Science.gov

Sample records for zone uz flow

  1. NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone

    SciTech Connect

    A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

    2000-03-08

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturatedmore » Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.« less

  2. The role of porous matrix in water flow regulation within a karst unsaturated zone: an integrated hydrogeophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrière, Simon D.; Chalikakis, Konstantinos; Danquigny, Charles; Davi, Hendrik; Mazzilli, Naomi; Ollivier, Chloé; Emblanch, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Some portions of the porous rock matrix in the karst unsaturated zone (UZ) can contain large volumes of water and play a major role in water flow regulation. The essential results are presented of a local-scale study conducted in 2011 and 2012 above the Low Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB - Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit) at Rustrel, southeastern France. Previous research revealed the geological structure and water-related features of the study site and illustrated the feasibility of specific hydrogeophysical measurements. In this study, the focus is on hydrodynamics at the seasonal and event timescales. Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) measured a high water content (more than 10 %) in a large volume of rock. This large volume of water cannot be stored in fractures and conduits within the UZ. MRS was also used to measure the seasonal variation of water stored in the karst UZ. A process-based model was developed to simulate the effect of vegetation on groundwater recharge dynamics. In addition, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring was used to assess preferential water pathways during a rain event. This study demonstrates the major influence of water flow within the porous rock matrix on the UZ hydrogeological functioning at both the local (LSBB) and regional (Fontaine de Vaucluse) scales. By taking into account the role of the porous matrix in water flow regulation, these findings may significantly improve karst groundwater hydrodynamic modelling, exploitation, and sustainable management.

  3. Geohydrologic data from test hole USW UZ-7, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kume, Jack; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains a description of the methods used in drilling and coring of the test-hole USW UZ-7, a description of the methods used in collecting, handling, and testing of test-hole samples; Lithologic information from the test hole; and water-content, water-potential, bulk-density, grain-density, porosity, and tritium data for the test hole. Test-hole USW UZ-7 was drilled and cored to a total depth of 62.94 m. The drilling was done using air as a drilling fluid to minimize disturbance to the water content of cores, drill-bit cuttings, and borehole wall-rock. Beginning at the land surface, the unsaturated-zone rock that was penetrated consisted of alluvium; welded and partially to nonwelded ash-flow tuff; bedded and reworked ash-fall tuff; nonwelded ash-flow tuff; and welded ash-flow tuff. Values of gravimetric water content and water potential of alluvium were intermediate between the extreme values in welded and nonwelded units of tuff. Gravimetric water content was largest in bedded and nonwelded ash-fall tuffs and was smallest in welded ash-flow tuff. Values of water potential were more negative in densely welded ash-flow tuffs and were less negative in bedded and nonwelded ash-fall tuffs. Bulk density was largest in densely welded ash-flow tuffs and smallest in nonwelded and bedded ash-fall tuffs. Grain density was uniform but was slightly larger in nonwelded and bedded ash-fall tuffs than in welded ash-flow tuffs. Porosity trends were opposite to bulk-density trends. Tritium content in alluvium was smallest near the alluvium-bedrock contact, markedly increased in the middle of the deposit, and decreased in the near-surface zone of the deposit. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Dead Zone Accretion Flows in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Neal; Sano, T.

    2008-01-01

    Planets form inside protostellar disks in a dead zone where the electrical resistivity of the gas is too high for magnetic forces to drive turbulence. We show that much of the dead zone nevertheless is active and flows toward the star while smooth, large-scale magnetic fields transfer the orbital angular momentum radially outward. Stellar X-ray and radionuclide ionization sustain a weak coupling of the dead zone gas to the magnetic fields, despite the rapid recombination of free charges on dust grains. Net radial magnetic fields are generated in the magnetorotational turbulence in the electrically conducting top and bottom surface layers of the disk, and reach the midplane by ohmic diffusion. A toroidal component to the fields is produced near the midplane by the orbital shear. The process is similar to the magnetization of the solar tachocline. The result is a laminar, magnetically driven accretion flow in the region where the planets form.

  5. Traffic flow characteristic and capacity in intelligent work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-10-15

    Intellgent transportation system (ITS) technologies are utilized to manage traffic flow and safety in : highway work zones. Traffic management plans for work zones require queuing analyses to determine : the anticipated traffic backups, but the predi...

  6. Chlorine-36 data at Yucca Mountain: Statistical tests of conceptual models for unsaturated-zone flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, K.; Wolfsberg, A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Sweetkind, D.

    2003-01-01

    An extensive set of chlorine-36 (36Cl) data has been collected in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), an 8-km-long tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the purpose of developing and testing conceptual models of flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at this site. At several locations, the measured values of 36Cl/Cl ratios for salts leached from rock samples are high enough to provide strong evidence that at least a small component of bomb-pulse 36Cl, fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s, was measured, implying that some fraction of the water traveled from the ground surface through 200-300 m of unsaturated rock to the level of the ESF during the last 50 years. These data are analyzed here using a formal statistical approach based on log-linear models to evaluate alternative conceptual models for the distribution of such fast flow paths. The most significant determinant of the presence of bomb-pulse 36Cl in a sample from the welded Topopah Spring unit (TSw) is the structural setting from which the sample was collected. Our analysis generally supports the conceptual model that a fault that cuts through the nonwelded Paintbrush tuff unit (PTn) that overlies the TSw is required in order for bomb-pulse 36Cl to be transmitted to the sample depth in less than 50 years. Away from PTn-cutting faults, the ages of water samples at the ESF appear to be a strong function of the thickness of the nonwelded tuff between the ground surface and the ESF, due to slow matrix flow in that unit. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modelling Fault Zone Evolution: Implications for fluid flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, H.; Lunn, R. J.; Shipton, Z. K.

    2009-04-01

    Flow simulation models are of major interest to many industries including hydrocarbon, nuclear waste, sequestering of carbon dioxide and mining. One of the major uncertainties in these models is in predicting the permeability of faults, principally in the detailed structure of the fault zone. Studying the detailed structure of a fault zone is difficult because of the inaccessible nature of sub-surface faults and also because of their highly complex nature; fault zones show a high degree of spatial and temporal heterogeneity i.e. the properties of the fault change as you move along the fault, they also change with time. It is well understood that faults influence fluid flow characteristics. They may act as a conduit or a barrier or even as both by blocking flow across the fault while promoting flow along it. Controls on fault hydraulic properties include cementation, stress field orientation, fault zone components and fault zone geometry. Within brittle rocks, such as granite, fracture networks are limited but provide the dominant pathway for flow within this rock type. Research at the EU's Soultz-sous-Forệt Hot Dry Rock test site [Evans et al., 2005] showed that 95% of flow into the borehole was associated with a single fault zone at 3490m depth, and that 10 open fractures account for the majority of flow within the zone. These data underline the critical role of faults in deep flow systems and the importance of achieving a predictive understanding of fault hydraulic properties. To improve estimates of fault zone permeability, it is important to understand the underlying hydro-mechanical processes of fault zone formation. In this research, we explore the spatial and temporal evolution of fault zones in brittle rock through development and application of a 2D hydro-mechanical finite element model, MOPEDZ. The authors have previously presented numerical simulations of the development of fault linkage structures from two or three pre-existing joints, the results of

  8. Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow control

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2012-06-26

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes X zones. An electrical heater includes Y heater segments that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and proximate with the PM filter. A valve assembly includes Z sections that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. A control module adjusts flow through each of the Z sections during regeneration of the PM filter via control of the valve assembly. X, Y and Z are integers.

  9. Vadose zone flow convergence test suite

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B. T.

    Performance Assessment (PA) simulations for engineered disposal systems at the Savannah River Site involve highly contrasting materials and moisture conditions at and near saturation. These conditions cause severe convergence difficulties that typically result in unacceptable convergence or long simulation times or excessive analyst effort. Adequate convergence is usually achieved in a trial-anderror manner by applying under-relaxation to the Saturation or Pressure variable, in a series of everdecreasing RELAxation values. SRNL would like a more efficient scheme implemented inside PORFLOW to achieve flow convergence in a more reliable and efficient manner. To this end, a suite of test problems that illustratemore » these convergence problems is provided to facilitate diagnosis and development of an improved convergence strategy. The attached files are being transmitted to you describing the test problem and proposed resolution.« less

  10. Map showing lava-flow hazard zones, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Chun, Jon Y.F.; Exposo, Jean; Heliker, Christina; Hodge, Jon; Lockwood, John P.; Vogt, Susan M.

    1992-01-01

    This map shows lava-flow hazard zones for the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. Volcano boundaries are shown as heavy, dark bands, reflecting the overlapping of lava flows from adjacent volcanoes along their common boundary. Hazard-zone boundaries are drawn as double lines because of the geologic uncertainty in their placement. Most boundaries are gradational, and the change In the degree of hazard can be found over a distance of a mile or more. The general principles used to place hazard-zone boundaries are discussed by Mullineaux and others (1987) and Heliker (1990). The differences between the boundaries presented here and in Heliker (1990) reflect new data used in the compilation of a geologic map for the Island of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). The primary source of information for volcano boundaries and generalized ages of lava flows for all five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii is the geologic map of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). More detailed information is available for the three active volcanoes. For Hualalai, see Moore and others (1987) and Moore and Clague (1991); for Mauna Loa, see Lockwood and Lipman (1987); and for Kilauea, see Holcomb (1987) and Moore and Trusdell (1991).

  11. Carbon isotopic data from test hole USW UZ-1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, In C.; Peters, C.A.; Thorstenson, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Rock-CO2-gas analyses in test hole USW UZ-1 at Yucca Mountain indicate that gas movement in the unsaturated zone is likely through a dry-fracture system with little porewater or caliche-calcite interaction. This is because near-surface ??13C values are of biogenic origin and have changed little throughout the total depth. Post-bomb 14C activity is observed to the depth of about 12 m. An abrupt change in plotted 14C/depth slope is seen at 61 m. The less steep upper segment corresponds to the zone with greater porosity and moisture content, and consequently more tortuosity, with an estimated traveltime of 1.27 cm/yr; the steeper sloped zone corresponding to the lower segment has smaller porosity and moisture content but larger fracture density for gas transport, with an estimated traveltime of 3.26 cm/yr.

  12. Heat flow and energetics of the San Andreas fault zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 100 heat flow measurements in the San Andreas fault zone indicate 1) there is no evidence for local frictional heating of the main fault trace at any latitude over a 1000-km length from Cape Mendocino to San Bernardino, 2) average heat flow is high (ca.2 HFU, ca.80 mW m-2) throughout the 550-km segment of the Coast Ranges that encloses the San Andreas fault zone in central California; this broad anomaly falls off rapidly toward the Great Valley to the east, and over a 200-km distance toward the Mendocino Triple Junction to the northwest. As others have pointed out, a local conductive heat flow anomaly would be detectable unless the frictional resistance allocated to heat production on the main trace were less than 100 bars. Frictional work allocated to surface energy of new fractures is probably unimportant, and hydrologic convection is not likely to invalidate the conduction assumption, since the heat discharge by thermal springs near the fault is negligible. -Authors

  13. Enhancing resolution of free-flow zone electrophoresis via a simple sheath-flow sample injection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Liu, Ji; Li, Jun-Min; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Qing; Wang, Ju-Fang; Xiao, Hua; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Li, Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a simple and novel sheath-flow sample injection method (SFSIM) is introduced to reduce the band broadening of free-flow zone electrophoresis separation in newly developed self-balance free-flow electrophoresis instrument. A needle injector was placed in the center of the separation inlet, into which the BGE and sample solution were pumped simultaneously. BGE formed sheath flow outside the sample stream, resulting in less band broadening related to hydrodynamics and electrodynamics. Hemoglobin and C-phycocyanin were successfully separated by the proposed method in contrast to the poor separation of free-flow electrophoresis with the traditional injection method without sheath flow. About 3.75 times resolution enhancement could be achieved by sheath-flow sample injection method. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Current challenges in quantifying preferential flow through the vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats; Jarvis, Nick

    2017-04-01

    In this presentation, we give an overview of current challenges in quantifying preferential flow through the vadose zone. A review of the literature suggests that current generation models do not fully reflect the present state of process understanding and empirical knowledge of preferential flow. We believe that the development of improved models will be stimulated by the increasingly widespread application of novel imaging technologies as well as future advances in computational power and numerical techniques. One of the main challenges in this respect is to bridge the large gap between the scales at which preferential flow occurs (pore to Darcy scales) and the scale of interest for management (fields, catchments, regions). Studies at the pore scale are being supported by the development of 3-D non-invasive imaging and numerical simulation techniques. These studies are leading to a better understanding of how macropore network topology and initial/boundary conditions control key state variables like matric potential and thus the strength of preferential flow. Extrapolation of this knowledge to larger scales would require support from theoretical frameworks such as key concepts from percolation and network theory, since we lack measurement technologies to quantify macropore networks at these large scales. Linked hydro-geophysical measurement techniques that produce highly spatially and temporally resolved data enable investigation of the larger-scale heterogeneities that can generate preferential flow patterns at pedon, hillslope and field scales. At larger regional and global scales, improved methods of data-mining and analyses of large datasets (machine learning) may help in parameterizing models as well as lead to new insights into the relationships between soil susceptibility to preferential flow and site attributes (climate, land uses, soil types).

  15. Fluid flow and permeabilities in basement fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinsworth, Allan; Koehn, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Fault zones are important sites for crustal fluid flow, specifically where they cross-cut low permeability host rocks such as granites and gneisses. Fluids migrating through fault zones can cause rheology changes, mineral precipitation and pore space closure, and may alter the physical and chemical properties of the host rock and deformation products. It is therefore essential to consider the evolution of permeability in fault zones at a range of pressure-temperature conditions to understand fluid migration throughout a fault's history, and how fluid-rock interaction modifies permeability and rheological characteristics. Field localities in the Rwenzori Mountains, western Uganda and the Outer Hebrides, north-west Scotland, have been selected for field work and sample collection. Here Archaean-age TTG gneisses have been faulted within the upper 15km of the crust and have experienced fluid ingress. The Rwenzori Mountains are an anomalously uplifted horst-block located in a transfer zone in the western rift of the East African Rift System. The north-western ridge is characterised by a tectonically simple western flank, where the partially mineralised Bwamba Fault has detached from the Congo craton. Mineralisation is associated with hydrothermal fluids heated by a thermal body beneath the Semliki rift, and has resulted in substantial iron oxide precipitation within porous cataclasites. Non-mineralised faults further north contain foliated gouges and show evidence of leaking fluids. These faults serve as an analogue for faults associated with the Lake Albert oil and gas prospects. The Outer Hebrides Fault Zone (OHFZ) was largely active during the Caledonian Orogeny (ca. 430-400 Ma) at a deeper crustal level than the Ugandan rift faults. Initial dry conditions were followed by fluid ingress during deformation that controlled its rheological behaviour. The transition also altered the existing permeability. The OHFZ is a natural laboratory in which to study brittle fault

  16. Thermocapillary flow stability in floating zone under low gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouizi, O.; Dang Vu-Delcarte, C.; Kasperski, G.

    The floating zone is a crucible-free process used to produce high-quality crystals. A molten zone is created by a lateral heating between a feed and a single crystal rod, and helds by capillary forces. The translation of the material through the heat flux induces the solidification of the crystal. Temperature gradients induce surface tension variations which are the source of thermocapillary convection. In order to reduce buoyancy effects, experiments have been performed in a low gravity environment te{Croll} and have demonstrated that thermocapillary convection alone can induce defects in the product due to flow instabilities. A major goal is to identify the mechanisms leading to the growth of those instabilities. The experimental difficulty comes from the fact that measurements in the core of the flow are usually limited to transparent fluids, that is having a Prandtl number value (Pr), ratio of the characteristic thermal to dynamical diffusion times, larger than 6 or so. However, it has been shown that, just as well in real experiments as in numerical experiences, performed on the simplified half-zone model, the transitions thresholds strongly depend on the Prandtl number value te{Carotenuto}, te{Levenstam}. It is thus interesting to study the nature and thresholds of the instabilities of the thermocapillary flow in a full liquid bridge as a function of the Prandtl number. In that case, a 2D study te{kasper1} has shown an important variation of the thresholds with Pr. The considered model consists of a vertical cylindrical liquid bridge, between two isothermal parallel concentric rigid disks, %of radius Rwhich are separated by a distance H and presenting a non-deformable free surface. This surface is submitted to a steady heating flux symmetrical about the horizontal mid-plane. The parameters of the model are the Prandtl number, the Marangoni number (Ma) which characterises the thermal convective regime and the aspect ratio A=H/2R fixed here to 1. Gravity is

  17. Preferential flow, diffuse flow, and perching in an interbedded fractured-rock unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, John R.; Creasey, Kaitlyn M.; Perkins, Kim S.; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2017-03-01

    Layers of strong geologic contrast within the unsaturated zone can control recharge and contaminant transport to underlying aquifers. Slow diffuse flow in certain geologic layers, and rapid preferential flow in others, complicates the prediction of vertical and lateral fluxes. A simple model is presented, designed to use limited geological site information to predict these critical subsurface processes in response to a sustained infiltration source. The model is developed and tested using site-specific information from the Idaho National Laboratory in the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), USA, where there are natural and anthropogenic sources of high-volume infiltration from floods, spills, leaks, wastewater disposal, retention ponds, and hydrologic field experiments. The thick unsaturated zone overlying the ESRP aquifer is a good example of a sharply stratified unsaturated zone. Sedimentary interbeds are interspersed between massive and fractured basalt units. The combination of surficial sediments, basalts, and interbeds determines the water fluxes through the variably saturated subsurface. Interbeds are generally less conductive, sometimes causing perched water to collect above them. The model successfully predicts the volume and extent of perching and approximates vertical travel times during events that generate high fluxes from the land surface. These developments are applicable to sites having a thick, geologically complex unsaturated zone of substantial thickness in which preferential and diffuse flow, and perching of percolated water, are important to contaminant transport or aquifer recharge.

  18. Preferential flow, diffuse flow, and perching in an interbedded fractured-rock unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, John R.; Creasey, Kaitlyn M; Perkins, Kimberlie; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2017-01-01

    Layers of strong geologic contrast within the unsaturated zone can control recharge and contaminant transport to underlying aquifers. Slow diffuse flow in certain geologic layers, and rapid preferential flow in others, complicates the prediction of vertical and lateral fluxes. A simple model is presented, designed to use limited geological site information to predict these critical subsurface processes in response to a sustained infiltration source. The model is developed and tested using site-specific information from the Idaho National Laboratory in the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), USA, where there are natural and anthropogenic sources of high-volume infiltration from floods, spills, leaks, wastewater disposal, retention ponds, and hydrologic field experiments. The thick unsaturated zone overlying the ESRP aquifer is a good example of a sharply stratified unsaturated zone. Sedimentary interbeds are interspersed between massive and fractured basalt units. The combination of surficial sediments, basalts, and interbeds determines the water fluxes through the variably saturated subsurface. Interbeds are generally less conductive, sometimes causing perched water to collect above them. The model successfully predicts the volume and extent of perching and approximates vertical travel times during events that generate high fluxes from the land surface. These developments are applicable to sites having a thick, geologically complex unsaturated zone of substantial thickness in which preferential and diffuse flow, and perching of percolated water, are important to contaminant transport or aquifer recharge.

  19. Effects from Unsaturated Zone Flow during Oscillatory Hydraulic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, D.; Zhou, Y.; Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.

    2014-12-01

    In analyzing pumping tests on unconfined aquifers, the impact of the unsaturated zone is often neglected. Instead, desaturation at the water table is often treated as a free-surface boundary, which is simple and allows for relatively fast computation. Richards' equation models, which account for unsaturated flow, can be compared with saturated flow models to validate the use of Darcy's Law. In this presentation, we examine the appropriateness of using fast linear steady-periodic models based on linearized water table conditions in order to simulate oscillatory pumping tests in phreatic aquifers. We compare oscillatory pumping test models including: 1) a 2-D radially-symmetric phreatic aquifer model with a partially penetrating well, simulated using both Darcy's Law and Richards' Equation in COMSOL; and 2) a linear phase-domain numerical model developed in MATLAB. Both COMSOL and MATLAB models are calibrated to match oscillatory pumping test data collected in the summer of 2013 at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS), and we examine the effect of model type on the associated parameter estimates. The results of this research will aid unconfined aquifer characterization efforts and help to constrain the impact of the simplifying physical assumptions often employed during test analysis.

  20. A knowledge-based approach to automated flow-field zoning for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1989-01-01

    An automated three-dimensional zonal grid generation capability for computational fluid dynamics is shown through the development of a demonstration computer program capable of automatically zoning the flow field of representative two-dimensional (2-D) aerodynamic configurations. The applicability of a knowledge-based programming approach to the domain of flow-field zoning is examined. Several aspects of flow-field zoning make the application of knowledge-based techniques challenging: the need for perceptual information, the role of individual bias in the design and evaluation of zonings, and the fact that the zoning process is modeled as a constructive, design-type task (for which there are relatively few examples of successful knowledge-based systems in any domain). Engineering solutions to the problems arising from these aspects are developed, and a demonstration system is implemented which can design, generate, and output flow-field zonings for representative 2-D aerodynamic configurations.

  1. Steady hydromagnetic flows in open magnetic fields. II - Global flows with static zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K.; Low, B. C.

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical study of an axisymmetric steady stellar wind with a static zone is presented, with emphasis on the situation where the global magnetic field is symmetrical about the stellar equator and is partially open. In this scenario, the wind escapes in open magnetic fluxes originating from a region at the star pole and a region at an equatorial belt of closed magnetic field in static equilibrium. The two-dimensional balance of the pressure gradient and the inertial, gravitational, and Lorentz forces in different parts of the flow are studied, along with the static interplay between external sources of energy (heating and/or cooling) distributed in the flow and the pressure distribution.

  2. Solar-cycle Variations of Meridional Flows in the Solar Convection Zone Using Helioseismic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2018-06-01

    The solar meridional flow is an axisymmetric flow in solar meridional planes, extending through the convection zone. Here we study its solar-cycle variations in the convection zone using SOHO/MDI helioseismic data from 1996 to 2010, including two solar minima and one maximum. The travel-time difference between northward and southward acoustic waves is related to the meridional flow along the wave path. Applying the ray approximation and the SOLA inversion method to the travel-time difference measured in a previous study, we obtain the meridional flow distributions in 0.67 ≤ r ≤ 0.96R ⊙ at the minimum and maximum. At the minimum, the flow has a three-layer structure: poleward in the upper convection zone, equatorward in the middle convection zone, and poleward again in the lower convection zone. The flow speed is close to zero within the error bar near the base of the convection zone. The flow distribution changes significantly from the minimum to the maximum. The change above 0.9R ⊙ shows two phenomena: first, the poleward flow speed is reduced at the maximum; second, an additional convergent flow centered at the active latitudes is generated at the maximum. These two phenomena are consistent with the surface meridional flow reported in previous studies. The change in flow extends all the way down to the base of the convection zone, and the pattern of the change below 0.9R ⊙ is more complicated. However, it is clear that the active latitudes play a role in the flow change: the changes in flow speed below and above the active latitudes have opposite signs. This suggests that magnetic fields could be responsible for the flow change.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Combustion Stabilization in Supersonic Flow Using Free Recirculation Zones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    NUMBERS Experimental Investigation of Combustion Stabilization in Supersonic Flow Using Free F6170896W0291 Recirculation Zones 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr...stabilization in supersonic flow using free recirculation zones Special contract (SPC-96-4043) with Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFMC), USA, EOARD...of three quarterly reports and presents experimental results on self-ignition and combustion stabilization in supersonic flow using free

  4. High-Resolution Flow Logging for Hydraulic Characterization of Boreholes and Aquifer Flow Zones at Contaminated Bedrock Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. H.; Johnson, C. D.; Paillet, F. L.

    2004-05-01

    In the past, flow logging was largely restricted to the application of spinner flowmeters to determine flow-zone contributions in large-diameter production wells screened in highly transmissive aquifers. Development and refinement of tool-measurement technology, field methods, and analysis techniques has greatly extended and enhanced flow logging to include the hydraulic characterization of boreholes and aquifer flow zones at contaminated bedrock sites. State-of-the-art in flow logging will be reviewed, and its application to bedrock-contamination investigations will be presented. In open bedrock boreholes, vertical flows are measured with high-resolution flowmeters equipped with flexible rubber-disk diverters fitted to the nominal borehole diameters to concentrate flow through the measurement throat of the tools. Heat-pulse flowmeters measure flows in the range of 0.05 to 5 liters per minute, and electromagnetic flowmeters measure flows in the range of 0.3 to 30 liters per minute. Under ambient and low-rate stressed (either extraction or injection) conditions, stationary flowmeter measurements are collected in competent sections of the borehole between fracture zones identified on borehole-wall images. Continuous flow, fluid-resistivity, and temperature logs are collected under both sets of conditions while trolling with a combination electromagnetic flowmeter and fluid tool. Electromagnetic flowmeters are used with underfit diverters to measure flow rates greater than 30 liters per minute and suppress effects of diameter variations while trolling. A series of corrections are applied to the flow-log data to account for the zero-flow response, bypass, trolling, and borehole-diameter biases and effects. The flow logs are quantitatively analyzed by matching simulated flows computed with a numerical model to measured flows by varying the hydraulic properties (transmissivity and hydraulic head) of the flow zones. Several case studies will be presented that demonstrate

  5. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow in vadose zone and groundwater

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One habitual simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone are not significant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In ...

  6. Concentrated flow paths in riparian buffer zones of southern Illinois

    Treesearch

    R.C. Pankau; J.E. Schoonover; K.W.J. Willard; P.J. Edwards

    2012-01-01

    Riparian buffers in agricultural landscapes should be designed to trap pollutants in overland flow by slowing, filtering, and infiltrating surface runoff entering the buffer via sheet flow. However, observational evidence suggests that concentrated flow is prevalent from agricultural fields. Over time sediment can accumulate in riparian buffers forming berms that...

  7. Importance of unsaturated zone flow for simulating recharge in a humid climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, R.J.; Prudic, David E.; Walker, J.F.; Anderson, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    Transient recharge to the water table is often not well understood or quantified. Two approaches for simulating transient recharge in a ground water flow model were investigated using the Trout Lake watershed in north-central Wisconsin: (1) a traditional approach of adding recharge directly to the water table and (2) routing the same volume of water through an unsaturated zone column to the water table. Areas with thin (less than 1 m) unsaturated zones showed little difference in timing of recharge between the two approaches; when water was routed through the unsaturated zone, however, less recharge was delivered to the water table and more discharge occurred to the surface because recharge direction and magnitude changed when the water table rose to the land surface. Areas with a thick (15 to 26 m) unsaturated zone were characterized by multimonth lags between infiltration and recharge, and, in some cases, wetting fronts from precipitation events during the fall overtook and mixed with infiltration from the previous spring snowmelt. Thus, in thicker unsaturated zones, the volume of water infiltrated was properly simulated using the traditional approach, but the timing was different from simulations that included unsaturated zone flow. Routing of rejected recharge and ground water discharge at land surface to surface water features also provided a better simulation of the observed flow regime in a stream at the basin outlet. These results demonstrate that consideration of flow through the unsaturated zone may be important when simulating transient ground water flow in humid climates with shallow water tables.

  8. Flow-path textures and mineralogy in tuffs of the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levy, Schön; Chipera, Steve; WoldeGabriel, Giday; Fabryka-Martin, June; Roach, Jeffrey; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Haneberg, William C.; Mozley, Peter S.; Moore, J. Casey; Goodwin, Laurel B.

    1999-01-01

    The high concentration of chlorine-36 (36Cl) produced by above-ground nuclear tests (bomb-pulse) provides a fortuitous tracer for infiltration during the last 50 years, and is used to detect fast flow in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a thick deposit of welded and nonwelded tuffs. Evidence of fast flow as much as 300 m into the mountain has been found in several zones in a 7.7-km tunnel. Many zones are associated with faults that provide continuous fracture flow paths from the surface. In the Sundance fault zone, water with the bomb-pulse signature has moved into subsidiary fractures and breccia zones. We found no highly distinctive mineralogic associations of fault and fracture samples containing bomb-pulse 36Cl. Bomb-pulse sites are slightly more likely to have calcite deposits than are non-bomb-pulse sites. Most other mineralogic and textural associations of fast-flow paths reflect the structural processes leading to locally enhanced permeability rather than the effects of ground-water percolation. Water movement through the rock was investigated by isotopic analysis of paired samples representing breccia zones and fractured wall rock bounding the breccia zones. Where bomb-pulse 36Cl is present, the waters in bounding fractures and intergranular pores of the fast pathways are not in equilibrium with respect to the isotopic signal. In structural domains that have experienced extensional deformation, fluid flow within a breccia is equivalent to matrix flow in a particulate rock, whereas true fracture flow occurs along the boundaries of a breccia zone. Where shearing predominated over extension, the boundary between wall rock and breccia is rough and irregular with a tight wallrock/breccia contact. The absence of a gap between the breccia and the wall rock helps maintain fluid flow within the breccia instead of along the wallrock/breccia boundary, leading to higher 36Cl/Cl values in the breccia than in the wall rock.

  9. Anti-Uz found in mother's serum and child's eluate.

    PubMed

    Read, S M; Taylor, M M; Reid, M E; Popovsky, M A

    1993-01-01

    A saline-reactive antibody, anti-Uz, that reacted stronger with S+ than with S- red blood cells (RBCs) and failed to react with U- or ficin-treated RBCs has been previously reported. We describe an antibody of similar specificity in the postpartum serum of an untransfused woman and the eluate from her fourth child's cord RBCs. The mother's RBCs typed S-s+U+, He+(weak), and appeared to have normal glycophorin A and B content, as deter- mined by immunoblotting. The direct antiglobulin test (DAT) and the autocontrol were negative. Her serum reacted stronger with S + RBCs only in the antiglobulin phase, and failed to react with U- or ficin-treated RBCs. The antibody was adsorbed completely by S-s+U+ RBCs, proving that anti-S was not present. Monocyte monolayer assay results with S+s-U+ and S-s+U+ RBCs indicated that transfusion of incompatible blood would not result in significant hemolysis. The child's cord RBCs typed S-s+. The DAT was 3+ with anti-IgG, and an eluate prepared from these RBCs had the same reactivity as the maternal serum. The child showed no clinical signs of hemolytic disease of the newborn. In contrast to previous reports, these results suggest an immune form of anti-Uz.

  10. Hyporheic hot moments: Dissolved oxygen dynamics in the hyporheic zone in response to surface flow perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Matthew H.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Buttles, Jim; Kessler, Adam J.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2017-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a key environmental variable that drives and feeds back with numerous processes. In the aquatic sediment that makes up the hyporheic zone, DO may exhibit pronounced spatial gradients and complex patterns which control the distribution of a series of redox processes. Yet, little is known regarding the dynamics of hyporheic zone DO, especially under transitional flow regimes. Considering the natural tendency of rivers to be highly responsive to external forcing, these temporal dynamics are potentially just as important and pronounced as the spatial gradients. Here we use laboratory flume experiments and multiphysics flow and reactive transport modeling to investigate surface flow controls on the depth of oxygen penetration in the bed as well as the area of oxygenated sediment. We show that the hyporheic zone DO conditions respond over time scales of hours-to-days when subjected to practically instantaneous surface flow perturbations. Additionally, the flume experiments demonstrate that hyporheic zone DO conditions respond faster to surface flow acceleration than to deceleration. Finally, we found that the morphology of the dissolved oxygen plume front depends on surface flow acceleration or deceleration. This study thus shows that the highly dynamic nature of typical streams and rivers drives equally dynamic redox conditions in the hyporheic zone. Because the redox conditions and their distribution within the hyporheic zone are important from biological, ecological, and contaminant perspectives, this hyporheic redox dynamism has the potential to impact system scale aquatic chemical cycles.

  11. Preferential Flow Paths In A Karstified Spring Catchment: A Study Of Fault Zones As Conduits To Rapid Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Terrell, A. N.; Veltri, M.; Sauter, M.; Schmidt, S.

    2017-12-01

    In this study we model saturated and unsaturated flow in the karstified Weendespring catchment, located within the Leinetal graben in Goettingen, Germany. We employ the finite element COMSOL Multiphysics modeling software to model variably saturated flow using the Richards equation with a van Genuchten type parameterization. As part of the graben structure, the Weende spring catchment is intersected by seven fault zones along the main flow path of the 7400 m cross section of the catchment. As the Weende spring is part of the drinking water supply in Goettingen, it is particularly important to understand the vulnerability of the catchment and effect of fault zones on rapid transport of contaminants. Nitrate signals have been observed at the spring only a few days after the application of fertilizers within the catchment at a distance of approximately 2km. As the underlying layers are known to be highly impermeable, fault zones within the area are likely to create rapid flow paths to the water table and the spring. The model conceptualizes the catchment as containing three hydrogeological limestone units with varying degrees of karstification: the lower Muschelkalk limestone as a highly conductive layer, the middle Muschelkalk as an aquitard, and the upper Muschelkalk as another conductive layer. The fault zones are parameterized based on a combination of field data from quarries, remote sensing and literary data. The fault zone is modeled considering the fracture core as well as the surrounding damage zone with separate, specific hydraulic properties. The 2D conceptual model was implemented in COMSOL to study unsaturated flow at the catchment scale using van Genuchten parameters. The study demonstrates the importance of fault zones for preferential flow within the catchment and its effect on the spatial distribution of vulnerability.

  12. Chemistry of unsaturated zone gases sampled in open boreholes at the crest of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Data and basic concepts of chemical and physical processes in the mountain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, Donald C.; Weeks, Edwin P.; Haas, Herbert; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, Niel; Peters, Charles A.

    1998-01-01

    Boreholes open to the unsaturated zone at the crest of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were variously sampled for CO2 (including 13C and 14C), CH4, N2, O2, Ar, CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113 from 1986 to 1993. Air enters the mountain in outcrops, principally on the eastern slope, is enriched in CO2by mixing with soil gas, and is advected to the mountain crest, where it returns to the atmosphere. The CFC data indicate that travel times of the advecting gas in the shallow Tiva Canyon hydrogeologic unit are ≤5 years. The 14C activities are postbomb to depths of 100 m, indicating little retardation of 14CO2 in the shallow flow systems. The 14C activities from 168 to 404 m in the Topopah Spring hydrogeologic unit are 85–90 pMC at borehole USW-UZ6. The CFC data show that the drilling of USW-UZ6 in 1984 has altered the natural system by providing a conduit through the Paintbrush Nonwelded unit, allowing flow from Topopah Spring outcrops in Solitario Canyon on the west to USW-UZ6, upward in the borehole through the Paintbrush, to the shallow Tiva Canyon flow systems, and out of the mountain.

  13. Conditions for the appearance of boundary-free circulation zones in supersonic axisymmetric accelerating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Andrey V.; Sokolov, Eugeny I.

    2018-05-01

    The mechanism of appearance of boundary-free circulation zones - circulating flows arising behind the Mach disk of an underexpanded supersonic jet is investigated. Ideas on the mechanism of formation of circulation zones and the criteria for their occurrence are formulated within the near-axis approximation. Technical possibilities of realization flows that satisfy these criteria are analyzed with the help of numerical simulation. A comparison is made with the results of a study of the formation of circulation zones in axisymmetric nozzles at the overexpansion mode.

  14. Prediction of recirculation zones in isothermal coaxial jet flows relevant to combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of the recirculation zones in confined coaxial turbulent jets are investigated numerically employing the kappa - epsilon turbulence model. The geometrical arrangement corresponds to the experimental study of Owen (AIAA J. 1976) and the investigation is undertaken to provide information for isothermal flow relevant to combustor flows. For the first time, the shape, size, and location of the recirculation zones for the above experimental configuration are correctly predicted. The processes leading to the observed results are explained. Detailed comparisons of the prediction with measurements are made. It is shown that the recirculation zones are very sensitive to the central jet exit configuration and the velocity ratio of the jets.

  15. Recirculation zone length in renal artery is affected by flow spirality and renal-to-aorta flow ratio.

    PubMed

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Fulker, David; Barber, Tracie

    2017-07-01

    Haemodynamic perturbations such as flow recirculation zones play a key role in progression and development of renal artery stenosis, which typically originate at the aorta-renal bifurcation. The spiral nature of aortic blood flow, division of aortic blood flow in renal artery as well as the exercise conditions have been shown to alter the haemodynamics in both positive and negative ways. This study focuses on the combinative effects of spiral component of blood flow, renal-to-aorta flow ratio and the exercise conditions on the size and distribution of recirculation zones in renal branches using computational fluid dynamics technique. Our findings show that the recirculation length was longest when the renal-to-aorta flow ratio was smallest. Spiral flow and exercise conditions were found to be effective in reducing the recirculation length in particular in small renal-to-aorta flow ratios. These results support the hypothesis that in renal arteries with small flow ratios where a stenosis is already developed an artificially induced spiral flow within the aorta may decelerate the progression of stenosis and thereby help preserve kidney function.

  16. Hydromechanical heterogeneities of a mature fault zone: impacts on fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Jeanne, Pierre; Guglielmi, Yves; Cappa, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fluid flow is examined for a mature strike-slip fault zone with anisotropic permeability and internal heterogeneity. The hydraulic properties of the fault zone were first characterized in situ by microgeophysical (VP and σc ) and rock-quality measurements (Q-value) performed along a 50-m long profile perpendicular to the fault zone. Then, the local hydrogeological context of the fault was modified to conduct a water-injection test. The resulting fluid pressures and flow rates through the different fault-zone compartments were then analyzed with a two-phase fluid-flow numerical simulation. Fault hydraulic properties estimated from the injection test signals were compared to the properties estimated from the multiscale geological approach. We found that (1) the microgeophysical measurements that we made yield valuable information on the porosity and the specific storage coefficient within the fault zone and (2) the Q-value method highlights significant contrasts in permeability. Fault hydrodynamic behavior can be modeled by a permeability tensor rotation across the fault zone and by a storativity increase. The permeability tensor rotation is linked to the modification of the preexisting fracture properties and to the development of new fractures during the faulting process, whereas the storativity increase results from the development of micro- and macrofractures that lower the fault-zone stiffness and allows an increased extension of the pore space within the fault damage zone. Finally, heterogeneities internal to the fault zones create complex patterns of fluid flow that reflect the connections of paths with contrasting properties. © 2013, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  17. Predicting Biological Information Flow in a Model Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louca, S.; Hawley, A. K.; Katsev, S.; Beltran, M. T.; Bhatia, M. P.; Michiels, C.; Capelle, D.; Lavik, G.; Doebeli, M.; Crowe, S.; Hallam, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Microbial activity drives marine biochemical fluxes and nutrient cycling at global scales. Geochemical measurements as well as molecular techniques such as metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics provide great insight into microbial activity. However, an integration of molecular and geochemical data into mechanistic biogeochemical models is still lacking. Recent work suggests that microbial metabolic pathways are, at the ecosystem level, strongly shaped by stoichiometric and energetic constraints. Hence, models rooted in fluxes of matter and energy may yield a holistic understanding of biogeochemistry. Furthermore, such pathway-centric models would allow a direct consolidation with meta'omic data. Here we present a pathway-centric biogeochemical model for the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in Saanich Inlet, a fjord off the coast of Vancouver Island. The model considers key dissimilatory nitrogen and sulfur fluxes, as well as the population dynamics of the genes that mediate them. By assuming a direct translation of biocatalyzed energy fluxes to biosynthesis rates, we make predictions about the distribution and activity of the corresponding genes. A comparison of the model to molecular measurements indicates that the model explains observed DNA, RNA, protein and cell depth profiles. This suggests that microbial activity in marine ecosystems such as oxygen minimum zones is well described by DNA abundance, which, in conjunction with geochemical constraints, determines pathway expression and process rates. Our work further demonstrates how meta'omic data can be mechanistically linked to environmental redox conditions and biogeochemical processes.

  18. Thermocapillary flow and melt/solid interfaces in floating-zone crystal growth under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. W.; Kou, Sindo

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulation of steady-state axisymmetrical heat transfer and fluid flow was conducted to study thermocapillary flow and melt/solid interfaces in floating-zone crystal growth under microgravity. The effects of key variables on the extent of thermocapillary flow in the melt zone, the shapes of melt/solid interfaces and the length of the melt zone were discussed. These variables are: (1) the temperature coefficient of surface tension (or the Marangoni number), (2) the pulling speed (or the Peclet number), (3) the feed rod radius, (4) the ambient temperature distribution, (5) the heat transfer coefficient (or the Biot number), and (6) the thermal diffusivity of the material (or the Prandtl number).

  19. Geothermal energy prospectivity of the Torrens Hinge Zone: evidence from new heat flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Chris

    2009-09-01

    The Torrens Hinge Zone is a long but narrow (up to 40km wide) geological transition zone between the relatively stable Eastern Gawler Craton `Olympic Domain' to the west, and the sedimentary basin known as the Adelaide Geosyncline to the east. The author hypothesised from first principles that the Torrens Hinge Zone should be prospective for high geothermal gradients due to the likely presence of high heat flow and insulating cover rocks. A method to test this hypothesis was devised, which involved the determination of surface heat flow on a pattern grid using purpose-drilled wells, precision temperature logging and detailed thermal conductivity measurements. The results of this structured test have validated the hypothesis, with heat flow values over 90mW/m2 recorded in five of six wells drilled. With several kilometres thickness of moderate conductivity sediments overlying the crystalline basement in this region, predicted temperature at 5000m ranges between 200 and 300°C.

  20. Meridional flow in the solar convection zone. I. Measurements from gong data

    SciTech Connect

    Kholikov, S.; Serebryanskiy, A.; Jackiewicz, J., E-mail: kholikov@noao.edu

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale plasma flows in the Sun's convection zone likely play a major role in solar dynamics on decadal timescales. In particular, quantifying meridional motions is a critical ingredient for understanding the solar cycle and the transport of magnetic flux. Because the signal of such features can be quite small in deep solar layers and be buried in systematics or noise, the true meridional velocity profile has remained elusive. We perform time-distance helioseismology measurements on several years worth of Global Oscillation Network Group Doppler data. A spherical harmonic decomposition technique is applied to a subset of acoustic modes to measure travel-timemore » differences to try to obtain signatures of meridional flows throughout the solar convection zone. Center-to-limb systematics are taken into account in an intuitive yet ad hoc manner. Travel-time differences near the surface that are consistent with a poleward flow in each hemisphere and are similar to previous work are measured. Additionally, measurements in deep layers near the base of the convection zone suggest a possible equatorward flow, as well as partial evidence of a sign change in the travel-time differences at mid-convection zone depths. This analysis on an independent data set using different measurement techniques strengthens recent conclusions that the convection zone may have multiple 'cells' of meridional flow. The results may challenge the common understanding of one large conveyor belt operating in the solar convection zone. Further work with helioseismic inversions and a careful study of systematic effects are needed before firm conclusions of these large-scale flow structures can be made.« less

  1. Rip currents and alongshore flows in single channels dredged in the surf zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moulton, Melissa; Elgar, Steve; Raubenheimer, Britt; Warner, John C.; Kumar, Nirnimesh

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the dynamics of flows near nonuniform bathymetry, single channels (on average 30 m wide and 1.5 m deep) were dredged across the surf zone at five different times, and the subsequent evolution of currents and morphology was observed for a range of wave and tidal conditions. In addition, circulation was simulated with the numerical modeling system COAWST, initialized with the observed incident waves and channel bathymetry, and with an extended set of wave conditions and channel geometries. The simulated flows are consistent with alongshore flows and rip-current circulation patterns observed in the surf zone. Near the offshore-directed flows that develop in the channel, the dominant terms in modeled momentum balances are wave-breaking accelerations, pressure gradients, advection, and the vortex force. The balances vary spatially, and are sensitive to wave conditions and the channel geometry. The observed and modeled maximum offshore-directed flow speeds are correlated with a parameter based on the alongshore gradient in breaking-wave-driven-setup across the nonuniform bathymetry (a function of wave height and angle, water depths in the channel and on the sandbar, and a breaking threshold) and the breaking-wave-driven alongshore flow speed. The offshore-directed flow speed increases with dissipation on the bar and reaches a maximum (when the surf zone is saturated) set by the vertical scale of the bathymetric variability.

  2. Rip currents and alongshore flows in single channels dredged in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, Melissa; Elgar, Steve; Raubenheimer, Britt; Warner, John C.; Kumar, Nirnimesh

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the dynamics of flows near nonuniform bathymetry, single channels (on average 30 m wide and 1.5 m deep) were dredged across the surf zone at five different times, and the subsequent evolution of currents and morphology was observed for a range of wave and tidal conditions. In addition, circulation was simulated with the numerical modeling system COAWST, initialized with the observed incident waves and channel bathymetry, and with an extended set of wave conditions and channel geometries. The simulated flows are consistent with alongshore flows and rip-current circulation patterns observed in the surf zone. Near the offshore-directed flows that develop in the channel, the dominant terms in modeled momentum balances are wave-breaking accelerations, pressure gradients, advection, and the vortex force. The balances vary spatially, and are sensitive to wave conditions and the channel geometry. The observed and modeled maximum offshore-directed flow speeds are correlated with a parameter based on the alongshore gradient in breaking-wave-driven-setup across the nonuniform bathymetry (a function of wave height and angle, water depths in the channel and on the sandbar, and a breaking threshold) and the breaking-wave-driven alongshore flow speed. The offshore-directed flow speed increases with dissipation on the bar and reaches a maximum (when the surf zone is saturated) set by the vertical scale of the bathymetric variability.

  3. One-dimensional flow model of the river-hyporheic zone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrajac, D.

    2016-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a shallow layer beneath natural streams that is characterized by intense exchange of water, nutrients, pollutants and thermal energy. Understanding these exchange processes is crucial for successful modelling of the river hydrodynamics and morphodynamics at various scales from the river corridor up to the river network scale (Cardenas, 2015). Existing simulation models of hyporheic exchange processes are either idealized models of the tracer movement through the river-hyporheic zone system (e.g. TSM, Bencala and Walters, 1983) or detailed models of turbulent flow in a stream, coupled with a conventional 2D Darcian groundwater model (e.g. Cardenas and Wilson, 2007). This paper presents an alternative approach which involves a simple 1-D simulation model of the hyporheic zone system based on the classical SWE equations coupled with the newly developed porous media analogue. This allows incorporating the effects of flow unsteadiness and non-Darcian parameterization od the drag term in the hyporheic zone model. The conceptual model of the stream-hyporheic zone system consists of a 1D model of the open channel flow in the river, coupled with a 1D model of the flow in the hyporheic zone via volume flux due to the difference in the water level in the river and the hyporheic zone. The interaction with the underlying groundwater aquifer is neglected, but coupling the present model with any conventional groundwater model is straightforward. The paper presents the derivation of the 1D flow equations for flow in the hyporheic zone, the details of the numerical scheme used for solving them and the model validation by comparison with published experimental data. References Bencala, K. E., and R. A. Walters (1983) "Simulation of solute transport in a mountain pool-and-riffle stream- a transient storage model", Water Resources Reseach 19(3): 718-724. Cardenas, M. B. (2015) "Hyporheic zone hydrologic science: A historical account of its emergence and a

  4. Relative Abundances of Calcite and Silica in Fracture Coatings as a Possible Indicator of Evaporation in a Thick Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. D.; Moscati, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    Yucca Mountain, a ridge of shallowly dipping, Miocene-age volcanic rocks in southwest Nevada, is the proposed site for a nuclear waste repository to be constructed in the 500- to 700-m-thick unsaturated zone (UZ). At the proposed repository, the 300-m-thick Topopah Spring Tuff welded unit (TSw) is overlain by approximately 30 m of nonwelded tuffs (PTn); the Tiva Canyon Tuff welded unit (TCw) overlies the PTn with a range in thickness from 0 to approximately 130 m at the site. The amount of water percolation through the UZ is low and difficult to measure directly, but local seepage into mined tunnels has been observed in the TCw. Past water seepage in the welded tuffs is recorded by widespread, thin (0.3 cm) coatings of calcite and silica on fracture surfaces and within cavities. Abundances of calcite and silica in the coatings were determined by X-ray microfluorescence mapping and subsequent multispectral image analysis of over 200 samples. The images were classified into constituent phases including opal-chalcedony-quartz (secondary silica) and calcite. In the TCw samples, the median calcite/silica ratio is 8; in the TSw samples within 35 m below the PTn, median calcite/silica falls to 2, perhaps reflecting an increase in soluble silica from the presence of glass in the nonwelded tuffs. In the deeper parts of the TSw, median calcite/silica reaches 100 and many samples contain no detectable secondary silica phase. Evaporation and changing pCO2 control precipitation of calcite from water percolating downward in the UZ, but precipitation of opal requires only evaporation. Calcite/silica ratios, therefore, can constrain the relative importance of evaporation in the UZ. Although calcite/silica values scatter widely within the TSw, reflecting the spatial variability of gas and water flow, average calcite/silica ratios increase with stratigraphic depth, indicating less evaporation at the deeper levels of the UZ. Coupled with the much smaller calcite/silica ratios

  5. The human thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones: Thermal comfort in your own skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J

    2015-01-01

    Human thermoregulation is achieved via autonomic and behavioral responses. Autonomic responses involve 2 synchronous 'components'. One counteracts large thermal perturbations, eliciting robust heat loss or gain (i.e., sweating or shivering). The other fends off smaller insults, relying solely on changes in sensible heat exchange (i.e., skin blood flow). This sensible component occurs within the thermoneutral zone [i.e., the ambient temperature range in which temperature regulation is achieved only by sensible heat transfer, without regulatory increases in metabolic heat production (e.g., shivering) or evaporative heat loss (e.g., sweating)].(1) The combination of behavior and sensible heat exchange permits a range of conditions that are deemed thermally comfortable, which is defined as the thermal comfort zone.(1) Notably, we spend the majority of our lives within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones. It is only when we are unable to stay within these zones that deleterious health and safety outcomes can occur (i.e., hypo- or hyperthermia). Oddly, although the thermoneutral zone and thermal preference (a concept similar to the thermal comfort zone) has been extensively studied in non-human animals, our understanding of human thermoregulation within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones remains rather crude.

  6. The human thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones: Thermal comfort in your own skin blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J

    2015-01-01

    Human thermoregulation is achieved via autonomic and behavioral responses. Autonomic responses involve 2 synchronous ‘components’. One counteracts large thermal perturbations, eliciting robust heat loss or gain (i.e., sweating or shivering). The other fends off smaller insults, relying solely on changes in sensible heat exchange (i.e., skin blood flow). This sensible component occurs within the thermoneutral zone [i.e., the ambient temperature range in which temperature regulation is achieved only by sensible heat transfer, without regulatory increases in metabolic heat production (e.g., shivering) or evaporative heat loss (e.g., sweating)].1 The combination of behavior and sensible heat exchange permits a range of conditions that are deemed thermally comfortable, which is defined as the thermal comfort zone.1 Notably, we spend the majority of our lives within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones. It is only when we are unable to stay within these zones that deleterious health and safety outcomes can occur (i.e., hypo- or hyperthermia). Oddly, although the thermoneutral zone and thermal preference (a concept similar to the thermal comfort zone) has been extensively studied in non-human animals, our understanding of human thermoregulation within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones remains rather crude. PMID:27226992

  7. Stochastic Ground Water Flow Simulation with a Fracture Zone Continuum Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, C.D.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented for incorporating the hydraulic effects of vertical fracture zones into two-dimensional cell-based continuum models of ground water flow and particle tracking. High hydraulic conductivity features are used in the model to represent fracture zones. For fracture zones that are not coincident with model rows or columns, an adjustment is required for the hydraulic conductivity value entered into the model cells to compensate for the longer flowpath through the model grid. A similar adjustment is also required for simulated travel times through model cells. A travel time error of less than 8% can occur for particles moving through fractures with certain orientations. The fracture zone continuum model uses stochastically generated fracture zone networks and Monte Carlo analysis to quantify uncertainties with simulated advective travel times. An approach is also presented for converting an equivalent continuum model into a fracture zone continuum model by establishing the contribution of matrix block transmissivity to the bulk transmissivity of the aquifer. The methods are used for a case study in west-central Florida to quantify advective travel times from a potential wetland rehydration site to a municipal supply wellfield. Uncertainties in advective travel times are assumed to result from the presence of vertical fracture zones, commonly observed on aerial photographs as photolineaments.

  8. Influence of Thermocapillary Flow on Capillary Stability: Long Float-Zones in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Steen, Paul H.

    1996-01-01

    A model problem is posed to study the influence of flow on the interfacial stability of a nearly cylindrical liquid bridge for lengths near its circumference (the Plateau-Rayleigh limit). The flow is generated by a shear stress imposed on the deformable interface. The symmetry of the imposed shear stress mimics the thermocapillary stress induced on a float-zone by a ring heater (i.e. a full zone). Principal assumptions are (1) zero gravity, (2) creeping flow, and (3) that the imposed coupling at the free surface between flow and temperature fields is the only such coupling. A numerical solution, complemented by a bifurcation analysis, shows that bridges substantially longer than the Plateau-Rayleigh limit are possible. An interaction of the first two capillary instabilities through the stress-induced flow is responsible. Time-periodic standing waves are also predicted in certain parameter ranges. Motivation comes from extra-long float-zones observed in MEPHISTO space lab experiments (June 1994).

  9. Reactive transport simulations of alternative flow pathways in the ambient unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, L.; Murphy, W.; Manepally, C.; Fedors, R.

    2003-04-01

    Uncertainties in simulated ambient system unsaturated zone flow could have a significant impact on performance evaluations of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In addition to determining variations in the quantity of water available to corrode engineered materials and transport radionuclides, model assumptions regarding flow pathways may significantly affect estimates of groundwater chemistry. The manner and extent to which groundwater compositions evolve along a flow pathway are determined mainly by thermohydrologic conditions, the types of reactive materials encountered, and the interaction times with those materials. Simulated groundwater compositions can thus vary significantly depending on whether or not the flow model includes lateral diversion of infiltrating waters, or preferential flow pathways in variably-saturated materials. To assist a regulatory review of a potential license application for a geologic repository for high-level waste, we developed a reactive transport model for the ambient hydrogeochemical system at Yucca Mountain. The model simulates two phase, nonisothermal, advective and diffusive flow and transport through a one dimensional, matrix and fracture continua (dual permeability) containing ten kinetically reactive hydrostatigraphic layers in the vicinity of the SD-9 borehole at Yucca Mountain. In this presentation, we describe how the model was used to evaluate alternative ambient unsaturated zone flow pathways proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy. This abstract is an independent product of the CNWRA and does not necessarily reflect the views or regulatory position of the NRC.

  10. Determining long time-scale hyporheic zone flow paths in Antarctic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gooseff, M.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Runkel, R.L.; Vaughn, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    In the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, glaciers are the source of meltwater during the austral summer, and the streams and adjacent hyporheic zones constitute the entire physical watershed; there are no hillslope processes in these systems. Hyporheic zones can extend several metres from each side of the stream, and are up to 70 cm deep, corresponding to a lateral cross-section as large as 12 m2, and water resides in the subsurface year around. In this study, we differentiate between the near-stream hyporheic zone, which can be characterized with stream tracer experiments, and the extended hyporheic zone, which has a longer time-scale of exchange. We sampled stream water from Green Creek and from the adjacent saturated alluvium for stable isotopes of D and 18O to assess the significance and extent of stream-water exchange between the streams and extended hyporheic zones over long time-scales (days to weeks). Our results show that water residing in the extended hyporheic zone is much more isotopically enriched (up to 11??? D and 2.2??? 18O) than stream water. This result suggests a long residence time within the extended hyporheic zone, during which fractionation has occured owing to summer evaporation and winter sublimation of hyporheic water. We found less enriched water in the extended hyporheic zone later in the flow season, suggesting that stream water may be exchanged into and out of this zone, on the time-scale of weeks to months. The transient storage model OTIS was used to characterize the exchange of stream water with the extended hyporheic zone. Model results yield exchange rates (??) generally an order magnitude lower (10-5 s-1) than those determined using stream-tracer techniques on the same stream. In light of previous studies in these streams, these results suggest that the hyporheic zones in Antarctic streams have near-stream zones of rapid stream-water exchange, where 'fast' biogeochemical reactions may influence water chemistry, and extended

  11. Asymmetrical Gene Flow in a Hybrid Zone of Hawaiian Schiedea (Caryophyllaceae) Species with Contrasting Mating Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Lisa E.; Culley, Theresa M.; Weller, Stephen G.; Sakai, Ann K.; Kuenzi, Ashley; Roy, Tilottama; Wagner, Warren L.; Nepokroeff, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetrical gene flow, which has frequently been documented in naturally occurring hybrid zones, can result from various genetic and demographic factors. Understanding these factors is important for determining the ecological conditions that permitted hybridization and the evolutionary potential inherent in hybrids. Here, we characterized morphological, nuclear, and chloroplast variation in a putative hybrid zone between Schiedea menziesii and S. salicaria, endemic Hawaiian species with contrasting breeding systems. Schiedea menziesii is hermaphroditic with moderate selfing; S. salicaria is gynodioecious and wind-pollinated, with partially selfing hermaphrodites and largely outcrossed females. We tested three hypotheses: 1) putative hybrids were derived from natural crosses between S. menziesii and S. salicaria, 2) gene flow via pollen is unidirectional from S. salicaria to S. menziesii and 3) in the hybrid zone, traits associated with wind pollination would be favored as a result of pollen-swamping by S. salicaria. Schiedea menziesii and S. salicaria have distinct morphologies and chloroplast genomes but are less differentiated at the nuclear loci. Hybrids are most similar to S. menziesii at chloroplast loci, exhibit nuclear allele frequencies in common with both parental species, and resemble S. salicaria in pollen production and pollen size, traits important to wind pollination. Additionally, unlike S. menziesii, the hybrid zone contains many females, suggesting that the nuclear gene responsible for male sterility in S. salicaria has been transferred to hybrid plants. Continued selection of nuclear genes in the hybrid zone may result in a population that resembles S. salicaria, but retains chloroplast lineage(s) of S. menziesii. PMID:21949765

  12. How Large Scale Flows in the Solar Convection Zone may Influence Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Large scale flows within the solar convection zone are the primary drivers of the Sun s magnetic activity cycle. Differential rotation can amplify the magnetic field and convert poloidal fields into toroidal fields. Poleward meridional flow near the surface can carry magnetic flux that reverses the magnetic poles and can convert toroidal fields into poloidal fields. The deeper, equatorward meridional flow can carry magnetic flux toward the equator where it can reconnect with oppositely directed fields in the other hemisphere. These axisymmetric flows are themselves driven by large scale convective motions. The effects of the Sun s rotation on convection produce velocity correlations that can maintain the differential rotation and meridional circulation. These convective motions can influence solar activity themselves by shaping the large-scale magnetic field pattern. While considerable theoretical advances have been made toward understanding these large scale flows, outstanding problems in matching theory to observations still remain.

  13. Velocity profiles and plug zones in a free surface viscoplastic flow : experimental study and comparison to shallow flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freydier, Perrine; Chambon, Guillaume; Naaim, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Rheological studies concerning natural muddy debris flows have shown that these materials can be modelled as non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluids. These complex flows are generally represented using models based on a depth-integrated approach (Shallow Water) that take into account closure terms depending on the shape of the velocity profile. But to date, there is poor knowledge about the shape of velocity profiles and the position of the interface between sheared and unsheared regions (plug) in these flows, especially in the vicinity of the front. In this research, the internal dynamics of a free-surface viscoplastic flow down an inclined channel is investigated and compared to the predictions of a Shallow Water model based on the lubrication approximation. Experiments are conducted in an inclined channel whose bottom is constituted by an upward-moving conveyor belt with controlled velocity, which allows generating and observing gravity-driven stationary surges in the laboratory frame. Carbopol microgel has been used as a homogeneous and transparent viscoplastic fluid. High-resolution measurements of velocity field is performed through optical velocimetry techniques both in the uniform zone and within the front zone where flow thickness is variable and where recirculation takes place. Specific analyses have been developed to determine the position of the plug within the surge. Flow height is accessible through image processing and ultrasonic sensors. Sufficiently far from the front, experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions regarding the velocity profiles and the flow height evolution. In the vicinity of the front, however, analysis of measured velocity profiles shows an evolution of the plug different from that predicted by lubrication approximation. Accordingly, the free surface shape also deviates from the predictions of the classical Shallow Water model. These results highlight the necessity to take into account higher

  14. Physical and stable-isotope evidence for formation of secondary calcite and silica in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whelan, J.F.; Paces, J.B.; Peterman, Z.E.

    2002-01-01

    Calcite and silica form coatings on fracture footwalls and cavity floors in the welded tuffs at Yucca Mountain, the potential site of a high-level radioactive waste repository. These secondary mineral deposits are heterogeneously distributed in the unsaturated zone (UZ) with fewer than 10% of possible depositional sites mineralized. The paragenetic sequence, compiled from deposits throughout the UZ, consists of an early-stage assemblage of calcite??fluorite??zeolites that is frequently capped by chalcedony??quartz. Intermediate- and late-stage deposits consist largely of calcite, commonly with opal on buried growth layers or outermost crystal faces of the calcite. Coatings on steep-dipping fractures usually are thin (??? 3 mm) with low-relief outer surfaces whereas shallow-dipping fractures and lithophysal cavities typically contain thicker, more coarsely crystalline deposits characterized by unusual thin, tabular calcite blades up to several cms in length. These blades may be capped with knobby or corniced overgrowths of late-stage calcite intergrown with opal. The observed textures in the fracture and cavity deposits are consistent with deposition from films of water fingering down fracture footwalls or drawn up faces of growing crystals by surface tension and evaporated at the crystal tips. Fluid inclusion studies have shown that most early-stage and some intermediate-stage calcite formed at temperatures of 35 to 85??C. Calcite deposition during the past several million years appears to have been at temperatures < 30??C. The elevated temperatures indicated by the fluid inclusions are consistent with temperatures estimated from calcite ??18O values. Although others have interpreted the elevated temperatures as evidence of hydrothermal activity and flooding of the tuffs of the potential repository, the authors conclude that the temperatures and fluid-inclusion assemblages are consistent with deposition in a UZ environment that experienced prolonged heat input from

  15. Preferential Flow and Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts Through Vadose Zone: Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, C. J.; Darnault, C. J.; Garnier, P.; Kim, Y.; Oveson, K.; Jenkins, M.; Ghiorse, W.; Baveye, P.; Parlange, J.; Steenhuis, T.

    2001-12-01

    Oocysts of the protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum, when they contaminate drinking water supplies, can cause outbreaks of Cryptosporidiosis, a common waterborne disease. Of the different pathways by which oocysts can wind up in drinking water, one has received very little attention to date; because soils are often considered to be perfect filters, the transport of oocysts through the subsoil to groundwater by preferential flow is generally ignored. To evaluate its significance, three set of laboratory experiments investigated transport of oocysts through vadose zone. Experiment set I was carried out in a vertical 50 cm-long column filled with silica sand, under conditions known to foster fingered flow. Experiment set II investigates the effect of gas-water interfaces by modifying the hydrodynamical conditions in the sand columns with water-repellent sand barriers. Experiment III involved undisturbed soil columns subjected to macropores flow. The sand and soil columns were subjected to artificial rainfall and were allowed to reach steady-state. At that point, feces of contaminated calves were applied at the surface, along with a known amount of KCl to serve as tracer, and rainfall was continued at the same rate. The breakthrough of oocysts and Cl-, monitored in the effluent, demonstrate the importance of preferential flow - fingered flow and macropore flow - on the transport of oocysts through vadose zone. Peak oocyst concentrations were not appreciably delayed, compared to Cl-, and in some cases, occurred even before the Cl- peak. However, the numbers of oocysts present in the effluents were still orders of magnitude higher than the 5 to 10 oocysts per liter that are considerable sufficient to cause cryptosporidiosis in healthy adults. The transport of oocysts was simulated based on a partitioning the soil profile in both a distribution zone and a preferential zone, In particular, the model simulates accurately the markedly asymmetric breakthrough patterns, and the

  16. The Fluid Flow Evolution During the Seismic Cycle Within Overpressured Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paola, Nicola; Vanhunen, Jeroen; Collettini, Cristiano; Faulkner, Dan

    2010-05-01

    The integration of seismic reflection profiles with well-located earthquakes shows that the mainshocks of the 1997 Umbria-Marche seismic sequence (Mw < 6) nucleated at about 6 km depth, within the Triassic Evaporites, a 2 km thick sequence made of interbedded anhydrites and dolostones. Two boreholes, drilled northwest of the epicentral area, encountered CO2 fluid overpressures at about 0.8 of the lithostatic load, at about 4 km depth. It has been proposed that the time-space evolution of the 1997 aftershock sequence, was driven by the coseismic release of trapped high-pressure fluids (lv = 0.8), within the Triassic Evaporites. In order to understand whether CO2 fluid overpressure can be maintained up to the coseismic period, and trigger earthquake nucleation, we modelled fluid flow through a mature fault zone within the Triassic Evaporites. We assume that fluid flow within the fault zone occurs in accord with the Darcy's Law. Under this condition, a near lithostatic pore pressure gradient can develop, within the fault zone, when the upward transport of fluid along the fault zone exceeds the fluid loss in a horizontal direction. Our model's parameters are: a) Fault zone structure: model inputs have been obtained from large fault zone analogues derived from field observation. The architecture of large fault zones within the TE is given by a distinct fault core, up to few meters thick, of very fine-grained fault rocks (cataclasites and fault gouge), where most of the shear strain has been accommodated, surrounded by a geometrically complex and heterogeneous damage zone (up to few tens of meters wide). The damage zone is characterized by adjacent zones of heavily fractured rocks (dolostones) and foliated rocks displaying little fracturing (anhydrites). b) Fault zone permeability: field data suggests that the permeability of the fault core is relatively low due to the presence of fine grained fault rocks (k < 10E-18 m2). The permeability of the dolostones, within the

  17. Vadose zone process that control landslide initiation and debris flow propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidle, Roy C.

    2015-04-01

    Advances in the areas of geotechnical engineering, hydrology, mineralogy, geomorphology, geology, and biology have individually advanced our understanding of factors affecting slope stability; however, the interactions among these processes and attributes as they affect the initiation and propagation of landslides and debris flows are not well understood. Here the importance of interactive vadose zone processes is emphasized related to the mechanisms, initiation, mode, and timing of rainfall-initiated landslides that are triggered by positive pore water accretion, loss of soil suction and increase in overburden weight, and long-term cumulative rain water infiltration. Both large- and small-scale preferential flow pathways can both contribute to and mitigate instability, by respectively concentrating and dispersing subsurface flow. These mechanisms are influenced by soil structure, lithology, landforms, and biota. Conditions conducive to landslide initiation by infiltration versus exfiltration are discussed relative to bedrock structure and joints. The effects of rhizosphere processes on slope stability are examined, including root reinforcement of soil mantles, evapotranspiration, and how root structures affect preferential flow paths. At a larger scale, the nexus between hillslope landslides and in-channel debris flows is examined with emphasis on understanding the timing of debris flows relative to chronic and episodic infilling processes, as well as the episodic nature of large rainfall and related stormflow generation in headwater streams. The hydrogeomorphic processes and conditions that determine whether or not landslides immediately mobilize into debris flows is important for predicting the timing and extent of devastating debris flow runout in steep terrain. Given the spatial footprint of individual landslides, it is necessary to assess vadose zone processes at appropriate scales to ascertain impacts on mass wasting phenomena. Articulating the appropriate

  18. Nitrogen fluxes across hydrogeomorphic zones in coastal deltaic floodplain using flow-through technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Twilley, R.; Christensen, A.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal floodplain deltas are the region of continental margins of major river basins that can remove excess nitrogen before entering the coastal ocean. We propose that the processing of nitrogen in active deltaic wetlands varies with soil organic content in response to different hydrogeomorphic zones. Continuous flow-through core system was used to incubate sediment cores from supratidal, intertidal, and subtidal hydrogeomorphic zones along a chronosequence in Wax Lake Delta during summer of 2017. Ambient water from Wax Lake Outlet was continuously pumped through sealed cores to estimate fluxes of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus across the sediment-water interface by calculating the difference between inflow and outflow concentrations. The average respiration rate of sediment cores from intertidal zone was about 1.5 g m-2 d-1 while the rate in supratidal zone was more than doubled to 3.7 g m-2 d-1. Under the constant inflow concentration of nitrate (about 107.1 umol/L), sediment cores in supratidal zone exhibited greater NO3- uptake (1329.7 umol m-2 h-1) and N2 release (499.0 umol N m-2 h-1) than that in intertidal zone (421.5 umol m-2 h-1 of NO3- uptake and 67.6 umol N m-2 h-1 of N2 flux respectively). These results indicate greater rate of net denitrification in supratidal zone than intertidal zone in the older chronosequence of the active delta (which formed approximately in 1980). Also, lower NH4 flux (mean 70.0 umol m-2 h-1) from sediment to water column in supratidal zone together with higher NO2- flux (mean 94.2 umol m-2 h-1) illustrated strong signal of nitrification. In conclusion, sediment cores at the intertidal zone helped to remove 12% of NO3- from the water column while cores at supratidal zone removed 35% of NO3-. Based on the correlation between NO3- and N2 fluxes, about 60% of NO3- removed could be converted to N2 under sediment organic concentrations of about 12%. Comparisons of NO3 removal and conversion to N2 by denitrification will be

  19. Domino structures evolution in strike-slip shear zones; the importance of the cataclastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, N.; Dias, R.

    2018-05-01

    The Porto-Tomar-Ferreira do Alentejo dextral Shear Zone is one of the most important structures of the Iberian Variscides. In its vicinity, close to Abrantes (Central Portugal), a localized heterogeneous strain pattern developed in a decimetric metamorphic siliceous multilayer. This complex pattern was induced by the D2 dextral shearing of the early S0//S1 foliation in brittle-ductile conditions, giving rise to three main shear zone families. One of these families, with antithetic kinematics, delimits blocks with rigid clockwise rotation surrounded by coeval cataclasites, generating a local domino structure. The proposed geometrical and kinematic analysis, coupled with statistical studies, highlights the relation between subsidiary shear zones and the main shear zone. Despite the heterogeneous strain pattern, a quantitative approach of finite strain was applied based on the restoration of the initial fracture pattern. This approach shows the importance of the cataclastic flow coupled with the translational displacement of the domino domain in solving space problems related to the rigid block rotation. Such processes are key in allowing the rigid block rotation inside shear zones whenever the simple shear component is a fundamental mechanism.

  20. Steady state fractionation of heavy noble gas isotopes in a deep unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seltzer, Alan M.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Andraski, Brian J.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-01-01

    To explore steady state fractionation processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ), we measured argon, krypton, and xenon isotope ratios throughout a ∼110 m deep UZ at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in Nevada, USA. Prior work has suggested that gravitational settling should create a nearly linear increase in heavy-to-light isotope ratios toward the bottom of stagnant air columns in porous media. Our high-precision measurements revealed a binary mixture between (1) expected steady state isotopic compositions and (2) unfractionated atmospheric air. We hypothesize that the presence of an unsealed pipe connecting the surface to the water table allowed for direct inflow of surface air in response to extensive UZ gas sampling prior to our first (2015) measurements. Observed isotopic resettling in deep UZ samples collected a year later, after sealing the pipe, supports this interpretation. Data and modeling each suggest that the strong influence of gravitational settling and weaker influences of thermal diffusion and fluxes of CO2 and water vapor accurately describe steady state isotopic fractionation of argon, krypton, and xenon within the UZ. The data confirm that heavy noble gas isotopes are sensitive indicators of UZ depth. Based on this finding, we outline a potential inverse approach to quantify past water table depths from noble gas isotope measurements in paleogroundwater, after accounting for fractionation during dissolution of UZ air and bubbles.

  1. Seismic anisotropy in the Hellenic subduction zone: Effects of slab segmentation and subslab mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    The segmentation and differentiation of subducting slabs have considerable effects on mantle convection and tectonics. The Hellenic subduction zone is a complex convergent margin with strong curvature and fast slab rollback. The upper mantle seismic anisotropy in the region is studied focusing at its western and eastern edges in order to explore the effects of possible slab segmentation on mantle flow and fabrics. Complementary to new SKS shear-wave splitting measurements in regions not adequately sampled so far, the source-side splitting technique is applied to constrain the depth of anisotropy and to densify measurements. In the western Hellenic arc, a trench-normal subslab anisotropy is observed near the trench. In the forearc domain, source-side and SKS measurements reveal a trench-parallel pattern. This indicates subslab trench-parallel mantle flow, associated with return flow due to the fast slab rollback. The passage from continental to oceanic subduction in the western Hellenic zone is illustrated by a forearc transitional anisotropy pattern. This indicates subslab mantle flow parallel to a NE-SW smooth ramp that possibly connects the two subducted slabs. A young tear fault initiated at the Kefalonia Transform Fault is likely not entirely developed, as this trench-parallel anisotropy pattern is observed along the entire western Hellenic subduction system, even following this horizontal offset between the two slabs. At the eastern side of the Hellenic subduction zone, subslab source-side anisotropy measurements show a general trench-normal pattern. These are associated with mantle flow through a possible ongoing tearing of the oceanic lithosphere in the area. Although the exact geometry of this slab tear is relatively unknown, SKS trench-parallel measurements imply that the tear has not reached the surface yet. Further exploration of the Hellenic subduction system is necessary; denser seismic networks should be deployed at both its edges in order to achieve

  2. Observations on preferential flow and horizontal transport of nitrogen fertilizer in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkison, D.H.; Blevins, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    A study site underlain by a claypan soil was instrumented to examine the transport of fertilizer nitrogen (N) under corn (Zea mays L.) cultivation. The study was designed to examine N transport within the unsaturated zone and in interflow (the saturated flow of water on top of the claypan). A 15N- labeled fertilizer (labeled N), bromide (Br), and chloride (Cl) were used as field tracers. Rapid or prolonged infiltration events allowed water and dissolved solutes to perch on the claypan for brief periods. However, a well- developed network of preferential flow paths quickly diverted water and solutes through the claypan and into the underlying glacial till aquifer. Excess fertilizer N in the unsaturated zone supplied a continuous, but declining input of N to ground water for a period of 15 mo after a single fertilizer application. Calculated solute velocities through the claypan matrix (6.4 x 10-6 cm s-1) were similar to horizontal transport rates along the claypan (3.5 to 7.3 x 10-6 cm s-1) but much slower than infiltration rates determined for preferential flow paths (1.67 x 10-3 cm s-1). These flow paths accounted for 35% of the transport. A seasonally variable, dual mode of transport (matrix and preferential flow) prevented the claypan from being an effective barrier to vertical transport. Simulations of selected field observations, conducted using the variably saturated two- dimensional flow and transport model, VS2DT, confirmed the presence of a dual flow regime in the claypan.

  3. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow and solute transport in vadose zone and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Weisbrod, N.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2013-12-01

    The complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One commonly used simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone is insignificant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In such cases the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone above groundwater level can be simulated as a 1D phenomenon, whereas through groundwater they are viewed as 2D or 3D phenomena. A new approach for a numerical scheme for 3D variably saturated flow and transport is presented. A Quasi-3D approach allows representing flow in the 'vadose zone - aquifer' system by a series of 1D Richards' equations solved in variably-saturated zone and by 3D-saturated flow equation in groundwater (modified MODFLOW code). The 1D and 3D equations are coupled at the phreatic surface in a way that aquifer replenishment is calculated using the Richards' equation, and solving for the moving water table does not require definition of the specific yield parameter. The 3D advection-dispersion equation is solved in the entire domain by the MT3D code. Using implicit finite differences approximation to couple processes in the vadose zone and groundwater provides mass conservation and increase of computational efficiency. The above model was applied to simulate the impact of irrigation on groundwater salinity in the Alto Piura aquifer (Northern Peru). Studies on changing groundwater quality in arid and semi-arid lands show that irrigation return flow is one of the major factors contributing to aquifer salinization. Existing mathematical models do not account explicitly for the solute recycling during irrigation on a daily scale. Recycling occurs throughout the unsaturated and saturated zones, as function of the solute mass extracted from pumping wells. Salt concentration in irrigation water is calculated at each time step as a function of concentration of both surface water and groundwater

  4. Global Transition Zone Anisotropy and Consequences for Mantle Flow and Earth's Deep Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghein, C.; Yuan, K.

    2011-12-01

    The transition zone has long been at the center of the debate between multi- and single-layered convection models that directly relate to heat transport and chemical mixing throughout the mantle. It has also been suggested that the transition zone is a reservoir that collects water transported by subduction of the lithosphere into the mantle. Since water lowers mantle minerals density and viscosity, thereby modifying their rheology and melting behavior, it likely affects global mantle dynamics and the history of plate tectonics. Constraining mantle flow is therefore important for our understanding of Earth's thermochemical evolution and deep water cycle. Because it can result from deformation by dislocation creep during convection, seismic anisotropy can help us model mantle flow. It is relatively well constrained in the uppermost mantle, but its presence in the transition zone is still debated. Its detection below 250 km depth has been challenging to date because of the poor vertical resolution of commonly used datasets. In this study, we used global Love wave overtone phase velocity maps, which are sensitive to structure down to much larger depths than fundamental modes alone, and have greater depth resolution than shear wave-splitting data. This enabled us to obtain a first 3-D model of azimuthal anisotropy for the upper 800km of the mantle. We inverted the 2Ψ terms of anisotropic phase velocity maps [Visser, et al., 2008] for the first five Love wave overtones between 35s and 174s period. The resulting model shows that the average anisotropy amplitude for vertically polarized shear waves displays two main stable peaks: one in the uppermost mantle and, most remarkably, one in the lower transition zone. F-tests showed that the presence of 2Ψ anisotropy in the transition zone is required to improve the third, fourth, and fifth overtones fit. Because of parameter trade-offs, however, we cannot exclude that the anisotropy is located in the upper transition zone as

  5. Secondary contact and asymmetrical gene flow in a cosmopolitan marine fish across the Benguela upwelling zone

    PubMed Central

    Reid, K; Hoareau, T B; Graves, J E; Potts, W M; dos Santos, S M R; Klopper, A W; Bloomer, P

    2016-01-01

    The combination of oceanographic barriers and habitat heterogeneity are known to reduce connectivity and leave specific genetic signatures in the demographic history of marine species. However, barriers to gene flow in the marine environment are almost never impermeable which inevitably allows secondary contact to occur. In this study, eight sampling sites (five along the South African coastline, one each in Angola, Senegal and Portugal) were chosen to examine the population genetic structure and phylogeographic history of the cosmopolitan bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), distributed across a large South-east Atlantic upwelling zone. Molecular analyses were applied to mtDNA cytochrome b, intron AM2B1 and 15 microsatellite loci. We detected uncharacteristically high genetic differentiation (FST 0.15–0.20; P<0.001) between the fish sampled from South Africa and the other sites, strongly influenced by five outlier microsatellite loci located in conserved intergenic regions. In addition, differentiation among the remaining East Atlantic sites was detected, although mtDNA indicated past isolation with subsequent secondary contact between these East Atlantic populations. We further identified secondary contact, with unidirectional gene flow from South Africa to Angola. The directional contact is likely explained by a combination of the northward flowing offshore current and endogenous incompatibilities restricting integration of certain regions of the genome and limiting gene flow to the south. The results confirm that the dynamic system associated with the Benguela current upwelling zone influences species distributions and population processes in the South-east Atlantic. PMID:27436525

  6. Secondary contact and asymmetrical gene flow in a cosmopolitan marine fish across the Benguela upwelling zone.

    PubMed

    Reid, K; Hoareau, T B; Graves, J E; Potts, W M; Dos Santos, S M R; Klopper, A W; Bloomer, P

    2016-11-01

    The combination of oceanographic barriers and habitat heterogeneity are known to reduce connectivity and leave specific genetic signatures in the demographic history of marine species. However, barriers to gene flow in the marine environment are almost never impermeable which inevitably allows secondary contact to occur. In this study, eight sampling sites (five along the South African coastline, one each in Angola, Senegal and Portugal) were chosen to examine the population genetic structure and phylogeographic history of the cosmopolitan bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), distributed across a large South-east Atlantic upwelling zone. Molecular analyses were applied to mtDNA cytochrome b, intron AM2B1 and 15 microsatellite loci. We detected uncharacteristically high genetic differentiation (F ST 0.15-0.20; P<0.001) between the fish sampled from South Africa and the other sites, strongly influenced by five outlier microsatellite loci located in conserved intergenic regions. In addition, differentiation among the remaining East Atlantic sites was detected, although mtDNA indicated past isolation with subsequent secondary contact between these East Atlantic populations. We further identified secondary contact, with unidirectional gene flow from South Africa to Angola. The directional contact is likely explained by a combination of the northward flowing offshore current and endogenous incompatibilities restricting integration of certain regions of the genome and limiting gene flow to the south. The results confirm that the dynamic system associated with the Benguela current upwelling zone influences species distributions and population processes in the South-east Atlantic.

  7. An analytic description of electrodynamic dispersion in free-flow zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis

    2015-07-24

    The present work analyzes the electrodynamic dispersion of sample streams in a free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) chamber resulting due to partial or complete blockage of electroosmotic flow (EOF) across the channel width by the sidewalls of the conduit. This blockage of EOF has been assumed to generate a pressure-driven backflow in the transverse direction for maintaining flow balance in the system. A parallel-plate based FFZE device with the analyte stream located far away from the channel side regions has been considered to simplify the current analysis. Applying a method-of-moments formulation, an analytic expression was derived for the variance of the sample zone at steady state as a function of its position in the separation chamber under these conditions. It has been shown that the increase in stream broadening due to the electrodynamic dispersion phenomenon is additive to the contributions from molecular diffusion and sample injection, and simply modifies the coefficient for the hydrodynamic dispersion term for a fixed lateral migration distance of the sample stream. Moreover, this dispersion mechanism can dominate the overall spatial variance of analyte zones when a significant fraction of the EOF is blocked by the channel sidewalls. The analysis also shows that analyte streams do not undergo any hydrodynamic broadening due to unwanted pressure-driven cross-flows in an FFZE chamber in the absence of a transverse electric field. The noted results have been validated using Monte Carlo simulations which further demonstrate that while the sample concentration profile at the channel outlet approaches a Gaussian distribution only in FFZE chambers substantially longer than the product of the axial pressure-driven velocity and the characteristic diffusion time in the system, the spatial variance of the exiting analyte stream is well described by the Taylor-Aris dispersion limit even in analysis ducts much shorter than this length scale. Copyright © 2015

  8. Change in hyporheic zone residence time under different surface flow states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Suning; Chui, Ting Fong May

    2017-04-01

    Hyporheic zone (HZ), which is the ecotone immediately below or adjacent to a stream, plays an important role in a stream ecological system. One of the most common metrics in evaluating the functioning of an HZ is residence time (RT) which is the duration a water molecule or a solute remains within the HZ. Many factors, such as meandering of a stream, heterogeneity of streambed, can influence the RT of an HZ. Stream discharge is another governing but less discussed factor. Different discharge values produce different flow states (i.e.., subcritical, critical and supercritical) and alluvial stream bed forms. This study examined the changes of RT in discharges of different states and their corresponding induced bed forms. It employed a toolbox developed by Stonedahl et al. (2015) within Netlogo to simulate the RT of an HZ, considering three discharge values in each of the supercritical, critical and subcritical states. It approximated the bed forms as sinusoidal waves with amplitudes and periods selected for each flow state. The simulated results suggest that the RT is minimum when the flow is critical, and it is longer for both subcritical and supercritical flows. For subcritical flow, the RT, as well as the fraction remained within the streambed during particle tracing, increases with the increase in discharge value. However, there is no such variation among the different discharge values of supercritical flow. Therefore, for supercritical flow, one combination of discharge value and bed form might be sufficient and representative. However, for subcritical flow, the variations of discharge values and their induced bed forms should be considered. Reference: Stonedahl, S.H., Roche, K.R., Stonedahl, F., & Packman, A.I. (2015). Visualizing Hyporheic Flow Through Bedforms Using Dye Experiments and Simulation. J. Vis. Exp. (105), e53285. doi: 10.3791/53285

  9. Iceland Scotland Overflow Water flow through the Bight Fracture Zone in June-July 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Herle; Petit, Tillys; Thierry, Virginie

    2017-04-01

    ISOW (Iceland Scotland Overflow Water) is the densest water in the northern Iceland Basin and a main constituent of the lower limb of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). ISOW is the product of mixing of dense water originating from the Nordic Seas with Atlantic Water and Labrador Sea Water during its crossing of the Iceland-Faroe-Scotland Ridge and downstream acceleration. In the northern Iceland Basin, ISOW is characterized by potential density σ0 > 27.8 and salinity > 34.94. Downstream of the Iceland-Scotland Ridge, ISOW flows southwestward in a Deep Western Boundary Current along the eastern flank of the Reykjanes Ridge. Models and float trajectories previously suggested that part of the ISOW flow could cross the Reykjanes Ridge through the Bight Fracture Zone. However, no direct observations of the ISOW flow through the Bight Fracture Zone are available that would allow us to quantify its transport and water mass transformation. This lack of direct observations also prevents understanding the dynamics of the throughflow. In this study, we analyzed a set of CTDO2 and LADCP stations acquired in June-July 2015 during the Reykjanes Ridge Experiment cruise and provide new insights on the ISOW flow through the Bight Fracture Zone. The evolution of the properties as well as the velocity measurements confirm an ISOW flow from the Iceland Basin to the Irminger Sea. A main constrain to the throughflow is the presence of two sills of about 2150 m depth and two narrows. With potential densities between 27.8-27.87 kg m-3 and near bottom potential temperature of 3.02°C and salinity of 34.98, only the lightest variety of ISOW is found at the entrance of the BFZ east of the sills. In the central part of the Bight Fracture Zone, the evolution of ISOW is characterized by a decrease of 0.015 kg m-3 in the near bottom density, ascribed to the blocking of the densest ISOW variety by the sills and/or diapycnal mixing. To the West, at the exit of the BFZ, ISOW overlays

  10. Joule heating induced stream broadening in free-flow zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis

    2018-03-01

    The use of an electric field in free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) automatically leads to Joule heating yielding a higher temperature at the center of the separation chamber relative to that around the channel walls. For small amounts of heat generated, this thermal effect introduces a variation in the equilibrium position of the analyte molecules due to the dependence of liquid viscosity and analyte diffusivity on temperature leading to a modification in the position of the analyte stream as well as the zone width. In this article, an analytic theory is presented to quantitate such effects of Joule heating on FFZE assays in the limit of small temperature differentials across the channel gap yielding a closed form expression for the stream position and zone variance under equilibrium conditions. A method-of-moments approach is employed to develop this analytic theory, which is further validated with numerical solutions of the governing equations. Interestingly, the noted analyses predict that Joule heating can drift the location of the analyte stream either way of its equilibrium position realized in the absence of any temperature rise in the system, and also tends to reduce zone dispersion. The extent of these modifications, however, is governed by the electric field induced temperature rise and three Péclet numbers evaluated based on the axial pressure-driven flow, transverse electroosmotic and electrophoretic solute velocities in the separation chamber. Monte Carlo simulations of the FFZE system further establish a time and a length scale over which the results from the analytic theory are valid. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Bottom-simulating reflector variability at the Costa Rica subduction zone and corresponding heat flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, S.; Bangs, N. L.; Hornbach, M. J.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    We use 3D seismic reflection data acquired in April - May 2011 by the R/V Marcus G. Langseth to extract heat flow information using the bottom-simulating reflector across the Costa Rica convergent margin. These data are part of the CRISP Project, which will image the Middle America subduction zone in 3D. The survey was conducted in an area approximately 55 x 11 km, to the northwest of the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. For the analysis presented here, 3D seismic data were processed with Paradigm Focus software through post-stack time migration. The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR)-a reverse polarity reflection indicating the base of the gas hydrate phase boundary-is imaged very clearly in two regions within the slope-cover sediments in the accretionary prism. In deep water environments, the BSR acts as a temperature gauge revealing subsurface temperatures across the margin. We predict BSR depth using a true 3D diffusive heat flow model combined with IODP drilling data and compare results with actual BSR depth observations to determine anomalies in heat flow. Uniform heat flow in the region should result in a deepening BSR downslope toward the trench, however our initial results indicate the BSR shoals near the trench to its shallowest level below sea floor of approximately 96 m below the sea floor, suggesting elevated heat flow towards the toe. Landward, the BSR deepens to about 333 m below the sea floor indicating lower heat flow. Both BSR segments display a trend of deepening landward from the trench, however the depth below the sea floor is greater overall for the landward segment than the segment near the toe. We suggest two regimes with differing heat flow exist across the margin that likely represent two separate fluid flow regimes - one from recently accreted sediments near the prism toe and the other through the older materials making up the prism.

  12. Soil Moisture Flow and Nitrate Movement Simulation through Deep and Heterogeneous Vadose Zone using Dual-porosity Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, B. K.; Tomar, J.; Harter, T.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate nitrate movement from non-point sources in deep, heterogeneous vadose zones, using multi-dimensional variably saturated flow and transport simulations. We hypothesize that porous media heterogeneity causes saturation variability that leads to preferential flow systems such that a significant portion of the vadose zone does not significantly contribute to flow. We solve Richards' equation and the advection-dispersion equation to simulate soil moisture and nitrate transport regimes in plot-scale experiments conducted in the San Joaquin Valley, California. We compare equilibrium against non-equilibrium (dual-porosity) approaches. In the equilibrium approach we consider each soil layer to have unique hydraulic properties as a whole, while in the dual-porosity approach we assume that large fractions of the porous flow domain are immobile. However we consider exchange of water and solute between mobile and immobile zone using the appropriate mass transfer terms. The results indicate that flow and transport in a nearly 16 m deep stratified vadose zone comprised of eight layers of unconsolidated alluvium experiences highly non-uniform, localized preferential flow and transport patterns leading to accelerated nitrate transfer. The equilibrium approach largely under-predicted the leaching of nitrate to groundwater while the dual-porosity approach showed higher rates of nitrate leaching, consistent with field observations. The dual-porosity approach slightly over-predicted nitrogen storage in the vadose zone, which may be the result of limited matrix flow or denitrification not accounted for in the model. Results of this study may be helpful to better predict fertilizer and pesticide retention times in deep vadose zone, prior to recharge into the groundwater flow system. Keywords: Nitrate, Preferential flow, Heterogeneous vadose zone, Dual-porosity approach

  13. Chromosomal rearrangements and gene flow over time in an inter-specific hybrid zone of the Sorex araneus group.

    PubMed

    Yannic, G; Basset, P; Hausser, J

    2009-06-01

    Most hybrid zones have existed for hundreds or thousands of years but have generally been observed for only a short time period. Studies extending over periods long enough to track evolutionary changes in the zones or assess the ultimate outcome of hybridization are scarce. Here, we describe the evolution over time of the level of genetic isolation between two karyotypically different species of shrews (Sorex araneus and Sorex antinorii) at a hybrid zone located in the Swiss Alps. We first evaluated hybrid zone movement by contrasting patterns of gene flow and changes in cline parameters (centre and width) using 24 microsatellite loci, between two periods separated by 10 years apart. Additionally, we tested the role of chromosomal rearrangements on gene flow by analysing microsatellite loci located on both rearranged and common chromosomes to both species. We did not detect any movement of the hybrid zone during the period analysed, suggesting that the zone is a typical tension zone. However, the gene flow was significantly lower among the rearranged than the common chromosomes for the second period, whereas the difference was only marginally significant for the first period. This further supports the role of chromosomal rearrangements on gene flow between these taxa.

  14. Continuous monitoring of water flow and solute transport using vadose zone monitoring technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, O.

    2009-04-01

    Groundwater contamination is usually attributed to pollution events that initiate on land surface. These may be related to various sources such as industrial, urban or agricultural, and may appear as point or non point sources, through a single accidental event or a continuous pollution process. In all cases, groundwater pollution is a consequence of pollutant transport processes that take place in the vadose zone above the water table. Attempts to control pollution events and prevent groundwater contamination usually involve groundwater monitoring programs. This, however, can not provide any protection against contamination since pollution identification in groundwater is clear evidence that the groundwater is already polluted and contaminants have already traversed the entire vadose zone. Accordingly, an efficient monitoring program that aims at providing information that may prevent groundwater pollution has to include vadose-zone monitoring systems. Such system should provide real-time information on the hydrological and chemical properties of the percolating water and serve as an early warning system capable of detecting pollution events in their early stages before arrival of contaminants to groundwater. Recently, a vadose-zone monitoring system (VMS) was developed to allow continuous monitoring of the hydrological and chemical properties of percolating water in the deep vadose zone. The VMS includes flexible time-domain reflectometry (FTDR) probes for continuous tracking of water content profiles, and vadose-zone sampling ports (VSPs) for frequent sampling of the deep vadose pore water at multiple depths. The monitoring probes and sampling ports are installed through uncased slanted boreholes using a flexible sleeve that allows attachment of the monitoring devices to the borehole walls while achieving good contact between the sensors and the undisturbed sediment column. The system has been successfully implemented in several studies on water flow and

  15. Fate and Transformation of Nitrate in the Unsaturated Zone of Two Soil Distributed Areas in the Huaihe River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Ruan, X.; Liu, C. Q.

    2016-12-01

    Unsaturated zone (UZ) is the most important passageway for nitrogen pollutants transporting from land surface to groundwater, and can be a hotspot for nitrogen transformation due to the transitional redox conditions. Study on the fate of nitrogen in UZ has significant implication for revealing the causes of groundwater nitrate pollution. In this study, we examined two types of UZs in Fluvo-aquic soil (FAS) and lime concretion black soil (LCBS) distributed areas which account for 33.57% and 13.31% of the arable land in the Huaihe River Basin, and determined the isotopic compositions (δ15N and δ18O) of nitrate in soil water extracts of both UZs to reveal the potential nitrification and denitrification processes. The similarity of measured δ18O-NO3- values in both upper UZs to the stoichiometrically calculated δ18O-NO3- value (3.4‰, according to the known nitrification pathway) confirms that the end product of nitrification process had a major contribution to the nitrate pool. Compared to those in the UZ of FAS area, the enrichment of heavy isotopes in nitrate coincided with the decrease of NO3-/Cl- molar ratios in the lower UZ of LCBS area, indicating the occurrence of denitrification therein. Further quantitative analyses showed that as high as 90% of the total nitrate was eliminated via denitrification based upon Rayleigh equation. Our results imply that groundwater in the FAS distributed areas may be more vulnerable to nitrate pollution induced by agricultural activities.

  16. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    PubMed Central

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M.; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R.; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J. -Michael

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed. PMID:27436676

  17. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J-Michael

    2016-07-20

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed.

  18. Identification of critical zones in the flow through prosthetic heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A.; Ledesma, R.; Zenit, R.; Pulos, G.

    2008-11-01

    The hemodynamic properties of prosthetic heart valves can cause blood damage and platelet activation due to the non- physiological flow patterns. Blood recirculation and elevated shear stresses are believed to be responsible for these complications. The objective of this study is to identify and quantify the conditions for which recirculation and high stress zones appear. We have performed a comparative study between a mechanical monoleaflet and biological valve. In order to generate the flow conditions to test the prosthesis, we have built a hydraulic circuit which reproduces the human systemic circulation, on the basis of the Windkessel model. This model is based on an electrical analogy which consists of an arterial resistance and compliance. Using PIV 3D- Stereo measurements, taken downstream from the prosthetic heart valves, we have reconstructed the full phase-averaged tridimensional velocity field. Preliminary results show that critical zones are more prominent in mechanical prosthesis, indicating that valves made with bio-materials are less likely to produce blood trauma. This is in accordance with what is generally found in the literature.

  19. Determination of ion mobility in EHD flow zone of plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumariyah, Kusminarto, Hermanto, Arief; Nuswantoro, Pekik

    2015-12-01

    Determination has been carried out for ion mobility in EHD flow zone generated using a pin-concentric multiple ring electrodes and a pin-single ring electrode used as a comparator. The pin needle was made from stainless steel with a tip diameter of 0.18 mm. The concentris multiple ring electrode in form three/two concentric ring electrodes which made of metal material connected to each other. Each ring of three concentric ring electrode has a diameter of 24 mm, 16 mm and 8 mm. And each ring of two concentric ring electrode has a diameter of 24 mm and 16 mm. Single ring electrode has a diameter24 mm. The all ring has same of width and thickness were 2 mm and 3 mm. EHD was generated by using a DC high voltage of 10 kV. Pin functional as an active electrode of corona discharge while the all ring electrodes acted as ions collector and passive electrodes. The experimental results show that the ion current is proportional to V2 according to calculations by Chouelo for hyperbolic-field approach. Ion mobility obtained from the quadratic polynomial fitting of experimental data were current and voltage as well as Choelo formulation. The results showed that the mobility of ions in the EHD flow zones utilizing pin-consentric multiple ring electrode larger than utilizing pin-single ring electrode. Pin-three Consentic ring electrode has the largest of ion mobility

  20. Finite Element Method Analysis of An Out Flow With Free Surface In Transition Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saoula, R. Iddir S.; Mokhtar, K. Ait

    The object of this work is to present this part of the fluid mechanics that relates to out-flows of the fluid to big speeds in transitions. Results usually gotten by the classic processes can only have a qualitative aspect. The method fluently used for the count of these out-flows to big speeds is the one of characteristics, this approach remains interesting so much that doesn't appear within the out-flow of intersections of shock waves, as well as of reflections of these. In the simple geometry case, the method of finite differences satisfying result, But when the complexity of this geometry imposes itself, it is the method of finite elements that is proposed to solve this type of prob- lem, in particular for problems Trans critic. The goal of our work is to analyse free surface flows in channels no prismatic has oblong transverse section in zone of tran- sition. (Convergent, divergent). The basic mathematical model of this study is Saint Venant derivatives partial equations. To solve these equations we use the finite ele- ment method, the element of reference is the triangular element with 6 nodes which are quadratic in speed and linear in height (pressure). Our results and their obtains by others are very close to experimental results.

  1. Mathematical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal areas are the most densely-populated areas in the world. Consequently water demand is high, posing great pressure on fresh water resources. Climatic change and its direct impacts on meteorological variables (e.g. precipitation) and indirect impact on sea level rise, as well as anthropogenic pressures (e.g. groundwater abstraction), are strong drivers causing groundwater salinisation and subsequently affecting coastal wetlands salinity with adverse effects on the corresponding ecosystems. Coastal zones are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes and variable-density flow conditions. Simulation of sea level rise and tidal effects on aquifer salinisation and accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades several computer codes have been developed to simulate coupled surface and groundwater flow. In these numerical models surface water flow is usually described by the 1-D Saint Venant equations (e.g. Swain and Wexler, 1996) or the 2D shallow water equations (e.g. Liang et al., 2007). Further simplified equations, such as the diffusion and kinematic wave approximations to the Saint Venant equations, are also employed for the description of 2D overland flow and 1D stream flow (e.g. Gunduz and Aral, 2005). However, for coastal bays, estuaries and wetlands it is often desirable to solve the 3D shallow water equations to simulate surface water flow. This is the case e.g. for wind-driven flows or density-stratified flows. Furthermore, most integrated models are based on the assumption of constant fluid density and therefore their applicability to coastal regions is questionable. Thus, most of the existing codes are not well-suited to represent surface water-groundwater interactions in coastal areas. To this end, the 3D integrated

  2. Are faults preferential flow paths through semiarid and arid vadose zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigda, John M.; Wilson, John L.

    2003-08-01

    Numerous faults crosscut the poorly lithified, basin-fill sands found in New Mexico's Rio Grande rift and in other extensional regimes. The deformational processes that created these faults sharply reduced both fault porosity and fault saturated hydraulic conductivity by altering grains and pores, particularly in structures referred to as deformation bands. The resulting pore distribution changes, which create barriers to saturated flow, should enhance fault unsaturated flow relative to parent sand under the relatively dry conditions of the semiarid southwest. We report the first measurements of unsaturated hydraulic properties for undisturbed fault materials, using samples from a small-displacement normal fault and parent sands in the Bosque del Apache Wildlife Refuge, central New Mexico. Fault samples were taken from a narrow zone of deformation bands. The unsaturated flow apparatus (UFA) centrifuge system was used to measure both relative permeability and moisture retention curves. We compared these relations and fitted hydraulic conductivity-matric potential models to test whether the fault has significantly different unsaturated hydraulic properties than its parent sand. Saturated conductivity is 3 orders of magnitude less in the fault than the undeformed sand. As matric potential decreases from 0 to -200 cm, unsaturated conductivity decreases roughly 1 order of magnitude in the fault but 5-6 orders of magnitude in undeformed sands. Fault conductivity is greater by 2-6 orders of magnitude at matric potentials between -200 and -1000 cm, which are typical potentials for semiarid and arid vadose zones. Fault deformation bands have much higher air-entry matric potential values than parent sands and remain close to saturation well after the parent sands have begun to approach residual moisture content. Under steady state, one-dimensional, gravity-driven flow conditions, moisture transport and solute advection is 102-106 times larger in the fault material than

  3. Measurements and modelling of beach groundwater flow in the swash-zone: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Diane P.

    2006-04-01

    This paper reviews research on beach groundwater dynamics and identifies research questions which will need to be answered before swash zone sediment transport and beach profile evolution can be successfully modelled. Beach groundwater hydrodynamics are a result of combined forcing from the tide and waves at a range of frequencies, and a large number of observations exist which describe the shape and elevation of the beach watertable in response to tidal forcing at diurnal, semi-diurnal and spring-neap tidal frequencies. Models of beach watertable response to tidal forcing have been successfully validated; however, models of watertable response to wave forcing are less well developed and require verification. Improved predictions of swash zone sediment transport and beach profile evolution cannot be achieved unless the complex fluid and sediment interactions between the surface flow and the beach groundwater are better understood, particularly the sensitivity of sediment transport processes to flow perpendicular to the permeable bed. The presence of a capillary fringe, particularly when it lies just below the sand surface, has influences on beach groundwater dynamics. The presence of a capillary fringe can have a significant effect on the exchange of water between the ocean and the coastal aquifer, particularly in terms of the storage capacity of the aquifer. Field and laboratory observations have also shown that natural groundwater waves usually propagate faster and decay more slowly in aquifers with a capillary fringe, and observations which suggest that horizontal flows may also occur in the capillary zone have been reported. The effects of infiltration and exfiltration are generally invoked to explain why beaches with a low watertable tend to accrete and beaches with a high watertable tend to erode. However, the relative importance of processes such as infiltration losses in the swash, changes in the effective weight of the sediment, and modified shear stress

  4. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Reges, José E. O.; Salazar, A. O.; Maitelli, Carla W. S. P.; Carvalho, Lucas G.; Britto, Ursula J. B.

    2016-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved. PMID:27420068

  5. Characterization of fractures and flow zones in a contaminated shale at the Watervliet Arsenal, Albany County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2002-01-01

    Flow zones in a fractured shale in and near a plume of volatile organic compounds at the Watervliet Arsenal in Albany County, N. Y. were characterized through the integrated analysis of geophysical logs and single- and cross-hole flow tests. Information on the fracture-flow network at the site was needed to design an effective groundwater monitoring system, estimate offsite contaminant migration, and evaluate potential containment and remedial actions.Four newly drilled coreholes and four older monitoring wells were logged and tested to define the distribution and orientation of fractures that intersected a combined total of 500 feet of open hole. Analysis of borehole-wall image logs obtained with acoustic and optical televiewers indicated 79 subhorizontal to steeply dipping fractures with a wide range of dip directions. Analysis of fluid resistivity, temperature, and heat-pulse and electromagnetic flowmeter logs obtained under ambient and short-term stressed conditions identified 14 flow zones, which consist of one to several fractures and whose estimated transmissivity values range from 0.1 to more than 250 feet squared per day.Cross-hole flow tests, which were used to characterize the hydraulic connection between fracture-flow zones intersected by the boreholes, entailed (1) injection into or extraction from boreholes that penetrated a single fracture-flow zone or whose zones were isolated by an inflatable packer, and (2) measurement of the transient response of water levels and flow in surrounding boreholes. Results indicate a wellconnected fracture network with an estimated transmissivity of 80 to 250 feet squared per day that extends for at least 200 feet across the site. This interconnected fracture-flow network greatly affects the hydrology of the site and has important implications for contaminant monitoring and remedial actions.

  6. Counterbalancing hydrodynamic sample distortion effects increases resolution of free-flow zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Weber, G; Bauer, J

    1998-06-01

    On fractionation of highly heterogeneous protein mixtures, optimal resolution was achieved by forcing proteins to migrate through a preestablished pH gradient, until they entered a medium with a pH similar but not equal to their pIs. For this purpose, up to seven different media were pumped through the electrophoresis chamber so that they were flowing adjacently to each other, forming a pH gradient declining stepwise from the cathode to the anode. This gradient had a sufficiently strong band-focusing effect to counterbalance sample distortion effects of the flowing medium as proteins approached their isoelectric medium closer than 0.5 pH units. Continuous free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) with high throughput capability was applicable if proteins did not precipitate or aggregate in these media. If components of heterogeneous protein mixtures had already started to precipitate or aggregate, in a medium with a pH exceeding their pI by more than 0.5 pH units, the application of interval modus and media forming flat pH gradients appeared advantageous.

  7. Steady flows in the chromosphere and transition-zone above active regions as observed by OSO-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lites, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Two years of data from the University of Colorado ultraviolet spectrometer aboard OSO-8 were searched for steady line-of-sight flows in the chromosphere and transition-zone above active regions. The most conspicuous pattern that emerges from this data set is that many sunspots show persistent blueshifts of transition-zone lines indicating velocities of about 20 km/s with respect to the surrounding plage areas. The data show much smaller shifts in ultraviolet emission lines arising from the chromosphere: the shifts are frequently to the blue, but sometimes redshifts do occur. Plage areas often show a redshift of the transition-zone lines relative to the surrounding quiet areas, and a strong gradient of the vertical component of the velocity is evident in many plages. One area of persistent blueshift was observed in the transition-zone above an active region filament. The energy requirement of these steady flows over sunspots is discussed.

  8. Catchment organisation, free energy dynamics and network control on critical zone water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, E.; Ehret, U.; Kleidon, A.; Jackisch, C.; Scherer, U.; Blume, T.

    2012-04-01

    as that these flow structures organize and dominate flows of water, dissolved matter and sediments during rainfall driven conditions at various scales: - Surface connected vertical flow structures of anecic worm burrows or soil cracks organize and dominated vertical flows at the plot scale - this is usually referred to as preferential flow; - Rill networks at the soil surface organise and dominate hillslope scale overland flow response and sediment yields; - Subsurface pipe networks at the bedrock interface organize and dominate hillslope scale lateral subsurface water and tracer flows; - The river net organizes and dominates flows of water, dissolved matter and sediments to the catchment outlet and finally across continental gradients to the sea. Fundamental progress with respect to the parameterization of hydrological models, subscale flow networks and to understand the adaptation of hydro-geo ecosystems to change could be achieved by discovering principles that govern the organization of catchments flow networks in particular at least during steady state conditions. This insight has inspired various scientists to suggest principles for organization of ecosystems, landscapes and flow networks; as Bejans constructural law, Minimum Energy Expenditure , Maximum Entropy Production. In line with these studies we suggest that a thermodynamic/energetic treatment of the catchment is might be a key for understanding the underlying principles that govern organisation of flow and transport. Our approach is to employ a) physically based hydrological model that address at least all the relevant hydrological processes in the critical zone in a coupled way, behavioural representations of the observed organisation of flow structures and textural elements, that are consistent with observations in two well investigated research catchments and have been tested against distributed observations of soil moisture and catchment scale discharge; to simulate the full concert of hydrological

  9. Magnetocentrifugally Driven Flows from Young Stars and Disks. IV. The Accretion Funnel and Dead Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Shu, Frank H.

    1995-07-01

    We formulate the time-steady, axisymmetric problem of stellar magnetospheric inflow of gas from a surrounding accretion disk. The computational domain is bounded on the outside by a surface of given shape containing the open field lines associated with an induced disk wind. The mechanism for this wind has been investigated in previous publications in this journal. Our zeroth-order solution incorporates an acceptable accounting of the pressure balance between the magnetic field lines loaded with accreting gas (funnel flow) and those empty of matter (dead zone). In comparison with previous models, our funnel-flow/dead-zone solution has the following novel features: (1) Because of a natural tendency for the trapped stellar magnetic flux to pinch toward the corotation radius Rx (X-point of the effective potential), most of the interesting magnetohydrodynamics is initiated within a small neighborhood of Rx (X-region), where the Keplerian angular speed of rotation in the disk equals the spin rate of the star. (2) Unimpeded funnel flow from the inner portion of the X-region to the star can occur when the amount of trapped magnetic flux equals or exceeds 1.5 times the unperturbed dipole flux that would lie outside Rx in the absence of an accretion disk. (3). Near the equatorial plane, radial infall from the X-point is terminated at a "kink" point Rk = 0.74Rx that deflects the flow away from the midplane, mediating thereby between the field topology imposed by a magnetic fan of trapped flux at Rx and the geometry of a strong stellar dipole. (4) The excess angular momentum of accretion that would otherwise spin up the star rapidly is deposited by the magnetic torques of the funnel flow into the inner portion of the X-region of the disk. (5) An induced disk wind arises in the outer portion of the .X-region, where the stellar field lines have been blown open, and removes whatever excess angular momentum that viscous torques do not transport to the outer disk. (6) The interface

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVR light curves of UZ Leo (Lee+, 2018)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. W.; Park, J.-H.

    2018-04-01

    We performed new CCD photometry of UZ Leo during two observing seasons between 2012 February and 2013 April, using a PIXIS: 2048B CCD and a BVR filter set attached to the 61 cm reflector at Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory (SOAO) in Korea. The CCD chip has 2048x2048pixels and a pixel size of 13.5um, so the field of view of a CCD frame is 17.6'x17.6'. (1 data file).

  11. THE FIRST PHOTOMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE NEGLECTED W-UMa-TYPE BINARY STAR UZ CMi

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Li, K.; Liao, W.-P.

    2013-04-15

    UZ CMi was a W-UMa-type binary star found more than 80 years ago. However, it has been neglected in photometric investigations. Here, the first complete light curves in the B, V, R, and I bands are presented and analyzed using the Wilson and Devinney method. It is discovered that UZ CMi is a contact binary (f = 38.4({+-} 2.3)%) with a mass ratio of 0.45. The derived orbital inclination (i = 87 Degree-Sign ) indicates that it is a total eclipsing binary, which suggests that the determined parameters are reliable. By using 17 new eclipse times together with those collectedmore » from the literature, we found that the general trend of the observed-calculated (O - C) curve shows an upward parabolic variation that corresponds to a long-term increase in the orbital period at a rate of P-dot = +4.1 x 10{sup -8} days yr{sup -1}. The continuous increase may be caused by a mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. This suggests that UZ CMi is in the thermal relaxation oscillation controlled stage of the evolutionary scheme proposed by Qian. UZ CMi will oscillate around a critical mass ratio and the contact configuration cannot be broken. After the upward parabolic change was removed, the (O - C){sub 2} curve of the photoelectric and charge-coupled device data revealed a cyclic variation with a small amplitude of 0.0026 days and a period of 21.1 yr. The cyclic change was analyzed for the light-travel time effect via the presence of an extremely cool stellar companion.« less

  12. Heat and Mass Transfer in the Over-Shower Zone of a Cooling Tower with Flow Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M. M. Hemmasian; Dobrego, K. V.

    2013-11-01

    The influence of flow rotation in the over-shower zone of a natural draft wet cooling tower (NDCT) on heat and mass transfer in this zone is investigated numerically. The 3D geometry of an actual NDCT and three models of the induced rotation velocity fields are utilized for calculations. Two phases (liquid and gaseous) and three components are taken into consideration. The interphase heat exchange, heat transfer to the walls, condensation-evaporation intensity field, and other parameters are investigated as functions of the induced rotation intensity (the inclination of the velocity vector at the periphery). It is shown that the induced flow rotation intensifies the heat and mass transfer in the over-shower zone of an NDCT. Flow rotation leads to specific redistribution of evaporation-condensation areas in an NDCT and stimulates water condensation near its walls.

  13. Feedbacks Between Deformation and Fluid Flow in Mantle Shear Zones from Zabargad, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, A.; Boudier, F. I.; Vauchez, A. R.; Zaderatzky, M.

    2016-12-01

    Peridotites in the Zabargad island, Red Sea, record different stages of lithospheric thinning and asthenospheric upwelling during rifting. Field mapping highlights a pervasive high-temperature NW-SE, subvertical foliation with lineations pluning 50°NW. This foliation is overprinted by a series of lower-temperature mylonitic zones with slightly oblique foliations and subhorizontal lineations, which record progressive strain localization under retrogressive conditions during the final exhumation of the peridotites (Nicolas and Boudier, JGR 1987). We performed a petrostructural study of ca. 50 samples collected by A. Nicolas and F. Boudier in the 80s from the different deformation facies. This study highlights: (1) a rather pervasive, but highly heterogeneous distribution of the LT deformation and (2) a feedback between deformation and fluid flow. The HT deformation is recorded in medium grained plagioclase- and spinel-peridotites by a homogeneous foliation and lineation marked by a shape-preferred orientation of plagioclase and olivine and a consistent CPO of all major-rock forming phases. The LT temperature deformation results in dynamic recrystallization of olivine leading to a marked grain size reduction by dynamic recrystallization of olivine, remobilization of orthopyroxene by dissolution-precipitation, and crystallization of amphibole. Increasing finite strain is recorded by the increase in the volume of the fine-grained material and of the amphibole proportion. The latter may attain in totally recrystallized cm-wide ultramylonite bands up to 30%. This together with the strong amphibole SPO and CPO corroborate fluid focusing and enhanced reaction rates into active shear zones. In the LT shear zones we also document: (1) changes in the olivine CPO, indicating changes in the dominant slip system and (2) unusual orthopyroxene CPO, which we interpret as due to oriented crystallization. Static replacement of pyroxenes by amphibole with no associated LT deformation

  14. Numerical model of water flow in a fractured basalt vadose zone: Box Canyon Site, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christine

    2000-12-01

    A numerical model of a fractured basalt vadose zone has been developed on the basis of the conceptual model described by Faybishenko et al. [[his issue]. The model has been used to simulate a ponded infiltration test in order to investigate infiltration through partially saturated fractured basalt. A key question addressed is how the fracture pattern geometry and fracture connectivity within a single basalt flow of the Snake River Plain basalt affect water infiltration. The two-dimensional numerical model extends from the ground surface to a perched water body 20 m below and uses an unconventional quasi-deterministic approach with explicit but highly simplified representation of major fractures and other important hydrogeologic features. The model adequately reproduces the majority of the field observation and provides insights into the infiltration process that cannot be obtained by data collection alone, demonstrating its value as a component of field studies.

  15. Hydrologic flow paths control dissolved organic carbon fluxes and metabolism in an Alpine stream hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battin, Tom J.

    1999-10-01

    The objective of the present paper was to link reach-scale streambed reactive uptake of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) to subsurface flow paths in an alpine stream (Oberer Seebach (OSB)). The topography adjacent to the stream channel largely determined flow paths, with shallow hillslope groundwater flowing beneath the stream and entering the alluvial groundwater at the opposite bank. As computed from hydrometric data, OSB consistently lost stream water to groundwater with fluxes out of the stream averaging 943 ± 47 and 664 ± 45 L m-2 h-1 at low (Q < 600 L s-1) and high (Q > 600 L s-1) flow, respectively. Hydrometric segregation of streambed fluxes and physicochemical mixing analysis indicated that stream water was the major input component to the streambed with average contributions of 70-80% to the hyporheic zone (i.e., the subsurface zone where shallow groundwater and stream water mix). Surface water was also the major source of DOC with 0.512 ± 0.043 mg C m-2 h-1 to the streambed. The DOC flux from shallow riparian groundwater was lower (0.309 ± 0.071 mg C m-2 h-1) and peaked in autumn with 1.011 mg C m-2 h-1. I computed the relative proportion of downstream discharge through the streambed as the ratio of the downstream length (Ssw) a stream water parcel travels before entering the streambed to the downstream length (Shyp) a streambed water parcel travels before returning to the stream water. The relative streambed DOC retention efficiency, calculated as (input-output)/input of interstitial DOC, correlated with the proportion (Ssw/Shyp) of downstream discharge (r2 = 0.76, p = 0.006). Also, did the streambed metabolism (calculated as DO uptake from mass balance) decrease with low subsurface downstream routing, whereas elevated downstream discharge through the streambed stimulated DO uptake (r2 = 0.69, p = 0.019)? Despite the very short DOC turnover times (˜0.05 days, calculated as mean standing stock/annual input) within the

  16. Creep cavitation bands control porosity and fluid flow in lower crustal shear zones

    SciTech Connect

    Menegon, Luca; Fusseis, Florian; Stunitz, Holger

    2015-03-01

    Shear zones channelize fluid flow in Earth’s crust. However, little is known about deep crustal fluid migration and how fluids are channelized and distributed in a deforming lower crustal shear zone. This study investigates the deformation mechanisms, fluid-rock interaction, and development of porosity in a monzonite ultramylonite from Lofoten, northern Norway. The rock was deformed and transformed into an ultramylonite under lower crustal conditions (temperature = 700–730 °C, pressure = 0.65–0.8 GPa). The ultramylonite consists of feldspathic layers and domains of amphibole + quartz + calcite, which result from hydration reactions of magmatic clinopyroxene. The average grain size in bothmore » domains is <25 mm. Microstructural observations and electron backscatter diffraction analysis are consistent with diffusion creep as the dominant deformation mechanism in both domains. Festoons of isolated quartz grains define C'-type bands in feldspathic layers. These quartz grains do not show a crystallographic preferred orientation. The alignment of quartz grains is parallel to the preferred elongation of pores in the ultramylonites, as evidenced from synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Such C'-type bands are interpreted as creep cavitation bands resulting from diffusion creep deformation associated with grain boundary sliding. Mass-balance calculation indicates a 2% volume increase during the protolith-ultramylonite transformation, which is consistent with synkinematic formation of creep cavities producing dilatancy. Thus, this study presents evidence that creep cavitation bands may control deep crustal porosity and fluid flow. Nucleation of new phases in creep cavitation bands inhibits grain growth and enhances the activity of grain size–sensitive creep, thereby stabilizing strain localization in the polymineralic ultramylonites.« less

  17. MERIDIONAL FLOW IN THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE. II. HELIOSEISMIC INVERSIONS OF GONG DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, J.; Serebryanskiy, A.; Kholikov, S., E-mail: jasonj@nmsu.edu

    2015-06-01

    Meridional flow is thought to play a very important role in the dynamics of the solar convection zone; however, because of its relatively small amplitude, precisely measuring it poses a significant challenge. Here we present a complete time–distance helioseismic analysis of about 2 years of ground-based Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Doppler data to retrieve the meridional circulation profile for modest latitudes in an attempt to corroborate results from other studies. We use an empirical correction to the travel times due to an unknown center-to-limb systematic effect. The helioseismic inversion procedure is first tested and reasonably validated on artificial datamore » from a large-scale numerical simulation followed by a test to broadly recover the solar differential rotation found from global seismology. From GONG data, we measure poleward photospheric flows at all latitudes with properties that are comparable with earlier studies and a shallow equatorward flow about 65 Mm beneath the surface, in agreement with recent findings from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data. No strong evidence of multiple circulation cells in depth or latitude is found, yet the whole phase space has not yet been explored. Tests of mass flux conservation are then carried out on the inferred GONG and HMI flows and compared to a fiducial numerical baseline from models, and we find that the continuity equation is poorly satisfied. While the two disparate data sets do give similar results for about the outer 15% of the interior radius, the total inverted circulation pattern appears to be unphysical in terms of mass conservation when interpreted over modest time scales. We can likely attribute this to both the influence of realization noise and subtle effects in the data and measurement procedure.« less

  18. Lava Flow Hazard Assessment, as of August 2007, for Kilauea East Rift Zone Eruptions, Hawai`i Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The most recent episode in the ongoing Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea Volcano is currently producing lava flows north of the east rift zone. Although they pose no immediate threat to communities, changes in flow behavior could conceivably cause future flows to advance downrift and impact communities thus far unaffected. This report reviews lava flow hazards in the Puna District and discusses the potential hazards posed by the recent change in activity. Members of the public are advised to increase their general awareness of these hazards and stay up-to-date on current conditions.

  19. Modeling unsaturated zone flow and runoff processes by integrating MODFLOW-LGR and VSF, and creating the new CFL package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borsia, I.; Rossetto, R.; Schifani, C.; Hill, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper two modifications to the MODFLOW code are presented. One concerns an extension of Local Grid Refinement (LGR) to Variable Saturated Flow process (VSF) capability. This modification allows the user to solve the 3D Richards’ equation only in selected parts of the model domain. The second modification introduces a new package, named CFL (Cascading Flow), which improves the computation of overland flow when ground surface saturation is simulated using either VSF or the Unsaturated Zone Flow (UZF) package. The modeling concepts are presented and demonstrated. Programmer documentation is included in appendices.

  20. Numerical modeling of fluid flow in a fault zone: a case of study from Majella Mountain (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Valentina; Battaglia, Maurizio; Bigi, Sabina; De'Haven Hyman, Jeffrey; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2017-04-01

    The study of fluid flow in fractured rocks plays a key role in reservoir management, including CO2 sequestration and waste isolation. We present a numerical model of fluid flow in a fault zone, based on field data acquired in Majella Mountain, in the Central Apennines (Italy). This fault zone is considered a good analogue for the massive presence of fluid migration in the form of tar. Faults are mechanical features and cause permeability heterogeneities in the upper crust, so they strongly influence fluid flow. The distribution of the main components (core, damage zone) can lead the fault zone to act as a conduit, a barrier, or a combined conduit-barrier system. We integrated existing information and our own structural surveys of the area to better identify the major fault features (e.g., type of fractures, statistical properties, geometrical and petro-physical characteristics). In our model the damage zones of the fault are described as discretely fractured medium, while the core of the fault as a porous one. Our model utilizes the dfnWorks code, a parallelized computational suite, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), that generates three dimensional Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) of the damage zones of the fault and characterizes its hydraulic parameters. The challenge of the study is the coupling between the discrete domain of the damage zones and the continuum one of the core. The field investigations and the basic computational workflow will be described, along with preliminary results of fluid flow simulation at the scale of the fault.

  1. Free-flow zone electrophoresis: a novel approach and scale-up for preparative protein separation.

    PubMed

    Poggel, M; Melin, T

    2001-04-01

    Different continuously working free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) chambers have already been developed [1, 2]. All of them deal with the problem of distinctive Joule heating. The resulting temperature gradients cause an unstable density field which leads to thermal convection and thus to an intermixing of the different fractions within the chamber. The most promising and simple approach to stabilize the flow is to build chambers with one very small dimension (e.g., h = 0.5 mm) to assure efficient heat withdrawal. This in turn presents substantial disadvantages, namely limited throughput and restricted scale-up potential. The novel approach combines a simplified design and assembly with the possibility of straightforward scale-up. It still operates with one small dimension (d = 1-2 mm) to handle the Joule heating. Here, however, not the dimension perpendicular to the electric field but the dimension parallel to the electric field (separation distance) is chosen as the smallest dimension. The efficiency of the new device is shown by the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome c with an overall protein throughput of up to 1.1 g/h, using a cell with a separation volume of less than 20 mL.

  2. Prediction of groundwater flowing well zone at An-Najif Province, central Iraq using evidential belief functions model and GIS.

    PubMed

    Al-Abadi, Alaa M; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Shahid, Shamsuddin

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study is to delineate groundwater flowing well zone potential in An-Najif Province of Iraq in a data-driven evidential belief function model developed in a geographical information system (GIS) environment. An inventory map of 68 groundwater flowing wells was prepared through field survey. Seventy percent or 43 wells were used for training the evidential belief functions model and the reset 30 % or 19 wells were used for validation of the model. Seven groundwater conditioning factors mostly derived from RS were used, namely elevation, slope angle, curvature, topographic wetness index, stream power index, lithological units, and distance to the Euphrates River in this study. The relationship between training flowing well locations and the conditioning factors were investigated using evidential belief functions technique in a GIS environment. The integrated belief values were classified into five categories using natural break classification scheme to predict spatial zoning of groundwater flowing well, namely very low (0.17-0.34), low (0.34-0.46), moderate (0.46-0.58), high (0.58-0.80), and very high (0.80-0.99). The results show that very low and low zones cover 72 % (19,282 km(2)) of the study area mostly clustered in the central part, the moderate zone concentrated in the west part covers 13 % (3481 km(2)), and the high and very high zones extended over the northern part cover 15 % (3977 km(2)) of the study area. The vast spatial extension of very low and low zones indicates that groundwater flowing wells potential in the study area is low. The performance of the evidential belief functions spatial model was validated using the receiver operating characteristic curve. A success rate of 0.95 and a prediction rate of 0.94 were estimated from the area under relative operating characteristics curves, which indicate that the developed model has excellent capability to predict groundwater flowing well zones. The produced map of groundwater

  3. Reattachment Zone Characterisation Under Offshore Winds With Flow Separation On The Lee Side Of Coastal Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Fernandez, I.; Jackson, D.; Cooper, J. A.; Baas, A. C.; Lynch, K.; Beyers, M.

    2010-12-01

    Airflow separation, lee-side eddies and secondary flows play an essential role on the formation and maintenance of sand dunes. Downstream from dune crests the flow surface layer detaches from the ground and generates an area characterised by turbulent eddies in the dune lee slope (the wake). At some distance downstream from the dune crest, flow separates into a reversed component directed toward the dune toe and an offshore “re-attached” component. This reattachment zone (RZ) has been documented in fluvial and desert environments, wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations, but not yet characterised in coastal dunes. This study examines the extent and temporal evolution of the RZ and its implications for beach-dune interaction at Magilligan, Northern Ireland. Wind parameters were measured over a profile extending from an 11 m height dune crest towards the beach, covering a total distance of 65 m cross-shore. Data was collected using an array of nine ultrasonic anemometers (UAs) deployed in April-May 2010, as part of a larger experiment to capture airflow data under a range of incident wind velocities and offshore directions. UAs were located along the profile (5 m tower spacing) over the beach, which allowed a detailed examination of the RZ with empirical data. Numerical modelling using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software was also conducted with input data from anemometer field measurements, running over a surface mesh generated from LiDAR and DGPS surveys. Results demonstrate that there is a wind threshold of approximately 5-6 ms-1 under which no flow separation exists with offshore winds. As wind speed increases over the threshold, a flow reversal area is quickly formed, with the maximum extent of the RZ at approximately 3.5 dune heights (h). The maximum extent of the RZ increases up to 4.5h with stronger wind speeds of 8-10 ms-1 and remains relatively constant as wind speed further increases. This suggests that the spatial extent of the RZ is

  4. An investigation of deformation and fluid flow at subduction zones using newly developed instrumentation and finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonte, Alison Louise

    Detecting seafloor deformation events in the offshore convergent margin environment is of particular importance considering the significant seismic hazard at subduction zones. Efforts to gain insight into the earthquake cycle have been made at the Cascadia and Costa Rica subduction margins through recent expansions of onshore GPS and seismic networks. While these studies have given scientists the ability to quantify and locate slip events in the seismogenic zone, there is little technology available for adequately measuring offshore aseismic slip. This dissertation introduces an improved flow meter for detecting seismic and aseismic deformation in submarine environments. The value of such hydrologic measurements for quantifying the geodetics at offshore margins is verified through a finite element modeling (FEM) study in which the character of deformation in the shallow subduction zone is determined from previously recorded hydrologic events at the Costa Rica Pacific margin. Accurately sensing aseismic events is one key to determining the stress state in subduction zones as these slow-slip events act to load or unload the seismogenic zone during the interseismic period. One method for detecting seismic and aseismic strain events is to monitor the hydrogeologic response to strain events using fluid flow meters. Previous instrumentation, the Chemical Aqueous Transport (CAT) meter which measures flow rates through the sediment-water interface, can detect transient events at very low flowrates, down to 0.0001 m/yr. The CAT meter performs well in low flow rate environments and can capture gradual changes in flow rate, as might be expected during ultra slow slip events. However, it cannot accurately quantify high flow rates through fractures and conduits, nor does it have the temporal resolution and accuracy required for detecting transient flow events associated with rapid deformation. The Optical Tracer Injection System (OTIS) developed for this purpose is an

  5. Long-term flow rates and biomat zone hydrology in soil columns receiving septic tank effluent.

    PubMed

    Beal, C D; Gardner, E A; Kirchhof, G; Menzies, N W

    2006-07-01

    Soil absorption systems (SAS) are used commonly to treat and disperse septic tank effluent (STE). SAS can hydraulically fail as a result of the low permeable biomat zone that develops on the infiltrative surface. The objectives of this experiment were to compare the hydraulic properties of biomats grown in soils of different textures, to investigate the long-term acceptance rates (LTAR) from prolonged application of STE, and to assess if soils were of major importance in determining LTAR. The STE was applied to repacked sand, Oxisol and Vertisol soil columns over a period of 16 months, at equivalent hydraulic loading rates of 50, 35 and 8L/m(2)/d, respectively. Infiltration rates, soil matric potentials, and biomat hydraulic properties were measured either directly from the soil columns or calculated using established soil physics theory. Biomats 1 to 2 cm thick developed in all soils columns with hydraulic resistances of 27 to 39 d. These biomats reduced a 4 order of magnitude variation in saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(s)) between the soils to a one order of magnitude variation in LTAR. A relationship between biomat resistance and organic loading rate was observed in all soils. Saturated hydraulic conductivity influenced the rate and extent of biomat development. However, once the biomat was established, the LTAR was governed by the resistance of the biomat and the sub-biomat soil unsaturated flow regime induced by the biomat. Results show that whilst initial soil K(s) is likely to be important in the establishment of the biomat zone in a trench, LTAR is determined by the biomat resistance and the unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity, not the K(s) of a soil. The results call into question the commonly used approach of basing the LTAR, and ultimately trench length in SAS, on the initial K(s) of soils.

  6. Field observations of swash zone flow patterns and 3D morphodynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puelo, Jack A.; Holland, K. Todd; Kooney, Timothy N.; Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Edge, Billy L.

    2001-01-01

    Rapid video measurements of foreshore morphology and velocity were collected at Duck, NC in 1997 to investigate sediment transport processes in the swash zone. Estimates of foreshore evolution over a roughly 30 m cross-shore by 80 m alongshore study area were determined using a stereogrammetric technique. During the passage of a small storm (offshore wave heights increased from 1.4 to 2.5 m), the foreshore eroded nearly 40 cm in less than 4 hours. Dense, horizontal surface velocities were measured over a sub-region (roughly 30 m by 40 m) of the study area using a new particle image velocimetry technique. This technique was able to quantify velocities across the bore front approaching 5 m s–1 as well as the rapid velocities in the very shallow backwash flows. The velocity and foreshore topography measurements were used to test a three-dimensional energetics-based sediment transport model. Even though these data represent the most extensive and highly resolved swash measurements to date, the results showed that while the model could predict some of the qualitative trends in the observed foreshore change, it was a poor predictor of the observed magnitudes of foreshore change. Model — data comparisons differed by roughly an order of magnitude with observed foreshore changes on the order of 10's of centimeters and model predictions on the order of meters. This poor comparison suggests that future models of swash-zone sediment transport may require the inclusion of other physical processes such as bore turbulence, fluid accelerations and skewness, infiltration/exfiltration, water depth variations, and variable friction factors (to name a few).

  7. Large-scale bedforms induced by supercritical flows and wave-wave interference in the intertidal zone (Cap Ferret, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucher, Romain; Pittet, Bernard; Humbert, Thomas; Ferry, Serge

    2018-06-01

    The Cap Ferret sand spit is situated along the wave-dominated, tidally modulated Atlantic coast of western France, characterized by a semidiurnal macrotidal range. It displays peculiar dome-like bedforms that can be observed at low tide across the intertidal zone. These bedforms exhibit a wavelength of ca. 1.2 m and an elevation of ca. 30 cm. They occur only when the incident wave heights reach 1.5-2 m. The internal stratifications are characterized by swaley-like, sub-planar, oblique-tangential, oblique-tabular, as well as hummocky-like stratifications. The tabular and tangential stratifications comprise prograding oblique sets (defined as foresets and backsets) that almost always show variations in their steepness. Downcutting into the bottomsets of the oblique-tangential stratifications is common. The sets of laminae observed in the bedforms share common characteristics with those formed by supercritical flows in flume experiments of earlier studies. These peculiar bedforms are observed at the surf-swash transition zone where the backwash flow reaches supercritical conditions. This type of flow can explain their internal architecture but not their general dome-like (three-dimensional) morphology. Wave-wave interference induced by the geomorphology (i.e. tidal channel) of the coastal environment is proposed as explanation for the localized formation of such bedforms. This study highlights that the combination of supercritical flows occurring in the surf-swash transition zone and wave-wave interferences can generate dome-like bedforms in intertidal zones.

  8. Large-scale bedforms induced by supercritical flows and wave-wave interference in the intertidal zone (Cap Ferret, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucher, Romain; Pittet, Bernard; Humbert, Thomas; Ferry, Serge

    2017-11-01

    The Cap Ferret sand spit is situated along the wave-dominated, tidally modulated Atlantic coast of western France, characterized by a semidiurnal macrotidal range. It displays peculiar dome-like bedforms that can be observed at low tide across the intertidal zone. These bedforms exhibit a wavelength of ca. 1.2 m and an elevation of ca. 30 cm. They occur only when the incident wave heights reach 1.5-2 m. The internal stratifications are characterized by swaley-like, sub-planar, oblique-tangential, oblique-tabular, as well as hummocky-like stratifications. The tabular and tangential stratifications comprise prograding oblique sets (defined as foresets and backsets) that almost always show variations in their steepness. Downcutting into the bottomsets of the oblique-tangential stratifications is common. The sets of laminae observed in the bedforms share common characteristics with those formed by supercritical flows in flume experiments of earlier studies. These peculiar bedforms are observed at the surf-swash transition zone where the backwash flow reaches supercritical conditions. This type of flow can explain their internal architecture but not their general dome-like (three-dimensional) morphology. Wave-wave interference induced by the geomorphology (i.e. tidal channel) of the coastal environment is proposed as explanation for the localized formation of such bedforms. This study highlights that the combination of supercritical flows occurring in the surf-swash transition zone and wave-wave interferences can generate dome-like bedforms in intertidal zones.

  9. Balancing practicality and hydrologic realism: a parsimonious approach for simulating rapid groundwater recharge via unsaturated-zone preferential flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of preferential flow on recharge and contaminant transport poses a considerable challenge to water-resources management. Typical hydrologic models require extensive site characterization, but can underestimate fluxes when preferential flow is significant. A recently developed source-responsive model incorporates film-flow theory with conservation of mass to estimate unsaturated-zone preferential fluxes with readily available data. The term source-responsive describes the sensitivity of preferential flow in response to water availability at the source of input. We present the first rigorous tests of a parsimonious formulation for simulating water table fluctuations using two case studies, both in arid regions with thick unsaturated zones of fractured volcanic rock. Diffuse flow theory cannot adequately capture the observed water table responses at both sites; the source-responsive model is a viable alternative. We treat the active area fraction of preferential flow paths as a scaled function of water inputs at the land surface then calibrate the macropore density to fit observed water table rises. Unlike previous applications, we allow the characteristic film-flow velocity to vary, reflecting the lag time between source and deep water table responses. Analysis of model performance and parameter sensitivity for the two case studies underscores the importance of identifying thresholds for initiation of film flow in unsaturated rocks, and suggests that this parsimonious approach is potentially of great practical value.

  10. Mass flows of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in central wastewater treatment plants of industrial zones in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kunacheva, Chinagarn; Tanaka, Shuhei; Fujii, Shigeo; Boontanon, Suwanna Kitpati; Musirat, Chanatip; Wongwattana, Thana; Shivakoti, Binaya Raj

    2011-04-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are fully fluorinated organic compounds, which have been used in many industrial processes and have been detected in wastewater and sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) around the world. This study focused on the occurrences of PFCs and PFCs mass flows in the industrial wastewater treatment plants, which reported to be the important sources of PFCs. Surveys were conducted in central wastewater treatment plant in two industrial zones in Thailand. Samples were collected from influent, aeration tank, secondary clarifier effluent, effluent and sludge. The major purpose of this field study was to identify PFCs occurrences and mass flow during industrial WWTP. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled with HPLC-ESI-MS/MS were used for the analysis. Total 10 PFCs including perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluoropropanoic acid (PFPA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluoronanoic acid (PFNA), perfluordecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnA), and perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) were measured to identify their occurrences. PFCs were detected in both liquid and solid phase in most samples. The exceptionally high level of PFCs was detected in the treatment plant of IZ1 and IZ2 ranging between 662-847ngL(-1) and 674-1383ngL(-1), respectively, which greater than PFCs found in most domestic wastewater. Due to PFCs non-biodegradable property, both WWTPs were found ineffective in removing PFCs using activated sludge processes. Bio-accumulation in sludge could be the major removal mechanism of PFCs in the process. The increasing amount of PFCs after activated sludge processes were identified which could be due to the degradation of PFCs precursors. PFCs concentration found in the effluent were very high comparing to those in river water of the area. Industrial activity could be the one of major sources of PFCs

  11. Alteration of chaotic advection in blood flow around partial blockage zone: Role of hematocrit concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Soumyabrata; Chaudhury, Kaustav; DasGupta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Spatial distributions of particles carried by blood exhibit complex filamentary pattern under the combined effects of geometrical irregularities of the blood vessels and pulsating pumping by the heart. This signifies the existence of so called chaotic advection. In the present article, we argue that the understanding of such pathologically triggered chaotic advection is incomplete without giving due consideration to a major constituent of blood: abundant presence of red blood cells quantified by the hematocrit (HCT) concentration. We show that the hematocrit concentration in blood cells can alter the filamentary structures of the spatial distribution of advected particles in an intriguing manner. Our results reveal that there primarily are two major impacts of HCT concentrations towards dictating the chaotic dynamics of blood flow: changing the zone of influence of chaotic mixing and determining the enhancement of residence time of the advected particles away from the wall. This, in turn, may alter the extent of activation of platelets or other reactive biological entities, bearing immense consequence towards dictating the biophysical mechanisms behind possible life-threatening diseases originating in the circulatory system.

  12. MEAN-FIELD SOLAR DYNAMO MODELS WITH A STRONG MERIDIONAL FLOW AT THE BOTTOM OF THE CONVECTION ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a study of kinematic axisymmetric mean-field dynamo models for the case of meridional circulation with a deep-seated stagnation point and a strong return flow at the bottom of the convection zone. This kind of circulation follows from mean-field models of the angular momentum balance in the solar convection zone. The dynamo models include turbulent sources of the large-scale poloidal magnetic field production due to kinetic helicity and a combined effect due to the Coriolis force and large-scale electric current. In these models the toroidal magnetic field, which is responsible for sunspot production, is concentrated at the bottommore » of the convection zone and is transported to low-latitude regions by a meridional flow. The meridional component of the poloidal field is also concentrated at the bottom of the convection zone, while the radial component is concentrated in near-polar regions. We show that it is possible for this type of meridional circulation to construct kinematic dynamo models that resemble in some aspects the sunspot magnetic activity cycle. However, in the near-equatorial regions the phase relation between the toroidal and poloidal components disagrees with observations. We also show that the period of the magnetic cycle may not always monotonically decrease with the increase of the meridional flow speed. Thus, for further progress it is important to determine the structure of the meridional circulation, which is one of the critical properties, from helioseismology observations.« less

  13. U-Pb ages of secondary silica at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Implications for the paleohydrology of the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neymark, L.A.; Amelin, Y.; Paces, J.B.; Peterman, Z.E.

    2002-01-01

    Uranium, Th and Pb isotopes were analyzed in layers of opal and chalcedony from individual mm- to cm-thick calcite and silica coatings at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA, a site that is being evaluated for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. These calcite and silica coatings on fractures and in lithophysal cavities in Miocene-age tuffs in the unsaturated zone (UZ) precipitated from descending water and record a long history of percolation through the UZ. Opal and chalcedony have high concentrations of U (10 to 780 ppm) and low concentrations of common Pb as indicated by large values of 206Pb/204Pb (up to 53,806), thus making them suitable for U-Pb age determinations. Interpretations of U-Pb isotope systems in opal samples at Yucca Mountain are complicated by the incorporation of excess 234U at the time of mineral formation, resulting in reverse discordance of U-Pb ages. However, the 207PB/235U ages are much less affected by deviation from initial secular equilibrium and provide reliable ages of most silica deposits between 0.6 and 9.8 Ma. For chalcedony subsamples showing normal age discordance, these ages may represent minimum times of deposition. Typically, 207Pb/235U ages are consistent with the microstratigraphy in the mineral coating samples, such that the youngest ages are for subsamples from outer layers, intermediate ages are from inner layers, and oldest ages are from innermost layers. 234U and 230Th in most silica layers deeper in the coatings are in secular equilibrium with 238U, which is consistent with their old age and closed system behavior during the past -0.5 Ma. The ages for subsamples of silica layers from different microstratigraphic positions in individual calcite and silica coating samples collected from lithophysal cavities in the welded part of the Topopah Spring Tuff yield slow long-term average growth rates of 1 to 5 mm/Ma. These data imply that the deeper parts of the UZ at Yucca Mountain maintained long-term hydrologic stability

  14. The internationalization of health care: the UZ Brussel model for international partnerships.

    PubMed

    Noppen, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Globalization of health care, flat medicine, cross-boarder health care, medical tourism, are all terms describing some, but not all, aspects of a growing trend: patients seeking health care provision abroad, and health care providers travelling abroad for temporary or permanent health care delivery services. This trend is a complex, bilateral and multifaceted phenomenon, which in our opinion, cannot be sustained in a single, comprehensive description. Individual hospitals have the unique opportunity to develop a model for appropriate action. The specific model created by the university hospital UZ Brussel is presented here.

  15. Transient flow conditions in probabilistic wellhead protection: importance and ways to manage spatial and temporal uncertainty in capture zone delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzenhoefer, R.; Rodriguez-Pretelin, A.; Nowak, W.

    2012-12-01

    "From an engineering standpoint, the quantification of uncertainty is extremely important not only because it allows estimating risk but mostly because it allows taking optimal decisions in an uncertain framework" (Renard, 2007). The most common way to account for uncertainty in the field of subsurface hydrology and wellhead protection is to randomize spatial parameters, e.g. the log-hydraulic conductivity or porosity. This enables water managers to take robust decisions in delineating wellhead protection zones with rationally chosen safety margins in the spirit of probabilistic risk management. Probabilistic wellhead protection zones are commonly based on steady-state flow fields. However, several past studies showed that transient flow conditions may substantially influence the shape and extent of catchments. Therefore, we believe they should be accounted for in the probabilistic assessment and in the delineation process. The aim of our work is to show the significance of flow transients and to investigate the interplay between spatial uncertainty and flow transients in wellhead protection zone delineation. To this end, we advance our concept of probabilistic capture zone delineation (Enzenhoefer et al., 2012) that works with capture probabilities and other probabilistic criteria for delineation. The extended framework is able to evaluate the time fraction that any point on a map falls within a capture zone. In short, we separate capture probabilities into spatial/statistical and time-related frequencies. This will provide water managers additional information on how to manage a well catchment in the light of possible hazard conditions close to the capture boundary under uncertain and time-variable flow conditions. In order to save computational costs, we take advantage of super-positioned flow components with time-variable coefficients. We assume an instantaneous development of steady-state flow conditions after each temporal change in driving forces, following

  16. Method and apparatus for affecting a recirculation zone in a cross flow

    DOEpatents

    Bathina, Mahesh [Andhra Pradesh, IN; Singh, Ramanand [Uttar Pradesh, IN

    2012-07-17

    Disclosed is a cross flow apparatus including a surface and at least one outlet located at the surface. The cross flow apparatus further includes at least one guide at the surface configured to direct an intersecting flow flowing across the surface and increase a velocity of a cross flow being expelled from the at least one outlet downstream from the at least one outlet.

  17. The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model for Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aziz, E.; James, S. C.; Arnold, B. W.; Zyvoloski, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    This presentation provides a reinterpreted conceptual model of the Yucca Mountain site-scale flow system subject to all quality assurance procedures. The results are based on a numerical model of site-scale saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, which is used for performance assessment predictions of radionuclide transport and to guide future data collection and modeling activities. This effort started from the ground up with a revised and updated hydrogeologic framework model, which incorporates the latest lithology data, and increased grid resolution that better resolves the hydrogeologic framework, which was updated throughout the model domain. In addition, faults are much better represented using the 250× 250- m2 spacing (compared to the previous model's 500× 500-m2 spacing). Data collected since the previous model calibration effort have been included and they comprise all Nye County water-level data through Phase IV of their Early Warning Drilling Program. Target boundary fluxes are derived from the newest (2004) Death Valley Regional Flow System model from the US Geologic Survey. A consistent weighting scheme assigns importance to each measured water-level datum and boundary flux extracted from the regional model. The numerical model is calibrated by matching these weighted water level measurements and boundary fluxes using parameter estimation techniques, along with more informal comparisons of the model to hydrologic and geochemical information. The model software (hydrologic simulation code FEHM~v2.24 and parameter estimation software PEST~v5.5) and model setup facilitates efficient calibration of multiple conceptual models. Analyses evaluate the impact of these updates and additional data on the modeled potentiometric surface and the flowpaths emanating from below the repository. After examining the heads and permeabilities obtained from the calibrated models, we present particle pathways from the proposed repository and compare them to those from the

  18. Tracking lava flow emplacement on the east rift zone of Kilauea, Hawai'i with InSAR coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, H. R.; Schmidt, D. A.; Poland, M. P.; Cashman, K. V.

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing of lava flows from the Pu`u `O`o-Kupaianaha eruption on the east rift zone of Kilauea serves to document the ongoing eruption, while yielding insights into how lava flow fields develop. InSAR is widely used to measure deformation by detecting minute changes in ground surfaces that stay correlated during repeat observations. The eruption and emplacement of fresh lava on the surface, however, disrupts the coherence of the radar echoes, allowing the area of these flows to be mapped with InSAR coherence images. We use InSAR correlation to visualize surface flow activity from 2003-2010 in order to quantify eruption rates and explore lava flow behavior from emplacement onward. This method for mapping flows does not require daylight, cloudless skies, or access to the active flow fields that is necessary for traditional visual surveys. We produce coherence maps for hundreds of 35 to 105-day periods from twelve tracks of ENVISAT SAR data using the GAMMA software package. By combining these coherence maps we create a unique dataset with which to develop this technique and amass lava flow observations. Where correlation images overlap in time, they are summed and normalized to derive a time series of surface coherence with a spatial resolution of 20 meters and a temporal resolution of as little as a few days. We identify existing stable flows by their high radar coherence, and determine a coherence threshold that is applied to each correlation image. This threshold is calibrated so as to reduce the effects of varying baseline, time duration, and atmospheric effects between images, as well as decorrelation due to vegetation. The final images illustrate lava flow activity that corresponds well with surface flow outlines and tube locations recorded by the USGS mapping effort. The InSAR-derived results serve to enhance these traditional maps by documenting pixel-scale changes over time. When compared with forward looking infrared (FLIR) thermal imagery, pixel

  19. Flow zone characterisation in a fractured aquifer using spring and open-well T and EC monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbotui, Prodeo; West, Landis; Bottrell, Simon

    2017-04-01

    The Cretaceous Chalk is a very important aquifer in England, and its relatively high transmissivity derives essentially from a well-developed network of solutionally-enhanced fractures and conduits. Like other fractured aquifers, characterisation and delineation of flow pathways and hence catchment boundaries is important. Determination of flow pathways for source catchment delineation (e.g. identification of safeguarding zones around wells) is critical for the effective management and protection of the groundwater resource. It also determines the areal extent of contamination from known sources, and enables the targeted sampling of flow zones e.g. for monitored natural attenuation (MNA). A rather simplistic conceptualisation of the unconfined chalk aquifer of East Yorkshire is currently used as a basis for numerical simulations: linearly reducing hydraulic conductivity (K) with depth below the maximum groundwater elevation, reducing to a minimum value below the zone of groundwater table fluctuation. This study represents an attempt to improve this conceptualisation via improved characterisation of permeable zones within the aquifer. The methods used are: pumping test drawdown analyses for transmissivity, ambient open-well dilution testing; rainfall, groundwater head, and spring / open-well specific electrical conductance (SEC) and temperature monitoring. Pumping test analyses yield overall well transmissivity; the open-well dilution/monitoring approach identifies inflow, outflow, crossflow zones and direction and rate of flow in wells; seasonal changes in flows in wells and springs reflect the annual recharge and recession cycle and the impact of seasonal hydraulic head variation on the activation/deactivation of permeable pathways. Variations in spring and well-water electrical conductivity / temperature provide insight into groundwater residence times and the degree of isolation of groundwater from atmospheric and soil zone sources of CO2. The results of the

  20. Nanoindentation study on the characteristic of shear transformation zone in a Pd-based bulk metallic glass during serrated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, G. K.; Long, Z. L.; Zhao, M. S. Z.; Peng, L.; Chai, W.; Ping, Z. H.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents the research on the evolution of shear transformation zone (STZ) in a Pd-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) during serrated flow under nanoindentation. A novel method of estimating the STZ volume through statistical analysis of the serrated flow behavior was proposed for the first time. Based on the proposed method, the STZ volume of the studied BMG at various peak loads have been systematically investigated. The results indicate that the measured STZ volumes are in good agreement with that documented in literature, and the STZ size exhibits an increasing trend during indentation. Moreover, the correlation between the serrated flow dynamics and the STZ activation has also been evaluated. It is found that the STZ activation can promote the formation of self-organized critical (SOC) state during serrated flow.

  1. In-situ Observations of Swash-zone Flow Velocities and Sediment Transport on a Steep Beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardon-Maldonado, P.; Puleo, J. A.; Figlus, J.

    2014-12-01

    A 45 m scaffolding frame containing an array of instruments was installed at South Bethany Beach, Delaware, to obtain in-situ measurements in the swash zone. Six cross-shore stations were established to simultaneously measure near-bed velocity profiles, sediment concentration and water level fluctuations on a steep beach. Measurements of swash-zone hydrodynamics and morphological change were collected from February 12 to 25, 2014, following a large Nor'easter storm with surf zone significant wave height exceeding 5 m. Swash-zone flow velocities (u,v,w) were measured at each cross-shore location using a Nortek Vectrino profiling velocimeter that measured a 30 mm velocity profile at 1 mm vertical increments at 100 Hz. These velocity profiles were used to quantify the vertical flow structure over the foreshore and estimate hydrodynamic parameters such as bed shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy dissipation. Sediment concentrations were measured using optical backscatter sensors (OBS) to obtain spatio-temporal measurements during both uprush and backwash phases of the swash cycle. Cross-shore sediment transport rates at each station were estimated by taking the product of cross-shore velocity and sediment concentration. Foreshore elevations were sampled every low tide using a Leica GPS system with RTK capability. Cross-shore sediment transport rates and gradients derived from the velocities and bed shear stress estimates will be related to the observed morphological change.

  2. Flow characteristics control turnover of polar trace organic compounds in the hyporheic zone of an urban lowland river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaper, Jonas L.; Seher, Wiebke; Jaeger, Anna; Galloway, Jason; Nuetzmann, Gunnar; Putschew, Anke; Lewandowski, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    Hyporheic zones are hypothesized to be important sinks for polar trace organic compounds (TrOCs) in lotic systems, mitigating potential adverse effects of TrOCs on ecosystem functioning and drinking water production. Predicting the fate of TrOCs in the hyporheic zone, however, is difficult as the attenuation rate itself as well as the biogeochemical factors and hydrological conditions controlling attenuation rates are unknown. We used time series of temperature depth profiles as well as heat pulse sensing with a 1D advection dispersion transport model to calculate first order attenuation rates of several TrOCs from equilibrium depth profiles in an urban lowland river in Berlin, Germany. Ring enclosures were used to prohibit horizontal flow and to create distinct biogeochemical conditions within the hyporheic zone. Flow characteristics as well as biogeochemical conditions showed pronounced differences between depth profiles inside and outside of enclosures. TrOCs attenuation rates varied considerably among compounds reflecting their general susceptibility to biodegradation and sorption. While for some compounds such as benzotriazole and sulfamethoxazole redox conditions had an influence on attenuation rates, the fate of other compounds was not affected by biogeochemical parameters. Under loosing conditions, hyporheic zones of urban lowland rivers can thus be regarded as sinks for TrOCs. Their effectiveness is dependent on both, hyporheic exchange characteristics as well as biogeochemical parameters.

  3. Groundwater flow in the transition zone between freshwater and saltwater: a field-based study and analysis of measurement errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Vincent E. A.; Banks, Eddie; Brunke, Miriam

    2018-02-01

    The quantification of groundwater flow near the freshwater-saltwater transition zone at the coast is difficult because of variable-density effects and tidal dynamics. Head measurements were collected along a transect perpendicular to the shoreline at a site south of the city of Adelaide, South Australia, to determine the transient flow pattern. This paper presents a detailed overview of the measurement procedure, data post-processing methods and uncertainty analysis in order to assess how measurement errors affect the accuracy of the inferred flow patterns. A particular difficulty encountered was that some of the piezometers were leaky, which necessitated regular measurements of the electrical conductivity and temperature of the water inside the wells to correct for density effects. Other difficulties included failure of pressure transducers, data logger clock drift and operator error. The data obtained were sufficiently accurate to show that there is net seaward horizontal flow of freshwater in the top part of the aquifer, and a net landward flow of saltwater in the lower part. The vertical flow direction alternated with the tide, but due to the large uncertainty of the head gradients and density terms, no net flow could be established with any degree of confidence. While the measurement problems were amplified under the prevailing conditions at the site, similar errors can lead to large uncertainties everywhere. The methodology outlined acknowledges the inherent uncertainty involved in measuring groundwater flow. It can also assist to establish the accuracy requirements of the experimental setup.

  4. Field tracer investigation of unsaturated zone flow paths and mechanisms in agricultural soils of northwestern Mississippi, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, K.S.; Nimmo, J.R.; Rose, C.E.; Coupe, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    In many farmed areas, intensive application of agricultural chemicals and withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation have led to water quality and supply issues. Unsaturated-zone processes, including preferential flow, play a major role in these effects but are not well understood. In the Bogue Phalia basin, an intensely agricultural area in the Delta region of northwestern Mississippi, the fine-textured soils often exhibit surface ponding and runoff after irrigation and rainfall as well as extensive surface cracking during prolonged dry periods. Fields are typically land-formed to promote surface flow into drainage ditches and streams that feed into larger river ecosystems. Downward flow of water below the root zone is considered minimal; regional groundwater models predict only 5% or less of precipitation recharges the heavily used alluvial aquifer. In this study transport mechanisms within and below the root zone of a fallow soybean field were assessed by performing a 2-m ring infiltration test with tracers and subsurface monitoring instruments. Seven months after tracer application, 48 continuous cores were collected for tracer extraction to define the extent of water movement and quantify preferential flow using a mass-balance approach. Vertical water movement was rapid below the pond indicating the importance of vertical preferential flow paths in the shallow unsaturated zone, especially to depths where agricultural disturbance occurs. Lateral flow of water at shallow depths was extensive and spatially non-uniform, reaching up to 10. m from the pond within 2. months. Within 1. month, the wetting front reached a textural boundary at 4-5. m between the fine-textured soil and sandy alluvium, now a potential capillary barrier which, prior to extensive irrigation withdrawals, was below the water table. Within 10. weeks, tracer was detectable at the water table which is presently about 12. m below land surface. Results indicate that 43% of percolation may be through

  5. Earthquake-driven fluid flow rates inferred from borehole temperature measurements within the Japan Trench plate boundary fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, P. M.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2016-12-01

    Using borehole sub-seafloor temperature measurements, we have recently identified signatures suggestive of earthquake-driven fluid pulses within the Japan Trench plate boundary fault zone during a major aftershock sequence. Here we use numerical models to show that these signatures are consistent with time-varying fluid flow rates out of permeable zones within the formation into the borehole annulus. In addition, we also identify an apparent time-varying sensitivity of whether suspected fluid pulses occur in response to earthquakes of a given magnitude and distance. The results suggest a damage and healing process and therefore provides a mechanism to allow for a disproportionate amount of heat and chemical transport in the short time frame after an earthquake. Our observations come from an observatory installed across the main plate boundary fault as part of IODP's Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST) following the March 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. It operated from July 2012 - April 2013 during which a Mw 7.3 earthquake and numerous aftershocks occurred. High-resolution temperature time series data reveal spatially correlated transients in response to earthquakes with distinct patterns interpreted to reflect advection by transient pulses of fluid flow from permeable zones into the borehole annulus. Typical transients involve perturbations over 12 m with increases of 10 mK that build over 0.1 days at shallower depths and decreases at deeper depths. They are consistently centered around 792.5 m below seafloor (mbsf) where a secondary fault and permeable zone have been independently identified within the damage zone above the main plate boundary fault at 820 mbsf . Model simulations suggest transient flow rates of up to 10-3m/s from the formation that quickly decrease. Comparison of characteristics of earthquakes identified in nearby ocean bottom pressure measurements suggest there is not a clear relationship between fluid pulses and static strain. There

  6. Assessment of Debris Flow Potential Hazardous Zones Using Numerical Models in the Mountain Foothills of Santiago, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, C.; Sepulveda, S. A.; Castruccio, A.; Lara, M.

    2017-12-01

    Debris and mudflows are some of the main geological hazards in the mountain foothills of Central Chile. The risk of flows triggered in the basins of ravines that drain the Andean frontal range into the capital city, Santiago, increases with time due to accelerated urban expansion. Susceptibility assessments were made by several authors to detect the main active ravines in the area. Macul and San Ramon ravines have a high to medium debris flow susceptibility, whereas Lo Cañas, Apoquindo and Las Vizcachas ravines have a medium to low debris flow susceptibility. This study emphasizes in delimiting the potential hazardous zones using the numerical simulation program RAMMS-Debris Flows with the Voellmy model approach, and the debris-flow model LAHARZ. This is carried out by back-calculating the frictional parameters in the depositional zone with a known event as the debris and mudflows in Macul and San Ramon ravines, on May 3rd, 1993, for the RAMMS approach. In the same scenario, we calibrate the coefficients to match conditions of the mountain foothills of Santiago for the LAHARZ model. We use the information obtained for every main ravine in the study area, mainly for the similarity in slopes and material transported. Simulations were made for the worst-case scenario, caused by the combination of intense rainfall storms, a high 0°C isotherm level and material availability in the basins where the flows are triggered. The results show that the runout distances are well simulated, therefore a debris-flow hazard map could be developed with these models. Correlation issues concerning the run-up, deposit thickness and transversal areas are reported. Hence, the models do not represent entirely the complexity of the phenomenon, but they are a reliable approximation for preliminary hazard maps.

  7. Documentation of the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) Package for modeling Unsaturated Flow Between the Land Surface and the Water Table with MODFLOW-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, Richard G.; Prudic, David E.; Regan, R. Steven

    2006-01-01

    Percolation of precipitation through unsaturated zones is important for recharge of ground water. Rain and snowmelt at land surface are partitioned into different pathways including runoff, infiltration, evapotranspiration, unsaturated-zone storage, and recharge. A new package for MODFLOW-2005 called the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) Package was developed to simulate water flow and storage in the unsaturated zone and to partition flow into evapotranspiration and recharge. The package also accounts for land surface runoff to streams and lakes. A kinematic wave approximation to Richards? equation is solved by the method of characteristics to simulate vertical unsaturated flow. The approach assumes that unsaturated flow occurs in response to gravity potential gradients only and ignores negative potential gradients; the approach further assumes uniform hydraulic properties in the unsaturated zone for each vertical column of model cells. The Brooks-Corey function is used to define the relation between unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and water content. Variables used by the UZF1 Package include initial and saturated water contents, saturated vertical hydraulic conductivity, and an exponent in the Brooks-Corey function. Residual water content is calculated internally by the UZF1 Package on the basis of the difference between saturated water content and specific yield. The UZF1 Package is a substitution for the Recharge and Evapotranspiration Packages of MODFLOW-2005. The UZF1 Package differs from the Recharge Package in that an infiltration rate is applied at land surface instead of a specified recharge rate directly to ground water. The applied infiltration rate is further limited by the saturated vertical hydraulic conductivity. The UZF1 Package differs from the Evapotranspiration Package in that evapotranspiration losses are first removed from the unsaturated zone above the evapotranspiration extinction depth, and if the demand is not met, water can be removed

  8. Flow regulation manipulates contemporary seasonal sedimentary dynamics in the reservoir fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiang; Bao, Yuhai; He, Xiubin; Fu, Bojie; Collins, Adrian L; Zhang, Xinbao

    2016-04-01

    Since the launch of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River, a distinctive reservoir fluctuation zone has been created and significantly modified by regular dam operations. Sediment redistribution within this artificial landscape differs substantially from that in natural fluvial riparian zones, due to a specific hydrological regime comprising steps of water impoundment with increasing magnitudes and seasonal water level fluctuation holding a range of sediment fluxes. This study reinterpreted post-dam sedimentary dynamics in the reservoir fluctuation zone by stratigraphy determination of a 345-cm long sediment core, and related it to impact of the hydrological regime. Seasonality in absolute grain-size composition of suspended sediment was applied as a methodological basis for stratigraphic differentiation. Sedimentary laminations with relatively higher proportions of sandy fractions were ascribed to sedimentation during the dry season when proximal subsurface bank erosion dominates source contributions, while stratigraphy with a lower proportion of sandy fractions is possibly contributed by sedimentation during the wet season when distal upstream surface erosion prevails. Chronology determination revealed non-linear and high annual sedimentation rates ranging from 21.7 to 152.1cm/yr. Although channel geomorphology may primarily determine the spatial extent of sedimentation, seasonal sedimentary dynamics was predominantly governed by the frequency, magnitude, and duration of flooding. Summer inundation by natural floods with enhanced sediment loads produced from upstream basins induced higher sedimentation rates than water impoundment during the dry season when distal sediment supply was limited. We thus conclude that flow regulation manipulates contemporary seasonal sedimentary dynamics in the reservoir fluctuation zone, though little impact on total sediment retention rate was detected. Ongoing reductions in flow and sediment supply under human disturbance may

  9. Hydrothermal quartz formation during fluctuations of brittle shear-zone activity and fluid flow: grain growth and deformation structures of the Pfahl shear zone (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, T.; Prosser, G.; Liotta, D.; Kruhl, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    , crosscutting the first generations of fine-grained quartz mass and the wall rocks, in connection to intense fracturing and brecciation. The complex geometry of the vein sets points to multiple fluid injections and brecciation, as additionally indicated by coarse quartz with different inclusion and CL intensity. Temporal changes of strain rate are indicated by crystal plastic deformation structures in quartz, which overprint brittle structures. (iv) The fourth quartz generation occurs in mm- to dm-thick quartz veins, partly open as geodes, filling N-S oriented cm- to dm-spaced fractures that crosscut the earlier quartz masses and veins and extend at least several meters into the wall rock. They indicate the last activity of the shear-zone in a constant kinematic framework. Summarizing, the Pfahl shear zone shows brittle-ductile deformation during the long-term activity of a large-scale hydrothermal system. Consequently, it represents an excellent example where different generations of quartz precipitation can be connected to fluctuations of fluid flow and strain rate.

  10. Microfluidic free-flow zone electrophoresis and isotachophoresis using carbon black nano-composite PDMS sidewall membranes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaotong; Mavrogiannis, Nicholas; Ibo, Markela; Crivellari, Francesca; Gagnon, Zachary R

    2017-01-01

    We present a new type of free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) device for performing on-chip microfluidic isotachophoresis and zone electrophoresis. FFE is performed using metal gallium electrodes, which are isolated from a main microfluidic flow channel using thin micron-scale polydimethylsiloxane/carbon black (PDMS/CB) composite membranes integrated directly into the sidewalls of the microfluidic channel. The thin membrane allows for field penetration and effective electrophoresis, but serves to prevent bubble generation at the electrodes from electrolysis. We experimentally demonstrate the ability to use this platform to perform on-chip free-flow electrophoretic separation and isotachophoretic concentration. Due to the small size and simple fabrication procedure, this PDMS/CB platform could be used as a part of an on-chip upstream sample preparation toolkit for portable microfluidic diagnostic applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Soil pipe flow tracer experiments: 2. Application of a transient storage zone model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil pipes, defined here as discrete preferential flow paths generally parallel to the slope, are important subsurface flow pathways that play a role in many soil erosion phenomena. However, limited research has been performed on quantifying and characterizing their flow and transport characteristic...

  12. Coronary physiological assessment combining fractional flow reserve and index of microcirculatory resistance in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention with grey zone fractional flow reserve.

    PubMed

    Niida, Takayuki; Murai, Tadashi; Yonetsu, Taishi; Kanaji, Yoshihisa; Usui, Eisuke; Matsuda, Junji; Hoshino, Masahiro; Araki, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Masao; Hada, Masahiro; Ichijyo, Sadamitsu; Hamaya, Rikuta; Kanno, Yoshinori; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Kakuta, Tsunekazu

    2018-03-08

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association between fractional flow reserve (FFR) values and change in coronary physiological indices after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Decision making for revascularization when FFR is 0.75-0.80 is controversial. A retrospective analysis was performed of 296 patients with stable angina pectoris who underwent physiological examinations before and after PCI. To investigate the differences of coronary flow improvement between territories with low-FFR (<0.75) and grey-zone FFR (0.75-0.80), serial changes in physiological indices including mean transit time (Tmn), coronary flow reserve (CFR), and index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) were compared between these two groups. Compared to low-FFR territories, grey-zone FFR territories showed significantly lower prevalence of Tmn shortening, CFR improvement, and decrease in IMR (Tmn shorting, 63.9% vs. 87.0%, P < .001; CFR improvement, 63.0% vs. 75.7%, P = .019; IMR decrease, 51.3% vs. 63.3%, P = .040) and lower extent of their absolute changes (Tmn shorting, 0.06 (-0.03 to 0.16) vs. 0.22 (0.07-0.45), P < .001; CFR improvement, 0.45 (-0.32 to 1.87) vs. 1.08 (0.02-2.44), P < .01; IMR decrease, 0.2 (-44.0 to 31.3) vs. 2.9 (-2.9 to 11.8), P = .022). Multivariate analysis showed that pre-PCI IMR predicted improved coronary flow profile in both groups, whereas pre-PCI FFR predicted increased coronary flow indices in low-FFR territories. Worsening of physiological indices after PCI was not uncommon in territories showing grey-zone FFR. Physiological assessment combining FFR and IMR may help identify patients who may benefit by PCI, particularly those in the grey zone. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Groundwater ages from the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer, Uvalde County, Texas—Insights into groundwater flow and recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Landis, Gary P.; Faith, Jason R.

    2016-02-23

    Tritium–helium-3 groundwater ages of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas were determined as part of a long-term study of groundwater flow and recharge in the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. These ages help to define groundwater residence times and to provide constraints for calibration of groundwater flow models. A suite of 17 samples from public and private supply wells within Uvalde County were collected for active and noble gases, and for tritium–helium-3 analyses from the confined and unconfined parts of the Edwards aquifer. Samples were collected from monitoring wells at discrete depths in open boreholes as well as from integrated pumped well-head samples. The data indicate a fairly uniform groundwater flow system within an otherwise structurally complex geologic environment comprised of regionally and locally faulted rock units, igneous intrusions, and karst features within carbonate rocks. Apparent ages show moderate, downward average, linear velocities in the Uvalde area with increasing age to the east along a regional groundwater flow path. Though the apparent age data show a fairly consistent distribution across the study area, many apparent ages indicate mixing of both modern (less than 60 years) and premodern (greater than 60 years) waters. This mixing is most evident along the “bad water” line, an arbitrary delineation of 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids that separates the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer from the downdip saline water zone. Mixing of modern and premodern waters also is indicated within the unconfined zone of the aquifer by high excess helium concentrations in young waters. Excess helium anomalies in the unconfined aquifer are consistent with possible subsurface discharge of premodern groundwater from the underlying Trinity aquifer into the younger groundwater of the Edwards aquifer.

  14. Numerical simulation of two-phase flow for sediment transport in the inner-surf and swash zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtyar, R.; Barry, D. A.; Yeganeh-Bakhtiary, A.; Li, L.; Parlange, J.-Y.; Sander, G. C.

    2010-03-01

    A two-dimensional two-phase flow framework for fluid-sediment flow simulation in the surf and swash zones was described. Propagation, breaking, uprush and backwash of waves on sloping beaches were studied numerically with an emphasis on fluid hydrodynamics and sediment transport characteristics. The model includes interactive fluid-solid forces and intergranular stresses in the moving sediment layer. In the Euler-Euler approach adopted, two phases were defined using the Navier-Stokes equations with interphase coupling for momentum conservation. The k-ɛ closure model and volume of fluid approach were used to describe the turbulence and tracking of the free surface, respectively. Numerical simulations explored incident wave conditions, specifically spilling and plunging breakers, on both dissipative and intermediate beaches. It was found that the spatial variation of sediment concentration in the swash zone is asymmetric, while the temporal behavior is characterized by maximum sediment concentrations at the start and end of the swash cycle. The numerical results also indicated that the maximum turbulent kinetic energy and sediment flux occurs near the wave-breaking point. These predictions are in general agreement with previous observations, while the model describes the fluid and sediment phase characteristics in much more detail than existing measurements. With direct quantifications of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, sediment concentration and flux, the model provides a useful approach to improve mechanistic understanding of hydrodynamic and sediment transport in the nearshore zone.

  15. 14C age reassessment of groundwater from the discharge zone due to cross-flow mixing in the deep confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xumei; Wang, Hua; Feng, Liang

    2018-05-01

    In a groundwater flow system, the age of groundwater should gradually increase from the recharge zone to the discharge zone within the same streamline. However, it is occasionally observed that the groundwater age becomes younger in the discharge zone in the piedmont alluvial plain, and the oldest age often appears in the middle of the plain. A new set of groundwater chemistry and isotopes was employed to reassess the groundwater 14C ages from the discharge zone in the North China Plain (NCP). Carbonate precipitation, organic matter oxidation and cross-flow mixing in the groundwater from the recharge zone to the discharge zone are recognized according to the corresponding changes of HCO3- (or DIC) and δ13C in the same streamline of the third aquifer of the NCP. The effects of carbonate precipitation and organic matter oxidation are calibrated with a 13C mixing model and DIC correction, but these corrected 14C ages seem unreasonable because they grow younger from the middle plain to the discharge zone in the NCP. The relationship of Cl- content and the recharge distance is used to estimate the expected Cl- content in the discharge zone, and ln(a14C)/Cl is proposed to correct the a14C in groundwater for the effect of cross-flow mixing. The 14C ages were reassessed with the corrected a14C due to the cross-flow mixing varying from 1.25 to 30.58 ka, and the groundwater becomes older gradually from the recharge zone to the discharge zone. The results suggest that the reassessed 14C ages are more reasonable for the groundwater from the discharge zone due to cross-flow mixing.

  16. Tritium and 36Cl as constraints on fast fracture flow and percolation flux in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain.

    PubMed

    Guerin, M

    2001-10-01

    An analysis of tritium and 36Cl data collected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada suggests that fracture flow may occur at high velocities through the thick unsaturated zone. The mechanisms and extent of this "fast flow" in fractures at Yucca Mountain are investigated with data analysis, mixing models and several one-dimensional modeling scenarios. The model results and data analysis provide evidence substantiating the weeps model [Gauthier, J.H., Wilson, M.L., Lauffer, F.C., 1992. Proceedings of the Third Annual International High-level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, vol. 1, Las Vegas, NV. American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL, pp. 891-989] and suggest that fast flow in fractures with minimal fracture-matrix interaction may comprise a substantial proportion of the total infiltration through Yucca Mountain. Mixing calculations suggest that bomb-pulse tritium measurements, in general, represent the tail end of travel times for thermonuclear-test-era (bomb-pulse) infiltration. The data analysis shows that bomb-pulse tritium and 36Cl measurements are correlated with discrete features such as horizontal fractures and areas where lateral flow may occur. The results presented here imply that fast flow in fractures may be ubiquitous at Yucca Mountain, occurring when transient infiltration (storms) generates flow in the connected fracture network.

  17. Tritium and 36Cl as constraints on fast fracture flow and percolation flux in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, Marianne

    2001-10-01

    An analysis of tritium and 36Cl data collected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada suggests that fracture flow may occur at high velocities through the thick unsaturated zone. The mechanisms and extent of this "fast flow" in fractures at Yucca Mountain are investigated with data analysis, mixing models and several one-dimensional modeling scenarios. The model results and data analysis provide evidence substantiating the weeps model [Gauthier, J.H., Wilson, M.L., Lauffer, F.C., 1992. Proceedings of the Third Annual International High-level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, vol. 1, Las Vegas, NV. American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL, pp. 891-989] and suggest that fast flow in fractures with minimal fracture-matrix interaction may comprise a substantial proportion of the total infiltration through Yucca Mountain. Mixing calculations suggest that bomb-pulse tritium measurements, in general, represent the tail end of travel times for thermonuclear-test-era (bomb-pulse) infiltration. The data analysis shows that bomb-pulse tritium and 36Cl measurements are correlated with discrete features such as horizontal fractures and areas where lateral flow may occur. The results presented here imply that fast flow in fractures may be ubiquitous at Yucca Mountain, occurring when transient infiltration (storms) generates flow in the connected fracture network.

  18. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; ...

    2014-08-05

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. Amore » well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. We found that the results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.« less

  19. Investigation of the fluid flow dynamic parameters for Newtonian and non-Newtonian materials: an approach to understanding the fluid flow-like structures within fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Shiomi, Y.; Ma, K.-F.

    2017-11-01

    To understand the fault zone fluid flow-like structure, namely the ductile deformation structure, often observed in the geological field (e.g., Ramsay and Huber The techniques of modern structure geology, vol. 1: strain analysis, Academia Press, London, 1983; Hobbs and Ord Structure geology: the mechanics of deforming metamorphic rocks, Vol. I: principles, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015), we applied a theoretical approach to estimate the rate of deformation, the shear stress and the time to form a streak-line pattern in the boundary layer of viscous fluids. We model the dynamics of streak lines in laminar boundary layers for Newtonian and pseudoplastic fluids and compare the results to those obtained via laboratory experiments. The structure of deformed streak lines obtained using our model is consistent with experimental observations, indicating that our model is appropriate for understanding the shear rate, flow time and shear stress based on the profile of deformed streak lines in the boundary layer in Newtonian and pseudoplastic viscous materials. This study improves our understanding of the transportation processes in fluids and of the transformation processes in fluid-like materials. Further application of this model could facilitate understanding the shear stress and time history of the fluid flow-like structure of fault zones observed in the field.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Physical Nature and Orbital Behavior of the Eclipsing System UZ Leonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Park, Jang-Ho

    2018-03-01

    New CCD photometric observations of UZ Leo were obtained between 2012 February and 2013 April, and on 2017 February. Its physical properties were derived from detailed analyses of our light curves and existing radial velocities. The results indicate that this system is a totally eclipsing A-subtype overcontact binary with both a high fill-out factor of 76% and a third light source contributing 12% light in the B bandpass, 10% in V, and 7% in R. The light residuals between observations and theoretical models are satisfactorily fitted by adopting a magnetic cool spot on the more massive primary star. Including our 12 measurements, a total of 172 eclipse times were used for ephemeris computations. We found that the orbital period of UZ Leo has varied due to a periodic oscillation superposed on an upward parabolic variation. The observed period increase at a rate of +3.49× {10}-7 day yr‑1 can be plausibly explained by some combination of non-conservative mass transfer from the secondary to the primary component and angular momentum loss due to magnetic braking. The period and semi-amplitude of the oscillation are about 139 years and 0.0225 days, respectively, which is interpreted as a light-time effect due to a third component with a mass of {M}3\\sin {i}3=0.30 {M}ȯ . Because the third lights of 7%–12% indicate that the circumbinary object is very overluminous for its mass, it would possibly match a white dwarf, rather than an M-type main sequence.

  1. Surface heat flow and CO2 emissions within the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rissmann, C.; Christenson, B.; Werner, C.; Leybourne, M.; Cole, J.; Gravley, D.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions and heat flow have been determined from the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand following 20a of production (116MW e). Soil CO2 degassing was quantified with 2663 CO2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber method, and 2563 soil temperatures were measured and converted to equivalent heat flow (Wm -2) using published soil temperature heat flow functions. Both CO2 flux and heat flow were analysed statistically and then modelled using 500 sequential Gaussian simulations. Forty subsoil CO 2 gas samples were also analysed for stable C isotopes. Following 20a of production, current CO2 emissions equated to 111??6.7T/d. Observed heat flow was 70??6.4MW, compared with a pre-production value of 122MW. This 52MW reduction in surface heat flow is due to production-induced drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows (61.5MW) and steam-heated pools (8.6MW) within the Ohaaki West thermal area (OHW). The drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows at Ohaaki means that the soil zone is now the major natural pathway of heat release from the high-temperature reservoir. On the other hand, a net gain in thermal ground heat flow of 18MW (from 25MW to 43.3??5MW) at OHW is associated with permeability increases resulting from surface unit fracturing by production-induced ground subsidence. The Ohaaki East (OHE) thermal area showed no change in distribution of shallow and deep soil temperature contours despite 20a of production, with an observed heat flow of 26.7??3MW and a CO 2 emission rate of 39??3T/d. The negligible change in the thermal status of the OHE thermal area is attributed to the low permeability of the reservoir beneath this area, which has limited production (mass extraction) and sheltered the area from the pressure decline within the main reservoir. Chemistry suggests that although alkali-Cl outflows once contributed significantly to the natural surface heat flow (~50%) they contributed little (<1%) to pre-production CO 2

  2. Preferential flow in the vadose zone and interface dynamics: Impact of microbial exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biting; Pales, Ashley R.; Clifford, Heather M.; Kupis, Shyla; Hennessy, Sarah; Liang, Wei-Zhen; Moysey, Stephen; Powell, Brian; Finneran, Kevin T.; Darnault, Christophe J. G.

    2018-03-01

    In the hydrological cycle, the infiltration process is a critical component in the distribution of water into the soil and in the groundwater system. The nonlinear dynamics of the soil infiltration process yield preferential flow which affects the water distribution in soil. Preferential flow is influenced by the interactions between water, soil, plants, and microorganisms. Although the relationship among the plant roots, their rhizodeposits and water transport in soil has been the subject of extensive study, the effect of microbial exudates has been studied in only a few cases. Here the authors investigated the influence of two artificial microbial exudates-catechol and riboflavin-on the infiltration process, particularly unstable fingered flow, one form of preferential flow. Flow experiments investigating the effects of types and concentrations of microbial exudates on unstable fingered flow were conducted in a two-dimensional tank that was filled with ASTM

  3. Self-potential method for characterizing streaming flows in the saturated and vadose zones: state of the art and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailhac, P.

    2005-12-01

    Self-Potential (SP) method is sensitive not only to the water content, but, above all, to flow velocities within the underground porous medium. So it can be considered as a crucial help in hydrogeophysics. This is underlined by the so-called electrokinetic coupling and has been early used in geophysics (e.g. Bogoslovsky and Ogilvy, 1970) and hydrology (Abaza and Clyde 1969). During the last decade, both experimental and theoretical progresses have moved ahead SP to provide quantitative flow parameters. Now SP time and/or spatial variations can be used to monitor water fluxes during infiltration (e.g. Thony et al. 1997, Doussan et al. 2002, Darnet & Marquis 2004), seepage (Titov et al. 2000), or pumping (e.g. Fagerlund & Heinson 2003, Darnet et al. 2003, Revil et al. 2003). In order that SP is used by a larger community, it would be useful to recall the fundamentals, to review recent interpretation techniques in a simple framework and to precise their limitations. First considering flows in the saturated zone and a pumping experiment, I will show different interpretation techniques that are based upon Green function decompositions (e.g. wavelets, COP tomography of Patella, and iso-α line of Revil et al.). Classical application of theses techniques is underlined by the assumption of a constant electrical conductivity medium that involves uncertainty and bias in quantitative flow parameter estimates. For instance, the diffusive effect of a conductive shallow layer tends to increase the apparent depth of an underground flow source or sink. To correct this problem, one can use Green functions of a tabular medium in the COP tomography. In the complex case of unsaturated zone, the hydraulic and electric conductivities are depending on the water content. We will discuss on different soil models and different experiments that can be used for the monitoring of the infiltration and the characterisation of the soil hydraulic parameters.

  4. Deep Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Behavior at T-Tunnel Complex, Rainier Mesa, Nevada National Security Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, R.; Reeves, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Rainier Mesa, a tuffaceous plateau on the Nevada National Security Site, has been the location of numerous subsurface nuclear tests conducted in a series of tunnel complexes located approximately 450 m below the top of the mesa and 500 m above the regional groundwater flow system. The tunnels were constructed near the middle of an 800 m Tertiary sequence of faulted, low-permeability welded and non-welded bedded, vitric, and zeolitized tuff units. Water levels from wells in the vicinity of the T-tunnel complex indicate the presence of a perched saturation zone located approximately 100 m above the T-tunnel complex. This upper zone of saturation extends downward through most of the Tertiary sequence. The groundwater table is located at an elevation of 1300 m within a thrust sheet of Paleozoic carbonates, corresponding to the lower carbonate aquifer hydrostratigraphic unit (LCA3). The LCA3 is considered to be hydraulically connected to the Death Valley regional flow system. The objective of this project is to simulate complex downward patterns of fluid flow and radionuclide transport from the T-tunnel complex through the matrix and fault networks of the Tertiary tuff units to the water table. We developed an improved fracture characterization and mapping methodology consisting of displacement-length scaling relationships, simulation of realistic fault networks based on site-specific data, and the development of novel fracture network upscaling techniques that preserves fracture network flow and transport properties on coarse continuum grid. Development of upscaling method for fracture continua is based on the concepts of discrete fracture network modeling approach which performs better at honoring network connectivity and anisotropy of sparse networks in comparison to other established methods such as a tensor approach. Extensive flow simulations in the dual-continuum framework demonstrate that the characteristics of fault networks strongly influences the saturation

  5. Experimental Demonstration of 3-Dimensional Flow Structures and Depositional Features in a Lateral Recirculation Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, P. E.; Schmeeckle, M. W.; Mueller, E. R.; Buscombe, D.; Kasprak, A.; Leary, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    The connections between stream hydraulics, geomorphology and ecosystems in mountain rivers have been substantially perturbed by humans, for example through flow regulation related to hydropower activities. It is well known that the ecosystem impacts downstream of hydropower dams may be managed by a properly designed compensation release or environmental flows ("e-flows"), and such flows may also include sediment considerations (e.g. to break up bed armor). However, there has been much less attention given to the ecosystem impacts of water intakes (where water is extracted and transferred for storage and/or power production), even though in many mountain systems such intakes may be prevalent. Flow intakes tend to be smaller than dams and because they fill quickly in the presence of sediment delivery, they often need to be flushed, many times within a day in Alpine glaciated catchments with high sediment yields. The associated short duration "flood" flow is characterised by very high sediment concentrations, which may drastically modify downstream habitat, both during the floods but also due to subsequent accumulation of "legacy" sediment. The impacts on flora and fauna of these systems have not been well studied. In addition, there are no guidelines established that might allow the design of "e-flows" that also treat this sediment problem, something we call "sed-flows". Through an Alpine field example, we quantify the hydrological, geomorphological, and ecosystem impacts of Alpine water transfer systems. The high sediment concentrations of these flushing flows lead to very high rates of channel disturbance downstream, superimposed upon long-term and progressive bed sediment accumulation. Monthly macroinvertebrate surveys over almost a two-year period showed that reductions in the flushing rate reduced rates of disturbance substantially, and led to rapid macroinvertebrate recovery, even in the seasons (autumn and winter) when biological activity should be reduced

  6. Shear zone formation within the billet and metal flow through the die orifice in unlubricated axisymmetric forward and backward extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valberg, Henry; Costa, Andrè L. M.

    2017-10-01

    Metal flow inside the billet is known to be completely different in forward (FWE) and backward (BWE) Al-extrusion. A practical implication of this is that contamination near to the surface of the extrusion billet, or on the peripheral surface skin, tends to flow out of the die more readily in BWE than in FWE. It is therefore common in BWE to use a scalping operation on the billet to remove eventual sub-surface contamination that may be present. This additional working operation may be required in order to avoid surface quality problems on BWE profiles. In spite of the importance of metal flow in metals extrusion, there are still lack of knowledge about the topic. With recent progress in FEM-analysis for modelling deformation processing, however, it is now possible to perform accurate studies on metal flow phenomena by simulation on the computer. In our study, we are using the 3D FEM-program DEFORM® to model axisymmetric FWE and BWE in case of non-lubricated extrusion through a flat-faced die. Our primary focus is to consider the difference in appearance of shear zones present inside the extrusion billet for the two processes, including metal flow in the die mouth.

  7. Heat flow, morphology, pore fluids and hydrothermal circulation in a typical Mid-Atlantic Ridge flank near Oceanographer Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gal, V.; Lucazeau, F.; Cannat, M.; Poort, J.; Monnin, C.; Battani, A.; Fontaine, F.; Goutorbe, B.; Rolandone, F.; Poitou, C.; Blanc-Valleron, M.-M.; Piedade, A.; Hipólito, A.

    2018-01-01

    Hydrothermal circulation affects heat and mass transfers in the oceanic lithosphere, not only at the ridge axis but also on their flanks, where the magnitude of this process has been related to sediment blanket and seamounts density. This was documented in several areas of the Pacific Ocean by heat flow measurements and pore water analysis. However, as the morphology of Atlantic and Indian ridge flanks is generally rougher than in the Pacific, these regions of slow and ultra-slow accretion may be affected by hydrothermal processes of different regimes. We carried out a survey of two regions on the eastern and western flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between Oceanographer and Hayes fracture zones. Two hundred and eight new heat flow measurements were obtained along six seismic profiles, on 5 to 14 Ma old seafloor. Thirty sediment cores (from which porewaters have been extracted) have been collected with a Kullenberg corer equipped with thermistors thus allowing simultaneous heat flow measurement. Most heat flow values are lower than those predicted by purely conductive cooling models, with some local variations and exceptions: heat flow values on the eastern flank of the study area are more variable than on the western flank, where they tend to increase westward as the sedimentary cover in the basins becomes thicker and more continuous. Heat flow is also higher, on average, on the northern sides of both the western and eastern field regions and includes values close to conductive predictions near the Oceanographer Fracture Zone. All the sediment porewaters have a chemical composition similar to that of bottom seawater (no anomaly linked to fluid circulation has been detected). Heat flow values and pore fluid compositions are consistent with fluid circulation in volcanic rocks below the sediment. The short distances between seamounts and short fluid pathways explain that fluids flowing in the basaltic aquifer below the sediment have remained cool and unaltered

  8. Fluid flow and water-rock interaction in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Mark E.; Thomas, Donald M.; Flexser, Steven; Vennemann, Torsten W.

    1997-07-01

    The East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii represents a major area of geothermal activity. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope analyses of secondary hydrothermal minerals in core samples from three scientific observation holes (SOH) drilled into the rift zone indicate that the geothermal system is dominated by meteoric waters to depths of as much as 1500 m below sea level. Calculated δ18O and δD values for fluids on the north side of the rift zone indicate that the deep meteoric fluids may be derived from precipitation on the upper slopes of Mauna Loa Volcano. In the interior of the rift zone, recharge is dominated by seawater mixed with local meteoric water. Water/rock ratios in the rift area are approximately 2, but strongly 18O-enriched fluids in the deeper parts of the SOH-2 and SOH-4 drill holes (on the north side of the rift) indicate that the fluids underwent extensive interaction with rocks prior to reaching this part of the rift zone. Marine carbonates at the subaerial to submarine transition (between 1700 and 1780 m depth) in SOH-4 have not fully equilibrated with the fluids, suggesting that the onset of hydrothermal activity in this area was relatively recent (<2000 years). This may represent increased volcanic activity along the rift after the end of the Ai La'au phase of eruptive activity at the Kilauea summit approximately 1000 years ago, or it may reflect progressive evolution of the hydrothermal system in response to southward migration of intrusive activity within the rift.

  9. Implications of different digital elevation models and preprocessing techniques to delineate debris flow inundation hazard zones in El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, E. R.; Griffin, R.; Irwin, D.

    2013-12-01

    Heavy rains and steep, volcanic slopes in El Salvador cause numerous landslides every year, posing a persistent threat to the population, economy and environment. Although potential debris inundation hazard zones have been delineated using digital elevation models (DEMs), some disparities exist between the simulated zones and actual affected areas. Moreover, these hazard zones have only been identified for volcanic lahars and not the shallow landslides that occur nearly every year. This is despite the availability of tools to delineate a variety of landslide types (e.g., the USGS-developed LAHARZ software). Limitations in DEM spatial resolution, age of the data, and hydrological preprocessing techniques can contribute to inaccurate hazard zone definitions. This study investigates the impacts of using different elevation models and pit filling techniques in the final debris hazard zone delineations, in an effort to determine which combination of methods most closely agrees with observed landslide events. In particular, a national DEM digitized from topographic sheets from the 1970s and 1980s provide an elevation product at a 10 meter resolution. Both natural and anthropogenic modifications of the terrain limit the accuracy of current landslide hazard assessments derived from this source. Global products from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Global DEM (ASTER GDEM) offer more recent data but at the cost of spatial resolution. New data derived from the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) in 2013 provides the opportunity to update hazard zones at a higher spatial resolution (approximately 6 meters). Hydrological filling of sinks or pits for current hazard zone simulation has previously been achieved through ArcInfo spatial analyst. Such hydrological processing typically only fills pits and can lead to drastic modifications of original elevation values

  10. Effects of Low-Permeability Layers in the Hyporheic Zone on Oxygen Consumption Under Losing and Gaining Groundwater Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, S.; Krause, S.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.; De Falco, N.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies at the watershed scale have demonstrated the dominant role that river bedforms play in driving hyporheic exchange and constraining biogeochemical processes along river corridors. At the reach and bedform scales, modeling studies have shown that sediment heterogeneity significantly modifies hyporheic flow patterns within bedforms, resulting in spatially heterogeneous biogeochemical processes. In this work, we summarize a series of flume experiments to evaluate the effect that low-permeability layers, representative of structural heterogeneity, have on hyporheic exchange and oxygen consumption in sandy streambeds. In this case, we systematically changed the geometry of the heterogeneities, the surface channel flow driving the exchange, and groundwater fluxes (gaining/losing) modulating the exchange. The flume was packed with natural sediments, which were amended with compost to minimize carbon limitations. Structural heterogeneities were represented by continuous and discontinuous layers of clay material. Flow patterns were studied using dye imaging through the side walls. Oxygen distribution in the streambed was measured using planar optodes. The experimental observations revealed that the clay layer had a significant effect on flow patterns and oxygen distribution in the streambed under neutral and losing conditions. Under gaining conditions, the aerobic zone was limited to the upper sections of the bedform and thus was less influenced by the clay layers that were located at a depth of 1-3 cm below the water-sediment interface. We are currently analyzing the results with a numerical flow and transport model to quantify the reactions rates under the different flow conditions and spatial sediment structures. Our preliminary results enable us to show the importance of the coupling between flow conditions, local heterogeneity within the streambed and oxygen consumption along bed forms and are expected to improve our ability to model the effect of stream

  11. Land cover effects on infiltration and preferential flow pathways in the high rainfall zone of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwartendijk, Bob; van Meerveld, Ilja; Ravelona, Maafaka; Razakamanarivo, Herintsitohaina; Ghimire, Chandra; Bruijnzeel, Sampurno; Jones, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Shortened slash-and-burn cycles exhaust agricultural land and have resulted in extensive tracts of highly degraded land across the tropics. Land degradation typically results in decreased rainfall infiltration due to a reduced field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of the topsoil because of a progressive decline in soil organic matter, exposure to raindrop impact, surface sealing and compaction. This results, in turn, in enhanced surface runoff and erosion, and consequently less subsurface flow and groundwater recharge. On the other hand, natural vegetation regrowth or active reforestation can lead to a renewed accumulation of soil organic matter, macropore development and increased infiltration rates. As part of the P4GES project (Can Paying 4 Global Ecosystem Services values reduce poverty?; www.p4ges.org), we study the effects of land use change and reforestation on water resources in the Corridor Ankeniheny-Zahamena (CAZ) in eastern Madagascar. In this poster, we present the results of infiltration and preferential flow measurements in four different land uses in the southern part of the CAZ: (i) closed canopy forest, (ii) 3-14 year-old regrowth on fallow land (savokas), (iii) exhausted and severely degraded land (tany maty), and (iv) recently reforested sites (6-8 years old). The results show that infiltrability increases significantly after several years of forest regrowth after land abandonment, but it remains unclear whether active replanting decreases the time required for restoration of soil hydrological functioning. Preferential flow pathways differed strikingly between the respective land cover types: infiltration in mature forests was predominantly characterized by macropore flow (preferential flow pathways), whereas infiltration in exhausted agricultural land was dominated by matrix flow (few preferential flow pathways). Occurrence of preferential flow pathways in reforestation and fallow sites varied considerably. These results suggest that land

  12. Entrainment-Zone Restratification and Flow Structures in Stratified Shear Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, B. Anders Pettersson; Werne, Joseph; Andreassen, Oyvind; Meyer, Christian; Davis-Mansour, Melissa

    2002-01-01

    Late-time dynamics and morphology of a stratified turbulent shear layer are examined using 1) Reynolds-stress and heat-flux budgets, 2) the single-point structure tensors introduced by Kassinos et al. (2001), and 3) flow visualization via 3D volume rendering. Flux reversal is observed during restratification in the edges of the turbulent layer. We present a first attempt to quantify the turbulence-mean-flow interaction and to characterize the predominant flow structures. Future work will extend this analysis to earlier times and different values of the Reynolds and Richardson numbers.

  13. The site-scale saturated zone flow model for Yucca Mountain: Calibration of different conceptual models and their impact on flow paths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zyvoloski, G.; Kwicklis, E.; Eddebbarh, A.-A.; Arnold, B.; Faunt, C.; Robinson, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents several different conceptual models of the Large Hydraulic Gradient (LHG) region north of Yucca Mountain and describes the impact of those models on groundwater flow near the potential high-level repository site. The results are based on a numerical model of site-scale saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain. This model is used for performance assessment predictions of radionuclide transport and to guide future data collection and modeling activities. The numerical model is calibrated by matching available water level measurements using parameter estimation techniques, along with more informal comparisons of the model to hydrologic and geochemical information. The model software (hydrologic simulation code FEHM and parameter estimation software PEST) and model setup allows for efficient calibration of multiple conceptual models. Until now, the Large Hydraulic Gradient has been simulated using a low-permeability, east-west oriented feature, even though direct evidence for this feature is lacking. In addition to this model, we investigate and calibrate three additional conceptual models of the Large Hydraulic Gradient, all of which are based on a presumed zone of hydrothermal chemical alteration north of Yucca Mountain. After examining the heads and permeabilities obtained from the calibrated models, we present particle pathways from the potential repository that record differences in the predicted groundwater flow regime. The results show that Large Hydraulic Gradient can be represented with the alternate conceptual models that include the hydrothermally altered zone. The predicted pathways are mildly sensitive to the choice of the conceptual model and more sensitive to the quality of calibration in the vicinity on the repository. These differences are most likely due to different degrees of fit of model to data, and do not represent important differences in hydrologic conditions for the different conceptual models. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B

  14. Regional Survey of Structural Properties and Cementation Patterns of Fault Zones in the Northern Part of the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico - Implications for Ground-Water Flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by the need to document and evaluate the types and variability of fault zone properties that potentially affect aquifer systems in basins of the middle Rio Grande rift, we systematically characterized structural and cementation properties of exposed fault zones at 176 sites in the northern Albuquerque Basin. A statistical analysis of measurements and observations evaluated four aspects of the fault zones: (1) attitude and displacement, (2) cement, (3) lithology of the host rock or sediment, and (4) character and width of distinctive structural architectural components at the outcrop scale. Three structural architectural components of the fault zones were observed: (1) outer damage zones related to fault growth; these zones typically contain deformation bands, shear fractures, and open extensional fractures, which strike subparallel to the fault and may promote ground-water flow along the fault zone; (2) inner mixed zones composed of variably entrained, disrupted, and dismembered blocks of host sediment; and (3) central fault cores that accommodate most shear strain and in which persistent low- permeability clay-rich rocks likely impede the flow of water across the fault. The lithology of the host rock or sediment influences the structure of the fault zone and the width of its components. Different grain-size distributions and degrees of induration of the host materials produce differences in material strength that lead to variations in width, degree, and style of fracturing and other fault-related deformation. In addition, lithology of the host sediment appears to strongly control the distribution of cement in fault zones. Most faults strike north to north-northeast and dip 55? - 77? east or west, toward the basin center. Most faults exhibit normal slip, and many of these faults have been reactivated by normal-oblique and strike slip. Although measured fault displacements have a broad range, from 0.9 to 4,000 m, most are <100 m, and fault zones appear to

  15. Getting into the musical zone: trait emotional intelligence and amount of practice predict flow in pianists

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Manuela M.; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2013-01-01

    Being “in flow” or “in the zone” is defined as an extremely focused state of consciousness which occurs during intense engagement in an activity. In general, flow has been linked to peak performances (high achievement) and feelings of intense pleasure and happiness. However, empirical research on flow in music performance is scarce, although it may offer novel insights into the question of why musicians engage in musical activities for extensive periods of time. Here, we focused on individual differences in a group of 76 piano performance students and assessed their flow experience in piano performance as well as their trait emotional intelligence. Multiple regression analysis revealed that flow was predicted by the amount of daily practice and trait emotional intelligence. Other background variables (gender, age, duration of piano training and age of first piano training) were not predictive. To predict high achievement in piano performance (i.e., winning a prize in a piano competition), a seven-predictor logistic regression model was fitted to the data, and we found that the odds of winning a prize in a piano competition were predicted by the amount of daily practice and the age at which piano training began. Interestingly, a positive relationship between flow and high achievement was not supported. Further, we explored the role of musical emotions and musical styles in the induction of flow by a self-developed questionnaire. Results suggest that besides individual differences among pianists, specific structural and compositional features of musical pieces and related emotional expressions may facilitate flow experiences. Altogether, these findings highlight the role of emotion in the experience of flow during music performance and call for further experiments addressing emotion in relation to the performer and the music alike. PMID:24319434

  16. Low mass planet migration in magnetically torqued dead zones - II. Flow-locked and runaway migration, and a torque prescription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Nelson, Richard P.; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan

    2018-04-01

    We examine the migration of low mass planets in laminar protoplanetary discs, threaded by large scale magnetic fields in the dead zone that drive radial gas flows. As shown in Paper I, a dynamical corotation torque arises due to the flow-induced asymmetric distortion of the corotation region and the evolving vortensity contrast between the librating horseshoe material and background disc flow. Using simulations of laminar torqued discs containing migrating planets, we demonstrate the existence of the four distinct migration regimes predicted in Paper I. In two regimes, the migration is approximately locked to the inward or outward radial gas flow, and in the other regimes the planet undergoes outward runaway migration that eventually settles to fast steady migration. In addition, we demonstrate torque and migration reversals induced by midplane magnetic stresses, with a bifurcation dependent on the disc surface density. We develop a model for fast migration, and show why the outward runaway saturates to a steady speed, and examine phenomenologically its termination due to changing local disc conditions. We also develop an analytical model for the corotation torque at late times that includes viscosity, for application to discs that sustain modest turbulence. Finally, we use the simulation results to develop torque prescriptions for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation.

  17. Insights into the base of the critical zone from geophysical logging and groundwater flow testing at U.S. Critical Zone Observatories (CZO) and critical zone study sites (CZs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B.; Zhang, Y.; Ren, S.; Flinchum, B. A.; Parsekian, A.; Holbrook, S.; Riebe, C. S.; Moravec, B. G.; Chorover, J.; Pelletier, J. D.; Richter, D. D., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Four prominent hypotheses exist and predict conceptual models defining the base of the critical zone. These hypotheses lack insights and constraints from borehole data since few deep (> 20 m) boreholes (and even fewer connected wellfields) are present in the U.S. Critical Zone Observatories (CZO) and similar critical zone study sites (CZs). The influence and interaction of fracture presence, fracture density, fracture orientation, groundwater presence and groundwater flow have only begun to be analyzed relative to any definition of the base of the critical zone. In this presentation, we examine each hypothesis by jointly evaluating borehole geophysical logs and groundwater testing datasets collected by the Wyoming Center for Environmental Hydrology and Geophysics (WyCEHG) since 2014 at these deep CZO or CZ boreholes. Deep boreholes allow a unique opportunity to observe the factors influencing groundwater transmissivity/storage capacity within the three main subsurface CZ layers: Unconsolidated (soil/saprolite), Fractured/weathered Bedrock, and Protolith bedrock (i.e. less fractured bedrock). The boreholes used in this study consist of: 1) nine wells of the Blair-Wallis (WY) WyCEHG CZ, 2) two wells in Catalina-Jemez CZO (Valle Caldera NM) and 3) one borehole at the Calhoun (SC) CZO. At this time, these are the only sites that contain boreholes with depths ranging from at least 20 m up to 70m that have been geophysically logged with full-waveform seismic, acoustic and optical televiewer, electric, electromagnetic, flowmeter (impeller and heat pulse), fluid temperature, fluid conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance. Further, the Blair-Wallis CZ site contains five hydraulically connected wells that allow us to estimate formation transmissivity and storage coefficients at increasing scales by conducting: slug tests, FLUTe™ borehole profiling, and cross-hole pumping tests. These well tests provide direct hydraulic data of the bedrock (both fractured and protolith

  18. Mihi Breccia: A stack of lacustrine sediments and subaqueous pyroclastic flows within the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downs, Drew

    2016-01-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, encompasses a wide variety of arc-related strata, although most of its small-volume (non-caldera-forming) eruptions are poorly-exposed and extensively hydrothermally altered. The Mihi Breccia is a stratigraphic sequence consisting of interbedded rhyolitic pyroclastic flows and lacustrine sediments with eruption ages of 281 ± 18 to at least 239 ± 6 ka (uncertainties at 2σ). In contrast to other small-volume rhyolitic eruptions within the TVZ, Mihi Breccia is relatively well-exposed within the Paeroa fault block, and contains minimal hydrothermal alteration. Pyroclastic flow characteristics and textures including: 1) breadcrusted juvenile clasts, 2) lack of welding, 3) abundant ash-rich matrix, 4) lack of fiamme and eutaxitic textures, 5) lack of thermal oxidation colors, 6) lack of cooling joints, 7) exclusive lacustrine sediment lithic clasts, and 8) interbedding with lacustrine sediments, all indicating that Mihi Breccia strata originated in a paleo-lake system. This ephemeral paleo-lake system is inferred to have lasted for > 50 kyr (based on Mihi Breccia age constraints), and referred to as Huka Lake. Mihi Breccia pyroclastic flow juvenile clast geochemistry and petrography correspond with similar-aged (264 ± 8, 263 ± 10, and 247 ± 4 ka) intra-caldera rhyolite domes filling the Reporoa caldera (source of the 281 ± 81 Kaingaroa Formation ignimbrite). These exposed intra-caldera rhyolite domes (as well as geophysically inferred subsurface domes) are proposed to be source vents for the Mihi Breccia pyroclastic flows. Soft-sediment deformation associated with Mihi Breccia strata indicate either seismic shock, rapid sediment loading during pyroclastic flow emplacement, or both. Thus, the Mihi Breccia reflects a prolonged series of subaqueous rhyolite dome building and associated pyroclastic flows, accompanied by seismic activity, emplaced into a large paleo-lake system within the TVZ.

  19. Mihi Breccia: A stack of lacustrine sediments and subaqueous pyroclastic flows within the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Drew T.

    2016-11-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, encompasses a wide variety of arc-related strata, although most of its small-volume (non-caldera-forming) eruptions are poorly-exposed and extensively hydrothermally altered. The Mihi Breccia is a stratigraphic sequence consisting of interbedded rhyolitic pyroclastic flows and lacustrine sediments with eruption ages of 281 ± 18 to at least 239 ± 6 ka (uncertainties at 2σ). In contrast to other small-volume rhyolitic eruptions within the TVZ, Mihi Breccia is relatively well-exposed within the Paeroa fault block, and contains minimal hydrothermal alteration. Pyroclastic flow characteristics and textures include: 1) prismatically jointed juvenile clasts, 2) lack of welding, 3) abundant ash-rich matrix, 4) lack of fiamme and eutaxitic textures, 5) lack of thermal oxidation colors, 6) lack of cooling joints, 7) exclusive lacustrine sediment lithic clasts, and 8) interbedding with lacustrine sediments, all indicating that Mihi Breccia strata originated in a paleo-lake system. This ephemeral paleo-lake system is inferred to have lasted for > 50 kyr (based on Mihi Breccia age constraints), and referred to as Huka Lake. Mihi Breccia pyroclastic flow juvenile clast geochemistry and petrography correspond with similar-aged (264 ± 8, 263 ± 10, and 247 ± 4 ka) intra-caldera rhyolite domes filling the Reporoa caldera (source of the 281 ka Kaingaroa Formation ignimbrite). These exposed intra-caldera rhyolite domes (as well as geophysically inferred subsurface domes) are proposed to be source vents for the Mihi Breccia pyroclastic flows. Soft-sediment deformation associated with Mihi Breccia strata indicates either seismic shock, rapid sediment loading during pyroclastic flow emplacement, or both. Thus, the Mihi Breccia reflects a prolonged series of subaqueous rhyolite dome building and associated pyroclastic flows, accompanied by seismic activity, emplaced into a large paleo-lake system within the TVZ.

  20. Cyclical shear fracture and viscous flow during transitional ductile-brittle deformation in the Saddlebag Lake Shear Zone, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Katharine E.; Kirkpatrick, James D.; Holk, Gregory J.

    2017-06-01

    Exhumed shear zones often contain folded and/or dynamically recrystallized structures, such as veins and pseudotachylytes, which record broadly contemporaneous brittle and ductile deformation. Here, we investigate veins within the Saddlebag Lake Shear Zone, central Sierra Nevada, California, to constrain the conditions and processes that caused fractures to form during ductile deformation. The shear zone mylonites contain compositional banding at centimeter- to meter- scales, and a ubiquitous, grain-scale, continuous- to spaced-foliation defined by aligned muscovite and chlorite grains. Veins of multiple compositions formed in two predominant sets: sub-parallel to the foliation and at high angle to the foliation. Some foliation sub-parallel veins show apparent shear offset consistent with the overall kinematics of the shear zone. These veins are folded with the foliation and are commonly boudinaged, showing they were rigid inclusions after formation. Quartz microstructures and fluid inclusion thermobarometry measurements indicate the veins formed by fracture at temperatures between 400-600 °C. Quartz, feldspar and tourmaline δ18O values (+ 2.5 to + 16.5) suggest extended fluid-rock interaction that involved magmatic, metamorphic, and meteoric-hydrothermal fluids. The orientation and spatial distribution of the veins shows that shear fractures formed along mechanically weak foliation planes. We infer fracture was promoted by perturbations to the strain rate and/or pore pressure during frictional-viscous deformation in a low effective stress environment. Evidence for repeated fracture and subsequent flow suggest both the stress and pore pressure varied, and that the tendency to fracture was controlled by the rates of pore pressure recovery, facilitated by fracture cementation. The tectonic setting and inferred phenomenological behavior were similar to intra-continental transform faults that host triggered tectonic tremor, suggesting the mechanisms that caused

  1. Inferences of Complex Anisotropic Layering and Mantle Flow Beneath the Malawi Rift Zone from Shear-Wave Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S. S.; Reed, C. A.; Yu, Y.; Liu, K. H.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Mdala, H. S.; Massinque, B.; Mutamina, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Measuring the magnitude and orientation of seismic anisotropy beneath actively extending rift zones provides invaluable estimates of the influence of numerous geodynamic parameters upon their evolution. In order to infer the character and origin of extensional forces acting upon the Malawi Rift Zone (MRZ) and Luangwa Rift Zone (LRZ) of southern Africa, we installed 33 Seismic Arrays For African Rift Initiation (SAFARI) three-component broadband seismic stations in Malawi, Mozambique, and Zambia between 2012-2014. Shear-wave splitting parameters, including the fast-component polarization orientation and the splitting time, are extracted from 142 events recorded during that time period for a total of 642 well-defined PKS, SKKS, and SKS phase measurements. Polarizations trend NE-SW along the western flank of the LRZ, whereupon they demonstrate an abrupt shift to N-S within the rift valley and the eastern flank. SWS orientations shift increasingly counterclockwise toward the east until, at 33°E, they shift from WNW-ESE to ENE-WSW, suggesting a systematic change in dominant mantle fabric orientation. The resulting fast orientations demonstrate remarkable variability within the MRZ, with E-W measurements in the north rotating counterclockwise toward the south to N-S within the southernmost MRZ. Measurements revert to E-W and NE-SW orientations toward the east in Mozambique, suggesting the presence of complex two-layer anisotropy. Azimuthal variations of SWS parameters recorded by stations within the central MRZ exhibit excellent 90° periodicity, further suggesting complex anisotropic layering. Lateral variation of measurements between the northern and southern MRZ imply the modulation of the mantle flow system beneath the active rift zone.

  2. Quaternary faulting of basalt flows on the Melones and Almanor fault zones, North Fork Feather River, northeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, J.; Page, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    Field relations indicate multiple sequences of late Cenozoic basalt flowed down the canyon of the North Fork Feather River from the Modoc Plateau during the Pliocene and early Quaternary. Remnants of at least three flow sequences are exposed in the canyon, the intermediate one yielding a K/Ar plagioclase date of 1.8 Ma. Topographic profiling of the remnants allows identification of Quaternary tectonic deformation along the northern Plumas trench, which separates the Sierra Nevada from the Diamond Mountains. The authors have identified several vertical displacements of the 1.8-Ma unit in the North Fork canyon and the area NE of Lake Almanor.more » NE of the lake, three NW-striking faults, each having down-to-the-west displacements of up to 35 m, are related to faulting along the east side of the Almanor tectonic depression. Analysis of the displaced basalt flows suggests that uplift of the Sierra Nevada occurred with canyon development prior to 2 Ma, and has continued coincident with several subsequent episodes of basalt deposition. Quaternary faulting of the basalt is associated with the Melones fault zone and the Plumas trench where they extend northward from the northern Sierra Nevada into the Modoc Plateau and southern Cascades. In contrast to the Mohawk Valley area, where the Plumas trench forms a 5-km-wide graben, faulting in the Almanor region is distributed over a 15-km-wide zone. A change in the strike of faulting occurs at Lake Almanor, from N50W along the Plumas trench to N20W north of the lake. The right-slip component on the fault of the Plums trench may result in a releasing bend at the change in strike and explain the origin of the Almanor depression.« less

  3. Identification of the inflow zone of unruptured cerebral aneurysms: comparison of 4D flow MRI and 3D TOF MRA data.

    PubMed

    Futami, K; Sano, H; Misaki, K; Nakada, M; Ueda, F; Hamada, J

    2014-07-01

    The hemodynamics of the inflow zone of cerebral aneurysms may be a key factor in coil compaction and recanalization after endovascular coil embolization. We performed 4D flow MR imaging in conjunction with 3D TOF MRA and compared their ability to identify the inflow zone of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. This series comprised 50 unruptured saccular cerebral aneurysms in 44 patients. Transluminal color-coded 3D MRA images were created by selecting the signal-intensity ranges on 3D TOF MRA images that corresponded with both the luminal margin and the putative inflow. 4D flow MR imaging demonstrated the inflow zone and yielded inflow velocity profiles for all 50 aneurysms. In 18 of 24 lateral-projection aneurysms (75%), the inflow zone was located distally on the aneurysmal neck. The maximum inflow velocity ranged from 285 to 922 mm/s. On 4D flow MR imaging and transluminal color-coded 3D MRA studies, the inflow zone of 32 aneurysms (64%) was at a similar location. In 91% of aneurysms whose neck section plane angle was <30° with respect to the imaging section direction on 3D TOF MRA, depiction of the inflow zone was similar on transluminal color-coded 3D MRA and 4D flow MR images. 4D flow MR imaging can demonstrate the inflow zone and provide inflow velocity profiles. In aneurysms whose angle of the neck-section plane is obtuse vis-a-vis the imaging section on 3D TOF MRA scans, transluminal color-coded 3D MRA may depict the inflow zone reliably. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. [Numerical simulation of flow fields through porous windbreak in shrubby zone].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Zhou, Junli; Xu, Zhong

    2003-03-01

    By treating the windbreak and shrub with the parameters in a equation, the flow fields through porous windbreak with and without shrub were calculated. The changes in relative wind velocity in horizontal direction, velocity profile and turbulent energy of the section were compared. It is concluded that shrub was very important in windbreak system, which could decrease the wind velocity in front of or some distance in the leeward of the windbreak. The calculated numerical results were compared with the data from wind-tunnel experiment where the influence of shrub on flow field was analyzed.

  5. Splay fault branching from the Hikurangi subduction shear zone: Implications for slow slip and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Faverola, A.; Henrys, S.; Pecher, I.; Wallace, L.; Klaeschen, D.

    2016-12-01

    Prestack depth migration data across the Hikurangi margin, East Coast of the North Island, New Zealand, are used to derive subducting slab geometry, upper crustal structure, and seismic velocities resolved to ˜14 km depth. We investigate the potential relationship between the crustal architecture, fluid migration, and short-term geodetically determined slow slip events. The subduction interface is a shallow dipping thrust at <7 km depth near the trench and steps down to 14 km depth along an ˜18 km long ramp, beneath Porangahau Ridge. This apparent step in the décollement is associated with splay fault branching and coincides with a zone of maximum slip (90 mm) inferred on the subduction interface during slow slip events in June and July 2011. A low-velocity zone beneath the plate interface, updip of the plate interface ramp, is interpreted as fluid-rich overpressured sediments capped with a low permeability condensed layer of chalk and interbedded mudstones. Fluid-rich sediments have been imbricated by splay faults in a region that coincides with the step down in the décollement from the top of subducting sediments to the oceanic crust and contribute to spatial variation in frictional properties of the plate interface that may promote slow slip behavior in the region. Further, transient fluid migration along splay faults at Porangahau Ridge may signify stress changes during slow slip.

  6. Capillary zone electrophoresis for analysis of complex proteomes using an electrokinetically pumped sheath flow nanospray interface

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Yan, Xiaojing; Champion, Mathew M.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of proteomic studies employ reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry for analysis of the tryptic digest of a cellular lysate. This technology is quite mature, and typically provides identification of hundreds to thousands of peptides, which is used to infer the identity of hundreds to thousands of proteins. These approaches usually require milligrams to micrograms of starting material. Capillary zone electrophoresis provides an interesting alternative separation method based on a different separation mechanism than HPLC. Capillary electrophoresis received some attention for protein analysis beginning 25 years ago. Those efforts stalled because of the limited performance of the electrospray interfaces and the limited speed and sensitivity of mass spectrometers of that era. This review considers a new electrospray interface design coupled with Orbitrap Velos and linear Q-trap mass spectrometers. Capillary zone electrophoresis coupled with this interface and these detectors provides single shot detection of >1,250 peptides from an E. coli digest in less than one hour, identification of nearly 5,000 peptides from analysis of seven fractions produced by solid-phase extraction of the E. coli digest in a six hour total analysis time, low attomole detection limits for peptides generated from standard proteins, and high zeptomole detection limits for selected ion monitoring of peptides. Incorporation of an integrated on-line immobilized trypsin microreactor allows digestion and analysis of picogram amounts of a complex eukaryotic proteome. PMID:24277677

  7. Applicability of Channel flow as an extrusion mechanism of the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone from Sutlej, Zanskar, Dhauliganga and Goriganga Sections, Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit

    2010-05-01

    Applicability of Channel flow as an extrusion mechanism of the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone from Sutlej, Zanskar, Dhauliganga and Goriganga Sections, Indian Himalaya Soumyajit Mukherjee Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay Powai, Mumbai- 400076, INDIA, e-mail: soumyajitm@gmail.com Mukherjee & Koyi (1,2) evaluated the applicability of channel flow extrusion of the Higher Himalayan Shear Zone (HHSZ) in the Zanskar and the Sutlej sections based on field- and micro-structural studies, analytical- and analog models. Further work on the Dhauliganga and the Goriganga sections of the HHSZ reveal complicated structural geology that is untenable to explain simply in terms of channel flow. For example, in the former section, flexure slip folds exist in a zone spatially separated from the upper strand of the South Tibetan Detachment System (STDSU). On the other hand, in the later section, an STDSU- in the sense of Mukherjee and Koyi (1)- is absent. Instead, a steep extensional shear zone with northeasterly dipping shear plane cuts the pre-existing shear fabrics throughout the HHSZ. However, the following common structural features in the HHSZ were observed in these sections. (1) S-C fabrics are the most ubiquitous ductile shear sense indicators in field. (2) Brittle shearing along the preexisting ductile primary shear planes in a top-to-SW sense. (3) Less ubiquitous ductile compressional shearing in the upper part of the shear zone including the STDSU. (4) A phase of local brittle-ductile extension throughout the shear zone as revealed by boudins of various morphologies. (5) The shear zone is divisible into a southern non-migmatitic and a northern migmatitic zone. No special structural dissimilarity is observed across this lithological boundary. Keywords: Channel flow, Extrusion, Higher Himalaya, Structural Geology, Shear zone, Deformation References 1. Mukherjee S, Koyi HA (in press) Higher Himalayan Shear Zone, Sutlej section: structural geology

  8. Using Opposing Slope Aspects to Understand Water and Energy Flow Controls on Critical Zone Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S. P.; Barnhart, K. R.; Kelly, P. K.; Foster, M. A.; Langston, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    A long-standing problem is to understand how climate controls the structure of the critical zone, including the depth of weathering, thickness and character of soils, and morphology of hillslopes. We exploit microclimates on opposing aspects in a watershed in the Boulder Creek CZO to investigate the role of water and energy fluxes on development of critical zone architectures. The 2.6 km2 Gordon Gulch, located at ~2500 m a.s.l. at 40°N latitude, is elongated east-west, and consequently is predominantly composed of north and south-facing soil-mantled slopes, dotted with tors, developed on Precambrian gneiss. The depth to fresh rock ranges from about 8 to 12 m, and is up to 2 m deeper on north-facing slopes. In addition to greater thickness, weathered rock is measurably lower in tensile strength on north-facing slopes. While characteristics of weathered rock vary with aspect, the overlying mobile regolith is relatively uniform in thickness at ~0.5 m across the catchment, and its mineralogy shows only minor chemical alteration from parent rock. These features of the critical zone architecture arise in the face of systematic differences in energy and water delivery by aspect. About 40-50% of the ~500 mm annual precipitation is delivered as snow. During spring, the south-facing slopes receive up to 50% greater direct solar radiation than the north-facing slopes. Consequently, snow cover is ephemeral in the open Ponderosa forests on south-facing slopes, and soil wetting and drying events are frequent. Frost penetration is shallow, and short lived. On north-facing slopes, less direct radiation and a dense Lodgepole pine forest cover leads to snowpack retention. Soils are colder and soil moisture stays elevated for long periods in spring on these slopes. We postulate that deeper and more sustained frost penetration on north-facing slopes enhances the damage rate by frost cracking. Deeper water delivery further aids this process, and supports chemical alteration processes

  9. Simulations of Convection Zone Flows and Measurements from Multiple Viewing Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L.; Hanasoge, Shravan

    2011-01-01

    A deep-focusing time-distance measurement technique has been applied to linear acoustic simulations of a solar interior perturbed by convective flows. The simulations are for the full sphere for r/R greater than 0.2. From these it is straightforward to simulate the observations from different viewing angles and to test how multiple viewing angles enhance detectibility. Some initial results will be presented.

  10. Observation of flow processes in the vadose zone using ERT on different space and time scales: results, obstacles, and suggestions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Ursula; Ganz, Christina; Lamparter, Axel; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus; Bachmann, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) observes the flow processes in the vadose zone indirectly. ERT has been used to estimate water flow in different soil types and under different flow conditions using active experiments or monitoring the natural process in many cases. Our experiments in sand and loess soil connected ERT with local soil probing using TDR devices and tensiometers in order to proof the reliability of the ERT inversion results in terms of infiltration velocity. Additionally, a colour tracer was used and sections through the infiltration zones were excavated in order to compare the shape of the dye -stained infiltration zone with the results of the ERT inversion. The data revealed the complicated infiltration pattern with a higher transport velocity in sand and a different shape than expected by classical soil hydraulic models. These results indicate the need for independent observations in order to correctly assess the water storage in the vadose zone with its hydrological consequences, the groundwater recharge and the contamination risk caused by rapid movement of water. ERT can be used for this purpose on different spatial- and time scales but for reliable results various obstacles need to be dealt with. Firstly, the ambiguity of the resistivity because soil resistivity depends on both, soil water content and electrical soil/water conductivity. This obstacle is less severe when the infiltration velocity is investigated, because then only the first onset of resistivity change is interpreted as the water arrival time. Our results show that the arrival of the water front as well as the final infiltration depth can be reliably detected. In contrast, this obstacle is very severe when the amount of water stored is observed using conductive tracer. The problem is not critical during a passive experiment when the natural rain fall and the waters fate through the vadose zone is monitored. The second obstacle is the limited resolution of ERT which

  11. Characterizing a middle to upper crustal shear zone: Microstructures, quartz c-axis fabrics, deformation temperatures and flow vorticity analysis of the northern Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenbin; Liu, Junlai; Zhang, Lisheng; Qi, Yinchuan; Ling, Chengyang

    2017-05-01

    Structural and microstructural characteristics, deformation temperatures and flow vorticities of the northern Ailao Shan (ALS) high-grade metamorphic belt provide significant information regarding the nature and tectonic evolution of the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) shear zone. Mineral deformation mechanisms, quartz lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) patterns and the opening angles of quartz c-axis fabrics of samples from the Gasa section indicate that the northern ALS high-grade metamorphic belt has experienced progressive shear deformation. The early stage shearing is characterized by a gradual decrease of deformation temperatures from >650 °C at the northeastern unit to ca. 300 °C at the southwestern unit, that results in the formation of migmatites, mylonitic gneisses, thin bedded mylonites, mylonitic schists and phyllonites from the NE to SW across the strike of the shear zone. The late stage low-temperature (300-400 °C) shearing is superimposed on the early deformation throughout the belt with the formation of discrete, small-scale shear zones, especially in the thin-banded mylonitic rocks along both margins. The kinematic vorticity values estimated by rotated rigid porphyroclast method and oblique grain-shaped/quartz c-axis-fabric method imply that the general shear-dominated flow (0.49-0.77) progressively changed to a simple shear-dominated flow (0.77-1) toward the late stage of ductile deformation. The two stages of shearing are consistent with early shortening-dominated and late extrusion-controlled regional tectonic processes. The transition between them occurred at ca. 27 Ma in the ALS high-grade metamorphic belt along the ASRR shear zone. The large amount of strike-slip displacement along the ASRR shear zone is predominantly attributed to accelerated flow along the shear zone during the late extrusion-controlled tectonic process.

  12. Soil moisture flow and nitrate transport through partially saturated zone considering mobile-immobile approach using 3D tank setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomar, J.; Yadav, B. K.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the soil water flow and nitrate movement through vadose zone considering mobile-immobile approach using large scale three dimensional (3D) tank setup. The three dimensional sand tank setup was fabricated having dimension of 60 cm length, 30 cm width and 60 cm height and embedded with horizontal and vertical layers of sampling ports. The tank was filled with a porous media of average size of 0.5 to 1.0 mm homogeneous and nitrate concentration of 300 mg/l was applied with a distributed constant water flux of 150ml/hr. at the top using a sprinkler system. Pore water samples were collected hourly from the sampling ports and were analyzed using UV-spectrophotometer. The soil hydraulic and solute transport parameters were deduced from the laboratory experiments for simulating the considered 3D domain using the mobile-immobile approach. Soil moisture flow and contaminant transport equations are numerically solved for simulating the nitrate movement in the tank setup. The simulated break through curves (BTC) show the nitrate movement is rapid in mobile region by a factor of 1.2 as compared with the immobile region. The results show that the mobile-immobile approach of predicting solute transport in variably saturated zone can be used effectively in field after getting the required parameters using the laboratory experiments under similar environmental conditions. The high concentration 130 ppm was observed in lateral and transverse axis at 05 cm depth. This results will help in further investigation in field and in implementation of decontamination techniques.

  13. Estimation of Unsaturated Zone Traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Using a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, Brian A.; Nimmo, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated

  14. Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

    2009-09-11

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travelmore » within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the

  15. Adaptive Traits Are Maintained on Steep Selective Gradients despite Gene Flow and Hybridization in the Intertidal Zone

    PubMed Central

    Canovas, Fernando; Ferreira Costa, Joana; Serrão, Ester A.; Pearson, Gareth A.

    2011-01-01

    Gene flow among hybridizing species with incomplete reproductive barriers blurs species boundaries, while selection under heterogeneous local ecological conditions or along strong gradients may counteract this tendency. Congeneric, externally-fertilizing fucoid brown algae occur as distinct morphotypes along intertidal exposure gradients despite gene flow. Combining analyses of genetic and phenotypic traits, we investigate the potential for physiological resilience to emersion stressors to act as an isolating mechanism in the face of gene flow. Along vertical exposure gradients in the intertidal zone of Northern Portugal and Northwest France, the mid-low shore species Fucus vesiculosus, the upper shore species Fucus spiralis, and an intermediate distinctive morphotype of F. spiralis var. platycarpus were morphologically characterized. Two diagnostic microsatellite loci recovered 3 genetic clusters consistent with prior morphological assignment. Phylogenetic analysis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms in 14 protein coding regions unambiguously resolved 3 clades; sympatric F. vesiculosus, F. spiralis, and the allopatric (in southern Iberia) population of F. spiralis var. platycarpus. In contrast, the sympatric F. spiralis var. platycarpus (from Northern Portugal) was distributed across the 3 clades, strongly suggesting hybridization/introgression with both other entities. Common garden experiments showed that physiological resilience following exposure to desiccation/heat stress differed significantly between the 3 sympatric genetic taxa; consistent with their respective vertical distribution on steep environmental clines in exposure time. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that F. spiralis var. platycarpus is a distinct entity in allopatry, but that extensive gene flow occurs with both higher and lower shore species in sympatry. Experimental results suggest that strong selection on physiological traits across steep intertidal exposure gradients acts to maintain

  16. Hierarchical random additive process and logarithmic scaling of generalized high order, two-point correlations in turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. I. A.; Marusic, I.; Meneveau, C.

    2016-06-01

    Townsend [Townsend, The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1976)] hypothesized that the logarithmic region in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows consists of space-filling, self-similar attached eddies. Invoking this hypothesis, we express streamwise velocity fluctuations in the inertial layer in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows as a hierarchical random additive process (HRAP): uz+=∑i=1Nzai . Here u is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, + indicates normalization in wall units, z is the wall normal distance, and ai's are independently, identically distributed random additives, each of which is associated with an attached eddy in the wall-attached hierarchy. The number of random additives is Nz˜ln(δ /z ) where δ is the boundary layer thickness and ln is natural log. Due to its simplified structure, such a process leads to predictions of the scaling behaviors for various turbulence statistics in the logarithmic layer. Besides reproducing known logarithmic scaling of moments, structure functions, and correlation function [" close="]3/2 <uz2(x ) uz2(x +r ) > uz(x ) uz(x +r ) >, new logarithmic laws in two-point statistics such as <uz3(x ) uz3(x +r ) > uz4(x ) > 1 /2, <uz(x ) uz5(x +r ) > 1/3, etc. can be derived using the HRAP formalism. Supporting empirical evidence for the logarithmic scaling in such statistics is found from the Melbourne High Reynolds Number Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel measurements. We also show that, at high Reynolds numbers, the above mentioned new logarithmic laws can be derived by assuming the arrival of an attached eddy at a generic point in the flow field to be a Poisson process [Woodcock and Marusic, Phys. Fluids 27, 015104 (2015), 10.1063/1.4905301]. Taken together, the results provide new evidence supporting the essential ingredients of the attached eddy hypothesis to describe streamwise velocity fluctuations of large, momentum transporting eddies in wall-bounded turbulence, while

  17. Diffuse-flow hydrothermal field in an oceanic fracture zone setting, Northeast Pacific: Deposit composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Koski, R.A.; Embley, R.W.; Reid, J.; Chang, S.-W.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first reported occurrence of an active hydrothermal field in an oceanic fracture zone setting. The hydrothermal field occurs in a pull-apart basin within the Blanco Fracture Zone (BFZ), which has four distinct mineral deposit types: (1) barite mounds and chimneys, (2) barite stockwork breccia, (3) silica-barite beds, and (4) silica, barite, and Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide in sediments. All deposit types contain minor amounts of sulfides. In barite stockwork, silica-barite beds, and mineralized sediment, Ba, Ph, Ag, S, Au, Zn, Cu, Hg, TI, As, Mo, Sb, U, Cd, and Cu are enriched relative to unmineralized rocks and sediments of the BFZ. Fe and Mn are not enriched in the barite stockwork or silica-barite beds, but along with P, Co, and Mg are enriched in the mineralized sediments. Silver contents in deposits of the hydrothermal field range up to 86 ppm, gold to 0.7 ppm, zinc to 3.2%, copper to 0.8%, and barium to 22%. Mineralization occurred by diffuse, low to intermediate temperature (mostly <250??C) discharge of hydrothermal fluids through pillow lavas and ponds of mixed volcaniclastic and biosiliceous sediments. Bacterial mats were mineralized by silica, barite, and minor Fe hydroxides, or less commonly, by Mn oxyhydroxides. Pervasive mineralization of bacterial mats resulted in formation of silica-barite beds. Silica precipitated from hydrothermal fluids by conductive cooling and mixing with seawater. Sulfate, U, and rare earth elements (REEs) in barite were derived from seawater, whereas the REE content of hydrothermal silica deposits and mineralized sediments is associated with the aluminosilicate detrital fraction. Fe-, Zn-, Cu-, Pb-, and Hg-sulfide minerals, Ba in barite, and Eu in all mineralized deposits were derived from hydrothermal fluids. Manganese oxides and associated elements (Co, Sb, Mo, W, Cl, and Cu) and Fe oxides and associated elements (Be, B, P, and Mo) precipitated as the result of mixing of hydrothermal fluids with seawater. ?? 2001 Canadian

  18. Sheet flow measurements on a surf-zone sandbar under shoaling and breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieras, R.; Puleo, J. A.; Cox, D. T.; Anderson, D. L.; Kim, Y.; Hsu, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    A large-scale experiment to quantify sheet flow processes over a sandbar under varying levels of wave steepness was conducted in the wave flume at Oregon State University's O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory. A fixed profile was constructed with concrete slabs anchored to the flume side walls, with the exception of the sandbar crest, where a steel pit was installed and filled with well-sorted sediment (d50 0.17 mm). This hybrid approach allowed for the isolation of small-scale bed response to large-scale wave forcing over the sandbar, where an array of sensors was positioned to measure hydrodynamic forcing and sediment response. Near-bed (< 3 cm above the bed) velocities were estimated using Nortek Vectrino-II profiling velocimeters, while sheet layer sediment concentration profiles (volumetric concentrations > 0.08 m3/m3) were approximated using Conductivity Concentration Profilers. Test conditions consisted of a regular wave train with incident wave heights for individual runs ranging from 0.4 m to 0.6 m and incident wave periods from 5 s to 9 s, encompassing a variety of skewed and asymmetric wave shapes across the shoaling and breaking regimes. Ensemble-averaged sediment concentration profiles exhibit considerable variation across the different conditions. The largest variation in sheet layer thickness occurs beneath the wave crest, ranging from 30 grain diameters for 5 sec, 0.4 m waves, up to 80 grain diameters for 7 sec, 0.6 m waves. Furthermore, the initiation and duration of sheet flow relative to the wave period differs for each condition set. It is likely that more than one mechanism plays a role in determining the aforementioned sheet layer characteristics. In the present work, we focus on the relative magnitude and phase of the near-bed flow acceleration and shear stress in determining the characteristics of the sheet layer.

  19. Harnessing electrical forces for separation. Capillary zone electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, field-flow fractionation, split-flow thin-cell continuous-separation and other techniques.

    PubMed

    Giddings, J C

    1989-10-20

    A simple analysis, first presented twenty years ago, showed that the effectiveness of a field-driven separation like electrophoresis, as expressed by the maximum number of theoretical plates (N), is given by the dimensionless ratio of two energies N = -delta mu ext/2RT in which -delta mu ext is the electrical potential energy drop of a charged species and RT is the thermal energy (R is the gas constant and T is the absolute temperature). Quantity -delta mu ext is the product of the force F acting on the species and the path length X of separation. The exceptional power of electrophoresis, for which often N approximately 10(6), can be traced directly to the enormous magnitude of the electrical force F. This paper explores the fundamentals underlying several different means for utilizing these powerful electrical forces for separation, including capillary zone electrophoresis, gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, electrical field-flow fractionation and split-flow thin continuous separation cells. Remarkably, the above equation and its relatives are found to describe the approximate performance of all these diverse electrically driven systems. Factors affecting both the resolving power and separation speed of the systems are addressed; from these considerations some broad optimization criteria emerge. The capabilities of the different methods are compared using numerical examples.

  20. Radiocarbon dates for lava flows from northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hilo 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan-Banks, J. M.; Lockwood, J.P.; Rubin, M.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-eight 14C analyses are reported for carbonized roots and other plant material collected from beneath 15 prehistoric lava flows erupted from the northeast rift zone (NERZ) of Mauna Loa Volcano (ML). The new 14C dates establish ages for 13 previously undated lava flows, and correct or add to information previously reported. Limiting ages on other flows that lie either above or below the dated flows are also established. These dates help to unravel the eruptive history of ML's NERZ. -from Authors

  1. Ambient groundwater flow diminishes nitrate processing in the hyporheic zone of streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizian, Morvarid; Boano, Fulvio; Cook, Perran L. M.; Detwiler, Russell L.; Rippy, Megan A.; Grant, Stanley B.

    2017-05-01

    Modeling and experimental studies demonstrate that ambient groundwater reduces hyporheic exchange, but the implications of this observation for stream N-cycling is not yet clear. Here we utilize a simple process-based model (the Pumping and Streamline Segregation or PASS model) to evaluate N-cycling over two scales of hyporheic exchange (fluvial ripples and riffle-pool sequences), ten ambient groundwater and stream flow scenarios (five gaining and losing conditions and two stream discharges), and three biogeochemical settings (identified based on a principal component analysis of previously published measurements in streams throughout the United States). Model-data comparisons indicate that our model provides realistic estimates for direct denitrification of stream nitrate, but overpredicts nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification. Riffle-pool sequences are responsible for most of the N-processing, despite the fact that fluvial ripples generate 3-11 times more hyporheic exchange flux. Across all scenarios, hyporheic exchange flux and the Damköhler Number emerge as primary controls on stream N-cycling; the former regulates trafficking of nutrients and oxygen across the sediment-water interface, while the latter quantifies the relative rates of organic carbon mineralization and advective transport in streambed sediments. Vertical groundwater flux modulates both of these master variables in ways that tend to diminish stream N-cycling. Thus, anthropogenic perturbations of ambient groundwater flows (e.g., by urbanization, agricultural activities, groundwater mining, and/or climate change) may compromise some of the key ecosystem services provided by streams.

  2. Numerical 3D flow simulation of ultrasonic horns with attached cavitation structures and assessment of flow aggressiveness and cavitation erosion sensitive wall zones.

    PubMed

    Mottyll, Stephan; Skoda, Romuald

    2016-07-01

    As a contribution to a better understanding of cavitation erosion mechanisms, a compressible inviscid finite volume flow solver with barotropic homogeneous liquid-vapor mixture cavitation model is applied to ultrasonic horn set-ups with and without stationary specimen, that exhibit attached cavitation at the horn tip. Void collapses and shock waves, which are closely related to cavitation erosion, are resolved. The computational results are compared to hydrophone, shadowgraphy and erosion test data. At the horn tip, vapor volume and topology, subharmonic oscillation frequency as well as the amplitude of propagating pressure waves are in good agreement with experimental data. For the evaluation of flow aggressiveness and the assessment of erosion sensitive wall zones, statistical analyses of wall loads and of the multiplicity of distinct collapses in wall-adjacent flow regions are applied to the horn tip and the stationary specimen. An a posteriori projection of load collectives, i.e. cumulative collapse rate vs. collapse pressure, onto a reference grid eliminates the grid dependency effectively for attached cavitation at the horn tip, whereas a significant grid dependency remains at the stationary specimen. The load collectives show an exponential decrease towards higher collapse pressures. Erosion sensitive wall zones are well predicted for both, horn tip and stationary specimen, and load profiles are in good qualitative agreement with measured topography profiles of eroded duplex stainless steel samples after long-term runs. For the considered amplitude and gap width according to ASTM G32-10 standard, the analysis of load collectives reveals that the distinctive erosive ring shape at the horn tip can be attributed to frequent breakdown and re-development of a small portion of the tip-attached cavity. This partial breakdown of the attached cavity repeats at each driving cycle and is associated with relatively moderate collapse peak pressures, whereas the

  3. Fracturing of doleritic intrusions and associated contact zones: Implications for fluid flow in volcanic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, Kim; Buckley, Simon J.; Chevallier, Luc; Fagereng, Åke; Galland, Olivier; Kurz, Tobias H.; Ogata, Kei; Planke, Sverre; Tveranger, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Igneous intrusions act as both carriers and barriers to subsurface fluid flow and are therefore expected to significantly influence the distribution and migration of groundwater and hydrocarbons in volcanic basins. Given the low matrix permeability of igneous rocks, the effective permeability in- and around intrusions is intimately linked to the characteristics of their associated fracture networks. Natural fracturing is caused by numerous processes including magma cooling, thermal contraction, magma emplacement and mechanical disturbance of the host rock. Fracturing may be locally enhanced along intrusion-host rock interfaces, at dyke-sill junctions, or at the base of curving sills, thereby potentially enhancing permeability associated with these features. In order to improve our understanding of fractures associated with intrusive bodies emplaced in sedimentary host rocks, we have investigated a series of outcrops from the Karoo Basin of the Eastern Cape province of South Africa, where the siliciclastic Burgersdorp Formation has been intruded by various intrusions (thin dykes, mid-sized sheet intrusions and thick sills) belonging to the Karoo dolerite. We present a quantified analysis of fracturing in- and around these igneous intrusions based on five outcrops at three individual study sites, utilizing a combination of field data, high-resolution lidar virtual outcrop models and image processing. Our results show a significant difference between the three sites in terms of fracture orientation. The observed differences can be attributed to contrasting intrusion geometries, outcrop geometry (for lidar data) and tectonic setting. Two main fracture sets were identified in the dolerite at two of the sites, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the contact respectively. Fracture spacing was consistent between the three sites, and exhibits a higher degree of variation in the dolerites compared to the host rock. At one of the study sites, fracture frequency in the

  4. Calibration of water distribution network of the Ramnagar zone in Nagpur City using online pressure and flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, Ramrao D.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2018-03-01

    Calibration of hydraulic model of a water distribution network is required to match the model results of flows and pressures with those obtained in the field. This is a challenging task considering the involvement of a large number of parameters. Having more precise data helps in reducing time and results in better calibration as shown herein with a case study of one hydraulic zone served from the Ramnagar Ground Service Reservoir in Nagpur City. Flow and pressure values for the entire day were obtained through data loggers. Network details regarding pipe lengths, diameters, installation year and material were obtained with the largest possible accuracy. Locations of consumers on the network were noted and average nodal consumptions were obtained from the billing records. The non-revenue water losses were uniformly allocated to all junctions. Valve positions and their operating status were noted from the field and used. The pipe roughness coefficients were adjusted to match the model values with field values of pressures at observation nodes by minimizing the sum of square of difference between them. This paper aims at describing the entire process from collection of the required data to the calibration of the network.

  5. Splay Fault Branching from the Hikurangi Subduction Shear Zone: Implications for Slow Slip and Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrys, S. A.; Plaza-Faverola, A. A.; Pecher, I. A.; Klaeschen, D.; Wallace, L.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic reflection data along the East Coast of the New Zealand North Island are used to map the offshore character and geometry of the central Hikurangi subduction thrust and outer wedge in a region of short term ( 2-3 weeks duration) geodetically determined slow-slip events (SSEs). Pre-stack depth migration of line 05CM-38 was used to derive subducting slab geometry and upper crustal structure together with a Vp image of the crust that is resolved to 14 km depth. The subduction interface is a shallow dipping thrust at < 7 km deep near the trench and steps down to 14 km depth along an approximately 18 km long ramp, beneath Porangahau Ridge. This bend in the subducted plate is associated with splay fault branching and coincides with the zone of maximum slip (90 mm) inferred on the subduction interface during slow slip events in June and July 2011. We infer that the step down in the décollement transfers slip on the plate interface from the top of subducting sediments to the oceanic crust and drives underplating beneath the inner margin of central Hikurangi margin. Low-velocity subducting sediments (LVZ) beneath the plate interface, updip of the plate interface ramp, are interpreted as being capped with a low permeability condensed layer of chalk and interbedded mudstones. We interpret this LVZ as fluid-rich overpressured sediments that have been displaced and later imbricated by splay faults in a region that may mark the up-dip transition from seismic to aseismic behavior. Further, we hypothesize that fluids derived from the overpressured sediment are channeled along splay faults to the shallow sub-seafloor near Porangahau Ridge where seafloor seepage and an upwarping of the gas hydrate Bottom-Simulating Reflector have been documented.

  6. Thermally driven mass flows in the convection zone of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijkhuis, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    A formulation of the fluid dynamics of convective regions is developed which leads to an analytical description of the solar rotation, the Evershed flow, and the supergranulation. The starting point of the present formulation is the mixing length picture of convective equilibrium, but the earlier point mass model for convective molecules is replaced here by a model with both inertia and intrinsic moment of inertia. This extension introduces three rotational degrees of freedom into the dynamics of individual convective molecules, which enter into the dynamical equations for a mixing length fluid in the form of a separate vector field which we term the spin field. It is shown that for convective molecules having a spherically symmetric mass distribution, the spin field is proportional to the local vorticity.

  7. Water, heat, and vapor flow in a deep vadose zone under arid and hyper-arid conditions: a numerical study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Raneem; de Rooij, Gerrit H.

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater recharge in arid regions is notoriously difficult to quantify. One reason is data scarcity: reliable weather records (rainfall, potential evapotranspiration rate, temperature) are typically lacking, the soil properties over the entire extent of the often very deep vadose zone are usually unknown, and the effect of sparse vegetation, wadis, (biological) soil crusts, and hard pans on infiltration and evaporation is difficult to quantify. Another reason is the difficulty of modeling the intricately coupled relevant processes over extended periods of time: coupled flow of liquid water, water vapor, and heat in a very deep soil in view of considerable uncertainty at the soil surface as indicated above, and over large spatial extents. In view of this myriad of problems, we limited ourselves to the simulation of 1-dimensional coupled flow of water, heat, and vapor in an unvegetated deep vadose zone. The conventional parameterizations of the soil hydraulic properties perform poorly under very dry conditions. We therefore selected an alternative that was developed specifically for dry circumstances and modified another to eliminate the physically implausible residual water content that rendered it of limited use for desert environments. The issue of data scarcity was resolved by using numerically generated rainfall records combined with a simple model for annual and daily temperature fluctuations. The soil was uniform, and the groundwater depth was constant at 100 m depth, which provided the lower boundary condition. The geothermal gradient determined the temperature at the groundwater level. We generated two scenarios with 120 years of weather in an arid and a hyper-arid climate. The initial condition was established by first starting with a somewhat arbitrary unit gradient initial condition corresponding to a small fraction of the annual average rainfall and let the model run through the 120-year atmospheric forcing. The resulting profile of matric potential

  8. TOMOGRAPHY OF PLASMA FLOWS IN THE UPPER SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE USING TIME-DISTANCE INVERSION COMBINING RIDGE AND PHASE-SPEED FILTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Svanda, Michal, E-mail: michal@astronomie.cz; Astronomical Institute, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8

    2013-09-20

    The consistency of time-distance inversions for horizontal components of the plasma flow on supergranular scales in the upper solar convection zone is checked by comparing the results derived using two k-{omega} filtering procedures-ridge filtering and phase-speed filtering-commonly used in time-distance helioseismology. I show that both approaches result in similar flow estimates when finite-frequency sensitivity kernels are used. I further demonstrate that the performance of the inversion improves (in terms of a simultaneously better averaging kernel and a lower noise level) when the two approaches are combined together in one inversion. Using the combined inversion, I invert for horizontal flows inmore » the upper 10 Mm of the solar convection zone. The flows connected with supergranulation seem to be coherent only for the top {approx}5 Mm; deeper down there is a hint of change of the convection scales toward structures larger than supergranules.« less

  9. Soil CO2 emissions as a proxy for heat and mass flow assessment, Taupō Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bloomberg, S.; Werner, Cynthia A.; Rissmann, C.F.; Mazot, A.; Horton, Travis B.; Gravley, D; Kennedy, B.; Oze, C

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of heat and mass flow between deep reservoirs and the surface is important for understanding magmatic and hydrothermal systems. Here, we use high-resolution measurement of carbon dioxide flux (φCO2) and heat flow at the surface to characterize the mass (CO2 and steam) and heat released to the atmosphere from two magma-hydrothermal systems. Our soil gas and heat flow surveys at Rotokawa and White Island in the Taupō Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, include over 3000 direct measurements of φCO2 and soil temperature and 60 carbon isotopic values on soil gases. Carbon dioxide flux was separated into background and magmatic/hydrothermal populations based on the measured values and isotopic characterization. Total CO2 emission rates (ΣCO2) of 441 ± 84 t d−1 and 124 ± 18 t d−1were calculated for Rotokawa (2.9 km2) and for the crater floor at White Island (0.3 km2), respectively. The total CO2 emissions differ from previously published values by +386 t d−1 at Rotokawa and +25 t d−1 at White Island, demonstrating that earlier research underestimated emissions by 700% (Rotokawa) and 25% (White Island). These differences suggest that soil CO2 emissions facilitate more robust estimates of the thermal energy and mass flux in geothermal systems than traditional approaches. Combining the magmatic/hydrothermal-sourced CO2 emission (constrained using stable isotopes) with reservoir H2O:CO2mass ratios and the enthalpy of evaporation, the surface expression of thermal energy release for the Rotokawa hydrothermal system (226 MWt) is 10 times greater than the White Island crater floor (22.5 MWt).

  10. A morphologic proxy for debris flow erosion with application to the earthquake deformation cycle, Cascadia Subduction Zone, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penserini, Brian D.; Roering, Joshua J.; Streig, Ashley

    2017-04-01

    In unglaciated steeplands, valley reaches dominated by debris flow scour and incision set landscape form as they often account for > 80% of valley network length and relief. While hillslope and fluvial process models have frequently been combined with digital topography to develop morphologic proxies for erosion rate and drainage divide migration, debris-flow-dominated networks, despite their ubiquity, have not been exploited for this purpose. Here, we applied an empirical function that describes how slope-area data systematically deviate from so-called fluvial power-law behavior at small drainage areas. Using airborne LiDAR data for 83 small ( 1 km2) catchments in the western Oregon Coast Range, we quantified variation in model parameters and observed that the curvature of the power-law scaling deviation varies with catchment-averaged erosion rate estimated from cosmogenic nuclides in stream sediments. Given consistent climate and lithology across our study area and assuming steady erosion, we used this calibrated denudation-morphology relationship to map spatial patterns of long-term uplift for our study catchments. By combining our predicted pattern of long-term uplift rate with paleoseismic and geodetic (tide gauge, GPS, and leveling) data, we estimated the spatial distribution of coseismic subsidence experienced during megathrust earthquakes along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Our estimates of coseismic subsidence near the coast (0.4 to 0.7 m for earthquake recurrence intervals of 300 to 500 years) agree with field measurements from numerous stratigraphic studies. Our results also demonstrate that coseismic subsidence decreases inland to negligible values > 25 km from the coast, reflecting the diminishing influence of the earthquake deformation cycle on vertical changes of the interior coastal ranges. More generally, our results demonstrate that debris flow valley networks serve as highly localized, yet broadly distributed indicators of erosion (and rock

  11. Origin and emplacement of the andesite of Burroughs Mountain, a zoned, large-volume lava flow at Mount Rainier, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockstill, K.R.; Vogel, T.A.; Sisson, T.W.

    2002-01-01

    Burroughs Mountain, situated at the northeast foot of Mount Rainier, WA, exposes a large-volume (3.4 km3) andesitic lava flow, up to 350 m thick and extending 11 km in length. Two sampling traverses from flow base to eroded top, over vertical sections of 245 and 300 m, show that the flow consists of a felsic lower unit (100 m thick) overlain sharply by a more mafic upper unit. The mafic upper unit is chemically zoned, becoming slightly more evolved upward; the lower unit is heterogeneous and unzoned. The lower unit is also more phenocryst-rich and locally contains inclusions of quenched basaltic andesite magma that are absent from the upper unit. Widespread, vuggy, gabbronorite-to-diorite inclusions may be fragments of shallow cumulates, exhumed from the Mount Rainier magmatic system. Chemically heterogeneous block-and-ash-flow deposits that conformably underlie the lava flow were the earliest products of the eruptive episode. The felsic-mafic-felsic progression in lava composition resulted from partial evacuation of a vertically-zoned magma reservoir, in which either (1) average depth of withdrawal increased, then decreased, during eruption, perhaps due to variations in effusion rate, or (2) magmatic recharge stimulated ascent of a plume that brought less evolved magma to shallow levels at an intermediate stage of the eruption. Pre-eruptive zonation resulted from combined crystallization- differentiation and intrusion(s) of less evolved magma into the partly crystallized resident magma body. The zoned lava flow at Burroughs Mountain shows that, at times, Mount Rainier's magmatic system has developed relatively large, shallow reservoirs that, despite complex recharge events, were capable of developing a felsic-upward compositional zonation similar to that inferred from large ash-flow sheets and other zoned lava flows. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Vadose Zone Flow and Transport of Dissolved Organic Carbon at Multiple Scales in Humid Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Philip M; Mayes, Melanie; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2006-06-01

    Scientists must embrace the necessity to offset global CO{sub 2} emissions regardless of politics. Efforts to enhance terrestrial organic carbon sequestration have traditionally focused on aboveground biomass and surface soils. An unexplored potential exists in thick lower horizons of widespread, mature soils such as Alfisols, Ultisols, and Oxisols. We present a case study of fate and transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a highly weathered Ultisol, involving spatial scales from the laboratory to the landscape. Our objectives were to interpret processes observed at various scales and provide an improved understanding of coupled hydrogeochemical mechanisms that control DOC mobility andmore » sequestration in deep subsoils within humid climatic regimes. Our approach is multiscale, using laboratory-scale batch and soil columns (0.2 by 1.0 m), an in situ pedon (2 by 2 by 3 m), a well-instrumented subsurface facility on a subwatershed (0.47 ha), and ephemeral and perennial stream discharge at the landscape scale (38.4 ha). Laboratory-scale experiments confirmed that lower horizons have the propensity to accumulate DOC, but that preferential fracture flow tends to limit sequestration. Intermediate-scale experiments demonstrated the beneficial effects of C diffusion into soil micropores. Field- and landscape-scale studies demonstrated coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological mechanisms that limit DOC sequestration, and their sensitivity to local environmental conditions. Our results suggest a multi-scale approach is necessary to assess the propensity of deep subsoils to sequester organic C in situ. By unraveling fundamental organic C sequestration mechanisms, we improve the conceptual and quantitative understanding needed to predict and alter organic C budgets in soil systems.« less

  13. Simulation of groundwater flow pathlines and freshwater/saltwater transition zone movement, Manhasset Neck, Nassau County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misut, Paul; Aphale, Omkar

    2014-01-01

    A density-dependent groundwater flow and solute transport model of Manhasset Neck, Long Island, New York, was used to analyze (1) the effects of seasonal stress on the position of the freshwater/saltwater transition zone and (2) groundwater flowpaths. The following were used in the simulation: 182 transient stress periods, representing the historical record from 1920 to 2011, and 44 transient stress periods, representing future hypothetical conditions from 2011 to 2030. Simulated water-level and salinity (chloride concentration) values are compared with values from a previously developed two-stress-period (1905–1944 and 1945–2005) model. The 182-stress-period model produced salinity (chloride concentration) values that more accurately matched the observed salinity (chloride concentration) values in response to hydrologic stress than did the two-stress-period model, and salinity ranged from zero to about 3 parts per thousand (equivalent to zero to 1,660 milligrams per liter chloride). The 182-stress-period model produced improved calibration statistics of water-level measurements made throughout the study area than did the two-stress-period model, reducing the Lloyd aquifer root mean square error from 7.0 to 5.2 feet. Decreasing horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities (fixed anisotropy ratio) of the Lloyd and North Shore aquifers by 20 percent resulted in nearly doubling the simulated salinity(chloride concentration) increase at Port Washington observation well N12508. Groundwater flowpath analysis was completed for 24 production wells to delineate water source areas. The freshwater/saltwater transition zone moved toward and(or) away from wells during future hypothetical scenarios.

  14. Fractional flow reserve-guided revascularization: practical implications of a diagnostic gray zone and measurement variability on clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Petraco, Ricardo; Sen, Sayan; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Echavarria-Pinto, Mauro; Escaned, Javier; Francis, Darrel P; Davies, Justin E

    2013-03-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effects of fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement variability on FFR-guided treatment strategy. Current appropriateness guidelines recommend the utilization of FFR to guide coronary revascularization based on a fixed cut-off of 0.8. This rigid approach does not take into account the intrinsic biological variability of a single FFR result and the clinical judgment of experienced interventional cardiologists. [corrected]. FFR reproducibility data from the landmark Deferral Versus Performance of PTCA in Patients Without Documented Ischemia (DEFER) trial was analyzed (two repeated FFR measurements in the same lesion, 10 min apart) and the standard deviation of the difference (SDD) between repeated measurements was calculated. The measurement certainty (probability that the FFR-guided revascularization strategy will not change if the test is repeated 10 min later) was subsequently established across the whole range of FFR values, from 0.2 to 1. Outside the [0.75 to 0.85] FFR range, measurement certainty of a single FFR result is >95%. However, closer to its cut-off, certainty falls to less than 80% within 0.77 to 0.83, reaching a nadir of 50% around 0.8. In clinical practice, that means that each time a single FFR value falls between 0.75 and 0.85, there is a chance that the FFR-derived revascularization recommendation will change if the measurement is repeated 10 min later, with this chance increasing the closer the FFR result is to 0.8. A measurement FFR gray-zone is found between 0.75 and 0.85]. Therefore, clinicians should make revascularization decisions based on broadened clinical judgment when a single FFR result falls within this uncertainty zone, particularly between 0.77 and 0.83, when measurement certainty falls to less than 80%. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Free-Flow Zone Electrophoresis of Peptides and Proteins in PDMS Microchip for Narrow pI Range Sample Prefractionation Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yong-Ak; Chan, Michael; Celio, Chris; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Wishnok, John S.; Han, Jongyoon

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we are evaluating the strategy of sorting peptides / proteins based on the charge to mass without resorting to ampholytes and / or isoelectric focusing, using a single- and two-step free-flow zone electrophoresis. We developed a simple fabrication method to create a salt bridge for free-flow zone electrophoresis in PDMS chips by surface printing a hydrophobic layer on a glass substrate. Since the surface-printed hydrophobic layer prevents plasma bonding between the PDMS chip and the substrate, an electrical junction gap can be created for free-flow zone electrophoresis. With this device, we demonstrated a separation of positive and negative peptides and proteins at a given pH in standard buffer systems, and validated the sorting result with LC/MS. Furthermore, we coupled two sorting steps via off-chip titration, and isolated peptides within specific pI ranges from sample mixtures, where the pI range was simply set by the pH values of the buffer solutions. This free-flow zone electrophoresis sorting device, with its simplicity of fabrication, and a sorting resolution of 0.5 pH unit, can potentially be a high-throughput sample fractionation tool for targeted proteomics using LC/MS. PMID:20163146

  16. Utilizing High-Performance Computing to Investigate Parameter Sensitivity of an Inversion Model for Vadose Zone Flow and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Ward, A. L.; Fang, Y.; Yabusaki, S.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution geologic models have proven effective in improving the accuracy of subsurface flow and transport predictions. However, many of the parameters in subsurface flow and transport models cannot be determined directly at the scale of interest and must be estimated through inverse modeling. A major challenge, particularly in vadose zone flow and transport, is the inversion of the highly-nonlinear, high-dimensional problem as current methods are not readily scalable for large-scale, multi-process models. In this paper we describe the implementation of a fully automated approach for addressing complex parameter optimization and sensitivity issues on massively parallel multi- and many-core systems. The approach is based on the integration of PNNL's extreme scale Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (eSTOMP) simulator, which uses the Global Array toolkit, with the Beowulf-Cluster inspired parallel nonlinear parameter estimation software, BeoPEST in the MPI mode. In the eSTOMP/BeoPEST implementation, a pre-processor generates all of the PEST input files based on the eSTOMP input file. Simulation results for comparison with observations are extracted automatically at each time step eliminating the need for post-process data extractions. The inversion framework was tested with three different experimental data sets: one-dimensional water flow at Hanford Grass Site; irrigation and infiltration experiment at the Andelfingen Site; and a three-dimensional injection experiment at Hanford's Sisson and Lu Site. Good agreements are achieved in all three applications between observations and simulations in both parameter estimates and water dynamics reproduction. Results show that eSTOMP/BeoPEST approach is highly scalable and can be run efficiently with hundreds or thousands of processors. BeoPEST is fault tolerant and new nodes can be dynamically added and removed. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to use high-resolution geologic models to preserve

  17. Sedimentology of the Larissa ophicalcite breccias: Mass flow deposits in a Tethyan Ocean-Continent Transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kati, M.; Magganas, A.; Melfos, V.; Voudouris, P.

    2009-04-01

    The ophicalcite breccias in the Larissa area, Central Greece, comprise part of the Eohellenic nappe that overthrusts the Pelagonian Zone and which represents a Mesozoic continental fragment of Gondwana. They are enveloped by imbricated serpentinites that overlie amphibolite and greenschists and structurally underlie crystalline limestones of the Upper Cretaceous age. Although these breccias have suffered hydrothermal and/or low grade metamorphism, most of their original sedimentary structures have been remarkably preserved, thus providing valuable information about their depositional conditions and mechanisms. The ophicalcite breccias consist primarily of serpentinite and secondarily carbonate clasts. Some of various dispersed clasts, which are composed of gneissic rocks, granite together with a few fossiliferous carbonates, are considered as belonging to the Pelagonian continental basement. The matrix percentage ranges widely resulting in the development from grain-supported fabrics with clasts cemented by sparry calcite to matrix-supported fabrics, where the clasts are embedded in a light green to brownish/red matrix made of serpentinite, calcite and some iron oxides. Though the ophicalcite breccias give the overall appearance of being structureless and disordered, nevertheless, the local presence of particular primary and diagenetic structures combined with essential changes in the distribution of the components throughout the formation have led to the identification of three distinctive units showing evidence of deposition by different gravity-induced mass flow processes. Accordingly, in the lower unit observation has been made of repeated alternations of finer- and coarser-grained beds with thickening- and coarsening-upward organization and clear reverse grading of their constituents in the latter, indicating that they were deposited by sediment gravity flow processes and specifically grain flows. In the intermediate unit comprising the major part of the

  18. Water flow and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum: Upscaling from rhizosphere to root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarovitch, Naftali; Perelman, Adi; Guerra, Helena; Vanderborght, Jan; Pohlmeier, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Root water and nutrient uptake are among the most important processes considered in numerical models simulating water content and fluxes in the subsurface, as they control plant growth and production as well as water flow and nutrient transport out of the root zone. Root water uptake may lead to salt accumulation at the root-soil interface, resulting in rhizophere salt concentrations much higher than in the bulk soil. This salt accumulation is caused by soluble salt transport towards the roots by mass flow through the soil, followed by preferential adsorption of specific nutrients by active uptake, thereby excluding most other salts at the root-soil interface or in the root apoplast. The salinity buildup can lead to large osmotic pressure gradients across the roots thereby effectively reducing root water uptake. The initial results from rhizoslides (capillary paper growth system) show that sodium concentration is decreasing with distance from the root, compared with the bulk that remained more stable. When transpiration rate was decreased under high salinity levels, sodium concentration was more homogenous compared with low salinity levels. Additionally, sodium and gadolinium distributions were measured nondestructively around tomato roots using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This technique could also observe the root structure and water content around single roots. Results from the MRI confirm the solutes concentration pattern around roots and its relation to their initial concentration. We conclude that local water potentials at the soil-root interface differ from bulk potentials. These relative differences increase with decreasing root density, decreasing initial salt concentration and increasing transpiration rate. Furthermore, since climate may significantly influence plant response to salinity a dynamic climate-coupled salinity reduction functions are critical in while using macroscopic numerical models.

  19. Blueschist preservation in a retrograded, high-pressure, low-temperature metamorphic terrane, Tinos, Greece: Implications for fluid flow paths in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeding, Christopher M.; Ague, Jay J.; BröCker, Michael; Bolton, Edward W.

    2003-01-01

    The preservation of high-pressure, low-temperature (HP-LT) mineral assemblages adjacent to marble unit contacts on the Cycladic island of Tinos in Greece was investigated using a new type of digital outcrop mapping and numerical modeling of metamorphic fluid infiltration. Mineral assemblage distributions in a large blueschist outcrop, adjacent to the basal contact of a 150-meter thick marble horizon, were mapped at centimeter-scale resolution onto digital photographs using a belt-worn computer and graphics editing software. Digital mapping reveals that while most HP-LT rocks in the outcrop were pervasively retrograded to greenschist facies, the marble-blueschist contact zone underwent an even more intense retrogression. Preservation of HP-LT mineral assemblages was mainly restricted to a 10-15 meter zone (or enclave) adjacent to the intensely retrograded lithologic contact. The degree and distribution of the retrograde overprint suggests that pervasively infiltrating fluids were channelized into the marble-blueschist contact and associated veins and flowed around the preserved HP-LT enclave. Numerical modeling of Darcian flow, based on the field observations, suggests that near the marble horizon, deflections in fluid flow paths caused by flow channelization along the high-permeability marble-blueschist contact zone likely resulted in very large fluid fluxes along the lithologic contact and significantly smaller fluxes (as much as 8 times smaller than the input flux) within the narrow, low-flux regions where HP-LT minerals were preserved adjacent to the contact. Our results indicate that lithologic contacts are important conduits for metamorphic fluid flow in subduction zones. Channelization of retrograde fluids into these discrete flow conduits played a critical role in the preservation of HP-LT assemblages.

  20. Ecological differentiation, lack of hybrids involving diploids, and asymmetric gene flow between polyploids in narrow contact zones of Senecio carniolicus (syn. Jacobaea carniolica, Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Hülber, Karl; Sonnleitner, Michaela; Suda, Jan; Krejčíková, Jana; Schönswetter, Peter; Schneeweiss, Gerald M; Winkler, Manuela

    2015-03-01

    Areas of immediate contact of different cytotypes offer a unique opportunity to study evolutionary dynamics within heteroploid species and to assess isolation mechanisms governing coexistence of cytotypes of different ploidy. The degree of reproductive isolation of cytotypes, that is, the frequency of heteroploid crosses and subsequent formation of viable and (partly) fertile hybrids, plays a crucial role for the long-term integrity of lineages in contact zones. Here, we assessed fine-scale distribution, spatial clustering, and ecological niches as well as patterns of gene flow in parental and hybrid cytotypes in zones of immediate contact of di-, tetra-, and hexaploid Senecio carniolicus (Asteraceae) in the Eastern Alps. Cytotypes were spatially separated also at the investigated microscale; the strongest spatial separation was observed for the fully interfertile tetra- and hexaploids. The three main cytotypes showed highly significant niche differences, which were, however, weaker than across their entire distribution ranges in the Eastern Alps. Individuals with intermediate ploidy levels were found neither in the diploid/tetraploid nor in the diploid/hexaploid contact zones indicating strong reproductive barriers. In contrast, pentaploid individuals were frequent in the tetraploid/hexaploid contact zone, albeit limited to a narrow strip in the immediate contact zone of their parental cytotypes. AFLP fingerprinting data revealed introgressive gene flow mediated by pentaploid hybrids from tetra- to hexaploid individuals, but not vice versa. The ecological niche of pentaploids differed significantly from that of tetraploids but not from hexaploids.

  1. Free-Surface flow dynamics and its effect on travel time distribution in unsaturated fractured zones - findings from analogue percolation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noffz, Torsten; Kordilla, Jannes; Dentz, Marco; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Flow in unsaturated fracture networks constitutes a high potential for rapid mass transport and can therefore possibly contributes to the vulnerability of aquifer systems. Numerical models are generally used to predict flow and transport and have to reproduce various complex effects of gravity-driven flow dynamics. However, many classical volume-effective modelling approaches often do not grasp the non-linear free surface flow dynamics and partitioning behaviour at fracture intersections in unsaturated fracture networks. Better process understanding can be obtained by laboratory experiments, that isolate single aspects of the mass partitioning process, which influence travel time distributions and allow possible cross-scale applications. We present a series of percolation experiments investigating partitioning dynamics of unsaturated multiphase flow at an individual horizontal fracture intersection. A high precision multichannel dispenser is used to establish gravity-driven free surface flow on a smooth and vertical PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) surface at rates ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 mL/min to obtain various flow modes (droplets; rivulets). Cubes with dimensions 20 x 20 x 20 cm are used to create a set of simple geometries. A digital balance provides continuous real-time cumulative mass bypassing the network. The influence of variable flow rate, atmospheric pressure and temperature on the stability of flow modes is shown in single-inlet experiments. Droplet and rivulet flow are delineated and a transition zone exhibiting mixed flow modes can be determined. Furthermore, multi-inlet setups with constant total inflow rates are used to reduce variance and the effect of erratic free-surface flow dynamics. Investigated parameters include: variable aperture widths df, horizontal offsets dv of the vertical fracture surface and alternating injection methods for both droplet and rivulet flow. Repetitive structures with several horizontal fractures extend arrival times

  2. Calibrated heat flow model for the determination of different heat-affected zones in single-pass laser-cut CFRP using a cw CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, P.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Speker, N.; Sommer, B.; Graf, T.

    2015-03-01

    Laser machining has great potential for automated manufacturing of parts made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) due to the nearly force and tool-wear free processing. The high vaporization temperatures and the large heat conductivity of the carbon fibers, however, lead to unintentional heat conduction into the material causing damage in zones close to the process. In this paper, the matrix damage zone (MDZ) is subdivided into a matrix sublimation zone (MSZ) where the matrix material was sublimated and a zone where the temperature temporarily exceeded a value causing structural damage in the matrix. In order to investigate the extent of these zones, a one-dimensional heat flow model was applied, which was calibrated by cutting experiments using temperature sensors embedded in the CFRP samples. The investigations showed that the extents of the MSZ and MDZ are dominated by a total interaction time, which includes the passage of the laser beam and the continued interaction of the cloud of hot ablation products with the carbon fibers at the kerf wall and that from a practical point of view, the experimentally determined effective heat conductivity is suitable for simple estimations of the heat-affected zones in CFRP.

  3. Effects of flow dynamics on the aquatic-terrestrial transition zone (ATTZ) of lower Missouri river sandbars with implications for selected biota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracy-Smith, Emily; Galat, David L.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Sandbars are an important aquatic terrestrial transition zone (ATTZ) in the active channel of rivers that provide a variety of habitat conditions for riverine biota. Channelization and flow regulation in many large rivers have diminished sandbar habitats and their rehabilitation is a priority. We developed sandbar-specific models of discharge-area relationships to determine how changes in flow regime affect the area of different habitat types within the submerged sandbar ATTZ (depth) and exposed sandbar ATTZ (elevation) for a representative sample of Lower Missouri River sandbars. We defined six different structural habitat types within the sandbar ATTZ based on depth or exposed elevation ranges that are important to different biota during at least part of their annual cycle for either survival or reproduction. Scenarios included the modelled natural flow regime, current managed flow regime and two environmental flow options, all modelled within the contemporary river active channel. Thirteen point and wing-dike sandbars were evaluated under four different flow scenarios to explore the effects of flow regime on seasonal habitat availability for foraging of migratory shorebirds and wading birds, nesting of softshell turtles and nursery of riverine fishes. Managed flows provided more foraging habitat for shorebirds and wading birds and more nursery habitat for riverine fishes within the channelized reach sandbar ATTZ than the natural flow regime or modelled environmental flows. Reduced summer flows occurring under natural and environmental flow alternatives increased exposed sandbar nesting habitat for softshell turtle hatchling emergence. Results reveal how management of channelized and flow regulated large rivers could benefit from a modelling framework that couples hydrologic and geomorphic characteristics to predict habitat conditions for a variety of biota.

  4. Characterization of fractures and flow zones in a contaminated crystalline-rock aquifer in the Tylerville section of Haddam, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Carole D.; Kiel, Kristal F.; Joesten, Peter K.; Pappas, Katherine L.

    2016-10-04

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, investigated the characteristics of the bedrock aquifer in the Tylerville section of Haddam, Connecticut, from June to August 2014. As part of this investigation, geophysical logs were collected from six water-supply wells and were analyzed to (1) identify well construction, (2) determine the rock type and orientation of the foliation and layering of the rock, (3) characterize the depth and orientation of fractures, (4) evaluate fluid properties of the water in the well, and (5) determine the relative transmissivity and head of discrete fractures or fracture zones. The logs included the following: caliper, electromagnetic induction, gamma, acoustic and (or) optical televiewer, heat-pulse flowmeter under ambient and pumped conditions, hydraulic head data, fluid electrical conductivity and temperature under postpumping conditions, and borehole-radar reflection collected in single-hole mode. In a seventh borehole, a former water-supply well, only caliper, fluid electrical conductivty, and temperature logs were collected, because of a constriction in the borehole.This report includes a description of the methods used to collect and process the borehole geophysical data, the description of the data collected in each of the wells, and a comparison of the results collected in all of the wells. The data are presented in plots of the borehole geophysical logs, tables, and figures. Collectively these data provide valuable characterizations that can be used to improve or inform site conceptual models of groundwater flow in the study area.

  5. Chitosan as cationic polyelectrolyte for the modification of electroosmotic flow and its utilization for the separation of inorganic anions by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshio; Motomizu, Shoji

    2006-09-01

    Cationic polyelectrolyte of chitosan was used for the reversal of electroosmotic flow in capillary zone electrophoresis. The chitosan was dissolved in acetic acid solution, and stable electroosmotic flow was obtained at the chitosan concentrations between 50 and 300 microg/mL. Separation of inorganic anions was carried out using the dynamically coated capillary by capillary zone electrophoresis. Nine kinds of anions were separated and detected with the capillary. The electrophoretic mobility of the analyte anions decreased with increasing concentrations of chitosan in the migrating solution through ion-ion interaction, but the migration order of the analyte anions was not changed in the concentration range of the chitosan examined. The signal shape for the analyte anions was developed by using field-enhanced sample stacking with 10 mM sodium sulfate.

  6. Geophysical, stratigraphic, and flow-zone logs of selected test, monitor, and water-supply wells in Cayuga County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, J. Alton; Williams, John H.; Eckhardt, David A.V.; Miller, Todd S.

    2003-01-01

    Volatile-organic compounds have been detected in water sampled from more than 50 supply wells between the City of Auburn and Village of Union Springs in Cayuga County, New York, and the area was declared a Superfund site in 2002. In 2001-04, geophysical logs were collected from 37 test, monitor, and water-supply wells as a preliminary part of the investigation of volatile-organic compound contamination in the carbonate-bedrock aquifer system. The geophysical logs included gamma, induction, caliper, wellbore image, deviation, fluid resistivity and temperature, and flowmeter. The geophysical logs were analyzed along with core samples and outcrops of the bedrock to define the stratigraphic units and flow zones penetrated by the wells. This report describes the logging methods used in the study and presents the geophysical, stratigraphic, and flow-zone logs.

  7. Two-stage fluid flow and element transfers in shear zones during collision burial-exhumation cycle: Insights from the Mont Blanc Crystalline Massif (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Y.; Rossi, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Mont-Blanc Massif was intensely deformed during the Alpine orogenesis: in a first stage of prograde underthrusting at c. 30 Ma and in a second stage of uplift and exhumation at 22-11 Ma. Mid-crustal shear zones of 1 mm-50 m size, neighbouring episyenites (quartz-dissolved altered granite) and alpine veins, have localised intense fluid flow, which produced substantial changes in mineralogy and whole-rock geochemistry. Four main metamorphic zones are oriented parallel to the strike of the massif: (i) epidote, (ii) chlorite, (iii) actinolite-muscovite ± biotite and (iv) muscovite ± biotite. In addition, phlogopite-bearing shear zones occur in the chlorite zone, and calcite-bearing shear zones are locally found in the muscovite zone. The initial chemical composition of the granitic protolith is relatively constant at massif scale, which allows investigating compositional changes related to shear zone activity, and subsequent volume change and elements mobility. The variations of whole-rock composition and mineral chemistry in shear zones reflect variations in fluid/rock ratios and fluid's chemistry, which have produced specific mineral reactions. Estimated time-integrated fluid fluxes are of the order of 106 m3/m2. The mineral assemblages that crystallised upon these fluid-P-T conditions are responsible for specific major and trace element enrichments. The XFe (Fe/Fe + Mg) pattern of shear zone phyllosilicates and the δ13C pattern of vein calcite both show a bell-type pattern across the massif with high values on the massif rims and low values in the centre of the massif. These low XFe and δ13C values are explained by down temperature up-flow of a Fe-Mg-CO2-rich and silica-depleted fluid during stage 1, while the massif was underthrusting. These produced phlogopite, chlorite and actinolite precipitation and quartz hydrolysis, resulting in strong volume losses. In contrast, during stage 2 (uplift), substantial volume gains occurred on the massif rims due to the

  8. The Growth of Melt Inclusion- and Water-Rich Zones in Clinopyroxene Phenocrysts of the Powai Ankaramite Flow, Deccan Traps, India: Rapid Closed System Oscillatory Mineral Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Water concentrations were measured and mapped using FTIR spectroscopy in clinopyroxene phenocrysts of the Powai ankaramite flow, located near Mumbai, west of the Western Ghats escarpment of the Deccan province, India. Samples were provided by Dr. Hetu Sheth of the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai. Chatterjee and Sheth (2015) showed that phenocrysts in the flow were part of a cumulate layer intruded by high-temperature basaltic melt at ~ 6 kb and ~1230oC. Cpx phenocrysts are euhedral and have concentric bands (100 to 200 microns thick) of fine (10-20 micron diameter) melt inclusions. Cpx bands that host melt inclusions have higher concentrations of water than inclusion-free bands. Water concentrations of cpx and ol were used to calculate water concentrations in the melt from which the crystals formed. Water concentrations in the parent magma were between 4.35 and 8.26 wt. % based on water concentrations in cpx, and between 8.24 and 9.41 wt. % based on those in ol. Both Mg and Fe are relatively depleted in the water- and melt inclusion-rich zones in cpx, and Ca is enriched in these zones. We suggest that oscillatory zoning in cpx is a result of repeated growth of cpx in water-richer and water-poorer boundary layers in which water lowered melt viscosity and enhanced diffusion and crystal growth rates. Water-enhanced growth rates may have resulted in preferential capture of melt inclusions preserved in water-rich cpx zones. Mg was preferentially incorporated into the cpx, causing Ca and water to build up in the boundary layer, and Mg and Fe to become relatively depleted in the boundary layer, as discussed for oscillatorially-zoned minerals by Wang and Merino (1993). Application of the equations for growth of oscillatory zones in crystals given by Wang and Merino (1993) to the growth of cpx crystals in the Powai ankaramite indicate that crystal growth occurred relatively quickly, on the order of days, although the width of the boundary zone, which is uncertain

  9. Groundwater flow, nutrient, and stable isotope dynamics in the parafluvial-hyporheic zone of the regulated Lower Colorado River (Texas, USA) over the course of a small flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briody, Alyse C.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Shuai, Pin; Knappett, Peter S. K.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2016-06-01

    Periodic releases from an upstream dam cause rapid stage fluctuations in the Lower Colorado River near Austin, Texas, USA. These daily pulses modulate fluid exchange and residence times in the hyporheic zone where biogeochemical reactions are typically pronounced. The effects of a small flood pulse under low-flow conditions on surface-water/groundwater exchange and biogeochemical processes were studied by monitoring and sampling from two dense transects of wells perpendicular to the river. The first transect recorded water levels and the second transect was used for water sample collection at three depths. Samples were collected from 12 wells every 2 h over a 24-h period which had a 16-cm flood pulse. Analyses included nutrients, carbon, major ions, and stable isotopes of water. The relatively small flood pulse did not cause significant mixing in the parafluvial zone. Under these conditions, the river and groundwater were decoupled, showed potentially minimal mixing at the interface, and did not exhibit any discernible denitrification of river-borne nitrate. The chemical patterns observed in the parafluvial zone can be explained by evaporation of groundwater with little mixing with river water. Thus, large pulses may be necessary in order for substantial hyporheic mixing and exchange to occur. The large regulated river under a low-flow and small flood pulse regime functioned mainly as a gaining river with little hydrologic connectivity beyond a narrow hyporheic zone.

  10. Delayed aneurysm rupture due to residual blood flow at the inflow zone of the intracranial paraclinoid internal carotid aneurysm treated with the Pipeline embolization device: Histopathological investigation

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Ando, Mitsushige; Chihara, Hideo; Arai, Daisuke; Hattori, Etsuko; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysm rupture is a serious complication that can occur after flow diverter (FD) placement, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We encountered a case in which direct stress on the aneurysm wall caused by residual blood flow at the inflow zone near the neck during the process of thrombosis after FD placement appeared associated with aneurysm rupture. The patient was a 67-year-old woman with progressive optic nerve compression symptoms caused by a large intracranial paraclinoid internal carotid aneurysm. The patient had undergone treatment with a Pipeline embolization device (PED) with satisfactory adherence between the PED and vessel wall. Surgery was completed without complications, and optic nerve compression symptoms improved immediately after treatment. Postoperative clinical course was satisfactory, but the patient suddenly died 34 days postoperatively. Autopsy confirmed the presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of the internal carotid aneurysm that had been treated with PED. Although the majority of the aneurysm lumen including the outflow zone was thrombosed, a non-thrombosed area was observed at the inflow zone. Perforation was evident in the aneurysm wall at the inflow zone near the neck, and this particular area of aneurysm wall was not covered in thrombus. Macrophage infiltration was not seen on immunohistochemical studies of the aneurysm wall near the perforation. A hemodynamically unstable period during the process of complete thrombosis of the aneurysm lumen after FD placement may be suggested, and blood pressure management and appropriate management with antiplatelet therapy may be important. PMID:26500232

  11. Time-Scales of Storm Flow Response in the Stream and Hyporheic Zone of a Small, Steep Forested Catchment - Contrasting the Potential Contributions from the Hillslope, Riparian-Hyporheic Zones, and the Stream Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wondzell, S. M.; Corson-rikert, H.; Haggerty, R.

    2016-12-01

    Storm-flow responses of small catchments are widely studied to identify water sources and mechanisms routing water through catchments. These studies typically observe rapid responses to rainfall with peak concentrations of many chemical constituents occurring on rising leg of the hydrograph. To explain this, some conceptual models suggest that stream water early in storm periods is dominated by riparian water sources with hillslope water sources dominating later in the storm. We examined changes in both stream and hyporheic water chemistry during a small, autumn storm in a forested mountain catchment to test this conceptual model. Our study site was located in WS01 at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, in Oregon, USA. The watershed has a narrow valley floor, always less than 15 m wide and occasionally interrupted by narrow, constrained bedrock sections. The valley floor has a longitudinal gradient of approximately 14%. Hyporheic water tends to flow parallel the valley axis and flow paths change little with changes in stream discharge, even during storm events. A well network is located in a 30-m reach near the bottom of the watershed. We sampled the stream, 9 hyporheic wells, and a hillslope well for DOC, DIC, Cl-, and NO3- during the storm. As expected, concentrations of DOC and NO3- increased rapidly on the rising leg of the hydrograph in both the stream and the hyporheic wells. However, the stream always had higher concentrations of DOC, and lower concentrations of NO3-, than did either the hillslope well or the hyporheic wells. These data suggest that the riparian/hyporheic zone is not a likely source of water influencing stream water chemistry on the rising leg of the hydrograph. These data agree with median travel time estimates of water flowing along hyporheic flow paths - it takes many 10s of hours for water to move from the riparian/hyporheic zone to the stream - a time scale that is far too slow to explain the rapid changes observed on the rising leg

  12. Laminar-to-turbulence and relaminarization zones detection by simulation of low Reynolds number turbulent blood flow in large stenosed arteries.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Reza; Ghalichi, Farzan; Hossainpour, Siamak; Ghasemzadeh, Kamran

    2016-08-12

    Laminar, turbulent, transitional, or combine areas of all three types of viscous flow can occur downstream of a stenosis depending upon the Reynolds number and constriction shape parameter. Neither laminar flow solver nor turbulent models for instance the k-ω (k-omega), k-ε (k-epsilon), RANS or LES are opportune for this type of flow. In the present study attention has been focused vigorously on the effect of the constriction in the flow field with a unique way. It means that the laminar solver was employed from entry up to the beginning of the turbulent shear flow. The turbulent model (k-ω SST Transitional Flows) was utilized from starting of turbulence to relaminarization zone while the laminar model was applied again with onset of the relaminarization district. Stenotic flows, with 50 and 75% cross-sectional area, were simulated at Reynolds numbers range from 500 to 2000 employing FLUENT (v6.3.17). The flow was considered to be steady, axisymmetric, and incompressible. Achieving results were reported as axial velocity, disturbance velocity, wall shear stress and the outcomes were compared with previously experimental and CFD computations. The analogy of axial velocity profiles shows that they are in acceptable compliance with the empirical data. As well as disturbance velocity and wall shear stresses anticipated by this new approach, part by part simulation, are reasonably valid with the acceptable experimental studies.

  13. New approach to the boundary-parallel plastic / viscous diapiric flow patterns in the curvilinear boundary zones: an implication for structural geology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil

    2010-05-01

    New approach to the boundary-parallel plastic / viscous diapiric flow patterns in the curvilinear boundary zones: an implication for structural geology studies Khalil Sarkarinejad and Abdolreza Partabian Department of Earth Sciences, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran (Sarkarinejad@geology.susc.ac.ir). In the oceanic diverging away plates, the asthenospheric flow at solidus high-temperature conditions typically produces mineral foliations and lineations in peridotites. Foliation and lineation of mantle are defined by preferred flattening and alignment of olivine, pyroxene and spinel. In the areas with steep foliations trajectories which are associated with the steeply plunging stretching lineation trajectories, reflecting localized vertical flow and has been related to mantle diapir. The mantle flow patterns are well documented through detail structural mapping of the Neyriz ophiolite along the Zagros inclined dextral transpression and Oman ophiolite. Such models of the diverging asthenaspheric mantle flow and formation of mantle diapir are rarely discussed and paid any attention in the mathematical models of transpressional deformation in converging continental crusts. Systematic measurements of the mineral preferred orientations and construction of the foliation and lineation trajectories of the Zagros high-strain zone reveal two diapers with the shape of the inclined NW-SE boundary-parallel semi-ellipses shape and one rotated asymmetric diapir. These diapers made of quartzo-feldspathic gneiss and garnet amphibolite core with phyllite, phyllonite, muscovite schist and deformed conglomerate as a cover sequences. These boundary-parallel and rotated diapirs are formed by the interaction of Afro-Arabian lower to middle continental detachment and hot subdacting Tethyan oceanic crust, due to increasing effective pressure and temperature. The plastic/viscous gneissic diapers were squeezed between in Zagros transpression curvilinear boundary zones in an

  14. Tracking lava flow emplacement on the east rift zone of Kilauea, Hawai’i with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietterich, Hannah R.; Poland, Michael P.; Schmidt, David; Cashman, Katharine V.; Sherrod, David R.; Espinosa, Arkin Tapia

    2012-01-01

    Lava flow mapping is both an essential component of volcano monitoring and a valuable tool for investigating lava flow behavior. Although maps are traditionally created through field surveys, remote sensing allows an extraordinary view of active lava flows while avoiding the difficulties of mapping on location. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, in particular, can detect changes in a flow field by comparing two images collected at different times with SAR coherence. New lava flows radically alter the scattering properties of the surface, making the radar signal decorrelated in SAR coherence images. We describe a new technique, SAR Coherence Mapping (SCM), to map lava flows automatically from coherence images independent of look angle or satellite path. We use this approach to map lava flow emplacement during the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō-Kupaianaha eruption at Kīlauea, Hawai‘i. The resulting flow maps correspond well with field mapping and better resolve the internal structure of surface flows, as well as the locations of active flow paths. However, the SCM technique is only moderately successful at mapping flows that enter vegetation, which is also often decorrelated between successive SAR images. Along with measurements of planform morphology, we are able to show that the length of time a flow stays decorrelated after initial emplacement is linearly related to the flow thickness. Finally, we use interferograms obtained after flow surfaces become correlated to show that persistent decorrelation is caused by post-emplacement flow subsidence.

  15. Approach for delineation of contributing areas and zones of transport to selected public-supply wells using a regional ground-water flow model, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, R.A.; Patterson, R.D.; Orzol, L.L.; Dixon, Joann

    2001-01-01

    Rapid urban development and population growth in Palm Beach County, Florida, have been accompanied with the need for additional freshwater withdrawals from the surficial aquifer system. To maintain water quality, County officials protect capture areas and determine zones of transport of municipal supply wells. A multistep process was used to help automate the delineation of wellhead protection areas. A modular ground-water flow model (MODFLOW) Telescopic Mesh Refinement program (MODTMR) was used to construct an embedded flow model and combined with particle tracking to delineate zones of transport to supply wells; model output was coupled with a geographic information system. An embedded flow MODFLOW model was constructed using input and output file data from a preexisting three-dimensional, calibrated model of the surficial aquifer system. Three graphical user interfaces for use with the geographic information software, ArcView, were developed to enhance the telescopic mesh refinement process. These interfaces include AvMODTMR for use with MODTMR; AvHDRD to build MODFLOW river and drain input files from dynamically segmented linear (canals) data sets; and AvWELL Refiner, an interface designed to examine and convert well coverage spatial data layers to a MODFLOW Well package input file. MODPATH (the U.S. Geological Survey particle-tracking postprocessing program) and MODTOOLS (the set of U.S. Geological Survey computer programs to translate MODFLOW and MODPATH output to a geographic information system) were used to map zones of transport. A steady-state, five-layer model of the Boca Raton area was created using the telescopic mesh refinement process and calibrated to average conditions during January 1989 to June 1990. A sensitivity analysis of various model parameters indicates that the model is most sensitive to changes in recharge rates, hydraulic conductivity for layer 1, and leakance for layers 3 and 4 (Biscayne aquifer). Recharge (58 percent); river (canal

  16. Drilling, logging, and testing information from borehole UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Thamir, F.; Thordarson, W.; Kume, J.

    Borehole UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16 is the first of two boreholes that may be used to determine the subsurface structure at Yucca Mountain by using vertical seismic profiling. This report contains information collected while this borehole was being drilled, logged, and tested from May 27, 1992, to April 22, 1994. It does not contain the vertical seismic profiling data. This report is intended to be used as: (1) a reference for drilling similar boreholes in the same area, (2) a data source on this borehole, and (3) a reference for other information that is available from this borehole. The reference information includesmore » drilling chronology, equipment, parameters, coring methods, penetration rates, completion information, drilling problems, and corrective actions. The data sources include lithology, fracture logs, a list of available borehole logs, and depths at which water was recorded. Other information is listed in an appendix that includes studies done after April 22, 1994.« less

  17. Air Change Rates and Interzonal Flows in Residences, and the Need for Multi-Zone Models for Exposure and Health Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liuliu; Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher; Chin, Jo-Yu; Parker, Edith; Breen, Michael; Brakefield, Wilma; Robins, Thomas; Lewis, Toby

    2012-01-01

    Air change rates (ACRs) and interzonal flows are key determinants of indoor air quality (IAQ) and building energy use. This paper characterizes ACRs and interzonal flows in 126 houses, and evaluates effects of these parameters on IAQ. ACRs measured using weeklong tracer measurements in several seasons averaged 0.73 ± 0.76 h−1 (median = 0.57 h−1, n = 263) in the general living area, and much higher, 1.66 ± 1.50 h−1 (median = 1.23 h−1, n = 253) in bedrooms. Living area ACRs were highest in winter and lowest in spring; bedroom ACRs were highest in summer and lowest in spring. Bedrooms received an average of 55 ± 18% of air from elsewhere in the house; the living area received only 26 ± 20% from the bedroom. Interzonal flows did not depend on season, indoor smoking or the presence of air conditioners. A two-zone IAQ model calibrated for the field study showed large differences in pollutant levels between the living area and bedroom, and the key parameters affecting IAQ were emission rates, emission source locations, air filter use, ACRs, interzonal flows, outdoor concentrations, and PM penetration factors. The single-zone models that are commonly used for residences have substantial limitations and may inadequately represent pollutant concentrations and exposures in bedrooms and potentially other environments other where people spend a substantial fraction of time. PMID:23235286

  18. Air change rates and interzonal flows in residences, and the need for multi-zone models for exposure and health analyses.

    PubMed

    Du, Liuliu; Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher; Chin, Jo-Yu; Parker, Edith; Breen, Michael; Brakefield, Wilma; Robins, Thomas; Lewis, Toby

    2012-12-12

    Air change rates (ACRs) and interzonal flows are key determinants of indoor air quality (IAQ) and building energy use. This paper characterizes ACRs and interzonal flows in 126 houses, and evaluates effects of these parameters on IAQ. ACRs measured using weeklong tracer measurements in several seasons averaged 0.73 ± 0.76 h(-1) (median = 0.57 h(-1), n = 263) in the general living area, and much higher, 1.66 ± 1.50 h(-1) (median = 1.23 h(-1), n = 253) in bedrooms. Living area ACRs were highest in winter and lowest in spring; bedroom ACRs were highest in summer and lowest in spring. Bedrooms received an average of 55 ± 18% of air from elsewhere in the house; the living area received only 26 ± 20% from the bedroom. Interzonal flows did not depend on season, indoor smoking or the presence of air conditioners. A two-zone IAQ model calibrated for the field study showed large differences in pollutant levels between the living area and bedroom, and the key parameters affecting IAQ were emission rates, emission source locations, air filter use, ACRs, interzonal flows, outdoor concentrations, and PM penetration factors. The single-zone models that are commonly used for residences have substantial limitations and may inadequately represent pollutant concentrations and exposures in bedrooms and potentially other environments other where people spend a substantial fraction of time.

  19. Groundwater flow path dynamics and nitrogen transport potential in the riparian zone of an agricultural headwater catchment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stream riparian zones are often thought of as areas that provide natural remediation for groundwater contaminants, especially agricultural nitrogen (N). While denitrification and vegetative uptake tend to be efficient N removal processes in slow moving shallow groundwater, these mechanisms decrease ...

  20. A steady state solution for ditch drainage problem with special reference to seepage face and unsaturated zone flow contribution: Derivation of a new drainage spacing eqaution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousfi, Ammar; Mechergui, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    The seepage face is an important feature of the drainage process when recharge occurs to a permeable region with lateral outlets. Examples of the formation of a seepage face above the downstream water level include agricultural land drained by ditches. Flow problem to these drains has been investigated extensively by many researchers (e.g. Rubin, 1968; Hornberger et al. 1969; Verma and Brutsaert, 1970; Gureghian and Youngs, 1975; Vauclin et al., 1975; Skaggs and Tang, 1976; Youngs, 1990; Gureghian, 1981; Dere, 2000; Rushton and Youngs, 2010; Youngs, 2012; Castro-Orgaz et al., 2012) and may be tackled either using variably saturated flow models, or the complete 2-D solution of Laplace equation, or using the Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation; the most widely accepted methods to obtain analytical solutions for unconfined drainage problems. However, the investigation reported by Clement et al. (1996) suggest that accounting for the seepage face alone, as in the fully saturated flow model, does not improve the discharge estimate because of disregarding flow the unsaturated zone flow contribution. This assumption can induce errors in the location of the water table surface and results in an underestimation of the seepage face and the net discharge (e.g. Skaggs and Tang, 1976; Vauclin et al., 1979; Clement et al., 1996). The importance of the flow in the unsaturated zone has been highlighted by many authors on the basis of laboratory experiments and/or numerical experimentations (e.g. Rubin, 1968; Verma and Brutsaert, 1970; Todsen, 1973; Vauclin et al., 1979; Ahmad et al., 1993; Anguela, 2004; Luthin and Day, 1955; Shamsai and Narasimhan, 1991; Wise et al., 1994; Clement et al., 1996; Boufadel et al., 1999; Romano et al., 1999; Kao et al., 2001; Kao, 2002). These studies demonstrate the failure of fully saturated flow models and suggested that the error made when using these models not only depends on soil properties but also on the infiltration rate as reported by Kao et

  1. Land surface temperature as an indicator of the unsaturated zone thickness: A remote sensing approach in the Atacama Desert.

    PubMed

    Urqueta, Harry; Jódar, Jorge; Herrera, Christian; Wilke, Hans-G; Medina, Agustín; Urrutia, Javier; Custodio, Emilio; Rodríguez, Jazna

    2018-01-15

    Land surface temperature (LST) seems to be related to the temperature of shallow aquifers and the unsaturated zone thickness (∆Z uz ). That relationship is valid when the study area fulfils certain characteristics: a) there should be no downward moisture fluxes in an unsaturated zone, b) the soil composition in terms of both, the different horizon materials and their corresponding thermal and hydraulic properties, must be as homogeneous and isotropic as possible, c) flat and regular topography, and d) steady state groundwater temperature with a spatially homogeneous temperature distribution. A night time Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image and temperature field measurements are used to test the validity of the relationship between LST and ∆Z uz at the Pampa del Tamarugal, which is located in the Atacama Desert (Chile) and meets the above required conditions. The results indicate that there is a relation between the land surface temperature and the unsaturated zone thickness in the study area. Moreover, the field measurements of soil temperature indicate that shallow aquifers dampen both the daily and the seasonal amplitude of the temperature oscillation generated by the local climate conditions. Despite empirically observing the relationship between the LST and ∆Z uz in the study zone, such a relationship cannot be applied to directly estimate ∆Z uz using temperatures from nighttime thermal satellite images. To this end, it is necessary to consider the soil thermal properties, the soil surface roughness and the unseen water and moisture fluxes (e.g., capillarity and evaporation) that typically occur in the subsurface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Using chemical, hydrologic, and age dating analysis to delineate redox processes and flow paths in the riparian zone of a glacial outwash aquifer‐stream system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, Larry J.; Cowdery, Timothy K.; McMahon, Peter B.; Tornes, Lan H.; Stoner, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    A combination of chemical and dissolved gas analyses, chlorofluorocarbon age dating, and hydrologic measurements were used to determine the degree to which biogeochemical processes in a riparian wetland were responsible for removing NO3−from groundwaters discharging to the Otter Tail River in west central Minnesota. An analysis of river chemistry and flow data revealed that NO3− concentrations in the river increased in the lower half of the 8.3 km study reach as the result of groundwater discharge to the river. Groundwater head measurements along a study transect through the riparian wetland revealed a zone of groundwater discharge extending out under the river. On the basis of combined chemical, dissolved gas, age date, and hydrologic results, it was determined that water chemistry under the riparian wetland was controlled largely by upgradient groundwaters that followed flow paths up to 16 m deep and discharged under the wetland, creating a pattern of progressively older, more chemically reduced, low NO3− water the farther one progressed from the edge of the wetland toward the river. These findings pose challenges for researchers investigating biogeochemical processes in riparian buffer zones because the progressively older groundwaters entered the aquifer in earlier years when less NO3− fertilizer was being used. NO3− concentrations originally present in the groundwater had also decreased in the upgradient aquifer as a result of denitrification and progressively stronger reducing conditions there. The resulting pattern of decreasing NO3− concentrations across the riparian zone may be incorrectly interpreted as evidence of denitrification losses there instead of in the upgradient aquifer. Consequently, it is important to understand the hydrogeologic setting and age structure of the groundwaters being sampled in order to avoid misinterpreting biogeochemical processes in riparian zones.

  3. Real-time three-dimensional color doppler evaluation of the flow convergence zone for quantification of mitral regurgitation: Validation experimental animal study and initial clinical experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitges, Marta; Jones, Michael; Shiota, Takahiro; Qin, Jian Xin; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Bauer, Fabrice; Kim, Yong Jin; Agler, Deborah A.; Cardon, Lisa A.; Zetts, Arthur D.; hide

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pitfalls of the flow convergence (FC) method, including 2-dimensional imaging of the 3-dimensional (3D) geometry of the FC surface, can lead to erroneous quantification of mitral regurgitation (MR). This limitation may be mitigated by the use of real-time 3D color Doppler echocardiography (CE). Our objective was to validate a real-time 3D navigation method for MR quantification. METHODS: In 12 sheep with surgically induced chronic MR, 37 different hemodynamic conditions were studied with real-time 3DCE. Using real-time 3D navigation, the radius of the largest hemispherical FC zone was located and measured. MR volume was quantified according to the FC method after observing the shape of FC in 3D space. Aortic and mitral electromagnetic flow probes and meters were balanced against each other to determine reference MR volume. As an initial clinical application study, 22 patients with chronic MR were also studied with this real-time 3DCE-FC method. Left ventricular (LV) outflow tract automated cardiac flow measurement (Toshiba Corp, Tokyo, Japan) and real-time 3D LV stroke volume were used to quantify the reference MR volume (MR volume = 3DLV stroke volume - automated cardiac flow measurement). RESULTS: In the sheep model, a good correlation and agreement was seen between MR volume by real-time 3DCE and electromagnetic (y = 0.77x + 1.48, r = 0.87, P <.001, delta = -0.91 +/- 2.65 mL). In patients, real-time 3DCE-derived MR volume also showed a good correlation and agreement with the reference method (y = 0.89x - 0.38, r = 0.93, P <.001, delta = -4.8 +/- 7.6 mL). CONCLUSIONS: real-time 3DCE can capture the entire FC image, permitting geometrical recognition of the FC zone geometry and reliable MR quantification.

  4. [Exploring Flow and Supervision of Medical Instruments by Standing on Frontier of the Reform of Free Trade Zone].

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianhua; Han, Meixian; Lu, Fei

    2017-11-30

    Shanghai Waigaoqiao Free Trade Zone as one of the special customs supervision areas of China (Shanghai) free trade pilot area, gathered a large number of general agent enterprises related to medical apparatus and instruments. This article analyzes the characteristics of special environment and medical equipment business in Shanghai Waigaoqiao Free Trade Zone in order to further implement the national administrative examination and approval reform. According to the latest requirement in laws and regulations of medical instruments, and trend of development in the industry of medical instruments, as well as research on the basis of practices of market supervision in countries around the world, this article also proposes measures about precision supervision, coordination of supervision, classification supervision and dynamic supervision to establish a new order of fair and standardized competition in market, and create conditions for establishment of allocation and transport hub of international medicine.

  5. Hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone, North Ramp area of the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rousseau, Joseph P.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Gillies, Daniel C.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Gillies, Daniel C.

    1999-01-01

    -14, CHn pore water, and saturated-zone water at boreholes NRG-7 a and SD-9. The absolute chloride concentration of the perched water, however, is much lower than the chloride concentration of pore water from either the PTn or the TSw. The chemical and isotopic compositions of perched water indicate that this water was derived primarily from fracture flow, with little or no contribution from water in the matrix of the overlying rock. Carbon-14 ages of perched water range from 3,000 to 7,000 years. Strontium-87 isotope ratios indicate dissolution of surficial pedogenic calcite and calcite fracture fillings, which supports a fracture-flow origin for perched water. Moreover, carbon-13 and deuterium isotope values indicate rapid infiltration into fractures with little or no prior evaporation. Evidence for deep fracture flow into the Calico Hills Formation at UZ-14 is indicated by carbon-14 values that are from 65 and 95 percent modem carbon, equivalent to apparent ages of about 3,500 to 500 years. Some of these ages are younger than age estimates for perched water in the overlying Topopah Spring Tuff and are much younger than any that could be derived from a matrix-flow model. Evidence is lacking for extensive lateral flow within the PTn or for interception and diversion of this flow downward along structural pathways (faults), two key features of the original conceptual model for unsaturated flow at Yucca Mountain. Where data are available to infer lateral flow in the PTn, it is not certain that fracture flow could not have produced the same results. Pneumatic data, derived primarily from analysis of the interference effects from excavation of the North Ramp tunnel, indicate that faults within the Topopah Spring Tuff are open over substantial distances and are very permeable. Tunnel-boring-induced pneumatic disturbances have been propagated along these faults over distances that exceed 500 meters. These disturbances also have been detected in the pneumatic

  6. The ultimate fate of a synmagmatic shear zone. Interplay between rupturing and ductile flow in a cooling granite pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibra, I.; White, J. C.; Menegon, L.; Dering, G.; Gessner, K.

    2018-05-01

    The Neoarchean Cundimurra Pluton (Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia) was emplaced incrementally along the transpressional Cundimurra Shear Zone. During syndeformational cooling, discrete networks of cataclasites and ultramylonites developed in the narrowest segment of the shear zone, showing the same kinematics as the earlier synmagmatic structures. Lithological boundaries between aplite/pegmatite veins and host granitic gneiss show more intense pre-cataclasite fabrics than homogeneous material, and these boundaries later became the preferred sites of shear rupture and cataclasite nucleation. Transient ductile instabilities established along lithological boundaries culminated in shear rupture at relatively high temperature (∼500-600 °C). Here, tensile fractures at high angles from the fault plane formed asymmetrically on one side of the fault, indicating development during seismic rupture, establishing the oldest documented earthquake on Earth. Tourmaline veins were emplaced during brittle shearing, but fluid pressure probably played a minor role in brittle failure, as cataclasites are in places tourmaline-free. Subsequent ductile deformation localized in the rheologically weak tourmaline-rich aggregates, forming ultramylonites that deformed by grain-size sensitive creep. The shape and width of the pluton/shear zone and the regime of strain partitioning, induced by melt-present deformation and established during pluton emplacement, played a key role in controlling the local distribution of brittle and then ductile subsolidus structures.

  7. Effects of reduced return activated sludge flows and volume on anaerobic zone performance for a septic wastewater biological phosphorus removal system.

    PubMed

    Magro, Daniel; Elias, Steven L; Randall, Andrew Amis

    2005-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorous removal (EBPR) performance was found to be adequate with reduced return-activated sludge (RAS) flows (50% of available RAS) to the anaerobic tank and smaller-than-typical anaerobic zone volume (1.08 hours hydraulic retention time [HRT]). Three identical parallel biological nutrient removal pilot plants were fed with strong, highly fermented (160 mg/L volatile fatty acids [VFAs]), domestic and industrial wastewater from a full-scale wastewater treatment facility. The pilot plants were operated at 100, 50, 40, and 25% RAS (percent of available RAS) flows to the anaerobic tank, with the remaining RAS to the anoxic tank. In addition, varying anaerobic HRT (1.08 and 1.5 hours) and increased hydraulic loading (35% increase) were examined. The study was divided into four phases, and the effect of these process variations on EBPR were studied by having one different variable between two identical systems. The most significant conclusion was that returning part of the RAS to the anaerobic zone did not decrease EBPR performance; instead, it changed the location of phosphorous release and uptake. Bringing less RAS to the anaerobic and more to the anoxic tank decreased anaerobic phosphorus release and increased anoxic phosphorus release (or decreased anoxic phosphorus uptake). Equally important is that, with VFA-rich influent wastewater, excessive anaerobic volume was shown to hurt overall phosphorus removal, even when it resulted in increased anaerobic phosphorus release.

  8. Design of suitable carrier buffer for free-flow zone electrophoresis by charge-to-mass ratio and band broadening analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fan-Zhi; Yang, Ying; He, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Guo-Qing; Fan, Liu-Yin; Xiao, Hua; Li, Shan; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2016-09-01

    In this work, charge-to-mass ratio (C/M) and band broadening analyses were combined to provide better guidance for the design of free-flow zone electrophoresis carrier buffer (CB). First, the C/M analyses of hemoglobin and C-phycocyanin (C-PC) under different pH were performed by CLC Protein Workbench software. Second, band dispersion due to the initial bandwidth, diffusion, and hydrodynamic broadening were discussed, respectively. Based on the analyses of the C/M and band broadening, a better guidance for preparation of free-flow zone electrophoresis CB was obtained. Series of experiments were performed to validate the proposed method. The experimental data showed high accordance with our prediction allowing the CB to be prepared easily with our proposed method. To further evaluate this method, C-PC was purified from crude extracts of Spirulina platensis with the selected separation condition. Results showed that C-PC was well separated from other phycobiliproteins that have similar physicochemical properties, and analytical grade product with purity up to 4.5 (A620/A280) was obtained. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Breaking out of the comfort zone: El Niño-Southern Oscillation as a driver of trophic flows in a benthic consumer of the Humboldt Current ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Riascos, José M; Solís, Marco A; Pacheco, Aldo S; Ballesteros, Manuel

    2017-06-28

    The trophic flow of a species is considered a characteristic trait reflecting its trophic position and function in the ecosystem and its interaction with the environment. However, climate patterns are changing and we ignore how patterns of trophic flow are being affected. In the Humboldt Current ecosystem, arguably one of the most productive marine systems, El Niño-Southern Oscillation is the main source of interannual and longer-term variability. To assess the effect of this variability on trophic flow we built a 16-year series of mass-specific somatic production rate (P/B) of the Peruvian scallop ( Argopecten purpuratus ), a species belonging to a former tropical fauna that thrived in this cold ecosystem. A strong increase of the P/B ratio of this species was observed during nutrient-poor, warmer water conditions typical of El Niño, owing to the massive recruitment of fast-growing juvenile scallops. Trophic ecology theory predicts that when primary production is nutrient limited, the trophic flow of organisms occupying low trophic levels should be constrained (bottom-up control). For former tropical fauna thriving in cold, productive upwelling coastal zones, a short time of low food conditions but warm waters during El Niño could be sufficient to waken their ancestral biological features and display massive proliferations. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Low-mass planet migration in magnetically torqued dead zones - II. Flow-locked and runaway migration, and a torque prescription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Nelson, Richard P.; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan

    2018-07-01

    We examine the migration of low-mass planets in laminar protoplanetary discs, threaded by large-scale magnetic fields in the dead zone that drive radial gas flows. As shown in Paper I, a dynamical corotation torque arises due to the flow-induced asymmetric distortion of the corotation region and the evolving vortensity contrast between the librating horseshoe material and background disc flow. Using simulations of laminar torqued discs containing migrating planets, we demonstrate the existence of the four distinct migration regimes predicted in Paper I. In two regimes, the migration is approximately locked to the inward or outward radial gas flow, and in the other regimes the planet undergoes outward runaway migration that eventually settles to fast steady migration. In addition, we demonstrate torque and migration reversals induced by mid-plane magnetic stresses, with a bifurcation dependent on the disc surface density. We develop a model for fast migration, and show why the outward runaway saturates to a steady speed, and examine phenomenologically its termination due to changing local disc conditions. We also develop an analytical model for the corotation torque at late times that includes viscosity, for application to discs that sustain modest turbulence. Finally, we use the simulation results to develop torque prescriptions for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation.

  11. A high-order multi-zone cut-stencil method for numerical simulations of high-speed flows over complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Patrick T.; Eldredge, Jeff D.; Zhong, Xiaolin; Kim, John

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a method for performing uniformly high-order direct numerical simulations of high-speed flows over arbitrary geometries. The method was developed with the goal of simulating and studying the effects of complex isolated roughness elements on the stability of hypersonic boundary layers. The simulations are carried out on Cartesian grids with the geometries imposed by a third-order cut-stencil method. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme was implemented to capture any steep gradients in the flow created by the geometries and a third-order Runge-Kutta method is used for time advancement. A multi-zone refinement method was also utilized to provide extra resolution at locations with expected complex physics. The combination results in a globally fourth-order scheme in space and third order in time. Results confirming the method's high order of convergence are shown. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional test cases are presented and show good agreement with previous results. A simulation of Mach 3 flow over the logo of the Ubuntu Linux distribution is shown to demonstrate the method's capabilities for handling complex geometries. Results for Mach 6 wall-bounded flow over a three-dimensional cylindrical roughness element are also presented. The results demonstrate that the method is a promising tool for the study of hypersonic roughness-induced transition.

  12. Magma mixing in the 1100 AD Montaña Reventada composite lava flow, Tenerife, Canary Islands: interaction between rift zone and central volcano plumbing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Deegan, F. M.; Troll, V. R.; Carracedo, J. C.; Chadwick, J. P.; Chew, D. M.

    2011-09-01

    Zoned eruption deposits commonly show a lower felsic and an upper mafic member, thought to reflect eruption from large, stratified magma chambers. In contrast, the Montaña Reventada composite flow (Tenerife) consists of a lower basanite and a much thicker upper phonolite. A sharp interface separates basanite and phonolite, and chilled margins at this contact indicate the basanite was still hot upon emplacement of the phonolite, i.e. the two magmas erupted in quick succession. Four types of mafic to intermediate inclusions are found in the phonolite. Inclusion textures comprise foamy quenched ones, others with chilled margins and yet others that are physically mingled, reflecting progressive mixing with a decreasing temperature contrast between the end-members. Analysis of basanite, phonolite and inclusions for majors, traces and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes show the inclusions to be derived from binary mixing of basanite and phonolite end-members in ratios of 2:1 to 4:1. Although, basanite and phonolite magmas were in direct contact, contrasting 206Pb/204Pb ratios show that they are genetically distinct (19.7193(21)-19.7418(31) vs. 19.7671(18)-19.7807(23), respectively). We argue that the Montaña Reventada basanite and phonolite first met just prior to eruption and had limited interaction time only. Montaña Reventada erupted from the transition zone between two plumbing systems, the phonolitic Teide-Pico Viejo complex and the basanitic Northwest rift zone. A rift zone basanite dyke most likely intersected the previously emplaced phonolite magma chamber. This led to eruption of geochemically and texturally unaffected basanite, with the inclusion-rich phonolite subsequently following into the established conduit.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBV light curves of DQ Tau and UZ Tau E (Ardila+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardila, D. R.; Jonhs-Krull, C.; Herczeg, G. J.; Mathieu, R. D.; Quijano-Vodniza, A.

    2016-01-01

    DQ Tau was observed with HST/COS four times per binary orbit, during three consecutive binary orbits, at phases ~0, ~0.2, ~0.5, and ~0.7 (in 2011 Feb, Mar). The original experimental design called for observations of UZ Tau E with the same cadence. However, the NUV observations at phase ~0.7 in the second orbit and both the FUV and NUV observations at phase ~0 in the third orbit failed. They were replaced by observations at phases ~0 and ~0.5 in a fourth binary orbit (in 2011 Feb, Mar, Apr). We obtained contemporaneous ground-based UBV photometry with the 14" telescope from the University of Narino Observatory, optical spectroscopy with the Sandiford Echelle Spectrometer on the 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope at McDonald Observatory, near-infrared spectroscopy with the CSHELL spectrograph on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, and near-infrared spectroscopy with GNIRS instrument on Gemini North. In this paper we focus on the U-band photometry only. UBV observations were obtained before and during the HST campaign. See table 3. (1 data file).

  14. Engineered Hyporheic Zones as Novel Water Quality Best Management Practice: Flow and Contaminant Attenuation in Constructed Stream Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, S.; McCray, J. E.; Higgins, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a hotspot for biogeochemical processing that can attenuate a variety of nonpoint source contaminants in streamwater. However, hyporheic zones in urban and agricultural streams are often degraded and poorly connected with surface water. In order to increase hyporheic exchange and improve water quality, we introduced engineered streambeds as a stormwater and restoration best management practice. Modifications to streambed hydraulic conductivity and reactivity are termed Biohydrochemical Enhancement structures for Streamwater Treatment (BEST). BEST are subsurface modules that utilize low- and high-permeability sediments to drive efficient hyporheic exchange, and reactive geomedia to increase reaction rates within the hyporheic zone. This work presents the first physical performance data of BEST modules at the pilot scale. BEST modules were installed in a constructed stream facility at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, CO. This facility features two 15m artificial streams, which included an all sand control condition alongside the BEST test condition. Streams were continuously operated at a discharge of 1 L/s using recycled water. Time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys demonstrated that BEST modules provided substantially greater hyporheic exchange than the control condition. Water quality samples at the hyporheic and reach scales also revealed greater attenuation of nitrogen, coliforms, and select metals and trace organics by BEST modules relative to the control condition. These experimental results were also compared to previous numerical model simulations to evaluate model accuracy. Together, these results show that BEST may be an effective best management practice for improving streamwater quality in urban and agricultural settings.

  15. Using borehole geophysics and cross-borehole flow testing to define hydraulic connections between fracture zones in bedrock aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.

    1993-01-01

    Nearly a decade of intensive geophysical logging at fractured rock hydrology research sites indicates that geophysical logs can be used to identify and characterize fractures intersecting boreholes. However, borehole-to-borehole flow tests indicate that only a few of the apparently open fractures found to intersect boreholes conduct flow under test conditions. This paper presents a systematic approach to fracture characterization designed to define the distribution of fractures along boreholes, relate the measured fracture distribution to structure and lithology of the rock mass, and define the nature of fracture flow paths across borehole arrays. Conventional electrical resistivity, gamma, and caliper logs are used to define lithology and large-scale structure. Borehole wall image logs obtained with the borehole televiewer are used to give the depth, orientation, and relative size of fractures in situ. High-resolution flowmeter measurements are used to identify fractures conducting flow in the rock mass adjacent to the boreholes. Changes in the flow field over time are used to characterize the hydraulic properties of fracture intersections between boreholes. Application of this approach to an array of 13 boreholes at the Mirror Lake, New Hamsphire site demonstrates that the transient flow analysis can be used to distinguish between fractures communicating with each other between observation boreholes, and those that are hydraulically isolated from each other in the surrounding rock mass. The Mirror Lake results also demonstrate that the method is sensitive to the effects of boreholes on the hydraulic properties of the fractured-rock aquifer. Experiments conducted before and after the drilling of additional boreholes in the array and before and after installation of packers in existing boreholes demonstrate that the presence of new boreholes or the inflation of packers in existing boreholes has a large effect on the measured hydraulic properties of the rock mass

  16. Impact of water flow conditions on the fate of ammonium and nitrate at the interface of the unsaturated and saturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glöckler, David; Gassen, Niklas; Stumpp, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater have caused severe environmental issues in the last decades. Mitigation strategies need to be developed to reduce the amount of nitrate without reducing crop yield though. Therefore, we need to understand nitrogen turnover processes and how they are influenced by hydrogeochemical conditions in the unsaturated and saturated zone. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of flow conditions on transport processes and the fate of ammonium and nitrate released from slurry application. Experiments were conducted under controlled conditions in an aquifer model setup (1.1 x 0.6 x 0.2 m3). A diluted slurry mix was injected continuously. The inorganic nitrogen compounds were traced under different water regimes regarding recharge rates and water table position (steady-state, transient and stagnant flow conditions). Conservative tracers and mathematical modeling were used to identify water flow and transport. Spatiotemporal changes of dissolved oxygen, ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, dissolved organic carbon and matrix potential were identified through high resolution monitoring (0.05 m). The ecosystem immediately responded to the slurry application with enhanced microbial respiration and the first step of nitrification converting ammonium to nitrite. This process was dominating during the first ten days of the experiment. A complete nitrification was established after 20 days resulting in increasing nitrate concentrations. Less nitrate was measured below the water table during steady state flow conditions in contrast to transient conditions with a fluctuating water table which seemed to inhibit denitrification. Still denitrification was not the dominating process despite high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (4-20 mg/L). Even under stagnant flow conditions, nitrate stayed in the system and denitrification was limited. Anoxic conditions were not established due to the low bioavailability of the dissolved

  17. Generating cycle flow between dark and light zones with double paddlewheels to improve microalgal growth in a flat plate photo-bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Xu, Junchen; Lu, Hongxiang; Ye, Qing; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu

    2018-08-01

    Double paddlewheels were proposed to generate cycle flow for increasing horizontal fluid velocity between dark and light zones in a flat plate photo-bioreactor, which strengthened the mass transfer and the mixing effect to improve microalgal growth with 15% CO 2 . Numerical fluid dynamics were used to simulate the cycle flow field with double paddlewheels. The local flow field measured with particle image velocimetry fitted well with the numerical simulation results. The horizontal fluid velocity in the photo-bioreactor was markedly increased from 5.8 × 10 -5  m/s to 0.45 m/s with the rotation of double paddlewheels, resulting in a decreased dark/light cycle period. Therefore, bubble formation time and diameter reduced by 24.4% and 27.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, solution mixing time reduced by 31.3% and mass transfer coefficient increased by 41.2%. The biomass yield of microalgae Nannochloropsis Oceanic increased by 127.1% with double paddlewheels under 15% CO 2 condition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Drought Conditions Maximize the Impact of High-Frequency Flow Variations on Thermal Regimes and Biogeochemical Function in the Hyporheic Zone.

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    Anthropogenic activities, such as dam operations, often induce larger and more frequent stage fluctuations than those occurring in natural rivers. However, the long-term impact of such flow variations on thermal and biogeochemical dynamics of the associated hyporheic zone (HZ) is poorly understood. A heterogeneous, two-dimensional thermo-hydro-biogeochemical model revealed an important interaction between high-frequency flow variations and watershed-scale hydrology. High-frequency stage fluctuations had their strongest thermal and biogeochemical impacts when the mean river stage was low during fall and winter. An abnormally thin snowpack in 2015, however, created a low river stage during summer and early fall, whereby high frequency stagemore » fluctuations caused the HZ to be warmer than usual. This study provided the scientific basis to assess the potential ecological consequences of the high-frequency flow variations in a regulated river, as well as guidance on how to maximize the potential benefits—or minimize the drawbacks—of river regulation to river ecosystems.« less

  19. Field-scale sulfur hexafluoride tracer experiment to understand long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Andraski, Brian J.; Green, Christopher T.; Stonestrom, David A.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    A natural gradient SF6 tracer experiment provided an unprecedented evaluation of long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone (UZ) under controlled (known) conditions. The field-scale gas tracer test in the 110-m-thick UZ was conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southwestern Nevada. A history of anomalous (theoretically unexpected) contaminant gas transport observed at the ADRS, next to the first commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in the United States, provided motivation for the SF6 tracer study. Tracer was injected into a deep UZ borehole at depths of 15 and 48 m, and plume migration was observed in a monitoring borehole 9 m away at various depths (0.5–109 m) over the course of 1 yr. Tracer results yielded useful information about gas transport as applicable to the spatial scales of interest for off-site contaminant transport in arid unsaturated zones. Modeling gas diffusion with standard empirical expressions reasonably explained SF6 plume migration, but tended to underpredict peak concentrations for the field-scale experiment given previously determined porosity information. Despite some discrepancies between observations and model results, rapid SF6 gas transport commensurate with previous contaminant migration was not observed. The results provide ancillary support for the concept that apparent anomalies in historic transport behavior at the ADRS are the result of factors other than nonreactive gas transport properties or processes currently in effect in the undisturbed UZ.

  20. The high Andes, gene flow and a stable hybrid zone shape the genetic structure of a wide-ranging South American parrot

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While the gene flow in some organisms is strongly affected by physical barriers and geographical distance, other highly mobile species are able to overcome such constraints. In southern South America, the Andes (here up to 6,900 m) may constitute a formidable barrier to dispersal. In addition, this region was affected by cycles of intercalating arid/moist periods during the Upper/Late Pleistocene and Holocene. These factors may have been crucial in driving the phylogeographic structure of the vertebrate fauna of the region. Here we test these hypotheses in the burrowing parrot Cyanoliseus patagonus (Aves, Psittaciformes) across its wide distributional range in Chile and Argentina. Results Our data show a Chilean origin for this species, with a single migration event across the Andes during the Upper/Late Pleistocene, which gave rise to all extant Argentinean mitochondrial lineages. Analyses suggest a complex population structure for burrowing parrots in Argentina, which includes a hybrid zone that has remained stable for several thousand years. Within this zone, introgression by expanding haplotypes has resulted in the evolution of an intermediate phenotype. Multivariate regressions show that present day climatic variables have a strong influence on the distribution of genetic heterogeneity, accounting for almost half of the variation in the data. Conclusions Here we show how huge barriers like the Andes and the regional environmental conditions imposed constraints on the ability of a parrot species to colonise new habitats, affecting the way in which populations diverged and thus, genetic structure. When contact between divergent populations was re-established, a stable hybrid zone was formed, functioning as a channel for genetic exchange between populations. PMID:21672266

  1. Isotopically zoned carbonate cements in Early Paleozoic sandstones of the Illinois Basin: δ18O and δ13C records of burial and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Adam C.; Kozdon, Reinhard; Kitajima, Kouki; Valley, John W.

    2017-11-01

    SEM/SIMS imaging and analysis of δ18O and δ13C in sandstones from a transect through the Illinois Basin (USA) show systematic μm-scale isotopic zonation of up to 10‰ in both carbonate and quartz cements of the middle-Ordovician St. Peter and Cambrian Mt. Simon formations. Quartz δ18O values are broadly consistent with the model of Hyodo et al. (2014), wherein burial and heating in the Illinois Basin is recorded in systematically zoned quartz overgrowths. Observations of zoned dolomite/ankerite cements indicate that they preserve a more extended record of temperature and fluid compositions than quartz, including early diagenesis before or during shallow burial, and late carbonates formed after quartz overgrowths. Many carbonate cements show innermost dolomite with δ18O values (21-25‰ VSMOW) that are too low to have formed by deposition at low temperatures from ancient seawater (δ18O > - 3‰) and most likely reflect mixing with meteoric water. A sharp increase in Fe content is commonly observed in zoned carbonate cements to be associated with a drop in δ18O and an abrupt shift in δ13C to higher or lower values. These changes are interpreted to record the passage of hot metal-rich brines through sandstone aquifers, that was associated with Mississippi-Valley Type (MVT) Pb-Zn deposits (ca. 270 Ma) of the Upper Mississippi Valley. Local variability and individual trends in δ13C are likely controlled by the sources of carbon and the degree to which carbon is sourced from adjacent carbonate units or thermal maturation of organic matter. Quartz overgrowths in sandstones provide an excellent record of conditions during burial, heating, and pressure-solution, whereas carbonate cements in sandstones preserve a more-extended record including initial pre-burial conditions and punctuated fluid flow events.

  2. Physical mechanisms of longitudinal vortexes formation, appearance of zones with high heat fluxes and early transition in hypersonic flow over delta wing with blunted leading edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, S. V.; Vaganov, A. V.; Shalaev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Processes of vortex structures formation and they interactions with the boundary layer in the hypersonic flow over delta wing with blunted leading edges are analyzed on the base of experimental investigations and numerical solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. Physical mechanisms of longitudinal vortexes formation, appearance of abnormal zones with high heat fluxes and early laminar turbulent transition are studied. These phenomena were observed in many high-speed wind tunnel experiments; however they were understood only using the detailed analysis of numerical modeling results with the high resolution. Presented results allowed explaining experimental phenomena. ANSYS CFX code (the DAFE MIPT license) on the grid with 50 million nodes was used for the numerical modeling. The numerical method was verified by comparison calculated heat flux distributions on the wing surface with experimental data.

  3. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: Physics of complex melt flow and formation mechanisms of pores, spatter, and denudation zones

    DOE PAGES

    Khairallah, Saad A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Rubenchik, Alexander; ...

    2016-02-23

    Our study demonstrates the significant effect of the recoil pressure and Marangoni convection in laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) of 316L stainless steel. A three-dimensional high fidelity powder-scale model reveals how the strong dynamical melt flow generates pore defects, material spattering (sparking), and denudation zones. The melt track is divided into three sections: a topological depression, a transition and a tail region, each being the location of specific physical effects. The inclusion of laser ray-tracing energy deposition in the powder-scale model improves over traditional volumetric energy deposition. It enables partial particle melting, which impacts pore defects in the denudation zone.more » Different pore formation mechanisms are observed at the edge of a scan track, at the melt pool bottom (during collapse of the pool depression), and at the end of the melt track (during laser power ramp down). Finally, we discuss remedies to these undesirable pores are discussed. The results are validated against the experiments and the sensitivity to laser absorptivity.« less

  4. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: Physics of complex melt flow and formation mechanisms of pores, spatter, and denudation zones

    SciTech Connect

    Khairallah, Saad A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Rubenchik, Alexander

    Our study demonstrates the significant effect of the recoil pressure and Marangoni convection in laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) of 316L stainless steel. A three-dimensional high fidelity powder-scale model reveals how the strong dynamical melt flow generates pore defects, material spattering (sparking), and denudation zones. The melt track is divided into three sections: a topological depression, a transition and a tail region, each being the location of specific physical effects. The inclusion of laser ray-tracing energy deposition in the powder-scale model improves over traditional volumetric energy deposition. It enables partial particle melting, which impacts pore defects in the denudation zone.more » Different pore formation mechanisms are observed at the edge of a scan track, at the melt pool bottom (during collapse of the pool depression), and at the end of the melt track (during laser power ramp down). Finally, we discuss remedies to these undesirable pores are discussed. The results are validated against the experiments and the sensitivity to laser absorptivity.« less

  5. Enhancement of the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite process in a modified single-stage subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland: Effect of saturated zone depth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Menglu; Wang, Zhen; Qi, Ran

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to explore enhancement of the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process in a modified single-stage subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland (VSSF) with saturated zone, and nitrogen transformation pathways in the VSSF treating digested swine wastewater were investigated at four different saturated zone depths (SZDs). SZD significantly affected nitrogen transformation pathways in the VSSF throughout the experiment. As the SZD was 45cm, the CANON process was enhanced most effectively in the system owing to the notable enhancement of anammox. Correspondingly, the VSSF had the best TN removal performance [(76.74±7.30)%] and lower N 2 O emission flux [(3.50±0.22)mg·(m 2 ·h) - 1 ]. It could be concluded that autotrophic nitrogen removal via CANON process could become a primary route for nitrogen removal in the VSSF with optimized microenvironment that developed as a result of the appropriate SZD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of medium heterogeneity and viscosity contrast in miscible flow regimes and mixing zone growth: A computational pore-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Saied; Hejazi, S. Hossein; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2018-05-01

    Miscible displacement of fluids in porous media is often characterized by the scaling of the mixing zone length with displacement time. Depending on the viscosity contrast of fluids, the scaling law varies between the square root relationship, a sign for dispersive transport regime during stable displacement, and the linear relationship, which represents the viscous fingering regime during an unstable displacement. The presence of heterogeneities in a porous medium significantly affects the scaling behavior of the mixing length as it interacts with the viscosity contrast to control the mixing of fluids in the pore space. In this study, the dynamics of the flow and transport during both unit and adverse viscosity ratio miscible displacements are investigated in heterogeneous packings of circular grains using pore-scale numerical simulations. The pore-scale heterogeneity level is characterized by the variations of the grain diameter and velocity field. The growth of mixing length is employed to identify the nature of the miscible transport regime at different viscosity ratios and heterogeneity levels. It is shown that as the viscosity ratio increases to higher adverse values, the scaling law of mixing length gradually shifts from dispersive to fingering nature up to a certain viscosity ratio and remains almost the same afterwards. In heterogeneous media, the mixing length scaling law is observed to be generally governed by the variations of the velocity field rather than the grain size. Furthermore, the normalization of mixing length temporal plots with respect to the governing parameters of viscosity ratio, heterogeneity, medium length, and medium aspect ratio is performed. The results indicate that mixing length scales exponentially with log-viscosity ratio and grain size standard deviation while the impact of aspect ratio is insignificant. For stable flows, mixing length scales with the square root of medium length, whereas it changes linearly with length during

  7. A rapid and accurate method for determining protein content in dairy products based on asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qin-Qin; Li, Yong-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    An accurate and rapid method and a system to determine protein content using asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry based on reaction between coomassie brilliant blue G250 (CBBG) and protein was established. Main merit of our approach is that it can avoid interferences of other nitric-compounds in samples, such as melamine and urea. Optimized conditions are as follows: Concentrations of CBBG, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), NaCl and HCl are 150 mg/l, 30 mg/l, 0.1 mol/l and 1.0% (v/v), respectively; volumes of the sample and reagent are 150 μl and 30 μl, respectively; length of a reaction coil is 200 cm; total flow rate is 2.65 ml/min. The linear range of the method is 0.5-15 mg/l (BSA), its detection limit is 0.05 mg/l, relative standard deviation is less than 1.87% (n=11), and analytical speed is 60 samples per hour. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Annual Glaciohydrology Cycle in the Ablation Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet: Part 2. Observed and Modeled Ice Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgan, William Terence; Rajaram, Harihar; Anderson, Robert S.; Steffen, Konrad; Zwally, H. Jay; Phillips, Thomas; Abdalati, Waleed

    2012-01-01

    Ice velocities observed in 2005/06 at three GPS stations along the Sermeq Avannarleq flowline, West Greenland, are used to characterize an observed annual velocity cycle. We attempt to reproduce this annual ice velocity cycle using a 1-D ice-flow model with longitudinal stresses coupled to a 1-D hydrology model that governs an empirical basal sliding rule. Seasonal basal sliding velocity is parameterized as a perturbation of prescribed winter sliding velocity that is proportional to the rate of change of glacier water storage. The coupled model reproduces the broad features of the annual basal sliding cycle observed along this flowline, namely a summer speed-up event followed by a fall slowdown event. We also evaluate the hypothesis that the observed annual velocity cycle is due to the annual calving cycle at the terminus. We demonstrate that the ice acceleration due to a catastrophic calving event takes an order of magnitude longer to reach CU/ETH ('Swiss') Camp (46km upstream of the terminus) than is observed. The seasonal acceleration observed at Swiss Camp is therefore unlikely to be the result of velocity perturbations propagated upstream via longitudinal coupling. Instead we interpret this velocity cycle to reflect the local history of glacier water balance.

  9. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  10. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  11. Seismic anisotropy and mantle flow in the Hellenic subduction zone: The possible effects of trench retreat and slab tear at both ends.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, Christos

    2017-04-01

    The upper mantle anisotropy pattern in the entire area of the Hellenic subduction zone have been analyzed for fast polarization directions and delay times to investigate the complex 3D pattern of mantle flow around the subducting slab. All previous studies do incorporate a significant number of measurements in the backarc area of the Aegean and in two cross-sections along the Hellenic subduction system. However, the transitional area from oceanic to continental subduction in the Western Hellenic trench has not been adequately sampled so far. Moreover, the eastern termination of the Hellenic subduction and the possible origin of a trench parallel anisotropy remains unclear. Here, I focus on the two possible ends of the high curvature Hellenic arc. I have now measured SKS splitting parameters from all broadband stations of the Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN), that they have not been measured before, specially concentrated in the transitional area from oceanic to continental subduction system. Complementary, using the Source-Side splitting technique to teleseismic S-wave records from intermediate depth earthquake in the Hellenic trench, the anisotropy measurements are increased in regions where no stations are installed. In western Greece, the Hellenic subduction system is separated by the Cephalonia Transform Fault (CTF), a dextral offset of 100 km, into the northern and southern segments, which are characterized by different convergence rates and slab composition. Recent seismic data show that north of CTF there is a subducted continental lithosphere in contrast to the region south of CTF where the on-going subduction is oceanic. The new measurements, combined with previously published observations, provide the most complete up-to-date spatial coverage for the area. Generally, the pronounced zonation of seismic anisotropy across the subduction zone, as inferred from other studies, is also observed here. Fast SKS splitting directions are trench-normal in the

  12. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J.

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to developmore » a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.« less

  13. Simulation of Flow and Long-Term Plutonium (Pu) Transport in the Vadose Zone at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkanli, I.; Molz, F. J.; Kaplan, D. I.; Fjeld, R. A.; Serkiz, S. M.

    2006-05-01

    An improved understanding of flow and radionuclide transport in vadose zone sediments is fundamental to all types of future planning involving radioactive materials. One way to obtain such understanding is to perform long-term experimental studies of Pu transport in complex natural systems. With this in mind, a series of field experiments were initiated at the SRNL in the early 1980s. Lysimeters containing sources of different Pu oxidation states were placed in the shallow subsurface and left open to the natural environment for 2 to 11 years. At the end of the experiments, Pu activities were measured along vertical cores obtained from the lysimeters. Pu distributions were anomalous in nature, with transport from oxidized Pu sources being less than expected, and a small fraction of Pu from reduced sources moving more. Laboratory studies with lysimeter sediments suggested that surface-mediated, oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions could be responsible for the anomalous behavior, and this hypothesis is tested by performing both steady-state and transient Pu transport simulations that include retardation along with first-order redox reactions on mineral surfaces. Based on the simulations, we conclude that the surface-mediated, redox hypothesis is consistent with the observed downward Pu activity profiles in the experiments, and such profiles are captured well by a steady-state, net downward, flow model. (Discussion is presented as to why a steady model appears to work in a highly transient flow environment.) The redox model explains how Pu(V/VI) sources release activity that moves downward more slowly than expected based on adsorptive retardation alone, and how Pu(III/IV) sources result in a small fraction of activity that moves downward more rapidly than expected. The calibrated parameter values were robust and relatively well-defined throughout all four sets of simulations. Pu(V/VI) (i.e., oxidized Pu)retardation factors were about 15, and reduced Pu

  14. The impact of splay faults on fluid flow, solute transport, and pore pressure distribution in subduction zones: A case study offshore the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Rachel M.; Saffer, Demian M.

    2015-04-01

    Observations of seafloor seeps on the continental slope of many subduction zones illustrate that splay faults represent a primary hydraulic connection to the plate boundary at depth, carry deeply sourced fluids to the seafloor, and are in some cases associated with mud volcanoes. However, the role of these structures in forearc hydrogeology remains poorly quantified. We use a 2-D numerical model that simulates coupled fluid flow and solute transport driven by fluid sources from tectonically driven compaction and smectite transformation to investigate the effects of permeable splay faults on solute transport and pore pressure distribution. We focus on the Nicoya margin of Costa Rica as a case study, where previous modeling and field studies constrain flow rates, thermal structure, and margin geology. In our simulations, splay faults accommodate up to 33% of the total dewatering flux, primarily along faults that outcrop within 25 km of the trench. The distribution and fate of dehydration-derived fluids is strongly dependent on thermal structure, which determines the locus of smectite transformation. In simulations of a cold end-member margin, smectite transformation initiates 30 km from the trench, and 64% of the dehydration-derived fluids are intercepted by splay faults and carried to the middle and upper slope, rather than exiting at the trench. For a warm end-member, smectite transformation initiates 7 km from the trench, and the associated fluids are primarily transmitted to the trench via the décollement (50%), and faults intercept only 21% of these fluids. For a wide range of splay fault permeabilities, simulated fluid pressures are near lithostatic where the faults intersect overlying slope sediments, providing a viable mechanism for the formation of mud volcanoes.

  15. Evaluation of a commercial electro-kinetically pumped sheath-flow nanospray interface coupled to an automated capillary zone electrophoresis system.

    PubMed

    Peuchen, Elizabeth H; Zhu, Guije; Sun, Liangliang; Dovichi, Norman J

    2017-03-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (CZE-ESI-MS) is attracting renewed attention for proteomic and metabolomic analysis. An important reason for this interest is the maturation and commercialization of interfaces for coupling CZE with ESI-MS. One of these interfaces is an electro-kinetically pumped sheath flow nanospray interface developed by the Dovichi group, in which a very low sheath flow is generated based on electroosmosis within a glass emitter. CMP Scientific has commercialized this interface as the EMASS-II ion source. In this work, we compared the performance of the EMASS-II ion source with our in-house system. The performance of the systems is equivalent. We also coupled the EMASS-II ion source with a PrinCE Next|480 capillary electrophoresis autosampler and an Orbitrap mass spectrometer, and analyzed this system's performance in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility, and separation performance for separation of tryptic digests, intact proteins, and amino acids. The system produced reproducible analysis of BSA digest; the RSDs of peptide intensity and migration time across 24 runs were less than 20 and 6%, respectively. The system produced a linear calibration curve of intensity across a 30-fold range of tryptic digest concentration. The combination of a commercial autosampler and electrospray interface efficiently separated amino acids, peptides, and intact proteins, and only required 5 μL of sample for analysis. Graphical Abstract The commercial and locally constructed versions of the interface provide similar numbers of protein identifications from a Xenopus laevis fertilized egg digest.

  16. Delineation of fractures, foliation, and groundwater-flow zones of the bedrock at the Harlem River Tunnel in northern New York County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumm, Frederick; Chu, Anthony; Joesten, Peter K.; Noll, Michael L.; Como, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced borehole-geophysical methods were used to investigate the hydrogeology of the crystalline bedrock in 36 boreholes on the northernmost part of New York County, New York, for the construction of a utilities tunnel beneath the Harlem River. The borehole-logging techniques were used to delineate bedrock fractures, foliation, and groundwater-flow zones in test boreholes at the site. Fracture indexes of the deep boreholes ranged from 0.65 to 0.76 per foot. Most of the fracture populations had either northwest to southwest or east to southeast dip azimuths with moderate dip angles. The mean foliation dip azimuth ranged from 100º to 124º southeast with dip angles of 52º to 60º. Groundwater appears to flow through an interconnected network of fractures that are affected by tidal variations from the nearby Harlem River and tunnel construction dewatering operations. The transmissivities of the 3 boreholes tested (USGS-1, USGS-3, and USGS-4), calculated from specific capacity data, were 2, 48, and 30 feet squared per day (ft2/d), respectively. The highest transmissivities were observed in wells north and west of the secant ring. Three borehole-radar velocity tomograms were collected. In the USGS-1 and USGS-4 velocity tomogram there are two areas of low radar velocity. The first is at the top of the tomogram and runs from 105 ft below land surface (BLS) at USGS-4 and extends to 125 ft BLS at USGS-1, the second area is centered at a depth of 150 ft BLS at USGS-1 and 135 to 150 ft BLS at USGS-4. Field measurements of specific conductance of 14 boreholes under ambient conditions at the site indicate an increase in conductivity toward the southwest part of the site (nearest the Harlem River). Specific conductance ranged from 107 microsiemens per centimeter (μS/cm) (borehole 63C) to 11,000 μS/cm (borehole 79B). The secant boreholes had the highest specific conductance.

  17. Actively heated high-resolution fiber-optic-distributed temperature sensing to quantify streambed flow dynamics in zones of strong groundwater upwelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin A.; Buckley, Sean F.; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Werkema, Dale D.; Lane, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Zones of strong groundwater upwelling to streams enhance thermal stability and moderate thermal extremes, which is particularly important to aquatic ecosystems in a warming climate. Passive thermal tracer methods used to quantify vertical upwelling rates rely on downward conduction of surface temperature signals. However, moderate to high groundwater flux rates (>−1.5 m d−1) restrict downward propagation of diurnal temperature signals, and therefore the applicability of several passive thermal methods. Active streambed heating from within high-resolution fiber-optic temperature sensors (A-HRTS) has the potential to define multidimensional fluid-flux patterns below the extinction depth of surface thermal signals, allowing better quantification and separation of local and regional groundwater discharge. To demonstrate this concept, nine A-HRTS were emplaced vertically into the streambed in a grid with ∼0.40 m lateral spacing at a stream with strong upward vertical flux in Mashpee, Massachusetts, USA. Long-term (8–9 h) heating events were performed to confirm the dominance of vertical flow to the 0.6 m depth, well below the extinction of ambient diurnal signals. To quantify vertical flux, short-term heating events (28 min) were performed at each A-HRTS, and heat-pulse decay over vertical profiles was numerically modeled in radial two dimension (2-D) using SUTRA. Modeled flux values are similar to those obtained with seepage meters, Darcy methods, and analytical modeling of shallow diurnal signals. We also observed repeatable differential heating patterns along the length of vertically oriented sensors that may indicate sediment layering and hyporheic exchange superimposed on regional groundwater discharge.

  18. Zone lines

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith

    2001-01-01

    Zone lines are narrow, usually dark markings formed in decaying wood. Zone lines are found most frequently in advanced white rot of hardwoods, although they occasionally are associated both with brown rot and with softwoods.

  19. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  20. Simulations of Ground-Water Flow and Particle Pathline Analysis in the Zone of Contribution of a Public-Supply Well in Modesto, Eastern San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Kauffman, Leon J.; Phillips, Steven P.; Dalgish, Barbara A.; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Shallow ground water in the eastern San Joaquin Valley is affected by high nitrate and uranium concentrations and frequent detections of pesticides and volatile organic compounds (VOC), as a result of ground-water development and intensive agricultural and urban land use. A single public-supply well was selected for intensive study to evaluate the dominant processes affecting the vulnerability of public-supply wells in the Modesto area. A network of 23 monitoring wells was installed, and water and sediment samples were collected within the approximate zone of contribution of the public-supply well, to support a detailed analysis of physical and chemical conditions and processes affecting the water chemistry in the well. A three-dimensional, steady-state local ground-water-flow and transport model was developed to evaluate the age of ground water reaching the well and to evaluate the vulnerability of the well to nonpoint source input of nitrate and uranium. Particle tracking was used to compute pathlines and advective travel times in the ground-water flow model. The simulated ages of particles reaching the public-supply well ranged from 9 to 30,000 years, with a median of 54 years. The age of the ground water contributed to the public-supply well increased with depth below the water table. Measured nitrate concentrations, derived primarily from agricultural fertilizer, were highest (17 milligrams per liter) in shallow ground water and decreased with depth to background concentrations of less than 2 milligrams per liter in the deepest wells. Because the movement of water is predominantly downward as a result of ground-water development, and because geochemical conditions are generally oxic, high nitrate concentrations in shallow ground water are expected to continue moving downward without significant attenuation. Simulated long-term nitrate concentrations indicate that concentrations have peaked and will decrease in the public-supply well during the next 100 years

  1. Tracking lava flow emplacement on the east rift zone of Kīlauea, Hawai‘i, with synthetic aperture radar coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah R.; Poland, Michael P.; Schmidt, David A.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Sherrod, David R.; Espinosa, Arkin Tapia

    2012-05-01

    Lava flow mapping is both an essential component of volcano monitoring and a valuable tool for investigating lava flow behavior. Although maps are traditionally created through field surveys, remote sensing allows an extraordinary view of active lava flows while avoiding the difficulties of mapping on location. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, in particular, can detect changes in a flow field by comparing two images collected at different times with SAR coherence. New lava flows radically alter the scattering properties of the surface, making the radar signal decorrelated in SAR coherence images. We describe a new technique, SAR Coherence Mapping (SCM), to map lava flows automatically from coherence images independent of look angle or satellite path. We use this approach to map lava flow emplacement during the Pu`u `Ō`ō-Kupaianaha eruption at Kīlauea, Hawai`i. The resulting flow maps correspond well with field mapping and better resolve the internal structure of surface flows, as well as the locations of active flow paths. However, the SCM technique is only moderately successful at mapping flows that enter vegetation, which is also often decorrelated between successive SAR images. Along with measurements of planform morphology, we are able to show that the length of time a flow stays decorrelated after initial emplacement is linearly related to the flow thickness. Finally, we use interferograms obtained after flow surfaces become correlated to show that persistent decorrelation is caused by post-emplacement flow subsidence.

  2. Slope stability in the critical zone: The relative influence of long vs. short-time scale soil and vegetation properties on debris-flow initiation during a catastrophic rainfall.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengers, F. K.; McGuire, L.; Coe, J. A.; Kean, J. W.; Baum, R. L.; Staley, D. M.; Godt, J.

    2016-12-01

    Within the critical zone there is a feedback between the state of soil and vegetation development, boundary conditions (e.g. topography, climate, hillslope aspect), and biogeochemical and geophysical process fluxes. Here we explore how one process—debris flows initiated by shallow landslides—is influenced by the critical zone development state and the imposed boundary conditions. In this study, we examine a rainstorm in September 2013 in the Colorado Front Range wherein 78% of 1138 debris flows were triggered on south-facing slopes. One hypothesis is that debris-flow initiation sites are controlled by long-term soil formation and bedrock weathering, which are aspect-dependent in the Front Range. A competing hypothesis is that debris flow initiation locations are controlled by present-day vegetation patterns within the critical zone. We tested these hypotheses with a regional investigation of the Green-Red Vegetation Index (GRVI), a metric used to identify the degree of vegetation cover. Although the majority of debris flows were observed on south-facing hillslopes, the GRVI analysis revealed that most debris-flow initiation locations had low tree density and high rainfall, regardless of hillslope aspect. We next numerically simulated soil pore pressure and slope stability using the September 2013 rainfall data at one site. Results suggest that spatial variations in soil depth and the relative extent of bedrock weathering on north- versus south-facing slopes are insufficient to explain the observed spatial variations in debris flow initiation. However, decreased debris flow initiation on north-facing slopes likely resulted from increased root reinforcement provided by trees on north-facing slopes. While the current vegetation regimes in the Colorado Front Range, and throughout much of the semi-arid southwestern U.S., are superimposed on a landscape where soil development and bedrock weathering (both of which affect slope stability) are responding to longer

  3. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOEpatents

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  4. Effects of Fluctuating River flow on Groundwater/Surface Water Mixing in the Hyporheic Zone of a Regulated, Large Cobble Bed River

    SciTech Connect

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Dresel, P. Evan

    2006-10-31

    Physicochemical relationships in the boundary zone between groundwater and surface water (i.e., the hyporheic zone) are controlled by surface water hydrology and the hydrogeologic properties of the riverbed. We studied how sediment permeability and river discharge altered the vertical hydraulic gradient (VHG) and water quality of the hyporheic zone within the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The Columbia River at Hanford is a large, cobble-bed river where water level fluctuates up to 2 m daily because of hydropower generation. Concomitant with recording river stage, continuous readings were made of water temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and water level ofmore » the hyporheic zone. The water level data were used to calculate VHG between the river and hyporheic zone. Sediment permeability was estimated using slug tests conducted in piezometers installed into the river bed. The response of water quality measurements and VHG to surface water fluctuations varied widely among study sites, ranging from no apparent response to co-variance with river discharge. At some sites, a hysteretic relationship between river discharge and VHG was indicated by a time lag in the response of VHG to changes in river stage. The magnitude, rate of change, and hysteresis of the VHG response varied the most at the least permeable location (hydraulic conductivity (K) = 2.9 x 10-4 cms-1), and the least at the most permeable location (K=8.0 x 10-3 cms-1). Our study provides empirical evidence that sediment properties and river discharge both control the water quality of the hyporheic zone. Regulated rivers, like the Columbia River at Hanford, that undergo large, frequent discharge fluctuations represent an ideal environment to study hydrogeologic processes over relatively short time scales (i.e., days to weeks) that would require much longer periods of time to evaluate (i.e., months to years) in un-regulated systems.« less

  5. Fluid pressure and flow at great depth in the continental crust. A discussion in relation to topography, temperature and salinity distribution using as an example the KTB Fault Zones in connection with the Eger Rift Hot Spot.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessels, W.; Kuhlmann, S.; Li, X.

    2006-12-01

    Hydraulic investigations in and between the two KTB boreholes have shown that groundwater flow is possible at great depth in the crystalline crust. Remarkable permeability was found particularly in the SE1 and SE2 fault zones. The results from a long term pump and injection test, and the related three-dimensional groundwater modelling (Graesle et al., 2006), document the existence of a large-scale (more than 10 km) hydraulic reservoir in the crystalline crust. According to this calculation, an overpressure of 0.4 MPa can be still be expected in KTB-HB in 2009, 4 years after the end of the injection. The good match with the measurement data confirms groundwater pathways at a scale of more than 10 km. The isotopic water composition recovered from the KTB pilot hole indicates a downward water flow along the SE2 fault zone, which is in contact with the Franconian Line. Moreover, there is a deep upward groundwater flow 60 km away in the western Eger Rift Valley as indicated e.g. by the temperature signature and gas flow observations. Therefore, the demand for fluid mass continuity means that water is being supplied by a downstream groundwater flow, probably from the Franconian Line. The question of potential driving processes must be answered to understand and quantify the flow in the deeper crust at a scale of 10 km to 100 km. The processes must result in a sufficient horizontal pressure gradient to allow groundwater flow at great depth. The density variations of groundwater with depth are highly relevant for the calculation of horizontal pressure differences. The two independent potential fields of gravity and pressure have to be considered. Differentiation into 4 relevant driving processes is required: \\bullet The groundwater surface topography related to the groundwater recharge and mean regional distance between neighbouring valleys \\bullet Geothermal gradient and water density depending on temperature and pressure \\bullet Different salt contents in adjacent

  6. Large volume sample stacking of positively chargeable analytes in capillary zone electrophoresis without polarity switching: use of low reversed electroosmotic flow induced by a cationic surfactant at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Quirino, J P; Terabe, S

    2000-01-01

    A simple and effective way to improve detection sensitivity of positively chargeable analytes in capillary zone electrophoresis more than 100-fold is described. Cationic species were made to migrate toward the cathode even under reversed electroosmotic flow caused by a cationic surfactant by using a low pH run buffer. For the first time, with such a configuration, large volume sample stacking of cationic analytes is achieved without a polarity-switching step and loss of efficiency. Samples are prepared in water or aqueous acetonitrile. Aromatic amines and a variety of drugs were concentrated using background solutions containing phosphoric acid and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Qualitative and quantitative aspects are also investigated.

  7. Palaeopermeability anisotropies of a strike-slip fault damage zone: 3D Insights of quantitative fluid flow from µCT analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, R.; Arancibia, G.; Nehler, M.; Bracke, R.; Morata, D.

    2017-12-01

    Fault zones and their related structural permeability are a key aspect in the migration of fluids through the continental crust. Therefore, the estimation of the hydraulic properties (palaeopermeability conditions; k) and the spatial distribution of the fracture mesh within the damage zone (DZ) are critical in the assessment of fault zones behavior for fluids. The study of the real spatial distribution of the veinlets of the fracture mesh (3D), feasible with the use of µCT analyses, is a first order factor to unravel both, the real structural permeability conditions of a fault-zone, and the validation of previous (and classical) estimations made in 2D analyses in thin-sections. This work shows the results of a fault-related fracture mesh and its 3D spatial distribution in the damage-zone of the Jorgillo Fault (JF), an ancient subvertical left-lateral strike-slip fault exposed in the Atacama Fault System in northern Chile. The JF is a ca. 20 km long NNW-striking strike-slip fault with sinistral displacement of ca. 4 km. The methodology consisted of drilling 5 mm vertically oriented plugs at several locations within the JF damage zone. Each specimen was scanned with an X-Ray µCT scanner, to assess the fracture mesh, with a voxel resolution of ca. 4.5 µm in the 3D reconstructed data. Tensor permeability modeling, using Lattice-Boltzmann Method, through the segmented microfracture mesh show GMkmin (geometric mean values) of 2.1x10-12 and 9.8x10-13 m2, and GMkmax of 6.4x10-12 and 2.1x10-12 m2. A high degree of anisotropy of the DZ permeability tensor both sides of the JF (eastern and western side, respectively) is observed, where the k values in the kmax plane are 2.4 and 1.9 times higher than the kmin direction at the time of fracture sealing. This style of anisotropy is consistent with the obtained for bedded sandstones supporting the idea that damage zones have an analogous effect - but vertically orientated - on bulk permeability (in low porosity rocks) as

  8. Air Change Rates and Interzonal Flows in Residences, and the Need for Multi-Zone Models for Exposure and Health Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air change rates (ACRs) and interzonal flows are key determinants of indoor air quality (IAQ) and building energy use. This paper characterizes ACRs and interzonal flows in 126 houses, and evaluates effects of these parameters on IAQ. ACRs measured using weeklong tracer measureme...

  9. Electropherogram of capillary zone electrophoresis with effective mobility axis as a transverse axis and its analytical utility. I. Transformation applying the hypothetical electroosmotic flow.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, N; Yamada, Y; Hirokawa, T

    2000-01-01

    For capillary zone electrophoresis, a new method of transformation from migration time to effective mobility was proposed, in which the mobility increase due to Joule heating and the relaxation effect of the potential gradient were eliminated successfully. The precision of the mobility evaluated by the proposed transformation was discussed in relation to the analysis of rare earth ions. By using the transformation, almost the same pherograms could be obtained even from the pherograms obtained originally at different applied voltages.

  10. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation on Passively Excited Flows by Distributed Local Hot Sources Settled at the D" Layer Below Hotspots and/or Large-Scale Cool Masses at Subduction Zones Within the Static Layered Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, T.; Matsubara, K.; Ishida, M.

    2001-12-01

    To unveil dynamic process associated with three-dimensional unsteady mantle convection, we carried out numerical simulation on passively exerted flows by simplified local hot sources just above the CMB and large-scale cool masses beneath smoothed subduction zones. During the study, we used our individual code developed with the finite difference method. The basic three equations are for the continuity, the motion with the Boussinesq (incompressible) approximation, and the (thermal) energy conservation. The viscosity of our model is sensitive to temperature. To get time integration with high precision, we used the Newton method. In detail, the size and thermal energy of the hot or cool sources are not uniform along the latitude, because we could not select uniform local volumes assigned for the sources within the finite difference grids throughout the mantle. Our results, thus, accompany some latitude dependence. First, we treated the case of the hotspots, neglecting the contribution of the subduction zones. The local hot sources below the currently active hotspots were settled as dynamic driving forces included in the initial condition. Before starting the calculation, we assumed that the mantle was statically layered with zero velocity component. The thermal anomalies inserted instantaneously in the initial condition do excite dynamically passive flows. The type of the initial hot sources was not 'plume' but 'thermal.' The simulation results represent that local upwelling flows which were directly excited over the initial heat sources reached the upper mantle by approximately 30 My during the calculation. Each of the direct upwellings above the hotspots has its own dynamic potential to exert concentric down- and up-welling flows, alternately, at large distances. Simultaneously, the direct upwellings interact mutually within the spherical mantle. As an interesting feature, we numerically observed secondary upwellings somewhere in a wide region covering east Eurasia

  11. The Model Analysis of Inclusion Moving in the Swirl Flow Zone Sourcing from the Inner-Swirl-Type Turbulence Controller in Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yan; Ye, Chen; Luo, Xiao; Yuan, Hui; Cheng, Changgui

    2017-05-01

    In order to improve the inclusion removal property of the tundish, the mathematic model for simulation of the flow field sourced from inner-swirl-type turbulence controller (ISTTC) was developed, in which there were six blades arranged with an eccentric angle (θ) counterclockwise. Based on the mathematical and water model, the effect of inclusion removal in the swirling flow field formed by ISTTC was analyzed. It was found that ISTTC had got the better effect of inhibiting turbulence in tundish than traditional turbulence inhibitor (TI). As the blades eccentric angle (θ) of ISTTC increasing, the intensity of swirling flow above it increased. The maximum rotate speed of fluid in swirling flow band driven by ISTTC (θ=45°) was equal to 25 rmp. Based on the force analysis of inclusion in swirling flow sourced from ISTTC, the removal effect of medium size inclusion by ISTTC was attributed to the centripetal force (Fct) of swirling flow, but removal effect of ISTTC to small size inclusion was more depend on its better turbulence depression behavior.

  12. Paleomagnetism of Basaltic Lava Flows in Coreholes ICPP 213, ICPP-214, ICPP-215, and USGS 128 Near the Vadose Zone Research Park, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Champion, Duane E.; Herman, Theodore C.

    2003-01-01

    A paleomagnetic study was conducted on basalt from 41 lava flows represented in about 2,300 ft of core from coreholes ICPP-213, ICPP-214, ICPP-215, and USGS 128. These wells are in the area of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Vadose Zone Research Park within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 508 samples from the four coreholes, which are compared to each other, and to surface outcrop paleomagnetic data. In general, subhorizontal lines of correlation exist between sediment layers and between basalt layers in the area of the new percolation ponds. Some of the basalt flows and flow sequences are strongly correlative at different depth intervals and represent important stratigraphic unifying elements. Some units pinch out, or thicken or thin even over short separation distances of about 1,500 ft. A more distant correlation of more than 1 mile to corehole USGS 128 is possible for several of the basalt flows, but at greater depth. This is probably due to the broad subsidence of the eastern Snake River Plain centered along its topographic axis located to the south of INEEL. This study shows this most clearly in the oldest portions of the cored sections that have differentially subsided the greatest amount.

  13. Lithologic and physicochemical properties and hydraulics of flow in and near the freshwater/saline-water transition zone, San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas, based on water-level and borehole geophysical log data, 1999-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Nyman, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    The freshwater zone of the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas (hereinafter, the Edwards aquifer) is bounded to the south and southeast by a zone of transition from freshwater to saline water (hereinafter, the transition zone). The boundary between the two zones is the freshwater/saline-water interface (hereinafter, the interface), defined as the 1,000-milligrams per liter dissolved solids concentration threshold. This report presents the findings of a study, done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, to obtain lithologic properties (rock properties associated with known stratigraphic units) and physicochemical properties (fluid conductivity and temperature) and to analyze the hydraulics of flow in and near the transition zone of the Edwards aquifer on the basis of water-level and borehole geophysical log data collected from 15 monitoring wells in four transects during 1999-2007. No identifiable relation between conductivity values from geophysical logs in monitoring wells in all transects and equivalent freshwater heads in the wells at the times the logs were run is evident; and no identifiable relation between conductivity values and vertical flow in the boreholes concurrent with the times the logs were run is evident. The direction of the lateral equivalent freshwater head gradient and thus the potential lateral flow at the interface in the vicinity of the East Uvalde transect fluctuates between into and out of the freshwater zone, depending on recharge and withdrawals. Whether the prevailing direction on average is into or out of the freshwater zone is not clearly indicated. Equivalent freshwater head data do not indicate a prevailing direction of the lateral gradient at the interface in the vicinity of the Tri-County transect. The prevailing direction on average of the lateral gradient and thus potential lateral flow at the interface in the vicinity of the Kyle transect likely is from the

  14. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.

    2009-06-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leadsmore » to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and {alpha}-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Pena Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.« less

  15. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone - A case study using uranium isotopes at Peña Blanca, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

    2009-10-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and 234U/ 238U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and α-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Peña Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced 234U/ 238U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using 234U/ 238U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

  16. Carbonate cements indicate channeled fluid flow along a zone of vertical faults at the deformation front of the Cascadia accretionary wedge (northwest U.S. coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sample, James C.; Reid, Mary R.; Tols, Harold J.; Moore, J. Casey

    1993-06-01

    To understand the relation between fluid seeps and structures, sedimentary rocks were collected with the DSRV Alvin from a vertical fault zone that transects the deformation front of the Cascadia accretionary wedge. The rocks contained diagenetic carbonate cement that was precipitated from fluids expelled during accretion. Carbon, oxygen, and strontium isotope data are consistent with a fluid source at >2 km depth. Most carbon isotopes range from -1‰ to -25‰ (PDB [Peedee belemnitel] standard) consistent with a thermogenic methane source. Oxygen isotopes show extreme 18O depletions (-4‰ to -13‰ PDB) that are consistent with precipitation from fluids with temperatures as high as 100 °C. 87Sr/86Sr values of 0.70975 to 0.71279 may be due to strontium in fluids derived from clay-rich parts of the stratigraphic section. The ubiquity of carbonate precipitates and the isotope data indicate that the vertical fault zone is an efficient conduit for fluid dewatering from deep levels of the accretionary wedge.

  17. Simulations of groundwater flow and particle-tracking analysis in the zone of contribution to a public-supply well in San Antonio, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Richard L.; Houston, Natalie A.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Fahlquist, Lynne S.; Kauffman, Leon J.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of short-circuit pathways, for example karst conduits, in the flow system on the movement of young water to the selected public-supply well could greatly alter contaminant arrival times compared to what might be expected from advection in a system without short circuiting. In a forecasting exercise, the simulated concentrations showed rapid initial response at the beginning and end of chemical input, followed by more gradual response as older water moved through the system. The nature of karst groundwater flow, where flow predominantly occurs via conduit flow paths, could lead to relatively rapid water quality responses to land-use changes. Results from the forecasting exercise indicate that timescales for change in the quality of water from the selected public-supply well could be on the order of a few years to decades for land-use changes that occur over days to decades, which has implications for source-water protection strategies that rely on land-use change to achieve water-quality objectives.

  18. Impact of transient stream flow on water exchange and reactions in the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater-surface water exchange is an important process that can facilitate the degradation of critical substances like nitrogen-species and contaminants, supporting a healthy status of the aquatic ecosystem. In our study, we simulate water exchange, solute transport and reactions within a natural in-stream gravel bar using a coupled surface and subsurface numerical model. Stream water flow is simulated by computational fluid dynamics software that provides hydraulic head distributions at the streambed, which are used as an upper boundary condition for a groundwater model. In the groundwater model water exchange, solute transport, aerobic respiration and denitrification in the subsurface are simulated. Ambient groundwater flow is introduced by lateral upstream and downstream hydraulic head boundaries that generate neutral, losing or gaining stream conditions. Stream water transports dissolved oxygen, organic carbon (as the dominant electron donor) and nitrate into the subsurface, whereas an additional nitrate source exists in the ambient groundwater. Scenarios of stream flow events varying in duration and stream stage are simulated and compared with steady state scenarios with respect to water fluxes, residence times and the solute turn-over rates. Results show, that water exchange and solute turn-over rates highly depend on the interplay between event characteristics and ambient groundwater levels. For scenarios, where the stream flow event shifts the hydraulic system to a net-neutral hydraulic gradient between the average stream stage and the ambient groundwater level (minimal exchange between ground- and surface water), solute consumption is higher, compared to the steady losing or gaining case. In contrast, events that induce strong losing conditions lead to a lower potential of solute consumption.

  19. Lower continental crust formation through focused flow in km-scale melt conduits: The zoned ultramafic bodies of the Chilas Complex in the Kohistan island arc (NW Pakistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, O.; Müntener, O.; Burg, J.-P.; Ulmer, P.; Jagoutz, E.

    2006-02-01

    Whole-rock and Sm-Nd isotopic data of the main units of the Chilas zoned ultramafic bodies (Kohistan paleo-island arc, NW Pakistan) indicate that ultramafic rocks and gabbronorite sequences stem from a common magma. However, field observations rule out formation of both ultramafic and mafic sequences in terms of gravitational crystal settling in a large magma chamber. Contacts between ultramafic and gabbronorite sequences show emplacement of the dunitic bodies into a semi-consolidated gabbronoritic crystal-mush, which in turn has intruded and reacted with the ultramafic rocks to produce concentric zoning. Field and petrological observations indicate a replacive origin of the dunite. Bulk Mg#'s of dunitic rocks range from 0.87-0.81 indicating that the dunite-forming melt underwent substantial fractionation-differentiation and that percolative fractional crystallization probably generated the dunitic core. The REE chemistry of clinopyroxene in primitive dunite samples and the Nd isotopic composition of ultramafic rocks are in equilibrium with the surrounding gabbronorite. Accordingly, liquids that formed the dunitic rocks and later the mafic sequence derived from a similar depleted source ( ɛNd˜4.8). We propose a mechanism for the comagmatic emplacement, where km-scale ultramafic bodies represent continuous channels reaching down into the upper mantle. The melt-filled porosity in these melt channels diminishes the mean-depth-integrated density difference to the surrounding rocks. Due to buoyancy forces, melt channels raise into the overlying crustal sequence. In the light of such processes, the ultramafic bodies are interpreted as melt channels through which the Chilas gabbronorite sequence was fed. The estimated basaltic-andesitic, low Mg# (˜0.53) bulk composition of the Chilas gabbronorite sequence closely matches estimates of lower crustal compositions. Since the mafic sequence originated from a primary, high Mg# (> 0.7) basaltic arc magma, differentiation of

  20. Stress concentrations at structural discontinuities in active fault zones in the western United States: Implications for permeability and fluid flow in geothermal fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siler, Drew; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Faulds, James E.

    2018-01-01

    Slip can induce concentration of stresses at discontinuities along fault systems. These structural discontinuities, i.e., fault terminations, fault step-overs, intersections, bends, and other fault interaction areas, are known to host fluid flow in ore deposition systems, oil and gas reservoirs, and geothermal systems. We modeled stress transfer associated with slip on faults with Holocene-to-historic slip histories at the Salt Wells and Bradys geothermal systems in western Nevada, United States. Results show discrete locations of stress perturbation within discontinuities along these fault systems. Well field data, surface geothermal manifestations, and subsurface temperature data, each a proxy for modern fluid circulation in the fields, indicate that geothermal fluid flow is focused in these same areas where stresses are most highly perturbed. These results suggest that submeter- to meter-scale slip on these fault systems generates stress perturbations that are sufficiently large to promote slip on an array of secondary structures spanning the footprint of the modern geothermal activity. Slip on these secondary faults and fractures generates permeability through kinematic deformation and allows for transmission of fluids. Still, mineralization is expected to seal permeability along faults and fractures over time scales that are generally shorter than either earthquake recurrence intervals or the estimated life span of geothermal fields. This suggests that though stress perturbations resulting from fault slip are broadly important for defining the location and spatial extent of enhanced permeability at structural discontinuities, continual generation and maintenance of flow conduits throughout these areas are probably dependent on the deformation mechanism(s) affecting individual structures.

  1. CNSFV code development, virtual zone Navier-Stokes computations of oscillating control surfaces and computational support of the laminar flow supersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopfer, Goetz H.

    1993-01-01

    The work performed during the past year on this cooperative agreement covered two major areas and two lesser ones. The two major items included further development and validation of the Compressible Navier-Stokes Finite Volume (CNSFV) code and providing computational support for the Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT). The two lesser items involve a Navier-Stokes simulation of an oscillating control surface at transonic speeds and improving the basic algorithm used in the CNSFV code for faster convergence rates and more robustness. The work done in all four areas is in support of the High Speed Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center.

  2. Ecological segregation in a small mammal hybrid zone: habitat-specific mating opportunities and selection against hybrids restrict gene flow on a fine spatial scale.

    PubMed

    Shurtliff, Quinn R; Murphy, Peter J; Matocq, Marjorie D

    2014-03-01

    The degree to which closely related species interbreed is determined by a complex interaction of ecological, behavioral, and genetic factors. We examine the degree of interbreeding between two woodrat species, Neotoma bryanti and N. lepida, at a sharp ecological transition. We identify the ecological association of each genotypic class, assess the opportunity for mating between these groups, and test whether they have similar patterns of year-to-year persistence on our study site. We find that 13% of individuals have a hybrid signature but that the two parental populations and backcrosses are highly segregated by habitat type and use. Also, we find that adult hybrids are comparable to parental types in terms of year-to-year persistence on our site but that, among juveniles, significantly fewer hybrids reach adulthood on site compared to their purebred counterparts. Our analyses show that this hybrid zone is maintained by occasional nonassortative mating coupled with hybrid fertility, but that these factors are balanced by lower apparent survival of juvenile hybrids and habitat-based preference or selection that limits heterospecific mating while promoting backcrossing to habitat-specific genotypes. This system presents a novel example of the role that sharp resource gradients play in reproductive isolation and the potential for genetic introgression. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

    1999-10-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptionsmore » used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes

  4. Exploring the dynamics of transit times and runoff source zones in a small agricultural catchment using a physically-based water flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, J. H.; Yang, J.; Heidbuchel, I.; Musolff, A.

    2017-12-01

    Catchment-scale transit time distributions (TTDs) for discharge and residence time distributions (RTDs) of the water in storage are promising tools to characterize the discharge and mixing behavior of a catchment. TTDs and RTDs are dynamic in time, influenced by dynamic rainfall and evapotranspiration forcing, as well as changing groundwater storage in the catchment. In order to understand the links between the dynamics of TTDs and catchment mixing in an agricultural catchment in central Germany, a 3D hydrological model was set up using the fully coupled surface-subsurface numerical code HydroGeoSphere. The transient model is calibrated using discharge and groundwater level measurements, and is run for a period of 10 years from 1997 to 2007. A particle tracking tool was implemented in HydroGeoSphere to track the movement of water parcels in the subsurface, outputting TTDs of discharge and RTDs of groundwater storage at daily intervals. Results show the strong variability of the median age of discharge and median age of the water in storage, in response to the overall wetness of the catchment. Computed fractional StorAge Selection (fSAS, van der Velde et al. 2012, Rinaldo et al. 2015) functions suggest systematic changes in the preference of the catchment to discharge water of a certain age ranges from storage over the seasons: In the wet period, youngest water in storage is preferentially selected, and the preference shifts gradually to older water in storage when the catchment transitions into periods of post-wet, dry and pre-wet. Those changes are driven by distinct shifts in the dominant flow paths from deeper, slow flow paths during dry periods to faster shallow flow paths during the wet season. Changes in the shape of the fSAS functions are quantified in terms of changes in the two parameters of the Beta functions, which are used to approximate the fSAS functions. This provides an opportunity to generate quasi-continuous fSAS functions over the course of a

  5. Methane-Carbon Flow into the Benthic Food Web at Cold Seeps – A Case Study from the Costa Rica Subduction Zone

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Helge; Linke, Peter; Knittel, Katrin; MacPherson, Enrique; Boetius, Antje; Brückmann, Warner; Larvik, Gaute; Wallmann, Klaus; Schacht, Ulrike; Omoregie, Enoma; Hilton, David; Brown, Kevin; Rehder, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Cold seep ecosystems can support enormous biomasses of free-living and symbiotic chemoautotrophic organisms that get their energy from the oxidation of methane or sulfide. Most of this biomass derives from animals that are associated with bacterial symbionts, which are able to metabolize the chemical resources provided by the seeping fluids. Often these systems also harbor dense accumulations of non-symbiotic megafauna, which can be relevant in exporting chemosynthetically fixed carbon from seeps to the surrounding deep sea. Here we investigated the carbon sources of lithodid crabs (Paralomis sp.) feeding on thiotrophic bacterial mats at an active mud volcano at the Costa Rica subduction zone. To evaluate the dietary carbon source of the crabs, we compared the microbial community in stomach contents with surface sediments covered by microbial mats. The stomach content analyses revealed a dominance of epsilonproteobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the free-living and epibiotic sulfur oxidiser Sulfurovum sp. We also found Sulfurovum sp. as well as members of the genera Arcobacter and Sulfurimonas in mat-covered surface sediments where Epsilonproteobacteria were highly abundant constituting 10% of total cells. Furthermore, we detected substantial amounts of bacterial fatty acids such as i-C15∶0 and C17∶1ω6c with stable carbon isotope compositions as low as −53‰ in the stomach and muscle tissue. These results indicate that the white microbial mats at Mound 12 are comprised of Epsilonproteobacteria and that microbial mat-derived carbon provides an important contribution to the crab's nutrition. In addition, our lipid analyses also suggest that the crabs feed on other 13C-depleted organic matter sources, possibly symbiotic megafauna as well as on photosynthetic carbon sources such as sedimentary detritus. PMID:24116017

  6. Methane-carbon flow into the benthic food web at cold seeps--a case study from the Costa Rica subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Helge; Linke, Peter; Knittel, Katrin; MacPherson, Enrique; Boetius, Antje; Brückmann, Warner; Larvik, Gaute; Wallmann, Klaus; Schacht, Ulrike; Omoregie, Enoma; Hilton, David; Brown, Kevin; Rehder, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Cold seep ecosystems can support enormous biomasses of free-living and symbiotic chemoautotrophic organisms that get their energy from the oxidation of methane or sulfide. Most of this biomass derives from animals that are associated with bacterial symbionts, which are able to metabolize the chemical resources provided by the seeping fluids. Often these systems also harbor dense accumulations of non-symbiotic megafauna, which can be relevant in exporting chemosynthetically fixed carbon from seeps to the surrounding deep sea. Here we investigated the carbon sources of lithodid crabs (Paralomis sp.) feeding on thiotrophic bacterial mats at an active mud volcano at the Costa Rica subduction zone. To evaluate the dietary carbon source of the crabs, we compared the microbial community in stomach contents with surface sediments covered by microbial mats. The stomach content analyses revealed a dominance of epsilonproteobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the free-living and epibiotic sulfur oxidiser Sulfurovum sp. We also found Sulfurovum sp. as well as members of the genera Arcobacter and Sulfurimonas in mat-covered surface sediments where Epsilonproteobacteria were highly abundant constituting 10% of total cells. Furthermore, we detected substantial amounts of bacterial fatty acids such as i-C15∶0 and C17∶1ω6c with stable carbon isotope compositions as low as -53‰ in the stomach and muscle tissue. These results indicate that the white microbial mats at Mound 12 are comprised of Epsilonproteobacteria and that microbial mat-derived carbon provides an important contribution to the crab's nutrition. In addition, our lipid analyses also suggest that the crabs feed on other (13)C-depleted organic matter sources, possibly symbiotic megafauna as well as on photosynthetic carbon sources such as sedimentary detritus.

  7. Data analysis and hydrological modelling of frozen ground, shallow groundwater formation and river flow co-evolution at small watersheds of Russia in continuous, discontinuous permafrost and the zone of seasonal ground freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, Luidmila; Semenova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Frozen ground distribution and its properties control the presence of aquifuge and aquifers. Correct representation of interactions between infiltrating water, ground ice, permafrost or seasonal freezing table and river flow is challenging for hydrological modelling in cold regions. Observational data of ground water levels, thawing depths in different landscapes or topographical units and meteorological information with high temporal and spatial resolution are required to analyze seasonal and interannual evolution of groundwater in active layer and its linkage to river flow. Such data are extremely rare in vast and remote regions of Russia. There are few historical datasets inherited from former USSR containing unique collection of long-term daily observations of water fluxes, frozen ground characteristics and groundwater levels. The data from three water balance stations were employed in our study with overall goal to analyze co-evolution of thawing layer, shallow groundwater and river flow by data processing and process-based modelling. Three instrumented small watersheds are situated in continuous, discontinuous permafrost zones and at the territory with seasonally frozen ground. They present different climates, landscapes and geology. The Kolyma water-balance station is located in mountainous region of continuous permafrost in North-Eastern Russia. The watershed area of 22 km2 is covered by bare rocks, mountain tundra, sparse larch forest and wet larch forest depending on slope aspect and inclination. The Bomnak water-balance station (22 km2) is situated in discontinuous permafrost zone in upper part of the Amur River basin and characterized by unmerged permafrost. Dominant landscapes are birch forest and bogs. The Pribaltiyskaya water-balance station (40 km2) located in Latvia is characterized by seasonally frozen ground and is covered by mixed forest and arable land. Process-based Hydrograph model was employed in the study. The model was developed

  8. Geotherms and heat flow estimates in the Odra Fault Zone (NE margin of Bohemian Massif, Central Europe) and its relationships to geological structure of NE termination of the European Variscan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puziewicz, Jacek; Czechowski, Leszek; Majorowicz, Jacek; Pietranik, Anna; Grad, Marek

    2017-04-01

    The NE margin of Variscan Orogen in Europe comprises Sudety Mts., Fore-Sudetic Block, Odra Fault Zone and Fore-Sudetic Homocline. The Sudety Mts. together with the located to the NE Fore-Sudetic Block form NE part of the Bohemian Massif. The Variscan crystalline basement is exposed at the surface here. The Odra Fault Zone is situated further to the NE. It is a ca. 20 km wide horst of crystalline basement, hidden beneath relatively thin (< 1000 m) Permian-Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary sequences and is called the Odra Horst in the following. This horst marks the margin of stretching to NE Fore-Sudetic Homocline, in which the crystalline basement is dipping to NE under thickening Permo-Mesozoic strata, covered by few hundred meter thick Cenozoic sedimentary layer (Żelaźniewicz et al. 2016 and references therein). The Odra Horst is possibly a continuation of the Mid German Crystalline High at the NE side of the Bohemian Massif (Dörr et al. 2006). The copper mines located at the central part of the Odra Horst at depth 600 - 1000 m enable the numerous high-quality temperature measurements. However, complicated geometry of geological units requires 3D simulations. We use 3D numerical thermal model for the considered region. The heat flow in the region is 80 mW/m2 (corrected for paleclimate). This value is higher than in the neighbouring parts of Sudetes and Fore-Sudetic Block ( 70 mW/m2) and compares rather to positive heat flow anomaly stretching NW-SE in Wielkopolska region north of the Dolsk Fault and continuing to NE Germany. This anomaly corresponds crudely to the extent of the Permian volcanic province of Polish and North-East German Basin. Unfortunately, preliminary results of the model are not conclusive, because they depend on many parameters, (compare e.g. Puziewicz et al 2012). It remains an open question if this anomaly could be related to the lithospheric mantle thermal anomalies (Tesauro et al. 2009) or is rather due to crustal rock contributions

  9. Pockmarks, fluid flow, and sediments outboard of the deformation front at the Cascadia Subduction Zone from analysis of multi-channel seismic and multi-beam sonar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. C.; Carbotte, S. M.; Han, S.; Carton, H. D.; Canales, P.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence of active fluid flow and the nature of the sediment section near the Cascadia deformation front are explored using multi-channel (MCS) seismic and multi-beam sonar data collected in summer 2012 using the R/V Marcus G. Langseth during the Juan de Fuca Ridge to Trench Survey. The MCS data were collected along two full plate transects (the 'Oregon' and 'Washington' transects) and one trench parallel line using a 6600 cubic inch source, and an 8 km streamer with 636 channels (12.5 m spacing). The MCS data pre-stack processing sequence includes geometry definition, trace editing, F-K filter, and deconvolution. Velocity analysis is performed via semblance and constant velocity stacks in order to create a velocity model of the sediments and upper oceanic crust. The traces are then stacked, and post-stack time migrated. The sonar data were collected using the R/V Langseth's Kongsberg EM122 1°x1° multi-beam sonar with 288 beams and 432 total soundings across track. Using MB-system the sonar data are cleaned, and the bathymetry data are then gridded at 35 m, while the backscatter data are gridded at 15 m. From the high-resolution mapping data 48 pockmarks varying in diameter from 50 m - 1 km are identified within 60 km outboard of the deformation front. The surface expression of these large features in an area of heavy sedimentation is likely indicative of active fluid flow. In order to gain sub-seafloor perspective on these features the MCS data are draped below the bathymetry/backscatter grids using QPS Fledermaus. From this perspective, specific locations for detailed velocity and attribute analysis of the sediment section are chosen. Sediment velocity and attribute analysis also provide insight into apparent differences in the sediment section and décollement formation along the Oregon and Washington plate transects. While both lines intersect areas of dense pockmark concentration, the area around the Oregon transect has been shown to contain a continuous

  10. The Impact of Mass Movement and Fluid Flow during Ridge Subduction inferred from Physical Properties and Zeolite Assemblage in the Upper Plate Slope of the Costa Rica Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamahashi, M.; Screaton, E.; Tanikawa, W.; Hashimoto, Y.; Martin, K. M.; Saito, S.; Kimura, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Costa Rica subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula is known as an erosive margin with active seismicity and the subduction of the Cocos Ridge. One of the major unknowns in this margin is the nature of the unconformity at the base of the slope sediments in the upper plate and the high velocity materials below. To investigate the geologic processes across the unconformity, we examined the consolidation state and mineral assemblages of the sediments at the mid-slope Site 1380 drilled during IODP Expedition 344 by conducting microstructural observation, particle size analysis, X-ray fluorescence/diffraction analysis and resistivity measurement. The general compaction trend is controlled primarily by grain-size sorting and the physical property transition is likely caused by massive sediment removal under normal fault regime, thickness of which range between ~600-850 m determined from the composite porosity-depth curve. Across the unconformity between the late Pliocene~late Pleistocene silty clay (Unit 1) and late Pliocene~early Pleistocene clayey siltstone (Unit 2), the mineral/element components of the sediments is marked by the transitions in zeolite compositions; Unit 1 consists of laumontite and heulandite, whereas below the unconformity, Unit 2 sediments contain analcime, laumontite, and heulandite, but laumontite become less abundant at lower depth. The experienced temperature of the sediments in Unit 2 is estimated to have reached between ~86 and 122℃ as inferred from analcime burial diagenesis. This may correspond with the greater depth range prior to mass movement and normal faulting. The initial analcime burial diagenetic zone was likely cut off by the sediment removal across the unconformity, and later overprinted by high temperature fluid along the boundary forming laumontite and heulandite in the vicinity. These results illustrate that ridge subduction has substantial potential to cause mass movement, an extensional stress regime, and fluid flow from

  11. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fusselman, Steve

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from themore » outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to

  12. Climate related natural hazards management in the vulnerable regions of Uzbekistan - experiences in the frame of projects Climate Risk Management in Uzbekistan (CRM-Uz) and Water in Central Asia (CAWa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkushkin, Alexander; Gafurov, Abror; Agaltseva, Natalya; Pak, Alexander; Mannig, Birgit; Paeth, Heiko; Vorogushyn, Sergiy; Unger-Shayesteh, Katy

    2014-05-01

    Increased frequency of natural hazards under conditions of observed climate change in Uzbekistan has become challenging concern and shows the need to develop more effective climate risk mechanisms towards improving the security of society and sustainable development. In the framework of presented study, the importance of drought monitoring and methodologies for early warning for such purposes in Uzbekistan are demonstrated. For the conditions of Uzbekistan, droughts are most dangerous climate related natural phenomenon. Therefore, the CRM-Uz Project on Climate Risk Management was established with focus on reducing climate risks, strengthening adaptive capacity for stimulating the development of early warning mechanisms, as well as to build up the basis for long-term investments. This serves to increase resilience to climate impacts in the country. In the frame of the CRM-Uz Project, Drought Early Warning System (DEWS), has been developed and implemented in one of the southern provinces of Uzbekistan (Kashkadarya). The main task of DEWS is to provide population with information on the possibility of upcoming drought season in advance. DEWS is used for the assessment, monitoring, prevention, early warning and decision making in this region. Such early warning system provides the required information to undertake appropriate measures against drought and to mitigate its adverse effects to society. It is clear that during years with expected drought the hydrological forecasts become much more important. Complex mathematical model which simulates of run-off formation as a basis of DEWS provides the seasonal hydrological forecasts that are used to inform all concerned sectors, especially the agricultural sector on water availability during the vegetation period. In the frame of cooperation with German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) within the CAWa Project, the DEWS was extended through implementation of MODSNOW - the operational tool for snow cover monitoring at

  13. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  14. Beyond the classic thermoneutral zone

    PubMed Central

    Kingma, Boris RM; Frijns, Arjan JH; Schellen, Lisje; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2014-01-01

    The thermoneutral zone is defined as the range of ambient temperatures where the body can maintain its core temperature solely through regulating dry heat loss, i.e., skin blood flow. A living body can only maintain its core temperature when heat production and heat loss are balanced. That means that heat transport from body core to skin must equal heat transport from skin to the environment. This study focuses on what combinations of core and skin temperature satisfy the biophysical requirements of being in the thermoneutral zone for humans. Moreover, consequences are considered of changes in insulation and adding restrictions such as thermal comfort (i.e. driver for thermal behavior). A biophysical model was developed that calculates heat transport within a body, taking into account metabolic heat production, tissue insulation, and heat distribution by blood flow and equates that to heat loss to the environment, considering skin temperature, ambient temperature and other physical parameters. The biophysical analysis shows that the steady-state ambient temperature range associated with the thermoneutral zone does not guarantee that the body is in thermal balance at basal metabolic rate per se. Instead, depending on the combination of core temperature, mean skin temperature and ambient temperature, the body may require significant increases in heat production or heat loss to maintain stable core temperature. Therefore, the definition of the thermoneutral zone might need to be reformulated. Furthermore, after adding restrictions on skin temperature for thermal comfort, the ambient temperature range associated with thermal comfort is smaller than the thermoneutral zone. This, assuming animals seek thermal comfort, suggests that thermal behavior may be initiated already before the boundaries of the thermoneutral zone are reached. PMID:27583296

  15. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  16. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  17. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results inmore » the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.« less

  18. High exhaust temperature, zoned, electrically-heated particulate matter filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.; Bhatia, Garima

    2015-09-22

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, an electric heater, and a control circuit. The electric heater includes multiple zones, which each correspond to longitudinal zones along a length of the PM filter. A first zone includes multiple discontinuous sub-zones. The control circuit determines whether regeneration is needed based on an estimated level of loading of the PM filter and an exhaust flow rate. In response to a determination that regeneration is needed, the control circuit: controls an operating parameter of an engine to increase an exhaust temperature to a first temperature during a first period; after the first period, activates the first zone; deactivates the first zone in response to a minimum filter face temperature being reached; subsequent to deactivating the first zone, activates a second zone; and deactivates the second zone in response to the minimum filter face temperature being reached.

  19. A broader classification of damage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Dimmen, V.; Rotevatn, A.; Sanderson, D. J.

    2017-09-01

    Damage zones have previously been classified in terms of their positions at fault tips, walls or areas of linkage, with the latter being described in terms of sub-parallel and synchronously active faults. We broaden the idea of linkage to include structures around the intersections of non-parallel and/or non-synchronous faults. These interaction damage zones can be divided into approaching damage zones, where the faults kinematically interact but are not physically connected, and intersection damage zones, where the faults either abut or cross-cut. The damage zone concept is applied to other settings in which strain or displacement variations are taken up by a range of structures, such as at fault bends. It is recommended that a prefix can be added to a wide range of damage zones, to describe the locations in which they formed, e.g., approaching, intersection and fault bend damage zone. Such interpretations are commonly based on limited knowledge of the 3D geometries of the structures, such as from exposure surfaces, and there may be spatial variations. For example, approaching faults and related damage seen in outcrop may be intersecting elsewhere on the fault planes. Dilation in intersection damage zones can represent narrow and localised channels for fluid flow, and such dilation can be influenced by post-faulting stress patterns.

  20. Zircon growth in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaulina, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    The possibility of direct dating of the deformation process is critical for understanding of orogenic belts evolution. Establishing the age of deformation by isotopic methods is indispensable in the case of uneven deformation overlapping, when later deformation inherits the structural plan of the early strains, and to distinguish them on the basis of the structural data only is impossible. A good example of zircon from the shear zones is zircon formed under the eclogite facies conditions. On the one hand, the composition of zircon speaks about its formation simultaneously to eclogitic paragenesis (Rubatto, Herman, 1999; Rubatto et al., 2003). On the other hand, geological studies show that mineral reactions of eclogitization are often held only in areas of shear deformations, which provides access of fluid to the rocks (Austrheim, 1987; Jamtveit et al., 2000; Bingen et al., 2004). Zircons from mafic and ultramafic rocks of the Tanaelv and Kolvitsa belts (Kola Peninsula, the Baltic Shield) have showed that the metamorphic zircon growth is probably controlled by the metamorphic fluid regime, as evidenced by an increase of zircon quantity with the degree of shearing. The internal structure of zircon crystals can provide an evidence of zircon growth synchronous with shearing. The studied crystals have a sector zoning and often specific "patchy" zoning (Fig. 1), which speaks about rapid change of growth conditions. Such internal structure can be compared with the "snowball" garnet structure reflecting the rotation of crystals during their growth under a shift. Rapidly changing crystallization conditions can also be associated with a small amount of fluid, where supersaturation is changing even at a constant temperature. Thus, the growth of metamorphic zircon in shear zones is more likely to occur in the fluid flow synchronous with deformation. A distinctive feature of zircons in these conditions is isometric shape and sector "patchy" zoning. The work was supported by

  1. Thermal impact of magmatism in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees Jones, David W.; Katz, Richard F.; Tian, Meng; Rudge, John F.

    2018-01-01

    Magmatism in subduction zones builds continental crust and causes most of Earth's subaerial volcanism. The production rate and composition of magmas are controlled by the thermal structure of subduction zones. A range of geochemical and heat flow evidence has recently converged to indicate that subduction zones are hotter at lithospheric depths beneath the arc than predicted by canonical thermomechanical models, which neglect magmatism. We show that this discrepancy can be resolved by consideration of the heat transported by magma. In our one- and two-dimensional numerical models and scaling analysis, magmatic transport of sensible and latent heat locally alters the thermal structure of canonical models by ∼300 K, increasing predicted surface heat flow and mid-lithospheric temperatures to observed values. We find the advection of sensible heat to be larger than the deposition of latent heat. Based on these results we conclude that thermal transport by magma migration affects the chemistry and the location of arc volcanoes.

  2. Small Gas Turbine Combustor Primary Zone Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. E.; Young, E. R.; Miles, G. A.; Williams, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A development process is described which consists of design, fabrication, and preliminary test evaluations of three approaches to internal aerodynamic primary zone flow patterns: (1) conventional double vortex swirl stabilization; (2) reverse flow swirl stabilization; and (3) large single vortex flow system. Each concept incorporates special design features aimed at extending the performance capability of the small engine combustor. Since inherent geometry of these combustors result in small combustion zone height and high surface area to volume ratio, design features focus on internal aerodynamics, fuel placement, and advanced cooling. The combustors are evaluated on a full scale annular combustor rig. A correlation of the primary zone performance with the overall performance is accomplished using three intrusion type gas sampling probes located at the exit of the primary zone section. Empirical and numerical methods are used for designing and predicting the performance of the three combustor concepts and their subsequent modifications. The calibration of analytical procedures with actual test results permits an updating of the analytical design techniques applicable to small reverse flow annular combustors.

  3. Numerical simulation of the vortical flow around a pitching airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiang; Li, Gaohua; Wang, Fuxin

    2017-04-01

    In order to study the dynamic behaviors of the flapping wing, the vortical flow around a pitching NACA0012 airfoil is investigated. The unsteady flow field is obtained by a very efficient zonal procedure based on the velocity-vorticity formulation and the Reynolds number based on the chord length of the airfoil is set to 1 million. The zonal procedure divides up the whole computation domain in to three zones: potential flow zone, boundary layer zone and Navier-Stokes zone. Since the vorticity is absent in the potential flow zone, the vorticity transport equation needs only to be solved in the boundary layer zone and Navier-Stokes zone. Moreover, the boundary layer equations are solved in the boundary layer zone. This arrangement drastically reduces the computation time against the traditional numerical method. After the flow field computation, the evolution of the vortices around the airfoil is analyzed in detail.

  4. Crashworthiness testing of a portable maintenance work-zone barrier.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-12-01

    Barrier and shadow vehicles generally provide Caltrans maintenance workers protection from errant vehicles entering the work zones, from the upstream direction of traffic flow. This type of protection does not protect workers from vehicles entering t...

  5. Design of lane merges at rural freeway construction work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this project is to evaluate unconventional lane-drop merge configurations in the vicinity of construction work zones on rural freeways to comparatively assess the conditions of the various designs that impact delay, flow, and safety throu...

  6. Life zone investigations in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cary, Merritt

    1917-01-01

    Wyoming is among the foremost of our States in its wealth of natural scenery, culminating in the grandeur of Yellowstone National Park, one of the wonders of the world. In addition to this distinction it posseses vast open plains and lofty mountains whence flow the headwaters of mighty river systems emptying far away to the west into the Pacific Ocean, to the southeast into the Gulf of Mexico, and to the southwest into the Gulf of California. The various slope exposures of its mountain ranges, the fertility of its intervening valleys or basins, and the aridity of its desert spaces present a study of geographic and vertical distribution of wild life that is in many particulars unique.The study of geographic and vertical distribution of life with the governing factors and attendant problems is valuable as a matter of scientific research and in the attainment of practical knowledge. The Biological Survey has been making detailed investigations of the transcontinental life belts, or zones, of North America for some years, and this work has been carried on with special reference to their practical value. It has become increasingly evident that life zones furnish a fairly accurate index to average climatic conditions and, therefore, are useful as marking the limits of agricultural possibilities, so far as these are dependent upon climate. The knowledge thus gained has been published and made available as the investigations have progressed and the life zones have been mapped.1

  7. Two-zone countercurrent smelter system and process

    DOEpatents

    Cox, J.H.; Fruehan, R.J.; Elliott, J.F.

    1995-01-03

    A process for continuously smelting iron ore by use of coal to yield molten iron or semi-steel is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of establishing a melt covered by slag; inducing the slag and the molten iron to flow countercurrently to one another, toward opposite ends of the smelter; maintaining iron oxide-reducing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the slag flows; maintaining carbon-oxidizing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the molten iron flows; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the slag from the reducing zone end of the smelter; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the molten iron from the oxidizing zone end of the smelter; and adding to both zones iron ore, coal, oxygen, and flux at addition rates sufficient to keep the molten iron in the reducing zone substantially saturated with carbon, maintain in the slag being tapped an FeO content of about 5 weight percent or less, and maintain in the molten iron being tapped a carbon content of about 0.5 to 5 weight percent. A slag dam preferably is included in the smelter, to impede the backflow of the slag from the reducing zone to the oxidizing zone. A metal bath dam with one or more flow-through portals also is preferably used, submerged below the slag dam, to impede the backflow of the hot metal. 8 figures.

  8. Two-zone countercurrent smelter system and process

    DOEpatents

    Cox, James H.; Fruehan, Richard J.; Elliott, deceased, John F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for continuously smelting iron ore by use of coal to yield molten iron or semi-steel is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of establishing a melt covered by slag; inducing the slag and the molten iron to flow countercurrently to one another, toward opposite ends of the smelter; maintaining iron oxide-reducing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the slag flows; maintaining carbon-oxidizing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the molten iron flows; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the slag from the reducing zone end of the smelter; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the molten iron from the oxidizing zone end of the smelter; and adding to both zones iron ore, coal, oxygen, and flux at addition rates sufficient to keep the molten iron in the reducing zone substantially saturated with carbon, maintain in the slag being tapped an FeO content of about 5 weight percent or less, and maintain in the molten iron being tapped a carbon content of about 0.5 to 5 weight percent. A slag dam preferably is included in the smelter, to impede the backflow of the slag from the reducing zone to the oxidizing zone. A metal bath dam with one or more flow-through portals also is preferably used, submerged below the slag dam, to impede the backflow of the hot metal.

  9. Missouri Work Zone Capacity : Results of Field Data Analysis

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-06-01

    This report presents the results of work zone field data analyzed on interstate highways in Missouri to determine : the mean breakdown and queue-discharge flow rates as measures of capacity. Several days of traffic data : collected at a work zone nea...

  10. Missouri work zone capacity : results of field data analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-06-01

    This report presents the results of work zone field data analyzed on interstate highways in Missouri to : determine the mean breakdown and queue-discharge flow rates as measures of capacity. Several days of : traffic data collected at a work zone nea...

  11. Utilizing Controlled Vibrations in a Microgravity Environment to Understand and Promote Microstructural Homogeneity During Floating-Zone Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anilkumar, A. V.; Bhowmick, J.; Grugel, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Our previous experiments with NaNO3 float-zones revealed that steady thermocapillary flow can be balanced/offset by the controlled surface streaming flow induced by end-wall vibration. In the current experiments we are examining the effects of streaming flow on steadying/stabilizing nonsteady thermocapillary flow in such zones. To this effect we have set up a controlled NaNO3 half-zone experiment, where the processing parameters, like zone dimensions and temperature gradients, can be easily varied to generate nonsteady thermocapillary flows. In the present paper we present preliminary results of our investigations into stabilizing such flows by employing endwall vibration.

  12. Utilizing Controlled Vibrations in a Microgravity Environment to Understand and Promote Microstructural Homogeneity During Float-Zone Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anilkumar, A. V.; Bhowmick, J.; Grugel, R. N.a

    2000-01-01

    Our previous experiments with NaNO3 float-zones revealed that steady thermocapillary flow can be balanced/offset by the controlled surface streaming flow induced by end-wall vibration. In the current experiments we are examining the effects of streaming flow on steadying/stabilizing nonsteady thermocapillary flow in such zones. To this effect we have set up a controlled NaNO3 half-zone experiment, where the processing parameters, like zone dimensions and temperature gradients, can be easily varied to generate nonsteady thermocapillary flows. In the present paper we present preliminary results of our investigations into stabilizing such flows by employing end-wall vibration.

  13. Effect of Microwave Pre-Processing of Pelletized Biomass on its Gasification and Combustion / Mikroviļnu Priekšapstrādes Ietekme Uz Granulētas Biomasas Gazifikācijas Un Degšanas Procesiem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, I.; Līckrastiņa, A.; Valdmanis, J.; Valdmanis, R.; Zaķe, M.; Arshanitsa, A.; Telysheva, G.; Solodovnik, V.

    2013-08-01

    To effectively produce clean heat energy from biomass, microwave (mw) pre-processing of its different types - pelletized wood (spruce), herbaceous biomass (reed canary grass) and their mixture (50:50) - was carried out at the 2.45 GHz frequency with different durations of biomass exposure to high-frequency oscillations. To estimate the mw pre-processing effect on the structure, composition and fuel characteristics of biomass, its thermogravimetric (TG), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements and elemental analysis were made. The pre-processing is shown to enhance the release of moisture and low-calorific volatiles and the partial destruction of biomass constituents (hemicelluloses, cellulose), promoting variations in the elemental composition and heating values of biomass. The field-enhanced variations of biomass characteristics and their influence on its gasification and combustion were studied using an integrated system of a biomass gasifier and a combustor with swirl-enhanced stabilization of the flame reaction zone. The results show that the mw pre-processing of biomass pellets provides a faster weight loss at the gasification, and, therefore, faster ignition and combustion of the activated pellets along with increased output of heat energy at their burnout Veikti kompleksi eksperimentālie pētījumi par mikroviļņu (2,45 GHz) priekšapstrādes ietekmi uz dažādas izcelsmes biomasas granulu (egles, miežabrāļa un to maisījumu 50:50) gazifikācijas un degšanas procesiem. Pētījumi apvieno granulētās biomasas elementārā sastāva un termogravimetriskos mērījumus, kā arī granulētās biomasas gazifikācijas un degšanas procesu kompleksu izpēti, apvienojot biomasas svara izmaiņu kinētiskos mērījumus ar degšanas zonas temperatūras, iekārtas jaudas un degšanas produktu sastāva kinētiskiem mērījumiem. Pētījumiem izmantota mazas jaudas eksperimentālā iekārta (līdz 2,5 kW), kuru veido integrēts gazifikātors un degšanas kamera. P

  14. Rift Zone Abandonment and Reconfiguration in Hawaii: Evidence from Mauna Loa’s Ninole Rift Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. K.; Park, J.; Zelt, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    Large oceanic volcanoes commonly develop elongate rift zones that disperse viscous magmas to the distal reaches of the edifice. Intrusion and dike propagation occur under tension perpendicular to the rift zone, controlled by topography, magmatic pressures, and deformation of the edifice. However, as volcanoes grow and interact, the controlling stress fields can change, potentially altering the orientations and activities of rift zones. This phenomenon is probably common, and can produce complex internal structures that influence the evolution of a volcano and its neighbors. However, little direct evidence for such rift zone reconfiguration exists, primarily due to poor preservation or recognition of earlier volcanic configurations. A new onshore-offshore 3-D seismic velocity model for the Island of Hawaii, derived from a joint tomographic inversion of an offshore airgun shot - onshore receiver geometry and earthquake sources beneath the island, demonstrates a complicated history of rift zone reconfiguration on Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii, including wholesale rift zone abandonment. Mauna Loa’s southeast flank contains a massive high velocity intrusive complex, now buried beneath flows derived from Mauna Loa’s active southwest rift zone (SWRZ). Introduced here as the Ninole Rift Zone, this feature extends more than 60 km south of Mauna Loa’s summit, spans a depth range of ~2-14 km below sea level, and is the probable source of the 100-200 ka Ninole volcanics in several prominent erosional hills. A lack of high velocities beneath the upper SWRZ and its separate zone of high velocities on the submarine flank, indicate that the younger rift zone was built upon a pre-existing edifice that emanated from the Ninole rift zone. The ancient Ninole rift zone may stabilize Mauna Loa’s southeast flank, focusing recent volcanic activity and deformation onto the unbuttressed west flank. The upper portion of the Ninole rift zone appears to have migrated westward over time

  15. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  16. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  17. Work zone safety analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  18. California tree seed zones

    Treesearch

    John M. Buck; Ronald S. Adams; Jerrold Cone; M. Thompson Conkle; William J. Libby; Cecil J. Eden; Michel J. Knight

    1970-01-01

    California forest tree seed zones were established originally by Fowells (1946), with revisions proposed by Roy (1963) and Schubert (1966). The Forest Tree Seed Committee of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, has revised the original zones and updated the recording system described in the earlier reports. Fowells' (1946) Research Note...

  19. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  20. Longleaf pine site zones

    Treesearch

    Phillip J. Craul; John S. Kush; William D. Boyer

    2005-01-01

    The authors delineate six major climatic areas of the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) region. They subdivide these areas into 21 site zones, each of which is deemed homogenous with respect to climate, physiography, and soils. The site zones are mapped and their climate, physiography, and soils described. The authors recommend that plantings of...

  1. Iowa Work Zone Fatalities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    From March through November, the Iowa DOT may have up to 500 road construction work zones, and each of the department's maintenance garages may establish one or more short-term work zones per day. Couple that with the work of cities and counties, and...

  2. Streamflow losses along the Balcones Fault Zone, Nueces River basin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, L.F.; Boning, C.W.; Harmsen, Lynn; Reeves, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical evaluations of historical daily flow records for the streams that have gaging stations upstream and downstream from the recharge zone provided mathematical relationships that expressed downstream flow in terms of other significant parameters. For each stream, flow entering the recharge zone is most significant in defining downstream flow; for some streams, antecedent flows at the upstream site and ground-water levels are also significantly related to downstream flow. The analyses also determined the discharges required upstream from the recharge zone to sustain flow downstream from that zone. These discharges ranged from 355 cubic feet per second for the combined Frio and Dry Frio Rivers to 33 cubic feet per second for the Nueces River. The entire flows of lesser magnitude are generally lost to recharge to the aquifer.

  3. Lava inundation zone maps for Mauna Loa, Island of Hawaiʻi, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Zoeller, Michael H.

    2017-10-12

    Lava flows from Mauna Loa volcano, on the Island of Hawaiʻi, constitute a significant hazard to people and property. This report addresses those lava flow hazards, mapping 18 potential lava inundation zones on the island.

  4. Detonation Reaction Zones in Condensed Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.

    2006-07-01

    Experimental measurements using nanosecond time resolved embedded gauges and laser interferometric techniques, combined with Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doling (NEZND) theory and Ignition and Growth reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling, have revealed the average pressure/particle velocity states attained in reaction zones of self-sustaining detonation waves in several solid and liquid explosives. The time durations of these reaction zone processes are discussed for explosives based on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitromethane, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), triaminitrinitrobenzene(TATB) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  5. Visualization of entry flow separation for oscillating flow in tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang; Simon, Terence W.

    1992-01-01

    Neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles with laser illumination are used to document entry flow separation for oscillating flow in tubes. For a symmetric entry case, the size of the separation zone appears to mildly depend on Reynolds number in the acceleration phase, but is roughly Reynolds number independent in the deceleration phase. For the asymmetric entry case, the separation zone was larger and appeared to grow somewhat during the deceleration phase. The separation zones for both entry geometry cases remain relatively small throughout the cycle. This is different from what would be observed in all-laminar, oscillator flows and is probably due to the high turbulence of the flow, particularly during the deceleration phase of the cycle.

  6. Habitable Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, D.; Lota, J.

    2012-12-01

    The location of the habitable zone around a star depends upon stellar luminosity and upon the properties of a potentially habitable planet such as its mass and near-surface volatile inventory. Stellar luminosity generally increases as a star ages whilst planetary properties change through time as a consequence of biological and geological evolution. Hence, the location of the habitable zone changes through time as a result of both stellar evolution and planetary evolution. Using the Earth's Phanerozoic temperature history as a constraint, it is shown that changes in our own habitable zone over the last 540 My have been dominated by planetary evolution rather than solar evolution. Furthermore, sparse data from earlier times suggests that planetary evolution may have dominated habitable zone development throughout our biosphere's history. Hence, the existence of a continuously habitable zone depends upon accidents of complex bio-geochemical evolution more than it does upon relatively simple stellar-evolution. Evolution of the inner margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations. Evolution of the outer margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations.

  7. Thermal structure and geodynamics of subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Ikuko

    The thermal structure of subduction zones depends on the age-controlled thermal state of the subducting slab and mantle wedge flow. Observations indicate that the shallow part of the forearc mantle wedge is stagnant and the slab-mantle interface is weakened. In this dissertation, the role of the interface strength in controlling mantle wedge flow, thermal structure, and a wide range of subduction zone processes is investigated through two-dimensional finite-element modelling and a global synthesis of geological and geophysical observations. The model reveals that the strong temperature-dependence of the mantle strength always results in full slab-mantle decoupling along the weakened part of the interface and hence complete stagnation of the overlying mantle. The interface immediately downdip of the zone of decoupling is fully coupled, and the overlying mantle is driven to flow at a rate compatible with the subduction rate. The sharpness of the transition from decoupling to coupling depends on the rheology assumed and increases with the nonlinearity of the flow system. This bimodal behaviour of the wedge flow gives rise to a strong thermal contrast between the cold stagnant and hot flowing parts of the mantle wedge. The maximum depth of decoupling (MDD) thus dictates the thermal regime of the forearc. Observed surface heat flow patterns and petrologically and geochemically estimated mantle wedge temperatures beneath the volcanic arc require an MDD of 70--80 km in most, if not all, subduction zones regardless of their thermal regime of the slab. The common MDD of 70--80 km explains the observed systematic variations of the petrologic, seismological, and volcanic processes with the thermal state of the slab and thus explains the rich diversity of subduction zones in a unified fashion. Models for warm-slab subduction zones such as Cascadia and Nankai predict shallow dehydration of the slab beneath the cold stagnant part of the mantle wedge, which provides ample fluid

  8. Ground-water flow and effects of agricultural application of sewage sludge and other fertilizers on the chemical quality of sediments in the unsaturated zone and ground water near Platteville, Colorado, 1985-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaggiani, N.G.

    1995-01-01

    From fall 1985 through 1989, 6,431 dry tons of anaerobic, digested, sewage sludge were applied as a fertilizer on about 1 square mile of sandy farm- land near Platteville, Colorado. Mean nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations in the surficial aquifer increased during the period of sewage- sludge application. However, the effects of municipal sewage sludge applied to the soil in section 16 are difficult to ascertain because anhydrous ammonia and cattle and chicken manure were applied to section 16 prior to sewage-sludge application and anhydrous ammonia was applied during the period of sewage-sludge application. Mostly ammonia plus organic nitrogen was detected in the unsaturated zone while nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen predominated in the surficial aquifer. The areas of largest concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen were in the northeastern and southwestern quarter sections os section 16. Changes in nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations with depth and time were detected in water samples from the multilevel ground-water sampling devices in the surficial aquifer. Nitrogen probably entered the saturated zone in the irrigated areas and low temporarily ponded areas and moved to the northeast with water in the surficial aquifer.

  9. Dicamptodon tenebrosus larvae within hyporheic zones of intermittent streams in California

    Treesearch

    David Feral; Michael A. Camann; Hartwell H. Welsh Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Lotic ecosystems are increasingly viewed as having three interactive spatial compartments, i.e., channel sediments, the hyporheic zone, and flood plains or riparian areas (Cummins et al. 1983; Ward 1989). The hyporheic zone is the sub-benthic habitat of interstitial spaces between substrate particles in the stream bed, and is the transition zone between surface flow...

  10. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  11. Speeds in school zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    School speed zones are frequently requested traffic controls for school areas, based on the common belief : that if the transportation agency would only install a reduced speed limit, then drivers would no longer : speed through the area. This resear...

  12. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  13. Simulated effects of alternative withdrawal strategies on groundwater flow in the unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, the Rio Grande water-bearing zone, and the Atlantic City 800-foot sand in the Great Egg Harbor and Mullica River Basins, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, Daryll A.; Carleton, Glen B.; Buxton, Debra E.; Walker, Richard L.; Shourds, Jennifer L.; Reilly, Pamela A.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is essential for water supply and plays a critical role in maintaining the environmental health of freshwater and estuarine ecosystems in the Atlantic Coastal basins of New Jersey. The unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system and the confined Atlantic City 800-foot sand are major sources of groundwater in the area, and each faces different water-supply concerns. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), conducted a study to simulate the effects of withdrawals in the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, the Atlantic City 800-foot sand, and the Rio Grande water-bearing zone and to evaluate potential scenarios. The study area encompasses Atlantic County and parts of Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, Ocean, Cape May, and Cumberland Counties. The major hydrogeologic units affecting water supply in the study area are the surficial Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, a thick diatomaceous clay confining unit in the upper part of Kirkwood Formation; the Rio Grande water-bearing zone; and the Atlantic City 800-foot sand of the Kirkwood Formation. Hydrogeologic data from 18 aquifer tests and specific capacity data from 230 wells were analyzed to provide horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the aquifers. Groundwater withdrawals are greatest from the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, and 65 percent of the water is used for public supply. Groundwater withdrawals from the Atlantic City 800-foot sand are about half those from the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. Ninety-five percent of the withdrawals from the Atlantic City 800-foot sand is used for public supply. Data from six streamgaging stations and 51 low-flow partial record sites were used to estimate base flow in the area. Base flow ranges from 60 to 92 percent of streamflow. A groundwater flow model of the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, the Rio Grande water-bearing zone, and the Atlantic City 800-foot sand was developed and calibrated

  14. Project Rulison gas flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Montan, D.N.

    1971-01-01

    An analysis of the well performance was attempted by fitting a simple model of the chimney, gas sands, and explosively created fracturing to the 2 experimentally measured variables, flow rate, and chimney pressure. The gas-flow calculations for various trial models were done by a finite difference solution to the nonlinear partial differential equation for radial Darcy flow. The TRUMP computer program was used to perform the numerical calculations. In principle, either the flow rate or the chimney pressure could be used as the independent variable in the calculations. In the present case, the flow rate was used as the independentmore » variable, since chimney pressure measurements were not made until after the second flow period in early Nov. 1970. Furthermore, the formation pressure was not accurately known and, hence, was considered a variable parameter in the modeling process. The chimney pressure was assumed equal to the formation pressure at the beginning of the flow testing. The model consisted of a central zone, representing the chimney, surrounded by a number of concentric zones, representing the formation. The effect of explosive fracturing was simulated by increasing the permeability in the zones near the central zone.« less

  15. Evolution of a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Van Hoolst, Tim; Dehant, Veronique

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand how Earth's surface might have evolved with time and to examine in a more general way the initiation and continuance of subduction zones and the possible formation of continents on an Earth-like planet. Plate tectonics and continents seem to influence the likelihood of a planet to harbour life, and both are strongly influenced by the planetary interior (e.g. mantle temperature and rheology) and surface conditions (e.g. stabilizing effect of continents, atmospheric temperature), but may also depend on the biosphere. Employing the Fortran convection code CHIC (developed at the Royal Observatory of Belgium), we simulate a subduction zone with a pre-defined weak zone (between oceanic and continental crust) and a fixed plate velocity for the subducting oceanic plate (Quinquis et al. in preparation). In our study we first investigate the main factors that influence the subduction process. We simulate the subduction of an oceanic plate beneath a continental plate (Noack et al., 2013). The crust is separated into an upper crust and a lower crust. We apply mixed Newtonian/non-Newtonian rheology and vary the parameters that are most likely to influence the subduction of the ocanic plate, as for example density of the crust/mantle, surface temperature, plate velocity and subduction angle. The second part of our study concentrates on the long-term evolution of a subduction zone. Even though we model only the upper mantle (until a depth of 670km), the subducted crust is allowed to flow into the lower mantle, where it is no longer subject to our investigation. This way we can model the subduction zone over long time spans, for which we assume a continuous inflow of the oceanic plate into the investigated domain. We include variations in mantle temperatures (via secular cooling and decay of radioactive heat sources) and dehydration of silicates (leading to stiffening of the material). We investigate how the mantle environment influences

  16. Delineation of faults, fractures, foliation, and ground-water-flow zones in fractured-rock, on the southern part of Manhattan, New York, through use of advanced borehole-geophysical techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumm, Frederick; Chu, Anthony; Monti, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Advanced borehole-geophysical techniques were used to assess the geohydrology of crystalline bedrock in 20 boreholes on the southern part of Manhattan Island, N.Y., in preparation for construction of a third water tunnel for New York City. The borehole-logging techniques included natural gamma, single-point resistance, short-normal resistivity, mechanical and acoustic caliper, magnetic susceptibility, borehole-fluid temperature and resistivity, borehole-fluid specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, redox, heatpulse flowmeter (at selected boreholes), borehole deviation, acoustic and optical televiewer, and borehole radar (at selected boreholes). Hydraulic head and specific-capacity test data were collected from 29 boreholes. The boreholes penetrated gneiss, schist, and other crystalline bedrock that has an overall southwest to northwest-dipping foliation. Most of the fractures penetrated are nearly horizontal or have moderate- to high-angle northwest or eastward dip azimuths. Foliation dip within the potential tunnel-construction zone is northwestward and southeastward in the proposed North Water-Tunnel, northwestward to southwestward in the proposed Midtown Water-Tunnel, and northwestward to westward dipping in the proposed South Water-Tunnel. Fracture population dip azimuths are variable. Heat-pulse flowmeter logs obtained under pumping and nonpumping (ambient) conditions, together with other geophysical logs, indicate transmissive fracture zones in each borehole. The 60-megahertz directional borehole-radar logs delineated the location and orientation of several radar reflectors that did not intersect the projection of the borehole.Fracture indexes range from 0.12 to 0.93 fractures per foot of borehole. Analysis of specific-capacity tests from each borehole indicated that transmissivity ranges from 2 to 459 feet squared per day; the highest transmissivity is at the Midtown Water-Tunnel borehole (E35ST-D).

  17. Comment on "Evaluating interactions between groundwater and vadose zone using the HYDRUS-based flow package for MODFLOW" by Navin Kumar C. Twarakavi, Jirka Šimůnek and Sophia Seo

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, R.G.; Prudic, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Twarakavi et al (2008) compared four packages that can be used to estimate recharge for regional-scale groundwater flow simulations using MODFLOW (Harbaugh, 2005). This comment is focused on the comparisons made between two of these packages, namely, UZF1 (Niswonger et al., 2006) and a derivative of HYDRUS referred to herein as HYDRUS (Seo et al., 2007). In their paper, Twarakavi et al. (2008) stated that HYDRUS more accurately simulates unsaturated flow processes and groundwater recharge as compared to UZF1. However, Twarakavi et al. (2008) did not address several important differences between these models that undermine the advantages of HYDRUS as compared to UZF1 for simulating recharge. These differences were not revealed by the comparisons presented by Twarakavi et al. because the test simulations used to compare the models were too simple

  18. ON HYDRODYNAMIC MOTIONS IN DEAD ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark, E-mail: jsoishi@astro.berkeley.ed, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.or

    We investigate fluid motions near the midplane of vertically stratified accretion disks with highly resistive midplanes. In such disks, the magnetorotational instability drives turbulence in thin layers surrounding a resistive, stable dead zone. The turbulent layers in turn drive motions in the dead zone. We examine the properties of these motions using three-dimensional, stratified, local, shearing-box, non-ideal, magnetohydrodynamical simulations. Although the turbulence in the active zones provides a source of vorticity to the midplane, no evidence for coherent vortices is found in our simulations. It appears that this is because of strong vertical oscillations in the dead zone. By analyzingmore » time series of azimuthally averaged flow quantities, we identify an axisymmetric wave mode particular to models with dead zones. This mode is reduced in amplitude, but not suppressed entirely, by changing the equation of state from isothermal to ideal. These waves are too low frequency to affect sedimentation of dust to the midplane, but may have significance for the gravitational stability of the resulting midplane dust layers.« less

  19. Mushy zone modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Smith, Richard N.; Marsh, Steven P.; Kuklinski, Robert

    A key element of mushy zone modeling is the description of the microscopic evolution of the lengthscales within the mushy zone and the influence of macroscopic transport processes. This paper describes some recent progress in developing a mean-field statistical theory of phase coarsening in adiabatic mushy zones. The main theoretical predictions are temporal scaling laws that indicate that average lengthscale increases as time 1/3, a self-similar distribution of mushy zone lengthscales based on spherical solid particle shapes, and kinetic rate constants which provide the dependences of the coarsening process on material parameters and the volume fraction of the solid phase. High precision thermal decay experiments are described which verify aspects of the theory in pure material mushy zones held under adiabatic conditions. The microscopic coarsening theory is then integrated within a macroscopic heat transfer model of one-dimensional alloy solidification, using the Double Integral Method. The method demonstrates an ability to predict the influence of macroscopic heat transfer on the evolution of primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings in Al-Cu alloys. Finally, some suggestions are made for future experimental and theoretical studies required in developing comprehensive solidification processing models.

  20. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  1. Freeway work zone lane capacity.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this report is a capacity analysis of two long-term urban freeway Work Zones. Work Zone #1 : tapered four mainline lanes to two, using two separate tapers; Work Zone #2 tapered two mainline lanes to one. : Work Zone throughput was analyz...

  2. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

    1999-06-22

    A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

  3. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Hannum, David W.; Conrad, Frank James

    1999-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow.

  4. Influence of the parameters of a high-frequency acoustic wave on the structure, properties, and plastic flow of metal in the zone of a joint of materials welded by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, A. P.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, E. V.; Dorodnikov, A. N.

    2017-05-01

    The results of an investigation of the influence of the parameters of high-frequency acoustic wave on the structure and properties of the zone of joint of homogeneous metals bonded by explosive welding under the action of ultrasound have been presented. The influence of the frequency and amplitude of ultrasonic vibrations on the structure and properties of the explosively welded joints compared with the samples welded without the application of ultrasound has been established. The action of high-frequency acoustic waves on the metal leads to a reduction in the dynamic yield stress, which changes the properties of the surface layers of the metal and the conditions of the formation of the joint of the colliding plates upon the explosive welding. It has been shown that the changes in the length and amplitude of waves that arise in the weld joint upon the explosive welding with the simultaneous action of ultrasonic vibrations are connected with a decrease in the magnitude of the deforming pulse and time of action of the compressive stresses that exceed the dynamic yield stress beyond the point of contact.

  5. Dike zones on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.; Sukhanov, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Venusian dike zone structures were identified from Venera 15 and 16 radar images. These include: a zone of subparallel rows centered at 30 deg N, 7 deg E; a system of intersecting bands centered at 67 deg N, 284 deg E; polygonal systems in lavas covering the structural base uplift centered at 47 deg N, 200 deg E; a system of light bands in the region of the ring structure centered at 43 deg N, 13 deg E; and a dike band centered at 27 deg N, 36 deg E.

  6. Optimization of remediation strategies using vadose zone monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Ofer

    2016-04-01

    In-situ bio-remediation of the vadose zone depends mainly on the ability to change the subsurface hydrological, physical and chemical conditions in order to enable development of specific, indigenous, pollutants degrading bacteria. As such the remediation efficiency is much dependent on the ability to implement optimal hydraulic and chemical conditions in deep sections of the vadose zone. These conditions are usually determined in laboratory experiments where parameters such as the chemical composition of the soil water solution, redox potential and water content of the sediment are fully controlled. Usually, implementation of desired optimal degradation conditions in deep vadose zone at full scale field setups is achieved through infiltration of water enriched with chemical additives on the land surface. It is assumed that deep percolation into the vadose zone would create chemical conditions that promote biodegradation of specific compounds. However, application of water with specific chemical conditions near land surface dose not necessarily results in promoting of desired chemical and hydraulic conditions in deep sections of the vadose zone. A vadose-zone monitoring system (VMS) that was recently developed allows continuous monitoring of the hydrological and chemical properties of deep sections of the unsaturated zone. The VMS includes flexible time-domain reflectometry (FTDR) probes which allow continuous monitoring of the temporal variation of the vadose zone water content, and vadose-zone sampling ports (VSPs) which are designed to allow frequent sampling of the sediment pore-water and gas at multiple depths. Implementation of the vadose zone monitoring system in sites that undergoes active remediation provides real time information on the actual chemical and hydrological conditions in the vadose zone as the remediation process progresses. Up-to-date the system has been successfully implemented in several studies on water flow and contaminant transport in

  7. Transition zone cells reach G2 phase before initiating elongation in maize root apex

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, M. Victoria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Root elongation requires cell divisions in the meristematic zone and cell elongation in the elongation zone. The boundary between dividing and elongating cells is called the transition zone. In the meristem zone, initial cells are continuously dividing, but on the basal side of the meristem cells exit the meristem through the transition zone and enter in the elongation zone, where they stop division and rapidly elongate. Throughout this journey cells are accompanied by changes in cell cycle progression. Flow cytometry analysis showed that meristematic cells are in cycle, but exit when they enter the elongation zone. In addition, the percentage of cells in G2 phase (4C) strongly increased from the meristem to the elongation zone. However, we did not observe remarkable changes in the percentage of cells in cell cycle phases along the entire elongation zone. These results suggest that meristematic cells in maize root apex stop the cell cycle in G2 phase after leaving the meristem. PMID:28495964

  8. Quantifying the Variation in Shear Zone Character with Depth: a Case Study from the Simplon Shear Zone, Central Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, T. K.; Platt, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    A widely-accepted model for the rheology of crustal-scale shear zones states that they comprise distributed strain at depth, in wide, high-temperature shear zones, which narrow to more localized, high-strain zones at lower temperature and shallower crustal levels. We test and quantify this model by investigating how the width, stress, temperature and deformation mechanisms change with depth in the Simplon Shear Zone (SSZ). The SSZ marks a major tectonic boundary in the central Alps, where normal-sense motion and rapid exhumation of the footwall have preserved evidence of older, deeper deformation in rocks progressively further into the currently-exposed footwall. As such, microstructures further from the brittle fault (which represents the most localized, most recently-active part of the SSZ) represent earlier, higher- temperature deformation from deeper crustal levels, while rocks closer to the fault have been overprinted by successively later, cooler deformation at shallower depths. This study uses field mapping and microstructural studies to identify zones representing deformation at various crustal levels, and characterize each in terms of zone width (representing width of the shear zone at that time and depth) and dominant deformation mechanism. In addition, quartz- (by Electron Backscatter Diffraction, EBSD) and feldspar grain size (measured optically) piezometry are used to calculate the flow stress for each zone, while the Ti-in-quartz thermometer (TitaniQ) is used to calculate the corresponding temperature of deformation. We document the presence of a broad zone in which quartz is recrystallized by the Grain Boundary Migration (GBM) mechanism and feldspar by Subgrain Rotation (SGR), which represents the broad, deep zone of deformation occurring at relatively high temperatures and low stresses. In map view, this transitions to successively narrower zones, respectively characterized by quartz SGR and feldspar Bulge Nucleation (BLG); quartz BLG and brittle

  9. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  10. Arid Zone Hydrology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arid zone hydrology encompasses a wide range of topics and hydro-meteorological and ecological characteristics. Although arid and semi-arid watersheds perform the same functions as those in humid environments, their hydrology and sediment transport characteristics cannot be readily predicted by inf...

  11. Zone of intrusion study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-15

    The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF) performed an analysis using LS-DYNA simulation to investigate the zone of intrusion (ZOI) of an NCHRP Report No. 350 2000p pickup truck when impacting a 40-in. high F-shape parapet. : The ZOI for the 40-in...

  12. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  14. Crossing Comfort Zones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison, D. Soyini

    1993-01-01

    Offers a narrative based on a real event, in the form of a "docustory," describing that moment when teaching worked--when, in an instructional setting, communication was "perfect" or "excellent." Describes how three very different students, in a course on the cultures of women of color, moved beyond comfort zones while working together on a class…

  15. Characterization of a high-transmissivity zone by well test analysis: Steady state case

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, Claire; Hsieh, Paul A.; Christian, Sarah B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is developed to analyze steady horizontal flow to a well pumped from a confined aquifer composed of two homogeneous zones with contrasting transmissivities. Zone 1 is laterally unbounded and encloses zone 2, which is elliptical in shape and is several orders of magnitude more transmissive than zone 1. The solution for head is obtained by the boundary integral equation method. Nonlinear least squares regression is used to estimate the model parameters, which include the transmissivity of zone 1, and the location, size, and orientation of zone 2. The method is applied to a hypothetical aquifer where zone 2 is a long and narrow zone of vertical fractures. Synthetic data are generated from three different well patterns, representing different areal coverage and proximity to the fracture zone. When zone 1 of the hypothetical aquifer is homogeneous, the method correctly estimates all model parameters. When zone 1 is a randomly heterogeneous transmissivity field, some parameter estimates, especially the length of zone 2, become highly uncertain. To reduce uncertainty, the pumped well should be close to the fracture zone, and surrounding observation wells should cover an area similar in dimension to the length of the fracture zone. Some prior knowledge of the fracture zone, such as that gained from a surface geophysical survey, would greatly aid in designing the well test.

  16. Europa, tidally heated oceans, and habitable zones around giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Ray T.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Kasting, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Tidal dissipation in the satellites of a giant planet may provide sufficient heating to maintain an environment favorable to life on the satellite surface or just below a thin ice layer. Europa could have a liquid ocean which may occasionally receive sunlight through cracks in the overlying ice shell. In such a case, sufficient solar energy could reach liquid water that organisms similar to those found under Antarctic ice could grow. In other solar systems, larger satellites with more significant heat flow could represent environments that are stable over an order of eons and in which life could perhaps evolve. A zone around a giant planet is defined in which such satellites could exist as a tidally-heated habitable zone. This zone can be compared to the habitable zone which results from heating due to the radiation of a central star. In this solar system, this radiatively-heated habitable zone contains the earth.

  17. Europa, tidally heated oceans, and habitable zones around giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, R. T.; McKay, C. P.; Kasting, J. F.

    Tidal dissipation in the satellites of a giant planet may provide sufficient heating to maintain an environment favorable to life on the satellite surface or just below a thin ice layer. Europa could have a liquid ocean which may occasionally receive sunlight through cracks in the overlying ice shell. In such a case, sufficient solar energy could reach liquid water that organisms similar to those found under Antarctic ice could grow. In other solar systems, larger satellites with more significant heat flow could represent environments that are stable over an order of eons and in which life could perhaps evolve. A zone around a giant planet is defined in which such satellites could exist as a tidally-heated habitable zone. This zone can be compared to the habitable zone which results from heating due to the radiation of a central star. In this solar system, this radiatively-heated habitable zone contains the earth.

  18. Laminar mixing in a small floating zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriott, George M.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the flow and solute fields during steady mass transfer of a dilute component is analyzed for multi-cellular rotating flows in the floating zone process of semiconductor growth. When the recirculating flows are weak in relation to the rate of crystal growth, a closed-form solution clearly shows the link between the convection pattern in the melt and the solute distribution across the surface of the growing solid. In the limit of strong convection, finite element calculations demonstrate the tendency of the composition to become uniform over the majority of the melt. The solute segregation in the product crystal is greatest when the recirculating motion is comparable to the rate of crystal growth, and points to the danger in attempting to grow compositionally uniform materials from a nearly convectionless melt.

  19. Latvian Waste Management Modelling in View of Environmental Impact Reduction / Latvijas Atkritumu SAIMNIECĪBAS ATTĪSTĪBA un TĀS RADĪTĀS Ietekmes UZ Vidi SAMAZINĀŠANAS MODELĒŠANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teibe, I.; Bendere, R.; Arina, D.

    2013-12-01

    In the work, the life-cycle assessment approach is applied to the planning of waste management development in a seaside region (Piejūra) using the Waste Management Planning System (WAMPS) program. In Latvia, the measures to be taken for the climate change mitigation are of utmost importance - especially as related to the WM performance, since a disposal of biodegradable waste presents the primary source of GHG emissions. To reduce the amount of such waste is therefore one of the most significant goals in the State WM plan for 2013-2020, whose adoption is the greatest challenge for municipalities. The authors analyse seven models which involve widely employed biomass processing methods, are based on experimental data and intended for minimising the direct disposal of organic mass at the solid waste landfills. The numerical results obtained evidence that the thermal or biotechnological treatment of organic waste substantially reduces the negative environmental impact of WM practices - by up to 6% as compared with the currently existing. Klimata pārmaiņu samazināšanas pasākumi Latvijā atkritumu saimniecības sektorā ir īpaši svarīgi. jo bioloģiski sadalāmo atkritumu apglabāšana ir viens no būtiskākajiem SEG emisiju avotiem valstī. Pētījumā modelēti virkne sadzīves atkritumu apsaimniekošanas modeļi. kas ietver plašāk izmantotās biomasas pārstrādes metodes un samazina tiešu organiskās masas apglabāšanu cieto sadzīves atkritumu poligonos. Atkritumu apsaimniekošanas modeļu radītās vides ietekmes novērtēšanai izmantota WAMPS (Waste Management Planning System) programma, kas balstīta uz atkritumu apsaimniekošanas procesu dzīves cikla novērtējumu vienā no desmit Latvijas atkritumu apsaimniekošanas reģioniem - Piejūra. Iegūtie kvantitatīvie rezultāti norāda. ka organiskās atkritumu masas pārstrāde un stabilizēšana, izmantojot biotehnoloģijas vai termisko pārstrādi, būtiski samazina atkritumu apsaimniekošanas rad

  20. The Equatorial Coordinates and B-Magnitudes of the Stars in the Southern Hemisphere Zones Based on the Digitized Astronegatives of FON Project at the Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuldoshev, Q. X.; Muminov, M. M.; Ehgamberdiev, Sh. A.; Usmanov, O. U.; Relke, H.; Protsyuk, Yu. I.; Kovylianska, O. E.; Protsyuk, S. V.; Andruk, V. N.

    FON (Russian abbreviation of the Photographic Sky Survey) were carried out at 6 observatories. The Kitab Observatory (KO) of Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute (UBAI) of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences (UzAS) was involved in this project from 1981 to 1996. For the observations the Double Astrograph of Zeiss (DAZ, D/F = 40/300, 69"/mm) was used. On the FON project about 2600 photographic plates were exposed. In October, 2015 digitization of these astroplates were started using EPSON Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner with the spatial resolution of 1200 dpi and completed in June, 2016. The first stage of the work is the processing of the 2000 photographic plates in zones of the southern hemisphere with the declination between 0 and -20 degrees. The 1704 plates have already been processed. The equatorial coordinates α, δ of stars and galaxies were determined in the system of the Tycho2 catalogue and the Bmagnitudes in the system of the photoelectric standards. UBAI UzAS, Tashkent (Uzbekistan), ASU, Andijan (Uzbekistan), WHO, Essen (Germany), RI NAO, Nikolaev (Ukraine), MAO NASU, Kyiv (Ukraine) have taken part in the processing of the digitized images. For the data reduction the MIDAS package and software, developed in the MAO NASU were used. Based on the results of the processing of the astronegatives in the sectors of right ascension from 0 hours to 24 hours and declination from - 20° to 0° the internal errors of the catalogue were estimated. The errors calculated for all stars are 0.17" and 0.18m respectively. For the stars brighter than 14 magnitude the errors are 0.08" and 0.07m for the equatorial coordinates and B-magnitudes respectively.

  1. Temporal Hyporheic Zone Response to Water Table Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Malzone, Jonathan M; Anseeuw, Sierra K; Lowry, Christopher S; Allen-King, Richelle

    2016-03-01

    Expansion and contraction of the hyporheic zone due to temporal hydrologic changes between stream and riparian aquifer influence the biogeochemical cycling capacity of streams. Theoretical studies have quantified the control of groundwater discharge on the depth of the hyporheic zone; however, observations of temporal groundwater controls are limited. In this study, we develop the concept of groundwater-dominated differential hyporheic zone expansion to explain the temporal control of groundwater discharge on the hyporheic zone in a third-order stream reach flowing through glacially derived terrain typical of the Great Lakes region. We define groundwater-dominated differential expansion of the hyporheic zone as: differing rates and magnitudes of hyporheic zone expansion in response to seasonal vs. storm-related water table fluctuation. Specific conductance and vertical hydraulic gradient measurements were used to map changes in the hyporheic zone during seasonal water table decline and storm events. Planar and riffle beds were monitored in order to distinguish the cause of increasing hyporheic zone depth. Planar bed seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone was of a greater magnitude and longer in duration (weeks to months) than storm event expansion (hours to days). In contrast, the hyporheic zone beneath the riffle bed exhibited minimal expansion in response to seasonal groundwater decline compared to storm related expansion. Results indicated that fluctuation in the riparian water table controlled seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone along the planar bed. This groundwater induced hyporheic zone expansion could increase the potential for biogeochemical cycling and natural attenuation. © 2015, National Ground Water Association.

  2. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets tomore » validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated

  3. Radial Anisotropy in the Mantle Transition Zone and Its Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. J.; Ferreira, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy is a useful tool to investigate mantle flow, mantle convection, and the presence of melts in mantle, since it provides information on the direction of mantle flow or the orientation of melts by combining it with laboratory results in mineral physics. Although the uppermost and lowermost mantle with strong anisotropy have been well studied, anisotropic properties of the mantle transition zone is still enigmatic. We use a recent global radially anisotropic model, SGLOBE-rani, to examine the patterns of radial anisotropy in the mantle transition zone. Strong faster SV velocity anomalies are found in the upper transition zone beneath subduction zones in the western Pacific, which decrease with depth, thereby nearly isotropic in the lower transition zone. This may imply that the origin for the anisotropy is the lattice-preferred orientation of wadsleyite, the dominant anisotropic mineral in the upper transition zone. The water content in the upper transition zone may be inferred from radial anisotropy because of the report that anisotropic intensity depends on the water content in wadsleyite.

  4. Evaluation of Ohio work zone speed zones process.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to determine the effectiveness of Ohio Department of Transportation processes for establishing work zone speed zones. Researchers observed motorists speed choice upstream of a...

  5. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  6. A benchmark for subduction zone modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Keken, P.; King, S.; Peacock, S.

    2003-04-01

    Our understanding of subduction zones hinges critically on the ability to discern its thermal structure and dynamics. Computational modeling has become an essential complementary approach to observational and experimental studies. The accurate modeling of subduction zones is challenging due to the unique geometry, complicated rheological description and influence of fluid and melt formation. The complicated physics causes problems for the accurate numerical solution of the governing equations. As a consequence it is essential for the subduction zone community to be able to evaluate the ability and limitations of various modeling approaches. The participants of a workshop on the modeling of subduction zones, held at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, MI, USA in 2002, formulated a number of case studies to be developed into a benchmark similar to previous mantle convection benchmarks (Blankenbach et al., 1989; Busse et al., 1991; Van Keken et al., 1997). Our initial benchmark focuses on the dynamics of the mantle wedge and investigates three different rheologies: constant viscosity, diffusion creep, and dislocation creep. In addition we investigate the ability of codes to accurate model dynamic pressure and advection dominated flows. Proceedings of the workshop and the formulation of the benchmark are available at www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/~keken/subduction02.html We strongly encourage interested research groups to participate in this benchmark. At Nice 2003 we will provide an update and first set of benchmark results. Interested researchers are encouraged to contact one of the authors for further details.

  7. Aeration Zone Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, B.

    The International Symposium on Recent Investigations in the Zone of Aeration (RIZA) was organized by the Institute for Hydrogeology and Hydrochemistry of the Technical University of Munich and held October 1-5, 1984, in the lecture halls of the Grosshadern Klinik in Munich, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). P. Udluft, B. Merkel, and K.-H. Prüsl, all of the university, were responsible for the organization of the symposium, which was under the patronage of K.-E. Quentin. There were over 200 participants from 22 different countries, among them Australia, Canada, China, India, and the United States. The topics of the symposium were the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes in the unsaturated zone, the region between the surface and the groundwater level. Here a number of complex processes occur that on the one hand are of natural origin and on the other hand are influenced by human activities in a number of ways.

  8. Geomorphic controls on hyporheic exchange flow in mountain streams.

    Treesearch

    T. Kasahara; S.M. Wondzell

    2003-01-01

    Hyporheic exchange flows were simulated using MODFLOW and MODPATH to estimate relative effects of channel morphologic features on the extent of the hyporheic zone, on hyporheic exchange flow, and on the residence time of stream water in the hyporheic zone. Four stream reaches were compared in order to examine the influence of stream size and channel constraint. Within...

  9. Crash characteristics at work zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-01-01

    Work zones tend to cause hazardous conditions for drivers and construction workers since they generate conflicts between construction activities and traffic. A clear understanding of the characteristics of work zone crashes will enhance the selection...

  10. Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System water quality modeling and decision support system designed for environmental impact assessment of mixing zones resulting from wastewater discharge from point sources

  11. Work zone intrusion alarm effectiveness.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-09-01

    16. Abstract : The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) commissioned a study to evaluate how : effective a work zone safety device known as the SonoBlaster! Work Zone Intrusion Alarm would be : in protecting maintenance workers fro...

  12. Trojans in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Dvorak, Rudolf; Erdi, Balint; Sándor, Zsolt

    2005-10-01

    With the aid of numerical experiments we examined the dynamical stability of fictitious terrestrial planets in 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jovian-like planets of extrasolar planetary systems. In our stability study of the so-called "Trojan" planets in the habitable zone, we used the restricted three-body problem with different mass ratios of the primary bodies. The application of the three-body problem showed that even massive Trojan planets can be stable in the 1:1 mean motion resonance. From the 117 extrasolar planetary systems only 11 systems were found with one giant planet in the habitable zone. Out of this sample set we chose four planetary systems--HD17051, HD27442, HD28185, and HD108874--for further investigation. To study the orbital behavior of the stable zone in the different systems, we used direct numerical computations (Lie Integration Method) that allowed us to determine the escape times and the maximum eccentricity of the fictitious "Trojan planets."

  13. Modelling of the MEA float zone using accelerometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    During a floating zone experiment involving the growth of indium on a recent orbiter mission, (STS 32) oscillation of the zone shapes were observed to occur in response to the background acceleration. An understanding of the nature of the response of the zone shape to forced (g-jitter) oscillations and predictions of its impact on future experiments is of great interest not only to the PI's but to other commercial and academic investigators who plan to fly similar experiments in the orbiter and on space station. Motivated by this, a 15 month study was undertaken to analyze the nature of the g-sensitivity of the STS 32 floating zone crystal growth experiment. Numerical models were used to describe the time-dependent free surface motion of the zone as it responds to the spacecraft residual acceleration. Relevant experimental data concerning the acceleration environment was obtained from the Honeywell in Space Accelerometer (HISA) investigators through MSFC's ACAP program and processed and analyzed. For the indium floating zone experiment, a series of calculations were made using time-dependent axial accelerations g(t). The form of g(t) included simple sinusoidal disturbances as well as actual data (subject to appropriate filtering) measured on the STS 32 mission. Focus was on the calculation of the response of the free surface of the zone as well as the internal flows and internal heat transfer. The influence of solidification on the response of the zone shape was also examined but found to be negligible.

  14. Fibonacci-like zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shubo; Liu, Mengsi; Xia, Tian; Tao, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    We present a new family of diffractive lenses, Fibonacci-like zone plates, generated with a modified Fibonacci sequence. The focusing properties and the evolution of transverse diffraction pattern for the Fibonacci-like zone plates have been analytically investigated both theoretically and experimentally and compared with the corresponding Fresnel zone plates of the same resolution. The results demonstrate that the Fibonacci-like zone plates possess the self-similar property and the multifocal behavior. Furthermore, the Fibonacci-like zone plate beams are found to possess the self-reconstruction property, and would be promising for 3D optical tweezers, laser machining, and optical imaging.

  15. The generalized mean zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; Cheng, Shubo; Tao, Shaohua

    2018-06-01

    In this paper a generalized mean zone plate is proposed, which generates twin foci located at the positions satisfying the expression of the generalized mean, which includes the m-golden mean, precious mean, and so on. The generalized mean zone plate can be designed to generate twin foci with various position ratios. The diffraction properties of the generalized mean zone plates have been investigated with simulations and experiments. The results show that the ratio of the positions of the twin foci for the generalized mean zone plate can be designed with the selected zone plate parameters.

  16. Extended residence time centrifugal contactor design modification and centrifugal contactor vane plate valving apparatus for extending mixing zone residence time

    DOEpatents

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2017-06-06

    The present invention provides an annular centrifugal contactor, having a housing adapted to receive a plurality of flowing liquids; a rotor on the interior of the housing; an annular mixing zone, wherein the annular mixing zone has a plurality of fluid retention reservoirs with ingress apertures near the bottom of the annular mixing zone and egress apertures located above the ingress apertures of the annular mixing zone; and an adjustable vane plate stem, wherein the stem can be raised to restrict the flow of a liquid into the rotor or lowered to increase the flow of the liquid into the rotor.

  17. Flow, affect and visual creativity.

    PubMed

    Cseh, Genevieve M; Phillips, Louise H; Pearson, David G

    2015-01-01

    Flow (being in the zone) is purported to have positive consequences in terms of affect and performance; however, there is no empirical evidence about these links in visual creativity. Positive affect often--but inconsistently--facilitates creativity, and both may be linked to experiencing flow. This study aimed to determine relationships between these variables within visual creativity. Participants performed the creative mental synthesis task to simulate the creative process. Affect change (pre- vs. post-task) and flow were measured via questionnaires. The creativity of synthesis drawings was rated objectively and subjectively by judges. Findings empirically demonstrate that flow is related to affect improvement during visual creativity. Affect change was linked to productivity and self-rated creativity, but no other objective or subjective performance measures. Flow was unrelated to all external performance measures but was highly correlated with self-rated creativity; flow may therefore motivate perseverance towards eventual excellence rather than provide direct cognitive enhancement.

  18. Liquid zone seal

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  19. Smartphones and Time Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, William; Secrest, Jeffery; Padgett, Clifford; Johnson, Wayne; Hagrelius, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Using the Sun to tell time is an ancient idea, but we can take advantage of modern technology to bring it into the 21st century for students in astronomy, physics, or physical science classes. We have employed smartphones, Google Earth, and 3D printing to find the moment of local noon at two widely separated locations. By reviewing GPS time-stamped photos from each place, we are able to illustrate that local noon is longitude-dependent and therefore explain the need for time zones.

  20. Marginal Ice Zone Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    A Voyage of Discovery. George Deacon 70th An-niversary Volume, (M. Angel, ed.), Pergamon Press, Oxford, p.15-41. Coachman, L.K., C.A. Barnes, 1961...some polar contrasts. In: S "" RUsium on Antarctic Ice and Water Masses, ( George Deacon, ed.), Sci- 72 Lebedev, A.A., 1968: Zone of possible icing of...Atlantic and Western Europe. British Meteorological Office. Geophysical Memoirs, 4(41). Brost , R.A., J.C. Wyngaard, 1978: A model study of the stably

  1. The travel-time ellipse: An approximate zone of transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almendinger, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    A zone of transport for a well is defined as the area in the horizontal plane bounded by a contour of equal ground-water travel time to the well. For short distances and ground-water travel times near a well, the potentiometric surface may be simulated analytically as that for a fully penetrating well in a uniform flow field. The zone of transport for this configuration is nearly elliptical. A simple method is derived to calculate a travel-time ellipse that approximates the zone of transport for a well in a uniform flow field. The travel-time ellipse was nearly congruent with the exact solution for the theoretical zone of transport for ground-water travel times of at least 10 years and for aquifer property values appropriate for southeastern Minnesota. For distances and travel times approaching infinity, however, the ellipse becomes slightly wider at its midpoint and narrower near its upgradient boundary than the theoretical zone of transport. The travel-time ellipse also may be used to simulate the plume area surrounding an injection well. However, the travel-time ellipse is an approximation that does not account for the effect of dispersion in enlarging the true area of an injection plume or zone of transport; hence, caution is advised in the use and interpretation of this simple construction.

  2. Flow Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Hedland Flow Meters manufactures a complete line of flow meters used in industrial operations to monitor the flow of oil, water or other liquids, air and other compressed gases, including caustics or corrosive liquids/gases. The company produces more than 1,000 types of flow meters featuring rugged construction, simplicity of installation and the ability to operate in any position.

  3. Jupiter's belts and zones: Contradictory evidence for upwelling and downwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Juno Science Team

    2017-10-01

    Early authors (Hess and Panofsky 1951, Ingersoll and Cuzzi 1969, Barcilon and Gierasch 1970) noted that the zonal winds are cyclonic in the belts and anticyclonic in the zones. From the thermal wind equation they concluded that the air below the clouds is colder at the belts and warmer at the zones. Hot air rising and cold air sinking led to the notion of downwelling in the belts and upwelling in the zones, which agreed with observations of clear air and low ammonia vapor in the belts and cloudy air and high ammonia vapor in the zones (Gierasch et al. 1986). However, lightning in the belts seemed to contradict that idea, based on the assumption that lightning and convection require upwelling of moist air from below (Little et al. 1999, Ingersoll et al. 2000). Convergence of the eddy momentum flux on the poleward sides of the zones (Salyk et al. 2006) supports the inference based on lightning by implying convergence of the meridional flow in the zones. Here we argue that lightning in the belts does not require upwelling. Instead, there is a threshold for moist convection that is triggered when the thickness of the weather layer drops below a critical value (Li and Ingersoll 2006, Thomson and McIntyre 2016). We also argue that the convergence of the eddy momentum flux does not require equatorward flow. Instead, the meridional flow is controlled by the sign of the potential vorticity (PV) gradient, which is southward on the equatorward sides of the zones (Ingersoll et al. 2017), implying divergence of the meridional flow in the zones. This is a new idea and is based on the observation that the predicted flat parts of the PV staircase (Dritschel and McIntyre 2008), might actually be sloping inward, since the curvature of the zonal velocity profile U_yy exceeds beta at the centers of the westward jets (Ingersoll and Cuzzi 1969, Ingersoll et al. 1981, Limaye et al. 1986, Li et al. 2004, Read et al. 2006). These arguments agree with observations of upwelling in the zones

  4. Structural characteristics of cohesive flow deposits, and a sedimentological approach on their flow mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripsanas, E. K.; Bryant, W. R.; Prior, D. B.

    2003-04-01

    A large number of Jumbo Piston cores (up to 20 m long), acquired from the continental slope and rise of the Northwest Gulf of Mexico (Bryant Canyon area and eastern Sigsbee Escarpment), have recovered various mass-transport deposits. The main cause of slope instabilities over these areas is oversteepening of the slopes due to the seaward mobilization of the underlying allochthonous salt masses. Cohesive flow deposits were the most common recoveries in the sediment cores. Four types of cohesive flow deposits have been recognized: a) fluid debris flow, b) mud flow, c) mud-matrix dominated debris flow, and d) clast-dominated debris flow deposits. The first type is characterized by its relatively small thickness (less than 1 m), a mud matrix with small (less than 0.5 cm) and soft mud-clasts, and a faint layering. The mud-clasts reveal a normal grading and become more abundant towards the base of each layer. That reveals that their deposition resulted by several successive surges/pulses, developed in the main flow, than the sudden “freezing” of the whole flow. The main difference between mud flow and mud-matrix dominated debris flow deposits is the presence of small to large mud-clasts in the later. Both deposits consist of a chaotic mud-matrix, and a basal shear laminated zone, where the strongest shearing of the flow was exhibited. Convolute laminations, fault-like surfaces, thrust faults, and microfaults are interpreted as occurring during the “freezing” of the flows and/or by adjustments of the rested deposits. Clast-dominated debris flow deposits consist of three zones: a) an upper plug-zone, characterized by large interlocked clasts, b) a mid-zone, of higher reworked, inversely graded clasts, floating in a mud-matrix, and c) a lower shear laminated zone. The structure of the last three cohesive flow deposits indicate that they represent deposition of typical Bingham flows, consisting of an upper plug-zone in which the yield stress is not exceeded and an

  5. Float-zone processing in a weightless environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowle, A. A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Perron, R. R.; Strong, P. F.; Swanson, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results were reported of investigations to: (1) test the validity of analyses which set maximum practical diameters for Si crystals that can be processed by the float zone method in a near weightless environment, (2) determine the convective flow patterns induced in a typical float zone, Si melt under conditions perceived to be advantageous to the crystal growth process using flow visualization techniques applied to a dimensionally scaled model of the Si melt, (3) revise the estimates of the economic impact of space produced Si crystal by the float zone method on the U.S. electronics industry, and (4) devise a rational plan for future work related to crystal growth phenomena wherein low gravity conditions available in a space site can be used to maximum benefit to the U.S. electronics industry.

  6. DEAD ZONE IN THE POLAR-CAP ACCELERATOR OF PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Alexander Y.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    We study plasma flows above pulsar polar caps using time-dependent simulations of plasma particles in the self-consistent electric field. The flow behavior is controlled by the dimensionless parameter {alpha} = j/c{rho}{sub GJ}, where j is the electric current density and {rho}{sub GJ} is the Goldreich-Julian charge density. The region of the polar cap where 0 < {alpha} < 1 is a {sup d}ead zone{sup -}in this zone, particle acceleration is inefficient and pair creation is not expected even for young, rapidly rotating pulsars. Pulsars with polar caps near the rotation axis are predicted to have a hollow-cone structure of radiomore » emission, as the dead zone occupies the central part of the polar cap. Our results apply to charge-separated flows of electrons (j < 0) or ions (j > 0). In the latter case, we consider the possibility of a mixed flow consisting of different ion species, and observe the development of two-stream instability. The dead zone at the polar cap is essential for the development of an outer gap near the null surface {rho}{sub GJ} = 0.« less

  7. Effectiveness of streamside management zones on water quality: pretreatment measurements

    Treesearch

    J.L. Boggs; G. Sun; S.G. McNulty; W. Swartley; E. Treasure

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paired watershed study is to quantify the effects of upland forest harvesting and Streamside Management Zones (SMZs) on stream water quantity and quality in North Carolina. Four watersheds ranging from 12 to 28 hectares (i.e., two on Hill Forest and two on Umstead Research Farm) with perennial stream channels were gauged for flow monitoring and...

  8. NAFTA: The World's Largest Trading Zone Turns 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrarini, Tawni Hunt; Day, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Everyone under the age of 20 who has grown up in North America has lived in the common market created by NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement. In a zone linking the United States, Canada, and Mexico, most goods and investments flow freely across borders to users, consumers, and investors. In 1994, NAFTA created the largest relatively…

  9. Recovery of the Chaparral Riparian Zone After Wildfire

    Treesearch

    Frank W. Davis; Edward A. Keller; Anuja Parikh; Joan Florsheim

    1989-01-01

    After the Wheeler Fire in southern California in July 1985, we monitored sediment deposition and vegetation recovery in a section of the severely burned chaparral riparian zone of the North Fork of Matilija Creek, near Ojai, California. Increased runoff was accompanied by low magnitude debris flows and fluvial transport of gravel, most of which was added to the channel...

  10. Sonic logging for detecting the excavation disturbed and fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Chang, Y. F.; Liu, J. W.; Tseng, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    This study presents a new sonic logging method to detect the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) and fracture zones in a tunnel. The EDZ is a weak rock zone where its properties and conditions have been changed by excavation, which results such as fracturing, stress redistribution and desaturation in this zone. Thus, the EDZ is considered as a physically less stable and could form a continuous and high-permeable pathway for groundwater flow. Since EDZ and fracture zone have the potential of affecting the safety of the underground openings and repository performance, many studies were conducted to characterize the EDZ and fracture zone by different methods, such as the rock mass displacements and strain measurements, seismic refraction survey, seismic tomography and hydraulic test, etc. In this study, we designed a new sonic logging method to explore the EDZ and fracture zone in a tunnel at eastern Taiwan. A high power and high frequency sonic system was set up which includes a two hydrophones pitch-catch technique with a common-offset immersed in water-filled uncased wells and producing a 20 KHz sound to scan the well rock. Four dominant sonic events were observed in the measurements, they are refracted P- and S-wave along the well rock, direct water wave and the reverberation in the well water. Thus the measured P- and S-wave velocities, the signal-to-noise ratio of the refraction and the amplitudes of reverberation along the well rock were used as indexes to determine the EDZ and fracture zone. Comparing these indexes with core samples shows that significant changes in the indexes are consistent with the EDZ and fracture zone. Thus, the EDZ and fracture zone can be detected by this new sonic method conclusively.

  11. [Current approach to zoning atomic shipbuilding plants].

    PubMed

    Blekher, A Ia

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusses the currently introduced radiation-and-hygienic system for zoning atomic shipbuilding plants, in accordance with which three radiation-and-hygienic zones (a strict regime zone, a controlled approach zone, and a free regime zone) are established at the plant site and two zones (a sanitary-and-protective zone and a follow-up zone) are also established outside the plant site.

  12. Hydrologic processes in deep vadose zones in interdrainage arid environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Hogan, James F.; Phillips, Fred M.; Scanlon, Bridget R.

    2004-01-01

    A unifying theory for the hydrology of desert vadose zones is particularly timely considering the rising population and water stresses in arid and semiarid regions. Conventional models cannot reconcile the apparent discrepancy between upward flow indicated by hydraulic gradient data and downward flow suggested by environmental tracer data in deep vadose zone profiles. A conceptual model described here explains both hydraulic and tracer data remarkably well by incorporating the hydrologic role of desert plants that encroached former juniper woodland 10 to 15 thousand years ago in the southwestern United States. Vapor transport also plays an important role in redistributing moisture through deep soils, particularly in coarse-grained sediments. Application of the conceptual model to several interdrainage arid settings reproduces measured matric potentials and chloride accumulation by simulating the transition from downward flow to upward flow just below the root zone initiated by climate and vegetation change. Model results indicate a slow hydraulic drying response in deep vadose zones that enables matric potential profiles to be used to distinguish whether precipitation episodically percolated below the root zone or was completely removed via evapotranspiration during the majority of the Holocene. Recharge declined dramatically during the Holocene in interdrainage basin floor settings of arid and semiarid basins. Current flux estimates across the water table in these environmental settings, are on the order of 0.01 to 0.1 mm yr-1 and may be recharge (downward) or discharge (upward) depending on vadose zone characteristics, such as soil texture, geothermal gradient, and water table depth. In summary, diffuse recharge through the basin floor probably contributes only minimally to the total recharge in arid and semiarid basins.

  13. Scheduling work zones in multi-modal networks phase 1: scheduling work zones in transportation service networks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to study the optimal scheduling of work zones so that they have minimum negative impact (e.g., travel delay, gas consumption, accidents, etc.) on transport service vehicle flows. In this project, a mixed integer linear ...

  14. Fast determination of soil behavior in the capillary zone using simple laboratory tests.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-12-01

    Frost heave and thaw weakening are typical problems for engineers building in northern regions. These unsaturated-soil behaviors are : caused by water flowing through the capillary zone to a freezing front, where it forms ice lenses. Although suction...

  15. Description and application of capture zone delineation for a wellfield at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-water capture zone boundaries for individual pumped wells in a confined aquffer were delineated by using groundwater models. Both analytical and numerical (semi-analytical) models that more accurately represent the $round-water-flow system were used. All models delineated 2-dimensional boundaries (capture zones) that represent the areal extent of groundwater contribution to a pumped well. The resultant capture zones were evaluated on the basis of the ability of each model to realistically rapresent the part of the ground-water-flow system that contributed water to the pumped wells. Analytical models used were based on a fixed radius approach, and induded; an arbitrary radius model, a calculated fixed radius model based on the volumetric-flow equation with a time-of-travel criterion, and a calculated fixed radius model derived from modification of the Theis model with a drawdown criterion. Numerical models used induded the 2-dimensional, finite-difference models RESSQC and MWCAP. The arbitrary radius and Theis analytical models delineated capture zone boundaries that compared least favorably with capture zones delineated using the volumetric-flow analytical model and both numerical models. The numerical models produced more hydrologically reasonable capture zones (that were oriented parallel to the regional flow direction) than the volumetric-flow equation. The RESSQC numerical model computed more hydrologically realistic capture zones than the MWCAP numerical model by accounting for changes in the shape of capture zones caused by multiple-well interference. The capture zone boundaries generated by using both analytical and numerical models indicated that the curnmtly used 100-foot radius of protection around a wellhead in South Carolina is an underestimate of the extent of ground-water capture for pumped wetis in this particular wellfield in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The arbitrary fixed radius of 100 feet was shown to underestimate the upgradient

  16. Flow networks for Ocean currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupikina, Liubov; Molkenthin, Nora; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Complex networks have been successfully applied to various systems such as society, technology, and recently climate. Links in a climate network are defined between two geographical locations if the correlation between the time series of some climate variable is higher than a threshold. Therefore, network links are considered to imply heat exchange. However, the relationship between the oceanic and atmospheric flows and the climate network's structure is still unclear. Recently, a theoretical approach verifying the correlation between ocean currents and surface air temperature networks has been introduced, where the Pearson correlation networks were constructed from advection-diffusion dynamics on an underlying flow. Since the continuous approach has its limitations, i.e., by its high computational complexity, we here introduce a new, discrete construction of flow-networks, which is then applied to static and dynamic velocity fields. Analyzing the flow-networks of prototypical flows we find that our approach can highlight the zones of high velocity by degree and transition zones by betweenness, while the combination of these network measures can uncover how the flow propagates within time. We also apply the method to time series data of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Current and the Gulf Stream ocean current for the changing velocity fields, which could not been done before, and analyse the properties of the dynamical system. Flow-networks can be powerful tools to theoretically understand the step from system's dynamics to network's topology that can be analyzed using network measures and is used for shading light on different climatic phenomena.

  17. Recent Advances in Hyporheic Zone Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, E. T.

    2017-12-01

    The hyporheic zone exists beneath and adjacent to streams and rivers where surface water and groundwater interact. It provides unique habitat for aquatic organisms, can buffer surface water temperatures, and can be highly reactive, processing nutrients and improving water quality. The hyporheic zone is the subject of considerable research and the past year in WRR witnessed important conceptual advances. A key focus was rigorous evaluation of mixing between surface water and groundwater that occurs within hyporheic sediments. Field observations indicate that greater mixing occurs in the hyporheic zone than in deeper groundwater, and this distinction has been explored by recent numerical modeling studies, but more research is needed to fully understand the causes. A commentary this year in WRR proposed that hyporheic mixing is enhanced by a combination of fluctuating boundary conditions and multiscale physical and chemical spatial heterogeneity but confirmation is left to future research. This year also witnessed the boundaries of knowledge pushed back in a number of other key areas. Field quantification of hyporheic exchange and reactions benefited from advances including the use and interpretation of high frequency nutrient sensors, actively heater fiber optic sensors, isotope tracers, and geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity imaging. Conceptual advances were made in understanding the effects of unsteady environmental conditions (e.g., tides and storms) and preferential flow on hyporheic processes. Finally, hyporheic science is being brought increasingly to bear on applied issues such as informing nutrient removal crediting for stream restoration practices, for example in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2016-05-17

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2012-11-06

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C; Booten, Charles W; Martin, Jerry L

    2013-12-24

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  1. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Partial Basin and Range Heat and Zones of Critical Stress Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    Interpolated maps of heat flow, temperature gradient, and quartz geothermometers are included as TIF files. Zones of critical stress map is also included as a TIF file. The zones are given a 5km diameter buffer. The study area is only a part of the Basin and Range, but it does includes the Tularosa Basin.

  2. Evaluating tsunami hazards from debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Debris flows that enter water bodies may have significant kinetic energy, some of which is transferred to water motion or waves that can impact shorelines and structures. The associated hazards depend on the location of the affected area relative to the point at which the debris flow enters the water. Three distinct regions (splash zone, near field, and far field) may be identified. Experiments demonstrate that characteristics of the near field water wave, which is the only coherent wave to emerge from the splash zone, depend primarily on debris flow volume, debris flow submerged time of motion, and water depth at the point where debris flow motion stops. Near field wave characteristics commonly may be used as & proxy source for computational tsunami propagation. This result is used to assess hazards associated with potential debris flows entering a reservoir in the northwestern USA. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  3. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  4. Temperature Models for the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, V. C.; Kostoglodov, V.; Currie, C.; Manea, M.; Wang, K.

    2002-12-01

    thermal models come from the surface thermal measurements (offshore - Prol-Ledesma et al (1989) and onshore - Ziagos et al. (1985)). Unfortunately these measurements are very sparse, and present an important dispersion and have large uncertainties. In our models, all profiles show a decrease in heat flow from the trench towards the continent, which is characteristic for subduction zones. We also have included a mantle wedge flow current in order to keep a constant depth to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This mantle wedge convection provides an increase in heat flow near the volcanic arc which is consistent with the surface observations. Our models indicate that the seismogenic zone in Mexico comprised between 100 §C and 350 §C is in good agreement with the coseismic rupture width inferred from the megathrust earthquake aftershocks and seismic models of rupture. These thermal models will be used to calculate the thermal stresses induced by the subducting plate.

  5. Microstructural Evolution during Mid-Crustal Shear Zone Thickening and Thinning, Mount Irene Detachment Zone, Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrini, M.; Smith, S. A. F.; Scott, J.; Rooney, J. S.; Demurtas, M.

    2016-12-01

    Recent work has shown that ductile shear zones experience cyclic variations in stress and strain rate due to, for example, elastic loading from earthquake slip on brittle faults or the presence of rigid particles and asperities within the shear zone. Such non-steady state flow conditions can promote microstructural changes including a decrease in grain sizes followed by a switch in the main deformation mechanisms. Understanding the microstructural changes that occur during non steady-state deformation is therefore critical in evaluating shear zone rheology. The Mount Irene shear zone formed during Cretaceous extension in the middle crust and was active at temperatures of 600°C and pressures of 6 kbar. The shear zone localized in a basal calcite marble layer typically 3-5 m thick containing hundreds of thin (mm-cm) calc-silicate bands that are now parallel to the shear zone boundaries. The lower boundary of the shear zone preserves meter-scale undulations that cause the shear zone to be squeezed in to regions that are <1.5 m thick. The calc-silicate bands act as "flow markers" and allow individual shear zone layers to be traced continuously through thick and thin regions, implying that the mylonites experienced cyclic variations in stress and strain rate. Calc-mylonite samples collected from the same layer close to the base of the shear zone reveal that layer thinning was accompanied by progressive microstructural changes including intense twinning, stretching and flattening of large calcite porphyroclasts as well as the development of interconnected networks of recrystallized calcite aggregates. EBSD analysis shows that the recrystallized aggregates contain polygonal calcite grains with microstructures (e.g. grain quadruple junctions) similar to those reported for neighbor-switching processes associated with grain boundary sliding and superplasticity. Ongoing and future work will utilize samples from across the full thickness of the shear zone to determine key

  6. Comparative Dynamics of Retrograde Actin Flow and Focal Adhesions: Formation of Nascent Adhesions Triggers Transition from Fast to Slow Flow

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrova, Antonina Y.; Arnold, Katya; Schaub, Sébastien; Vasiliev, Jury M.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Bershadsky, Alexander D.; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow), and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body). Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces) retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base. PMID:18800171

  7. Abyssal Upwelling in Mid-Ocean Ridge Fracture Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Louis; Thurnherr, Andreas M.

    2018-03-01

    Turbulence in the abyssal ocean plays a fundamental role in the climate system by sustaining the deepest branch of the overturning circulation. Over the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the South Atlantic, previously observed bottom-intensified and tidally modulated mixing of abyssal waters appears to imply a counterintuitive densification of deep and bottom waters. Here we show that inside fracture zones, however, turbulence is elevated away from the seafloor because of intensified downward propagating near-inertial wave energy, which decays below a subinertial shear maximum. Ray-tracing simulations predict a decay of wave energy subsequent to wave-mean flow interactions. The hypothesized wave-mean flow interactions drive a deep flow toward lighter densities of up to 0.6 Sv over the mid-ocean ridge flank in the Brazil Basin, and the same process may also cause upwelling of abyssal waters in other ocean basins with mid-ocean ridges with fracture zones.

  8. Regulation of coronary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Gorlin, Richard

    1971-01-01

    Coronary blood flow is dependent upon arterial pressure, diastolic time, and small vessel resistance. The system is regulated to achieve a low flow high oxygen extraction and low myocardial Po2. This setting is sensitive to change in oxygen needs. Regulation of blood flow occurs primarily through local intrinsic regulation, most likely through production of vasodilating metabolites in response to minimal degrees of ischaemia. Local regulation appears to dominate over remote regulation in most circumstances. Blood flow distribution to the myocardium is depth dependent as well as regional in variation. Both types of distribution of blood flow are profoundly disturbed in the presence of obstructive coronary atherosclerosis. This results in either concentric myocardial shells or patchy transmural zones of selective ischaemia with clear-cut but local abnormalities in metabolism and performance. Images PMID:4929442

  9. Fuel conditioning facility zone-to-zone transfer administrative controls.

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, C. L.

    2000-06-21

    The administrative controls associated with transferring containers from one criticality hazard control zone to another in the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) are described. FCF, located at the ANL-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, is used to remotely process spent sodium bonded metallic fuel for disposition. The process involves nearly forty widely varying material forms and types, over fifty specific use container types, and over thirty distinct zones where work activities occur. During 1999, over five thousand transfers from one zone to another were conducted. Limits are placed on mass, material form and type, and container typesmore » for each zone. Ml material and containers are tracked using the Mass Tracking System (MTG). The MTG uses an Oracle database and numerous applications to manage the database. The database stores information specific to the process, including material composition and mass, container identification number and mass, transfer history, and the operators involved in each transfer. The process is controlled using written procedures which specify the zone, containers, and material involved in a task. Transferring a container from one zone to another is called a zone-to-zone transfer (ZZT). ZZTs consist of four distinct phases, select, request, identify, and completion.« less

  10. Blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    A heuristic treatment of blood flow in the heart and the aorta together with some of the main branches considers the effects of fluid viscosity and vessel elasticity as well as pressure distribution in the typical pulsating flow.

  11. Multi-pollutant interactions in hyporheic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.; Weatherill, J.; Bonet, B.; Blaen, P.; Khamis, K.; Cassidy, N. J.; Hannah, D. M.; Rivett, M. O.; Lynch, I.; Ullah, S.

    2017-12-01

    Hyporheic zones represent hotspots of biogeochemical reactivity, with the potential to attenuate pollutants and ameliorate their impact on ecosystem functioning. Sources and types of pollutants in streambed environments are manifold, with legacy industry contaminants, agricultural pollution and emerging pollutants such as pharmaceuticals or engineered nanoparticles entering hyporheic zones along different flow paths where they mix and potentially react with each other. Current conceptualizations of drivers and controls of biogeochemical turnover in hyporheic zones highlight primarily the role of transport and reaction times but do not account for potential interactions between different pollutants. This study presents two case studies of multi-pollutant interactions to illustrate the need to consider interferences between different pollutants, their transport and reaction pathways for adequate impact assessment. We discuss in the first instance how the natural attenuation of a Trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume in an agricultural catchment is limited by high riparian and hyporheic nitrate concentrations. As nitrate outcompeted TCE in its reaction with organic carbon as electron donor, TCE attenuation was in this case limited to hyporheic denitrification hotspots. Hence any pollution control measures to reduce the impact of this TCE plume require a reduction of agricultural nitrate loads, highlighting the connectedness of legacy (TCE) and more recent (nitrate) pollution problems. In the second case, we investigate how the labile organic carbon content of streambed sediments as main control of hyporheic respiration is overridden by exposure to different silver nanoparticle concentrations, representing emerging pollutants in many of our rivers. Also in this case, the impacts of different stressors (nanoparticle exposure) and drivers (availability of organic matter, water temperature) are interacting in their impacts on hyporheic zone functioning. We argue that

  12. Molecular differences in transition zone and peripheral zone prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Rider, Jennifer R.; Carlsson, Jessica; Gerke, Travis; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Penney, Kathryn L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Loda, Massimo; Fall, Katja; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Pawitan, Yudi; Andersson, Sven-Olof; Andrén, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Prostate tumors arise primarily in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate, but 20–30% arise in the transition zone (TZ). Zone of origin may have prognostic value or reflect distinct molecular subtypes; however, it can be difficult to determine in practice. Using whole-genome gene expression, we built a signature of zone using normal tissue from five individuals and found that it successfully classified nine tumors of known zone. Hypothesizing that this signature captures tumor zone of origin, we assessed its relationship with clinical factors among 369 tumors of unknown zone from radical prostatectomies (RPs) and found that tumors that molecularly resembled TZ tumors showed lower mortality (P = 0.09) that was explained by lower Gleason scores (P = 0.009). We further applied the signature to an earlier study of 88 RP and 333 transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) tumor samples, also of unknown zone, with gene expression on ~6000 genes. We had observed previously substantial expression differences between RP and TURP specimens, and hypothesized that this might be because RPs capture primarily PZ tumors, whereas TURPs capture more TZ tumors. Our signature distinguished these two groups, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 87% (P < 0.0001). Our findings that zonal differences in normal tissue persist in tumor tissue and that these differences are associated with Gleason score and sample type suggest that subtypes potentially resulting from different etiologic pathways might arise in these zones. Zone of origin may be important to consider in prostate tumor biomarker research. PMID:25870172

  13. Seismic cycle feedbacks in a mid-crustal shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, Benjamin L.; Rowe, Christie D.; Gerbi, Christopher; Smit, Louis; Macey, Paul

    2018-07-01

    Mid-crustal fault rheology is controlled by alternating brittle and plastic deformation mechanisms, which cause feedback cycles that influence earthquake behavior. Detailed mapping and microstructural observations in the Pofadder Shear Zone (Namibia and South Africa) reveal a lithologically heterogeneous shear zone core with quartz-rich mylonites and ultramylonites, plastically overprinted pseudotachylyte and active shear folds. We present evidence for a positive feedback cycle in which coseismic grain size reduction facilitates active shear folding by enhancing competency contrasts and promoting crystal plastic flow. Shear folding strengthens a portion of a shear zone by limb rotation, focusing deformation and promoting plastic flow or brittle slip in resulting areas of localized high stress. Using quartz paleopiezometry, we estimate strain and slip rates consistent with other studies of exhumed shear zones and modern plate boundary faults, helping establish the Pofadder Shear Zone as an ancient analogue to modern, continental-scale, strike-slip faults. This feedback cycle influences seismicity patterns at the scale of study (10s of meters) and possibly larger scales as well, and contributes to bulk strengthening of the brittle-plastic transition on modern plate boundary faults.

  14. Achieving That Elusive "Leadership Zone"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Reaching the "leadership zone" happens when librarians tap into the extraordinary skills lying within to overcome obstacles and transform sometimes-difficult situations into meaningful outcomes. Maturing into an experienced leader who stays in the leadership zone requires knowledge, training, and practice. This article provides tactical…

  15. Role of H2O in Generating Subduction Zone Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, A.

    2017-03-01

    A dense nationwide seismic network and high seismic activity in Japan have provided a large volume of high-quality data, enabling high-resolution imaging of the seismic structures defining the Japanese subduction zones. Here, the role of H2O in generating earthquakes in subduction zones is discussed based mainly on recent seismic studies in Japan using these high-quality data. Locations of intermediate-depth intraslab earthquakes and seismic velocity and attenuation structures within the subducted slab provide evidence that strongly supports intermediate-depth intraslab earthquakes, although the details leading to the earthquake rupture are still poorly understood. Coseismic rotations of the principal stress axes observed after great megathrust earthquakes demonstrate that the plate interface is very weak, which is probably caused by overpressured fluids. Detailed tomographic imaging of the seismic velocity structure in and around plate boundary zones suggests that interplate coupling is affected by local fluid overpressure. Seismic tomography studies also show the presence of inclined sheet-like seismic low-velocity, high-attenuation zones in the mantle wedge. These may correspond to the upwelling flow portion of subduction-induced secondary convection in the mantle wedge. The upwelling flows reach the arc Moho directly beneath the volcanic areas, suggesting a direct relationship. H2O originally liberated from the subducted slab is transported by this upwelling flow to the arc crust. The H2O that reaches the crust is overpressured above hydrostatic values, weakening the surrounding crustal rocks and decreasing the shear strength of faults, thereby inducing shallow inland earthquakes. These observations suggest that H2O expelled from the subducting slab plays an important role in generating subduction zone earthquakes both within the subduction zone itself and within the magmatic arc occupying its hanging wall.

  16. The Supergalactic Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Habitability in the local universe is examined. Constrained by metal abundance and exposure to sterilizing events, life as we know it requires significantly long periods of stable environmental conditions. Planets within galaxies undergoing major mergers, active AGN, starburst episodes, and merging black holes pose serious threats to long-term habitability. Importantly, the development of several layers of protection from high-energy particles such as a thick atmosphere, a strong planetary magnetic field, an astrosphere, and a galactic magnetic field is of great benefit. Factors such as star type and activity, planet type and composition, the location of a planet within its host galaxy, and even the location within a supercluster of galaxies can affect the potential habitability of planets. We discuss the concept of the Supergalactic Habitable Zone introduced by Mason and Biermann in terms of habitability in the local universe and find that galaxies near the center of the Virgo cluster, for example, have a much lower probability for the development of life as we know it as compared to locations in the Milky Way.

  17. Detecting livestock production zones.

    PubMed

    Grisi-Filho, J H H; Amaku, M; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Neto, J S Ferreira; Negreiros, R L; Ossada, R

    2013-07-01

    Communities are sets of nodes that are related in an important way, most likely sharing common properties and/or playing similar roles within a network. Unraveling a network structure, and hence the trade preferences and pathways, could be useful to a researcher or a decision maker. We implemented a community detection algorithm to find livestock communities, which is consistent with the definition of a livestock production zone, assuming that a community is a group of farm premises in which an animal is more likely to stay during its lifetime than expected by chance. We applied this algorithm to the network of animal movements within the state of Mato Grosso for 2007. This database holds information concerning 87,899 premises and 521,431 movements throughout the year, totaling 15,844,779 animals moved. The community detection algorithm achieved a network partition that shows a clear geographical and commercial pattern, two crucial features for preventive veterinary medicine applications; this algorithm provides also a meaningful interpretation to trade networks where links emerge based on trader node choices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Contact Zone: Missoula

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-23

    A rock outcrop dubbed "Missoula," near Marias Pass on Mars, is seen in this image mosaic taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager on NASA's Curiosity rover. Pale mudstone (bottom of outcrop) meets coarser sandstone (top) in this geological contact zone, which has piqued the interest of Mars scientists. White mineral veins that fill fractures in the lower rock unit abruptly end when they meet the upper rock unit. Such clues help scientists understand the possible timing of geological events. First, the fine sediment that now forms the lower unit would have hardened into rock. It then would have fractured, and groundwater would have deposited calcium sulfate minerals into the fractures. Next, the coarser sediment that forms the upper unit would have been deposited. The area pictured is about 16 inches (40 centimeters) across. The image was taken on the 1,031st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 1, 2015). MAHLI was built by Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the project's Curiosity rover. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19829

  19. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  20. Jovian 'Twilight Zone'

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-01

    This image captures the swirling cloud formations around the south pole of Jupiter, looking up toward the equatorial region. NASA's Juno spacecraft took the color-enhanced image during its eleventh close flyby of the gas giant planet on Feb. 7 at 7:11 a.m. PST (10:11 a.m. EST). At the time, the spacecraft was 74,896 miles (120,533 kilometers) from the tops of Jupiter's clouds at 84.9 degrees south latitude. Citizen scientist Gerald Gerald Eichstädt processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. This image was created by reprocessing raw JunoCam data using trajectory and pointing data from the spacecraft. This image is one in a series of images taken in an experiment to capture the best results for illuminated parts of Jupiter's polar region. To make features more visible in Jupiter's terminator -- the region where day meets night -- the Juno team adjusted JunoCam so that it would perform like a portrait photographer taking multiple photos at different exposures, hoping to capture one image with the intended light balance. For JunoCam to collect enough light to reveal features in Jupiter's dark twilight zone, the much brighter illuminated day-side of Jupiter becomes overexposed with the higher exposure. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21980

  1. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  2. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  3. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  4. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  5. 33 CFR 165.169 - Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 165.169 Section 165.169 Navigation and... Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.169 Safety and Security Zones: New York Marine Inspection Zone...

  6. Evolution of Unsteady Groundwater Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xing; Jin, Menggui; Niu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Natural groundwater flow is usually transient, especially in long time scale. A theoretical approach on unsteady groundwater flow systems was adopted to highlight some of the knowledge gaps in the evolution of groundwater flow systems. The specific consideration was focused on evolution of groundwater flow systems from unsteady to steady under natural and mining conditions. Two analytical solutions were developed, using segregation variable method to calculate the hydraulic head under steady and unsteady flow conditions. The impact of anisotropy ratio, hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific yield (μs) on the flow patterns were analyzed. The results showed that the area of the equal velocity region increased and the penetrating depth of the flow system decreased while the anisotropy ratio (ɛ = °Kx-/Kz--) increased. Stagnant zones were found in the flow field where the directions of streamlines were opposite. These stagnant zones moved up when the horizontal hydraulic conductivity increased. The results of the study on transient flow indicated a positive impact on hydraulic head with an increase of hydraulic conductivity, while a negative effect on hydraulic head was observed when the specific yield was enhanced. An unsteady numerical model of groundwater flow systems with annual periodic recharge was developed using MODFLOW. It was observed that the transient groundwater flow patterns were different from that developed in the steady flow under the same recharge intensity. The water table fluctuated when the recharge intensity altered. The monitoring of hydraulic head and concentration migration revealed that the unsteady recharge affected the shallow local flow system more than the deep regional flow system. The groundwater flow systems fluctuated with the action of one or more pumping wells. The comparison of steady and unsteady groundwater flow observation indicated that the unsteady flow patterns cannot be simulated by the steady model when the condition

  7. Concentration-Discharge Relations in the Critical Zone: Implications for Resolving Critical Zone Structure, Function, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorover, Jon; Derry, Louis A.; McDowell, William H.

    2017-11-01

    Critical zone science seeks to develop mechanistic theories that describe critical zone structure, function, and long-term evolution. One postulate is that hydrogeochemical controls on critical zone evolution can be inferred from solute discharges measured down-gradient of reactive flow paths. These flow paths have variable lengths, interfacial compositions, and residence times, and their mixing is reflected in concentration-discharge (C-Q) relations. Motivation for this special section originates from a U.S. Critical Zone Observatories workshop that was held at the University of New Hampshire, 20-22 July 2015. The workshop focused on resolving mechanistic CZ controls over surface water chemical dynamics across the full range of lithogenic (e.g., nonhydrolyzing and hydrolyzing cations and oxyanions) and bioactive solutes (e.g., organic and inorganic forms of C, N, P, and S), including dissolved and colloidal species that may cooccur for a given element. Papers submitted to this special section on "concentration-discharge relations in the critical zone" include those from authors who attended the workshop, as well as others who responded to the open solicitation. Submissions were invited that utilized information pertaining to internal, integrated catchment function (relations between hydrology, biogeochemistry, and landscape structure) to help illuminate controls on observed C-Q relations.

  8. Modeling biogechemical reactive transport in a fracture zone

    SciTech Connect

    Molinero, Jorge; Samper, Javier; Yang, Chan Bing, and Zhang, Guoxiang

    2005-01-14

    A coupled model of groundwater flow, reactive solute transport and microbial processes for a fracture zone of the Aspo site at Sweden is presented. This is the model of the so-called Redox Zone Experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of tunnel construction on the geochemical conditions prevailing in a fracture granite. It is found that a model accounting for microbially-mediated geochemical processes is able to reproduce the unexpected measured increasing trends of dissolved sulfate and bicarbonate. The model is also useful for testing hypotheses regarding the role of microbial processes and evaluating the sensitivity of model results to changes inmore » biochemical parameters.« less

  9. Numerical simulations of inductive-heated float-zone growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Y. T.; Choi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    The present work provides an improved fluid flow and heat-transfer modeling of float-zone growth by introducing a RF heating model so that an ad hoc heating temperature profile is not necessary. Numerical simulations were carried out to study the high-temperature float-zone growth of titanium carbide single crystal. The numerical results showed that the thermocapillary convection occurring inside the molten zone tends to increase the convexity of the melt-crystal interface and decrease the maximum temperature of the molten zone, while the natural convection tends to reduce the stability of the molten zone by increasing its height. It was found that the increase of induced heating due to the increase of applied RF voltage is reduced by the decrease of zone diameter. Surface tension plays an important role in controlling the amount of induced heating. Finally, a comparison of the computed shape of the free surface with a digital image obtained during a growth run showed adequate agreement.

  10. A comparison of the Landsat image and LAHARZ-simulated lahar inundation hazard zone by the 2010 Merapi eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seul-Ki; Lee, Chang-Wook; Lee, Saro

    2015-06-01

    Located above the Java subduction zone, Merapi Volcano is an active stratovolcano with a volcanic activity cycle of 1-5 years. Most Merapi eruptions are relatively small with volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of 1-3. However, the most recent eruption, which occurred in 2010, was quite violent with a VEI of 4 and 386 people were killed. In this study, lahars and pyroclastic flow zones were detected using optical Landsat images and the lahar and pyroclastic flow zone simulated using the LAHARZ program. To detect areal extents of lahar and pyroclastic flows using Landsat images, supervised classification was performed after atmospheric correction by using a cosine of the solar zenith correction (COST) model. As a result, the extracted dimensions of pyroclastic flows are nearly identical to the Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) monthly reports. Then, areas of potential lahar and pyroclastic flow inundation based on flow volume using the LAHARZ program were simulated and mapped. Finally, the detected lahars and pyroclastic flow zones were compared with the simulated potential zones using LAHARZ program and verified. Results showed satisfactory similarity (55.63 %) between the detected and simulated zone. The simulated zones using the LAHARZ program can be used as an essential volcanic hazard map for preventing life and property damages for Merapi Volcano and other hazardous volcanic areas. Also, the LAHARZ program can be used to map volcano hazards in other hazardous volcanic areas.

  11. 49 CFR 71.11 - Alaska zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska zone. 71.11 Section 71.11 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.11 Alaska zone. The sixth zone, the Alaska standard time zone, includes the entire State of Alaska, except as provided in § 71.12...

  12. 49 CFR 71.13 - Samoa zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Samoa zone. 71.13 Section 71.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.13 Samoa zone. The eighth zone, the Samoa standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 169 degrees...

  13. 49 CFR 71.6 - Central zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.6 Central zone. The third zone, the central standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of the boundary line between the eastern and central standard time zones described in § 71.5 and east of the...

  14. 49 CFR 71.4 - Eastern zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eastern zone. 71.4 Section 71.4 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.4 Eastern zone. The second zone, the eastern standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of 67°30″ W...

  15. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″ W...

  16. 49 CFR 71.14 - Chamorro Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chamorro Zone. 71.14 Section 71.14 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.14 Chamorro Zone. The ninth zone, the Chamorro standard time zone, includes the Island of Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern...

  17. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of the boundary line between the central and mountain standard time zones described in § 71.7 and east of the...

  18. 49 CFR 71.10 - Pacific zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.10 Pacific zone. The fifth zone, the Pacific standard time zone, includes that part of the continental United States that is west of the boundary line between the mountain and Pacific standard time zones described in § 71.9, but...

  19. Capture zones for simple aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    Capture zones showing the area influenced by a well within a certain time are useful for both aquifer protection and cleanup. If hydrodynamic dispersion is neglected, a deterministic curve defines the capture zone. Analytical expressions for the capture zones can be derived for simple aquifers. However, the capture zone equations are transcendental and cannot be explicitly solved for the coordinates of the capture zone boundary. Fortunately, an iterative scheme allows the solution to proceed quickly and efficiently even on a modest personal computer. Three forms of the analytical solution must be used in an iterative scheme to cover the entire region of interest, after the extreme values of the x coordinate are determined by an iterative solution. The resulting solution is a discrete one, and usually 100-1000 intervals along the x-axis are necessary for a smooth definition of the capture zone. The presented program is written in FORTRAN and has been used in a variety of computing environments. No graphics capability is included with the program; it is assumed the user has access to a commercial package. The superposition of capture zones for multiple wells is expected to be satisfactory if the spacing is not too close. Because this program deals with simple aquifers, the results rarely will be the final word in a real application.

  20. Method for continuously recovering metals using a dual zone chemical reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bronson, Mark C.

    1995-01-01

    A dual zone chemical reactor continuously processes metal-containing materials while regenerating and circulating a liquid carrier. The starting materials are fed into a first reaction zone of a vessel containing a molten salt carrier. The starting materials react to form a metal product and a by-product that dissolves in the molten salt that flows to a second reaction zone in the reaction vessel. The second reaction zone is partitioned from, but in fluid communication with, the first reaction zone. The liquid carrier continuously circulates along a pathway between the first reaction zone and the second reaction zone. A reactive gas is introduced into the second reaction zone to react with the reaction by-product to generate the molten salt. The metal product, the gaseous waste products, and the excess liquid carrier are removed without interrupting the operation of the reactor. The design of the dual zone reactor can be adapted to combine a plurality of liquid carrier regeneration zones in a multiple dual zone chemical reactor for production scale processing.

  1. Method for continuously recovering metals using a dual zone chemical reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bronson, M.C.

    1995-02-14

    A dual zone chemical reactor continuously processes metal-containing materials while regenerating and circulating a liquid carrier. The starting materials are fed into a first reaction zone of a vessel containing a molten salt carrier. The starting materials react to form a metal product and a by-product that dissolves in the molten salt that flows to a second reaction zone in the reaction vessel. The second reaction zone is partitioned from, but in fluid communication with, the first reaction zone. The liquid carrier continuously circulates along a pathway between the first reaction zone and the second reaction zone. A reactive gas is introduced into the second reaction zone to react with the reaction by-product to generate the molten salt. The metal product, the gaseous waste products, and the excess liquid carrier are removed without interrupting the operation of the reactor. The design of the dual zone reactor can be adapted to combine a plurality of liquid carrier regeneration zones in a multiple dual zone chemical reactor for production scale processing. 6 figs.

  2. ELECTROMAGNETIC STIRRING IN ZONE REFINING

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, I.; Frank, F.C.; Marshall, S.

    1958-02-01

    The efficiency of the zone refining process can obviously be increased by stirring the molten zone to disperse the impurity-rich layer at the solid- liquid surface. Induction heating is sometimes preferred to radiant heat because it produces more convection, but no marked improvement has been reported. Pfann and Dorsi(1967) have described a method of stirring the melt by passing an electric current through the ingot and compressing a magnetic field across the molten zone. Preliminary results obtained by using a rotating magnetic field us the stirring agent during the purification of aluminum are described. (A.C.)

  3. In Situ NAPL Modification for Contaminant Source-Zone Passivation, Mass Flux Reduction, and Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateas, D. J.; Tick, G.; Carroll, K. C.

    2016-12-01

    A remediation method was developed to reduce the aqueous solubility and mass-flux of target NAPL contaminants through the in-situ creation of a NAPL mixture source-zone. This method was tested in the laboratory using equilibrium batch tests and two-dimensional flow-cell experiments. The creation of two different NAPL mixture source zones were tested in which 1) volumes of relatively insoluble n-hexadecane (HEX) or vegetable oil (VO) were injected into a trichloroethene (TCE) contaminant source-zone; and 2) pre-determined HEX-TCE and VO-TCE mixture ratio source zones were emplaced into the flow cell prior to water flushing. NAPL-aqueous phase batch tests were conducted prior to the flow-cell experiments to evaluate the effects of various NAPL mixture ratios on equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations of TCE and toluene (TOL) and to design optimal NAPL (HEX or VO) injection volumes for the flow-cell experiments. Uniform NAPL mixture source-zones were able to quickly decrease contaminant mass-flux, as demonstrated by the emplaced source-zone experiments. The success of the HEX and VO injections to also decrease mass flux was dependent on the ability of these injectants to homogeneously mix with TCE source-zone. Upon injection, both HEX and VO migrated away from the source-zone, to some extent. However, the lack of a steady-state dissolution phase and the inefficient mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior produced after VO injection suggest that VO was more effective than HEX for mixing and partitioning within the source-zone region to form a more homogeneous NAPL mixture with TCE. VO appears to be a promising source-zone injectant-NAPL due to its negligible long-term toxicity and lower mobilization potential.

  4. Identifying fracture‐zone geometry using simulated annealing and hydraulic‐connection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    A new approach is presented to condition geostatistical simulation of high‐permeability zones in fractured rock to hydraulic‐connection data. A simulated‐annealing algorithm generates three‐dimensional (3‐D) realizations conditioned to borehole data, inferred hydraulic connections between packer‐isolated borehole intervals, and an indicator (fracture zone or background‐K bedrock) variogram model of spatial variability. We apply the method to data from the U.S. Geological Survey Mirror Lake Site in New Hampshire, where connected high‐permeability fracture zones exert a strong control on fluid flow at the hundred‐meter scale. Single‐well hydraulic‐packer tests indicate where permeable fracture zones intersect boreholes, and multiple‐well pumping tests indicate the degree of hydraulic connection between boreholes. Borehole intervals connected by a fracture zone exhibit similar hydraulic responses, whereas intervals not connected by a fracture zone exhibit different responses. Our approach yields valuable insights into the 3‐D geometry of fracture zones at Mirror Lake. Statistical analysis of the realizations yields maps of the probabilities of intersecting specific fracture zones with additional wells. Inverse flow modeling based on the assumption of equivalent porous media is used to estimate hydraulic conductivity and specific storage and to identify those fracture‐zone geometries that are consistent with hydraulic test data.

  5. 77 FR 6007 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ...] Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation... they could be published in the Federal Register. This notice lists temporary safety zones, security zones, special local regulations, drawbridge operation regulations and regulated navigation areas, all...

  6. TURBULENCE, TRANSPORT, AND WAVES IN OHMIC DEAD ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Gole, Daniel; Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.

    We use local numerical simulations to study a vertically stratified accretion disk with a resistive mid-plane that damps magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. This is an idealized model for the dead zones that may be present at some radii in protoplanetary and dwarf novae disks. We vary the relative thickness of the dead and active zones to quantify how forced fluid motions in the dead zone change. We find that the residual Reynolds stress near the mid-plane decreases with increasing dead zone thickness, becoming negligible in cases where the active to dead mass ratio is less than a few percent. This impliesmore » that purely Ohmic dead zones would be vulnerable to episodic accretion outbursts via the mechanism of Martin and Lubow. We show that even thick dead zones support a large amount of kinetic energy, but this energy is largely in fluid motions that are inefficient at angular momentum transport. Confirming results from Oishi and Mac Low, the perturbed velocity field in the dead zone is dominated by an oscillatory, vertically extended circulation pattern with a low frequency compared to the orbital frequency. This disturbance has the properties predicted for the lowest order r mode in a hydrodynamic disk. We suggest that in a global disk similar excitations would lead to propagating waves, whose properties would vary with the thickness of the dead zone and the nature of the perturbations (isothermal or adiabatic). Flows with similar amplitudes would buckle settled particle layers and could reduce the efficiency of pebble accretion.« less

  7. Flow chamber

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor [Manassas, VA

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  8. Heat Transfer at the Reattachment Zone of Separated Laminar Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Paul M.; Viegas, John R.

    1961-01-01

    The flow and heat transfer are analyzed at the reattachment zone of two-dimensional separated laminar boundary layers. The fluid is considered to be flowing normal to the wall at reattachment. An approximate expression is derived for the heat transfer in the reattachment region and a calculated value is compared with an experimental measurement.

  9. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  10. Non-axisymmetric flow characteristics in centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Leilei; Lao, Dazhong; Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce

    2015-06-01

    The flow field distribution in centrifugal compressor is significantly affected by the non-axisymmetric geometry structure of the volute. The experimental and numerical simulation methods were adopted in this work to study the compressor flow field distribution with different flow conditions. The results show that the pressure distributionin volute is characterized by the circumferential non-uniform phenomenon and the pressure fluctuation on the high static pressure zone propagates reversely to upstream, which results in the non-axisymmetric flow inside the compressor. The non-uniform level of pressure distribution in large flow condition is higher than that in small flow condition, its effect on the upstream flow field is also stronger. Additionally, the non-uniform circumferential pressure distribution in volute brings the non-axisymmetric flow at impeller outlet. In different flow conditions,the circumferential variation of the absolute flow angle at impeller outlet is also different. Meanwhile, the non-axisymmetric flow characteristics in internal impeller can be also reflected by the distribution of the mass flow. The high static pressure region of the volute corresponds to the decrease of mass flow in upstream blade channel, while the low static pressure zone of the volute corresponds to the increase of the mass flow. In small flow condition, the mass flow difference in the blade channel is bigger than that in the large flow condition.

  11. Improving work zone safety through speed management.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    Safety hazards are increased in highway work zones as the dynamics of a work zone introduce a constantly changing : environment with varying levels of risk. Excessive speeding through work and maintenance zones is a common occurrence : which elevates...

  12. Granular flows in constrained geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Tejas; Viswanathan, Koushik

    Confined geometries are widespread in granular processing applications. The deformation and flow fields in such a geometry, with non-trivial boundary conditions, determine the resultant mechanical properties of the material (local porosity, density, residual stresses etc.). We present experimental studies of deformation and plastic flow of a prototypical granular medium in different nontrivial geometries- flat-punch compression, Couette-shear flow and a rigid body sliding past a granular half-space. These geometries represent simplified scaled-down versions of common industrial configurations such as compaction and dredging. The corresponding granular flows show a rich variety of flow features, representing the entire gamut of material types, from elastic solids (beam buckling) to fluids (vortex-formation, boundary layers) and even plastically deforming metals (dead material zone, pile-up). The effect of changing particle-level properties (e.g., shape, size, density) on the observed flows is also explicitly demonstrated. Non-smooth contact dynamics particle simulations are shown to reproduce some of the observed flow features quantitatively. These results showcase some central challenges facing continuum-scale constitutive theories for dynamic granular flows.

  13. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranganu, Constantin

    Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C/km. In general, thermal gradients increase from SW (14.11sp°C/km) to NE (42.24sp°C/km). The range of 1,498 in situ thermal conductivity measurements (after corrections for anisotropy, in situ temperature, and porosity) is 0.90-6.1 W/m-K; the average is 1.68 W/m-K. Estimated near-surface heat flow (±20%) at 20 new sites in Oklahoma varies between 22 ± 4 mW/msp2 and 86 ± 17 mW/msp2; the average is 50 mW/msp2. Twenty-seven new heat-generation estimates, along with 22 previously published data, are used to create a heat generation map of Oklahoma. The range of heat production estimates is 1.1-3.5 muW/msp3, with an average of 2.5 muW/msp3. The heat flow regime in Oklahoma is primarily conductive in nature, except for a zone in northeast. Transient effects due to sedimentary processes and metamorphic/igneous activity, as well as past climatic changes, do not significantly influence the thermal state of the Oklahoma crust. Heat flow near the margins of the Arkoma and Anadarko Basins may be depressed or elevated by 5-13 mW/msp2 by refraction of heat from sedimentary rocks of relatively low thermal conductivity (1-2 W/m-K) into crystalline basement rocks of relatively high thermal conductivity (˜3-4 W/m-K). The heat generation-heat flow relationship shows a modest correlation. The relatively high heat flow (˜70-80 mW/msp2) in part of northeastern Oklahoma suggests that the thermal regime there may be perturbed by regional groundwater flow originating in the fractured outcrops of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Arbuckle Mountains.

  14. Crash characteristics at work zones

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-05-01

    Work zones tend to cause hazardous conditions for vehicle drivers and construction workers since they generate conflicts between construction activities and the traffic, and therefore aggravate the existing traffic conditions.

  15. Work zone and operation enhancements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-02-01

    Oregon Department of Transportation contractors are required to implement Traffic Control Plans (TCPs) to protect and direct traffic through work zones. The design and implementation of TCPs have shown variation from project-to-project across the Sta...

  16. Physical and chemical controls on the critical zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.P.; Von Blanckenburg, F.; White, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    Geochemists have long recognized a correlation between rates of physical denudation and chemical weathering. What underlies this correlation? The Critical Zone can be considered as a feed-through reactor. Downward advance of the weathering front brings unweathered rock into the reactor. Fluids are supplied through precipitation. The reactor is stirred at the top by biological and physical processes. The balance between advance of the weathering front by mechanical and chemical processes and mass loss by denudation fixes the thickness of the Critical Zone reactor. The internal structure of this reactor is controlled by physical processes that create surface area, determine flow paths, and set the residence time of material in the Critical Zone. All of these impact chemical weathering flux.

  17. An updated model of induced airflow in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, Arthur L.; Joss, Craig J.

    1995-01-01

    Simulation of induced movement of air in the unsaturated zone provides a method to determine permeability and to design vapor extraction remediation systems. A previously published solution to the airflow equation for the case in which the unsaturated zone is separated from the atmosphere by a layer of lower permeability (such as a clay layer) has been superseded. The new solution simulates airflow through the layer of lower permeability more rigorously by defining the leakage in terms of the upper boundary condition rather than by adding a leakage term to the governing airflow equation. This note presents the derivation of the new solution. Formulas for steady state pressure, specific discharge, and mass flow in the domain are obtained for the new model and for the case in which the unsaturated zone is in direct contact with the atmosphere.

  18. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-03-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  19. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-07-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  20. Primary zone dynamics in a gas turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. P.; Barron, D.; Seal, M.; Morgan, D.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1989-01-01

    Fluid mechanical investigations simulating the flow in the primary zone of a gas turbine combustor are presented using three generic test rigs: (1) rotating pipe yielding a swirling jet of air; (2) primary