientation is fixed by the Coachella segment of the San Andreas fault (SAF), southwest of the transpressive "big bend" in the SAF. Both the shear zone and the Garlock fault are assumed to be a direct result of this restraining bend, and consequent strain redistribution. The model explains several aspects of local and regional tectonics, may apply to other transpressive continental plate boundary zones, and may improve seismic hazard estimates in these zones.

  19. POLARIZED LINE FORMATION WITH LOWER-LEVEL POLARIZATION AND PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Supriya, H. D.; Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N.

    2016-09-10

    In the well-established theories of polarized line formation with partial frequency redistribution (PRD) for a two-level and two-term atom, it is generally assumed that the lower level of the scattering transition is unpolarized. However, the existence of unexplained spectral features in some lines of the Second Solar Spectrum points toward a need to relax this assumption. There exists a density matrix theory that accounts for the polarization of all the atomic levels, but it is based on the flat-spectrum approximation (corresponding to complete frequency redistribution). In the present paper we propose a numerical algorithm to solve the problem of polarizedmore » line formation in magnetized media, which includes both the effects of PRD and the lower level polarization (LLP) for a two-level atom. First we derive a collisionless redistribution matrix that includes the combined effects of the PRD and the LLP. We then solve the relevant transfer equation using a two-stage approach. For illustration purposes, we consider two case studies in the non-magnetic regime, namely, the J {sub a} = 1, J {sub b} = 0 and J {sub a} = J {sub b} = 1, where J {sub a} and J {sub b} represent the total angular momentum quantum numbers of the lower and upper states, respectively. Our studies show that the effects of LLP are significant only in the line core. This leads us to propose a simplified numerical approach to solve the concerned radiative transfer problem.« less

  20. Public speaking stress-induced neuroendocrine responses and circulating immune cell redistribution in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Lucas, Ayscha; Holtmann, Gerald; Haag, Sebastian; Gerken, Guido; Riemenschneider, Natalie; Langhorst, Jost; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2006-10-01

    Augmented neuroendocrine stress responses and altered immune functions may play a role in the manifestation of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We tested the hypothesis that IBS patients would demonstrate enhanced psychological and endocrine responses, as well as altered stress-induced redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocytes, in response to an acute psychosocial stressor when compared with healthy controls. Responses to public speaking stress were analyzed in N = 17 IBS patients without concurrent psychiatric conditions and N = 12 healthy controls. At baseline, immediately following public speaking, and after a recovery period, state anxiety, acute GI symptoms, cardiovascular responses, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were measured, and numbers of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Public speaking led to significant cardiovascular activation, a significant increase in ACTH, and a redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations, including significant increases in natural killer cells and cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. IBS patients demonstrated significantly greater state anxiety both at baseline and following public speaking. However, cardiovascular and endocrine responses, as well as the redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations after public speaking stress, did not differ for IBS patients compared with controls. In IBS patients without psychiatric comorbidity, the endocrine response as well as the circulation pattern of leukocyte subpopulations to acute psychosocial stress do not differ from healthy controls in spite of enhanced emotional responses. Future studies should discern the role of psychopathology in psychological and biological stress responses in IBS.

  1. Evaluating the effect of nutrient redistribution by animals on the phosphorus cycle of lowland Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendía, Corina; Kleidon, Axel; Manzoni, Stefano; Reu, Björn; Porporato, Amilcare

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) availability decreases with soil age and potentially limits the productivity of ecosystems growing on old and weathered soils. Despite growing on ancient soils, ecosystems of lowland Amazonia are highly productive and are among the most biodiverse on Earth. P eroded and weathered in the Andes is transported by the rivers and deposited in floodplains of the lowland Amazon basin creating hotspots of P fertility. We hypothesize that animals feeding on vegetation and detritus in these hotspots may redistribute P to P-depleted areas, thus contributing to dissipate the P gradient across the landscape. Using a mathematical model, we show that animal-driven spatial redistribution of P from rivers to land and from seasonally flooded to terra firme (upland) ecosystems may sustain the P cycle of Amazonian lowlands. Our results show how P imported to land by terrestrial piscivores in combination with spatial redistribution of herbivores and detritivores can significantly enhance the P content in terra firme ecosystems, thereby highlighting the importance of food webs for the biogeochemical cycling of Amazonia.

  2. Economic benefits of sharing and redistributing influenza vaccines when shortages occurred.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-I

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent influenza outbreak has been a concern for government health institutions in Taiwan. Over 10% of the population is infected by influenza viruses every year, and the infection has caused losses to both health and the economy. Approximately three million free vaccine doses are ordered and administered to high-risk populations at the beginning of flu season to control the disease. The government recommends sharing and redistributing vaccine inventories when shortages occur. While this policy intends to increase inventory flexibility, and has been proven as widely valuable, its impact on vaccine availability has not been previously reported. This study developed an inventory model adapted to vaccination protocols to evaluate government recommended polices under different levels of vaccine production. Demands were uncertain and stratified by ages and locations according to the demographic data in Taiwan. When vaccine supply is sufficient, sharing pediatric vaccine reduced vaccine unavailability by 43% and overstock by 54%, and sharing adult vaccine reduced vaccine unavailability by 9% and overstock by 15%. Redistributing vaccines obtained greater gains for both pediatrics and adults (by 75%). When the vaccine supply is in short, only sharing pediatric vaccine yielded a 48% reduction of unused inventory, while other polices do not improve performances. When implementing vaccination activities for seasonal influenza intervention, it is important to consider mismatches of demand and vaccine inventory. Our model confirmed that sharing and redistributing vaccines can substantially increase availability and reduce unused vaccines.

  3. Economic benefits of sharing and redistributing influenza vaccines when shortages occurred

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Recurrent influenza outbreak has been a concern for government health institutions in Taiwan. Over 10% of the population is infected by influenza viruses every year, and the infection has caused losses to both health and the economy. Approximately three million free vaccine doses are ordered and administered to high-risk populations at the beginning of flu season to control the disease. The government recommends sharing and redistributing vaccine inventories when shortages occur. While this policy intends to increase inventory flexibility, and has been proven as widely valuable, its impact on vaccine availability has not been previously reported. Material and methods This study developed an inventory model adapted to vaccination protocols to evaluate government recommended polices under different levels of vaccine production. Demands were uncertain and stratified by ages and locations according to the demographic data in Taiwan. Results When vaccine supply is sufficient, sharing pediatric vaccine reduced vaccine unavailability by 43% and overstock by 54%, and sharing adult vaccine reduced vaccine unavailability by 9% and overstock by 15%. Redistributing vaccines obtained greater gains for both pediatrics and adults (by 75%). When the vaccine supply is in short, only sharing pediatric vaccine yielded a 48% reduction of unused inventory, while other polices do not improve performances. Conclusions When implementing vaccination activities for seasonal influenza intervention, it is important to consider mismatches of demand and vaccine inventory. Our model confirmed that sharing and redistributing vaccines can substantially increase availability and reduce unused vaccines. PMID:29040317

  4. Plant Clonal Integration Mediates the Horizontal Redistribution of Soil Resources, Benefiting Neighboring Plants.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xue-Hua; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Liu, Zhi-Lan; Gao, Shu-Qin; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Feng-Hong; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Resources such as water taken up by plants can be released into soils through hydraulic redistribution and can also be translocated by clonal integration within a plant clonal network. We hypothesized that the resources from one (donor) microsite could be translocated within a clonal network, released into different (recipient) microsites and subsequently used by neighbor plants in the recipient microsite. To test these hypotheses, we conducted two experiments in which connected and disconnected ramet pairs of Potentilla anserina were grown under both homogeneous and heterogeneous water regimes, with seedlings of Artemisia ordosica as neighbors. The isotopes [(15)N] and deuterium were used to trace the translocation of nitrogen and water, respectively, within the clonal network. The water and nitrogen taken up by P. anserina ramets in the donor microsite were translocated into the connected ramets in the recipient microsites. Most notably, portions of the translocated water and nitrogen were released into the recipient microsite and were used by the neighboring A. ordosica, which increased growth of the neighboring A. ordosica significantly. Therefore, our hypotheses were supported, and plant clonal integration mediated the horizontal hydraulic redistribution of resources, thus benefiting neighboring plants. Such a plant clonal integration-mediated resource redistribution in horizontal space may have substantial effects on the interspecific relations and composition of the community and consequently on ecosystem processes.

  5. The Ultimate Spitzer Phase Curve Survey: Cross-Planetary Comparison of Heat-Redistribution Efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraine, Jonathan D.; Stevenson, Kevin; Bean, Jacob; Deming, Drake; Fortney, Jonathan; Kataria, Tiffany; Kempton, Eliza; Lewis, Nikole K.; Line, Michael; Morley, Caroline; Rauscher, Emily; Showman, Adam; Feng, Katherina

    2018-01-01

    Exoplanet phase curves provide a wealth of information about exoplanet atmospheres, including longitudinal constraints on atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and energy transport, that continue to open new doors of scientific inquiry and propel future investigations. The measured heat redistribution efficiency (or ability to transport energy from a planet's highly-irradiated dayside to its eternally-dark nightside) shows considerable variation between exoplanets. Theoretical models predict a correlation between heat redistribution efficiency and planet temperature; however, the latest results are inconsistent with current predictions from 3D atmospheric simulations. We will present preliminary results from a 660-hour Spitzer phase curve survey program that targeted six short-period extrasolar planets. By comparing short periods exoplanets over a range of equilibrium temperatures, we can begin to disentangle the effects of planetary rotation and energy budget on a planet's thermal properties. We will discuss how the measured planet temperature and rotation rate affect the heat redistribution efficiencies, examine trends in the phase curve peak offset, and discuss cloud coverage constraints. Our Spitzer observations will provide valuable information for predicting and interpreting future, JWST-era observations.

  6. Microcirculatory responses of sacral tissue in healthy individuals and inpatients on different pressure-redistribution mattresses.

    PubMed

    Bergstrand, S; Källman, U; Ek, A-C; Engström, M; Lindgren, M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the interaction between interface pressure, pressure-induced vasodilation, and reactive hyperaemia with different pressure-redistribution mattresses. A cross-sectional study was performed with a convenience sample of healthy young individuals, and healthy older individuals and inpatients, at a university hospital in Sweden. Blood flow was measured at depths of 1mm, 2mm, and 10mm using laser Doppler flowmetry and photoplethysmography. The blood flow, interface pressure and skin temperature were measured in the sacral tissue before, during, and after load while lying on one standard hospital mattress and three different pressure-redistribution mattresses. There were significant differences between the average sacral pressure, peak sacral pressure, and local probe pressure on the three pressure-redistribution mattresses, the lowest values found were with the visco-elastic foam/air mattress (23.5 ± 2.5mmHg, 49.3 ± 11.1mmHg, 29.2 ± 14.0mmHg, respectively). Blood flow, measured as pressure-induced vasodilation, was most affected in the visco-elastic foam/air group compared to the alternating pressure mattress group at tissue depths of 2mm (39.0% and 20.0%, respectively), and 10mm (56.9 % and 35.1%, respectively). Subjects in all three groups, including healthy 18-65 year olds, were identified with no pressure-induced vasodilation or reactive hyperaemia on any mattress (n=11), which is considered a high-risk blood flow response. Interface pressure magnitudes considered not harmful during pressure-exposure on different pressure-redistribution mattresses can affect the microcirculation in different tissue structures. Despite having the lowest pressure values compared with the other mattresses, the visco-elastic foam/air mattress had the highest proportion of subjects with decreased blood flow. Healthy young individuals were identified with the high-risk blood flow response, suggesting an innate vulnerability to pressure exposure

  7. Incorporating convection into one-dimensional solute redistribution during crystal growth from the melt I. The steady-state solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, C. T.; Tiller, W. A.

    1992-03-01

    A one-dimensional mathematical analysis is made of the redistribution of solute which occurs during crystal growth from a convected melt. In this analysis, the important contribution from lateral melt convection to one-dimensional solute redistribution analysis is taken into consideration via an annihilation/creation term in the one-dimensional solute transport equation. Calculations of solute redistribution under steady-state conditions have been carried out analytically. It is found that this new solute redistribution model overcomes several weaknesses that occur when applying the Burton, Prim and Slichter solute segregation equation (1953) in real melt growth situations. It is also found that, with this correction, the diffusion coefficients for solute's in liquid silicon are now found to be in the same range as other liquid metal diffusion coefficients.

  8. Potential biases in evapotranspiration estimates from Earth system models due to spatial heterogeneity and lateral moisture redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouholahnejad, E.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key process in land-climate interactions and affects the dynamics of the atmosphere at local and regional scales. In estimating ET, most earth system models average over considerable sub-grid heterogeneity in land surface properties, precipitation (P), and potential evapotranspiration (PET). This spatial averaging could potentially bias ET estimates, due to the nonlinearities in the underlying relationships. In addition, most earth system models ignore lateral redistribution of water within and between grid cells, which could potentially alter both local and regional ET. Here we present a first attempt to quantify the effects of spatial heterogeneity and lateral redistribution on grid-cell-averaged ET as seen from the atmosphere over heterogeneous landscapes. Using a Budyko framework to express ET as a function of P and PET, we quantify how sub-grid heterogeneity affects average ET at the scale of typical earth system model grid cells. We show that averaging over sub-grid heterogeneity in P and PET, as typical earth system models do, leads to overestimates of average ET. We use a similar approach to quantify how lateral redistribution of water could affect average ET, as seen from the atmosphere. We show that where the aridity index P/PET increases with altitude, gravitationally driven lateral redistribution will increase average ET, implying that models that neglect lateral moisture redistribution will underestimate average ET. In contrast, where the aridity index P/PET decreases with altitude, gravitationally driven lateral redistribution will decrease average ET. This approach yields a simple conceptual framework and mathematical expressions for determining whether, and how much, spatial heterogeneity and lateral redistribution can affect regional ET fluxes as seen from the atmosphere. This analysis provides the basis for quantifying heterogeneity and redistribution effects on ET at regional and continental scales, which will be the

  9. Support for redistribution is shaped by compassion, envy, and self-interest, but not a taste for fairness.

    PubMed

    Sznycer, Daniel; Lopez Seal, Maria Florencia; Sell, Aaron; Lim, Julian; Porat, Roni; Shalvi, Shaul; Halperin, Eran; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John

    2017-08-01

    Why do people support economic redistribution? Hypotheses include inequity aversion, a moral sense that inequality is intrinsically unfair, and cultural explanations such as exposure to and assimilation of culturally transmitted ideologies. However, humans have been interacting with worse-off and better-off individuals over evolutionary time, and our motivational systems may have been naturally selected to navigate the opportunities and challenges posed by such recurrent interactions. We hypothesize that modern redistribution is perceived as an ancestral scene involving three notional players: the needy other, the better-off other, and the actor herself. We explore how three motivational systems-compassion, self-interest, and envy-guide responses to the needy other and the better-off other, and how they pattern responses to redistribution. Data from the United States, the United Kingdom, India, and Israel support this model. Endorsement of redistribution is independently predicted by dispositional compassion, dispositional envy, and the expectation of personal gain from redistribution. By contrast, a taste for fairness, in the sense of ( i ) universality in the application of laws and standards, or ( ii ) low variance in group-level payoffs, fails to predict attitudes about redistribution.

  10. Support for redistribution is shaped by compassion, envy, and self-interest, but not a taste for fairness

    PubMed Central

    Lopez Seal, Maria Florencia; Sell, Aaron; Lim, Julian; Porat, Roni; Halperin, Eran; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John

    2017-01-01

    Why do people support economic redistribution? Hypotheses include inequity aversion, a moral sense that inequality is intrinsically unfair, and cultural explanations such as exposure to and assimilation of culturally transmitted ideologies. However, humans have been interacting with worse-off and better-off individuals over evolutionary time, and our motivational systems may have been naturally selected to navigate the opportunities and challenges posed by such recurrent interactions. We hypothesize that modern redistribution is perceived as an ancestral scene involving three notional players: the needy other, the better-off other, and the actor herself. We explore how three motivational systems—compassion, self-interest, and envy—guide responses to the needy other and the better-off other, and how they pattern responses to redistribution. Data from the United States, the United Kingdom, India, and Israel support this model. Endorsement of redistribution is independently predicted by dispositional compassion, dispositional envy, and the expectation of personal gain from redistribution. By contrast, a taste for fairness, in the sense of (i) universality in the application of laws and standards, or (ii) low variance in group-level payoffs, fails to predict attitudes about redistribution. PMID:28716928

  11. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  12. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  13. Work zone safety analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  14. California tree seed zones

    Treesearch

    John M. Buck; Ronald S. Adams; Jerrold Cone; M. Thompson Conkle; William J. Libby; Cecil J. Eden; Michel J. Knight

    1970-01-01

    California forest tree seed zones were established originally by Fowells (1946), with revisions proposed by Roy (1963) and Schubert (1966). The Forest Tree Seed Committee of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, has revised the original zones and updated the recording system described in the earlier reports. Fowells' (1946) Research Note...

  15. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  16. Longleaf pine site zones

    Treesearch

    Phillip J. Craul; John S. Kush; William D. Boyer

    2005-01-01

    The authors delineate six major climatic areas of the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) region. They subdivide these areas into 21 site zones, each of which is deemed homogenous with respect to climate, physiography, and soils. The site zones are mapped and their climate, physiography, and soils described. The authors recommend that plantings of...

  17. Iowa Work Zone Fatalities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    From March through November, the Iowa DOT may have up to 500 road construction work zones, and each of the department's maintenance garages may establish one or more short-term work zones per day. Couple that with the work of cities and counties, and...

  18. Rainfall simulation experiments to study sediment redistribution using rare earth element oxides as tracers under conventional and conservation agricultural practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Adrienn; Jakab, Gergely; Sipos, Péter; Karlik, Máté; Madarász, Balázs; Zacháry, Dóra; Szabó, Judit; Szalai, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) have very favourable characteristics for being ideal sediment tracers as they are characterised by strong binding to soil particles, low mobility, low background concentration in soils, environmental benignity, high analytical sensitivity and they can be detected relatively easily and inexpensively in soils. The group of REEs consist of 16 elements with similar chemical properties, but at the same time, they are clearly distinguishable enabling multiple tracking of sediment deriving from different parts of the studied area, as well as mapping redistribution processes by appropriate designing of subareas marked by different REEs. In this study, rainfall simulation experiments were carried out to compare the loss and redistribution of soil sediments in two plots under conventional and conservation agricultural practices. Five different rainfall intensities (up to 80 mm/h) were applied to both plots. Sources and pathways of sediments within the two plots were studied using REE-oxides as tracers. Approximately 1,000 mg/kg of Er2O3, Ho2O3 and Sm2O3 (calculated to the upper 1 cm of the soil) were dispersed to the soil surface with banded distribution; each transversal band covered the third of the surface are of the plots. Concentration of the REE-oxides in the sediment leaving the plots, and that of the surface soil before and after the experiment were analysed by X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry. Significant sediment losses were found for both plots after the experiments, with slightly different characteristics between the conventional and conservation ones. Highest difference in loss of added REEs was found in the upper third of the plots with 81 ± 19% in the conventional and 71 ± 21% in the conservation ones. These values have been equalized downwards with almost complete losses in the lower third of the plots (99 ± 2% and 97 ± 4%, respectively). Only very small part of the removed sediment has been accumulated in the lower parts of the

  19. [A study on training method for increasing adaptability to blood redistribution in human].

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; You, Guang-xing; Wu, Ping; Xue, Yue-ying; Liu, Xing-hua; Su, Shuang-ning

    2003-01-01

    To verify validity of the increase in adaptability of blood redistribution in human body with repeated body position change training and to find preferable training method for increasing astronaut's adaptability of blood redistribution. Twelve subjects were randomly divided into group A and B. Six subjects in each group were trained with mode A and B repeated position change (9 times in 11 d) respectively. Their head-down tilt (HDT -30 degrees/30 min) tolerance and orthostatic tolerance were determined before and after training to verify training effects. 1) Two kinds of repeated body position change training modes increased all subjects' HDT tolerance. Compared with pre-training, during HDT test subjects' symptom scores in group B were significantly lower than those in group A (P<0.05) and after training decreasing magnitude of heart rate in group B increased significantly (P<0.01). Then mode B to be preferable training method in increasing HDT tolerance was suggested. 2) Two kinds of training modes improved all subjects' orthostatic tolerance. Compared with pre-training, during orthostatic tolerance test increasing magnitude of mean arterial blood pressure in group B increased significantly (P<0.05) and a trend of increasing magnitude of heart rate in group B was appeared smaller than in group A (P<0.10). Mode B to be preferable training method in increasing orthostatic tolerance was suggested too. Repeated body position change training could increase adaptability to blood redistribution in human body. Mode B was preferable training method and would be hopeful to be used in astronaut training.

  20. Carbon redistribution during interrill erosion in subtropical forests: Effects of leaf litter diversity and soil fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion is crucial for degradation of carbon (C) from their pools in the soil. If C of the eroded sediment and runoff are not only related to soil pools but also resulting additively from decomposition of litter cover, the system gets more complex. The role of these amounts for C cycling in a forest environment is not yet known properly and thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of leaf litter diversity, litter cover and soil fauna on C redistribution during interrill erosion. We established 96 runoff plots that were deployed with seven domestic leaf litter species resulting in none species (bare ground), 1-species, 2-species and 4-species mixtures. Every second runoff plot was equipped with a fauna extinction feature to investigate the role of soil meso- and macrofauna. Erosion processes were initiated using a rainfall simulator at two time steps (summer 2012 and autumn 2012) to investigate the role of leaf litter decomposition on C redistribution. C fluxes during 20 min rainfall simulation were 99.13 ± 94.98 g/m². C fluxes and C contents both were affected by soil fauna. C fluxes were higher with presence of soil fauna due to loosening and slackening of the soil surface rather than due to faster decomposition of leaves. In contrast, C contents were higher in the absence of soil fauna possibly resulting from a missing dilution effect in the top soil layer. Leaf litter diversity did not affect C fluxes, but indirectly affected C contents as it increased the soil fauna effect with higher leaf litter diversity due to superior food supply. Initial C contents in the soil mainly determined those of the eroded sediment. For future research, it will be essential to introduce a long-term decomposition experiment to get further insights into the processes of C redistribution.

  1. Revisiting the horizontal redistribution of water in soils: Experiments and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, L; Hassanizadeh, S M; Kleingeld, P J; van Genuchten, M Th

    2017-09-01

    A series of experiments and related numerical simulations were carried out to study one-dimensional water redistribution processes in an unsaturated soil. A long horizontal Plexiglas box was packed as homogenously as possible with sand. The sandbox was divided into two sections using a very thin metal plate, with one section initially fully saturated and the other section only partially saturated. Initial saturation in the dry section was set to 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 in three different experiments. Redistribution between the wet and dry sections started as soon as the metal plate was removed. Changes in water saturation at various locations along the sandbox were measured as a function of time using a dual-energy gamma system. Also, air and water pressures were measured using two different kinds of tensiometers at various locations as a function of time. The saturation discontinuity was found to persist during the entire experiments, while observed water pressures were found to become continuous immediately after the experiments started. Two models, the standard Richards equation and an interfacial area model, were used to simulate the experiments. Both models showed some deviations between the simulated water pressures and the measured data at early times during redistribution. The standard model could only simulate the observed saturation distributions reasonably well for the experiment with the lowest initial water saturation in the dry section. The interfacial area model could reproduce observed saturation distributions of all three experiments, albeit by fitting one of the parameters in the surface area production term.

  2. A Computational Model of the Fetal Circulation to Quantify Blood Redistribution in Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Rudenick, Paula A.; Crispi, Fatima; Cruz-Lemini, Monica; Palau, Georgina; Camara, Oscar; Gratacos, Eduard; Bijens, Bart H.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency is associated with blood flow redistribution in order to maintain delivery of oxygenated blood to the brain. Given that, in the fetus the aortic isthmus (AoI) is a key arterial connection between the cerebral and placental circulations, quantifying AoI blood flow has been proposed to assess this brain sparing effect in clinical practice. While numerous clinical studies have studied this parameter, fundamental understanding of its determinant factors and its quantitative relation with other aspects of haemodynamic remodeling has been limited. Computational models of the cardiovascular circulation have been proposed for exactly this purpose since they allow both for studying the contributions from isolated parameters as well as estimating properties that cannot be directly assessed from clinical measurements. Therefore, a computational model of the fetal circulation was developed, including the key elements related to fetal blood redistribution and using measured cardiac outflow profiles to allow personalization. The model was first calibrated using patient-specific Doppler data from a healthy fetus. Next, in order to understand the contributions of the main parameters determining blood redistribution, AoI and middle cerebral artery (MCA) flow changes were studied by variation of cerebral and peripheral-placental resistances. Finally, to study how this affects an individual fetus, the model was fitted to three IUGR cases with different degrees of severity. In conclusion, the proposed computational model provides a good approximation to assess blood flow changes in the fetal circulation. The results support that while MCA flow is mainly determined by a fall in brain resistance, the AoI is influenced by a balance between increased peripheral-placental and decreased cerebral resistances. Personalizing the model allows for quantifying the balance between cerebral and peripheral-placental remodeling

  3. "These young chaps think they are just men, too": redistributing masculinity in Kgatleng bars.

    PubMed

    Suggs, D N

    2001-07-01

    In the 19th century the BaKgatla polity was a chiefdom with a redistributional economy based on mixed agriculture. Sorghum beer was symbolic not only of the patrilineal core of their descent system and of the ideologies of reciprocity and redistribution, but also of masculinity and patriarchal control. With the establishment of a market economy, an industrial brewery and individual access to income, both beer and the act of drinking have been symbolically reconstructed. The ideology of redistribution was well suited to the support of the BaKgatla gerontocracy via alcohol production and consumption. The limits on production and consumption of beer inherent in the agricultural cycle and the control of young men's access by elders made alcohol an effective symbol of managerial competence from the limited context of household authority to that of the chiefdom as a whole. Today, young men's greater control of cash income has given them access to beer beyond the control of elders. As a result, the contrasting ideology of market exchange and competitive distribution of beer has contributed to the degradation of the power of seniors. After reviewing the historical background, this paper explores those changes. It argues that while the observed infrastructural changes have had a predictable impact on drinking behaviors and the symbolic structure of "seniority/masculinity", constructions of the "masculine community" in BaKgatla bars demonstrate continuity in key areas of mens' identities. If as anthropologists we see obvious discontinuities in behavior and ideology, the BaKgatla build selective bridges to "tradition" which seemingly ground the experience of change in relatively seamless continuity.

  4. Optimal redistribution of an urban air quality monitoring network using atmospheric dispersion model and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yufang; Xie, Shaodong

    2018-03-01

    Air quality monitoring networks play a significant role in identifying the spatiotemporal patterns of air pollution, and they need to be deployed efficiently, with a minimum number of sites. The revision and optimal adjustment of existing monitoring networks is crucial for cities that have undergone rapid urban expansion and experience temporal variations in pollution patterns. The approach based on the Weather Research and Forecasting-California PUFF (WRF-CALPUFF) model and genetic algorithm (GA) was developed to design an optimal monitoring network. The maximization of coverage with minimum overlap and the ability to detect violations of standards were developed as the design objectives for redistributed networks. The non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm was applied to optimize the network size and site locations simultaneously for Shijiazhuang city, one of the most polluted cities in China. The assessment on the current network identified the insufficient spatial coverage of SO2 and NO2 monitoring for the expanding city. The optimization results showed that significant improvements were achieved in multiple objectives by redistributing the original network. Efficient coverage of the resulting designs improved to 60.99% and 76.06% of the urban area for SO2 and NO2, respectively. The redistributing design for multi-pollutant including 8 sites was also proposed, with the spatial representation covered 52.30% of the urban area and the overlapped areas decreased by 85.87% compared with the original network. The abilities to detect violations of standards were not improved as much as the other two objectives due to the conflicting nature between the multiple objectives. Additionally, the results demonstrated that the algorithm was slightly sensitive to the parameter settings, with the number of generations presented the most significant effect. Overall, our study presents an effective and feasible procedure for air quality network optimization at a city scale.

  5. Microgravity-Induced Physiological Fluid Redistribution: Computational Analysis to Assess Influence of Physiological Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J. G.; Eke, Chika; Werner, C.; Nelson, E. S.; Mulugeta, L.; Feola, A.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Space flight impacts human physiology in many ways, the most immediate being the marked cephalad (headward) shift of fluid upon introduction into the microgravity environment. This physiological response to microgravity points to the redistribution of blood and interstitial fluid as a major factor in the loss of venous tone and reduction in heart muscle efficiency which impact astronaut performance. In addition, researchers have hypothesized that a reduction in astronaut visual acuity, part of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, is associated with this redistribution of fluid. VIIP arises within several months of beginning space flight and includes a variety of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, distension of the optic nerve sheath, and kinking of the optic nerve. We utilize a suite of lumped parameter models to simulate microgravity-induced fluid redistribution in the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems to provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element simulation of ocular biomechanics in VIIP. Specifically, the lumped parameter cardiovascular model acts as the primary means of establishing how microgravity, and the associated lack of hydrostatic gradient, impacts fluid redistribution. The cardiovascular model consists of 16 compartments, including three cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments, three cranial blood compartments, and 10 thoracic and lower limb blood compartments. To assess the models capability to address variations in physiological parameters, we completed a formal uncertainty and sensitivity analysis that evaluated the relative importance of 42 input parameters required in the model on relative compartment flows and compartment pressures. Utilizing the model in a pulsatile flow configuration, the sensitivity analysis identified the ten parameters that most influenced each compartment pressure. Generally, each compartment responded appropriately to parameter variations

  6. Liquid redistribution behind a drainage front in porous media imaged by neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogland, Frouke; Lehmann, Peter; Moebius, Franziska; Vontobel, Peter; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    Drainage from porous media is a highly dynamic process involving the motion of a displacement front with rapid pore scale interfacial jumps and phase entrapment, but also a more gradual host of liquid redistribution processes in the unsaturated region behind the front. Depending on the velocity of the drainage process, liquid properties and the permeability of the porous medium, redistribution lingers long after the main drainage process is stopped, until gravity and capillary forces regain equilibrium. The rapid and often highly inertial Haines jumps at the drainage front challenge the validity of Buckingham-Darcy law and thus representation of the process based on the foundation of Richards equation. To quantify front displacement and liquid reconfiguration and to test validity of Richards equation with respect to fast drainage dynamics, we carried out drainage experiments by withdrawing water from the bottom of initially saturated sand-filled Hele-Shaw cells at constant water flux (2.6 or 13.1 mm/minute). Water content distribution and evolution of drainage front were measured with neutron radiography at spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.1 mm and 3 seconds, respectively. Water pressure was measured above and below the front using pressure transducers and a tensiometer. After the pump was stopped (at a front depth around 100 mm), capillary pressure values in the unsaturated region (above the front) gradually converged to a new equilibrium. The pressure signal in the saturated region below the front reflected viscous losses during flow that were relaxed when the pump stopped. During pressure relaxation water was redistributed primarily downward in the unsaturated region. Pressure signals and dynamics of water content profiles for fast process (13.6 mm/minute) could not be reproduced with Richards equation based on hydraulic functions determined in preceding laboratory experiments. To explore if the deviations stem from inappropriate hydraulic functions we

  7. Elliptic Relaxation of a Tensor Representation for the Redistribution Terms in a Reynolds Stress Turbulence Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, J. R.; Gatski, T. B.

    2002-01-01

    A formulation to include the effects of wall proximity in a second-moment closure model that utilizes a tensor representation for the redistribution terms in the Reynolds stress equations is presented. The wall-proximity effects are modeled through an elliptic relaxation process of the tensor expansion coefficients that properly accounts for both correlation length and time scales as the wall is approached. Direct numerical simulation data and Reynolds stress solutions using a full differential approach are compared for the case of fully developed channel flow.

  8. Pressure redistribution devices: what works, at what cost and what's next?

    PubMed

    Clancy, Michael J

    2013-08-01

    This article discusses the development and usage of pressure redistribution devices (PRDs) and their impact on the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers within the NHS. The article outlines the history of the development of these devices and discusses the reasons for a lack of substantial evidence in support of the use of these devices, their impact on the NHS on cost and perceived outcome. The article describes the typical usage profile in a 500 bed NHS hospital and concludes with a view as to how that may change in the future. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Redistribution by insurance market regulation: Analyzing a ban on gender-based retirement annuities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Amy; Poterba, James; Rothschild, Casey

    2009-01-01

    We illustrate how equilibrium screening models can be used to evaluate the economic consequences of insurance market regulation. We calibrate and solve a model of the United Kingdom's compulsory annuity market and examine the impact of gender-based pricing restrictions. We find that the endogenous adjustment of annuity contract menus in response to such restrictions can undo up to half of the redistribution from men to women that would occur with exogenous Social Security-like annuity contracts. Our findings indicate the importance of endogenous contract responses and illustrate the feasibility of employing theoretical insurance market equilibrium models for quantitative policy analysis.

  10. Redistribution by insurance market regulation: Analyzing a ban on gender-based retirement annuities

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Amy; Poterba, James; Rothschild, Casey

    2009-01-01

    We illustrate how equilibrium screening models can be used to evaluate the economic consequences of insurance market regulation. We calibrate and solve a model of the United Kingdom’s compulsory annuity market and examine the impact of gender-based pricing restrictions. We find that the endogenous adjustment of annuity contract menus in response to such restrictions can undo up to half of the redistribution from men to women that would occur with exogenous Social Security-like annuity contracts. Our findings indicate the importance of endogenous contract responses and illustrate the feasibility of employing theoretical insurance market equilibrium models for quantitative policy analysis. PMID:20046907

  11. Habitable Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, D.; Lota, J.

    2012-12-01

    The location of the habitable zone around a star depends upon stellar luminosity and upon the properties of a potentially habitable planet such as its mass and near-surface volatile inventory. Stellar luminosity generally increases as a star ages whilst planetary properties change through time as a consequence of biological and geological evolution. Hence, the location of the habitable zone changes through time as a result of both stellar evolution and planetary evolution. Using the Earth's Phanerozoic temperature history as a constraint, it is shown that changes in our own habitable zone over the last 540 My have been dominated by planetary evolution rather than solar evolution. Furthermore, sparse data from earlier times suggests that planetary evolution may have dominated habitable zone development throughout our biosphere's history. Hence, the existence of a continuously habitable zone depends upon accidents of complex bio-geochemical evolution more than it does upon relatively simple stellar-evolution. Evolution of the inner margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations. Evolution of the outer margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations.

  12. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  13. Evaluating clustering methods within the Artificial Ecosystem Algorithm and their application to bike redistribution in London.

    PubMed

    Adham, Manal T; Bentley, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes and evaluates a solution to the truck redistribution problem prominent in London's Santander Cycle scheme. Due to the complexity of this NP-hard combinatorial optimisation problem, no efficient optimisation techniques are known to solve the problem exactly. This motivates our use of the heuristic Artificial Ecosystem Algorithm (AEA) to find good solutions in a reasonable amount of time. The AEA is designed to take advantage of highly distributed computer architectures and adapt to changing problems. In the AEA a problem is first decomposed into its relative sub-components; they then evolve solution building blocks that fit together to form a single optimal solution. Three variants of the AEA centred on evaluating clustering methods are presented: the baseline AEA, the community-based AEA which groups stations according to journey flows, and the Adaptive AEA which actively modifies clusters to cater for changes in demand. We applied these AEA variants to the redistribution problem prominent in bike share schemes (BSS). The AEA variants are empirically evaluated using historical data from Santander Cycles to validate the proposed approach and prove its potential effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prescription Drug Diversion: Predictors of Illicit Acquisition and Redistribution in Three U.S. Metropolitan Areas.

    PubMed

    Harris, Shana; Nikulina, Valentina; Gelpí-Acosta, Camila; Morton, Cory; Newsome, Valerie; Gunn, Alana; Hoefinger, Heidi; Aikins, Ross; Smith, Vivian; Barry, Victoria; Downing, Martin J

    2015-12-02

    Prescription drug diversion, the transfer of prescription drugs from lawful to unlawful channels for distribution or use, is a problem in the United States. Despite the pervasiveness of diversion, there are gaps in the literature regarding characteristics of individuals who participate in the illicit trade of prescription drugs. This study examines a range of predictors (e.g., demographics, prescription insurance coverage, perceived risk associated with prescription drug diversion) of membership in three distinct diverter groups: individuals who illicitly acquire prescription drugs, those who redistribute them, and those who engage in both behaviors. Data were drawn from a cross-sectional Internet study ( N = 846) of prescription drug use and diversion patterns in New York City, South Florida, and Washington, D.C.. Participants were classified into diversion categories based on their self-reported involvement in the trade of prescription drugs. Group differences in background characteristics of diverter groups were assessed by Chi-Square tests and followed up with multivariate logistic regressions. While individuals in all diversion groups were more likely to be younger and have a licit prescription for any of the assessed drugs in the past year than those who did not divert, individuals who both acquire and redistribute are more likely to live in New York City, not have prescription insurance coverage, and perceive fewer legal risks of prescription drug diversion. Findings suggest that predictive characteristics vary according to diverter group.

  15. Load redistribution in walking and trotting Beagles with induced forelimb lameness.

    PubMed

    Abdelhadi, Jalal; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Galindo-Zamora, Vladimir; Anders, Alexandra; Nolte, Ingo; Schilling, Nadja

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the load redistribution mechanisms in walking and trotting dogs with induced forelimb lameness. 7 healthy adult Beagles. Dogs walked and trotted on an instrumented treadmill to determine control values for peak and mean vertical force as well as vertical impulse for all 4 limbs. A small sphere was attached to the ventral pad of the right forelimb paw to induce a reversible lameness, and recordings were repeated for both gaits. Additionally, footfall patterns were assessed to test for changes in temporal gait variables. During walking and trotting, peak and mean vertical force as well as vertical impulse were decreased in the ipsilateral forelimb, increased in the contralateral hind limb, and remained unchanged in the ipsilateral hind limb after lameness was induced. All 3 variables were increased in the contralateral forelimb during trotting, whereas only mean vertical force and vertical impulse were increased during walking. Stance phase duration increased in the contralateral forelimb and hind limb during walking but not during trotting. Analysis of the results suggested that compensatory load redistribution mechanisms in dogs depend on the gait. All 4 limbs should be evaluated in basic research and clinical studies to determine the effects of lameness on the entire body. Further studies are necessary to elucidate specific mechanisms for unloading of the affected limb and to determine the long-term effects of load changes in animals with chronic lameness.

  16. Seasonal Redistribution of Water in the Surficial Martian Regolith: Results of the HEND Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmin, R. O.; Zabalueva, E. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. I.; Parshukov, A. V.; Grinkov, V. Yu.; Saunders, R. S.; Boynton, W.

    2005-01-01

    The global mapping of the neutrons emission from the Mars, conducted recently by HEND instrument (Mars Odyssey), has shown that the surface layer (1-2 m) on the high latitudes of the planet (up to 50 ) is very reached by water ice with abundance more 50% by mass [1,2,3 ]. It was also shown that water ice distribution in surficial layer of the northern and the southern sub-polar regions is notably different [4]. Until today the existing HEND data already covers the period more then one the Martian year. This let to study the seasonal effects of volatiles redistribution associated with processes of sublimation and condensation of the seasonal polar caps and water exchange between the surface regolith and atmosphere. The goal of our work was to analyze the dynamic of the globally mapped neutrons flux as key to understanding of the seasonal redistribution of the water ice in the surface layer. For this we analyzed the globally mapped flux of the neutrons with different energy and corresponding effective layer of their emission.

  17. Kinetics of incorporation/redistribution of photosensitizer hypericin to/from high-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Joniova, Jaroslava; Buriankova, Luboslava; Buzova, Diana; Miskovsky, Pavol; Jancura, Daniel

    2014-11-20

    By means of fluorescence spectroscopy we have studied the kinetics of interaction of a photosensitizer hypericin (Hyp) with high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Hyp is incorporated into HDL molecules as monomer till ratio Hyp/HDL ∼8:1 and above this ratio forms non-fluorescent aggregates. This number is different from that found in the case of Hyp incorporation into low-density lipoprotein (LDL) molecules (8:1 vs 30:1). The difference is mainly attributed to the smaller size of HDL in comparison with LDL molecule. Biphasic kinetics of Hyp association with HDL was observed. The rapid phase of incorporation is completed within seconds, while the slow one lasts several minutes. The kinetics of the association of Hyp molecules with free HDL, Hyp/HDL=10:1 complex and the redistribution of Hyp from Hyp/HDL=70:1 complex to free HDL molecules reveal a qualitative similar characteristics of these processes with those observed for the interaction of Hyp with LDL. However, the incorporation of Hyp into HDL in the "slow" phase is more rapid than to LDL and extend of Hyp penetration into lipoproteins in the fast phase is also much higher in the case of HDL. The lower concentration of cholesterol molecules in outer shell of HDL particles is probably the determining factor for the more rapid kinetics of Hyp incorporation to and redistribution from these molecules when comparing with LDL particles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Surficial redistribution of fallout 131iodine in a small temperate catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Joshua D.; Hamm, Nathan T.; Renshaw, Carl E.; Dade, W. Brian; Magilligan, Francis J.; Gartner, John D.

    2012-03-01

    Isotopes of iodine play significant environmental roles, including a limiting micronutrient (127I), an acute radiotoxin (131I), and a geochemical tracer (129I). But the cycling of iodine through terrestrial ecosystems is poorly understood, due to its complex environmental chemistry and low natural abundance. To better understand iodine transport and fate in a terrestrial ecosystem, we traced fallout 131iodine throughout a small temperate catchment following contamination by the 11 March 2011 failure of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility. We find that radioiodine fallout is actively and efficiently scavenged by the soil system, where it is continuously focused to surface soils over a period of weeks following deposition. Mobilization of historic (pre-Fukushima) 137cesium observed concurrently in these soils suggests that the focusing of iodine to surface soils may be biologically mediated. Atmospherically deposited iodine is subsequently redistributed from the soil system via fluvial processes in a manner analogous to that of the particle-reactive tracer 7beryllium, a consequence of the radionuclides' shared sorption affinity for fine, particulate organic matter. These processes of surficial redistribution create iodine hotspots in the terrestrial environment where fine, particulate organic matter accumulates, and in this manner regulate the delivery of iodine nutrients and toxins alike from small catchments to larger river systems, lakes and estuaries.

  19. Postmortem distribution of guaifenesin concentrations reveals a lack of potential for redistribution.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Iain M; Navarrete, Aylmer; Mena, Othon

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic (or non-toxic) postmortem guaifenesin blood and liver concentrations have not been previously described. Peripheral blood guaifenesin concentrations were compared to central blood and liver concentrations in eight medical examiner cases. Specimens were initially screened for alcohol and simple volatiles, drugs of abuse, alkaline, and acid/neutral drugs. Guaifenesin, when detected by the acid/neutral drug screen, was subsequently confirmed and quantified by a high performance liquid chromatography procedure. Data suggest that postmortem guaifenesin peripheral blood concentrations may be considered non-toxic to at least 5.4mg/L with liver concentrations to at least 7.0mg/kg. Overall, guaifenesin concentrations ranged from 1.9 to 40mg/L in peripheral blood, 2.2-150mg/L in central blood, and 2.6-36mg/kg in liver. The median guaifenesin central blood to peripheral blood ratio was 1.1 (N=8). Similarly, liver to peripheral blood ratios showed a median value of 0.9L/kg (N=5). Given that a liver to peripheral blood ratio less than 5L/kg is consistent with little to no propensity for postmortem redistribution, these data suggest that guaifenesin is not prone to substantial postmortem redistribution. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Rapid Spontaneous Redistribution of Acute Epidural Hematoma : Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Ki Seong; Park, Jong Tae; Kim, Tae Young

    2009-01-01

    Acute epidural hematoma (AEDH) occurring as a result of traumatic head injury constitutes one of the most critical emergencies in neurosurgery. However, there are only several reports that show the rapid disappearance of AEDH without surgical intervention. We suggest redistribution of hematoma through the overlying skull fractures as the mechanism of rapid disappearance of AEDH. A 13-year-old female fell from a height of about 2 m and presented with mild headache. A computed tomography (CT) scan performed 4 hours after the injury revealed an AEDH with an overlying fracture in the right temporal region and acute small hemorrhagic contusion in the left frontal region. A repeat CT scan 16 hours after injury revealed that the AEDH had almost completely disappeared and showed an increase in the epicranial hematoma. The patient was discharged 10 days after injury with no neurological deficits. This case is characterized by the rapid disappearance of an AEDH associated with an overlying skull fracture. We believe that the rapid disappearance of the AEDH is due to the redistribution of the hematoma, rather than its resolution or absorption, and fracture plays a key role in this process. PMID:19274119

  1. Role of rafting in the mechanical redistribution of sea ice thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babko, O.; Rothrock, D. A.; Maykut, G. A.

    2002-08-01

    Ice draft data derived from upward looking sonar observations collected during a Scientific Ice Expeditions (SCICEX) submarine cruise in the Arctic Ocean have been used to test the ice thickness distribution theory of Thorndike et al. [1975]. Two separate ice draft surveys, 40 days apart, were made during the fall of 1996 in a circular Lagrangian region ~180 km across. Air temperature and deformation data from buoys in the region were used to force an ice thickness distribution model in an effort to reproduce the changes observed over the 40 day interval. Initial tests with an elementary ridging treatment were unsuccessful in predicting the observed change in the ice thickness distribution. The shape of the distribution suggested that both ridging and rafting of ice were involved in the redistribution process. Modifying the theory to include rafting along with ridging resulted in much improved agreement between the modeled and observed ice thickness distributions. This result, taken together with many other field observations, leads us to believe that rafting is an important component of the mechanical redistribution of ice thickness during the fall.

  2. Microgravity and clinorotation cause redistribution of free calcium in sweet clover columella cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Brown, C. S.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    In higher plants, calcium redistribution is believed to be crucial for the root to respond to a change in the direction of the gravity vector. To test the effects of clinorotation and microgravity on calcium localization in higher plant roots, sweet clover (Melilotus alba L.) seedlings were germinated and grown for two days on a slow rotating clinostat or in microgravity on the US Space Shuttle flight STS-60. Subsequently, the tissue was treated with a fixative containing antimonate (a calcium precipitating agent) during clinorotation or in microgravity and processed for electron microscopy. In root columella cells of clinorotated plants, antimonate precipitates were localized adjacent to the cell wall in a unilateral manner. Columella cells exposed to microgravity were characterized by precipitates mostly located adjacent to the proximal and lateral cell wall. In all treatments some punctate precipitates were associated with vacuoles, amyloplasts, mitochondria, and euchromatin of the nucleus. A quantitative study revealed a decreased number of precipitates associated with the nucleus and the amyloplasts in columella cells exposed to microgravity as compared to ground controls. These data suggest that roots perceive a change in the gravitational field, as produced by clinorotation or space flights, and respond respectively differently by a redistribution of free calcium.

  3. Redistribution of carbon flux in Torulopsis glabrata by altering vitamin and calcium level.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liming; Li, Yin; Zhu, Yang; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2007-01-01

    Manipulation of cofactor (thiamine, biotin and Ca(2+)) levels as a potential tool to redistribute carbon flux was studied in Torulopsis glabrata. With sub-optimization of vitamin in fermentation medium, the carbon flux was blocked at the key node of pyruvate, and 69 g/L pyruvate was accumulated. Increasing the concentrations of thiamine and biotin could selectively open the valve of carbon flux from pyruvate to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the pyruvate carboxylase (PC) pathway and the channel into the TCA cycle, leading to the over-production of alpha-ketoglutarate. In addition, the activity of PC was enhanced with Ca(2+) present in fermentation medium. By combining high concentration's vitamins and CaCO(3) as the pH buffer, a batch culture was conducted in a 7-L fermentor, with the pyruvate concentration decreased to 21.8 g/L while alpha-ketoglutarate concentration increased to 43.7 g/L. Our study indicated that the metabolic flux could be redistributed to overproduce desired metabolites with manipulating the cofactor levels. Furthermore, the manipulation of vitamin level provided an alternative tool to realize metabolic engineering goals.

  4. Atmospheric redistribution of reactive nitrogen and phosphorus by wildfires and implications for global carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Xu, L.; Wiggins, E. B.; Chen, Y.; Riley, W. J.; Mekonnen, Z. A.; Pellegrini, A.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Fires are an important process regulating the redistribution of nutrients within terrestrial ecosystems. Frequently burning ecosystems such as savannas are a net source of N and P to the atmosphere each year, with atmospheric transport and dry and wet deposition increasing nutrient availability in downwind ecosystems and over the open ocean. Transport of N and P aerosols from savanna fires within the Hadley circulation contributes to nutrient deposition over tropical forests, yielding an important cross-biome nutrient transfer. Pyrodenitrification of reactive N increases with fire temperature and modified combustion efficiency, generating a global net biospheric loss of approximately 14 Tg N per year. Here we analyze atmospheric N and P redistribution using the Global Fire Emissions Database version 4s and the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy earth system model. We synthesize literature estimates of N and P concentrations in fire-emitted aerosols and ecosystem mass balance measurements to help constrain model estimates of these biosphere-atmosphere fluxes. In our analysis, we estimate the fraction of terrestrial net primary production (NPP) that is sustained by fire-emitted P and reactive N from upwind ecosystems. We then evaluate how recent global declines in burned area in savanna and grassland ecosystems may be changing nutrient availability in downwind ecosystems.

  5. Rapid reduction of acute subdural hematoma and redistribution of hematoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Arata; Omata, Tomohiro; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    An 88-year-old woman presented with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) which showed rapid resolution on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. She was transferred to our hospital after falling out of bed. On admission, she was comatose with Japan Coma Scale score of 200 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E1V1M2. Brain CT showed a thick left frontotemporal ASDH. Conservative treatment consisted of 200 ml of glycerol administered intravenously twice a day, and maintenance in the approximately 20 degree head-up position to reduce intracranial pressure. Three days later, her consciousness recovered to Japan Coma Scale score of 30 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E2V4M5. CT showed obvious reduction of the hematoma without brain or scalp swelling. Spinal MR imaging detected no redistribution of hematoma to the spine. The present case illustrates that rapid spontaneous reduction of ASDH may occur by redistribution of hematoma, mainly to the supratentorial subdural space because of brain atrophy.

  6. Gauss-Seidel and Successive Overrelaxation Methods for Radiative Transfer with Partial Frequency Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampoorna, M.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2010-04-01

    The linearly polarized solar limb spectrum that is produced by scattering processes contains a wealth of information on the physical conditions and magnetic fields of the solar outer atmosphere, but the modeling of many of its strongest spectral lines requires solving an involved non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer problem accounting for partial redistribution (PRD) effects. Fast radiative transfer methods for the numerical solution of PRD problems are also needed for a proper treatment of hydrogen lines when aiming at realistic time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar chromosphere. Here we show how the two-level atom PRD problem with and without polarization can be solved accurately and efficiently via the application of highly convergent iterative schemes based on the Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation (SOR) radiative transfer methods that had been previously developed for the complete redistribution case. Of particular interest is the Symmetric SOR method, which allows us to reach the fully converged solution with an order of magnitude of improvement in the total computational time with respect to the Jacobi-based local accelerated lambda iteration method.

  7. [Rainfall and soil moisture redistribution induced by xerophytic shrubs in an arid desert ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng Ning; Wang, Xin Ping; Liu, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Rainfall partitioning by desert shrub canopy modifies the redistribution of incident rainfall under the canopy, and may affect the distribution pattern of soil moisture around the plant. This study examined the distribution of rainfall and the response of soil moisture beneath the canopy of two dominant desert shrubs, Caragana korshinskii and Artemisia ordosica, in the revegetation area at the southeastern edge of the Tengger Desert. The results showed that throughfall and stemflow ave-ragely occupied 74.4%, 11.3% and 61.8%, 5.5% of the gross precipitation for C. korshinskii and A. ordosica, respectively. The mean coefficients of variation (CV) of throughfall were 0.25 and 0.30, respectively. C. korshinski were more efficient than A. ordosica on stemflow generation. The depth of soil wetting front around the stem area was greater than other areas under shrub canopy for C. korshinski, and it was only significantly greater under bigger rain events for A. ordosica. The shrub canopy could cause the unevenness of soil wetting front under the canopy in consequence of rainfall redistribution induced by xerophytic shrub.

  8. Surficial redistribution of fallout 131iodine in a small temperate catchment

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Joshua D.; Hamm, Nathan T.; Renshaw, Carl E.; Dade, W. Brian; Magilligan, Francis J.; Gartner, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Isotopes of iodine play significant environmental roles, including a limiting micronutrient (127I), an acute radiotoxin (131I), and a geochemical tracer (129I). But the cycling of iodine through terrestrial ecosystems is poorly understood, due to its complex environmental chemistry and low natural abundance. To better understand iodine transport and fate in a terrestrial ecosystem, we traced fallout 131iodine throughout a small temperate catchment following contamination by the 11 March 2011 failure of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility. We find that radioiodine fallout is actively and efficiently scavenged by the soil system, where it is continuously focused to surface soils over a period of weeks following deposition. Mobilization of historic (pre-Fukushima) 137cesium observed concurrently in these soils suggests that the focusing of iodine to surface soils may be biologically mediated. Atmospherically deposited iodine is subsequently redistributed from the soil system via fluvial processes in a manner analogous to that of the particle-reactive tracer 7beryllium, a consequence of the radionuclides’ shared sorption affinity for fine, particulate organic matter. These processes of surficial redistribution create iodine hotspots in the terrestrial environment where fine, particulate organic matter accumulates, and in this manner regulate the delivery of iodine nutrients and toxins alike from small catchments to larger river systems, lakes and estuaries. PMID:22378648

  9. Thermohydrological conditions and silica redistribution near high-level nuclear wastes emplaced in saturated geological formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, A.; Pruess, K.

    1988-02-01

    Evaluation of the thermohydrological conditions near high-level nuclear waste packages is needed for the design of the waste canister and for overall repository design and performance assessment. Most available studies in this area have assumed that the hydrologic properties of the host rock are not changed in response to the thermal, mechanical, or chemical effects caused by waste emplacement. However, the ramifications of this simplifying assumption have not been substantiated. We have studied dissolution and precipitation of silica in liquid-saturated hydrothermal flow systems, including changes in formation porosity and permeability. Using numerical simulation, we compare predictions of thermohydrological conditions with and without inclusion of silica redistribution effects. Two cases were studied, namely, a canister-scale problem, and a repository-wide thermal convection problem and different pore models were employed for the permeable medium (fractures with uniform or nonuniform cross sections). We find that silica redistribution in water-saturated conditions does not have a sizeable effect on host rock and canister temperatures, pore pressures, or flow velocities.

  10. Moment analysis description of wetting and redistribution plumes in wettable and water-repellent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yunwu; Furman, Alex; Wallach, Rony

    2012-02-01

    SummaryWater repellency has a significant impact on water flow patterns in the soil profile. Transient 2D flow in wettable and natural water-repellent soils was monitored in a transparent flow chamber. The substantial differences in plume shape and spatial water content distribution during the wetting and subsequent redistribution stages were related to the variation of contact angle while in contact with water. The observed plumes shape, internal water content distribution in general and the saturation overshoot behind the wetting front in particular in the repellent soils were associated with unstable flow. Moment analysis was applied to characterize the measured plumes during the wetting and subsequent redistribution. The center of mass and spatial variances determined for the measured evolving plumes were fitted by a model that accounts for capillary and gravitational driving forces in a medium of temporally varying wettability. Ellipses defined around the stable and unstable plumes' centers of mass and whose semi-axes represented a particular number of spatial variances were used to characterize plume shape and internal moisture distribution. A single probability curve was able to characterize the corresponding fractions of the total added water in the different ellipses for all measured plumes, which testify the competence and advantage of the moment analysis method.

  11. Charge redistribution in QM:QM ONIOM model systems: a constrained density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckett, Daniel; Krukau, Aliaksandr; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2017-11-01

    The ONIOM hybrid method has found considerable success in QM:QM studies designed to approximate a high level of theory at a significantly reduced cost. This cost reduction is achieved by treating only a small model system with the target level of theory and the rest of the system with a low, inexpensive, level of theory. However, the choice of an appropriate model system is a limiting factor in ONIOM calculations and effects such as charge redistribution across the model system boundary must be considered as a source of error. In an effort to increase the general applicability of the ONIOM model, a method to treat the charge redistribution effect is developed using constrained density functional theory (CDFT) to constrain the charge experienced by the model system in the full calculation to the link atoms in the truncated model system calculations. Two separate CDFT-ONIOM schemes are developed and tested on a set of 20 reactions with eight combinations of levels of theory. It is shown that a scheme using a scaled Lagrange multiplier term obtained from the low-level CDFT model calculation outperforms ONIOM at each combination of levels of theory from 32% to 70%.

  12. Fiscal decentralization in the Italian NHS: what happens to interregional redistribution?

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Caterina; Zanardi, Alberto

    2011-04-01

    This paper explores how pressures for an increased decentralization of taxing powers to sub-national governments may affect the degree of income redistribution across regional territories accomplished by the Italian NHS. In Italy, political responsibilities for health care are decentralized to regional governments, but the central government retains a critical role in ensuring all citizens uniform access to health services. To this end the central government runs an expenditure needs equalizing system to top up regional governments own resources. However, this system is currently put under question by strong political pressures calling for a weakening of central government involvement. Applying a well developed econometric approach we find that the NHS currently reduces interregional differences in per-capita income by about 7% of GDP. A reform of the NHS in terms of a reduction of expenditure standards produces a weakening of redistribution across jurisdictions, the size of which crucially depends on the financing arrangements of health care that will be actually adopted. We conclude that the decentralization of the NHS would give rise to relevant policy issues concerning in particular the different health care spending possibilities across regions and the impact on the interregional mobility of patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidative Injury and Iron Redistribution Are Pathological Hallmarks of Marmoset Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Jordon; Bauer, Jan; Campbell, Graham R; Mahad, Don J; van Driel, Nikki; van der Pol, Susanne M A; 't Hart, Bert A; Lassmann, Hans; Laman, Jon D; van Horssen, Jack; Kap, Yolanda S

    2017-06-01

    Oxidative damage and iron redistribution are associated with the pathogenesis and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS), but these aspects are not entirely replicated in rodent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models. Here, we report that oxidative burst and injury as well as redistribution of iron are hallmarks of the MS-like pathology in the EAE model in the common marmoset. Active lesions in the marmoset EAE brain display increased expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (p22phox, p47phox, and gp91phox) and inducible nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity within lesions with active inflammation and demyelination, coinciding with enhanced expression of mitochondrial heat-shock protein 70 and superoxide dismutase 1 and 2. The EAE lesion-associated liberation of iron (due to loss of iron-containing myelin) was associated with altered expression of the iron metabolic markers FtH1, lactoferrin, hephaestin, and ceruloplasmin. The enhanced expression of oxidative damage markers in inflammatory lesions indicates that the enhanced antioxidant enzyme expression could not counteract reactive oxygen and nitrogen species-induced cellular damage, as is also observed in MS brains. This study demonstrates that oxidative injury and aberrant iron distribution are prominent pathological hallmarks of marmoset EAE thus making this model suitable for therapeutic intervention studies aimed at reducing oxidative stress and associated iron dysmetabolism. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Redistribution of nitric acid in the Arctic lower stratosphere during the winter of 1996-1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Koike, M.; Kondo, Y.; Bodeker, G. E.; Danilin, M. Y.; Sasano, Y.

    2001-10-01

    Vertical profiles of HNO3, N2O, O3, and the aerosol extinction coefficient at 780 nm were observed by the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) on board the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) during the Arctic winter of 1996-1997. Irreversible redistribution of HNO3 is evaluated using HNO3-N2O and HNO3-O3 correlations. Denitrification and nitrification started to be observed just after the Arctic vortex cooled to below the ice frost point (TICE) on February 10. Trajectory analyses show that denitrification occurred only in air masses, which were once cooled to near TICE and were kept at temperatures below the nitric acid trihydrate saturation threshold continuously for more than 4 days. Such a temperature history provides the necessary conditions for nucleation and growth of particles causing denitrification. The average extent of denitrification at 19 km reached 43% at the center of the vortex, suggesting that stratospheric ozone could be affected by denitrification deep inside the vortex. Denitrification (>2 ppbv) and nitrification (>1 ppbv) covered 40±10% and 35±10% of the vortex area, respectively. Redistributed numbers of HNO3 molecules at each altitude were calculated by integrating the area-weighted changes in the HNO3 concentration. The decreases in total HNO3 concentration at 17-21 km in late February and early March agreed with the increases at 12-15 km to within 25%, confirming conservation of HNO3 during sedimentation and evaporation of HNO3-containing polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  15. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p’-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis. PMID:26601698

  16. Generalized Redistribute-to-the-Right Algorithm: Application to the Analysis of Censored Cost Data

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, SHUAI; ZHAO, HONGWEI

    2013-01-01

    Medical cost estimation is a challenging task when censoring of data is present. Although researchers have proposed methods for estimating mean costs, these are often derived from theory and are not always easy to understand. We provide an alternative method, based on a replace-from-the-right algorithm, for estimating mean costs more efficiently. We show that our estimator is equivalent to an existing one that is based on the inverse probability weighting principle and semiparametric efficiency theory. We also propose an alternative method for estimating the survival function of costs, based on the redistribute-to-the-right algorithm, that was originally used for explaining the Kaplan–Meier estimator. We show that this second proposed estimator is equivalent to a simple weighted survival estimator of costs. Finally, we develop a more efficient survival estimator of costs, using the same redistribute-to-the-right principle. This estimator is naturally monotone, more efficient than some existing survival estimators, and has a quite small bias in many realistic settings. We conduct numerical studies to examine the finite sample property of the survival estimators for costs, and show that our new estimator has small mean squared errors when the sample size is not too large. We apply both existing and new estimators to a data example from a randomized cardiovascular clinical trial. PMID:24403869

  17. The effectiveness of small changes for pressure redistribution; using the air mattress for small changes.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Sayumi; Sato, Aya; Azuma, Eri; Urushidani, Hiroko; Osawa, Masako; Kadoya, Kanaho; Takamura, Mana; Nunomi, Makiko; Mitsuoka, Akimi; Nishizawa Yokono, Tomoe; Sugama, Junko

    2016-05-01

    Observing small changes (SCs) at specific sites is a new form of managing changes in position. We investigated SCs at specific sites considering interface pressure, contact area, body alignment and physical sensation in nine healthy female adults and evaluated SCs using the air mattress that was divided into six cells (A-F). Thirty-three SC combinations at one or several sites were evaluated. Pressure in the sacral region significantly decreased in 28 SC combinations compared with the supine position (p < 0.05), and the effect of pressure redistribution was greater when SCs were applied at several instead of a single site. The contact area at 17 of the 28 SC combinations significantly increased (p < 0.05). Among sites ranked based on interface pressure, body alignment and physical sensation, SCs at sites BCE, AE and BD were the most favorable. The common feature among these three combinations was that they involved tilting the buttock region and one other site. The findings suggested that SCs at the buttock region could reduce disruptions in alignment as well as the impact on physical sensation caused by the body sinking into the mattress and improve interface pressure redistribution via increased contact area with the mattress. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrologic processes in deep vadose zones in interdrainage arid environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Hogan, James F.; Phillips, Fred M.; Scanlon, Bridget R.

    2004-01-01

    A unifying theory for the hydrology of desert vadose zones is particularly timely considering the rising population and water stresses in arid and semiarid regions. Conventional models cannot reconcile the apparent discrepancy between upward flow indicated by hydraulic gradient data and downward flow suggested by environmental tracer data in deep vadose zone profiles. A conceptual model described here explains both hydraulic and tracer data remarkably well by incorporating the hydrologic role of desert plants that encroached former juniper woodland 10 to 15 thousand years ago in the southwestern United States. Vapor transport also plays an important role in redistributing moisture through deep soils, particularly in coarse-grained sediments. Application of the conceptual model to several interdrainage arid settings reproduces measured matric potentials and chloride accumulation by simulating the transition from downward flow to upward flow just below the root zone initiated by climate and vegetation change. Model results indicate a slow hydraulic drying response in deep vadose zones that enables matric potential profiles to be used to distinguish whether precipitation episodically percolated below the root zone or was completely removed via evapotranspiration during the majority of the Holocene. Recharge declined dramatically during the Holocene in interdrainage basin floor settings of arid and semiarid basins. Current flux estimates across the water table in these environmental settings, are on the order of 0.01 to 0.1 mm yr-1 and may be recharge (downward) or discharge (upward) depending on vadose zone characteristics, such as soil texture, geothermal gradient, and water table depth. In summary, diffuse recharge through the basin floor probably contributes only minimally to the total recharge in arid and semiarid basins.

  19. Overlap in nitrogen sources and redistribution of nitrogen between trees and grasses in a semi-arid savanna.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, K V R; Prins, Herbert H T; de Bie, Steven; Heitkönig, Ignas M A; Woodborne, Stephan; Gort, Gerrit; Kirkman, Kevin; Fry, Brian; de Kroon, Hans

    2014-04-01

    A key question in savanna ecology is how trees and grasses coexist under N limitation. We used N stable isotopes and N content to study N source partitioning across seasons from trees and associated grasses in a semi-arid savanna. We also used (15)N tracer additions to investigate possible redistribution of N by trees to grasses. Foliar stable N isotope ratio (δ(15)N) values were consistent with trees and grasses using mycorrhiza-supplied N in all seasons except in the wet season when they switched to microbially fixed N. The dependence of trees and grasses on mineralized soil N seemed highly unlikely based on seasonal variation in mineralization rates in the Kruger Park region. Remarkably, foliar δ(15)N values were similar for all three tree species differing in the potential for N fixation through nodulation. The tracer experiment showed that N was redistributed by trees to understory grasses in all seasons. Our results suggest that the redistribution of N from trees to grasses and uptake of N was independent of water redistribution. Although there is overlap of N sources between trees and grasses, dependence on biological sources of N coupled with redistribution of subsoil N by trees may contribute to the coexistence of trees and grasses in semi-arid savannas.

  20. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  1. Speeds in school zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    School speed zones are frequently requested traffic controls for school areas, based on the common belief : that if the transportation agency would only install a reduced speed limit, then drivers would no longer : speed through the area. This resear...

  2. An Experimental and Modeling Synthesis to Determine Seasonality of Hydraulic Redistribution in Semi-arid Region with Multispecies Vegetation Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Kumar, P.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Scott, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    A key challenge in critical zone science is to understand and predict the interaction between aboveground and belowground eco-hydrologic processes. Roots play an important role in linking aboveground plant ecophysiological processes, such as carbon, water and energy exchange with the atmosphere, and the belowground processes associated with soil moisture and carbon, and microbial and nutrient dynamics. This study analyzes aboveground and belowground interaction through hydraulic redistribution (HR), a phenomenon that roots serve as preferential pathways for water movement from wet to dry soil layers. HR process is simulated by multi-layer canopy model and compared with relative measurements from the field to study effect of HR on different plant species where Posopis velutina Woot. (velvet mesquite) and understory co-exist and share resources. The study site is one of Ameriflux sites: Santa Rita Mesquite savanna, Arizona, with a distinct dry season that facilitates occurrence of HR. We analyzed how two vegetation species share and utilize the limited amount of water by HR in both dry and wet seasons. During dry season, water moves from deep layer to shallow layer through roots and hydraulic lift (HL) occurs. During wet season, water moves from shallow layer to deep layer through roots and hydraulic descent (HD) occurs. About 40% of precipitation is transferred to deep soil layer with HD and 15% of that is transported back to shallow soil layer with HL in dry season. Assuming water supplied through HL supports evapotranspiration of plants, HL supports 10% of evapotranspiration. The ratio of mesquite and understory root conductivities is an important factor that determines how two plant species interact and share resources in water-limited environment. The sensitivity analysis of root conductivities suggests that high understory root conductivity facilitates water transported by HR and increases mesquite transpiration and photosynthesis. Understory transpiration and

  3. Stable isotopic constraints on fluid-rock interaction and Cu-PGE-S redistribution in the Sonju Lake intrusion, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, Y.-R.; Ripley, E.M.; Miller, J.D.; Li, C.; Mariga, J.; Shafer, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Sonju Lake intrusion, part of the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift-related Beaver Bay Complex, is a 1,200-m-thick, strongly differentiated, layered sequence of mafic cumulates located in northeastern Minnesota. Basal melatroctolite and dunite layers are overlain by troctolite, gabbro, Fe-Ti oxide-rich gabbro, apatite diorite, and monzodiorite. Stratigraphic intervals rich in Pt + Pd, Cu, and S occur over ???500 m in the Fe-Ti oxide-rich gabbro and apatite diorite units. Peak concentrations show offsets that are similar to those found in other tholeiitic layered intrusions. Concentrations of Pd in excess of 100 ppb are confined to the lowermost 25 m of the interval. Copper shows a sharp increase to 630 ppm above the Pd-rich interval. Sulfur contents are low (<375 ppm) in the Cu-rich interval, but they increase to values as high as 3,150 ppm above in the apatite diorite. Disseminated sulfides in the intrusion have ??34S values that range from -2.2 to 3 per mil Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) and suggest that contamination by country rock sulfur was not an important process in the formation of the metal-rich interval. ??18O values of plagioclase from the intrusion range from 5.6 to 12.0 per mil (V-SMOW) and indicate that a relatively low-18O fluid (??18O ???3-5 ???) interacted with the rocks of the intrusion at temperatures less than ???275??C. Clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides (ilmenite with minor amounts of titanomagnetite) show much more restricted ranges in ??18O values (4.6-5.7 and 5.5-6.7 per mil, respectively) and attest to the kinetic control of the oxygen isotope exchange process. The externally derived fluid that interacted with rocks now enriched in platinum group elements (PGE) + Cu- and Fe-sulfide minerals locally liberated sulfur and replaced chalcopyrite and pyrite with goethite. In the Cu-rich zone, goethite that replaces chalcopyrite may contain up to 8.5 weight percent Cu. It is evident that hydrothermal alteration resulted in a decoupling of copper

  4. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  5. Pressure-strain energy redistribution in compressible turbulence: return-to-isotropy versus kinetic-potential energy equipartition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kurnchul; Venugopal, Vishnu; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2016-08-01

    Return-to-isotropy and kinetic-potential energy equipartition are two fundamental pressure-moderated energy redistributive processes in anisotropic compressible turbulence. Pressure-strain correlation tensor redistributes energy among various Reynolds stress components and pressure-dilatation is responsible for energy reallocation between dilatational kinetic and potential energies. The competition and interplay between these pressure-based processes are investigated in this study. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of low turbulent Mach number dilatational turbulence are performed employing the hybrid thermal Lattice Boltzman method (HTLBM). It is found that a tendency towards equipartition precedes proclivity for isotropization. An evolution towards equipartition has a collateral but critical effect on return-to-isotropy. The preferential transfer of energy from strong (rather than weak) Reynolds stress components to potential energy accelerates the isotropization of dilatational fluctuations. Understanding of these pressure-based redistributive processes is critical for developing insight into the character of compressible turbulence.

  6. The role of impact events play in redistributing and sequestering water on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, G.; Tornabene, L. L.

    2017-12-01

    Impact cratering is one of the most fundamental geological process in the Solar System. Several workers have considered the effect that impact events may have had on the climate of Early Mars. The proposed effects range from impact-induced precipitation to the production of runaway stable climates to the impact delivery of climatically active gases. The role of impact events in forming hydrated minerals has been touched upon but remains debated. In this contribution, we focus on the role that impact events may have played in redistributing and sequestering water on Early Mars; a record that may still be preserved in the Noachian crust. It has been previously proposed that the sequestration of significant quantities of water may have occurred within various hydrated minerals, in particular clays, in the martian crust. There is undoubtedly no single origin for clay-bearing rocks on Mars and the purpose of this contribution is not to review all the possible formation mechanisms. What we do propose, however, is that it is theoretically possible for impact events to create all known occurrences of clays on Mars. We show that clays can form within and around impact craters in two main ways: through the solid-state devitrification of hydrous impact melts and/or impact-generated hydrothermal alteration. Neither of these mechanisms requires a warmer or wetter climate scenario on Early Mars. Notwithstanding the original origin of clays, any clays may be widely redistributed over the Martian surface in the ejecta deposits of large impact craters. However, ejecta deposits are much more complex than commonly thought, with evidence in many instances for two different types of ejecta deposits around martian craters. The first is a ballistic ejecta layer that is low-shock, melt-poor and low-temperature; it will likely not induce the formation of new clays through the mechanisms described above, but could redistribute pre-impact clays over 100's and 1000's of km over the martian

  7. Measurements of sea ice mass redistribution during ice deformation event in Arctic winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkin, P.; Spreen, G.; King, J.; Rösel, A.; Skourup, H.; Munk Hvidegaard, S.; Wilkinson, J.; Oikkonen, A.; Granskog, M. A.; Gerland, S.

    2016-12-01

    Sea-ice growth during high winter is governed by ice dynamics. The highest growth rates are found in leads that open under divergent conditions, where exposure to the cold atmosphere promotes thermodynamic growth. Additionally ice thickens dynamically, where convergence causes rafting and ridging. We present a local study of sea-ice growth and mass redistribution between two consecutive airborne measurements, on 19 and 24 April 2015, during the N-ICE2015 expedition in the area north of Svalbard. Between the two overflights an ice deformation event was observed. Airborne laser scanner (ALS) measurements revisited the same sea-ice area of approximately 3x3 km. By identifying the sea surface within the ALS measurements as a reference the sea ice plus snow freeboard was obtained with a spatial resolution of 5 m. By assuming isostatic equilibrium of level floes, the freeboard heights can be converted to ice thickness. The snow depth is estimated from in-situ measurements. Sea ice thickness measurements were made in the same area as the ALS measurements by electromagnetic sounding from a helicopter (HEM), and with a ground-based device (EM31), which allows for cross-validation of the sea-ice thickness estimated from all 3 procedures. Comparison of the ALS snow freeboard distributions between the first and second overflight shows a decrease in the thin ice classes and an increase of the thick ice classes. While there was no observable snowfall and a very low sea-ice growth of older level ice during this period, an autonomous buoy array deployed in the surroundings of the area measured by the ALS shows first divergence followed by convergence associated with shear. To quantify and link the sea ice deformation with the associated sea-ice thickness change and mass redistribution we identify over 100 virtual buoys in the ALS data from both overflights. We triangulate the area between the buoys and calculate the strain rates and freeboard change for each individual triangle

  8. A Mathematical Model on Water Redistribution Mechanism of the Seismonastic Movement of Mimosa Pudica

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, K.W.; Ye, Z.W.; Chye, M.L.; Ngan, A.H.W.

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical model based on the water redistribution mechanism is proposed to predict the volumetric strain of motor cells in Mimosa pudica during the seismonastic movement. The model describes the water and ion movements following the opening of ion channels triggered by stimulation. The cellular strain is related to the angular velocity of the plant movement, and both their predictions are in good agreement with experimental data, thus validating the water redistribution mechanism. The results reveal that an increase in ion diffusivity across the cell membrane of <15-fold is sufficient to produce the observed seismonastic movement. PMID:23823246

  9. Partitioning of photosynthate within and distal to the growth zone of tall fescue leaf blades

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, G.; Nelson, C.J.

    The growth zone of developing tall fescue leaf blades, consisting of zones of cell division, cell elongation and cell maturation, are a strong sink for photosynthate. Distribution of {sup 14}C along the growth zone and partitioning between water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) and WSC-free dry matter (SDM) were observed for up to 64 h after labelling the youngest fully expanded leaf or the exposed tip of the elongating leaf with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Deposition rates of {sup 14}C were estimated using the continuity equation. The cell elongation zone, especially the WSC fraction, was the strongest sink for {sup 14}C. In the proximalmore » end of the maturation zone, partitioning of {sup 14}C shifted from being allocated mainly to the WSC fraction after 2 h to an equal distribution between WSC and SDM at the distal end of the zone after 64 h. A significant proportion of {sup 14}C in the SDM fraction of the maturation zone could be attributed to redistribution from WSC.« less

  10. Mushy zone modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Smith, Richard N.; Marsh, Steven P.; Kuklinski, Robert

    A key element of mushy zone modeling is the description of the microscopic evolution of the lengthscales within the mushy zone and the influence of macroscopic transport processes. This paper describes some recent progress in developing a mean-field statistical theory of phase coarsening in adiabatic mushy zones. The main theoretical predictions are temporal scaling laws that indicate that average lengthscale increases as time 1/3, a self-similar distribution of mushy zone lengthscales based on spherical solid particle shapes, and kinetic rate constants which provide the dependences of the coarsening process on material parameters and the volume fraction of the solid phase. High precision thermal decay experiments are described which verify aspects of the theory in pure material mushy zones held under adiabatic conditions. The microscopic coarsening theory is then integrated within a macroscopic heat transfer model of one-dimensional alloy solidification, using the Double Integral Method. The method demonstrates an ability to predict the influence of macroscopic heat transfer on the evolution of primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings in Al-Cu alloys. Finally, some suggestions are made for future experimental and theoretical studies required in developing comprehensive solidification processing models.

  11. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  12. Effect of a central redistribution of fluid volume on response to lower-body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaselli, Clare M.; Frey, Mary A. B.; Kenney, Richard A.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe

    1990-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) were studied following 1 hour of 6-deg head-down tilt to determine whether a redistribution of blood volume toward the central circulation modifies the subsequent response to orthostatic stress. Responses of 12 men, ages 30-39 years, were evaluated by electrocardiography, impedance cardiography, sphygmomanometry, and measurement of calf circumference. During the LBNP that followed head-down tilt, as compared with control LBNP (no preceding head-down tilt) subjects, had smaller stroke volume and cardiac output, greater total peripheral resistance, and less calf enlargement. These differences reflect differences in the variables immediately preceding LBNP. Magnitudes of the responses from pre-LBNP to each pressure stage of the LBNP procedure did not differ between protocols. Mean and diastolic arterial pressures were slightly elevated after LBNP-control, but they fell slightly during LBNP post-tilt.

  13. Redistribution of fallout radionuclides in Enewetak Atoll lagoon sediments by callianassid bioturbation.

    PubMed

    McMurtry, G M; Schneider, R C; Colin, P L; Buddemeier, R W; Suchanek, T H

    The lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands contain a large selection of fallout radionuclides as a result of 43 nuclear weapon tests conducted there between 1948 and 1958. Studies of the burial of fallout radionuclides have been conducted on the islands and in several of the large craters, but studies of their vertical distribution have been limited to about the upper 20 cm of the lagoon sediments. We have found elevated fallout radionuclide concentrations buried more deeply in the lagoon sediments and evidence of burrowing into the sediment by several species of callianassid ghost shrimp (Crustacea: Thalassinidea) which has displaced highly radioactive sediment. The burrowing activities of callianassids, which are ubiquitous on the lagoon floor, facilitate radionuclide redistribution and complicate the fallout radionuclide inventory of the lagoon.

  14. Moment redistribution in continuous reinforced concrete beams strengthened with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, M. A.; Valente, L.; Rizzo, A.

    2007-09-01

    The results of tests on continuous steel-fiber-reinforced concrete (RC) beams, with and without an external strengthening, are presented. The internal flexural steel reinforcement was designed so that to allow steel yielding before the collapse of the beams. To prevent the shear failure, steel stirrups were used. The tests also included two nonstrengthened control beams; the other specimens were strengthened with different configurations of externally bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates. In order to prevent the premature failure from delamination of the CFRP strengthening, a wrapping was also applied. The experimental results obtained show that it is possible to achieve a sufficient degree of moment redistribution if the strengthening configuration is chosen properly, confirming the results provided by two simple numerical models.

  15. The impact of regime type on health: does redistribution explain everything?

    PubMed

    Wigley, Simon; Akkoyunlu-Wigley, Arzu

    2011-01-01

    Many scholars claim that democracy improves population health. The prevailing explanation for this is that democratic regimes distribute health-promoting resources more widely than autocratic regimes. The central contention of this article is that democracies also have a significant pro-health effect regardless of public redistributive policies. After establishing the theoretical plausibility of the nondistributive effect, a panel of 153 countries for the years 1972 to 2000 is used to examine the relationship between extent of democratic experience and life expectancy. The authors find that democratic governance continues to have a salutary effect on population health even when controls are introduced for the distribution of health-enhancing resources. Data for fifty autocratic countries for the years 1994 to 2007 are then used to examine whether media freedom—independent of government responsiveness—has a positive impact on life expectancy.

  16. Large scale mass redistribution and surface displacement from GRACE and SLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Ries, J. C.; Tapley, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    Mass transport between the atmosphere, ocean and solid earth results in the temporal variations in the Earth gravity field and loading induced deformation of the Earth. Recent space-borne observations, such as GRACE mission, are providing extremely high precision temporal variations of gravity field. The results from 10-yr GRACE data has shown a significant annual variations of large scale vertical and horizontal displacements occurring over the Amazon, Himalayan region and South Asia, African, and Russian with a few mm amplitude. Improving understanding from monitoring and modeling of the large scale mass redistribution and the Earth's response are a critical for all studies in the geosciences, in particular for determination of Terrestrial Reference System (TRS), including geocenter motion. This paper will report results for the observed seasonal variations in the 3-dimentional surface displacements of SLR and GPS tracking stations and compare with the prediction from time series of GRACE monthly gravity solution.

  17. Simulation of bio-locomotion by a momentum redistribution technique for self-propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curet, Oscar; Shirgaonkar, Anup; Patankar, Neelesh; Maciver, Malcolm

    2007-11-01

    We have developed a general purpose computational approach for self-propulsion based on a momentum redistribution concept. In this poster, our primary goal is to show that the technique can simulate swimming of various organisms without using reduced order models for fluid dynamics. The approach fully resolves the motion of the organism and the surrounding fluid. Thus, it is an effective tool to obtain forces, flow fields, as well as the swimming velocity when the deformation kinematics of the organism are available from observational data. We will present images of computational flow fields for several examples including the aquatic locomotion of sperm, jellyfish, eel, and blackghost knifefish. These examples span a range of body configurations, swimming gaits, and Reynolds numbers in their natural environments. Peculiarities of various modes of swimming will be highlighted.

  18. Exploiting the flexibility of a family of models for taxation and redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertotti, M. L.; Modanese, G.

    2012-08-01

    We discuss a family of models expressed by nonlinear differential equation systems describing closed market societies in the presence of taxation and redistribution. We focus in particular on three example models obtained in correspondence to different parameter choices. We analyse the influence of the various choices on the long time shape of the income distribution. Several simulations suggest that behavioral heterogeneity among the individuals plays a definite role in the formation of fat tails of the asymptotic stationary distributions. This is in agreement with results found with different approaches and techniques. We also show that an excellent fit for the computational outputs of our models is provided by the κ-generalized distribution introduced by Kaniadakis in [Physica A 296, 405 (2001)].

  19. Power ramp induced iodine and cesium redistribution in LWR fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontheimer, F.; Vogl, W.; Ruyter, I.; Markgraf, J.

    1980-01-01

    Volatile fission product migration in LWR fuel rods which are power ramped above a certain threshold beyond the envelope of their previous power history, plays an important role in stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy. This may cause fuel rods to fail already at stresses below the yield strength. In the HFR, Petten, many power ramp experiments have been performed with subsequent examination of the ramped rods for fission product distribution. This study describes the measurement of iodine and cesium distribution using γ-spectroscopy of I-131 and Cs-137. An evaluation method is presented which makes the determination of absolute amounts of I/Cs feasible. It is shown that a threshold for I/Cs redistribution exists beyond which it depends strongly on local fuel rod power and fuel type.

  20. Pressure redistribution by molded inserts in diabetic footwear: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lord, M; Hosein, R

    1994-08-01

    A small-scale trial is described to demonstrate and evaluate the redistribution of plantar pressure resulting from the use of custom-molded inserts in the orthopedic shoes of diabetic patients at risk of plantar ulceration. A pressure-measuring insole based on force-sensitive resistor technology enabled the load distribution to be compared using molded inserts and flat inserts fitted into the same shoes. An analysis of the 12 peaks of pressure that could be identified under a discrete metatarsal head of six subjects in the trial showed that the pressure was significantly reduced with the use of molded inserts (flat inserts: 305 +/- 79 kPa; molded inserts: 216 +/- 70 kPa; n = 6 p < 0.005). Technical limitations of the equipment and the difficult choice of match of flat insert to molded for comparison suggest that further studies are required for a definitive result.

  1. Redistributing Chern numbers and quantum Hall transitions in multi-band lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. L.; Zhai, Z. Y.; Jiang, C.

    2018-07-01

    We numerically study the integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) on m-band lattices. With continuous modulating the next-nearest-neighbor hopping integral t' , it is found that the full band is divided into 2 m - 1 regions. There are m - 1 critical regions with pseudogaps induced by the merging between the two adjacent subbands, where both Chern numbers of the correlating Landau subbands and the corresponding Hall plateau are not well-defined. The other m regions with different well-defined Chern numbers are separated by the above m - 1 critical regions. Due to the redistributing Chern numbers of system induced by the merging of subbands, the Hall conductance exhibits a peculiar phase transition, which is characterized by the direct change of Hall plateau state.

  2. Influences of Root Hydraulic Redistribution on N2O Emissions at AmeriFlux Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Congsheng; Lee, Xuhui; Griffis, Timothy J.; Wang, Guiling; Wei, Zhongwang

    2018-05-01

    It has long been suspected that root hydraulic redistribution (HR) affects the carbon and nitrogen cycles. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and is the primary stratospheric ozone-depleting substance. To our knowledge, the influences of HR on N2O emissions have not been investigated. Here we use the HR schemes of Ryel et al. and Amenu and Kumar incorporated into CLM4.5 to examine N2O emissions at five AmeriFlux sites. The results show that HR reduced N2O emissions by 28-92% in the four natural ecosystems experiencing a dry season, whereas it had a very limited effect on the Corn Belt site that has strong emissions but with no distinct dry season. We hypothesize that N2O emissions in ecosystems with a distinct dry season are likely overestimated by CENTURY-based Earth system models.

  3. Phase Transformation Temperatures and Solute Redistribution in a Quaternary Zirconium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, C.; Daymond, M. R.

    2018-05-01

    This study investigates the phase stability and redistribution of solute during heating and cooling of a quaternary zirconium alloy, Excel (Zr-3.2Sn-0.8Mo-0.8Nb). Time-of-flight neutron diffraction data are analyzed using a novel Vegard's law-based approach to determine the phase fractions and location of substitutional solute atoms in situ during heating from room temperature up to 1050 °C. It is seen that this alloy exhibits direct nucleation of the β Zr phase from martensite during tempering, and stable retention of the β Zr phase to high temperatures, unlike other two-phase zirconium alloys. The transformation strains resulting from the α \\leftrightarrow β transformation are shown to have a direct impact on the development of microstructure and crystallographic texture.

  4. Hypergravity Leads to the Redistribution of Calcium Ions in Plant Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, Olena M.

    2008-06-01

    The study of hypergravity influence on calcium ions distribution and on the relative amount of Ca2+ in cells of Nicotiana tabacum callus was carried out using the centrifuge. 15-day-old N. tabacum callus grown in a Murashige and Scoog agar medium was exposed to hypergravity at 6.5 g and 14 g for 15 and 60 min. The control samples and the centrifuged callus were loaded with Fluo-4 and then studied by the confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The visible redistribution of Ca2+ in the investigated cells and the appearance of calcium-microdomains in cytoplasm have been established under influence of hypergravity. Readaptation of Ca2+ distribution in the cells occurred in 2-4 h after hypergravity ending. It is suggested that influence of hypergravity lead to change of ionic transport of plasmalemma and endomembranes, and also to efflux of Ca2+ from apoplast.

  5. Cascading failures with local load redistribution in interdependent Watts-Strogatz networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Du, Wen-Bo; Sallan, Jose Maria; Lordan, Oriol

    2016-05-01

    Cascading failures of loads in isolated networks have been studied extensively over the last decade. Since 2010, such research has extended to interdependent networks. In this paper, we study cascading failures with local load redistribution in interdependent Watts-Strogatz (WS) networks. The effects of rewiring probability and coupling strength on the resilience of interdependent WS networks have been extensively investigated. It has been found that, for small values of the tolerance parameter, interdependent networks are more vulnerable as rewiring probability increases. For larger values of the tolerance parameter, the robustness of interdependent networks firstly decreases and then increases as rewiring probability increases. Coupling strength has a different impact on robustness. For low values of coupling strength, the resilience of interdependent networks decreases with the increment of the coupling strength until it reaches a certain threshold value. For values of coupling strength above this threshold, the opposite effect is observed. Our results are helpful to understand and design resilient interdependent networks.

  6. Intramolecular vibrational redistribution of CH 2I 2 dissolved in supercritical Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, K.; Shimojima, A.; Kajimoto, O.

    2003-03-01

    Intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) of CH 2I 2 in supercritical Xe has been studied. The first overtone of the C-H stretching mode was excited with a near infrared laser pulse and the transient UV absorption near 390 nm was monitored. Signals showed a rise and decay profile, which gave the IVR and VET (intermolecular vibrational energy transfer) rates, respectively. Solvent density dependence of each rate was obtained by tuning the pressure at a constant temperature. The IVR rate in supercritical Xe increased with increasing solvent density and asymptotically reached a limiting value. This result suggests that the IVR process of CH 2I 2 in condensed phase is a solvent-assisted process.

  7. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  8. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Burch, J.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Kuntz, Kip; Omidi, N.; Read, A.; Robertson, Ina; hide

    2010-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversies surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  9. Freeway work zone lane capacity.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this report is a capacity analysis of two long-term urban freeway Work Zones. Work Zone #1 : tapered four mainline lanes to two, using two separate tapers; Work Zone #2 tapered two mainline lanes to one. : Work Zone throughput was analyz...

  10. Estimating Temporal Redistribution of Surface Melt Water into Upper Stratigraphy of the Juneau Icefield, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilner, J.; Smith, B.; Moore, T.; Campbell, S. W.; Slavin, B. V.; Hollander, J.; Wolf, J.

    2015-12-01

    The redistribution of winter accumulation from surface melt into firn or deeper layers (i.e. internal accumulation) remains a poorly understood component of glacier mass balance. Winter accumulation is usually quantified prior to summer melt, however the time window between accumulation and the onset of melt is minimal so this is not always possible. Studies which are initiated following the onset of summer melt either neglect sources of internal accumulation or attempt to estimate melt (and therefore winter accumulation uncertainty) through a variety of modeling methods. Here, we used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) repeat common midpoint (CMP) surveys with supporting common offset surveys, mass balance snow pits, and probing to estimate temporal changes in water content within the winter accumulation and firn layers of the southern Juneau Icefield, Alaska. In temperate glaciers, radio-wave velocity is primarily dependent on water content and snow or firn density. We assume density changes are temporally slow relative to water flow through the snow and firn pack, and therefore infer that changing radio-wave velocities measured by successive CMP surveys result from flux in surface melt through deeper layers. Preliminary CMP data yield radio-wave velocities of 0.15 to 0.2 m/ns in snowpack densities averaging 0.56 g cm-3, indicating partially to fully saturated snowpack (4-9% water content). Further spatial-temporal analysis of CMP surveys is being conducted. We recommend that repeat CMP surveys be conducted over a longer time frame to estimate stratigraphic water redistribution between the end of winter accumulation and maximum melt season. This information could be incorporated into surface energy balance models to further understanding of the influence of internal accumulation on glacier mass balance.

  11. Hot-electron-induced hydrogen redistribution and defect generation in metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, D. A.; Marwick, A. D.; Dimaria, D. J.; Dori, L.

    1994-09-01

    Redistribution of hydrogen caused by hot-electron injection has been studied by hydrogen depth profiling with N-15 nuclear reaction analysis and electrical methods. Internal photoemission and Fowler-Nordheim injection were used for electron injection into large Al-gate and polysilicon-gate capacitors, respectively. A hydrogen-rich layer (about 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm) observed at the Al/SiO2 interface was found to serve as the source of hydrogen during the hot-electron stress. A small fraction of the hydrogen released from this layer was found to be retrapped near the Si/SiO2 interface for large electron fluences in the Al-gate samples. Within the limit of detectability, about 10(exp 14)/sq cm, no hydrogen was measured using nuclear reaction analysis in the polysilicon-gate samples. The buildup of hydrogen at the Si/SiO2 interface exhibits a threshold at about 1 MV/cm, consistent with the threshold for electron heating in SiO2. In the 'wet' SiO2 films with purposely introduced excess hydrogen, the rate of hydrogen buildup at the Si/SiO2 interface is found to be significantly greater than that found in the 'dry' films. During electron injection, hydrogen redistribution was also confirmed via the deactivation of boron dopant in the silicon substrate. The generation rates of interface states, neutral electron traps, and anomalous positive charge are found to increase with increasing hydrogen buildup in the substrate and the initial hydrogen concentration in the film. It is concluded that the generation of defects is preceded by the hot-electron-induced release and transport of atomic hydrogen and it is the chemical reaction of this species within the metal-oxide-semiconductor structure that generates the electrically active defects.

  12. Redistribution of blood within the body is important for thermoregulation in an ectothermic vertebrate (Crocodylus porosus).

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E

    2007-11-01

    Changes in blood flow are a principal mechanism of thermoregulation in vertebrates. Changes in heart rate will alter blood flow, although multiple demands for limited cardiac output may compromise effective thermoregulation. We tested the hypothesis that regional differences in blood flow during heating and cooling can occur independently from changes in heart rate. We measured heart rate and blood pressure concurrently with blood flow in the crocodile, Crocodylus porosus. We measured changes in blood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry, and by injecting coloured microspheres. All measurements were made under different heat loads, with and without blocking cholinergic and beta-adrenergic receptors (autonomic blockade). Heart rates were significantly faster during heating than cooling in the control animals, but not when autonomic receptors were blocked. There were no significant differences in blood flow distribution between the control and autonomic blockade treatments. In both treatments, blood flow was directed to the dorsal skin and muscle and away from the tail and duodenum during heating. When the heat source was switched off, there was a redistribution of blood from the dorsal surface to the duodenum. Blood flow to the leg skin and muscle, and to the liver did not change significantly with thermal state. Blood pressure was significantly higher during the autonomic blockade than during the control. Thermal time constants of heating and cooling were unaffected by the blockade of autonomic receptors. We concluded that animals partially compensated for a lack of differential heart rates during heating and cooling by redistributing blood within the body, and by increasing blood pressure to increase flow. Hence, measures of heart rate alone are insufficient to assess physiological thermoregulation in reptiles.

  13. Adaptive finite-volume WENO schemes on dynamically redistributed grids for compressible Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Harshavardhana S.; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2016-08-01

    A high-order adaptive finite-volume method is presented for simulating inviscid compressible flows on time-dependent redistributed grids. The method achieves dynamic adaptation through a combination of time-dependent mesh node clustering in regions characterized by strong solution gradients and an optimal selection of the order of accuracy and the associated reconstruction stencil in a conservative finite-volume framework. This combined approach maximizes spatial resolution in discontinuous regions that require low-order approximations for oscillation-free shock capturing. Over smooth regions, high-order discretization through finite-volume WENO schemes minimizes numerical dissipation and provides excellent resolution of intricate flow features. The method including the moving mesh equations and the compressible flow solver is formulated entirely on a transformed time-independent computational domain discretized using a simple uniform Cartesian mesh. Approximations for the metric terms that enforce discrete geometric conservation law while preserving the fourth-order accuracy of the two-point Gaussian quadrature rule are developed. Spurious Cartesian grid induced shock instabilities such as carbuncles that feature in a local one-dimensional contact capturing treatment along the cell face normals are effectively eliminated through upwind flux calculation using a rotated Hartex-Lax-van Leer contact resolving (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver for the Euler equations in generalized coordinates. Numerical experiments with the fifth and ninth-order WENO reconstructions at the two-point Gaussian quadrature nodes, over a range of challenging test cases, indicate that the redistributed mesh effectively adapts to the dynamic flow gradients thereby improving the solution accuracy substantially even when the initial starting mesh is non-adaptive. The high adaptivity combined with the fifth and especially the ninth-order WENO reconstruction allows remarkably sharp capture of

  14. Life cycle assessment of pig slurry treatment technologies for nutrient redistribution in Denmark.

    PubMed

    ten Hoeve, Marieke; Hutchings, Nicholas J; Peters, Gregory M; Svanström, Magdalena; Jensen, Lars S; Bruun, Sander

    2014-01-01

    Animal slurry management is associated with a range of impacts on fossil resource use and the environment. The impacts are greatest when large amounts of nutrient-rich slurry from livestock production cannot be adequately utilised on adjacent land. To facilitate nutrient redistribution, a range of different technologies are available. This study comprised a life cycle assessment of the environmental impacts from handling 1000 kg of pig slurry ex-animal. Application of untreated pig slurry onto adjacent land was compared with using four different treatment technologies to enable nutrient redistribution before land application: (a) separation by mechanical screw press, (b) screw press separation with composting of the solid fraction, (c) separation by decanter centrifuge, and (d) decanter centrifuge separation with ammonia stripping of the liquid fraction. Emissions were determined based on a combination of values derived from the literature and simulations with the Farm-N model for Danish agricultural and climatic conditions. The environmental impact categories assessed were climate change, freshwater eutrophication, marine eutrophication, terrestrial acidification, natural resource use, and soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus storage. In all separation scenarios, the liquid fraction was applied to land on the pig-producing (donor) farm and the solid fraction transported to a recipient farm and utilised for crop production. Separation, especially by centrifuge, was found to result in a lower environmental impact potential than application of untreated slurry to adjacent land. Composting and ammonia stripping either slightly increased or slightly decreased the environmental impact potential, depending on the impact category considered. The relative ranking of scenarios did not change after a sensitivity analysis in which coefficients for field emissions of nitrous oxide, ammonia and phosphorus were varied within the range cited in the literature. Therefore, the best

  15. The hydrostatic pressure indifference point underestimates orthostatic redistribution of blood in humans.

    PubMed

    Petersen, L G; Carlsen, J F; Nielsen, M B; Damgaard, M; Secher, N H

    2014-04-01

    The hydrostatic indifference point (HIP; where venous pressure is unaffected by posture) is located at the level of the diaphragm and is believed to indicate the orthostatic redistribution of blood, but it remains unknown whether HIP coincides with the indifference point for blood volume (VIP). During graded (± 20°) head-up (HUT) and head-down tilt (HDT) in 12 male volunteers, we determined HIP from central venous pressure and VIP from redistribution of both blood, using ultrasound imaging of the inferior caval vein (VIPui), and fluid volume, by regional electrical admittance (VIPadm). Furthermore, we evaluated whether inflation of medical antishock trousers (to 70 mmHg) affected HIP and VIP. Leaving cardiovascular variables unaffected by tilt, HIP was located 7 ± 4 cm (mean ± SD) below the 4th intercostal space (IC-4) during HUT and was similar (7 ± 3 cm) during HDT and higher (P < 0.0001) than both VIPui (HUT: 22 ± 16 cm; HDT: 13 ± 7 cm) and VIPadm (HUT: 29 ± 9 cm; HDT: 20 ± 9 cm below IC-4). During HUT antishock trousers elevated both HIP and VIPui [to 3 ± 5 cm (P = 0.028) and 17 ± 7 cm below IC-4 (P = 0.051), respectively], while VIPadm remained unaffected. By simultaneous recording of pressure and filling of the inferior caval vein as well as fluid distribution, we found HIP located corresponding to the diaphragm while VIP was placed low in the abdomen, and that medical antishock trousers elevated both HIP and VIP. The low indifference point for volume shows that the gravitational influence on distribution of blood is more profound than indicated by the indifference point for venous pressure.

  16. Impacts of hydraulic redistribution on overstory-understory interactions in a semiarid savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron-Gafford, G.; Minor, R. L.; Hendryx, S.; Lee, E.; Sutter, L., Jr.; Colella, A.; Murphy, P.; Sanchez-Canete, E. P.; Hamerlynck, E. P.; Kumar, P.; Scott, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is an important ecohydrological process in dryland environments by which plants preferentially move water from wet to dry soil layers. How does this water movement by the overstory influence physiological activity in the understory? Are there periods of facilitation when the tree is lifting water and periods of competition when the water is being moved deeper in the profile? We combined trunk, lateral root, and taproot sap flow data, and linked these measures with shallow and deep soil moisture data to show that soil moisture gradients control hydraulic redistribution in overstory mesquite trees. During prolonged inter-rain periods of drought and in response to periods of high vapor pressure deficits, mesquites drew upon this deeper, stored water to meet biological demands. We created plots under mesquite that experienced HR and plots where HR was physically prohibited to quantify the impacts of HR on understory performance. We measured carbon and water exchange at the leaf-level on mesquite and understory grass and for entire understory ecosystem using a large, portable chamber. We found that HR provided a drought-buffering capacity for the overstory mesquite and a significant decrease in mesquite photosynthesis in trees where the capacity for HR was reduced. While we had hypothesized that water lifted by the mesquite in periods of drought would facilitate understory grass function, we found no evidence for this. In fact, we found that grasses actually conducted higher rates of photosynthesis in plots where HR was eliminated. Ultimately, we found that HR in upland savannas, where there is little to no access to deep water, yields a competitive interaction between overstory mesquites and understory grasses at the scale of individual precipitation pulse events and across entire growing seasons.

  17. Influence of management history and landscape variables on soil organic carbon and soil redistribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venteris, E.R.; McCarty, G.W.; Ritchie, J.C.; Gish, T.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled studies to investigate the interaction between crop growth, soil properties, hydrology, and management practices are common in agronomy. These sites (much as with real world farmland) often have complex management histories and topographic variability that must be considered. In 1993 an interdisiplinary study was started for a 20-ha site in Beltsville, MD. Soil cores (271) were collected in 1999 in a 30-m grid (with 5-m nesting) and analyzed as part of the site characterization. Soil organic carbon (SOC) and 137Cesium (137Cs) were measured. Analysis of aerial photography from 1992 and of farm management records revealed that part of the site had been maintained as a swine pasture and the other portion as cropped land. Soil properties, particularly soil redistribution and SOC, show large differences in mean values between the two areas. Mass C is 0.8 kg m -2 greater in the pasture area than in the cropped portion. The pasture area is primarily a deposition site, whereas the crop area is dominated by erosion. Management influence is suggested, but topographic variability confounds interpretation. Soil organic carbon is spatially structured, with a regionalized variable of 120 m. 137Cs activity lacks spatial structure, suggesting disturbance of the profile by animal activity and past structures such as swine shelters and roads. Neither SOC nor 137Cs were strongly correlated to terrain parameters, crop yields, or a seasonal soil moisture index predicted from crop yields. SOC and 137Cs were weakly correlated (r2 ???0.2, F-test P-value 0.001), suggesting that soil transport controls, in part, SOC distribution. The study illustrates the importance of past site history when interpreting the landscape distribution of soil properties, especially those strongly influenced by human activity. Confounding variables, complex soil hydrology, and incomplete documentation of land use history make definitive interpretations of the processes behind the spatial distributions

  18. Soil redistribution model for undisturbed and cultivated sites based on Chernobyl-derived cesium-137 fallout.

    PubMed

    Hrachowitz, Markus; Maringer, Franz-Josef; Steineder, Christian; Gerzabek, Martin H

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of 137Cs fallout have been used in combination with a range of conversion models for the investigation of soil relocation mechanisms and sediment budgets in many countries for more than 20 yr. The objective of this paper is to develop a conversion model for quantifying soil redistribution, based on Chernobyl-derived 137Cs. The model is applicable on uncultivated as well as on cultivated sites, taking into account temporal changes in the 137Cs depth distribution pattern as well as tillage-induced 137Cs dilution effects. The main idea of the new model is the combination of a modified exponential model describing uncultivated soil with a Chapman distribution based model describing cultivated soil. The compound model subsequently allows a dynamic description of the Chernobyl derived 137Cs situation in the soil and its change, specifically migration and soil transport processes over the course of time. Using the suggested model at the sampling site in Pettenbach, in the Austrian province of Oberösterreich 137Cs depth distributions were simulated with a correlation coefficient of 0.97 compared with the measured 137Cs depth profile. The simulated rates of soil distribution at different positions at the sampling site were found to be between 27 and 60 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1). It was shown that the model can be used to describe the temporal changes of 137Cs depth distributions in cultivated as well as uncultivated soils. Additionally, the model allows to quantify soil redistribution in good correspondence with already existing models.

  19. Dike zones on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.; Sukhanov, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Venusian dike zone structures were identified from Venera 15 and 16 radar images. These include: a zone of subparallel rows centered at 30 deg N, 7 deg E; a system of intersecting bands centered at 67 deg N, 284 deg E; polygonal systems in lavas covering the structural base uplift centered at 47 deg N, 200 deg E; a system of light bands in the region of the ring structure centered at 43 deg N, 13 deg E; and a dike band centered at 27 deg N, 36 deg E.

  20. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots affects whole-stand evapotranspiration and net ecosystem carbon exchange

    Treesearch

    J.-C. Domec; J.S. King; A. Noormets; E. Treasure; M.J. Gavazzi; G. Sun; S.G. McNulty

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) of water via roots from moist to drier portions of the soil occurs in many ecosystems, potentially influencing both water use and carbon assimilation. By measuring soil water content, sap flow and eddy covariance, we investigated the temporal variability of HR in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation during months of...

  1. Large wood recruitment and redistribution in headwater streams in the southern Oregon Coast Range, U.S.A.

    Treesearch

    C. L. May; R. E. Gresswell

    2003-01-01

    Abstract - Large wood recruitment and redistribution mechanisms were investigated in a 3.9 km 2 basin with an old-growth Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco and Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg. Forest, located in the southern Coast Range of Oregon. Stream size and topographic setting strongly influenced processes that delivered wood to the channel network. In small...

  2. Modelling evolution of air dose rates in river basins in Fukushima Prefecture affected by sediment-sorbed radiocesium redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malins, A.; Sakuma, K.; Nakanishi, T.; Kurikami, H.; Machida, M.; Kitamura, A.; Yamada, S.

    2015-12-01

    The radioactive 134Cs and 137Cs isotopes deposited over Fukushima Prefecture by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster are the predominant radiological concern for the years following the accident. This is because the energetic gamma radiation they emit on decay constitutes the majority of the elevated air dose rates that now afflict the region. Therefore, we developed a tool for calculating air dose rates from arbitrary radiocesium spatial distributions across the land surface and depth profiles within the ground. As cesium is strongly absorbed by clay soils, its primary redistribution mechanism within Fukushima Prefecture is by soil erosion and water-borne sediment transport. Each year between 0.1~1% of the total radiocesium inventory in the river basins neighboring Fukushima Daiichi is eroded from the land surface and enters into water courses, predominantly during typhoon storms. Although this is a small amount in relative terms, in absolute terms it corresponds to terabecquerels of 134Cs and 137Cs redistribution each year and this can affect the air dose rate at locations of high erosion and sediment deposition. This study inputs the results of sediment redistribution simulations into the dose rate evaluation tool to calculate the locations and magnitude of air dose rate changes due to radiocesium redistribution. The dose rate calculations are supported by handheld survey instrument results taken within the Prefecture.

  3. 34 CFR 694.16 - What are the requirements for redistribution or return of scholarship funds not awarded to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of scholarship funds not awarded to a project's eligible students? 694.16 Section 694.16 Education...) § 694.16 What are the requirements for redistribution or return of scholarship funds not awarded to a project's eligible students? The following requirements apply only to section 404E scholarship awards for...

  4. 34 CFR 694.16 - What are the requirements for redistribution or return of scholarship funds not awarded to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of scholarship funds not awarded to a project's eligible students? 694.16 Section 694.16 Education...) § 694.16 What are the requirements for redistribution or return of scholarship funds not awarded to a project's eligible students? The following requirements apply only to section 404E scholarship awards for...

  5. 34 CFR 694.16 - What are the requirements for redistribution or return of scholarship funds not awarded to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of scholarship funds not awarded to a project's eligible students? 694.16 Section 694.16 Education...) § 694.16 What are the requirements for redistribution or return of scholarship funds not awarded to a project's eligible students? The following requirements apply only to section 404E scholarship awards for...

  6. 34 CFR 694.16 - What are the requirements for redistribution or return of scholarship funds not awarded to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of scholarship funds not awarded to a project's eligible students? 694.16 Section 694.16 Education...) § 694.16 What are the requirements for redistribution or return of scholarship funds not awarded to a project's eligible students? The following requirements apply only to section 404E scholarship awards for...

  7. NATIVE ROOT XYLEM EMBOLISM AND STOMATAL CLOSURE IN STANDS OF DOUGLAS-FIR AND PONDEROSA PINE: MITIGATION BY HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR), the passive movement of water via roots from moist to drier portions of the soil, occurs in many ecosystems, influencing both plant and ecosystem-water use. We examined the effects of HR on root hydraulic functioning during drought in young and old-...

  8. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  9. Arid Zone Hydrology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arid zone hydrology encompasses a wide range of topics and hydro-meteorological and ecological characteristics. Although arid and semi-arid watersheds perform the same functions as those in humid environments, their hydrology and sediment transport characteristics cannot be readily predicted by inf...

  10. Zone of intrusion study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-15

    The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF) performed an analysis using LS-DYNA simulation to investigate the zone of intrusion (ZOI) of an NCHRP Report No. 350 2000p pickup truck when impacting a 40-in. high F-shape parapet. : The ZOI for the 40-in...

  11. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  13. Crossing Comfort Zones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison, D. Soyini

    1993-01-01

    Offers a narrative based on a real event, in the form of a "docustory," describing that moment when teaching worked--when, in an instructional setting, communication was "perfect" or "excellent." Describes how three very different students, in a course on the cultures of women of color, moved beyond comfort zones while working together on a class…

  14. A comparative analysis of early child health and development services and outcomes in countries with different redistributive policies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The social environment is a fundamental determinant of early child development and, in turn, early child development is a determinant of health, well-being, and learning skills across the life course. Redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities, such as a welfare state and labour market policies, have shown a positive association with selected health indicators. In this study, we investigated the influence of redistributive policies specifically on the social environment of early child development in five countries with different political traditions. The objective of this analysis was to highlight similarities and differences in social and health services between the countries and their associations with other health outcomes that can inform better global early child development policies and improve early child health and development. Methods Four social determinants of early child development were selected to provide a cross-section of key time periods in a child’s life from prenatal to kindergarten. They included: 1) prenatal care, 2) maternal leave, 3) child health care, and 4) child care and early childhood education. We searched international databases and reports (e.g. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, World Bank, and UNICEF) to obtain information about early child development policies, services and outcomes. Results Although a comparative analysis cannot claim causation, our analysis suggests that redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities are associated with a positive influence on the social determinants of early child development. Generous redistributive policies are associated with a higher maternal leave allowance and pay and more preventive child healthcare visits. A decreasing trend in infant mortality, low birth weight rate, and under five mortality rate were observed with an increase in redistributive policies. No clear influence of redistributive policies was observed on

  15. A comparative analysis of early child health and development services and outcomes in countries with different redistributive policies.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Meta; Hopkins, Jessica; Biscaro, Anne; Srikanthan, Cinntha; Feller, Andrea; Bremberg, Sven; Verkuijl, Nienke; Flapper, Boudien; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth Lee; Williams, Robin

    2013-11-06

    The social environment is a fundamental determinant of early child development and, in turn, early child development is a determinant of health, well-being, and learning skills across the life course. Redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities, such as a welfare state and labour market policies, have shown a positive association with selected health indicators. In this study, we investigated the influence of redistributive policies specifically on the social environment of early child development in five countries with different political traditions. The objective of this analysis was to highlight similarities and differences in social and health services between the countries and their associations with other health outcomes that can inform better global early child development policies and improve early child health and development. Four social determinants of early child development were selected to provide a cross-section of key time periods in a child's life from prenatal to kindergarten. They included: 1) prenatal care, 2) maternal leave, 3) child health care, and 4) child care and early childhood education. We searched international databases and reports (e.g. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, World Bank, and UNICEF) to obtain information about early child development policies, services and outcomes. Although a comparative analysis cannot claim causation, our analysis suggests that redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities are associated with a positive influence on the social determinants of early child development. Generous redistributive policies are associated with a higher maternal leave allowance and pay and more preventive child healthcare visits. A decreasing trend in infant mortality, low birth weight rate, and under five mortality rate were observed with an increase in redistributive policies. No clear influence of redistributive policies was observed on breastfeeding and immunization

  16. Redistribution of fluorescently labeled tubulin in the mitotic apparatus of sand dollar eggs and the effects of taxol.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Y; Toriyama, M; Sakai, H; Hiramoto, Y

    1987-02-01

    Fluorescently labeled tubulin was quickly incorporated into the mitotic apparatus when injected into a live sand dollar egg. After a rectangular area (1.6 X 16 microns) of the mitotic spindle was photobleached at metaphase or anaphase by the irradiation of a laser microbeam, redistribution of fluorescence was almost complete within 30 sec. The photobleached area did not change in shape during the redistribution. During the period of redistribution, the bleached area moved slightly toward the near pole at metaphase and anaphase (means: 1.6 and 1.8 micron/min, respectively). These results indicate that redistribution was not due to the exchange of tubulin subunits only at the ends of microtubules but to their rapid exchange at sites along the microtubules in the bleached region. Furthermore, treadmilling of tubulin molecules along with the spindle microtubules possibly occurred at the rate of 1.6 micron/min at metaphase. Birefringence of the mitotic apparatus increased with a large increase in both the number and length of astral rays shortly after taxol was injected. However, the microtubules did not all seem to elongate at the same rate but appeared to become equalized in length. Chromosome movement stopped within 60 sec after the injection. Centrospheres became large and the labeled tubulin already incorporated into the centrospheres was excluded from the enlarged centrospheres. Shortly after the labeled tubulin was injected following the injection of taxol, it accumulated in the peripheral region of the centrospheres, suggesting that microtubules first assembled at this region. Fluorescently labeled tubulin in the mitotic apparatus in the egg after injection of taxol was redistributed much more slowly after photobleaching than in uninjected eggs.

  17. Hydraulic redistribution in a Mediterranean wild olive-pasture ecosystem: A key to tree survival and a limit to tree-patch size.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Matteo; Montaldo, Nicola; Oren, Ram

    2017-04-01

    In water-limited environments, such as certain Mediterranean ecosystems, trees may survive prolonged droughts by uptake of water by dimorphic root system: deep roots, growing vertically, and shallower lateral roots, extending beyond the crown projection of tree clumps into zones of seasonal vegetative cover. In such ecosystems, therefore, the balance between soil water under tree canopy versus that in treeless patches plays a crucial role on sustaining tree physiological performance and surface water fluxes during drought periods. The study has been performed at the Orroli site, Sardinia (Italy). The landscape is covered by patchy vegetation: wild olives trees in clumps, herbaceous species, drying to bare soil in late spring. The climate is Mediterranean maritime with long droughts from May to October, and an historical mean yearly rain of about 670 mm concentrated in the autumn and winter months. Soil depth varies from 10 to 50 cm, with underlying fractured rocky layer of basalt. From 2003, a 10 meters micrometeorological tower equipped with eddy-covariance system has been used for measuring water and energy surface fluxes, as well as key state variables (e.g. leaf and soil skin temperature, radiations, air humidity and wind velocity). Soil moisture was measured with five soil water reflectometers (two below the olive canopy and three in patches with pasture vegetation alternating with bare soil in the dry season). Early analyses show that wild olive continue to transpire even as the soil dries and the pasture desiccates. In 2015, to estimate plant water use and in the context of soil water dynamic, 33 Granier-type thermal dissipation probes were installed for estimating sap flow in stems of wild olives trees, 40 cm aboveground, in representative trees over the eddy-covariance foot-print. The combined data of sap flow, soil water content, and eddy covariance, revealed hydraulic redistribution system through the plant and the soil at different layers, allowing to

  18. Evaluation of Ohio work zone speed zones process.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to determine the effectiveness of Ohio Department of Transportation processes for establishing work zone speed zones. Researchers observed motorists speed choice upstream of a...

  19. Sea ice floe size distribution in the marginal ice zone: Theory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinlun; Schweiger, Axel; Steele, Michael; Stern, Harry

    2015-05-01

    To better describe the state of sea ice in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) with floes of varying thicknesses and sizes, both an ice thickness distribution (ITD) and a floe size distribution (FSD) are needed. In this work, we have developed a FSD theory that is coupled to the ITD theory of Thorndike et al. (1975) in order to explicitly simulate the evolution of FSD and ITD jointly. The FSD theory includes a FSD function and a FSD conservation equation in parallel with the ITD equation. The FSD equation takes into account changes in FSD due to ice advection, thermodynamic growth, and lateral melting. It also includes changes in FSD because of mechanical redistribution of floe size due to ice ridging and, particularly, ice fragmentation induced by stochastic ocean surface waves. The floe size redistribution due to ice fragmentation is based on the assumption that wave-induced breakup is a random process such that when an ice floe is broken, floes of any smaller sizes have an equal opportunity to form, without being either favored or excluded. To focus only on the properties of mechanical floe size redistribution, the FSD theory is implemented in a simplified ITD and FSD sea ice model for idealized numerical experiments. Model results show that the simulated cumulative floe number distribution (CFND) follows a power law as observed by satellites and airborne surveys. The simulated values of the exponent of the power law, with varying levels of ice breakups, are also in the range of the observations. It is found that floe size redistribution and the resulting FSD and mean floe size do not depend on how floe size categories are partitioned over a given floe size range. The ability to explicitly simulate multicategory FSD and ITD together may help to incorporate additional model physics, such as FSD-dependent ice mechanics, surface exchange of heat, mass, and momentum, and wave-ice interactions.

  20. Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction Does Not Explain All Regional Perfusion Redistribution in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Vanessa J; Hibbert, Kathryn A; Kohli, Puja; Kone, Mamary; Greenblatt, Elliot E; Venegas, Jose G; Winkler, Tilo; Harris, R Scott

    2017-10-01

    Regional hypoventilation in bronchoconstricted patients with asthma is spatially associated with reduced perfusion, which is proposed to result from hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). To determine the role of HPV in the regional perfusion redistribution in bronchoconstricted patients with asthma. Eight patients with asthma completed positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic lung imaging at baseline and after bronchoconstriction, breathing either room air or 80% oxygen (80% O 2 ) on separate days. Relative perfusion, specific ventilation (sV), and gas fraction (Fgas) in the 25% of the lung with the lowest specific ventilation (sV low ) and the remaining lung (sV high ) were quantified and compared. In the sV low region, bronchoconstriction caused a significant decrease in sV under both room air and 80% O 2 conditions (baseline vs. bronchoconstriction, mean ± SD, 1.02 ± 0.20 vs. 0.35 ± 0.19 and 1.03 ± 0.20 vs. 0.32 ± 0.16, respectively; P < 0.05). In the sV low region, relative perfusion decreased after bronchoconstriction under room air conditions and also, to a lesser degree, under 80% O 2 conditions (1.02 ± 0.19 vs. 0.72 ± 0.08 [P < 0.001] and 1.08 ± 0.19 vs. 0.91 ± 0.12 [P < 0.05], respectively). The Fgas increased after bronchoconstriction under room air conditions only (0.99 ± 0.04 vs. 1.00 ± 0.02; P < 0.05). The sV low subregion analysis indicated that some of the reduction in relative perfusion after bronchoconstriction under 80% O 2 conditions occurred as a result of the presence of regional hypoxia. However, relative perfusion was also significantly reduced in sV low subregions that were hyperoxic under 80% O 2 conditions. HPV is not the only mechanism that contributes to perfusion redistribution in bronchoconstricted patients with asthma, suggesting that another nonhypoxia mechanism also contributes. We propose that this nonhypoxia mechanism may be either direct

  1. Organic matter mineralization and trace element post-depositional redistribution in Western Siberia thermokarst lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audry, S.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Shirokova, L. S.; Kirpotin, S. N.; Dupré, B.

    2011-11-01

    This study reports the very first results on high-resolution sampling of sediments and their porewaters from three thermokarst (thaw) lakes representing different stages of ecosystem development located within the Nadym-Pur interfluve of the Western Siberia plain. Up to present time, the lake sediments of this and other permafrost-affected regions remain unexplored regarding their biogeochemical behavior. The aim of this study was to (i) document the early diagenesic processes in order to assess their impact on the organic carbon stored in the underlying permafrost, and (ii) characterize the post-depositional redistribution of trace elements and their impact on the water column. The estimated organic carbon (OC) stock in thermokarst lake sediments of 14 ± 2 kg m-2 is low compared to that reported for peat soils from the same region and denotes intense organic matter (OM) mineralization. Mineralization of OM in the thermokarst lake sediments proceeds under anoxic conditions in all the three lakes. In the course of the lake development, a shift in mineralization pathways from nitrate and sulfate to Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides as the main terminal electron acceptors in the early diagenetic reactions was suggested. This shift was likely promoted by the diagenetic consumption of nitrate and sulfate and their gradual depletion in the water column due to progressively decreasing frozen peat lixiviation occurring at the lake's borders. Trace elements were mobilized from host phases (OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides) and partly sequestered in the sediment in the form of authigenic Fe-sulfides. Arsenic and Sb cycling was also closely linked to that of OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides. Shallow diagenetic enrichment of particulate Sb was observed in the less mature stages. As a result of authigenic sulfide precipitation, the sediments of the early stage of ecosystem development were a sink for water column Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Sb. In contrast, at all stages of ecosystem development

  2. Organic matter mineralization and trace element post-depositional redistribution in Western Siberia thermokarst lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audry, S.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Shirokova, L. S.; Kirpotin, S. N.; Dupré, B.

    2011-08-01

    This study reports the very first results on high-resolution sampling of sediments and their porewaters from three thermokarst (thaw) lakes representing different stages of ecosystem development located within the Nadym-Pur interfluve of the Western Siberia plain. Up to present time, the lake sediments of this and other permafrost-affected regions remain unexplored regarding their biogeochemical behavior. The aim of this study was to (i) document the early diagenesic processes in order to assess their impact on the organic carbon stored in the underlying permafrost, and (ii) characterize the post-depositional redistribution of trace elements and their impact on the water column. The estimated organic carbon (OC) stock in thermokarst lake sediments of 14 ± 2 kg m-2 is low compared to that reported for peat soils from the same region and denotes intense organic matter (OM) mineralization. Mineralization of OM in the thermokarst lake sediments proceeds under anoxic conditions in all the three lakes. In the course of the lake development, a shift in mineralization pathways was evidenced from nitrate and sulfate to Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides as the main terminal electron acceptors in the early diagenetic reactions. This shift was promoted by the diagenetic consumption of nitrate and sulfate and their gradual depletion in the water column due to progressively decreasing frozen peat lixiviation occurring at the lake's borders. Trace elements were mobilized from host phases (OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides) and partly sequestered in the sediment in the form of authigenic Fe-sulfides. Arsenic and Sb cycling was also closely linked to that of OM and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides. Shallow diagenetic enrichment of particulate Sb was observed in the less mature stages. As a result of authigenic sulfide precipitation, the sediments of the early stage of ecosystem development were a sink for water column Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Sb. In contrast, at all stages of ecosystem development, the

  3. Fat redistribution following suction lipectomy: defense of body fat and patterns of restoration.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Teri L; Kittelson, John M; Law, Christopher K; Ketch, Lawrence L; Stob, Nicole R; Lindstrom, Rachel C; Scherzinger, Ann; Stamm, Elizabeth R; Eckel, Robert H

    2011-07-01

    No randomized studies in humans have examined whether fat returns after removal or where it returns. We undertook a prospective, randomized-controlled trial of suction lipectomy in nonobese women to determine if adipose tissue (AT) is defended and if so, the anatomic pattern of redistribution. Healthy women with disproportionate AT depots (lower abdomen, hips, or thighs) were enrolled. Baseline body composition measurements included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (a priori primary outcome), abdominal/limb circumferences, subcutaneous skinfold thickness, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (torso/thighs). Participants (n = 32; 36 ± 1 year) were randomized to small-volume liposuction (n = 14, mean BMI: 24 ± 2 kg/m(2)) or control (n=18, mean BMI: 25 ± 2) following baseline. Surgery group participants underwent liposuction within 2-4 weeks. Identical measurements were repeated at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year later. Participants agreed not to make lifestyle changes while enrolled. Between-group differences were adjusted for baseline level of the outcome variable. After 6 weeks, percent body fat (%BF) by DXA was decreased by 2.1% in the lipectomy group and by 0.28% in the control group (adjusted difference (AD): -1.82%; 95% confidence interval (CI): -2.79% to -0.85%; P = 0.0002). This difference was smaller at 6 months, and by 1 year was no longer significant (0.59% (control) vs. -0.41% (lipectomy); AD: -1.00%; CI: -2.65 to 0.64; P = 0.23). AT reaccumulated differently across various sites. After 1 year the thigh region remained reduced (0.77% (control) vs. -1.83% (lipectomy); AD: -2.59%; CI: -3.91 to -1.28; P = 0.0001), but AT reaccumulated in the abdominal region (0.64% (control) vs. 0.42% (lipectomy); AD: -0.22; CI: -2.35 to 1.91; P = 0.84). Following suction lipectomy, BF was restored and redistributed from the thigh to the abdomen.

  4. Biomass burning drives atmospheric nutrient redistribution within forested peatlands in Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponette-González, Alexandra G.; Curran, Lisa M.; Pittman, Alice M.; Carlson, Kimberly M.; Steele, Bethel G.; Ratnasari, Dessy; Mujiman; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2016-08-01

    Biomass burning plays a critical role not only in atmospheric emissions, but also in the deposition and redistribution of biologically important nutrients within tropical landscapes. We quantified the influence of fire on biogeochemical fluxes of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and sulfur (S) in a 12 ha forested peatland in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Total (inorganic + organic) N, {{{{NO}}}3}- -N, {{{{NH}}}4}+ -N, total P, {{{{PO}}}4}3- -P, and {{{{SO}}}4}2- -S fluxes were measured in throughfall and bulk rainfall weekly from July 2013 to September 2014. To identify fire events, we used concentrations of particulate matter (PM10) and MODIS Active Fire Product counts within 20 and 100 km radius buffers surrounding the site. Dominant sources of throughfall nutrient deposition were explored using cluster and back-trajectory analysis. Our findings show that this Bornean peatland receives some of the highest P (7.9 kg {{{{PO}}}4}3- -P ha-1yr-1) and S (42 kg {{{{SO}}}4}2- -S ha-1yr-1) deposition reported globally, and that N deposition (8.7 kg inorganic N ha-1yr-1) exceeds critical load limits suggested for tropical forests. Six major dry periods and associated fire events occurred during the study. Seventy-eight percent of fires within 20 km and 40% within 100 km of the site were detected within oil palm plantation leases (industrial agriculture) on peatlands. These fires had a disproportionate impact on below-canopy nutrient fluxes. Post-fire throughfall events contributed >30% of the total inorganic N ({{{{NO}}}3}- -N + {{{{NH}}}4}+ -N) and {{{{PO}}}4}3- -P flux to peatland soils during the study period. Our results indicate that biomass burning associated with agricultural peat fires is a major source of N, P, and S in throughfall and could rival industrial pollution as an input to these systems during major fire years. Given the sheer magnitude of fluxes reported here, fire-related redistribution of nutrients may have significant fertilizing or acidifying effects on

  5. Redistribution Principle Approach for Evaluation of Seismic Active Earth Pressure Behind Retaining Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskar, A. D.; Madhekar, S. N.; Phatak, D. R.

    2017-11-01

    The knowledge of seismic active earth pressure behind the rigid retaining wall is very essential in the design of retaining wall in earthquake prone regions. Commonly used Mononobe-Okabe (MO) method considers pseudo-static approach. Recently there are many pseudo-dynamic methods used to evaluate the seismic earth pressure. However, available pseudo-static and pseudo-dynamic methods do not incorporate the effect of wall movement on the earth pressure distribution. Dubrova (Interaction between soils and structures, Rechnoi Transport, Moscow, 1963) was the first, who considered such effect and till date, it is used for cohesionless soil, without considering the effect of seismicity. In this paper, Dubrova's model based on redistribution principle, considering the seismic effect has been developed. It is further used to compute the distribution of seismic active earth pressure, in a more realistic manner, by considering the effect of wall movement on the earth pressure, as it is displacement based method. The effects of a wide range of parameters like soil friction angle (ϕ), wall friction angle (δ), horizontal and vertical seismic acceleration coefficients (kh and kv); on seismic active earth pressure (Kae) have been studied. Results are presented for comparison of pseudo-static and pseudo-dynamic methods, to highlight the realistic, non-linearity of seismic active earth pressure distribution. The current study results in the variation of Kae with kh in the same manner as that of MO method and Choudhury and Nimbalkar (Geotech Geol Eng 24(5):1103-1113, 2006) study. To increase in ϕ, there is a reduction in static as well as seismic earth pressure. Also, by keeping constant ϕ value, as kh increases from 0 to 0.3, earth pressure increases; whereas as δ increases, active earth pressure decreases. The seismic active earth pressure coefficient (Kae) obtained from the present study is approximately same as that obtained by previous researchers. Though seismic earth

  6. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOEpatents

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  7. Aeration Zone Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, B.

    The International Symposium on Recent Investigations in the Zone of Aeration (RIZA) was organized by the Institute for Hydrogeology and Hydrochemistry of the Technical University of Munich and held October 1-5, 1984, in the lecture halls of the Grosshadern Klinik in Munich, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). P. Udluft, B. Merkel, and K.-H. Prüsl, all of the university, were responsible for the organization of the symposium, which was under the patronage of K.-E. Quentin. There were over 200 participants from 22 different countries, among them Australia, Canada, China, India, and the United States. The topics of the symposium were the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes in the unsaturated zone, the region between the surface and the groundwater level. Here a number of complex processes occur that on the one hand are of natural origin and on the other hand are influenced by human activities in a number of ways.

  8. Crash characteristics at work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    Work zones tend to cause hazardous conditions for drivers and construction workers since they generate conflicts between construction activities and traffic. A clear understanding of the characteristics of work zone crashes will enhance the selection...

  9. Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System water quality modeling and decision support system designed for environmental impact assessment of mixing zones resulting from wastewater discharge from point sources

  10. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  11. Work zone intrusion alarm effectiveness.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-09-01

    16. Abstract : The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) commissioned a study to evaluate how : effective a work zone safety device known as the SonoBlaster! Work Zone Intrusion Alarm would be : in protecting maintenance workers fro...

  12. Trojans in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Dvorak, Rudolf; Erdi, Balint; Sándor, Zsolt

    2005-10-01

    With the aid of numerical experiments we examined the dynamical stability of fictitious terrestrial planets in 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jovian-like planets of extrasolar planetary systems. In our stability study of the so-called "Trojan" planets in the habitable zone, we used the restricted three-body problem with different mass ratios of the primary bodies. The application of the three-body problem showed that even massive Trojan planets can be stable in the 1:1 mean motion resonance. From the 117 extrasolar planetary systems only 11 systems were found with one giant planet in the habitable zone. Out of this sample set we chose four planetary systems--HD17051, HD27442, HD28185, and HD108874--for further investigation. To study the orbital behavior of the stable zone in the different systems, we used direct numerical computations (Lie Integration Method) that allowed us to determine the escape times and the maximum eccentricity of the fictitious "Trojan planets."

  13. The role of vigorous current systems in the Southeast Indian Ocean in redistributing deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Müller, Dietmar; Hogg, Andrew; Spence, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the transport of modern deep-sea sediment is critical for accurate models of climate-ocean history and the widespread use of the sedimentological record as a proxy for productivity where the connection between biogenic seafloor lithologies and sea-surface is tenuous. The Southern Ocean, where diatoms contribute the bulk of pelagic material to the seafloor forming an extensive belt of diatom ooze, is an exemplar. However, most of the key studies on large-scale sediment reworking in the Southern Ocean were conducted in the 1970s when relatively little was known about the oceanography of this region. At this time even our knowledge of the bathymetry and tectonic fabric, which underpin the distribution of deep-sea currents, were fairly general. The record of widespread regional disconformities in the abyssal plains of the Southern Ocean is well-established and indicates extensive erosion of deep-sea sediments throughout the Quaternary. Here we combine a high-resolution numerical model of bottom currents with sedimentological data to constrain the redistribution of sediment across the abyssal plains and adjacent mid-ocean ridges in the Southern Ocean. We use the global ocean-sea ice model (GFDL-MOM01) to simulate ocean circulation at a resolution that results in realistic velocities throughout the water column, and is ideal for estimating interaction between time-dependent bottom currents and ocean bathymetry. 230Th-normalized vertical sediment rain rates for 63 sites in the Southeast Indian Ocean, combined with satellite data-derived surface productivity, demonstrate that a wide belt of fast sedimentation rates (> 5.5 cm/kyr) along the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) occurs in a region of low surface productivity bounded by two major disconformity fields associated with the Kerguelen Plateau to the east and the Macquarie Ridge to the west. Our ocean circulation model illustrates that the disconformity fields occur in regions of intense bottom current

  14. Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Line; Idorn, Manja; Olofsson, Gitte H; Lauenborg, Britt; Nookaew, Intawat; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Becker, Jürgen C; Pedersen, Katrine S; Dethlefsen, Christine; Nielsen, Jens; Gehl, Julie; Pedersen, Bente K; Thor Straten, Per; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-03-08

    Regular exercise reduces the risk of cancer and disease recurrence. Yet the mechanisms behind this protection remain to be elucidated. In this study, tumor-bearing mice randomized to voluntary wheel running showed over 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across five different tumor models. Microarray analysis revealed training-induced upregulation of pathways associated with immune function. NK cell infiltration was significantly increased in tumors from running mice, whereas depletion of NK cells enhanced tumor growth and blunted the beneficial effects of exercise. Mechanistic analyses showed that NK cells were mobilized by epinephrine, and blockade of β-adrenergic signaling blunted training-dependent tumor inhibition. Moreover, epinephrine induced a selective mobilization of IL-6-sensitive NK cells, and IL-6-blocking antibodies blunted training-induced tumor suppression, intratumoral NK cell infiltration, and NK cell activation. Together, these results link exercise, epinephrine, and IL-6 to NK cell mobilization and redistribution, and ultimately to control of tumor growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Insolubility and redistribution of GPI-anchored proteins at the cell surface after detergent treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, S; Maxfield, F R

    1995-01-01

    A diverse set of cell surface eukaryotic proteins including receptors, enzymes, and adhesion molecules have a glycosylphosphoinositol-lipid (GPI) modification at the carboxy-terminal end that serves as their sole means of membrane anchoring. These GPI-anchored proteins are poorly solubilized in nonionic detergent such as Triton X-100. In addition these detergent-insoluble complexes from plasma membranes are significantly enriched in several cytoplasmic proteins including nonreceptor-type tyrosine kinases and caveolin/VIP-21, a component of the striated coat of caveolae. These observations have suggested that the detergent-insoluble complexes represent purified caveolar membrane preparations. However, we have recently shown by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy that GPI-anchored proteins are diffusely distributed at the cell surface but may be enriched in caveolae only after cross-linking. Although caveolae occupy only a small fraction of the cell surface (< 4%), almost all of the GPI-anchored protein at the cell surface becomes incorporated into detergent-insoluble low-density complexes. In this paper we show that upon detergent treatment the GPI-anchored proteins are redistributed into a significantly more clustered distribution in the remaining membranous structures. These results show that GPI-anchored proteins are intrinsically detergent-insoluble in the milieu of the plasma membrane, and their co-purification with caveolin is not reflective of their native distribution. These results also indicate that the association of caveolae, GPI-anchored proteins, and signalling proteins must be critically re-examined. Images PMID:7579703

  16. Coupled ion redistribution and electronic breakdown in low-alkali boroaluminosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Doo Hyun, E-mail: cooldoo@add.re.kr; Randall, Clive, E-mail: car4@psu.edu; Furman, Eugene, E-mail: euf1@psu.edu

    2015-08-28

    Dielectrics with high electrostatic energy storage must have exceptionally high dielectric breakdown strength at elevated temperatures. Another important consideration in designing a high performance dielectric is understanding the thickness and temperature dependence of breakdown strengths. Here, we develop a numerical model which assumes a coupled ionic redistribution and electronic breakdown is applied to predict the breakdown strength of low-alkali glass. The ionic charge transport of three likely charge carriers (Na{sup +}, H{sup +}/H{sub 3}O{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}) was used to calculate the ionic depletion width in low-alkali boroaluminosilicate which can further be used for the breakdown modeling. This model predictsmore » the breakdown strengths in the 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9 }V/m range and also accounts for the experimentally observed two distinct thickness dependent regions for breakdown. Moreover, the model successfully predicts the temperature dependent breakdown strength for low-alkali glass from room temperature up to 150 °C. This model showed that breakdown strengths were governed by minority charge carriers in the form of ionic transport (mostly sodium) in these glasses.« less

  17. Measurements and modelling of fast-ion redistribution due to resonant MHD instabilities in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. M.; Cecconello, M.; McClements, K. G.; Klimek, I.; Akers, R. J.; Boeglin, W. U.; Keeling, D. L.; Meakins, A. J.; Perez, R. V.; Sharapov, S. E.; Turnyanskiy, M.; the MAST Team

    2015-12-01

    The results of a comprehensive investigation into the effects of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) and energetic particle modes on the NBI-generated fast-ion population in MAST plasmas are reported. Fast-ion redistribution due to frequency-chirping TAE in the range 50 kHz-100 kHz and frequency-chirping energetic particle modes known as fishbones in the range 20 kHz-50 kHz, is observed. TAE and fishbones are also observed to cause losses of fast ions from the plasma. The spatial and temporal evolution of the fast-ion distribution is determined using a fission chamber, a radially-scanning collimated neutron flux monitor, a fast-ion deuterium alpha spectrometer and a charged fusion product detector. Modelling using the global transport analysis code Transp, with ad hoc anomalous diffusion and fishbone loss models introduced, reproduces the coarsest features of the affected fast-ion distribution in the presence of energetic particle-driven modes. The spectrally and spatially resolved measurements show, however, that these models do not fully capture the effects of chirping modes on the fast-ion distribution.

  18. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, E.; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ding, W. X.; Johnson, C. A.; Lin, L.

    2016-05-01

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm with neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q0 by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].

  19. Sch proteins are localized on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and are redistributed after tyrosine kinase receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, L V; Lanfrancone, L; Migliaccio, E; Zompetta, C; Pelicci, G; Salcini, A E; Falini, B; Pelicci, P G; Torrisi, M R

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular localization of Shc proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in normal cells and cells expressing the epidermal growth factor receptor or the EGFR/erbB2 chimera. In unstimulated cells, the immunolabeling was localized in the central perinuclear area of the cell and mostly associated with the cytosolic side of rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon epidermal growth factor treatment and receptor tyrosine kinase activation, the immunolabeling became peripheral and was found to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane and endocytic structures, such as coated pits and endosomes, and with the peripheral cytosol. Receptor activation in cells expressing phosphorylation-defective mutants of Shc and erbB-2 kinase showed that receptor autophosphorylation, but not Shc phosphorylation, is required for redistribution of Shc proteins. The rough endoplasmic reticulum localization of Shc proteins in unstimulated cells and their massive recruitment to the plasma membrane, endocytic structures, and peripheral cytosol following receptor tyrosine kinase activation could account for multiple putative functions of the adaptor protein. PMID:8628261

  20. Chromatin Redistribution of the DEK Oncoprotein Represses hTERT Transcription in Leukemias12

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Maroun; Thenoz, Morgan; Capraro, Valérie; Robin, Jean-Philippe; Pinatel, Christiane; Lancon, Agnès; Galia, Perrine; Sibon, David; Thomas, Xavier; Ducastelle-Lepretre, Sophie; Nicolini, Franck; El-Hamri, Mohamed; Chelghoun, Youcef; Wattel, Eric; Mortreux, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous factors have been found to modulate hTERT transcription, the mechanism of its repression in certain leukemias remains unknown. We show here that DEK represses hTERT transcription through its enrichment on the hTERT promoter in cells from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not acute lymphocytic leukemias where hTERT is overexpressed. We isolated DEK from the hTERT promoter incubated with nuclear extracts derived from fresh acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells and from cells expressing Tax, an hTERT repressor encoded by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1. In addition to the recruitment of DEK, the displacement of two potent known hTERT transactivators from the hTERT promoter characterized both AML cells and Tax-expressing cells. Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays permitted to map the region that supports the repressive effect of DEK on hTERT transcription, which was proportionate to the level of DEK-promoter association but not with the level of DEK expression. Besides hTERT repression, this context of chromatin redistribution of DEK was found to govern about 40% of overall transcriptional modifications, including those of cancer-prone genes. In conclusion, DEK emerges as an hTERT repressor shared by various leukemia subtypes and seems involved in the deregulation of numerous genes associated with leukemogenesis. PMID:24563617

  1. Development of multi-metal interaction model for Daphnia magna: Significance of metallothionein in cellular redistribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangrui; Liu, Jianyu; Tan, Qiaoguo; Ren, Jinqian; Liang, Dingyuan; Fan, Wenhong

    2018-04-30

    Despite the great progress made in metal-induced toxicity mechanisms, a critical knowledge gap still exists in predicting adverse effects of heavy metals on living organisms in the natural environment, particularly during exposure to multi-metals. In this study, a multi-metal interaction model of Daphnia manga was developed in an effort to provide reasonable explanations regarding the joint effects resulting from exposure to multi-metals. Metallothionein (MT), a widely used biomarker, was selected. In this model, MT was supposed to play the role of a crucial transfer protein rather than detoxifying protein. Therefore, competitive complexation of metals to MT could highly affect the cellular metal redistribution. Thus, competitive complexation of MT in D. magna with metals like Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ and Cu 2+ was qualitatively studied. The results suggested that Cd 2+ had the highest affinity towards MT, followed by Pb 2+ and Cu 2+ . On the other hand, the combination of MT with Cu 2+ appeared to alter its structure which resulted in higher affinity towards Pb 2+ . Overall, the predicted bioaccumulation of metals under multi-metal exposure was consisted with earlier reported studies. This model provided an alternative angle for joint effect through a combination of kinetic process and internal interactions, which could help to develop future models predicting toxicity to multi-metal exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Drag reduction by polymers in turbulent channel flows: Energy redistribution between invariant empirical modes.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Elisabetta; Casciola, Carlo M; L'vov, Victor S; Piva, Renzo; Procaccia, Itamar

    2003-05-01

    We address the phenomenon of drag reduction by a dilute polymeric additive to turbulent flows, using direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the FENE-P model of viscoelastic flows. It had been amply demonstrated that these model equations reproduce the phenomenon, but the results of DNS were not analyzed so far with the goal of interpreting the phenomenon. In order to construct a useful framework for the understanding of drag reduction we initiate in this paper an investigation of the most important modes that are sustained in the viscoelastic and Newtonian turbulent flows, respectively. The modes are obtained empirically using the Karhunen-Loéve decomposition, allowing us to compare the most energetic modes in the viscoelastic and Newtonian flows. The main finding of the present study is that the spatial profile of the most energetic modes is hardly changed between the two flows. What changes is the energy associated with these modes, and their relative ordering in the decreasing order from the most energetic to the least. Modes that are highly excited in one flow can be strongly suppressed in the other, and vice versa. This dramatic energy redistribution is an important clue to the mechanism of drag reduction as is proposed in this paper. In particular, there is an enhancement of the energy containing modes in the viscoelastic flow compared to the Newtonian one; drag reduction is seen in the energy containing modes rather than the dissipative modes, as proposed in some previous theories.

  3. A first generation dynamic ingress, redistribution and transport model of soil track-in: DIRT.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D L

    2008-12-01

    This work introduces a spatially resolved quantitative model, based on conservation of mass and first order transfer kinetics, for following the transport and redistribution of outdoor soil to, and within, the indoor environment by track-in on footwear. Implementations of the DIRT model examined the influence of room size, rug area and location, shoe size, and mass transfer coefficients for smooth and carpeted floor surfaces using the ratio of mass loading on carpeted to smooth floor surfaces as a performance metric. Results showed that in the limit for large numbers of random steps the dual aspects of deposition to and track-off from the carpets govern this ratio. Using recently obtained experimental measurements, historic transport and distribution parameters, cleaning efficiencies for the different floor surfaces, and indoor dust deposition rates to provide model boundary conditions, DIRT predicts realistic floor surface loadings. The spatio-temporal variability in model predictions agrees with field observations and suggests that floor surface dust loadings are constantly in flux; steady state distributions are hardly, if ever, achieved.

  4. The Complete Redistribution Approximation in Optically Thick Line-Driven Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayley, K. G.; Onifer, A. J.

    2001-05-01

    Wolf-Rayet winds are thought to exhibit large momentum fluxes, which has in part been explained by ionization stratification in the wind. However, it the cause of high mass loss, not high momentum flux, that remains largely a mystery, because standard models fail to achieve sufficient acceleration near the surface where the mass-loss rate is set. We consider a radiative transfer approximation that allows for the dynamics of optically thick Wolf-Rayet winds to be modeled without detailed treatment of the radiation field, called the complete redistribution approximation. In it, it is assumed that thermalization processes cause the photon frequencies to be completely randomized over the course of propagating through the wind, which allows the radiation field to be treated statistically rather than in detail. Thus the approach is similar to the statistical treatment of the line list used in the celebrated CAK approach. The results differ from the effectively gray treatment in that the radiation field is influenced by the line distribution, and the role of gaps in the line distribution is enhanced. The ramifications for the driving of large mass-loss rates is explored.

  5. Internest food sharing within wood ant colonies: resource redistribution behavior in a complex system

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Elva J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Resource sharing is an important cooperative behavior in many animals. Sharing resources is particularly important in social insect societies, as division of labor often results in most individuals including, importantly, the reproductives, relying on other members of the colony to provide resources. Sharing resources between individuals is therefore fundamental to the success of social insects. Resource sharing is complicated if a colony inhabits several spatially separated nests, a nesting strategy common in many ant species. Resources must be shared not only between individuals in a single nest but also between nests. We investigated the behaviors facilitating resource redistribution between nests in a dispersed-nesting population of wood ant Formica lugubris. We marked ants, in the field, as they transported resources along the trails between nests of a colony, to investigate how the behavior of individual workers relates to colony-level resource exchange. We found that workers from a particular nest “forage” to other nests in the colony, treating them as food sources. Workers treating other nests as food sources means that simple, pre-existing foraging behaviors are used to move resources through a distributed system. It may be that this simple behavioral mechanism facilitates the evolution of this complex life-history strategy. PMID:27004016

  6. Ideas and perspectives: hydrothermally driven redistribution and sequestration of early Archaean biomass - the "hydrothermal pump hypothesis"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Jan-Peter; Thiel, Volker; Bauersachs, Thorsten; Mißbach, Helge; Reinhardt, Manuel; Schäfer, Nadine; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.; Reitner, Joachim

    2018-03-01

    Archaean hydrothermal chert veins commonly contain abundant organic carbon of uncertain origin (abiotic vs. biotic). In this study, we analysed kerogen contained in a hydrothermal chert vein from the ca. 3.5 Ga Dresser Formation (Pilbara Craton, Western Australia). Catalytic hydropyrolysis (HyPy) of this kerogen yielded n-alkanes up to n-C22, with a sharp decrease in abundance beyond n-C18. This distribution ( ≤ n-C18) is very similar to that observed in HyPy products of recent bacterial biomass, which was used as reference material, whereas it differs markedly from the unimodal distribution of abiotic compounds experimentally formed via Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis. We therefore propose that the organic matter in the Archaean chert veins has a primarily microbial origin. The microbially derived organic matter accumulated in anoxic aquatic (surface and/or subsurface) environments and was then assimilated, redistributed and sequestered by the hydrothermal fluids (hydrothermal pump hypothesis).

  7. Hydraulic redistribution of water from Pinus ponderosa trees to seedlings: evidence for an ectomycorrhizal pathway.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeffrey M; Brooks, J Renée; Meinzer, Frederick C; Eberhart, Joyce L

    2008-01-01

    While there is strong evidence for hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by trees, it is not known if common mycorrhizal networks (CMN) can facilitate HR from mature trees to seedlings under field conditions. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seedlings were planted into root-excluding 61-microm mesh barrier chambers buried in an old-growth pine forest. After 2 yr, several mature trees were cut and water enriched in D(2)O and acid fuchsin dye was applied to the stumps. Fine roots and mycorrhizal root tips of source trees became heavily dyed, indicating reverse sap flow in root xylem transported water from stems throughout root systems to the root hyphal mantle that interfaces with CMN. Within 3 d, D(2)O was found in mesh-chamber seedling foliage > 1 m from source trees; after 3 wk, eight of 10 mesh-chamber seedling stem samples were significantly enriched above background levels. Average mesh-chamber enrichment was 1.8 x greater than that for two seedlings for which the connections to CMN were broken by trenching before D(2)O application. Even small amounts of water provided to mycorrhizas by HR may maintain hyphal viability and facilitate nutrient uptake under drying conditions, which may provide an advantage to seedlings hydraulically linked by CMN to large trees.

  8. Mitosis-Specific Mechanosensing and Contractile Protein Redistribution Control Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    Effler, Janet C.; Kee, Yee-Seir; Berk, Jason M.; Tran, Minhchau N.; Iglesias, Pablo A.; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Because cell division failure is deleterious, promoting tumorigenesis in mammals [1], cells utilize numerous mechanisms to control their cell-cycle progression [2–4]. Though cell division is considered a well-ordered sequence of biochemical events [5], cytokinesis, an inherently mechanical process, must also be mechanically controlled to ensure that two equivalent daughter cells are produced with high fidelity. Since cells respond to their mechanical environment [6, 7], we hypothesized that cells utilize mechanosensing and mechanical feedback to sense and correct shape asymmetries during cytokinesis. Because the mitotic spindle and myosin-II are vital to cell division [8, 9], we explored their roles in responding to shape perturbations during cell division. We demonstrate that the contractile proteins, myosin-II and cortexillin-I, redistribute in response to intrinsic and externally induced shape asymmetries. In early cytokinesis, mechanical load overrides spindle cues and slows cytokinesis progression while contractile proteins accumulate and correct shape asymmetries. In late cytokinesis, mechanical perturbation also directs contractile proteins but without apparently disrupting cytokinesis. Significantly, this response only occurs during anaphase through cytokinesis, does not require microtubules, is independent of spindle orientation, but is dependent on myosin-II. Our data provide evidence for a mechanosensory system that directs contractile proteins to regulate cell shape during mitosis. PMID:17027494

  9. Redistribution of wastewater alkalinity with a microbial fuel cell to support nitrification of reject water.

    PubMed

    Modin, Oskar; Fukushi, Kensuke; Rabaey, Korneel; Rozendal, René A; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2011-04-01

    In wastewater treatment plants, the reject water from the sludge treatment processes typically contains high ammonium concentrations, which constitute a significant internal nitrogen load in the plant. Often, a separate nitrification reactor is used to treat the reject water before it is fed back into the plant. The nitrification reaction consumes alkalinity, which has to be replenished by dosing e.g. NaOH or Ca(OH)(2). In this study, we investigated the use of a two-compartment microbial fuel cell (MFC) to redistribute alkalinity from influent wastewater to support nitrification of reject water. In an MFC, alkalinity is consumed in the anode compartment and produced in the cathode compartment. We use this phenomenon and the fact that the influent wastewater flow is many times larger than the reject water flow to transfer alkalinity from the influent wastewater to the reject water. In a laboratory-scale system, ammonium oxidation of synthetic reject water passed through the cathode chamber of an MFC, increased from 73.8 ± 8.9 mgN/L under open-circuit conditions to 160.1 ± 4.8 mgN/L when a current of 1.96 ± 0.37 mA (15.1 mA/L total MFC liquid volume) was flowing through the MFC. These results demonstrated the positive effect of an MFC on ammonium oxidation of alkalinity-limited reject water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modeling of stress/strain behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites including stress redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is presented for nonlinear analyses which incorporates microstress redistribution due to progressive fracture in ceramic matrix composites. This procedure facilitates an accurate simulation of the stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites up to failure. The nonlinearity in the material behavior is accounted for at the constituent (fiber/matrix/interphase) level. This computational procedure is a part of recent upgrades to CEMCAN (Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code. The fiber substructuring technique in CEMCAN is used to monitor the damage initiation and progression as the load increases. The room-temperature tensile stress-strain curves for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix unidirectional and angle-ply laminates are simulated and compared with experimentally observed stress-strain behavior. Comparison between the predicted stress/strain behavior and experimental stress/strain curves is good. Collectively the results demonstrate that CEMCAN computer code provides the user with an effective computational tool to simulate the behavior of ceramic matrix composites.

  11. Possible Phosphate Redistribution on the Martian Surface: Implication From Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibus, G.; Haubold, R.; Jagoutz, E.

    2001-12-01

    The chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils as measured with the APXS (Alpha Proton X-ray Spectrometer) of the Mars Pathfinder Mission are very different [1]. Surprisingly, only small differences of the phosphorous concentrations between soils and rocks were found. The P concentration of about 4000 ppm is similar to that measured in basaltic shergottites. Phosphates are the host mineral for the REE, Th and U. Leach experiments with slightly acidified brines on basaltic shergottites easily dissolved more than a half of the REEs and U whereas K remained insoluble. Therefore, we suggested the possibility of alteration and mobilization of phosphates in the Martian environment with the result of an enrichment of U, Th, and consequently P on the surface. However, the APXS measured no P enrichment in rocks and soil of the Martian crust, whereas a high Th concentration on the surface was measured with the gamma-spectroscopy from orbit by Mars-5 and Phobos-2 [2]. With leach experiments on terrestrial samples we studied the solubility of U and Th as in the case of shergottites, but also that of phosphorous. Furthermore, simulation experiments of reactions between slightly acidified calcium-phosphate solution and different terrestrial rock types were performed to clarify the redistribution of P at the Martian surface with its complex weathering history. Ref.: [1] Brueckner J. et al. (2001) Lunar Planet. Science. XXXII, 1293; [2] Surkov Yu. A. et al. (1989) Nature 341, 595.

  12. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, E.; Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706; Anderson, J. K.

    2016-05-15

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm withmore » neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q{sub 0} by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].« less

  13. Computational model of cerebral blood flow redistribution during cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verisokin, Andrey Y.; Verveyko, Darya V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades modelling studies on cortical spreading depression (CSD) and migraine waves successfully contributed to formation of modern view on these fundamental phenomena of brain physiology. However, due to the extreme complexity of object under study (brain cortex) and the diversity of involved physiological pathways, the development of new mathematical models of CSD is still a very relevant and challenging research problem. In our study we follow the functional modelling approach aimed to map the action of known physiological pathways to the specific nonlinear mechanisms that govern formation and evolution of CSD wave patterns. Specifically, we address the role of cerebral blood flow (CBF) redistribution that is caused by excessive neuronal activity by means of neurovascular coupling and mediates a spatial pattern of oxygen and glucose delivery. This in turn changes the local metabolic status of neural tissue. To build the model we simplify the web of known cell-to-cell interactions within a neurovascular unit by selecting the most relevant ones, such as local neuron-induced elevation of extracellular potassium concentration and biphasic response of arteriole radius. We propose the lumped description of distance-dependent hemodynamic coupling that fits the most recent experimental findings.

  14. Hyperforin depletes synaptic vesicles content and induces compartmental redistribution of nerve ending monoamines.

    PubMed

    Roz, Netta; Rehavi, Moshe

    2004-10-22

    Hyperforin, a phloroglucinol derivative found in Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort) extracts has antidepressant properties in depressed patients. Hyperforin has a unique pharmacological profile and it inhibits uptake of biogenic monoamines as well as amino acid transmitters. We have recently showed that the monoamines uptake inhibition exerted by hyperforin is related to its ability to dissipate the pH gradient across the synaptic vesicle membrane thereby interfering with vesicular monoamines storage. In the present study we demonstrate that hyperforin induces dose-dependent efflux of preloaded [3H]5HT and [3H]DA from rat brain slices. Moreover, we show that hyperforin attenuates depolarization- dependent release of monoamines, while increasing monoamine release by amphetamine or fenfluramine. It is also demonstrated that preincubation of brain slices with reserpine is associated with dose- dependent blunting of efflux due to hyperforin. Our data indicate that hyperforin-induced efflux of [3H]5HT and [3H]DA reflect elevated cytoplasmic concentrations of the two monoamines secondary to the depletion of the synaptic vesicle content and the compartmental redistribution of nerve ending monoamines. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  15. POLARIZED LINE FORMATION IN MOVING ATMOSPHERES WITH PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION AND A WEAK MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N., E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in

    2015-10-10

    The dynamical state of the solar and stellar atmospheres depends on the macroscopic velocity fields prevailing within them. The presence of such velocity fields in the line formation regions strongly affects the polarized radiation field emerging from these atmospheres. Thus it becomes necessary to solve the radiative transfer equation for polarized lines in moving atmospheres. Solutions based on the “observer’s frame method” are computationally expensive to obtain, especially when partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in line scattering and large-amplitude velocity fields are taken into account. In this paper we present an efficient alternative method of solution, namely, the comoving frame technique,more » to solve the polarized PRD line formation problems in the presence of velocity fields. We consider one-dimensional planar isothermal atmospheres with vertical velocity fields. We present a study of the effect of velocity fields on the emergent linear polarization profiles formed in optically thick moving atmospheres. We show that the comoving frame method is far superior when compared to the observer’s frame method in terms of the computational speed and memory requirements.« less

  16. Loss of ISWI Function in Drosophila Nuclear Bodies Drives Cytoplasmic Redistribution of Drosophila TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Bonaccorso, Rosa; Li Greci, Lorenzo; Romano, Giulia; Sollazzo, Martina; Ingrassia, Antonia Maria Rita; Feiguin, Fabian; Corona, Davide F. V.; Onorati, Maria Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decade, evidence has identified a link between protein aggregation, RNA biology, and a subset of degenerative diseases. An important feature of these disorders is the cytoplasmic or nuclear aggregation of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Redistribution of RBPs, such as the human TAR DNA-binding 43 protein (TDP-43) from the nucleus to cytoplasmic inclusions is a pathological feature of several diseases. Indeed, sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration share as hallmarks ubiquitin-positive inclusions. Recently, the wide spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by RBPs functions’ alteration and loss was collectively named proteinopathies. Here, we show that TBPH (TAR DNA-binding protein-43 homolog), the Drosophila ortholog of human TDP-43 TAR DNA-binding protein-43, interacts with the arcRNA hsrω and with hsrω-associated hnRNPs. Additionally, we found that the loss of the omega speckles remodeler ISWI (Imitation SWI) changes the TBPH sub-cellular localization to drive a TBPH cytoplasmic accumulation. Our results, hence, identify TBPH as a new component of omega speckles and highlight a role of chromatin remodelers in hnRNPs nuclear compartmentalization. PMID:29617352

  17. Femtosecond laser structuring of silver-containing glass: Silver redistribution, selective etching, and surface topology engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Desmoulin, Jean-Charles; Petit, Yannick; Cardinal, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.cardinal@icmcb.cnrs.fr

    2015-12-07

    Femtosecond direct laser writing in silver-containing phosphate glasses allows for the three-dimensional (3D) implementation of complex photonic structures. Sample translation along or perpendicular to the direction of the beam propagation has been performed, which led to the permanent formation of fluorescent structures, either corresponding to a tubular shape or to two parallel planes at the vicinity of the interaction voxel, respectively. These optical features are related to significant modifications of the local material chemistry. Indeed, silver depletion areas with a diameter below 200 nm were evidenced at the center of the photo-produced structures while photo-produced luminescence properties are attributed to themore » formation of silver clusters around the multiphoton interaction voxel. The laser-triggered oxidation-reduction processes and the associated photo-induced silver redistribution are proposed to be at the origin of the observed original 3D luminescent structures. Thanks to such material structuring, surface engineering has been also demonstrated. Selective surface chemical etching of the glass has been obtained subsequently to laser writing at the location of the photo-produced structures, revealing features with nanometric depth profiles and radial dimensions strongly related to the spatial distributions of the silver clusters.« less

  18. Mode-specific vibrational excitation and energy redistribution after ultrafast intramolecular electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogiu, S.; Werncke, W.; Pfeiffer, M.; Dreyer, J.; Elsaesser, T.

    2000-07-01

    Vibrational relaxation in the electronic ground state initiated by intramolecular back-electron transfer (b-ET) of betaine-30 (B-30) is studied by picosecond time-resolved anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Measurements were carried out with B-30 dissolved in slowly as well as in rapidly relaxing solvents. We observed a risetime of the Raman band with the highest frequency near 1600 cm-1 which is close to the b-ET time τb-ET of B-30. For B-30 dissolved in propylene carbonate (τb-ET˜1 ps), the population of this mode exhibits a rise time of 1 ps whereas vibrational populations between 400 and 1400 cm-1 increase substantially slower. In contrast, in glycerol triacetin (τb-ET˜3.5 ps) and in ethanol (τb-ET˜6 ps) rise times of all modes are close to the respective b-ET times. Within the first few picoseconds, direct vibrational excitation through b-ET is favored for modes with the highest frequencies and high Franck-Condon factors. Later on, indirect channels of population due to vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) become effective. Thermal equilibrium populations of the Raman active modes are established within 10 to 15 ps after optical excitation.

  19. Arctic stratospheric dehydration - Part 1: Unprecedented observation of vertical redistribution of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaykin, S. M.; Engel, I.; Vömel, H.; Formanyuk, I. M.; Kivi, R.; Korshunov, L. I.; Krämer, M.; Lykov, A. D.; Meier, S.; Naebert, T.; Pitts, M. C.; Santee, M. L.; Spelten, N.; Wienhold, F. G.; Yushkov, V. A.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of water vapour, aerosols and clouds in the Arctic stratosphere in January and February 2010 carried out by in-situ instrumentation on balloon-sondes and high-altitude aircraft combined with satellite observations. The measurements provide unparalleled evidence of dehydration and rehydration due to gravitational settling of ice particles. An extreme cooling of the Arctic stratospheric vortex during the second half of January 2010 resulted in a rare synoptic-scale outbreak of ice PSCs (polar stratospheric clouds) detected remotely by the lidar aboard the CALIPSO satellite. The widespread occurrence of ice clouds was followed by sedimentation and consequent sublimation of ice particles, leading to vertical redistribution of water inside the vortex. A sequence of balloon and aircraft soundings with chilled mirror and Lyman-α hygrometers (CFH, FISH, FLASH) and backscatter sondes (COBALD) conducted in January 2010 within the LAPBIAT and RECONCILE campaigns captured various phases of this phenomenon: ice formation, irreversible dehydration and rehydration. Consistent observations of water vapour by these independent measurement techniques show clear signatures of irreversible dehydration of the vortex air by up to 1.6 ppmv in the 20-24 km altitude range and rehydration by up to 0.9 ppmv in a 1 km-thick layer below. Comparison with space-borne Aura MLS water vapour observations allow the spatiotemporal evolution of dehydrated air masses within the Arctic vortex to be derived and upscaled.

  20. REDISTRIBUTION OF ALKALINE ELEMENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH AQUEOUS ACTIVITY IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Takuya; Yoneda, Shigekazu, E-mail: hidaka@hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: s-yoneda@kahaku.go.jp

    2015-12-10

    It is known that the Sayama meteorite (CM2) shows an extensive signature for aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body, and that most of the primary minerals in the chondrules are replaced with phyllosilicates as the result of the aqueous alteration. In this paper, it is confirmed from the observation of two-dimensional Raman spectra that a part of olivine in a chondrule collected from the Sayama chondrite is serperntinized. Ion microprobe analysis of the chondrule showed that alkaline elements such as Rb and Cs are heterogeneously redistributed in the chondrule. The result of higher Rb and Cs contents in serpentinizedmore » phases in the chondrule rather than in other parts suggested the selective adsorption of alkaline elements into the serpentine in association with early aqueous activity on the meteorite parent body. Furthermore Ba isotopic analysis provided variations of {sup 135}Ba/{sup 138}Ba and {sup 137}Ba/{sup 138}Ba in the chondrule. This result was consistent with our previous isotopic data suggesting isotopic evidence for the existence of the presently extinct nuclide {sup 135}Cs in the Sayama meteorite, but the abundance of {sup 135}Cs in the solar system remains unclear because of large analytical uncertainties.« less

  1. Tropospheric Ozone Change from 1980 to 2010 Dominated by Equatorward Redistribution of Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yuqiang; Cooper, Owen R.; Gaudel, Audrey; Thompson, Anne M.; Nedelec, Philippe; Ogino, Shin-Ya; West, J. Jason

    2016-01-01

    Ozone is an important air pollutant at the surface, and the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Since 1980, anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors methane, non-methane volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides (NOx) have shifted from developed to developing regions. Emissions have thereby been redistributed equatorwards, where they are expected to have a stronger effect on the tropospheric ozone burden due to greater convection, reaction rates and NOx sensitivity. Here we use a global chemical transport model to simulate changes in tropospheric ozone concentrations from 1980 to 2010, and to separate the influences of changes in the spatial distribution of global anthropogenic emissions of short-lived pollutants, the magnitude of these emissions, and the global atmospheric methane concentration. We estimate that the increase in ozone burden due to the spatial distribution change slightly exceeds the combined influences of the increased emission magnitude and global methane. Emission increases in Southeast, East and South Asia may be most important for the ozone change, supported by an analysis of statistically significant increases in observed ozone above these regions. The spatial distribution of emissions dominates global tropospheric ozone, suggesting that the future ozone burden will be determined mainly by emissions from low latitudes.

  2. Improving the redistribution of the security lessons in healthcare: An evaluation of the Generic Security Template.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Johnson, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The recurrence of past security breaches in healthcare showed that lessons had not been effectively learned across different healthcare organisations. Recent studies have identified the need to improve learning from incidents and to share security knowledge to prevent future attacks. Generic Security Templates (GSTs) have been proposed to facilitate this knowledge transfer. The objective of this paper is to evaluate whether potential users in healthcare organisations can exploit the GST technique to share lessons learned from security incidents. We conducted a series of case studies to evaluate GSTs. In particular, we used a GST for a security incident in the US Veterans' Affairs Administration to explore whether security lessons could be applied in a very different Chinese healthcare organisation. The results showed that Chinese security professional accepted the use of GSTs and that cyber security lessons could be transferred to a Chinese healthcare organisation using this approach. The users also identified the weaknesses and strengths of GSTs, providing suggestions for future improvements. Generic Security Templates can be used to redistribute lessons learned from security incidents. Sharing cyber security lessons helps organisations consider their own practices and assess whether applicable security standards address concerns raised in previous breaches in other countries. The experience gained from this study provides the basis for future work in conducting similar studies in other healthcare organisations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Photographic measurements in 301 cases of liposuction and abdominoplasty reveal fat reduction without redistribution.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Eric

    2012-08-01

    There are no published studies of liposuction or abdominoplasty in a large number of patients using measurements of body dimensions. In the absence of rigorous data, some investigators have proposed that fat returns after liposuction. A prospective study was undertaken among predominantly nonobese consecutive patients undergoing 301 liposuction and abdominoplasty procedures meeting the study criteria (inclusion rate, 70.7 percent). Lower body dimensions were measured using standardized photographs taken before and at least 3 months after surgery. Upper body measurements were compared between women who underwent simultaneous cosmetic breast surgery (n=67) and a group of women who had breast surgery alone (n=78) to investigate the possibility of fat redistribution. The average weight change was a loss of 2.2 lbs after lower body liposuction (p<0.01) and 4.6 lbs when combined with abdominoplasty (p<0.001). Liposuction significantly reduced abdominal, thigh, knee, and arm width (p<0.001). Midabdominal and hip width were more effectively reduced by lipoabdominoplasty than liposuction alone (p<0.001). There was no difference in upper body measurements when comparing patients who had simultaneous liposuction and/or abdominoplasty with patients who had cosmetic breast surgery alone. Measurements in patients with at least 1 year of follow-up (n=46) showed no evidence of fat reaccumulation. Both liposuction and abdominoplasty are valid techniques for long-term fat reduction and improvement of body proportions. There is no evidence of fat regrowth. Therapeutic, III.

  4. Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure Causes Redistribution of Endothelial Tube VE-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Ming-Wei; Kozlosky, John; Po, Iris P.; Strickland, Pamela Ohman; Svoboda, Kathy K. H.; Cooper, Keith; Laumbach, Robert; Gordon, Marion K.

    2010-01-01

    Whether diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) potentially have a direct effect on capillary endothelia was examined by following the adherens junction component, vascular endothelial cell cadherin (VE-cadherin). This molecule is incorporated into endothelial adherens junctions at the cell surface, where it forms homodimeric associations with adjacent cells and contributes to the barrier function of the vasculature (Dejana et al., 2008; Venkiteswaran et al., 2002; Villasante et al., 2007). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were pre-formed into capillary-like tube networks in vitro were exposed to DEPs for 24 hr. After exposure, the integrity of VE-cadherin in adherens junctions was assessed by immunofluorescence analysis, and demonstrated that increasing concentrations of DEPs caused increasing redistribution of VE-cadherin away from the cell-cell junctions toward intracellular locations. Since HUVEC tube networks are three-dimensional structures, whether particles entered the endothelial cells or tubular lumens was also examined. The data indicate that translocation of the particles does occur. The results, obtained in a setting that removes the confounding effects of inflammatory cells or blood components, suggest that if DEPs encounter alveolar capillaries in vivo, they may be able to directly affect the endothelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:20887764

  5. Uniaxial Strain Redistribution in Corrugated Graphene: Clamping, Sliding, Friction, and 2D Band Splitting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuanye; Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Christopher, Jason W; Paiella, Roberto; Swan, Anna K

    2015-09-09

    Graphene is a promising material for strain engineering based on its excellent flexibility and elastic properties, coupled with very high electrical mobility. In order to implement strain devices, it is important to understand and control the clamping of graphene to its support. Here, we investigate the limits of the strong van der Waals interaction on friction clamping. We find that the friction of graphene on a SiO2 substrate can support a maximum local strain gradient and that higher strain gradients result in sliding and strain redistribution. Furthermore, the friction decreases with increasing strain. The system used is graphene placed over a nanoscale SiO2 grating, causing strain and local strain variations. We use a combination of atomic force microscopy and Raman scattering to determine the friction coefficient, after accounting for compression and accidental charge doping, and model the local strain variation within the laser spot size. By using uniaxial strain aligned to a high crystal symmetry direction, we also determine the 2D Raman Grüneisen parameter and deformation potential in the zigzag direction.

  6. Collision cascades enhanced hydrogen redistribution in cobalt implanted hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Williams, G. V. M.; Hübner, R.; Heinig, K.-H.; Markwitz, A.

    2017-03-01

    Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films produced by C3H6 deposition at 5 kV and implanted at room temperature with 30 keV Co atoms to 12 at.% show not only a bimodal distribution of Co atoms but also a massive redistribution of hydrogen in the films. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis was used to measure the hydrogen depth profiles (15N-method). Depletion of hydrogen near the surface was measured to be as low as 7 at.% followed by hydrogen accumulation from 27 to 35 at.%. A model is proposed considering the thermal energy deposited by collision cascade for thermal insulators. In this model, sufficient energy is provided for dissociated hydrogen to diffuse out of the sample from the surface and diffuse into the sample towards the interface which is however limited by the range of the incoming Co ions. At a hydrogen concentration of ∼35 at.%, the concentration gradient of the mobile unbounded hydrogen atoms is neutralised effectively stopping diffusion towards the interface. The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications.

  7. Nucleoporins redistribute inside the nucleus after cell cycle arrest induced by histone deacetylases inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Garrastachu, Miguel; Arluzea, Jon; Andrade, Ricardo; Díez-Torre, Alejandro; Urtizberea, Marta; Silió, Margarita; Aréchaga, Juan

    2017-09-03

    Nucleoporins are the main components of the nuclear-pore complex (NPC) and were initially considered as mere structural elements embedded in the nuclear envelope, being responsible for nucleocytoplasmic transport. Nevertheless, several recent scientific reports have revealed that some nucleoporins participate in nuclear processes such as transcription, replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation. Thus, the interaction of NPCs with chromatin could modulate the distribution of chromosome territories relying on the epigenetic state of DNA. In particular, the nuclear basket proteins Tpr and Nup153, and the FG-nucleoporin Nup98 seem to play key roles in all these novel functions. In this work, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) were used to induce a hyperacetylated state of chromatin and the behavior of the mentioned nucleoporins was studied. Our results show that, after HDACi treatment, Tpr, Nup153 and Nup98 are translocated from the nuclear pore toward the interior of the cell nucleus, accumulating as intranuclear nucleoporin clusters. These transitory structures are highly dynamic, and are mainly present in the population of cells arrested at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Our results indicate that the redistribution of these nucleoporins from the nuclear envelope to the nuclear interior may be implicated in the early events of cell cycle initialization, particularly during the G1 phase transition.

  8. LTP-triggered cholesterol redistribution activates Cdc42 and drives AMPA receptor synaptic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Anna; Norwood, Stephanie; Brouwers, Jos F.; Palomer, Ernest; Helms, J. Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor trafficking during synaptic plasticity requires the concerted action of multiple signaling pathways and the protein transport machinery. However, little is known about the contribution of lipid metabolism during these processes. In this paper, we addressed the question of the role of cholesterol in synaptic changes during long-term potentiation (LTP). We found that N-methyl-d-aspartate–type glutamate receptor (NMDAR) activation during LTP induction leads to a rapid and sustained loss or redistribution of intracellular cholesterol in the neuron. A reduction in cholesterol, in turn, leads to the activation of Cdc42 and the mobilization of GluA1-containing α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid–type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) from Rab11-recycling endosomes into the synaptic membrane, leading to synaptic potentiation. This process is accompanied by an increase of NMDAR function and an enhancement of LTP. These results imply that cholesterol acts as a sensor of NMDAR activation and as a trigger of downstream signaling to engage small GTPase (guanosine triphosphatase) activation and AMPAR synaptic delivery during LTP. PMID:25753037

  9. Contrasted glass-whole rock compositions and phenocryst re-distribution, IPOD Sites 417 and 418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, H.; Bryan, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Major element composition ranges of closely associated basalt glass-whole rock pairs from individual small cooling units approach the total known range of basalt glass and whole rock compositions at IPOD sites 417 and 418. The whole rock samples fall into two groups: one is depleted in MgO and distinctly enriched in plagioclase but has lost some olivine and/or pyroxene relative to its corresponding glass; and the other is enriched in MgO and in phenocrysts of olivine and pyroxene as well as plagioclase compared to its corresponding glass. By analogy with observed phenocryst distributions in lava pillows, tubes, and dikes, and with some theoretical studies, we infer that bulk rock compositions are strongly affected by phenocryst redistribution due to gravity settling, flotation, and dynamic sorting after eruption, although specific models are not well constrained by the one-dimensional geometry of drill core. Compositional trends or groupings in whole rock data resulting from such late-stage processes should not be confused with more fundamental compositional effects produced in deep chambers or during partial melting.

  10. Redistribution of neural phase coherence reflects establishment of feedforward map in speech motor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Ranit

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress in our understanding of sensorimotor integration in speech learning, a comprehensive framework to investigate its neural basis is lacking at behaviorally relevant timescales. Structural and functional imaging studies in humans have helped us identify brain networks that support speech but fail to capture the precise spatiotemporal coordination within the networks that takes place during speech learning. Here we use neuronal oscillations to investigate interactions within speech motor networks in a paradigm of speech motor adaptation under altered feedback with continuous recording of EEG in which subjects adapted to the real-time auditory perturbation of a target vowel sound. As subjects adapted to the task, concurrent changes were observed in the theta-gamma phase coherence during speech planning at several distinct scalp regions that is consistent with the establishment of a feedforward map. In particular, there was an increase in coherence over the central region and a decrease over the fronto-temporal regions, revealing a redistribution of coherence over an interacting network of brain regions that could be a general feature of error-based motor learning in general. Our findings have implications for understanding the neural basis of speech motor learning and could elucidate how transient breakdown of neuronal communication within speech networks relates to speech disorders. PMID:25632078

  11. Redistribution of Iron and Titanium in High-Pressure Ultramafic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, Rosalind J.; Evans, Katy A.; Reddy, Steven M.; Lester, Gregory W.

    2017-11-01

    The redox state of iron in high-pressure serpentinites, which host a significant proportion of Fe3+ in subduction zones, can be used to provide an insight into iron cycling and constrain the composition of subduction zone fluids. In this study, we use oxide and silicate mineral textures, interpretation of mineral parageneses, mineral composition data, and whole rock geochemistry of high-pressure retrogressed ultramafic rocks from the Zermatt-Saas Zone to constrain the distribution of iron and titanium, and iron oxidation state. These data provide an insight on the oxidation state and composition of fluids at depth in subduction zones. Oxide minerals host the bulk of iron, particularly Fe3+. The increase in mode of magnetite and observation of magnetite within antigorite veins in the investigated ultramafic samples during initial retrogression is most consistent with oxidation of existing iron within the samples during the infiltration of an oxidizing fluid since it is difficult to reconcile addition of Fe3+ with the known limited solubility of this species. However, high Ti contents are not typical of serpentinites and also cannot be accounted for by simple mixing of a depleted mantle protolith with the nearby Allalin gabbro. Titanium-rich phases coincide with prograde metamorphism and initial exhumation, implying the early seafloor and/or prograde addition and late mobilization of Ti. If Ti addition has occurred, then the introduction of Fe3+, also generally considered to be immobile, cannot be disregarded. We explore possible transport vectors for Ti and Fe through mineral texture analysis.

  12. Fibonacci-like zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shubo; Liu, Mengsi; Xia, Tian; Tao, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    We present a new family of diffractive lenses, Fibonacci-like zone plates, generated with a modified Fibonacci sequence. The focusing properties and the evolution of transverse diffraction pattern for the Fibonacci-like zone plates have been analytically investigated both theoretically and experimentally and compared with the corresponding Fresnel zone plates of the same resolution. The results demonstrate that the Fibonacci-like zone plates possess the self-similar property and the multifocal behavior. Furthermore, the Fibonacci-like zone plate beams are found to possess the self-reconstruction property, and would be promising for 3D optical tweezers, laser machining, and optical imaging.

  13. The generalized mean zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; Cheng, Shubo; Tao, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    In this paper a generalized mean zone plate is proposed, which generates twin foci located at the positions satisfying the expression of the generalized mean, which includes the m-golden mean, precious mean, and so on. The generalized mean zone plate can be designed to generate twin foci with various position ratios. The diffraction properties of the generalized mean zone plates have been investigated with simulations and experiments. The results show that the ratio of the positions of the twin foci for the generalized mean zone plate can be designed with the selected zone plate parameters.

  14. How Many Convective Zones Are There in the Atmosphere of Venus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, V. I.; Rodin, A. V.

    2002-11-01

    The qualitative characteristics of the vertical structure of the atmospheres of Venus and the Earth essentially differ. For instance, there are at least two, instead of one, zones with normal (thermal) convection on Venus. The first one is near the surface (a boundary layer); the second is at the altitudes of the lower part of the main cloud layer between 49 and 55 km. Contrary to the hypotheses proposed by Izakov (2001, 2002), the upper convective zone prevents energy transfer from the upper clouds to the subcloud atmosphere by ``anomalous turbulent heat conductivity.'' It is possible, however, that the anomalous turbulent heat conductivity takes part in the redistribution of the heat fluxes within the lower (subcloud) atmosphere.

  15. Diffusion of Siderophile Elements in Fe Metal: Application to Zoned Metal Grains in Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.; Humajun, M.

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of highly siderophile elements (HSE) in planetary materials is controlled mainly by metal. Diffusion processes can control the distribution or re-distribution of these elements within metals, yet there is little systematic or appropriate diffusion data that can be used to interpret HSE concentrations in such metals. Because our understanding of isotope chronometry, redox processes, kamacite/taenite-based cooling rates, and metal grain zoning would be enhanced with diffusion data, we have measured diffusion coefficients for Ni, Co, Ga, Ge, Ru, Pd, Ir and Au in Fe metal from 1200 to 1400 C and 1 bar and 10 kbar. These new data on refractory and volatile siderophile elements are used to evaluate the role of diffusional processes in controlling zoning patterns in metal-rich chondrites.

  16. An upper bound on the second order asymptotic expansion for the quantum communication cost of state redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Nilanjana, E-mail: n.datta@statslab.cam.ac.uk; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu, E-mail: Min-Hsiu.Hsieh@uts.edu.au; Oppenheim, Jonathan, E-mail: j.oppenheim@ucl.ac.uk

    State redistribution is the protocol in which given an arbitrary tripartite quantum state, with two of the subsystems initially being with Alice and one being with Bob, the goal is for Alice to send one of her subsystems to Bob, possibly with the help of prior shared entanglement. We derive an upper bound on the second order asymptotic expansion for the quantum communication cost of achieving state redistribution with a given finite accuracy. In proving our result, we also obtain an upper bound on the quantum communication cost of this protocol in the one-shot setting, by using the protocol ofmore » coherent state merging as a primitive.« less

  17. Enhanced uridine 5'-monophosphate production by whole cell of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through rational redistribution of metabolic flux.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Yong; Li, An; Xie, Jingjing; Xiong, Jian; Bai, Jianxin; Chen, Xiaochun; Niu, Huanqing; Zhou, Tao; Ying, Hanjie

    2012-06-01

    A whole-cell biocatalytic process for uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) production from orotic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed. To rationally redistribute the metabolic flux between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway, statistical methods were employed first to find out the critical factors in the process. NaH(2)PO(4), MgCl(2) and pH were found to be the important factors affecting UMP production significantly. The levels of these three factors required for the maximum production of UMP were determined: NaH(2)PO(4) 22.1 g/L; MgCl(2) 2.55 g/L; pH 8.15. An enhancement of UMP production from 6.12 to 8.13 g/L was achieved. A significant redistribution of metabolic fluxes was observed and the underlying mechanism was discussed.

  18. Snow cover distribution over elevation zones in a mountainous catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagoulia, D.; Panagopoulos, Y.

    2009-04-01

    A good understanding of the elevetional distribution of snow cover is necessary to predict the timing and volume of runoff. In a complex mountainous terrain the snow cover distribution within a watershed is highly variable in time and space and is dependent on elevation, slope, aspect, vegetation type, surface roughness, radiation load, and energy exchange at the snow-air interface. Decreases in snowpack due to climate change could disrupt the downstream urban and agricultural water supplies, while increases could lead to seasonal flooding. Solar and longwave radiation are dominant energy inputs driving the ablation process. Turbulent energy exchange at the snow cover surface is important during the snow season. The evaporation of blowing and drifting snow is strongly dependent upon wind speed. Much of the spatial heterogeneity of snow cover is the result of snow redistribution by wind. Elevation is important in determining temperature and precipitation gradients along hillslopes, while the temperature gradients determine where precipitation falls as rain and snow and contribute to variable melt rates within the hillslope. Under these premises, the snow accumulation and ablation (SAA) model of the US National Weather Service (US NWS) was applied to implement the snow cover extent over elevation zones of a mountainous catchment (the Mesochora catchment in Western-Central Greece), taking also into account the indirectly included processes of sublimation, interception, and snow redistribution. The catchment hydrology is controlled by snowfall and snowmelt and the simulated discharge was computed from the soil moisture accounting (SMA) model of the US NWS and compared to the measured discharge. The elevationally distributed snow cover extent presented different patterns with different time of maximization, extinction and return during the year, producing different timing of discharge that is a crucial factor for the control and management of water resources systems.

  19. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Inhomogeneous charge redistribution in Xe clusters exposed to an intense extreme ultraviolet free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwayama, H.; Sugishima, A.; Nagaya, K.; Yao, M.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Liu, X.-J.; Yamada, A.; Wang, C.; Ueda, K.; Saito, N.; Nagasono, M.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Ohashi, H.; Kimura, H.; Togashi, T.

    2010-08-01

    The emission of highly charged ions from Xe clusters exposed to intense extreme ultraviolet laser pulses (λ ~ 52 nm) from the free electron laser in Japan was investigated using ion momentum spectroscopy. With increasing average cluster size, we observed multiply charged ions Xez + up to z = 3. From kinetic energy distributions, we found that multiply charged ions were generated near the cluster surface. Our results suggest that charges are inhomogeneously redistributed in the cluster to lower the total energy stored in the clusters.

  20. Electrical Resistivity Tomography Reveals Upward Redistribution of Soil-Water by Coyote Brush in a Shrub-Grassland Ecotone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, J. E.; Schulz, M. S.; Lambrecht, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Species imbalance within many California plant assemblages may arise due to more intense wildfires as well as climate warming. Given this, coyote brush (Baccharis pilularis DC), a native evergreen shrub known as a ready colonizer of disturbed soil, may become more dominant. While prolonged spring soil moisture is required for seedling establishment, 1+ year-old coyote brush can withstand low soil water potentials (-1.2 MPa). Beyond this, little is known about its soil-water dynamics. Hydraulic redistribution of water within the soil profile by plant roots has been established in numerous species in the past 20 years. Recent quantification of the water quantity re-distributed by root systems are beginning to provide detail that could inform ET, weathering, and carbon cycling models. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been used to study soil hydraulics in natural as well as cropland settings. This study is the first known to use ERT to investigate hydraulic redistribution in coyote brush. One mid-size shrub surrounded by open grassland was selected at the study site, located on a coastal marine terrace west of Santa Cruz, CA. The soil profile, previously characterized with ERT and auger-based soil-water sampling, includes a clay-rich B horizon and is texturally non-uniform due to bioturbation to 0.6 meter. The 12-m ERT survey transect had 48 semi-permanent electrodes, with the 4-m wide shrub canopy at probes 16 to 32. Five repeats of evening and morning surveys were conducted. Heterogeneous texture and severe soil drying necessitated qualitative comparison across time. Overnight resistivity changes using differences plots of the modelled data revealed increased moisture beneath the shrub canopy during the night. Areas beyond the canopy—presumably outside the root zone—experienced variable overnight changes, with moisture increasing in the clay-rich horizon. Preliminary analysis suggests that coyote brush roots redistribute water upward within the soil

  1. Redistribution of vegetation zones and populations of Larix sibirica Ledb. and Pinus sylvestris L. in central Siberia in a warming climate

    Treesearch

    N.M. Tchebakova; G.E. Rehfeldt; E.I. Parfenova

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for global warming over the past 200 years is overwhelming (Hulme et al. 1999), based on both direct weather observation and indirect physical and biological indicators such as retreating glaciers and snow/ice cover, increasing sea level, and longer growing seasons (IPCC 2001). Recent GCM projections of the Hadley Centre (Gordon et al. 2000) for Siberia show...

  2. Liquid zone seal

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  3. Smartphones and Time Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, William; Secrest, Jeffery; Padgett, Clifford; Johnson, Wayne; Hagrelius, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Using the Sun to tell time is an ancient idea, but we can take advantage of modern technology to bring it into the 21st century for students in astronomy, physics, or physical science classes. We have employed smartphones, Google Earth, and 3D printing to find the moment of local noon at two widely separated locations. By reviewing GPS time-stamped photos from each place, we are able to illustrate that local noon is longitude-dependent and therefore explain the need for time zones.

  4. Marginal Ice Zone Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    A Voyage of Discovery. George Deacon 70th An-niversary Volume, (M. Angel, ed.), Pergamon Press, Oxford, p.15-41. Coachman, L.K., C.A. Barnes, 1961...some polar contrasts. In: S "" RUsium on Antarctic Ice and Water Masses, ( George Deacon, ed.), Sci- 72 Lebedev, A.A., 1968: Zone of possible icing of...Atlantic and Western Europe. British Meteorological Office. Geophysical Memoirs, 4(41). Brost , R.A., J.C. Wyngaard, 1978: A model study of the stably

  5. Large wood recruitment and redistribution in headwater streams in the southern Oregon Coast Range, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Large wood recruitment and redistribution mechanisms were investigated in a 3.9 km2 basin with an old-growth Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco and Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg. forest, located in the southern Coast Range of Oregon. Stream size and topographic setting strongly influenced processes that delivered wood to the channel network. In small colluvial channels draining steep hillslopes, processes associated with slope instability dominated large wood recruitment. In the larger alluvial channel, windthrow was the dominant recruitment process from the local riparian area. Consequently, colluvial channels received wood from further upslope than the alluvial channel. Input and redistribution processes influenced piece location relative to the direction of flow and thus, affected the functional role of wood. Wood recruited directly from local hillslopes and riparian areas was typically positioned adjacent to the channel or spanned its full width, and trapped sediment and wood in transport. In contrast, wood that had been fluvially redistributed was commonly located in mid-channel positions and was associated with scouring of the streambed and banks. Debris flows were a unique mechanism for creating large accumulations of wood in small streams that lacked the capacity for abundant fluvial transport of wood, and for transporting wood that was longer than the bank-full width of the channel.

  6. A tracer analysis study on the redistribution and oxidization of endogenous carbon monoxide in the human body.

    PubMed

    Sawano, Makoto; Shimouchi, Akito

    2010-09-01

    Past studies have suggested that some carbon monoxide (CO) moves from blood haemoglobin to tissue cells and that mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase oxidizes CO to carbon dioxide (CO(2)). However, no study has demonstrated this redistribution and oxidization of CO under physiological conditions. The objective of this study was to trace the redistribution and oxidization of CO in the human body by detecting (13)CO(2) production after the inhalation of (13)CO. In Experiment 1, we asked a healthy subject to inhale 50 ppm (13)CO gas. In Experiment 2, we circulated heparinized human blood in a cardio-pulmonary bypass circuit and supplied 50 ppm (13)CO gas to the oxygenator. We sequentially sampled exhaled and output gases and measured the (13)CO(2)/(12)CO(2) ratios. In Experiment 1, the exhaled (13)CO(2)/(12)CO(2) ratio increased significantly between 4 to 31 h of (13)CO inhalation. In Experiment 2, the output (13)CO(2)/(12)CO(2) ratio showed no significant increase within 36 h of (13)CO input. Experiment 1 demonstrated the oxidization of CO in the human body under physiological conditions. Experiment 2 confirmed that oxidization does not occur in the circulating blood and indicated the redistribution of CO from blood carboxyhaemoglobin to tissue cells.

  7. No Increase in Female Breast Size or Fat Redistribution to the Upper Body After Liposuction: A Prospective Controlled Photometric Study.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Some studies have indicated that liposuction may cause breast enlargement. Fat redistribution to the upper body as a compensatory mechanism after liposuction has also been reported. To evaluate the possibility of secondary breast hypertrophy and fat redistribution after liposuction, breast size and upper body measurements were obtained and compared for women who did not gain weight postoperatively. Eighty-two women who underwent cosmetic surgery, not including breast surgery, were enrolled in this prospective controlled study. Participants represented 1 of 3 procedure groups: cosmetic surgery not including liposuction (n = 24), liposuction (n = 41), and liposuction combined with abdominoplasty (n = 17). Breast measurements were obtained from standardized lateral photographs matched for size and orientation. Results were compared among the study groups. Postoperatively, there were no significant changes in mean body weight among the study groups. No significant increases in upper pole projection, breast projection, or breast area were found in patients treated with liposuction alone and those who received liposuction plus abdominoplasty. Upper body dimensions were unchanged except for a significant (P < .01) decrease in upper abdominal width in women treated with liposuction plus abdominoplasty. The findings were the same for a subset of 17 women with liposuction aspirate volumes >1500 mL. Results indicate that neither liposuction nor abdominoplasty produces secondary breast enlargement. Upper body dimensions are unchanged, consistent with findings of a previous study and contrary to the theory of fat redistribution. 2. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  8. Heat and Mass Transfer in the Over-Shower Zone of a Cooling Tower with Flow Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M. M. Hemmasian; Dobrego, K. V.

    2013-11-01

    The influence of flow rotation in the over-shower zone of a natural draft wet cooling tower (NDCT) on heat and mass transfer in this zone is investigated numerically. The 3D geometry of an actual NDCT and three models of the induced rotation velocity fields are utilized for calculations. Two phases (liquid and gaseous) and three components are taken into consideration. The interphase heat exchange, heat transfer to the walls, condensation-evaporation intensity field, and other parameters are investigated as functions of the induced rotation intensity (the inclination of the velocity vector at the periphery). It is shown that the induced flow rotation intensifies the heat and mass transfer in the over-shower zone of an NDCT. Flow rotation leads to specific redistribution of evaporation-condensation areas in an NDCT and stimulates water condensation near its walls.

  9. Electrically-inactive phosphorus re-distribution during low temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peral, Ana; Youssef, Amanda; Dastgheib-Shirazi, Amir; Akey, Austin; Peters, Ian Marius; Hahn, Giso; Buonassisi, Tonio; del Cañizo, Carlos

    2018-04-01

    An increased total dose of phosphorus (P dose) in the first 40 nm of a phosphorus diffused emitter has been measured after Low Temperature Annealing (LTA) at 700 °C using the Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometry technique. This evidence has been observed in three versions of the same emitter containing different amounts of initial phosphorus. A stepwise chemical etching of a diffused phosphorus emitter has been carried out to prepare the three types of samples. The total P dose in the first 40 nm increases during annealing by 1.4 × 1015 cm-2 for the sample with the highly doped emitter, by 0.8 × 1015 cm-2 in the middle-doped emitter, and by 0.5 × 1015 cm-2 in the lowest-doped emitter. The presence of surface dislocations in the first few nanometers of the phosphorus emitter might play a role as preferential sites of local phosphorus gettering in phosphorus re-distribution, because the phosphorus gettering to the first 40 nm is lower when this region is etched stepwise. This total increase in phosphorus takes place even though the calculated electrically active phosphorus concentration shows a reduction, and the measured sheet resistance shows an increase after annealing at a low temperature. The reduced electrically active P dose is around 0.6 × 1015 cm-2 for all the emitters. This can be explained with phosphorus-atoms diffusing towards the surface during annealing, occupying electrically inactive configurations. An atomic-scale visual local analysis is carried out with needle-shaped samples of tens of nm in diameter containing a region of the highly doped emitter before and after LTA using Atom Probe Tomography, showing phosphorus precipitates of 10 nm and less before annealing and an increased density of larger precipitates after annealing (25 nm and less).

  10. Deciphering the plasma membrane hallmarks of apoptotic cells: Phosphatidylserine transverse redistribution and calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, M Carmen; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie

    2001-01-01

    Background During apoptosis, Ca2+-dependent events participate in the regulation of intracellular and morphological changes including phosphatidylserine exposure in the exoplasmic leaflet of the cell plasma membrane. The occurrence of phosphatidylserine at the surface of specialized cells, such as platelets, is also essential for the assembly of the enzyme complexes of the blood coagulation cascade, as demonstrated by hemorrhages in Scott syndrome, an extremely rare genetic deficiency of phosphatidylserine externalization, without other apparent pathophysiologic consequences. We have recently reported a reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry in Scott cells which may be part of the Scott phenotype. Results Taking advantage of these mutant lymphoblastoid B cells, we have studied the relationship between this mode of Ca2+ entry and phosphatidylserine redistribution during apoptosis. Ca2+ ionophore induced apoptosis in Scott but not in control cells. However, inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ channels led to caspase-independent DNA fragmentation and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential in both control and Scott cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 also reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry and induced apoptosis at comparable extents in control and Scott cells. During the apoptotic process, both control and more markedly Scott cells externalized phosphatidylserine, but in the latter, this membrane feature was however dissociated from several other intracellular changes. Conclusions The present results suggest that different mechanisms account for phosphatidylserine transmembrane migration in cells undergoing stimulation and programmed death. These observations testify to the plasticity of the plasma membrane remodeling process, allowing normal apoptosis even when less fundamental functions are defective. PMID:11701087

  11. Characterization of beam-driven instabilities and current redistribution in MST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, E.

    2015-11-01

    A unique, high-rep-rate (>10 kHz) Thomson scattering diagnostic and a high-bandwidth FIR interferometer-polarimeter on MST have enabled characterization of beam-driven instabilities and magnetic equilibrium changes observed during high power (1 MW) neutral beam injection (NBI). While NBI leads to negligible net current drive, an increase in on-axis current density observed through Faraday rotation is offset by a reduction in mid-radius current. Identification of the phase flip in temperature fluctuations associated with tearing modes provides a sensitive measure of rational surface locations. This technique strongly constrains the safety factor for equilibrium reconstruction and provides a powerful new tool for measuring the equilibrium magnetic field. For example, the n = 6 temperature structure is observed to shift inward 1.1 +/- 0.6 cm, with an estimated reduction of q0 by 5%. This is consistent with a mid-radius reduction in current, and together the Faraday rotation and Thomson scattering measurements corroborate an inductive redistribution of current that compares well with TRANSP/MSTFit predictions. Interpreting tearing mode temperature structures in the RFP remains challenging; the effects of multiple, closely-spaced tearing modes on the mode phase measurement require further verification. In addition to equilibrium changes, previous work has shown that the large fast ion population drives instabilities at higher frequencies near the Alfvén continuum. Recent observations reveal a new instability at much lower frequency (~7 kHz) with strongly chirping behavior. It participates in extensive avalanches of the higher frequency energetic particle and Alfvénic modes to drive enhanced fast ion transport. Internal structures measured from Te and ne fluctuations, their dependence on the safety factor, as well as frequency scaling motivate speculation about mode identity. Work supported by U.S. DOE.

  12. Splanchnic Th(2) and Th(1) cytokine redistribution in microsurgical cholestatic rats.

    PubMed

    García-Dominguez, José; Aller, María-Angeles; García, Cruz; de Vicente, Felipe; Corcuera, Maria-Teresa; Gómez-Aguado, Fernando; Alonso, María José; Vara, Elena; Arias, Jaime

    2010-08-01

    Long-term extrahepatic cholestasis in the rat induces ductular proliferation and fibrosis in the liver, portal hypertension, splenomegaly, portosystemic collateral circulation, and ascites. These splanchnic alterations could have an inflammatory pathophysiology. We measured serum levels of hepatobiliary injury markers and the acute phase proteins, alpha-1-major acid protein (alpha(1)-MAP) and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (alpha(1)-GPA) in rats 6 wk after microsurgical extrahepatic cholestasis. We also assayed Th(1) (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) and Th(2) (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokine levels in the liver, ileum, spleen, and mesenteric lymph complex by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Liver fibrosis was measured by Sirius red stain and by using an image system computer-assisted method and mast cell liver infiltration by Giemsa stain. The cholestatic rats showed an increase (P<0.001) in serum levels of bile acids, total and direct bilirubin, AST, ALT, AST/ALT index, gamma-GT, alkaline phosphatase, alpha(1)- MAP, alpha(1)-GPA, and LDH (P<0.05) in relation to sham-operated rats. TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-4, and IL-10 increased in the ileum (P<0.01) and mesenteric lymph complex (P<0.001), and decreased in the liver (P<0.001). A marked bile proliferation associated with fibrosis (P<0.001) and mast cell infiltration was also shown in the liver of cholestatic rats. The splanchnic redistribution of cytokines, with an increase of Th(1) and Th(2) production in the small bowel and in the mesenteric lymph complex, supports the key role of inflammatory mechanisms in rats with secondary biliary fibrosis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enduring legacy of a toxic fan via episodic redistribution of California gold mining debris

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Michael Bliss; Aalto, Rolf; James, L. Allan; Kilham, Nina E.; Higson, John L.; Ghoshal, Subhajit

    2013-01-01

    The interrelationships between hydrologically driven evolution of legacy landscapes downstream of major mining districts and the contamination of lowland ecosystems are poorly understood over centennial time scales. Here, we demonstrate within piedmont valleys of California’s Sierra Nevada, through new and historical data supported by modeling, that anthropogenic fans produced by 19th century gold mining comprise an episodically persistent source of sediment-adsorbed Hg to lowlands. Within the enormous, iconic Yuba Fan, we highlight (i) an apparent shift in the relative processes of fan evolution from gradual vertical channel entrenchment to punctuated lateral erosion of fan terraces, thus enabling entrainment of large volumes of Hg-laden sediment during individual floods, and (ii) systematic intrafan redistribution and downstream progradation of fan sediment into the Central Valley, triggered by terrace erosion during increasingly long, 10-y flood events. Each major flood apparently erodes stored sediment and delivers to sensitive lowlands the equivalent of ∼10–30% of the entire postmining Sierran Hg mass so far conveyed to the San Francisco Bay-Delta (SFBD). This process of protracted but episodic erosion of legacy sediment and associated Hg is likely to persist for >104 y. It creates, within an immense swath of river corridor well upstream of the SFBD, new contaminated floodplain surfaces primed for Hg methylation and augments/replenishes potential Hg sources to the SFBD. Anticipation, prediction, and management of toxic sediment delivery, and corresponding risks to lowland ecology and human society globally, depend on the morphodynamic stage of anthropogenic fan evolution, synergistically coupled to changing frequency of and duration extreme floods. PMID:24167273

  14. Quantum dynamics of the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in OCS: From localization to quasi-thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, J. B.; Arce, J. C.

    2018-06-01

    We report a fully quantum-dynamical study of the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) in the electronic ground state of carbonyl sulfide, which is a prototype of an isolated many-body quantum system with strong internal couplings and non-Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) behavior. We pay particular attention to the role of many-body localization and the approach to thermalization, which currently are topics of considerable interest, as they pertain to the very foundations of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. We employ local-mode (valence) coordinates and consider initial excitations localized in one local mode, with energies ranging from low to near the dissociation threshold, where the classical dynamics have been shown to be chaotic. We propagate the nuclear wavepacket on the potential energy surface by means of the numerically exact multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method and employ mean local energies, time-dependent and time-averaged populations in quantum number space, energy distributions, entanglement entropies, local population distributions, microcanonical averages, and dissociation probabilities, as diagnostic tools. This allows us to identify a continuous localization → delocalization transition in the energy flow, associated with the onset of quantum chaos, as the excitation energy increases up to near the dissociation threshold. Moreover, we find that at this energy and ˜1 ps the molecule nearly thermalizes. Furthermore, we observe that IVR is so slow that the molecule begins to dissociate well before such quasi-thermalization is complete, in accordance with earlier classical-mechanical predictions of non-RRKM behavior.

  15. Redistribution of benefits but not detection in a fisheries bycatch-reduction management initiative.

    PubMed

    McClanahan, T R; Kosgei, J K

    2018-02-01

    Reducing the capture of small fish, discarded fish, and bycatch is a primary concern of fisheries managers who propose to maintain high yields, species diversity, and ecosystem functions. Modified fishing gear is one of the primary ways to reduce by-catch and capture of small fish. The outcomes of gear modification may depend on competition among fishers using other similar resources and other gears in the same fishing grounds and the subsequent adoption or abandonment of modified gears by fishers. We evaluated adoption of modified gear, catch size, catch per unit effort (CPUE), yield, and fisher incomes in a coral reef fishery in which a 3-cm escape gap was introduced into traditional traps. There were 26.1 (SD 4.9) fishers who used the experimental landing sites and 228(SD 15.7) fishers who used the control landing sites annually over 7 years. The size of fish increased by 10.6% in the modified traps, but the catch of smaller fish increased by 11.2% among the other gears. There was no change in the overall CPUE, yields, or per area incomes; rather, yield benefits were redistributed in favor of the unmodified gears. For example, estimated incomes of fishers who adopted the modified traps remained unchanged but increased for net and spear fishers. Fishers using escape-gap traps had a high proportion of income from larger fish, which may have led to a perception of benefits, high status, and no abandonment of the modified traps. The commensal rather than competitive outcome may explain the continued use of escape-gap traps 3 years after their introduction. Trap fishers showed an interest in negotiating other management improvements, such as increased mesh sizes for nets, which could ultimately catalyze community-level decisions and restrictions that could increase their profits. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Redistribution of flexibility in stabilizing antibody fragment mutants follows Le Châtelier's principle.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J; Livesay, Dennis R

    2014-01-01

    Le Châtelier's principle is the cornerstone of our understanding of chemical equilibria. When a system at equilibrium undergoes a change in concentration or thermodynamic state (i.e., temperature, pressure, etc.), La Châtelier's principle states that an equilibrium shift will occur to offset the perturbation and a new equilibrium is established. We demonstrate that the effects of stabilizing mutations on the rigidity ⇔ flexibility equilibrium within the native state ensemble manifest themselves through enthalpy-entropy compensation as the protein structure adjusts to restore the global balance between the two. Specifically, we characterize the effects of mutation to single chain fragments of the anti-lymphotoxin-β receptor antibody using a computational Distance Constraint Model. Statistically significant changes in the distribution of both rigidity and flexibility within the molecular structure is typically observed, where the local perturbations often lead to distal shifts in flexibility and rigidity profiles. Nevertheless, the net gain or loss in flexibility of individual mutants can be skewed. Despite all mutants being exclusively stabilizing in this dataset, increased flexibility is slightly more common than increased rigidity. Mechanistically the redistribution of flexibility is largely controlled by changes in the H-bond network. For example, a stabilizing mutation can induce an increase in rigidity locally due to the formation of new H-bonds, and simultaneously break H-bonds elsewhere leading to increased flexibility distant from the mutation site via Le Châtelier. Increased flexibility within the VH β4/β5 loop is a noteworthy illustration of this long-range effect.

  17. Time-Variable Gravity Signal due to Extratropic Pacific Water Mass Redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Boy, J. -P.; Cox, C. M.; Au, A. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Using the satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) data, Cox and Chao [2002] reported the detection of a large post-1998 anomaly (in the form of a positive jump) in the time series of Earth s lowest-degree gravity harmonic 52, or the dynamic oblateness. Among several groups now examining the mass redistribution in the global geophysical fluids in search of the cause(s), we report here a temporally coinciding anomalies found in the extratropic north + south Pacific basins. Clearly seen in the leading EOFPC mode for extratropic Pacific, these anomalies occurred in sea-surface height, sea-surface temperature, and temperature- and salinity-depth profiles. We based our analysis on two different data sources: TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry, and the ECCO ocean general circulation model output assimilating T/P data. The magnitude of these changes, when converted to equivalent J2 change, appears to be a few times too small to explain the observed J2 directly. These findings, and the fact that the anomalies occurred following the strong 1997-98 El Nino, suggest strong geophysical connection of the interannual-to-decadal variation of 52 with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the ultimate global-change processes that cause PDO. More work is underway, and additional independent data sources are examined, paying close attention to the fact that the J2 anomaly has been reversing back to normal since 2001. These include: (1) cryospheric contributions (melting of glaciers and ice sheets); (2) land hydrological contributions; (3) polar sea influences ( e g , via deep flow); (4) fluid flow in Earth's core; (5) time-variable gravity signals from SLR in higher harmonic degree/order, including J3,J4, (2,1), and (2,2) coefficients, considering their lower signal-to-noise ratios; (6) Earth rotation data in terms of length-of-day and polar motion.

  18. Quantum dynamics of the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in OCS: From localization to quasi-thermalization.

    PubMed

    Pérez, J B; Arce, J C

    2018-06-07

    We report a fully quantum-dynamical study of the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) in the electronic ground state of carbonyl sulfide, which is a prototype of an isolated many-body quantum system with strong internal couplings and non-Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) behavior. We pay particular attention to the role of many-body localization and the approach to thermalization, which currently are topics of considerable interest, as they pertain to the very foundations of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. We employ local-mode (valence) coordinates and consider initial excitations localized in one local mode, with energies ranging from low to near the dissociation threshold, where the classical dynamics have been shown to be chaotic. We propagate the nuclear wavepacket on the potential energy surface by means of the numerically exact multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method and employ mean local energies, time-dependent and time-averaged populations in quantum number space, energy distributions, entanglement entropies, local population distributions, microcanonical averages, and dissociation probabilities, as diagnostic tools. This allows us to identify a continuous localization → delocalization transition in the energy flow, associated with the onset of quantum chaos, as the excitation energy increases up to near the dissociation threshold. Moreover, we find that at this energy and ∼1 ps the molecule nearly thermalizes. Furthermore, we observe that IVR is so slow that the molecule begins to dissociate well before such quasi-thermalization is complete, in accordance with earlier classical-mechanical predictions of non-RRKM behavior.

  19. HMO growth and the geographical redistribution of generalist and specialist physicians, 1987-1997.

    PubMed Central

    Escarce, J J; Polsky, D; Wozniak, G D; Kletke, P R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the growth in HMO penetration in different metropolitan areas on the change in the number of generalists, specialists, and total physicians, and on the change in the proportion of physicians who are generalists. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The American Medical Association Physician Masterfile, to obtain the number of patient care generalists and specialists in 1987 and in 1997 who were practicing in each of 316 metropolitan areas in the United States. Additional data for each metropolitan area were obtained from a variety of sources, and included HMO penetration in 1986 and 1996. STUDY DESIGN: We estimated multivariate regression models in which the change in the number of physicians between 1987 and 1997 was a function of HMO penetration in 1986, the change in HMO penetration between 1986 and 1996, population characteristics and physician fees in 1986, and the change in population characteristics and fees between 1986 and 1996. Each model was estimated using ordinary least squares (OLS) and two-stage least squares (TSLS). PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HMO penetration did not affect the number of generalist physicians or hospital-based specialists, but faster HMO growth led to smaller increases in the numbers of medical/surgical specialists and total physicians. Faster HMO growth also led to larger increases in the proportion of physicians who were generalists. Our best estimate is that an increase in HMO penetration of .10 between 1986 and 1996 reduced the rate of increase in medical/surgical specialists by 10.3 percent and reduced the rate of increase in total physicians by 7.2 percent. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study support the notion that HMOs reduce the demand for physician services, particularly for specialists' services. The findings also imply that, during the past decade, there has been a redistribution of physicians-especially medical/surgical specialists-from metropolitan areas with high HMO penetration to low

  20. Computation of porosity redistribution resulting from thermal convection in slanted porous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouze, Phillippe; Coudrain-Ribstein, Anne; Bernard, Dominique

    1994-01-01

    Unlike fluid displacement due to regional hydraulic head, thermoconvetive motions are generally slow. The thermal impacts of such movements are very weak, whereas their chemical impacts may be significant because of their cumulated effects over geologic time. For nonhorizontal thick sedimentary reservoirs, the fluid velocity due to thermal convection can be accurately approximated by an explicit function of the dip of the reservior, the permeability and the difference in thermal conductivity between the aquifer and the confining beds. The latter parameter controls the rotation direction of the flow and, for clastic reservoirs bounded by impervious clayey media, fluid moves up the slope along the caprock layer. As the fluid velocity is small, the major rock-forming minerals control the fluid composition by thermodynamic equilibrium. Thus, whereas the volume of redistributed mineral depends on the volume of water circulated, the localization of porosity enhancement is strongly controlled by the reservoir mineralogy. With realistic values of permeability and layer thickness, several per cent of secondary porosity per million years can be created or lost at shallow depth (less than 2 km), depending on the chlorinity, the set of representative minerals and the temperature. In sandstone resevoirs and high-chlorinity calcarenite resoervoirs, the porosity decreases under the caprock where hydrocarbons can accumulate. In chlorinity calcarenite resevoirs, the porosity decreases under the caprock where hydrocarbons can accumulate. In chloride-depleted carbonate aquifers, the simulataneous control by carbonates, silica and aluminosilicates can produce a decrease of porosity above the bedrock and an enhancement of porosity under the caprock. However, computations show that the quality of the upper part of the reservoir is mainly reduced by the precipitation of silica and clays.

  1. Thiol trapping and metabolic redistribution of sulfur metabolites enable cells to overcome cysteine overload

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Anup Arunrao; Bhatia, Muskan; Laxman, Sunil; Bachhawat, Anand Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine is an essential requirement in living organisms. However, due to its reactive thiol side chain, elevated levels of intracellular cysteine can be toxic and therefore need to be rapidly eliminated from the cellular milieu. In mammals and many other organisms, excess cysteine is believed to be primarily eliminated by the cysteine dioxygenase dependent oxidative degradation of cysteine, followed by the removal of the oxidative products. However, other mechanisms of tackling excess cysteine are also likely to exist, but have not thus far been explored. In this study, we use Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which naturally lacks a cysteine dioxygenase, to investigate mechanisms for tackling cysteine overload. Overexpressing the high affinity cysteine transporter, YCT1, enabled yeast cells to rapidly accumulate high levels of intracellular cysteine. Using targeted metabolite analysis, we observe that cysteine is initially rapidly interconverted to non-reactive cystine in vivo. A time course revealed that cells systematically convert excess cysteine to inert thiol forms; initially to cystine, and subsequently to cystathionine, S-Adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) and S-Adenosyl L-methionine (SAM), in addition to eventually accumulating glutathione (GSH) and polyamines. Microarray based gene expression studies revealed the upregulation of arginine/ornithine biosynthesis a few hours after the cysteine overload, and suggest that the non-toxic, non-reactive thiol based metabolic products are eventually utilized for amino acid and polyamine biogenesis, thereby enabling cell growth. Thus, cells can handle potentially toxic amounts of cysteine by a combination of thiol trapping, metabolic redistribution to non-reactive thiols and subsequent consumption for anabolism. PMID:28435838

  2. Direct visualization of the Wntless-induced redistribution of WNT1 in developing chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Galli, Lisa M; Santana, Frederick; Apollon, Chantilly; Szabo, Linda A; Ngo, Keri; Burrus, Laura W

    2018-04-30

    Paracrine Wnt signals are critical regulators of cell proliferation, specification, and differentiation during embryogenesis. Consistent with the discovery that Wnt ligands are post-translationally modified with palmitoleate (a 16 carbon mono-unsaturated fatty acid), our studies show that the vast majority of bioavailable chick WNT1 (cWNT1) produced in stably transfected L cells is cell-associated. Thus, it seems unlikely that the WNT1 signal is propagated by diffusion alone. Unfortunately, the production and transport of vertebrate Wnt proteins has been exceedingly difficult to study as few antibodies are able to detect endogenous Wnt proteins and fixation is known to disrupt the architecture of cells and tissues. Furthermore, vertebrate Wnts have been extraordinarily refractory to tagging. To help overcome these obstacles, we have generated a number of tools that permit the detection of WNT1 in palmitoylation assays and the visualization of chick and zebrafish WNT1 in live cells and tissues. Consistent with previous studies in fixed cells, live imaging of cells and tissues with overexpressed cWNT1-moxGFP shows predominant localization of the protein to a reticulated network that is likely to be the endoplasmic reticulum. As PORCN and WLS are important upstream regulators of Wnt gradient formation, we also undertook the generation of mCherry-tagged variants of both proteins. While co-expression of PORCN-mCherry had no discernible effect on the localization of WNT1-moxGFP, co-expression of WLS-mCherry caused a marked redistribution of WNT1-moxGFP to the cell surface and cellular projections in cultured cells as well as in neural crest and surface ectoderm cells in developing chick embryos. Our studies further establish that the levels of WLS, and not PORCN, are rate limiting with respect to WNT1 trafficking. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Redox equilibria in hydroxylamine oxidoreductase. Electrostatic control of electron redistribution in multielectron oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Kurnikov, Igor V; Ratner, Mark A; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2005-02-15

    We report results of continuum electrostatics calculations of the cofactor redox potentials, and of the titratable group pK(a) values, in hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO). A picture of a sophisticated multicomponent control of electron flow in the protein emerged from the studies. First, we found that neighboring heme cofactors strongly interact electrostatically, with energies of 50-100 mV. Thus, cofactor redox potentials depend on the oxidation state of other cofactors, and cofactor redox potentials in the active (partially oxidized) enzyme differ substantially from the values obtained in electrochemical redox titration experiments. We found that, together, solvent-exposed heme 1 (having a large negative redox potential) and heme 2 (having a large positive redox potential) form a lock for electrons generated during the oxidation reaction The attachment of HAO's physiological electron transfer partner cytochrome c(554) results in a positive shift in the redox potential of heme 1, and "opens the electron gate". Electrons generated as a result of hydroxylamine oxidation travel to heme 3 and heme 8, which have redox potentials close to 0 mV versus NHE (this result is in partial disagreement with an existing experimental redox potential assignment). The closeness of hemes 3 and 8 from different enzyme subunits allows redistribution of the four electrons generated as a result of hydroxylamine oxidation, among the three enzyme subunits. For the multielectron oxidation process to be maximally efficient, the redox potentials of the electron-accepting cofactors should be roughly equal, and electrostatic interactions between extra electrons on these cofactors should be minimal. The redox potential assignments presented in the paper satisfy this general rule.

  4. Hydraulic redistribution affects modeled carbon cycling via soil microbial activity and suppressed fire.

    PubMed

    Fu, Congsheng; Wang, Guiling; Bible, Kenneth; Goulden, Michael L; Saleska, Scott R; Scott, Russell L; Cardon, Zoe G

    2018-04-13

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) of water from moist to drier soils, through plant roots, occurs world-wide in seasonally dry ecosystems. Although the influence of HR on landscape hydrology and plant water use has been amply demonstrated, HR's effects on microbe-controlled processes sensitive to soil moisture, including carbon and nutrient cycling at ecosystem scales, remain difficult to observe in the field and have not been integrated into a predictive framework. We incorporated a representation of HR into the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) and found the new model improved predictions of water, energy, and system-scale carbon fluxes observed by eddy covariance at four seasonally dry yet ecologically diverse temperate and tropical AmeriFlux sites. Modeled plant productivity and microbial activities were differentially stimulated by upward HR, resulting at times in increased plant demand outstripping increased nutrient supply. Modeled plant productivity and microbial activities were diminished by downward HR. Overall, inclusion of HR tended to increase modeled annual ecosystem uptake of CO 2 (or reduce annual CO 2 release to the atmosphere). Moreover, engagement of CLM4.5's ground-truthed fire module indicated that though HR increased modeled fuel load at all four sites, upward HR also moistened surface soil and hydrated vegetation sufficiently to limit the modeled spread of dry season fire and concomitant very large CO 2 emissions to the atmosphere. Historically, fire has been a dominant ecological force in many seasonally dry ecosystems, and intensification of soil drought and altered precipitation regimes are expected for seasonally dry ecosystems in the future. HR may play an increasingly important role mitigating development of extreme soil water potential gradients and associated limitations on plant and soil microbial activities, and may inhibit the spread of fire in seasonally dry ecosystems. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Excited stilbene: intramolecular vibrational redistribution and solvation studied by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Weigel, A; Ernsting, N P

    2010-06-17

    Excited-state relaxation of cis- and trans-stilbene is traced with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, exploiting S(n) <-- S(1) resonance conditions. For both isomers, decay in Raman intensity, shift of spectral positions, and broadening of the bands indicate intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR). In n-hexane this process effectively takes 0.5-0.7 ps. Analysis of the intensity decay allows us to further distinguish two phases for trans-stilbene: fast IVR within a subset of modes (approximately 0.3 ps) followed by slower equilibration over the full vibrational manifold (approximately 0.9 ps). In acetonitrile IVR completes with 0.15 ps; this acceleration may originate from symmetry breakage induced by the polar solvent. Another process, dynamic solvation by acetonitrile, is seen as spectral narrowing and characteristic band shifts of the C=C stretch and phenyl bending modes with 0.69 ps. Wavepacket motion is observed in both isomers as oscillation of low-frequency bands with their pertinent mode frequency (90 or 195 cm(-1) in trans-stilbene; 250 cm(-1) in cis-stilbene). Anharmonic coupling shows up as a modulation of high-frequency peak positions by phenyl/ethylene torsion modes of 57 and 90 cm(-1). Decay and shift of the 90 cm(-1) inverse Raman band within the first 0.3 ps suggests a gradual involvement of phenyl/ethylene torsion in relaxation. In cis- and trans-stilbene, low-frequency spectral changes are found within 0.15 ps, indicating an additional ultrafast process.

  6. High-resolution mapping of heterochromatin redistribution in a Drosophila position-effect variegation model.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Maartje J; Pagie, Ludo; Talhout, Wendy; Nieuwland, Marja; Kerkhoven, Ron M; van Steensel, Bas

    2009-01-29

    Position-effect variegation (PEV) is the stochastic transcriptional silencing of a gene positioned adjacent to heterochromatin. white-mottled X-chromosomal inversions in Drosophila are classic PEV models that show variegation of the eye color gene white due to its relocation next to pericentric heterochromatin. It has been suggested that in these models the spreading of heterochromatin across the rearrangement breakpoint causes the silencing of white. However, the extent of this spreading and the precise pattern of heterochromatin redistribution have remained unclear. To obtain insight into the mechanism of PEV, we constructed high-resolution binding maps of Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1) on white-mottled chromosomes. We find that HP1 invades euchromatin across the inversion breakpoints over approximately 175 kb and approximately 30 kb, causing de novo association of HP1 with 20 genes. However, HP1 binding levels in these regions show substantial local variation, and white is the most strongly bound gene. Remarkably, white is also the only gene that is detectably repressed by heterochromatin. Furthermore, we find that HP1 binding to the invaded region is particularly sensitive to the dosage of the histone methyltransferase Su(var)3-9, indicating that the de novo formed heterochromatin is less stable than naturally occurring constitutive heterochromatin. Our molecular maps demonstrate that heterochromatin can invade a normally euchromatic region, yet the strength of HP1 binding and effects on gene expression are highly dependent on local context. Our data suggest that the white gene has an unusual intrinsic affinity for heterochromatin, which may cause this gene to be more sensitive to PEV than most other genes.

  7. Thermally induced cation redistribution in Fe-bearing oxy-dravite and potential geothermometric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosi, Ferdinando; Skogby, Henrik; Hålenius, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Iron-bearing oxy-dravite was thermally treated in air and hydrogen atmosphere at 800 °C to study potential changes in Fe, Mg and Al ordering over the octahedrally coordinated Y and Z sites and to explore possible applications to intersite geothermometry based on tourmaline. Overall, the experimental data (structural refinement, Mössbauer, infrared and optical absorption spectroscopy) show that heating Fe-bearing tourmalines results in disordering of Fe over Y and Z balanced by ordering of Mg at Y, whereas Al does not change appreciably. The Fe disorder depends on temperature, but less on redox conditions. The degree of Fe3+-Fe2+ reduction is limited despite strongly reducing conditions, indicating that the f O2 conditions do not exclusively control the Fe oxidation state at the present experimental conditions. Untreated and treated samples have similar short- and long-range crystal structures, which are explained by stable Al-extended clusters around the O1 and O3 sites. In contrast to the stable Al clusters that preclude any temperature-dependent Mg-Al order-disorder, there occurs Mg diffusion linked to temperature-dependent exchange with Fe. Ferric iron mainly resides around O2- at O1 rather than (OH)-, but its intersite disorder induced by thermal treatment indicates that Fe redistribution is the driving force for Mg-Fe exchange and that its diffusion rates are significant at these temperatures. With increasing temperature, Fe progressively disorders over Y and Z, whereas Mg orders at Y according to the order-disorder reaction: YFe + ZMg → ZFe + YMg. The presented findings are important for interpretation of the post-crystallization history of both tourmaline and tourmaline host rocks and imply that successful tourmaline geothermometers may be developed by thermal calibration of the Mg-Fe order-disorder reaction, whereas any thermometers based on Mg-Al disorder will be insensitive and involve large uncertainties.

  8. Arctic stratospheric dehydration - Part 1: Unprecedented observation of vertical redistribution of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaykin, S. M.; Engel, I.; Vömel, H.; Formanyuk, I. M.; Kivi, R.; Korshunov, L. I.; Krämer, M.; Lykov, A. D.; Meier, S.; Naebert, T.; Pitts, M. C.; Santee, M. L.; Spelten, N.; Wienhold, F. G.; Yushkov, V. A.; Peter, T.

    2013-11-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of water vapour, aerosols and clouds in the Arctic stratosphere in January and February 2010 carried out by in situ instrumentation on balloon sondes and high-altitude aircraft combined with satellite observations. The measurements provide unparalleled evidence of dehydration and rehydration due to gravitational settling of ice particles. An extreme cooling of the Arctic stratospheric vortex during the second half of January 2010 resulted in a rare synoptic-scale outbreak of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) remotely detected by the lidar aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) satellite. The widespread occurrence of ice clouds was followed by sedimentation and consequent sublimation of ice particles, leading to vertical redistribution of water inside the vortex. A sequence of balloon and aircraft soundings with chilled mirror and Lyman- α hygrometers (Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer, CFH; Fast In Situ Stratospheric Hygrometer, FISH; Fluorescent Airborne Stratospheric Hygrometer, FLASH) and backscatter sondes (Compact Optical Backscatter Aerosol Detector, COBALD) conducted in January 2010 within the LAPBIAT (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere Facility) and RECONCILE (Reconciliation of Essential Process Parameters for an Enhanced Predictability of Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Loss and its Climate Interactions) campaigns captured various phases of this phenomenon: ice formation, irreversible dehydration and rehydration. Consistent observations of water vapour by these independent measurement techniques show clear signatures of irreversible dehydration of the vortex air by up to 1.6 ppmv in the 20-24 km altitude range and rehydration by up to 0.9 ppmv in a 1 km thick layer below. Comparison with space-borne Aura MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) water vapour observations allow the spatiotemporal evolution of dehydrated air masses within the Arctic vortex to be derived and upscaled.

  9. Planktic foraminiferal production stimulated by chlorophyll redistribution and entrainment of nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Ralf; Waniek, Joanna; Bork, Matthias; Hemleben, Christoph

    2001-03-01

    During September and October 1996 planktic foraminifers and pteropods were sampled from the upper 2500 m of the water column in the BIOTRANS area (47°N, 20°W), eastern North Atlantic, as part of the JGOFS program. Hydrography, chlorophyll fluorescence, and nutrient content were recorded at high spatial and temporal resolution providing detailed information about the transition time between summer and fall. At the beginning of the cruise a shallow pycnocline was present and oligotrophic conditions prevailed. Over the course of the cruise, the mixed layer depth increased and surface water temperature decreased by 1.5°C. Both chlorophyll- a dispersed in the upper 50 m by vertical mixing and chlorophyll- a concentrations at the sea surface increased. The nitracline shoaled and nutrient enriched waters were entrained into the mixed layer. Planktic foraminifers and pteropods closely reflected the changes in the hydrography by increased growth rates and changes in species composition. Three main groups of planktic foraminiferal species were recognized: (1) a temperate and low-productivity group dominated by Neogloboquadrina incompta characterized the shallow mixed layer depths. (2) A temperate and high-productivity group dominated by Globigerina bulloides characterized the period with wind-induced dispersal of chlorophyll- a and entrainment of nutrient-enriched waters. (3) A warm water group containing Globigerinoides sacculifer, Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides ruber (white), and Globigerinella siphonifera was most common during the first days of sampling. Synchronous with the hydrographic change from summer to fall, planktic foraminiferal and pteropod growth was stimulated by redistribution of chlorophyll- a and entrainment of nutrient-enriched waters into the mixed layer. In addition, the seasonal change in the eastern North Atlantic resulted in a transition of the epipelagic faunal composition and an increased calcareous particle flux, which could be used to

  10. Proton redistribution and pseudoantiferroelectricity in H+ implanted Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Jiang, A. Q.; Tang, T. A.

    2009-05-01

    Hydrogen ions were implanted into 500-nm-thick Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ferroelectric thin films with different doses and energies. An antiferroelectric behavior was confirmed in the implanted thin films with proper H+ injection energies from independent measurements of polarization-electric hysteresis loops and capacitance-voltage curves. With the increase in the H+ doping concentration and implanting energy up to 25 keV, the characteristic pseudoantiferroelectric behavior becomes more evident in the films along with the concomitant reduction in the remnant polarization. However, the above antiferroelectricity is weakened for the restoration of a preferred ferroelectric state, once the implanting energy is higher than 35 eV. The consequent "Trim94" simulation of the H+ distribution as well as the induced oxygen vacancies (VOṡṡ) indicates the almost linear shift in the depth for the maximum charge density within the film with the enhanced implanting energy until the depth moves out of the film thickness above 40 keV. Beyond the antiferroelectric dependence on the implanting energy in thin films, the previous ferroelectric state can also be rejuvenated under a bipolar-field stressing through the redistribution of the H+ and VOṡṡ concentrations. The rejuvenation process is accelerated upon heating due to the increased charge mobility. The doping charges are immobile during short-time domain switching but movable under a long-time negative/positive field with the estimated activation energy of 0.23/0.29 eV. This study implies the potential application of high-density charge storage of the implanted ferroelectric capacitor with the property comparable to a genuine antiferroelectric capacitor.

  11. Redistribution of Flexibility in Stabilizing Antibody Fragment Mutants Follows Le Châtelier’s Principle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B.; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Le Châtelier’s principle is the cornerstone of our understanding of chemical equilibria. When a system at equilibrium undergoes a change in concentration or thermodynamic state (i.e., temperature, pressure, etc.), La Châtelier’s principle states that an equilibrium shift will occur to offset the perturbation and a new equilibrium is established. We demonstrate that the effects of stabilizing mutations on the rigidity ⇔ flexibility equilibrium within the native state ensemble manifest themselves through enthalpy-entropy compensation as the protein structure adjusts to restore the global balance between the two. Specifically, we characterize the effects of mutation to single chain fragments of the anti-lymphotoxin-β receptor antibody using a computational Distance Constraint Model. Statistically significant changes in the distribution of both rigidity and flexibility within the molecular structure is typically observed, where the local perturbations often lead to distal shifts in flexibility and rigidity profiles. Nevertheless, the net gain or loss in flexibility of individual mutants can be skewed. Despite all mutants being exclusively stabilizing in this dataset, increased flexibility is slightly more common than increased rigidity. Mechanistically the redistribution of flexibility is largely controlled by changes in the H-bond network. For example, a stabilizing mutation can induce an increase in rigidity locally due to the formation of new H-bonds, and simultaneously break H-bonds elsewhere leading to increased flexibility distant from the mutation site via Le Châtelier. Increased flexibility within the VH β4/β5 loop is a noteworthy illustration of this long-range effect. PMID:24671209

  12. Flow Redistribution Between Legs and Brain During STS 93 Re-Entry and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbeille, P.; Meck, J.; Porcher, M.; Benavides, E.; Martin, D. S.; South, D. A.; Ribeiro, C.; Westover, A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to quantify bit by bit the arterial hemodynamic response to the successive acceleration induced fluid shifts during re-entry and landing. Method: The astronaut instrumented himself with a flat Doppler probe fixed on the skin, a blood pressure arm cuff, and 3 ECG electrodes. The ICMS (integrated cardiovascular monitoring system, 15x15x25 cu cm, battery powered) designed to monitor Blood pressure, ECG, cerebral and femoral flows was fixed below the astronaut sit in the middeck. Recordings started 5 minutes before de-orbiting (TIG) and stopped 5 min after wheels stop. Results. During re-entry blood pressure increased by 20% at TIG, and then by 25 to 30% during the highest Gz accelerations (approx 1 S g ) . The cerebral flow remained decreased by 10 to 15% below inflight value all during the Entry and landing phases. Conversely the femoral flow increased at TIG and entry ( + l0 to 20%), recovered at 0.lg, and then decreased in proportion with the Gz acceleration (-10% to -40% from 0.5g to 1.5g). The reduction in Femoral flow was associated with an opposite variation in lower limb vascular resistance. Consequently the cerebral flow/femoral flow ratio decreased at TIG and entry (-20%), and then increased according to the Gz acceleration level ( + l0 to +40% from 0.5 to 1.5g). Conclusion: During orthostatic tests (Stand LBNP tests) the cerebral to femoral flow ratio allowed to quantify the efficiency of the flow redistribution between these 2 areas and predicted orthostatic intolerance. In the present case the astronaut was found orthostatically tolerant at postflight tilt tests, but we suggest that during re-entry this parameter could predict the occurrence of syncope in severely disadapted astronauts.

  13. [Current approach to zoning atomic shipbuilding plants].

    PubMed

    Blekher, A Ia

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusses the currently introduced radiation-and-hygienic system for zoning atomic shipbuilding plants, in accordance with which three radiation-and-hygienic zones (a strict regime zone, a controlled approach zone, and a free regime zone) are established at the plant site and two zones (a sanitary-and-protective zone and a follow-up zone) are also established outside the plant site.

  14. Assessment of an in-channel redistribution technique for large woody debris management in Locust Creek, Linn County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.

    2017-10-24

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Conservation and Missouri Department of Natural Resources, completed a study to assess a mechanical redistribution technique used for the management of large woody debris (LWD) jams in Locust Creek within Pershing State Park and Fountain Grove Conservation Area, Linn County, Missouri. Extensive LWD jams were treated from 1996 to 2009 using a low-impact technique in which LWD from the jams was redistributed to reopen the channel and to mimic the natural geomorphic process of channel migration and adjustment to an obstruction. The scope of the study included the comparison of selected channel geometry characteristics and bed material particle-size distribution in seven LWD treatment reaches with that of adjacent untreated reaches (unaffected by LWD accumulations) of Locust Creek. A comparison of 1996 and 2015 survey cross sections in treated and untreated reaches and photograph documentation were used to assess channel geomorphic change and the stability of redistributed LWD. The physical characteristics of LWD within jams present in the study reach during 2015–16 also were documented.Based on the general lack of differences in channel metrics between treated and untreated reaches, it can be concluded that the mechanical redistribution technique has been an effective treatment of extensive LWD jams in Locust Creek. Channel alterations, including aggradation, streamflow piracy, and diversions, have resulted in temporal and spatial changes in the Locust Creek channel that may affect future applications of the redistribution technique in Pershing State Park. The redistribution technique was used to effectively manage LWD in Locust Creek at a potentially lower financial cost and reduced environmental disturbance than the complete removal of LWD.A comparison of four channel metrics (bankfull cross-sectional area, channel width, streamflow capacity, and width-depth ratio) for individual treatment

  15. Cost-effective sampling of ¹³⁷Cs-derived net soil redistribution: part 1--estimating the spatial mean across scales of variation.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Chappell, A; Nyamdavaa, B; Yu, H; Davaasuren, D; Zoljargal, K

    2015-03-01

    The (137)Cs technique for estimating net time-integrated soil redistribution is valuable for understanding the factors controlling soil redistribution by all processes. The literature on this technique is dominated by studies of individual fields and describes its typically time-consuming nature. We contend that the community making these studies has inappropriately assumed that many (137)Cs measurements are required and hence estimates of net soil redistribution can only be made at the field scale. Here, we support future studies of (137)Cs-derived net soil redistribution to apply their often limited resources across scales of variation (field, catchment, region etc.) without compromising the quality of the estimates at any scale. We describe a hybrid, design-based and model-based, stratified random sampling design with composites to estimate the sampling variance and a cost model for fieldwork and laboratory measurements. Geostatistical mapping of net (1954-2012) soil redistribution as a case study on the Chinese Loess Plateau is compared with estimates for several other sampling designs popular in the literature. We demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of the hybrid design for spatial estimation of net soil redistribution. To demonstrate the limitations of current sampling approaches to cut across scales of variation, we extrapolate our estimate of net soil redistribution across the region, show that for the same resources, estimates from many fields could have been provided and would elucidate the cause of differences within and between regional estimates. We recommend that future studies evaluate carefully the sampling design to consider the opportunity to investigate (137)Cs-derived net soil redistribution across scales of variation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  17. Multiple Magnetic Storm Study of the High-Altitude Redistribution of Equatorial Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Curtis, N.; Anderson, D.

    2008-12-01

    altitude densities will be cross compared for the various storms and the similarities and differences will be studied and correlated with various geophysical parameters such as the interplanetary magnetic field (Bz), Dst, hemispheric power, cross cap potential, PPE, equatorial vertical drifts, and the interplanetary electric field. The overall objective is to elucidate the physical relationships that govern the redistribution of equatorial plasma during storms, and the generation and evolution of SEDs.

  18. Redistribution of insoluble interphotoreceptor matrix components during photoreceptor differentiation in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Mieziewska, K; Szél, A; Van Veen, T; Aguirre, G D; Philp, N

    1994-07-01

    The development of the nervous system is largely influenced by the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the neural retina, the photoreceptors are surrounded by a unique ECM, the interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM). The IPM plays a central and possibly crucial role in the development, maintenance and specific function of the photoreceptors. Therefore, the characterization of IPM components is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating photoreceptor differentiation. The IPM in the mouse retina was examined during photoreceptor morphogenesis with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) F22, which recognizes a 250 kDa component of the interphotoreceptor matrix. The binding pattern of MAb F22 revealed a striking redistribution in the expression of the 250 kDa F22 antigen in late stage of postnatal photoreceptor differentiation in the mouse retina. The F22 staining was detectable in the IPM around the inner segments on the third postnatal day (P3). The MAb F22 initially labeled the region around inner segments, but as the outer segments elongated, the F22 distribution became concentrated to the matrix around the rod and cone outer segments until P16-17. At P17, the F22 label around rods began to disappear, while the label around cones became more defined. The shift in label distribution was largely completed by P20. Residual rod-associated label disappeared within a few days. In the adult animal, the F22 antibody labeled the cone-associated matrix only, and this labeling pattern remained stationary. The change in the distribution of MAb F22 demonstrated by immunolabeling was not accompanied by changes in the size of the molecule; F22 antigen isolated from the IPM of P13-15, and from adult IPM migrated with the same molecular weight on SDS gels. The distribution of MAb F22 was compared to that of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans which are abundant in the IPM. The labeling patterns of MAbs CS-56, C6-S and C4-S were distinct from that of MAb F22. A general decrease of the label

  19. Effects of landcover, water redistribution, and temperature on ecosystem processes in the South Plate Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, Jill S.; Hartman, M.D.; Kittel, Timothy G.F.; Band, L.E.; Ojima, D. S.; Lammers, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    evapotranspiration of 1000–1500 mm and is insufficient for optimum plant productivity. The changes in water flux and photosynthesis from conversion of steppe to cropland are the result of redistribution of snowmelt water from the mountains and groundwater pumping through irrigation projects.

  20. Spilled oil and infaunal activity - Modification of burrowing behavior and redistribution of oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clifton, H.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments in Willapa Bay, Washington, indicates the degree to which the presence of spilled oil modifies the burrowing behavior of infauna and the extent to which the animals redistribute oil into intertidal sediment. Small amounts of North Slope crude oil introduced at low tide directly into burrow openings (mostly made by the crustacean Callianassa) resulted in a limited and temporary reduction in the number of burrow openings. In contrast, a layer of oil-saturated sand 1 cm thick buried about 5 cm below the sediment surface sharply reduced the number of burrow openings. After a year, the few new burrows penetrated only the margins of the experimental plot, and bioturbation below the buried oil-saturated sand layer declined dramatically. The experiments suggest that small amounts of oil temporarily stranded by tides in themselves have no long-range effect on burrowing behavior. The fauna, however, are capable of introducing measurable amounts of oil into the subsurface, where it is retained long after the rest of the stranded oil had washed away. A buried layer of oil-saturated sand greatly reduces infaunal activity; the oil presents an effective barrier that can persist for years. The oil incorporated into the sediment from burrow openings showed evidence of degradation after 7 months. In contrast the layer of buried oil remained essentially undergraded after a period of two years, even though oil in lower concentrations above the layer was degraded after a period of one year. This variation in degree of degradation of the buried oil, as well as the heterogeneity of oil distribution wherever the oil has been incorporated from the surface, emphasises the importance of careful sampling in any attempt to locate or monitor the presence of spilled oil in the substrate.In a series of experiments in Willapa Bay, Washington, small amounts of North Slope crude oil introduced at low tide directly into burrow openings resulted in a limited and temporary

  1. Element mobilization and redistribution under extreme tropical weathering of basalts from the Hainan Island, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ke; Qi, Hua-Wen; Hu, Rui-Zhong

    2018-06-01

    and formation of secondary phosphates. Our findings highlight the importance of secondary phosphates in the redistribution of transition metals, and in the possible Mg, Cu, and Ni isotopic fractionation under extreme weathering of basalt in tropic climate.

  2. The interaction between soil erosion and soil organisms in temperate agroecosystems: nematode redistribution in tramlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Craig; Rowan, John S.; McKenzie, Blair M.; Neilson, Roy

    2014-05-01

    Arable agriculture presents a unique set of challenges, and one of the most important is soil erosion. Whilst policy and practice look towards sustainable intensification of production to ensure food security, fundamental gaps in our understanding still exist. The physical processes involved in the detachment, transport and deposition of soil are well characterised but further research considering chemical and nutrient transport, fertiliser and pesticide losses, and environmental impacts to downstream environments is still required. Furthermore the interaction between soil erosion and soil organisms have largely been ignored, even though soil organisms serve a myriad of functions essential in the provision of soil ecosystem goods and services. Here we present the findings of a field-scale experiment into soil biotic redistribution undertaken at the James Hutton Institute's Balruddery Farm, Scotland (Link Tramlines Project XDW8001). Farm vehicle-tyre wheelings left in arable fields (tramlines) to enable crop spraying during the crop growth cycle have been identified as key transport pathways for sediment and associated nutrients. We tested the hypothesis that soil organisms were also transported by tramline erosion. During the winter of 2012/13 an experiment was undertaken to measure soil organism export from unbound hillslope plots subject to four different tramline treatments set out in a randomised block design. We used soil nematodes as a model organism as they are ubiquitous and sensitive to disturbance and an established indicator taxa of biological and physico-chemical changes in soil. Tramline treatments included a control tyre (conventional tractor tyre), a control tyre with a sown tramline, a low pressure tyre with sown tramline, and a control tyre with a spiked harrow. Post-event sampling of rainfall events was undertaken, and a range of variables measured in the laboratory. The spiked harrow treatment produced the greatest overall reductions in nematode

  3. Simulation of infiltration and redistribution of intense rainfall using Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Anna; Verhoef, Anne; Cloke, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    describe and deal with this top boundary condition definition. All three LSMs discretise the spatial derivative in the Richards equation (∂/∂z) using central finite differences, which is a 2nd order method, that according to Godunov's theorem is non-monotone. It is prone to producing non-physical oscillations in the solution. We performed a mesh and timestep dependence study for hypothetical soil columns and showed the presence of the oscillations in Jules and SWAP solutions. We also investigated the rainfall/runoff partition and redistribution in case of intense rainfall using these three models.

  4. Redistribution of Mechanical Work at the Knee and Ankle Joints During Fast Running in Minimalist Shoes.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Joel T; Buckley, Jonathan D; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Thewlis, Dominic

    2016-10-01

    Minimalist shoes have been suggested as a way to alter running biomechanics to improve running performance and reduce injuries. However, to date, researchers have only considered the effect of minimalist shoes at slow running speeds. To determine if runners change foot-strike pattern and alter the distribution of mechanical work at the knee and ankle joints when running at a fast speed in minimalist shoes compared with conventional running shoes. Crossover study. Research laboratory. Twenty-six trained runners (age = 30.0 ± 7.9 years [age range, 18-40 years], height = 1.79 ± 0.06 m, mass = 75.3 ± 8.2 kg, weekly training distance = 27 ± 15 km) who ran with a habitual rearfoot foot-strike pattern and had no experience running in minimalist shoes. Participants completed overground running trials at 18 km/h in minimalist and conventional shoes. Sagittal-plane kinematics and joint work at the knee and ankle joints were computed using 3-dimensional kinematic and ground reaction force data. Foot-strike pattern was classified as rearfoot, midfoot, or forefoot strike based on strike index and ankle angle at initial contact. We observed no difference in foot-strike classification between shoes (χ 2 1 = 2.29, P = .13). Ankle angle at initial contact was less (2.46° versus 7.43°; t 25 = 3.34, P = .003) and strike index was greater (35.97% versus 29.04%; t 25 = 2.38, P = .03) when running in minimalist shoes compared with conventional shoes. We observed greater negative (52.87 J versus 42.46 J; t 24 = 2.29, P = .03) and positive work (68.91 J versus 59.08 J; t 24 = 2.65, P = .01) at the ankle but less negative (59.01 J versus 67.02 J; t 24 = 2.25, P = .03) and positive work (40.37 J versus 47.09 J; t 24 = 2.11, P = .046) at the knee with minimalist shoes compared with conventional shoes. Running in minimalist shoes at a fast speed caused a redistribution of work from the knee to the ankle joint. This finding suggests that runners changing from conventional to minimalist

  5. Redistribution of Mechanical Work at the Knee and Ankle Joints During Fast Running in Minimalist Shoes

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Joel T.; Buckley, Jonathan D.; Tsiros, Margarita D.; Brown, Nicholas A. T.; Thewlis, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    redistribution of work from the knee to the ankle joint. This finding suggests that runners changing from conventional to minimalist shoes for short-distance races could be at an increased risk of ankle and calf injuries but a reduced risk of knee injuries. PMID:27834504

  6. ICAMs Redistributed by Chemokines to Cellular Uropods as a Mechanism for Recruitment of T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Cabañas, Carlos; Montoya, María C.; Ager, Ann; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    1997-01-01

    The recruitment of leukocytes from the bloodstream is a key step in the inflammatory reaction, and chemokines are among the main regulators of this process. During lymphocyte–endothelial interaction, chemokines induce the polarization of T lymphocytes, with the formation of a cytoplasmic projection (uropod) and redistribution of several adhesion molecules (ICAM-1,-3, CD43, CD44) to this structure. Although it has been reported that these cytokines regulate the adhesive state of integrins in leukocytes, their precise mechanisms of chemoattraction remain to be elucidated. We have herein studied the functional role of the lymphocyte uropod. Confocal microscopy studies clearly showed that cell uropods project away from the cell bodies of adhered lymphocytes and that polarized T cells contact other T cells through the uropod structure. Time-lapse videomicroscopy studies revealed that uropod-bearing T cells were able, through this cellular projection, to contact, capture, and transport additional bystander T cells. Quantitative analysis revealed that the induction of uropods results in a 5–10-fold increase in cell recruitment. Uropod-mediated cell recruitment seems to have physiological relevance, since it was promoted by both CD45R0+ peripheral blood memory T cells as well as by in vivo activated lymphocytes. Additional studies showed that the cell recruitment mediated by uropods was abrogated with antibodies to ICAM-1, -3, and LFA-1, whereas mAb to CD43, CD44, CD45, and L-selectin did not have a significant effect, thus indicating that the interaction of LFA-1 with ICAM-1 and -3 appears to be responsible for this process. To determine whether the increment in cell recruitment mediated by uropod may affect the transendothelial migration of T cells, we carried out chemotaxis assays through confluent monolayers of endothelial cells specialized in lymphocyte extravasation. An enhancement of T cell migration was observed under conditions of uropod formation, and this

  7. Fuel conditioning facility zone-to-zone transfer administrative controls.

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, C. L.

    2000-06-21

    The administrative controls associated with transferring containers from one criticality hazard control zone to another in the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) are described. FCF, located at the ANL-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, is used to remotely process spent sodium bonded metallic fuel for disposition. The process involves nearly forty widely varying material forms and types, over fifty specific use container types, and over thirty distinct zones where work activities occur. During 1999, over five thousand transfers from one zone to another were conducted. Limits are placed on mass, material form and type, and container typesmore » for each zone. Ml material and containers are tracked using the Mass Tracking System (MTG). The MTG uses an Oracle database and numerous applications to manage the database. The database stores information specific to the process, including material composition and mass, container identification number and mass, transfer history, and the operators involved in each transfer. The process is controlled using written procedures which specify the zone, containers, and material involved in a task. Transferring a container from one zone to another is called a zone-to-zone transfer (ZZT). ZZTs consist of four distinct phases, select, request, identify, and completion.« less

  8. Molecular differences in transition zone and peripheral zone prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Rider, Jennifer R.; Carlsson, Jessica; Gerke, Travis; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Penney, Kathryn L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Loda, Massimo; Fall, Katja; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Pawitan, Yudi; Andersson, Sven-Olof; Andrén, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Prostate tumors arise primarily in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate, but 20–30% arise in the transition zone (TZ). Zone of origin may have prognostic value or reflect distinct molecular subtypes; however, it can be difficult to determine in practice. Using whole-genome gene expression, we built a signature of zone using normal tissue from five individuals and found that it successfully classified nine tumors of known zone. Hypothesizing that this signature captures tumor zone of origin, we assessed its relationship with clinical factors among 369 tumors of unknown zone from radical prostatectomies (RPs) and found that tumors that molecularly resembled TZ tumors showed lower mortality (P = 0.09) that was explained by lower Gleason scores (P = 0.009). We further applied the signature to an earlier study of 88 RP and 333 transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) tumor samples, also of unknown zone, with gene expression on ~6000 genes. We had observed previously substantial expression differences between RP and TURP specimens, and hypothesized that this might be because RPs capture primarily PZ tumors, whereas TURPs capture more TZ tumors. Our signature distinguished these two groups, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 87% (P < 0.0001). Our findings that zonal differences in normal tissue persist in tumor tissue and that these differences are associated with Gleason score and sample type suggest that subtypes potentially resulting from different etiologic pathways might arise in these zones. Zone of origin may be important to consider in prostate tumor biomarker research. PMID:25870172

  9. Nanoparticles of noble metals in the supergene zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmodik, S. M.; Kalinin, Yu. A.; Roslyakov, N. A.; Mironov, A. G.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Belyanin, D. K.; Nemirovskaya, N. A.; Spiridonov, A. M.; Nesterenko, G. V.; Airiyants, E. V.; Moroz, T. N.; Bul'bak, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Formation of noble metal nanoparticles is related to various geological processes in the supergene zone. Dispersed mineral phases appear during weathering of rocks with active participation of microorganisms, formation of soil, in aqueous medium and atmosphere. Invisible gold and other noble metals are incorporated into oxides, hydroxides, and sulfides, as well as in dispersed organic and inorganic carbonic matter. Sulfide minerals that occur in bedrocks and ores unaltered by exogenic processes and in cementation zone are among the main concentrators of noble metal nanoparticles. The ability of gold particles to disaggregate is well-known and creates problems in technological and analytical practice. When Au and PGE nanoparticles and clusters occur, these problems are augmented because of their unusual reactions and physicochemical properties. The studied gold, magnetite, titanomagnetite and pyrite microspherules from cementation zone and clay minerals of laterites in Republic of Guinea widen the knowledge of their abundance and inferred formation conditions, in particular, in the contemporary supergene zone. Morphology and composition of micrometer-sized Au mineral spherules were studied with SEM and laser microprobe. The newly formed segregations of secondary gold on the surface of its residual grains were also an object of investigation. The character of such overgrowths is the most indicative for nanoparticles. The newly formed Au particles provide evidence for redistribution of ultradispersed gold during weathering. There are serious prerequisites to state that microorganisms substantially control unusual nano-sized microspherical morphology of gold particles in the supergene zone. This is supported by experiments indicating active absorption of gold by microorganisms and direct evidence for participation of Ralstonia metallidurans bacteria in the formation of peculiar corroded bacteriomorphic surface of gold grains. In addition, the areas enriched in carbon

  10. Convergence of the effect of root hydraulic functioning and root hydraulic redistribution on ecosystem water and carbon balance across divergent forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    domec, J.; King, J. S.; Ogée, J.; Noormets, A.; Warren, J.; Meinzer, F. C.; Sun, G.; Jordan-Meille, L.; Martineau, E.; Brooks, R. J.; Laclau, J.; Battie Laclau, P.; McNulty, S.

    2012-12-01

    INVITED ABSTRACT: Deep root water uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) play a major role in forest ecosystems during drought, but little is known about the impact of climate change on root-zone processes influencing HR and its consequences on water and carbon fluxes. Using data from two old growth sites in the western USA, two mature sites in the eastern USA, one site in southern Brazil, and simulations with the process-based model MuSICA, our objectives were to show that HR can 1) mitigate the effects of soil drying on root functioning, and 2) have important implications for carbon uptake and net ecosystem exchange (NEE). In a dry, old-growth ponderosa pine (USA) and a eucalyptus stand (Brazil) both characterized by deep sandy soils, HR limited the decline in root hydraulic conductivity and increased dry season tree transpiration (T) by up to 30%, which impacted NEE through major increases in gross primary productivity (GPP). The presence of deep-rooted trees did not necessarily imply high rates of HR unless soil texture allowed large water potential gradients to occur, as was the case in the wet old-growth Douglas-fir/mixed conifer stand. At the Duke mixed hardwood forest characterized by a shallow clay-loam soil, modeled HR was low but not negligible, representing annually up to 10% of T, and maintaining root conductance high. At this site, in the absence of HR, it was predicted that annual GPP would have been diminished by 7-19%. At the coastal loblolly pine plantation, characterized by deep organic soil, HR limited the decline in shallow root conductivity by more than 50% and increased dry season T by up to 40%, which increased net carbon gain by the ecosystem by about 400 gC m-2 yr-1, demonstrating the significance of HR in maintaining the stomatal conductance and assimilation capacity of the whole ecosystem. Under future climate conditions (elevated atmospheric [CO2] and temperature), HR is predicted to be reduced by up to 50%; reducing the resilience of

  11. Achieving That Elusive "Leadership Zone"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Reaching the "leadership zone" happens when librarians tap into the extraordinary skills lying within to overcome obstacles and transform sometimes-difficult situations into meaningful outcomes. Maturing into an experienced leader who stays in the leadership zone requires knowledge, training, and practice. This article provides tactical…

  12. Sperm sorting procedure induces a redistribution of Hsp70 but not Hsp60 and Hsp90 in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Spinaci, Marcella; Volpe, Sara; Bernardini, Chiara; de Ambrogi, Marco; Tamanini, Carlo; Seren, Eraldo; Galeati, Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock proteins, besides their protective function against stresses, have been recently indicated as key factors for sperm fertilizing ability. Since sexing sperm by high-speed flow-cytometry subjects them to different physical, mechanical, and chemical stresses, the present study was designed to verify, by immunofluorescence and Western blot, whether the sorting procedure induces any modification in the amount and cellular distribution of heat shock proteins 60, 70, and 90 (Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90). Immunolocalization and Western blot quantification of both Hsp60 and Hsp90 did not reveal differences between unsorted and sorted semen. On the contrary, a redistribution of Hsp70 immunoreactivity from the equatorial subsegment toward the equator of sperm cells was recorded after sorting; this relocation suggests capacitation-like changes of sperm membrane. This modification seems to be caused mainly by incubation with Hoechst 33342, while both passage of sperm through flow cytometer and laser beam represent only minor stimuli. A further Hsp70 redistribution seems to be due to the final steps of sperm sorting, charging, and deflection of drops, and to the dilution during collection. On the other hand, staining procedure and mechanical stress seem to be the factors most injurious to sperm viability. Moreover, Hsp70 relocation was deeply influenced by the storage method. In fact, storing sexed spermatozoa, after centrifugation, in a small volume in presence of seminal plasma induced a reversion of Hsp70 redistribution, while storage in the diluted catch fluid of collection tubes caused Hsp70 relocation in most sorted spermatozoa.

  13. Effects of Cluster Sets and Rest-Redistribution on Mechanical Responses to Back Squats in Trained Men.

    PubMed

    Tufano, James J; Conlon, Jenny A; Nimphius, Sophia; Brown, Lee E; Petkovic, Alex; Frick, Justin; Haff, G Gregory

    2017-09-01

    Eight resistance-trained men completed three protocols separated by 48-96 hours. Each protocol included 36 repetitions with the same rest duration, but the frequency and length of rest periods differed. The cluster sets of four (CS4) protocol included 30 s of rest after the 4th, 8th, 16th, 20th, 28th, and 32nd repetition in addition to 120 s of rest after the 12th and 24th repetition. For the other two protocols, the total 420 s rest time of CS4 was redistributed to include nine sets of four repetitions (RR4) with 52.5 s of rest after every four repetitions, or 36 sets of single repetitions (RR1) with 12 s of rest after every repetition. Mean (MF) and peak (PF) force, velocity (MV and PV), and power output (MP and PP) were measured during 36 repetitions and were collapsed into 12 repetitions for analysis. Repeated measures ANOVA 3 (protocol) x 12 (repetition) showed a protocol x repetition interaction for PF, MV, PV, MP, and PP (p-values from <0.001 to 0.012). No interaction or main effect was present for MF. During RR1, MV, PV, MP, and PP were maintained, but decreased throughout every 4-repetition sequence during CS4 and RR4. During CS4 and RR4, PF was less following a rest period compared to subsequent repetitions, whereas PF was maintained during RR1. These data indicate that rest redistribution results in similar average kinetics and kinematics, but if total rest time is redistributed to create shorter but more frequent sets, kinetics and kinematics may remain more constant.

  14. Effects of Cluster Sets and Rest-Redistribution on Mechanical Responses to Back Squats in Trained Men

    PubMed Central

    Tufano, James J.; Conlon, Jenny A.; Nimphius, Sophia; Brown, Lee E.; Petkovic, Alex; Frick, Justin; Haff, G. Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Eight resistance-trained men completed three protocols separated by 48-96 hours. Each protocol included 36 repetitions with the same rest duration, but the frequency and length of rest periods differed. The cluster sets of four (CS4) protocol included 30 s of rest after the 4th, 8th, 16th, 20th, 28th, and 32nd repetition in addition to 120 s of rest after the 12th and 24th repetition. For the other two protocols, the total 420 s rest time of CS4 was redistributed to include nine sets of four repetitions (RR4) with 52.5 s of rest after every four repetitions, or 36 sets of single repetitions (RR1) with 12 s of rest after every repetition. Mean (MF) and peak (PF) force, velocity (MV and PV), and power output (MP and PP) were measured during 36 repetitions and were collapsed into 12 repetitions for analysis. Repeated measures ANOVA 3 (protocol) x 12 (repetition) showed a protocol x repetition interaction for PF, MV, PV, MP, and PP (p-values from <0.001 to 0.012). No interaction or main effect was present for MF. During RR1, MV, PV, MP, and PP were maintained, but decreased throughout every 4-repetition sequence during CS4 and RR4. During CS4 and RR4, PF was less following a rest period compared to subsequent repetitions, whereas PF was maintained during RR1. These data indicate that rest redistribution results in similar average kinetics and kinematics, but if total rest time is redistributed to create shorter but more frequent sets, kinetics and kinematics may remain more constant. PMID:28828076

  15. The Supergalactic Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Habitability in the local universe is examined. Constrained by metal abundance and exposure to sterilizing events, life as we know it requires significantly long periods of stable environmental conditions. Planets within galaxies undergoing major mergers, active AGN, starburst episodes, and merging black holes pose serious threats to long-term habitability. Importantly, the development of several layers of protection from high-energy particles such as a thick atmosphere, a strong planetary magnetic field, an astrosphere, and a galactic magnetic field is of great benefit. Factors such as star type and activity, planet type and composition, the location of a planet within its host galaxy, and even the location within a supercluster of galaxies can affect the potential habitability of planets. We discuss the concept of the Supergalactic Habitable Zone introduced by Mason and Biermann in terms of habitability in the local universe and find that galaxies near the center of the Virgo cluster, for example, have a much lower probability for the development of life as we know it as compared to locations in the Milky Way.

  16. Detecting livestock production zones.

    PubMed

    Grisi-Filho, J H H; Amaku, M; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Neto, J S Ferreira; Negreiros, R L; Ossada, R

    2013-07-01

    Communities are sets of nodes that are related in an important way, most likely sharing common properties and/or playing similar roles within a network. Unraveling a network structure, and hence the trade preferences and pathways, could be useful to a researcher or a decision maker. We implemented a community detection algorithm to find livestock communities, which is consistent with the definition of a livestock production zone, assuming that a community is a group of farm premises in which an animal is more likely to stay during its lifetime than expected by chance. We applied this algorithm to the network of animal movements within the state of Mato Grosso for 2007. This database holds information concerning 87,899 premises and 521,431 movements throughout the year, totaling 15,844,779 animals moved. The community detection algorithm achieved a network partition that shows a clear geographical and commercial pattern, two crucial features for preventive veterinary medicine applications; this algorithm provides also a meaningful interpretation to trade networks where links emerge based on trader node choices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Contact Zone: Missoula

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-23

    A rock outcrop dubbed "Missoula," near Marias Pass on Mars, is seen in this image mosaic taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager on NASA's Curiosity rover. Pale mudstone (bottom of outcrop) meets coarser sandstone (top) in this geological contact zone, which has piqued the interest of Mars scientists. White mineral veins that fill fractures in the lower rock unit abruptly end when they meet the upper rock unit. Such clues help scientists understand the possible timing of geological events. First, the fine sediment that now forms the lower unit would have hardened into rock. It then would have fractured, and groundwater would have deposited calcium sulfate minerals into the fractures. Next, the coarser sediment that forms the upper unit would have been deposited. The area pictured is about 16 inches (40 centimeters) across. The image was taken on the 1,031st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 1, 2015). MAHLI was built by Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the project's Curiosity rover. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19829

  18. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  19. Jovian 'Twilight Zone'

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-01

    This image captures the swirling cloud formations around the south pole of Jupiter, looking up toward the equatorial region. NASA's Juno spacecraft took the color-enhanced image during its eleventh close flyby of the gas giant planet on Feb. 7 at 7:11 a.m. PST (10:11 a.m. EST). At the time, the spacecraft was 74,896 miles (120,533 kilometers) from the tops of Jupiter's clouds at 84.9 degrees south latitude. Citizen scientist Gerald Gerald Eichstädt processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. This image was created by reprocessing raw JunoCam data using trajectory and pointing data from the spacecraft. This image is one in a series of images taken in an experiment to capture the best results for illuminated parts of Jupiter's polar region. To make features more visible in Jupiter's terminator -- the region where day meets night -- the Juno team adjusted JunoCam so that it would perform like a portrait photographer taking multiple photos at different exposures, hoping to capture one image with the intended light balance. For JunoCam to collect enough light to reveal features in Jupiter's dark twilight zone, the much brighter illuminated day-side of Jupiter becomes overexposed with the higher exposure. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21980

  20. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...