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Sample records for zone vi appendix

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise [Estimated Plume Rise (in Meters) Based...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise [Estimated Plume Rise (in Meters) Based...

  3. 40 CFR Appendixes Vi-Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] VI Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 [Reserved] ...

  4. 40 CFR Appendixes Vi-Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false [Reserved] VI Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 [Reserved] ...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 261 - Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Financial Requirements for Management of Excluded Hazardous Secondary Materials Wording of the instruments. Appendix VI to Part 261 [Reserved for Etiologic Agents] ...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 1039 - Nonroad Compression-ignition Composite Transient Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nonroad Compression-ignition Composite Transient Cycle VI Appendix VI to Part 1039 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... ENGINES Pt. 1039, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 1039—Nonroad Compression-ignition Composite Transient Cycle...

  7. 15 CFR Appendix Vi to Subpart P of... - Special-Use Areas Boundary Coordinates and Use Designations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special-Use Areas Boundary Coordinates and Use Designations VI Appendix VI to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. P, App. VI Appendix VI to Subpart P of Part 922...

  8. 15 CFR Appendix Vi to Subpart P of... - Special-Use Areas Boundary Coordinates and Use Designations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special-Use Areas Boundary Coordinates and Use Designations VI Appendix VI to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. P, App. VI Appendix VI to Subpart P of Part 922...

  9. 15 CFR Appendix Vi to Subpart P of... - Special-Use Areas Boundary Coordinates and Use Designations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special-Use Areas Boundary Coordinates and Use Designations VI Appendix VI to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. P, App. VI Appendix VI to Subpart P of Part 922...

  10. 20 CFR Appendix Vi to Subpart C of... - Percentage of Automatic Increases in Primary Insurance Amounts Since 1978

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percentage of Automatic Increases in Primary Insurance Amounts Since 1978 VI Appendix VI to Subpart C of Part 404 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 265 - Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X VI Appendix VI to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X Compound name CAS No. Acetaldol 107-89-1 Acetamide 60-35-5 2...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 265 - Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X VI Appendix VI to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X Compound name CAS No. Acetaldol 107-89-1 Acetamide 60-35-5 2...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 265 - Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X VI Appendix VI to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X Compound name CAS No. Acetaldol 107-89-1 Acetamide 60-35-5 2...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 265 - Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X VI Appendix VI to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X Compound name CAS No. Acetaldol 107-89-1 Acetamide 60-35-5 2...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 265 - Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X VI Appendix VI to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X Compound name CAS No. Acetaldol 107-89-1 Acetamide 60-35-5 2...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 222 - Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones C Appendix C to.... 222, App. C Appendix C to Part 222—Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones Introduction This Guide to... without implementation of additional safety measures at any crossings in the quiet zone; or c. Additional...

  17. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Davidson Seamount Management Zone F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922—Davidson Seamount Management Zone...

  18. 78 FR 23489 - Safety Zone; V.I. Carnival Finale, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S.V.I.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; V.I. Carnival Finale, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. AGENCY: Coast Guard... waters of St. Thomas Harbor in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands during the V.I. Carnival Finale, a... being positioned near the St. Thomas Harbor channel from which fireworks will be lit. The safety zone is...

  19. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: a potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization’s maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 μg L−1) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 μg L−1. To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to ~1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged from 0 to 42 μg kg−1, representing a minute fraction of total Cr. Chromium(VI) content was typically below detection in surface soils (top 10 cm) where soil organic matter was high, and increased with increasing depth in the soil auger cores as organic matter decreased. Maximum concentrations of Cr(VI) were up to 3 times greater in the deeper drill core samples than the shallow auger cores. Although Cr(VI) in these vadose zone soils and sediments was only a

  20. Redox transformation and reductive immobilization of Cr(VI) in the Columbia River hyporheic zone sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fen; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zachara, John; Bowden, Mark; Kennedy, David; Plymale, Andrew E.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2017-12-01

    An experimental and modeling study was conducted to investigate the redox transformation and reductive immobilization of groundwater contaminant Cr in hyporheic zone (HZ) sediments from U.S. DOE's Hanford Site, where groundwater Cr(VI) is migrating and discharging to the nearby Columbia River. Experimental results revealed that Cr(VI) can be reduced and immobilized by the HZ sediments in the presence/absence of O2. Anaerobic pre-incubation of the sediments increased the effective rate of Cr reduction that was correlated with the increase in HCl-extractable Fe(II) content in the sediments. The reduced Cr was stable when exposed to O2 under field-relevant pH (7.5) with and without dissolved Mn(II), which might be oxidized to form Mn(III/IV) oxides that may oxidize reduced Cr. The Cr(VI) reduction rate showed a multi-rate behavior, apparently reflecting the presence of reductants with different reactivity in the sediments. The results from this study indicated that the HZ sediments can reductively immobilize Cr and the sediment redox capacity can be recharged through microbial activities. The results implied that HZ can play a role as a natural permeable redox barrier for removing groundwater Cr before it discharges into a river system.

  1. Redox transformation and reductive immobilization of Cr(VI) in the Columbia River hyporheic zone sediments

    SciT

    Xu, Fen; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zachara, John

    An experimental and modeling study was conducted to investigate the redox transformation and reductive immobilization of groundwater contaminant Cr in hyporheic zone (HZ) sediments from U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford site, where groundwater Cr(VI) is migrating and discharging to the nearby Columbia River. Experimental results revealed that Cr(VI) can be reduced to immobile reduced Cr by the HZ sediments in the presence/absence of O2. Anaerobic pre-incubation of the sediments increased the effective rate of Cr reduction that was correlated with the increase in HCl-extractable Fe(II) content in the sediments. The reduced Cr was stable in exposure to O2 under field-relevantmore » pH (~7.5) and Mn-containing (~0.02% w/w) conditions. The Cr(VI) reduction rate showed a multi-rate behavior, apparently reflecting the presence of reductants with different reactivity in the sediments. The results from this study indicated that the HZ sediments can reductively immobilize Cr and the sediment redox capacity can be recharged through microbial activities. The results implied that HZ can play a role as a natural permeable redox barrier for removing groundwater Cr before it discharges into a river system.« less

  2. 15 CFR Appendix B to Subpart M of... - Zones Within the Sanctuary Where Overflights Below 1000 Feet Are Prohibited

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Zones Within the Sanctuary Where Overflights Below 1000 Feet Are Prohibited B Appendix B to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade... Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. B Appendix B to Subpart M of Part 922—Zones...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 222 - Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones C Appendix C to Part 222 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION USE OF LOCOMOTIVE HORNS AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Pt...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 222 - Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones C Appendix C to Part 222 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION USE OF LOCOMOTIVE HORNS AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Pt...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 222 - Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones C Appendix C to Part 222 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION USE OF LOCOMOTIVE HORNS AT PUBLIC HIGHWAY-RAIL GRADE CROSSINGS Pt...

  6. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Davidson Seamount Management Zone F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 222 - Guide to Establishing Quiet Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Horns will not be subject to annual reviews. (5) The use of FRA's web-based Quiet Zone Calculator is... appendix A (e.g., shorter than required traffic channelization devices), non-engineering ASMs (e.g., programmed law enforcement), and engineering ASMs (i.e., engineering improvements other than modified SSMs...

  8. 15 CFR Appendix C to Subpart H of... - No-Anchoring Seagrass Protection Zones in Tomales Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false No-Anchoring Seagrass Protection Zones in Tomales Bay C Appendix C to Subpart H of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating... of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. H, App. C Appendix C to Subpart H of Part...

  9. Optimal early active mobilisation protocol after extensor tendon repairs in zones V and VI: A systematic review of literature.

    PubMed

    Collocott, Shirley Jf; Kelly, Edel; Ellis, Richard F

    2018-03-01

    Early mobilisation protocols after repair of extensor tendons in zone V and VI provide better outcomes than immobilisation protocols. This systematic review investigated different early active mobilisation protocols used after extensor tendon repair in zone V and VI. The purpose was to determine whether any one early active mobilisation protocol provides superior results. An extensive literature search was conducted to identify articles investigating the outcomes of early active mobilisation protocols after extensor tendon repair in zone V and VI. Databases searched were AMED, Embase, Medline, Cochrane and CINAHL. Studies were included if they involved participants with extensor tendon repairs in zone V and VI in digits 2-5 and described a post-operative rehabilitation protocol which allowed early active metacarpophalangeal joint extension. Study designs included were randomised controlled trials, observational studies, cohort studies and case series. The Structured Effectiveness Quality Evaluation Scale was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. Twelve articles met the inclusion criteria. Two types of early active mobilisation protocols were identified: controlled active motion protocols and relative motion extension splinting protocols. Articles describing relative motion extension splinting protocols were more recent but of lower methodological quality than those describing controlled active motion protocols. Participants treated with controlled active motion and relative motion extension splinting protocols had similar range of motion outcomes, but those in relative motion extension splinting groups returned to work earlier. The evidence reviewed suggested that relative motion extension splinting protocols may allow an earlier return to function than controlled active motion protocols without a greater risk of complication.

  10. 15 CFR Appendix E to Subpart M of... - Motorized Personal Watercraft Zones and Access Routes Within the Sanctuary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motorized Personal Watercraft Zones and Access Routes Within the Sanctuary E Appendix E to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC...

  11. 15 CFR Appendix B to Subpart M of... - Zones Within the Sanctuary Where Overflights Below 1000 Feet Are Prohibited

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Zones Within the Sanctuary Where Overflights Below 1000 Feet Are Prohibited B Appendix B to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION...

  12. (20-22) Proposals to add Gerard, FL gallo-Prov. 1761, Kramer, Elench. Veg. 156, and Miller, Gard. Dict. Abr. ed. 4 1754 to the list of suppressed works in Appendix VI

    The International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants in its current edition, the 2012 Melbourne Code, includes in Art. 34 provisions for the suppression of names in specified publications that are listed in its Appendix VI. Any publication can be proposed for suppression, and if such a...

  13. 78 FR 34575 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim VI, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... of any grant or loan recipients, and will not raise any novel legal or policy issues. The safety zone... through the safety zone when permitted by the Captain of the Port. 2. Impact on Small Entities Under the... entities. The Coast Guard certifies under 5 U.S.C. 605(b) that this proposed rule will not have a...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 268 - Recommended Technologies To Achieve Deactivation of Characteristics in Section 268.42

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Pt. 268, App. VI....42 The treatment standard for many characteristic wastes is stated in the § 268.40 Table of Treatment... combination, can achieve the deactivation portion of the treatment standard. Characteristic wastes that are...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 268 - Recommended Technologies To Achieve Deactivation of Characteristics in Section 268.42

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Pt. 268, App. VI....42 The treatment standard for many characteristic wastes is stated in the § 268.40 Table of Treatment... combination, can achieve the deactivation portion of the treatment standard. Characteristic wastes that are...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 268 - Recommended Technologies To Achieve Deactivation of Characteristics in Section 268.42

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Pt. 268, App. VI....42 The treatment standard for many characteristic wastes is stated in the § 268.40 Table of Treatment... combination, can achieve the deactivation portion of the treatment standard. Characteristic wastes that are...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 268 - Recommended Technologies To Achieve Deactivation of Characteristics in Section 268.42

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Pt. 268, App. VI....42 The treatment standard for many characteristic wastes is stated in the § 268.40 Table of Treatment... combination, can achieve the deactivation portion of the treatment standard. Characteristic wastes that are...

  18. 29 CFR Appendix D to Subpart R of... - Illustration of the Use of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With § 1926.760(c)(3) D Appendix D... of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying..., tapes, or equivalent materials, and supporting stanchions as follows: (i) Each line is rigged and...

  19. 29 CFR Appendix D to Subpart R of... - Illustration of the Use of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With § 1926.760(c)(3) D Appendix D... of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying..., tapes, or equivalent materials, and supporting stanchions as follows: (i) Each line is rigged and...

  20. 29 CFR Appendix D to Subpart R of... - Illustration of the Use of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illustration of the Use of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With § 1926.760(c)(3) D Appendix D...

  1. 29 CFR Appendix D to Subpart R of... - Illustration of the Use of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustration of the Use of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With § 1926.760(c)(3) D Appendix D...

  2. 29 CFR Appendix D to Subpart R of... - Illustration of the Use of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Illustration of the Use of Control Lines To Demarcate Controlled Decking Zones (CDZs): Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With § 1926.760(c)(3) D Appendix D...

  3. Guidelines and Data to Support Plans for Reallocating Food during Crisis Relocation. Regional Appendix. FEMA Region VI,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    POPLAR BLUFF MO 2 1 0 0 0 2,2-50 JONESBORO GROCER CO JOIES3ORO AR 1 I 0 0 0 0 7-0 MALONE AND HIDE INC MEMPHIS TN 4 2 I I 0 0 6,000 WETTERAU FOODS INC SCOTT...five states in FEMA Region VI ( Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas) are largely P self-sufficient, warehousing between 75% to 97% of their food supplies...within their own borders. New Mexico and Arkansas are heavily dependent on out-of-state warehouses for food shipments, with less than one-third of their

  4. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Monterey Bay National Marine... [Coordinates in this appendix are unprojected (Geographic Coordinate System) and are calculated using the North...

  5. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Monterey Bay National Marine... [Coordinates in this appendix are unprojected (Geographic Coordinate System) and are calculated using the North...

  6. 15 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Davidson Seamount Management Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Monterey Bay National Marine... [Coordinates in this appendix are unprojected (Geographic Coordinate System) and are calculated using the North...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 122 - Rainfall Zones of the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Appendix E to Part 122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE NATIONAL POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM Pt. 122, App. E... Protection Agency, Office of Water, Nonpoint Source Division, Washington, DC, 1986. [55 FR 48073, Nov. 16...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 122 - Rainfall Zones of the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Appendix E to Part 122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE NATIONAL POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM Pt. 122, App. E... Protection Agency, Office of Water, Nonpoint Source Division, Washington, DC, 1986. [55 FR 48073, Nov. 16...

  9. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 110 - Climatic Zones Used To Determine Rates of Commutation Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Virginia 42. Wisconsin 43. Wyoming The climate zones listed above are to be used as a guide to determine... commanders may request a zone change by submitting evidence to the Major Command of the appropriate Military...

  10. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 110 - Climatic Zones Used To Determine Rates of Commutation Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Virginia 42. Wisconsin 43. Wyoming The climate zones listed above are to be used as a guide to determine... commanders may request a zone change by submitting evidence to the Major Command of the appropriate Military...

  11. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 110 - Climatic Zones Used To Determine Rates of Commutation Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Virginia 42. Wisconsin 43. Wyoming The climate zones listed above are to be used as a guide to determine... commanders may request a zone change by submitting evidence to the Major Command of the appropriate Military...

  12. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 110 - Climatic Zones Used To Determine Rates of Commutation Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Virginia 42. Wisconsin 43. Wyoming The climate zones listed above are to be used as a guide to determine... commanders may request a zone change by submitting evidence to the Major Command of the appropriate Military...

  13. Western Shallow Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study, Appendix 3, Second Wilhelm Sand

    SciT

    Carey, K.B.

    1987-09-01

    The general Reservoir Study of the Western Shallow Oil Zone was prepared by Evans, Carey and Crozier as Task Assignment 009 under Contract No. DE-ACO1-85FE60600 with the United States Department of Energy. This study Appendix III, the second Wilhelm Sand and it's sub units and pools. Basic pressure, production and assorted technical data were provided by the U.S. Department of Energy staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made by Evans, Carey and Crozier for independent verification. This study has identified the petrophysical properties and the past productive performance of the reservoir. Primarymore » reserves have been determined and general means of enhancing future recovery have been suggested. It is hoped that this volume can not additionally serve as a take off point for exploitation engineers to develop specific programs towards these ends. 15 figs., 9 tabs.« less

  14. Application of the zone-melting technique to metal chelate systems-VI A new apparatus for zone-melting chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maeda, S; Kobayashi, H; Ueno, K

    1973-07-01

    An improved apparatus has been constructed for zone-melting chromatography. An essential feature of the apparatus is that the length of the molten zone can be kept constant during a zone-melting operation, by employing heating and cooling compartments which are separated from each other by double partition plates. Each compartment is heated or cooled with jets of hot or cold air. The apparatus is suitable for organic materials melting in the range between 40 degrees and 180 degrees . The distribution of metal ion along the column after zone melting of copper acetylacetonate in 2-methoxynaphthalene was a smooth curve. The plot of the position of maximum concentration, x(max), against the number of zone passes, n, gave a relationship in accordance with theoretical prediction.

  15. Western Shallow Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study, Appendix 4, Fourth Wilhelm sand

    SciT

    Carey, K.B.

    1987-09-01

    The general Reservoir Study of the Western Shallow Oil Zone was prepared by Evans, Carey and Crozier as Task Assignment 009 with the United States Department of Energy. This study, Appendix IV, addresses the Fourth Wilhelm Sand and its sub units and pools. Basic pressure, production and assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy staff at Elk Hills. Basic pressure production and assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made by Evans, Carey and Crozier for independent verification.more » This study has identified the petrophysical properties and the past productive performance of the reservoir. Primary reserves have been determined and general means of enhancing future recovery have been suggested. It is hoped that this volume can now additionally serve as a take off point for exploitation engineers to develop specific programs toward the end. 12 figs., 9 tabs.« less

  16. Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Wang, Zheming; Dixit, Suvasis; Steefel, Carl I; Saiz, Eduardo; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2009-04-01

    A saline-alkaline brine containing high concentration of U(VI) was accidentally spilled at the Hanford Site in 1951, introducing 10 tons of U into sediments under storage tank BX-102. U concentrations in the deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes increase with time, yet how the U has been migrating is not fully understood. We simulated the spill event in laboratory soil columns, followed by aging, and obtained spatially resolved U partitioning and speciation along simulated plumes. We found after aging, at apparent steady state, that the pore aqueous phase U concentrations remained surprisingly high (up to 0.022 M), in close agreement with the recently reported high U concentrations (up to 0.027 M) in the vadose zone plume (1). The pH values of aged pore liquids varying from 10 to 7, consistent with the measured pH of the field borehole sediments varying from 9.5 to 7.4 (2), from near the plume source to the plume front. The direct measurements of aged pore liquids together with thermodynamic calculations using a Pitzer approach revealed that UO2(CO3)3(4-) is the dominant aqueous U species within the plume body (pH 8-10), whereas Ca2UO2(CO3)3 and CaUO2(CO3)32- are also significant in the plume frontvicinity (pH 7-8), consistent with that measured from field borehole pore-waters (3). U solid phase speciation varies at different locations along the plume flow path and even within single sediment grains, because of location dependent pore and micropore solution chemistry. Our results suggest that continuous gravity-driven migration of the highly stable U02(CO3)34 in the residual carbonate and sodium rich tank waste solution is likely responsible for the detected growing U concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater.

  17. Gulf Coast Deep Water Port Facilities Study. Appendix C. Eastern Gulf Hydrobiological Zones.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-04-01

    MARINE 5IOTA C-22 1. Benthic Plants C-22 2. Plankton C;23 3. Benthic Invertebrates C-27 4. Fish C-33 5. Marine Mammals C-35 6. Marine Birds C-37 7. Rare...56 B. RESIDENT AND TRANSIENT MARINE BIOTA C-56 1. Plankton C-56 2. Benthic Invertebrates C-62 3. Fish C-62 4. Marine Mammals C-684 Artur D Little Inc...TRANSIENT MARINE BIOTA C-78 l.-Plankton C-78 .-2. Benthic Invertebrates C8 3. F ish C-81 4. Marine Mammals C-85 V. ZONAL ANALYSIS C-87 A. ZONE V

  18. Tc(VII) and Cr(VI) Interaction with Naturally Reduced Ferruginous Smectite from a Redox Transition Zone

    SciT

    Qafoku, Odeta; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Neumann, Anke

    Fe(II)-rich clay minerals found in subsurface redox transition zones (RTZs) can serve as important source of electron equivalents limiting the transport of redox active contaminants. While most laboratory reactivity studies are based on reduced model clays, the reactivity of naturally reduced clays in field samples remains poorly explored. Characterization of the clay size fraction of a fine-grained unit from RTZ interface at the Hanford site, Washington, including mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and Fe(II)/(III) content, indicates that ferruginous montmorillonite is the dominant mineralogical component. Oxic and anoxic fractions differ significantly in Fe(II) concentration, but FeTOTAL remains constant demonstrating no Fe loss duringmore » reduction-oxidation cycling. At its native pH of 8.6, the anoxic fraction despite its significant Fe(II) (~23% of FeTOTAL), exhibits minimal reactivity with TcO4- and CrO42- and much slower reaction kinetics than that measured in studies with biologically/chemically reduced model clays. Reduction capacity is enhanced by added Fe(II) (if Fe(II)SORBED >8% clay Fe(II)LABILE), however the kinetics of this conceptually surface-mediated reaction remain sluggish. Surface-sensitive Fe L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that Fe(II)SORBED and the resulting reducing equivalents are not available in the outermost few nanometers of clay surfaces. Slow kinetics thus appear related to diffusion-limited access to electron equivalents retained within clay mineral.« less

  19. Tc(VII) and Cr(VI) Interaction with Naturally Reduced Ferruginous Smectite from a Redox Transition Zone.

    PubMed

    Qafoku, Odeta; Pearce, Carolyn I; Neumann, Anke; Kovarik, Libor; Zhu, Mengqiang; Ilton, Eugene S; Bowden, Mark E; Resch, Charles T; Arey, Bruce W; Arenholz, Elke; Felmy, Andrew R; Rosso, Kevin M

    2017-08-15

    Fe(II)-rich clay minerals found in subsurface redox transition zones (RTZs) can serve as important sources of electron equivalents limiting the transport of redox-active contaminants. While most laboratory reactivity studies are based on reduced model clays, the reactivity of naturally reduced field samples remains poorly explored. Characterization of the clay size fraction of a fine-grained unit from the RTZ interface at the Hanford site, Washington, including mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and Fe(II)/(III) content, indicates that ferruginous montmorillonite is the dominant mineralogical component. Oxic and anoxic fractions differ significantly in Fe(II) natural content, but Fe TOTAL remains constant, demonstrating no Fe loss during its reduction-oxidation cyclings. At native pH of 8.6, the anoxic fraction, despite its significant Fe(II), ∼23% of Fe TOTAL , exhibits minimal reactivity with TcO 4 - and CrO 4 2- and much slower reaction kinetics than those measured in studies with biologically/chemically reduced model clays. Reduction capacity is enhanced by added/sorbed Fe(II) (if Fe(II) SORBED > 8% clay Fe(II) LABILE ); however, the kinetics of this conceptually surface-mediated reaction remain sluggish. Surface-sensitive Fe L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that Fe(II) SORBED and the resulting reducing equivalents are not available in the outermost few nanometers of clay surfaces. Slow kinetics thus appear related to diffusion-limited access to electron equivalents retained within the clay mineral structure.

  20. 15 CFR Appendix C to Subpart H of... - No-Anchoring Seagrass Protection Zones in Tomales Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. H, App. C Appendix C to Subpart H of Part...

  1. 15 CFR Appendix E to Subpart M of... - Motorized Personal Watercraft Zones and Access Routes Within the Sanctuary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... access route southwest along a bearing of approximately 196° true (180° magnetic) to the red and white...° magnetic) to the red and white bell buoy at the eastern boundary of Zone Three bounded by: Point ID No...° true (0° magnetic) to the southern boundary of Zone Four bounded by: Point ID No. Latitude Longitude 1...

  2. 38 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Illustrative Applications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 General Pt. 18, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart... purchased or otherwise obtained by the grantee (or political subdivision) from hospitals, nursing homes...

  3. 38 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Illustrative Applications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 General Pt. 18, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart... purchased or otherwise obtained by the grantee (or political subdivision) from hospitals, nursing homes...

  4. Appendix C: GLEES Macroinvertebrates

    B. C. Kondratieff

    1994-01-01

    This Appendix identifies macroinvertebrate species found in streams and lakes at GLEES during a preliminary qualitative survey conducted in the summer of 1988 by Dr. Boris Kondratieff. The littoral zones of each lake and each stream were sampled by hand-picking and with a triangle net. Insect voucher specimens are maintained in the Gillette Entomological Museum at...

  5. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    MedlinePlus

    ... palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy; Sixth nerve palsy; Neuropathy - sixth nerve ... with: Brain aneurysms Nerve damage from diabetes( diabetic neuropathy ) Gradenigo syndrome (which also causes discharge from the ...

  6. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    SciT

    Bowman, Stephen M

    2008-09-01

    examples of using SCALE/KENO-VI for criticality analyses; the SCALE/KENO-VI manual provides information on the use of SCALE/KENO-VI and all its modules. The primer also contains an appendix with sample input files.« less

  7. Appendix (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... become infected. Although most people are familiar with appendicitis, it is a relatively rare disease. It is ... of the appendix (appendectomy). Recovery time for uncomplicated appendicitis is usually just three days.

  8. Container Technology Study : Volume 2. Appendixes.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1980-10-01

    Volume II has nine appendixes as follows: Appendix A - Railroad Flatcar Data; Appendix B - Calculations; Appendix C - Record of Telephone Calls; Appendix D - Industry Interviews; Appendix E - Field Trips and Conferences; Appendix F - Annotated biblio...

  9. Environmental application of remote sensing methods to coastal zone land use and marine resource management. Appendix F: User's guide for advection, convection prototype. [southeastern Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for the environmental computer model proposed for the Richmond-Cape Henry Environmental Laboratory (RICHEL) application project for coastal zone land use investigations and marine resources management. The model was developed around the hydrologic cycle and includes two data bases consisting of climate and land use variables. The main program is described, along with control parameters to be set and pertinent subroutines.

  10. ESL VI Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flander, Leonard

    This curriculum guide for English as a Second Language (ESL) Level VI is the sixth of six in a Guam Community College ESL project series. The other five guides, a companion teacher's guide and pre- and post-tests are available separately (see note). The entire project centers around the Peabody Kits P, Level P, Level 1, Level 2, Level 3, and the…

  11. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Formula (Sample) E Appendix E to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... COMMUTATION INSTEAD OF UNIFORMS FOR MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS Pt. 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) Zone I Zone II Total...

  12. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) E Appendix E to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... Appendix E to Part 110—Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) Zone I Zone II Total...

  13. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) E Appendix E to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... Appendix E to Part 110—Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) Zone I Zone II Total...

  14. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) E Appendix E to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... Appendix E to Part 110—Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) Zone I Zone II Total...

  15. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) E Appendix E to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... Appendix E to Part 110—Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) Zone I Zone II Total...

  16. Final Technical Report -- GEO-VI - USGEO

    SciT

    Hirsch, Leonard

    2009-11-30

    Representatives of US earth observations departments and agencies, other participating governments, NGOs and civil society participated in the Sixth Plenary Meeting of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO-VI), hosted by the United States in Washington, DC on November 17 and 18, 2009. The meeting was held in the Atrium Ballroom of the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center. Exhibitions of international Earth observation technology and programs were held concurrently in the same venue. A number of GEO committee meetings and side events were held in conjunction with the GEO-VI Plenary, including the GEO-IGOS Symposium on Earth observation science and applications, themore » GEOSS in the Americas Forum on Coastal Zones, and separate meetings of the GEO Communities of Practice on Carbon, Health, and Air Quality.« less

  17. 47 CFR Appendix - Technical Appendix 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAM Waiver of household eligibility. Pt. 301, App. 2 Technical Appendix 2 TECHNICAL APPENDIX 2—NTIA... promotional prices Equipment cannot be sold conditioned on the purchase of a Smart Antenna or other equipment...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 21 - Activities to Which This Part Applies When a Primary Objective of the Federal Financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Primary Objective of the Federal Financial Assistance Is To Provide Employment B Appendix B to Part 21... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 21, App. B Appendix B to Part 21—Activities to Which This Part Applies When a Primary Objective of the Federal Financial...

  19. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Application of Basic Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Application of Basic Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample) C Appendix C to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Appendix C to Part 110—Application of Basic Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample) Zone I Zone...

  20. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Application of Basic Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Female Members) (Sample) C Appendix C to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... COMMUTATION INSTEAD OF UNIFORMS FOR MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS Pt. 110, App. C Appendix C to Part 110—Application of Basic Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample) Zone I Zone...

  1. 50 CFR 654.24 - Shrimp/stone crab separation zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shrimp/stone crab separation zones. 654.24... Measures § 654.24 Shrimp/stone crab separation zones. Five zones are established in the management area and... trapping. The zones are as shown in Appendix A, Figure 3, of this part. Although Zone II is entirely within...

  2. 50 CFR 654.24 - Shrimp/stone crab separation zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Shrimp/stone crab separation zones. 654... Measures § 654.24 Shrimp/stone crab separation zones. Five zones are established in the management area and... trapping. The zones are as shown in Appendix A, Figure 3, of this part. Although Zone II is entirely within...

  3. Appendix A : literature review.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-03-01

    This appendix contains a review of the literature and other background information : germane to the experimental and analytical research presented in subsequent appendices. Table : 1 lists the sections and topics contained in this appendix and those ...

  4. The Economy and Enlisted Retention in the Navy. Volume 2: Technical Appendixes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Appendix C 13 Table 1. Selected summary statistics of Zone A sailors Statistic Men Women SRB 1.2 0.7 Months of sea duty in past 24 months 19.3 10.7...525,535 89,925 Appendix C 14 Table 2. Selected summary statistics of Zone B sailors Statistic Men Women SRB 1.0 0.5 Months of sea duty in...relationship holds for Zone A women as well as Zone B men and women as that found for Zone A men. Table 5. Changes in the unemployment and Treasury

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms...

  9. 76 FR 60593 - Title VI; Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration [Docket No. FTA-2011-0054] Title VI... complying with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The purpose of this Circular is to provide.... Department of Transportation's Title VI regulations (49 CFR part 21). FTA is updating its Title VI Circular...

  10. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 195 - Programs to Which This Part Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 195, App. A Appendix A to Part 195—Programs to... Defense assistance to programs of adult education in civil defense subjects (50 United States Code App. 2281 (e), (f)). 6. Office of Civil Defense radiological instruments grants (50 United States Code App...

  11. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 195 - Programs to Which This Part Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 195, App. A Appendix A to Part 195—Programs to... Defense assistance to programs of adult education in civil defense subjects (50 United States Code App. 2281 (e), (f)). 6. Office of Civil Defense radiological instruments grants (50 United States Code App...

  12. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 1250 - NASA Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Part Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false NASA Federal Financial Assistance to Which... ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS OF NASA-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 1250, App. A Appendix A to Part 1250—NASA Federal Financial Assistance to Which...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 1250 - NASA Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Part Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NASA Federal Financial Assistance to Which... ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS OF NASA-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 1250, App. A Appendix A to Part 1250—NASA Federal Financial Assistance to Which...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 1250 - NASA Federal Financial Assistance to Which This Part Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NASA Federal Financial Assistance to Which... ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS OF NASA-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 1250, App. A Appendix A to Part 1250—NASA Federal Financial Assistance to Which...

  15. Cr(VI) Occurrence and Geochemistry in Water From Public-Supply Wells in California

    DOE PAGES

    Izbicki, John A.; Wright, Michael T.; Seymour, Whitney A.; ...

    2015-08-18

    Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in 918 wells sampled throughout California between 2004 and 2012 by the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program—Priority Basin Project (GAMA—PBP) ranged from less than the study reporting limit (SRL) of 1 microgram per liter (μg/L) to 32 μg/L. Statewide, Cr(VI) was reported in 31 percent of sampled wells and equaled or exceeded the recently established (2014) California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for Cr(VI) of 10 μg/L in 4 percent of sampled wells. Cr(VI) data collected for regulatory purposes overestimate Cr(VI) occurrence. Ninety percent of chromium was present as Cr(VI), which was detected more frequently and atmore » higher concentrations in alkaline (pH > 8), oxic water, and more frequently in agricultural and urban land uses compared to native land uses. Chemical, isotopic (tritium and carbon-14), and noble-gas data show high Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers in the southern California deserts result from long groundwater-residence times and geochemical reactions such as silicate weathering that increase pH, while oxic conditions persist. High Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers along the west-side of the Central Valley results from high-chromium abundance in source rock eroded to form those aquifers, and areal recharge processes (including irrigation return) that mobilize chromium from the unsaturated zone. Cr(VI) co-occurred with oxyanions having similar chemistry, including vanadium, selenium, and uranium. Cr(VI) was positively correlated with nitrate, consistent with increased concentrations in areas of agricultural land use and mobilization of chromium from the unsaturated zone by irrigation return.« less

  16. Cr(VI) occurrence and geochemistry in water from public-supply wells in California

    Izbicki, John; Wright, Michael; Seymour, Whitney A.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, Bradley K.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in 918 wells sampled throughout California between 2004 and 2012 by the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment-Priority Basin Project (GAMA-PBP) ranged from less than the study reporting limit of 1 microgram per liter (μg/L) to 32 μg/L. Statewide, Cr(VI) was reported in 31 percent of wells and equaled or exceeded the recently established (2014) California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for Cr(VI) of 10 μg/L in 4 percent of wells. Cr(VI) data collected for regulatory purposes overestimated Cr(VI) occurrence compared to spatially-distributed GAMA-PBP data. Ninety percent of chromium was present as Cr(VI), which was detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in alkaline (pH ≥ 8), oxic water; and more frequently in agricultural and urban land uses compared to native land uses. Chemical, isotopic (tritium and carbon-14), and noble-gas data show high Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers in the southern California deserts result from long groundwater-residence times and geochemical reactions such as silicate weathering that increase pH, while oxic conditions persist. High Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers along the west-side of the Central Valley results from high-chromium in source rock eroded to form those aquifers, and areal recharge processes (including irrigation return) that can mobilize chromium from the unsaturated zone. Cr(VI) co-occurred with oxyanions having similar chemistry, including vanadium, selenium, and uranium. Cr(VI) was positively correlated with nitrate, consistent with increased concentrations in areas of agricultural land use and mobilization of chromium from the unsaturated zone by irrigation return.

  17. Protostars and Planets VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    star and planet formation. They are used by students to dive into new topics, and they are much valued by experienced researchers as a comprehensive overview of the field with all its interactions. We hope that you will enjoy reading (and learning from) this book as much as we do. The organization of the Protostars and Planets conference was carried out in close collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and the Center for Astronomy of the University Heidelberg, with generous support from the German Science Foundation. This volume is a product of effort and care by many people. First and foremost, we want to acknowledge the 250 contributing authors, as it is only due to their expertise and knowledge that such a comprehensive review compendium in all its depth and breadth is possible. The Protostars and Planets VI conference and this volume was a major undertaking, with support and contributions by many people and institutions. We like to thank the members of the Scientific Advisory Committee who selected the 38 teams and chapters out of more than 120 submitted proposals. Similarly, we are grateful to the reviewers, who provided valuable input and help to the chapter authors. The book would also not have been possible without the great support of Renée Dotson and other staff from USRA’s Lunar and Planetary Institute, who handled the detailed processing of all manuscripts and the production of the book, and of Allyson Carter and other staff from the University of Arizona Press. We are also grateful to Richard Binzel, the General Editor of the Space Science Series, for his constant support during the long process, from the original concept to this final product. Finally, we would like to express a very special thank you to the entire conference local organizing committee, and in particular, Carmen Cuevas and Natali Jurina, for their great commitment to the project and for a very fruitful and enjoyable collaboration.

  18. LABORATORY STUDY FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) USING SODIUM METABISULFITE UNDER ACIDIC CONDITIONS

    SciT

    DUNCAM JB; GUTHRIE MD; LUECK KJ

    2007-07-18

    This report describes the results from RPP-PLAN-32738, 'Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome(VI) to Chrome(I1I) in the Secondary Waste Stream', using sodium metabisulfite. Appendix A presents the report as submitted by the Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) to CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The CLS carried out the laboratory effort under Contract Number 21065, release Number 30. This report extracts the more pertinent aspects of the laboratory effort.

  19. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 110 - Application of Advanced Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Application of Advanced Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample) D Appendix D to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Appendix D to Part 110—Application of Advanced Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample) Zone I...

  20. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 110 - Application of Advanced Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Female Members) (Sample) D Appendix D to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... COMMUTATION INSTEAD OF UNIFORMS FOR MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS Pt. 110, App. D Appendix D to Part 110—Application of Advanced Course Formula (Male and Female Members) (Sample) Zone I...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents the... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a specific process, operation, or activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a specific process, operation, or activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... a specific process, operation, or activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI...

  5. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a specific process, operation, or activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI...

  6. 77 FR 52116 - Title VI; Final Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration [Docket No. FTA-2011-0054] Title VI... Web site, guidance in the form of a Circular to assist grantees in complying with Title VI of the... Title VI regulations (49 CFR part 21). DATES: Effective Date: The effective date of the Circular is...

  7. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 63 - Determination of the Fraction Biodegraded (Fbio) in a Biological Treatment Unit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... designed and operated to approach or achieve uniform biomass distribution and organic compound... required by the rule. Unless otherwise specified, the procedures presented in this appendix are designed to... subdivided into a series of zones that have uniform characteristics within each zone. The number of zones...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 63 - Determination of the Fraction Biodegraded (Fbio) in a Biological Treatment Unit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designed and operated to approach or achieve uniform biomass distribution and organic compound... required by the rule. Unless otherwise specified, the procedures presented in this appendix are designed to... subdivided into a series of zones that have uniform characteristics within each zone. The number of zones...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 63 - Determination of the Fraction Biodegraded (Fbio) in a Biological Treatment Unit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designed and operated to approach or achieve uniform biomass distribution and organic compound... required by the rule. Unless otherwise specified, the procedures presented in this appendix are designed to... subdivided into a series of zones that have uniform characteristics within each zone. The number of zones...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 63 - Determination of the Fraction Biodegraded (Fbio) in a Biological Treatment Unit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designed and operated to approach or achieve uniform biomass distribution and organic compound... required by the rule. Unless otherwise specified, the procedures presented in this appendix are designed to... subdivided into a series of zones that have uniform characteristics within each zone. The number of zones...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 63 - Determination of the Fraction Biodegraded (Fbio) in a Biological Treatment Unit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designed and operated to approach or achieve uniform biomass distribution and organic compound... required by the rule. Unless otherwise specified, the procedures presented in this appendix are designed to... subdivided into a series of zones that have uniform characteristics within each zone. The number of zones...

  13. 33 CFR 334.1490 - Caribbean Sea, at St. Croix, V.I.; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Caribbean Sea, at St. Croix, V.I.; restricted areas. 334.1490 Section 334.1490 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1490 Caribbean Sea...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1490 - Caribbean Sea, at St. Croix, V.I.; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Caribbean Sea, at St. Croix, V.I.; restricted areas. 334.1490 Section 334.1490 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1490 Caribbean Sea...

  15. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 -- 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a dust free, manufactured microgravity EVA environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 -- 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 -- 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of International Space Station (ISS)-based EVA tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected periodically throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the

  16. Modeling myosin VI stepping dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehver, Riina

    Myosin VI is a molecular motor that transports intracellular cargo as well as acts as an anchor. The motor has been measured to have unusually large step size variation and it has been reported to make both long forward and short inchworm-like forward steps, as well as step backwards. We have been developing a model that incorporates this diverse stepping behavior in a consistent framework. Our model allows us to predict the dynamics of the motor under different conditions and investigate the evolutionary advantages of the large step size variation.

  17. Zone lines

    Kevin T. Smith

    2001-01-01

    Zone lines are narrow, usually dark markings formed in decaying wood. Zone lines are found most frequently in advanced white rot of hardwoods, although they occasionally are associated both with brown rot and with softwoods.

  18. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall provide appropriate personal... clothing and equipment should be laundered or cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with... shall provide change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI...

  19. Title VI Summary 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huskey, Barton

    Title VI provides federal funds to states under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. This document describes Title VI programs and the use of funds in the Austin Independent School District (AISD), Texas for 2000-2001. The AISD allocation of $481,559 was based on the May 2000 projected school enrollment, including projected…

  20. Oxidation of octylphenol by ferrate(VI).

    PubMed

    Anquandah, George A K; Sharma, Virender K

    2009-01-01

    The rates of the oxidation of octylphenols (OP) by potassium ferrate(VI) (K(2)FeO(4)) in water were determined as a function of pH (8.0-10.9) at 25 degrees C. The rate law for the oxidation of OP by Fe(VI) was found to be first order with each reactant. The observed second-order rate constants, k(obs), for the oxidation of alkylphenols decreased with an increase in pH. The speciation of Fe(VI) (HFeO(4)(-) and FeO(4)(2 -)) and OP (OP-OH and OP-O(-)) species were used to determine individual rate constants of the reactions. Comparison of rate constants and half-lives of oxidation of OP by Fe(VI) with nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol-A (BPA) were conducted to demonstrate that Fe(VI) efficiently oxidizes environmentally relevant alkylphenols in water.

  1. ANTIGENIC STRUCTURE OF ACTINOMYCETALES VI.

    PubMed Central

    Kwapinski, J. B.

    1963-01-01

    Kwapinski, J. B. (University of New England, Armidale, N.S.W., Australia). Antigenic structure of Actinomycetales. VI. Serological relationships between antigenic fractions of Actinomyces and Nocardia. J. Bacteriol. 86:179–186. 1963.—A total of 52 chemical fractions were obtained by a comprehensive technique of preparation from three strains of Actinomyces and three strains of Nocardia. The chemical and serological structures and specificities of disintegrated cells, cell walls, cytoplasms, and individual fractions were thoroughly studied. Cytoplasmic materials were found to be serologically alike or identical. The polysaccharide fractions, extracted from cell walls with alkali, formamide, and phenol, proved to be serologically related. Fractions prepared from the Nocardia by extractions in hot and concentrated solutions of acetic acid and sodium hydroxide, as well as the second protein fraction and the acetate-extracted polysaccharides of both the Nocardia and Actinomyces, proved to be genus-specific. PMID:14058939

  2. Intelsat VI - A continuing evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. B.; Braverman, D. J.

    1984-11-01

    Design, launch, and performance features of the Intelsat VI satellite scheduled for 1986 launch are described. The spacecraft will operated with SS/TDMA techniques and six antenna beams, weigh 23 kg at the beginning of life, carry 80,000 half-circuits, and will be borne aloft by either the STS or Ariane 4. The communications equipment will include Cand K-band receivers, 14/11 GHz upconverters, traveling wave tube amplifiers, and 50 input and output filters. Total interconnectivity will be present for all uplinks and downlinks, which will issue spot and shaped beam coverage of the hemisphere. Satellite power is to be supplied by solar panels furnishing 2 kW continuously and eclipse power is to be drawn from two 44 Ah NiH batteries. Orbit maintenance and attitude control are assigned to six 22 N thrusters.

  3. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 21 - Application of Part 21 to Certain Federal Financial Assistance of the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 21, App. C Appendix C to Part 21... Nondiscrimination on Federally Assisted Projects (a) Examples. The following examples, without being exhaustive... retained for, or incidental to, construction, planning, research, highway safety, engineering, property...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 21 - Application of Part 21 to Certain Federal Financial Assistance of the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 21, App. C Appendix C to Part 21... Nondiscrimination on Federally Assisted Projects (a) Examples. The following examples, without being exhaustive... to, construction, planning, research, highway safety, engineering, property management, and fee...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 21 - Application of Part 21 to Certain Federal Financial Assistance of the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 21, App. C Appendix C to Part 21... Nondiscrimination on Federally Assisted Projects (a) Examples. The following examples, without being exhaustive... retained for, or incidental to, construction, planning, research, highway safety, engineering, property...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 21 - Application of Part 21 to Certain Federal Financial Assistance of the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 21, App. C Appendix C to Part 21... Nondiscrimination on Federally Assisted Projects (a) Examples. The following examples, without being exhaustive... retained for, or incidental to, construction, planning, research, highway safety, engineering, property...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 21 - Application of Part 21 to Certain Federal Financial Assistance of the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 21, App. C Appendix C to Part 21... Nondiscrimination on Federally Assisted Projects (a) Examples. The following examples, without being exhaustive... retained for, or incidental to, construction, planning, research, highway safety, engineering, property...

  8. 5 CFR Appendix C to Subpart D of... - Application of Subpart D, Part 900, to Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance of the Office of Personnel Management C Appendix C to Subpart D of Part 900 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Programs in the Office of Personnel Management-Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Pt...

  9. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    PubMed

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  10. Methods for determining soluble and insoluble Cr III and Cr VI compounds in welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Matczak, W; Chmielnicka, J

    1989-01-01

    An analytical procedure for simultaneous determination of soluble and insoluble Cr III and Cr VI compounds in welding fumes has been proposed. In the welding fume samples collected on a membrane filter, total chromium was determined with atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Glass filters with collected samples were divided into two parts. In one part of the sample, soluble and insoluble chromium was determined by means of AAS. The separation of soluble chromium III and VI was carried out on diphenylcarbazide resin. In the second part of the sample total chromium VI was determined by means of the colorimetric method with s-diphenylcarbazide. The difference in the results of these determinations allowed the calculation of the content of total Cr III, Cr III insolub. and Cr VI insolub. The results of determining chromium compounds in welding fumes samples collected in the welder's breathing zone and in experimental chambers are also presented in this paper. The content of total chromium in the fumes determined by AAS (from a membrane filtr) and that calculated from the sum of soluble and insoluble chromium (from a glass filter) were concordant and within the limits of the admissible error for the method. Total chromium content in welding fume samples collected individually was found to range from 2.4-4.2%. The percentage of particular chromium compounds as compared to total chromium (100%) amounted: total Cr III--34%, total Cr VI--66%, soluble chromium--66% and in this Cr III--20% and Cr VI--43%, insoluble chromium--34% and in this: Cr III--14% and Cr VI--20%.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: glycoprotein VI deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... protein called glycoprotein VI (GPVI). This protein is embedded in the outer membrane of blood cell fragments ... erythematosus (SLE). Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own cells and ...

  12. ETS-VI multibeam satellite communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Makoto; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Ohtomo, Isao

    1989-10-01

    The fixed and mobile satellite communications systems of the Japanese Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) are described. The system requirements are outlined along with the system configuration. The ETS-VI multibeam system employs three frequency bands. When used for Ka-band fixed communications, it covers the Japanese main islands with thirteen 0.3-degree-wide spot beam. Four of the beams are active for ETS-VI. When used for S-band mobile communications, five beams cover the area within 200 nautical miles from the Japanese coast. The C-band beam for fixed communications covers the central area of the Japanese main islands with a single beam. The onboard antenna system is described along with the transponders and their associated onboard systems. A discussion of the system technology follows, covering the TDMA transmisssion system, the relay function, rainfall compensation, and the antenna and propagation performance.

  13. Rheology of water ices V and VI

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the mechanical strength (??) of pure water ices V and VI under steady state deformation conditions. Constant displacement rate compressional tests were conducted in a gas apparatus at confining pressures from 400 250 K. Ices V and VI are thus Theologically distinct but by coincidence have approximately the same strength under the conditions chosen for these experiments. To avoid misidentification, these tests are therefore accompanied by careful observations of the occurrences and characteristics of phase changes. One sample each of ice V and VI was quenched at pressure to metastably retain the high-pressure phase and the acquired deformation microstructures; X ray diffraction analysis of these samples confirmed the phase identification. Surface replicas of the deformed and quenched samples suggest that ice V probably deforms largely by dislocation creep, while ice VI deforms by a more complicated process involving substantial grain size reduction through recrystallization.

  14. 19 CFR Annex Vi to Part 351 - Countervailing Investigations Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Countervailing Investigations Timeline VI Annex VI to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VI Annex VI to Part 351—Countervailing Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.000 ...

  15. 19 CFR Annex Vi to Part 351 - Countervailing Investigations Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Countervailing Investigations Timeline VI Annex VI to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VI Annex VI to Part 351—Countervailing Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.000 ...

  16. 19 CFR Annex Vi to Part 351 - Countervailing Investigations Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Countervailing Investigations Timeline VI Annex VI to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VI Annex VI to Part 351—Countervailing Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.000 ...

  17. 19 CFR Annex Vi to Part 351 - Countervailing Investigations Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Countervailing Investigations Timeline VI Annex VI to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VI Annex VI to Part 351—Countervailing Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.000 ...

  18. 19 CFR Annex Vi to Part 351 - Countervailing Investigations Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Countervailing Investigations Timeline VI Annex VI to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VI Annex VI to Part 351—Countervailing Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.000 ...

  19. Use of a Ferrous Sulfate - Sodium Dithionite Blend to Treat a Dissolved Phase Cr(VI) Plume

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of a combination of sodium dithionite and ferrous sulfate in creating an in situ redox zone for treatment of a dissolved phase Cr(VI) plume at a former industrial site. The reductant blend was injected into the path of a dissolved ...

  20. Characterization of Amoeba proteus myosin VI immunoanalog.

    PubMed

    Dominik, Magdalena; Kłopocka, Wanda; Pomorski, Paweł; Kocik, Elzbieta; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2005-07-01

    Amoeba proteus, the highly motile free-living unicellular organism, has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion and intracellular actin-based-only trafficking remain poorly understood. A search for myosin motors responsible for vesicular transport in these giant cells resulted in detection of 130-kDa protein interacting with several polyclonal antibodies against different tail regions of human and chicken myosin VI. This protein was binding to actin in the ATP-dependent manner, and immunoprecipitated with anti-myosin VI antibodies. In order to characterize its possible functions in vivo, its cellular distribution and colocalization with actin filaments and dynamin II during migration and pinocytosis were examined. In migrating amoebae, myosin VI immunoanalog localized to vesicular structures, particularly within the perinuclear and sub-plasma membrane areas, and colocalized with dynamin II immunoanalog and actin filaments. The colocalization was even more evident in pinocytotic cells as proteins concentrated within pinocytotic pseudopodia. Moreover, dynamin II and myosin VI immunoanalogs cosedimented with actin filaments, and were found on the same isolated vesicles. Blocking endogenous myosin VI immunoanalog with anti-myosin VI antibodies inhibited the rate of pseudopodia protrusion (about 19% decrease) and uroidal retraction (about 28% decrease) but did not affect cell morphology and the manner of cell migration. Treatment with anti-human dynamin II antibodies led to changes in directionality of amebae migration and affected the rate of only uroidal translocation (about 30% inhibition). These results indicate that myosin VI immunoanalog is expressed in protist Amoeba proteus and may be involved in vesicle translocation and cell locomotion.

  1. 46 CFR Appendix A - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] A Appendix A Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN CHEMICAL TESTING Management Information System Management Information System requirements. Appendix A [Reserved] 46 CFR Ch. I (10-1-10 Edition...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 194 - Guidelines for the Preparation of Response Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Oil spill removal organization field equipment deployment drills conducted yearly. (5) A drill that... PLANS FOR ONSHORE OIL PIPELINES Pt. 194, App. A Appendix A to Part 194—Guidelines for the Preparation of... substantial harm to the environment; (4) A list of line sections contained in the response zone, identified by...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 194 - Guidelines for the Preparation of Response Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Oil spill removal organization field equipment deployment drills conducted yearly. (5) A drill that... PLANS FOR ONSHORE OIL PIPELINES Pt. 194, App. A Appendix A to Part 194—Guidelines for the Preparation of... substantial harm to the environment; (4) A list of line sections contained in the response zone, identified by...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 194 - Guidelines for the Preparation of Response Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Oil spill removal organization field equipment deployment drills conducted yearly. (5) A drill that... PLANS FOR ONSHORE OIL PIPELINES Pt. 194, App. A Appendix A to Part 194—Guidelines for the Preparation of... substantial harm to the environment; (4) A list of line sections contained in the response zone, identified by...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 194 - Guidelines for the Preparation of Response Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Oil spill removal organization field equipment deployment drills conducted yearly. (5) A drill that... PLANS FOR ONSHORE OIL PIPELINES Pt. 194, App. A Appendix A to Part 194—Guidelines for the Preparation of... substantial harm to the environment; (4) A list of line sections contained in the response zone, identified by...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 194 - Guidelines for the Preparation of Response Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Oil spill removal organization field equipment deployment drills conducted yearly. (5) A drill that... PLANS FOR ONSHORE OIL PIPELINES Pt. 194, App. A Appendix A to Part 194—Guidelines for the Preparation of... substantial harm to the environment; (4) A list of line sections contained in the response zone, identified by...

  7. ViA: a perceptual visualization assistant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, Chris G.; St. Amant, Robert; Elhaddad, Mahmoud S.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes an automated visualized assistant called ViA. ViA is designed to help users construct perceptually optical visualizations to represent, explore, and analyze large, complex, multidimensional datasets. We have approached this problem by studying what is known about the control of human visual attention. By harnessing the low-level human visual system, we can support our dual goals of rapid and accurate visualization. Perceptual guidelines that we have built using psychophysical experiments form the basis for ViA. ViA uses modified mixed-initiative planning algorithms from artificial intelligence to search of perceptually optical data attribute to visual feature mappings. Our perceptual guidelines are integrated into evaluation engines that provide evaluation weights for a given data-feature mapping, and hints on how that mapping might be improved. ViA begins by asking users a set of simple questions about their dataset and the analysis tasks they want to perform. Answers to these questions are used in combination with the evaluation engines to identify and intelligently pursue promising data-feature mappings. The result is an automatically-generated set of mappings that are perceptually salient, but that also respect the context of the dataset and users' preferences about how they want to visualize their data.

  8. Replication profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VI.

    PubMed

    Friedman, K L; Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1997-11-01

    An understanding of the replication programme at the genome level will require the identification and characterization of origins of replication through large, contiguous regions of DNA. As a step toward this goal, origin efficiencies and replication times were determined for 10 ARSs spanning most of the 270 kilobase (kb) chromosome VI of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Chromosome VI shows a wide variation in the percentage of cell cycles in which different replication origins are utilized. Most of the origins are activated in only a fraction of cells, suggesting that the pattern of origin usage on chromosome VI varies greatly within the cell population. The replication times of fragments containing chromosome VI origins show a temporal pattern that has been recognized on other chromosomes--the telomeres replicate late in S phase, while the central region of the chromosome replicates early. As demonstrated here for chromosome VI, analysis of the direction of replication fork movement along a chromosome and determination of replication time by measuring a period of hemimethylation may provide an efficient means of surveying origin activity over large regions of the genome.

  9. Singular Instantons and Painlevé VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñiz Manasliski, Richard

    2016-06-01

    We consider a two parameter family of instantons, which is studied in [Sadun L., Comm. Math. Phys. 163 (1994), 257-291], invariant under the irreducible action of SU_2 on S^4, but which are not globally defined. We will see that these instantons produce solutions to a one parameter family of Painlevé VI equations (P_VI}) and we will give an explicit expression of the map between instantons and solutions to P_{VI}. The solutions are algebraic only for that values of the parameters which correspond to the instantons that can be extended to all of S^4. This work is a generalization of [Muñiz Manasliski R., Contemp. Math., Vol. 434, Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, RI, 2007, 215-222] and [Muñiz Manasliski R., J. Geom. Phys. 59 (2009), 1036-1047, arXiv:1602.07221], where instantons without singularities are studied.

  10. Factors Affecting Formation of Incomplete Vi Antibody in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Sidney; Currie, Julius A.; Tully, Joseph G.

    1965-01-01

    Gaines, Sidney (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), Julius A. Currie, and Joseph G. Tully. Factors affecting formation of incomplete Vi antibody in mice. J. Bacteriol. 90:635–642. 1965.—Single immunizing doses of purified Vi antigen elicited complete and incomplete Vi antibodies in BALB/c mice, but only incomplete antibody in Cinnamon mice. Three of six other mouse strains tested responded like BALB/c mice; the remaining three, like Cinnamon mice. Varying the quantity of antigen injected or the route of administration failed to stimulate the production of detectable complete Vi antibody in Cinnamon mice. Such antibody was evoked in these animals by multiple injections of Vi antigen or by inoculating them with Vi-containing bacilli or Vi-coated erythrocytes. The early protection afforded by serum from Vi-immunized BALB/c mice coincided with the appearance of incomplete Vi antibody, 1 day prior to the advent of complete antibody. Persistence of incomplete as well as complete antibody in the serum of immunized mice was demonstrated for at least 56 days after injection of 10 μg of Vi antigen. Incomplete Vi antibody was shown to have blocking ability, in vitro bactericidal activity, and the capability of protecting mice against intracerebral as well as intraperitoneal challenge with virulent typhoid bacilli. Production of incomplete and complete Vi antibodies was adversely affected by immunization with partially depolymerized Vi antigens. PMID:16562060

  11. ViSC Social Competence Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmeier, Dagmar; Hoffmann, Christine; Schiller, Eva-Maria; Stefanek, Elisabeth; Spiel, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The ViSC Social Competence Program has been implemented in Austrian schools within the scope of a national strategy plan, Together Against Violence. The program is a primary preventive program designed for grades 5 to 8. The prevention of aggression and bullying is defined as a school development task, and the initial implementation of the program…

  12. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... resembling the processes, types of material, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions in... resembling the processes, types of material, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions in..., work practices, or control methods that may result in new or additional exposures to chromium (VI), or...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... resembling the processes, types of material, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions in... resembling the processes, types of material, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions in..., work practices, or control methods that may result in new or additional exposures to chromium (VI), or...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Citation on PubMed Garrido E, Cormand B, Hopwood JJ, Chabás A, Grinberg D, Vilageliu L. Maroteaux-Lamy ... N, Leão Teles E, Sá Miranda MC, Hopwood JJ. Mutational analysis of 105 mucopolysaccharidosis type VI patients. ...

  15. 18 CFR Appendix A to Subpart H of... - Appendix A to Subpart H of Part 35

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appendix A to Subpart H of Part 35 A Appendix A to Subpart H of Part 35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... Rates Pt. 35, Subpt. H, App. A Appendix A to Subpart H of Part 35 Appendix A Standard Screen Format...

  16. Appendix F - Sample Contingency Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This sample Contingency Plan in Appendix F is intended to provide examples of contingency planning as a reference when a facility determines that the required secondary containment is impracticable, pursuant to 40 CFR §112.7(d).

  17. 49 CFR Appendix C - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false [Reserved] C Appendix C Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... C [Reserved] ...

  18. The Revalidation of an Instrument to Measure Zones of Indifference of Teachers to Directives Issued by Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, Sam T.; Blackbourn, Joe M.

    This project attempts to refine the Zones of Indifference Instrument, (included in appendix) that measures zones of indifference of teachers to typical directives issued by administrators. As a result of the original validation study, a 78-item, two-factor instrument was developed. These two factors explained 52 percent of the variance. The…

  19. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND RELATED STATUTES-IMPLEMENTATION AND REVIEW PROCEDURES § 200.7 FHWA Title VI policy. It is the policy of the FHWA to...

  20. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND RELATED STATUTES-IMPLEMENTATION AND REVIEW PROCEDURES § 200.7 FHWA Title VI policy. It is the policy of the FHWA to...

  1. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND RELATED STATUTES-IMPLEMENTATION AND REVIEW PROCEDURES § 200.7 FHWA Title VI policy. It is the policy of the FHWA to...

  2. 23 CFR 200.7 - FHWA Title VI policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false FHWA Title VI policy. 200.7 Section 200.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE VI PROGRAM AND RELATED STATUTES-IMPLEMENTATION AND REVIEW PROCEDURES § 200.7 FHWA Title VI policy. It is the policy of the FHWA to...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix F to Subchapter B... - Commercial Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., N. Mex. 18 Ravenswood, W. Va. 19 Lake Charles, La. 20 Syracuse, N.Y. 21 Baltimore, Md. 22 Cleveland... in respect of a shipment which has had a prior, or will have a subsequent movement by water carrier... Boulevard to its junction with St. Charles Rock Road, thence westerly along St. Charles Rock Road to its...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix F to Subchapter B... - Commercial Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Cincinnati, Ohio 8 Kansas City, Mo.-Kansas City, Kans. 9 Boston, Mass. 10 Davenport, Iowa; Rock Island and... with the right-of-way of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad, thence in an easterly direction... commercially a part of the San Pedro, Wilmington, and Terminal Island Districts of Los Angeles and Long Beach...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix F to Subchapter B... - Commercial Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Cincinnati, Ohio 8 Kansas City, Mo.-Kansas City, Kans. 9 Boston, Mass. 10 Davenport, Iowa; Rock Island and... with the right-of-way of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad, thence in an easterly direction... commercially a part of the San Pedro, Wilmington, and Terminal Island Districts of Los Angeles and Long Beach...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix F to Subchapter B... - Commercial Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Cincinnati, Ohio 8 Kansas City, Mo.-Kansas City, Kans. 9 Boston, Mass. 10 Davenport, Iowa; Rock Island and... with the right-of-way of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad, thence in an easterly direction... commercially a part of the San Pedro, Wilmington, and Terminal Island Districts of Los Angeles and Long Beach...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix F to Subchapter B... - Commercial Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....J.; the area within the borough limits of Alpine, Tenafly, Englewood Cliffs, Leonia, Fort Lee... along U.S. Highway 40 to its junction with the Lee's Summit, Mo., corporate limits. Thence along the eastern Lee's Summit corporate limits to the Jackson-Cass County line, thence west along Jackson-Cass...

  8. Advanced Concepts of Naval Engineering Maintenance Training. Volume 2. Appendix F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    maintenance instruction, the Hagan Automatic Boiler Control (ABC) course. These job requirements also included the tasks, skills, and knowledges for all...Pressure 1 3/4 NAVTRAEQÜIPCEN 74-C-0151-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME II OF II APPENDIX F Page Hagan Automatic Boiler Controls Systems (FAS) 6...a c a ■* w ■H u 0 M « s? u ’• B n J-riH 3 o c 0 hhO a a o -i •H -I 0 -H 9J ■ a a oi « C -a u <rl « vi) •a - 8 ai >> u u

  9. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person or...

  10. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person or...

  11. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person or...

  12. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person or...

  13. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person or...

  14. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 8 - Federal Financial Assistance Covered by Title VI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to State projects designed for the research and development of commercial fisheries resources of the... U.S.C. 1151-1161). National Bureau of Standards 1. Grants to universities and other research organizations for fire research and safety programs (15 U.S.C. 278f). National Fire Prevention and Control...

  15. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 8 - Federal Financial Assistance Covered by Title VI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to State projects designed for the research and development of commercial fisheries resources of the... U.S.C. 1151-1161). National Bureau of Standards 1. Grants to universities and other research organizations for fire research and safety programs (15 U.S.C. 278f). National Fire Prevention and Control...

  16. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 8 - Federal Financial Assistance Covered by Title VI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to State projects designed for the research and development of commercial fisheries resources of the... U.S.C. 1151-1161). National Bureau of Standards 1. Grants to universities and other research organizations for fire research and safety programs (15 U.S.C. 278f). National Fire Prevention and Control...

  17. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 8 - Federal Financial Assistance Covered by Title VI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to State projects designed for the research and development of commercial fisheries resources of the... U.S.C. 1151-1161). National Bureau of Standards 1. Grants to universities and other research organizations for fire research and safety programs (15 U.S.C. 278f). National Fire Prevention and Control...

  18. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 8 - Federal Financial Assistance Covered by Title VI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to State projects designed for the research and development of commercial fisheries resources of the... U.S.C. 1151-1161). National Bureau of Standards 1. Grants to universities and other research organizations for fire research and safety programs (15 U.S.C. 278f). National Fire Prevention and Control...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 1039 - Nonroad Compression-ignition Composite Transient Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 78 61 311 78 46 312 66 65 313 78 97 314 84 63 315 57 26 316 36 22 317 20 34 318 19 8 319 9 10 320 5 5... 0 8 0 0 9 0 0 10 0 0 11 0 0 12 0 0 13 0 0 14 0 0 15 0 0 16 0 0 17 0 0 18 0 0 19 0 0 20 0 0 21 0 0 22... 23 1 59 1 3 60 1 8 61 1 3 62 1 5 63 1 6 64 1 4 65 1 4 66 0 6 67 1 4 68 9 21 69 25 56 70 64 26 71 60...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 1039 - Nonroad Compression-ignition Composite Transient Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 78 61 311 78 46 312 66 65 313 78 97 314 84 63 315 57 26 316 36 22 317 20 34 318 19 8 319 9 10 320 5 5... 0 8 0 0 9 0 0 10 0 0 11 0 0 12 0 0 13 0 0 14 0 0 15 0 0 16 0 0 17 0 0 18 0 0 19 0 0 20 0 0 21 0 0 22... 23 1 59 1 3 60 1 8 61 1 3 62 1 5 63 1 6 64 1 4 65 1 4 66 0 6 67 1 4 68 9 21 69 25 56 70 64 26 71 60...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 1039 - Nonroad Compression-ignition Composite Transient Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 78 61 311 78 46 312 66 65 313 78 97 314 84 63 315 57 26 316 36 22 317 20 34 318 19 8 319 9 10 320 5 5... 0 8 0 0 9 0 0 10 0 0 11 0 0 12 0 0 13 0 0 14 0 0 15 0 0 16 0 0 17 0 0 18 0 0 19 0 0 20 0 0 21 0 0 22... 23 1 59 1 3 60 1 8 61 1 3 62 1 5 63 1 6 64 1 4 65 1 4 66 0 6 67 1 4 68 9 21 69 25 56 70 64 26 71 60...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 1039 - Nonroad Compression-ignition Composite Transient Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 78 61 311 78 46 312 66 65 313 78 97 314 84 63 315 57 26 316 36 22 317 20 34 318 19 8 319 9 10 320 5 5... 0 8 0 0 9 0 0 10 0 0 11 0 0 12 0 0 13 0 0 14 0 0 15 0 0 16 0 0 17 0 0 18 0 0 19 0 0 20 0 0 21 0 0 22... 23 1 59 1 3 60 1 8 61 1 3 62 1 5 63 1 6 64 1 4 65 1 4 66 0 6 67 1 4 68 9 21 69 25 56 70 64 26 71 60...

  3. Statements Relating to the Impact of Technological Change. Technology and the American Economy, Appendix, Volume VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Technology, Automation and Economic Progress, Washington, DC.

    Forty-seven statements by industrial and business spokesmen, union and association representatives, and professors concern the broad impact of technological change on individuals, establishments, and society in general. Some of the longer presentations are (1) "The Poverty and Unemployment Crisis," by Walter Buckingham, (2) "Technological…

  4. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 86 - Vehicle and Engine Components

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exhaust valves. (2) Drive belts. (3) Manifold and cylinder head bolts. (4) Engine oil and filter. (5...) Carburetor-idle RPM, mixture ratio. (3) Choke mechanism. (4) Fuel system filter and fuel system lines and... filter breather cap. (4) Manifold inlet (carburetor spacer, etc.). V. External Exhaust Emission Control...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 86 - Vehicle and Engine Components

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... exhaust valves. (2) Drive belts. (3) Manifold and cylinder head bolts. (4) Engine oil and filter. (5...) Carburetor-idle RPM, mixture ratio. (3) Choke mechanism. (4) Fuel system filter and fuel system lines and... filter breather cap. (4) Manifold inlet (carburetor spacer, etc.). V. External Exhaust Emission Control...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 86 - Vehicle and Engine Components

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (2) Drive belts. (3) Manifold and cylinder head bolts. (4) Engine oil and filter. (5) Engine coolant...) Carburetor-idle RPM, mixture ratio. (3) Choke mechanism. (4) Fuel system filter and fuel system lines and... filter breather cap. (4) Manifold inlet (carburetor spacer, etc.). V. External Exhaust Emission Control...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 86 - Vehicle and Engine Components

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exhaust valves. (2) Drive belts. (3) Manifold and cylinder head bolts. (4) Engine oil and filter. (5...) Carburetor-idle RPM, mixture ratio. (3) Choke mechanism. (4) Fuel system filter and fuel system lines and... filter breather cap. (4) Manifold inlet (carburetor spacer, etc.). V. External Exhaust Emission Control...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 86 - Vehicle and Engine Components

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exhaust valves. (2) Drive belts. (3) Manifold and cylinder head bolts. (4) Engine oil and filter. (5...) Carburetor-idle RPM, mixture ratio. (3) Choke mechanism. (4) Fuel system filter and fuel system lines and... filter breather cap. (4) Manifold inlet (carburetor spacer, etc.). V. External Exhaust Emission Control...

  9. Identifying the need for a multidisciplinary approach for early recognition of mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI).

    PubMed

    Choy, Yew Sing; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Balasubramaniam, Shanti; Fietz, Michael; Fu, Antony; Inwood, Anita; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Kosuga, Motomichi; Kwun, Young Hee; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Mendelsohn, Nancy J; Okuyama, Torayuki; Samion, Hasri; Tan, Adeline; Tanaka, Akemi; Thamkunanon, Verasak; Thong, Meow-Keong; Toh, Teck-Hock; Yang, Albert D; McGill, Jim

    2015-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI, Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome) is caused by deficient activity of the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase, resulting in impaired degradation of the glycosaminoglycan dermatan sulfate. Patients experience a range of manifestations including joint contractures, short stature, dysostosis multiplex, coarse facial features, decreased pulmonary function, cardiac abnormalities, corneal clouding and shortened life span. Recently, clinicians from institutions in the Asia-Pacific region met to discuss the occurrence and implications of delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis of MPS VI in the patients they have managed. Eighteen patients (44% female) were diagnosed. The most common sign presented by the patients was bone deformities in 11 patients (65%). Delays to diagnosis occurred due to the lack of or distance to diagnostic facilities for four patients (31%), alternative diagnoses for two patients (15%), and misleading symptoms experienced by two patients (15%). Several patients experienced manifestations that were subtler than would be expected and were subsequently overlooked. Several cases highlighted the unique challenges associated with diagnosing MPS VI from the perspective of different specialties and provide insights into how these patients initially present, which may help to elucidate strategies to improve the diagnosis of MPS VI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Congenital absence of the vermiform appendix.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Aniruddha

    2012-09-01

    Agenesis of the vermiform appendix is very rare. The incidence is estimated to be one in 100,000 laparotomies for suspected appendicitis. During a routine dissection of the abdomen in a 60-year-old donated male cadaver, the vermiform appendix was found to be absent. The ileocaecal junction and retrocaecal area were thoroughly searched, but the vermiform appendix was not found or appeared to resemble a tubercle. This is likely the first reported case of agenesis of a vermiform appendix in India. This suggests the possibility that the human vermiform appendix would ultimately become rudimentary or absent in the course of evolution.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 63 - Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for each data set that is collected during the initial performance test. A single composite value of... Multiple Zone Concentrations Calculations Procedure based on inlet and outlet concentrations (Column A of... composite value of Ks discussed in section III.C of this appendix. This value of Ks is calculated during the...

  12. IN SITU SOURCE TREATMENT OF CR(VI) USING A FE(II)-BASED REDUCTANT BLEND: LONG-TERM MONITORING AND EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The long-term effectiveness of a FeSO4 + Na2S2O4 reductant solution blend for in situ saturated zone treatment of dissolved and solid phase Cr(VI) in a high pH chromite ore processing solid waste (COPSW) fill material was investigated. Two field pilot injection studies were cond...

  13. Vič Goes to Near Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhar, Vida Kariž; Capuder, Rok; Maroševič, Timotej; Artač, Sonja; Mozer, Alenka; Štekovič, Maja

    2016-11-01

    In the school year 2012-2013 about 50 students (Fig. 1), managed by mentors (teachers from the middle school Gimnazija Vič in Ljubljana, Slovenia) created an atmospheric probe and launched it into an altitude of more than 30 km above Earth's surface. The aim of this "space expedition" was to take pictures of Earth and to measure how air pressure, the temperature, CO2 and O2 concentrations, the level of UVA and UVB radiation, and the amount of light change with altitude. There was also a yeast sample placed inside and outside of the probe. Here we report on some of the successes and failures of this endeavor.

  14. Myosin VI facilitates connexin 43 gap junction accretion.

    PubMed

    Waxse, Bennett J; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Hesketh, Geoffrey G; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Buss, Folma

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate myosin VI enrichment at Cx43 (also known as GJA1)-containing gap junctions (GJs) in heart tissue, primary cardiomyocytes and cell culture models. In primary cardiac tissue and in fibroblasts from the myosin VI-null mouse as well as in tissue culture cells transfected with siRNA against myosin VI, we observe reduced GJ plaque size with a concomitant reduction in intercellular communication, as shown by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and a new method of selective calcein administration. Analysis of the molecular role of myosin VI in Cx43 trafficking indicates that myosin VI is dispensable for the delivery of Cx43 to the cell surface and connexon movement in the plasma membrane. Furthermore, we cannot corroborate clathrin or Dab2 localization at gap junctions and we do not observe a function for the myosin-VI-Dab2 complex in clathrin-dependent endocytosis of annular gap junctions. Instead, we found that myosin VI was localized at the edge of Cx43 plaques by using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and use FRAP to identify a plaque accretion defect as the primary manifestation of myosin VI loss in Cx43 homeostasis. A fuller understanding of this derangement may explain the cardiomyopathy or gliosis associated with the loss of myosin VI. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Design, baseline characteristics, and early findings of the MPS VI (mucopolysaccharidosis VI) Clinical Surveillance Program (CSP).

    PubMed

    Hendriksz, Christian J; Giugliani, Roberto; Harmatz, Paul; Lampe, Christina; Martins, Ana Maria; Pastores, Gregory M; Steiner, Robert D; Leão Teles, Elisa; Valayannopoulos, Vassili

    2013-03-01

    To outline the design, baseline data, and 5-year follow-up data of patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VI enrolled in the Clinical Surveillance Program (CSP), a voluntary, multinational, observational program. The MPS VI CSP was opened in 2005 to collect, for at least 15 years, observational data from standard clinical and laboratory assessments of patients with MPS VI. Baseline and follow-up data are documented by participating physicians in electronic case report forms. Between September 2005 and March 2010 the CSP enrolled 132 patients, including 123 who received enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with galsulfase. Median age at enrolment was 13 years (range 1-59). Mean baseline data showed impaired growth, hepatosplenomegaly, and reduced endurance and pulmonary function. The most common findings were heart valve disease (90%), reduced visual acuity (79%), impaired hearing (59%), and hepatosplenomegaly (54%). Follow-up data up to 5 years in patients with pre- and post-ERT measurements showed a decrease in urinary glycosaminoglycans and increases in height and weight in patients <16 years and suggested reductions in liver and spleen size and improvements in endurance and pulmonary function after ERT was started. Vision, hearing, and cardiac function were unchanged. Safety data were in line with previous reports. The CSP represents the largest cross-sectional study of MPS VI to date. This first report provides information on the design and implementation of the program and population statistics for several clinical variables in patients with MPS VI. Data collected over 5 years suggest that ERT provides clinical benefit and is well-tolerated with no new safety concerns.

  16. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE PAGES

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; ...

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore » an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  17. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    SciT

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore » an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  18. The INTELSAT VI SSTDMA network diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamboli, Satish P.; Zhu, Xiaobo; Wilkins, Kim N.; Gupta, Ramesh K.

    The system-level design of an expert-system-based, near-real-time diagnostic system for INTELSAT VI satellite-switched time-division multiple access (SSTDMA) network is described. The challenges of INTELSAT VI diagnostics are discussed, along with alternative approaches for network diagnostics and the rationale for choosing a method based on burst unique-word detection. The focal point of the diagnostic system is the diagnostic processor, which resides in the central control and monitoring facility known as the INTELSAT Operations Center TDMA Facility (IOCTF). As real-time information such as burst unique-word detection data, reference terminal status data, and satellite telemetry alarm data are received at the IOCTF, the diagnostic processor continuously monitors the data streams. When a burst status change is detected, a 'snapshot' of the real-time data is forwarded to the expert system. Receipt of the change causes a set of rules to be invoked which associate the traffic pattern with a set of probable causes. A user-friendly interface allows a graphical view of the burst time plan and provides the ability to browse through the knowledge bases.

  19. Late Neanderthals at Jarama VI (central Iberia)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehl, Martin; Burow, Christoph; Hilgers, Alexandra; Navazo, Marta; Pastoors, Andreas; Weniger, Gerd-Christian; Wood, Rachel; Jordá Pardo, Jesús F.

    2013-09-01

    Previous geochronological and archaeological studies on the rock shelter Jarama VI suggested a late survival of Neanderthals in central Iberia and the presence of lithic assemblages of Early Upper Paleolithic affinity. New data on granulometry, mineralogical composition, geochemical fingerprints and micromorphology of the sequence corroborate the previous notion that the archaeological units JVI.2.1 to JVI.2.3 are slackwater deposits of superfloods, which did not experience significant post-depositional changes, whereas the artifact-rich units JVI.3 and JVI.1 mainly received sediment inputs by sheetwash and cave spall. New AMS radiocarbon measurements on three samples of cut-marked bone using the ultrafiltration technique yielded ages close to, or beyond, the limit of radiocarbon dating at ca. 50 14C ka BP, and hence suggest much higher antiquity than assumed previously. Furthermore, elevated temperature post-IR IRSL luminescence measurements on K feldspars yielded burial ages for subunits JVI.2.2 and JVI.2.3 between 50 and 60 ka. Finally, our reappraisal of the stone industry strongly suggests that the whole sequence is of Mousterian affinity. In conclusion, Jarama VI most probably does not document a late survival of Neanderthals nor an Early Upper Paleolithic occupation in central Iberia, but rather indicates an occupation breakdown after the Middle Paleolithic.

  20. Flickering AGN can explain the strong circumgalactic O VI observed by COS-Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Segers, Marijke; Schaye, Joop; Richings, Alexander J.; Crain, Robert A.

    2018-03-01

    Proximity zone fossils (PZFs) are ionization signatures around recently active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where metal species in the circumgalactic medium remain overionized after the AGNs have shut off due to their long recombination time scales. We explore cosmological zoom hydrodynamic simulations, using the EAGLE (Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments) model paired with a non-equilibrium ionization and cooling module including time-variable AGN radiation to model PZFs around star-forming disc galaxies in the z ˜ 0.2 Universe. Previous simulations typically underestimated the O VI content of galactic haloes, but we show that plausible PZF models increase O VI column densities by 2 - 3 × to achieve the levels observed around COS-Halos star-forming galaxies out to 150 kpc. Models with AGN bolometric luminosities ≳ 1043.6erg s- 1, duty cycle fractions ≲ 10 per cent, and AGN lifetimes ≲ 106 yr are the most promising, because their supermassive black holes grow at the cosmologically expected rate and they mostly appear as inactive AGN, consistent with COS-Halos. The central requirement is that the typical star-forming galaxy hosted an active AGN within a time-scale comparable to the recombination time of a high metal ion, which for circumgalactic O VI is ≈107 yr. H I, by contrast, returns to equilibrium much more rapidly due to its low neutral fraction and does not show a significant PZF effect. O VI absorption features originating from PZFs appear narrow, indicating photoionization, and are often well aligned with lower metal ion species. PZFs are highly likely to affect the physical interpretation of circumgalactic high ionization metal lines if, as expected, normal galaxies host flickering AGN.

  1. 24 CFR Appendix B to 24 Cfr Part 3400 - Appendix B to 24 CFR Part 3400

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Appendix B to 24 CFR Part 3400 B Appendix B to 24 CFR Part 3400 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFE MORTGAGE LICENSING ACT Pt. 3400, App. B Appendix B to 24 CFR Part 3400...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 25 - Appendix B to Part 25

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendix B to Part 25 B Appendix B to Part 25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Pt. 25, App. B Appendix B to Part 25 EC28SE91.055 EC28SE91...

  3. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 13 - Appendix A to Part 13

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Appendix A to Part 13 A Appendix A to Part 13 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN AGENCY PROCEEDINGS Pt. 13, App. A Appendix A to Part 13 Proceedings covered Statutory authority Applicable regulations...

  4. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 13 - Appendix A to Part 13

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Appendix A to Part 13 A Appendix A to Part 13 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN AGENCY PROCEEDINGS Pt. 13, App. A Appendix A to Part 13 Proceedings covered Statutory authority Applicable regulations...

  5. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 13 - Appendix A to Part 13

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appendix A to Part 13 A Appendix A to Part 13 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN AGENCY PROCEEDINGS Pt. 13, App. A Appendix A to Part 13 Proceedings covered Statutory authority Applicable regulations...

  6. 30 CFR Appendix A to Subpart J of... - Appendix A to Subpart J of Part 75

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appendix A to Subpart J of Part 75 A Appendix A to Subpart J of Part 75 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Medium-Voltage Alternating Current Circuits Pt. 75, Subpt. J, App. A Appendix A to Subpart J of Part 75...

  7. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 151 - Appendix G to Part 151

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendix G to Part 151 G Appendix G to Part 151 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Pt. 151, App. G Appendix G to Part 151 There is set forth below an...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 151 - Appendix G to Part 151

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appendix G to Part 151 G Appendix G to Part 151 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Pt. 151, App. G Appendix G to Part 151 There is set forth below an...

  9. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 151 - Appendix G to Part 151

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendix G to Part 151 G Appendix G to Part 151 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Pt. 151, App. G Appendix G to Part 151 There is set forth below an...

  10. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 151 - Appendix G to Part 151

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendix G to Part 151 G Appendix G to Part 151 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Pt. 151, App. G Appendix G to Part 151 There is set forth below an...

  11. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 151 - Appendix C to Part 151

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendix C to Part 151 C Appendix C to Part...) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Pt. 151, App. C Appendix C to Part 151 There is set forth below an... Items 1. Maintenance-type work, including: (a) Seal coats. (b) Crack filling. (c) Resealing joints. (d...

  12. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 25 - Appendix C to Part 25

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendix C to Part 25 C Appendix C to Part... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Pt. 25, App. C Appendix C to Part 25 Part I—Atmospheric....062 EC28SE91.063 (c) Takeoff maximum icing. The maximum intensity of atmospheric icing conditions for...

  13. 24 CFR Appendix C to 24 Cfr Part 3400 - Appendix C to 24 CFR Part 3400

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Appendix C to 24 CFR Part 3400 C Appendix C to 24 CFR Part 3400 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFE MORTGAGE LICENSING ACT Pt. 3400, App. C Appendix C to 24 CFR Part 3400...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 25 - Appendix C to Part 25

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendix C to Part 25 C Appendix C to Part... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Pt. 25, App. C Appendix C to Part 25 Part I—Atmospheric....062 EC28SE91.063 (c) Takeoff maximum icing. The maximum intensity of atmospheric icing conditions for...

  15. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 25 - Appendix C to Part 25

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix C to Part 25 C Appendix C to Part... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Pt. 25, App. C Appendix C to Part 25 Part I—Atmospheric....062 EC28SE91.063 (c) Takeoff maximum icing. The maximum intensity of atmospheric icing conditions for...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 151 - Appendix H to Part 151

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix H to Part 151 H Appendix H to Part...) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Pt. 151, App. H Appendix H to Part 151 There is set forth below the...)). H. Withholding for unpaid wages and liquidated damages, and priority of payment (1) The FAA may...

  17. 18 CFR Appendix B to Subpart H of... - Appendix B to Subpart H of Part 35

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appendix B to Subpart H of Part 35 B Appendix B to Subpart H of Part 35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... Rates Pt. 35, Subpt. H, App. B Appendix B to Subpart H of Part 35 This is an example of the required...

  18. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  19. Chromium isotope inventory of Cr(VI)-polluted groundwaters at four industrial sites in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Martin; Martinkova, Eva; Chrastny, Vladislav; Stepanova, Marketa; Curik, Jan; Szurmanova, Zdenka; Cron, Marcel; Tylcer, Jiri; Sebek, Ondrej

    2016-04-01

    solid Cr(III) in the soil was estimated at 6600 and 500 kg at Zlate Hory and Loucna, respectively. At the same time, the pool size of dissolved Cr(VI) was estimated at 50 and 1.2 kg at Zlate Hory and Loucna, respectively. It follows that, at both sites, less than 1 % of the entire Cr that had leaked into the aquifer an a liquid form remained in the liquid form. If, indeed, most solid Cr now present in the saturated zone had undergone anaerobic reduction, we would expect much higher del53/52Cr values of the residual liquid Cr(VI) than those actually observed. Our understanding of the system is incomplete. Currently, del53/52Cr values of the contaminated soils are being determined in an attempt to close a Cr isotope mass balance.

  20. Advective removal of intraparticle uranium from contaminated vadose zone sediments, Hanford, U.S.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Liu, Chongxuan; Moore, Dean A; Zachara, John M

    2008-03-01

    A column study on U(VI)-contaminated vadose zone sediments from the Hanford Site, WA, was performed to investigate U(VI) release kinetics with water advection and variable geochemical conditions. The sediments were collected from an area adjacent to and below tank BX-102 that was contaminated as a result of a radioactive tank waste overfill event. The primary reservoir for U(VI) in the sediments are micrometer-size precipitates composed of nanocrystallite aggregates of a Na-U-Silicate phase, most likely Na-boltwoodite, that nucleated and grew within microfractures of the plagioclase component of sand-sized granitic clasts. Two sediment samples, with different U(VI) concentrations and intraparticle mass transfer properties, were leached with advective flows of three different solutions. The influent solutions were all calcite-saturated and in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2. One solution was prepared from DI water, the second was a synthetic groundwater (SGW) with elevated Na that mimicked groundwater at the Hanford site, and the third was the same SGW but with both elevated Na and Si. The latter two solutions were employed, in part, to test the effect of saturation state on U(VI) release. For both sediments, and all three electrolytes, there was an initial rapid release of U(VI) to the advecting solution followed by slower near steady-state release. U(VI)aq concentrations increased during subsequent stop-flow events. The electrolytes with elevated Na and Si depressed U(VL)aq concentrations in effluent solutions. Effluent U(VI)aq concentrations for both sediments and all three electrolytes were simulated reasonably well by a three domain model (the advecting fluid, fractures, and matrix) that coupled U(VI) dissolution, intraparticle U(VI)aq diffusion, and interparticle advection, where diffusion and dissolution properties were parameterized in a previous batch study.

  1. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of zinc-cyanide complex.

    PubMed

    Yngard, Ria; Damrongsiri, Seelawut; Osathaphan, Khemarath; Sharma, Virender K

    2007-10-01

    Zinc-cyanide complexes are found in gold mining effluents and in metal finishing rinse water. The effect of Zn(II) on the oxidation of cyanide by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O(4)(2-), Fe(VI)) was thus investigated by studying the kinetics of the reaction of Fe(VI) with cyanide present in a potassium salt of a zinc cyanide complex (K(2)Zn(CN)(4)) and in a mixture of Zn(II) and cyanide solutions as a function of pH (9.0-11.0). The rate-law for the oxidation of Zn(CN)(4)(2-) by Fe(VI) was found to be -d[Fe(VI)]/dt=k[Fe(VI)][Zn(CN)(4)(2-)](0.5). The rate constant, k, decreased with an increase in pH. The effect of temperature (15-45 degrees C) on the oxidation was studied at pH 9.0, which gave an activation energy of 45.7+/-1.5kJmol(-1). The cyanide oxidation rate decreased in the presence of the Zn(II) ions. However, Zn(II) ions had no effect on the cyanide removal efficiency by Fe(VI) and the stoichiometry of Fe(VI) to cyanide was approximately 1:1; similar to the stoichiometry in absence of Zn(II) ions. The destruction of cyanide by Fe(VI) resulted in cyanate. The experiments on removal of cyanide from rinse water using Fe(VI) demonstrated complete conversion of cyanide to cyanate.

  2. Micro- and Nano-scale Diffusion Domains Acting as Kinetic Controls for U(VI) Release to the Hanford 300-Area Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D. L.; Hay, M. B.; Davis, J. A.; Zachara, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The 300-Area of the Hanford reservation, a cold-war era nuclear processing facility, is plagued by long-term elevated concentrations of U(VI) in the underlying aquifer. While the sediment U(VI) concentration is relatively low, it continues to act as a source and sink for the contaminant, allowing for persistent groundwater concentrations well above the maximum contamination limit (MCL). Simple Kd modeling of the attenuation of U(VI) in the aquifer predicted that groundwater U(VI) concentrations would decrease to below the drinking water standard by the year 2002. However, grain-scale morphology of the aquifer material suggests that intra-grain flow paths and mineral coatings, in which sorption complexes and precipitates formed over years of waste disposal, provide a significant kinetic constraint that slows groundwater flushing of the sediments. In order to quantify the impact of diffusion kinetics on the release of U(VI), high-resolution, non-reactive tracer studies were conducted on vadose zone sediments in both column and batch reactors. Systems were equilibrated for long time scales with tritated artificial groundwater and then flushed with flow and stop-flow events included for columns. Previously collected U(VI) release data from batch dissolution/desorption studies is compared with tritium tracer diffusion kinetics as well as porosimetry and detailed microscopy characterization. The micro-scale and nano-scale diffusion regimes, including intra-granular regions as well as mineral coatings, represent a significant potential long-term source of contaminant U(VI). Understanding the physical kinetic limitations coupled with the complex chemistry of U(VI) sorption processes within natural systems is an important step forward in providing information to strengthen field-scale reactive transport simulations.

  3. Root Apex Transition Zone As Oscillatory Zone

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen, and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command center. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwin, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone. PMID:24106493

  4. 32 CFR 2003.6 - Voting (Article VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Voting (Article VI). 2003.6 Section 2003.6 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.6 Voting (Article VI). (a) Motions. When the Panel is...

  5. 32 CFR 2003.6 - Voting (Article VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Voting (Article VI). 2003.6 Section 2003.6 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.6 Voting (Article VI). (a) Motions. When the Panel is...

  6. Kandinsky's "Composition VI": Heideggerian Poetry in Noah's Ark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    The author will begin his investigation of Wassily Kandinsky's painting "Composition VI" with Kandinsky's own commentary on the painting. He will then turn to the analysis of Kandinsky and the "Compositions" in John Sallis's book "Shades." Using this analysis as his point of departure, the author will consider how "Composition VI" resonates with…

  7. Phosphate solubilization and chromium (VI) remediation potential of Klebsiella sp. strain CPSB4 isolated from the chromium contaminated agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratishtha; Kumar, Vipin; Usmani, Zeba; Rani, Rupa; Chandra, Avantika

    2018-02-01

    In this study, an effort was made to identify an efficient phosphate solubilizing bacterial strain from chromium contaminated agricultural soils. Based on the formation of a solubilized halo around the colonies on Pikovskaya's agar amended with chromium (VI), 10 strains were initially screened out. Out of 10, strain CPSB4, which showed significantly high solubilization zone at different chromium concentrations, was selected for further study. The strain CPSB4 showed significant plant growth promotion traits with chromium (VI) stress under in-vitro conditions in broth. The plant growth promotion activities of the strain decreased regularly, but were not completely lost with the increase in concentration of chromium up to 200 mg L -1 . On subjected to FT-IR analysis, the presence of the functional group, indicating the organic acid aiding in phosphate solubilization was identified. At an optimal temperature of 30  ° C and pH 7.0, the strain showed around 93% chromium (VI) reduction under in-vitro conditions in broth study. In soil condition, the maximum chromium (VI) reduction obtained was 95% under in-vitro conditions. The strain CPSB4 was identified as Klebsiella sp. on the basis of morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This study shows that the diverse role of the bacterial strain CPSB4 would be useful in the chromium contaminated soil as a good bioremediation and plant growth promoting agent as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 76 FR 62148 - Title VI; Proposed Circular, Environmental Justice; Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ...-0055] Title VI; Proposed Circular, Environmental Justice; Proposed Circular AGENCY: Federal Transit... the September 29, 2011, Federal Register Notices titled ``Title VI; Proposed Circular'' and... September 29, 2011, Federal Register Notices titled ``Title VI; Proposed Circular'' (76 FR 60593) and...

  9. Kinetic investigations of quinoline oxidation by ferrate(VI).

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiyong; Li, Xueming; Zhai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Quinoline is considered as one of the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds and is commonly found in industrial wastewaters, which require treatment before being discharged. Removal of quinoline by the use of an environmentally friendly oxidant, potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4), was assessed by studying the kinetics of the oxidation of quinoline by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) as a function of pH (8.53-10.53) and temperature (21-36°C) in this work. The reaction of quinoline with Fe(VI) was found to be first order in Fe(VI), half order in quinoline, and 1.5 order overall. The observed rate constant at 28°C decreased non-linearly from 0.5334 to 0.2365 M(-0.5) min(-1) with an increase in pH from 8.53 to 10.03. Considering the equilibria of Fe(VI) and quinoline, the reaction between quinoline and Fe(VI) contained two parallel reactions under the given pH conditions. The individual rate constants of these two reactions were determined. The results indicate that the protonated species of Fe(VI) reacts more quickly with quinoline than the deprotonated form of Fe(VI). The reaction activation energy Ea was obtained to be 51.44 kJ·mol(-1), and it was slightly lower than that of conventional chemical reaction. It reveals that the oxidation of quinoline by Fe(VI) is feasible in the routine water treatment.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 66 - Instruction Manual

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Instruction Manual B Appendix B to...) ASSESSMENT AND COLLECTION OF NONCOMPLIANCE PENALTIES BY EPA Pt. 66, App. B Appendix B to Part 66—Instruction Manual Note: For text of appendix B see appendix B to part 67. ...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 66 - Computer Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Computer Program C Appendix C to Part...) ASSESSMENT AND COLLECTION OF NONCOMPLIANCE PENALTIES BY EPA Pt. 66, App. C Appendix C to Part 66—Computer Program Note: For text of appendix C see appendix C to part 67. ...

  12. The FUSE Survey of 0 VI in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Savage, B. D.; Wakker, B. P.; Sembach, K. R.; Jenkins, E. B.; Moos, H. W.; Shull, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) program to study 0 VI in the Milky Way halo. Spectra of 100 extragalactic objects and two distant halo stars are analyzed to obtain measures of O VI absorption along paths through the Milky Way thick disk/halo. Strong O VI absorption over the velocity range from -100 to 100 km/s reveals a widespread but highly irregular distribution of O VI, implying the existence of substantial amounts of hot gas with T approx. 3 x 10(exp 5) K in the Milky Way thick disk/halo. The overall distribution of O VI is not well described by a symmetrical plane-parallel layer of patchy O VI absorption. The simplest departure from such a model that provides a reasonable fit to the observations is a plane-parallel patchy absorbing layer with an average O VI mid-plane density of n(sub 0)(O VI) = 1.7 x 10(exp -2)/cu cm, a scale height of approx. 2.3 kpc, and a approx. 0.25 dex excess of O VI in the northern Galactic polar region. The distribution of O VI over the sky is poorly correlated with other tracers of gas in the halo, including low and intermediate velocity H I, Ha emission from the warm ionized gas at approx. l0(exp 4) K, and hot X-ray emitting gas at approx. l0(exp 6) K . The O VI has an average velocity dispersion, b approx. 60 km/s and standard deviation of 15 km/s. Thermal broadening alone cannot explain the large observed profile widths. A combination of models involving the radiative cooling of hot fountain gas, the cooling of supernova bubbles in the halo, and the turbulent mixing of warm and hot halo gases is required to explain the presence of O VI and other highly ionized atoms found in the halo. The preferential venting of hot gas from local bubbles and superbubbles into the northern Galactic polar region may explain the enhancement of O VI in the North.

  13. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    SciT

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  14. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciT

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results inmore » the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.« less

  15. 41 CFR Appendix to Subchapter H... - Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reserved to Appendix to Subchapter H-Temporary Regulations Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... (FMR) (41 CFR chapter 102, parts 102-1 through 102-220). Appendix to Subchapter H—Temporary Regulations...

  16. Kinetics of microbial reduction of Solid phase U(VI).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fredrickson, James K

    2006-10-15

    Sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH x 1.5 H2O) was used to assess the kinetics of microbial reduction of solid-phase U(VI) by a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. The bioreduction kinetics was studied with Na-boltwoodite in suspension or within alginate beads in a nongrowth medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 6.8 buffered with PIPES. Concentrations of U(VI)tot and cell number were varied to evaluate the coupling of U(VI) dissolution, diffusion, and microbial activity. Microscopic and spectroscopic analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) collectively indicated that solid-phase U(VI) was first dissolved and diffused out of grain interiors before it was reduced on bacterial surfaces and/or within the periplasm. The kinetics of solid-phase U(VI) bioreduction was well described by a coupled model of bicarbonate-promoted dissolution of Na-boltwoodite, intragrain uranyl diffusion, and Monod type bioreduction kinetics with respect to dissolved U(VI) concentration. The results demonstrated that microbial reduction of solid-phase U(VI) is controlled by coupled biological, chemical, and physical processes.

  17. Kinetics of Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase U(VI)

    SciT

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong Hun; Zachara, John M.

    2006-10-01

    Sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH ?1.5H2O) was used to assess the kinetics of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) by a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. The bioreduction kinetics was studied with Na-boltwoodite in suspension or within alginate beads. Concentrations of U(VI)tot and cell number were varied to evaluate the coupling of U(VI) dissolution, diffusion, and microbial activity. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 6.8 buffered with PIPES. Microscopic and spectroscopic analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) collectively indicated that solidmore » phase U(VI) was first dissolved and diffused out of grain interiors before it was reduced on bacterial surfaces and/or within the periplasm. The kinetics of solid phase U(VI) bioreduction was well described by a coupled model of bicarbonate-promoted dissolution of Na-boltwoodite, intraparticle uranyl diffusion, and Monod type bioreduction kinetics with respect to dissolved U(VI) concentration. The results demonstrated the intimate coupling of biological, chemical, and physical processes in microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI).« less

  18. Electrochemical alkaline Fe(VI) water purification and remediation.

    PubMed

    Licht, Stuart; Yu, Xingwen

    2005-10-15

    Fe(VI) is an unusual and strongly oxidizing form of iron, which provides a potentially less hazardous water-purifying agent than chlorine. A novel on-line electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification methodology is introduced. Fe(VI) addition had been a barrier to its effective use in water remediation, because solid Fe(VI) salts require complex (costly) syntheses steps and solutions of Fe(VI) decompose. Online electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification avoids these limitations, in which Fe(VI) is directly prepared in solution from an iron anode as the FeO42- ion, and is added to the contaminant stream. Added FeO42- decomposes, by oxidizing a wide range of water contaminants including sulfides (demonstrated in this study) and other sulfur-containing compounds, cyanides (demonstrated in this study), arsenic (demonstrated in this study), ammonia and other nitrogen-containing compounds (previously demonstrated), a wide range of organics (phenol demonstrated in this study), algae, and viruses (each previously demonstrated).

  19. Removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution using walnut hull.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Song; Li, Zhi Zhong; Tao, Sheng Rong

    2009-02-01

    In this study, removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution by walnut hull (a local low-cost adsorbent) was studied. The extent of adsorption was investigated as a function of solution pH, contact time, adsorbent and adsorbate concentration, reaction temperature and supporting electrolyte (sodium chloride). The Cr (VI) removal was pH-dependent, reaching a maximum (97.3%) at pH 1.0. The kinetic experimental data were fitted to the first-order, modified Freundlich, intraparticle diffusion and Elovich models and the corresponding parameters were obtained. A 102.78 kJ/mol Ea (activation energy) for the reaction of chromium (VI) adsorption onto walnut indicated that the rate-limiting step in this case might be a chemically controlled process. Both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were suitable for describing the biosorption of chromium (VI) onto walnut hull. The uptake of chromium (VI) per weight of adsorbent increased with increasing initial chromium (VI) concentration up to 240-480 mg/L, and decreased sharply with increasing adsorbent concentration ranging from 1.0 to 5.0 g/L. An increase in sodium chloride (as supporting electrolyte) concentration was found to induce a negative effect while an increase in temperature was found to give rise to a positive effect on the chromium (VI) adsorption process. Compared to the various other adsorbents reported in the literature, the walnut hull in this study shows very good promise for practical applicability.

  20. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the Military Health System: Appendixes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    report. Appendixes F through H supply other supplementary material. Appendixes F and G contain the CAM survey instrument and a glossary of CAM services...respectively. Appendix H contains tables of detailed results from the CAM survey and the MHS administrative data analyses. Individual tables in...this appendix are referenced in Chapters Three through Seven of the main report. 2 Table of Contents Appendix F: CAM Survey Instrument

  1. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) on granite.

    PubMed

    Fan, Q H; Hao, L M; Wang, C L; Zheng, Z; Liu, C L; Wu, W S

    2014-03-01

    The effects of pH, counter ions and temperature on the adsorption of U(VI) on Beishan granite (BsG) were investigated in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA). The adsorption edge of U(VI) on BsG suggested that U(VI) adsorption was mainly controlled by ion exchange and outer-sphere complexation at low pH, whereas inner-sphere complex was the dominant adsorption species in the pH range of 4.0-9.0. Above pH 9.0, Na2U2O7 might play an important role in the rise of U(VI) adsorption again. Counter ions such as Cl(-), SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) can provoke U(VI) adsorption on BsG to some extent, which was directly correlated to the complexing ability of U(VI)-ligand. More noticeably, the large enhancement of U(VI) adsorption in the presence of phosphate can be attributed to the ternary complex formation (BsG-PO4-UO2), precipitation ((UO2)3(PO4)2(s)) and secondary phase (Na-autunite). Both FA and HA can slightly increase U(VI) adsorption at low pH, whereas they strongly inhibited U(VI) adsorption at high pH range. Artificial synthesized granite (AsG) prepared in the laboratory is impossible to use as an analogue of natural granite because of the large difference in the adsorption and surface properties.

  2. Multispan Elevated Guideway Design for Passenger Transport Vehicles : Volume 2. Appendixes.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-04-01

    Contents: Appendix A - derivation of vehicle-guideway interaction equations; Appendix B - evaluation of pier support dynamics; Appendix C - computer simulation program of two-dimensional vehicle over a multi-span guideway; Appendix D - computer progr...

  3. The MK VI - A second generation attitude control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. J.

    1986-10-01

    The MK VI, a new multipurpose attitude control system for the exoatmospheric attitude control of sounding rocket payloads, is described. The system employs reprogrammable microcomputer memory for storage of basic control logic and for specific mission event control data. The paper includes descriptions of MK VI specifications and configuration; sensor characteristics; the electronic, analog, and digital sections; the pneumatic system; ground equipment; the system operation; and software. A review of the MK VI performance for the Comet Halley flight is presented. Block diagrams are included.

  4. A survey with Copernicus of interstellar O VI absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Meloy, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The presence of broad, shallow absorptions caused by O VI ions were revealed from UV spectra observations recorded by the Copernicus satellite for thirty-two stars. A table lists survey data on the stars observed for which values of the O VI column densities or their upper limits are extracted. Interstellar rather than circumstellar origin is evident from observation of the lack of correspondence between radical velocities of the stars and those of the O VI profiles. The presence of a low-density high-temperature phase of interstellar gas produced by supernova explosions is suggested.

  5. Microbial communities biostimulated by ethanol during uranium (VI) bioremediation in contaminated sediment as shown by stable isotope probing

    SciT

    Leigh, Mary Beth; Wu, Wei -Min; Cardenas, Erick

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify microbes stimulated by ethanol addition in microcosms containing two sediments collected from the bioremediation test zone at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge site, TN, USA. One sample was highly bioreduced with ethanol while another was less reduced. Microcosms with the respective sediments were amended with 13C labeled ethanol and incubated for 7 days for SIP. Ethanol was rapidly converted to acetate within 24 h accompanied with the reduction of nitrate and sulfate. The accumulation of acetate persisted beyond the 7 d period. Aqueous U did not decline in the microcosmmore » with the reduced sediment due to desorption of U but continuously declined in the less reduced sample. Microbial growth and concomitant 13C-DNA production was detected when ethanol was exhausted and abundant acetate had accumulated in both microcosms. This coincided with U(VI) reduction in the less reduced sample. 13C originating from ethanol was ultimately utilized for growth, either directly or indirectly, by the dominant microbial community members within 7 days of incubation. The microbial community was comprised predominantly of known denitrifiers, sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron (III) reducing bacteria including Desulfovibrio, Sphingomonas, Ferribacterium, Rhodanobacter, Geothrix, Thiobacillus and others, including the known U(VI)-reducing bacteria Acidovorax, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfovibrio, Geobacter and Desulfosporosinus. As a result, the findings suggest that ethanol biostimulates the U(VI)-reducing microbial community by first serving as an electron donor for nitrate, sulfate, iron (III) and U(VI) reduction, and acetate which then functions as electron donor for U(VI) reduction and carbon source for microbial growth.« less

  6. Distribution and Kinematics of O VI in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B. D.; Sembach, K. R.; Wakker, B. P.; Richter, P.; Meade, M.; Jenkins, E. B.; Shull, J. M.; Moos, H. W.; Sonneborn, G.

    2003-05-01

    Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of 100 extragalactic objects and two distant halo stars are analyzed to obtain measures of O VI λλ1031.93, 1037.62 absorption along paths through the Milky Way thick disk/halo. Strong O VI absorption over the velocity range from -100 to 100 km s-1 reveals a widespread but highly irregular distribution of O VI, implying the existence of substantial amounts of hot gas with T~3×105 K in the Milky Way thick disk/halo. The integrated column density, log[N(O VI) cm-2], ranges from 13.85 to 14.78 with an average value of 14.38 and a standard deviation of 0.18. Large irregularities in the gas distribution are found to be similar over angular scales extending from <1° to 180°, implying a considerable amount of small- and large-scale structure in the absorbing gas. The overall distribution of O VI is not well described by a symmetrical plane-parallel layer of patchy O VI absorption. The simplest departure from such a model that provides a reasonable fit to the observations is a plane-parallel patchy absorbing layer with an average O VI midplane density of n0(O VI)=1.7×10-8 cm-3, a scale height of ~2.3 kpc, and a ~0.25 dex excess of O VI in the northern Galactic polar region. The distribution of O VI over the sky is poorly correlated with other tracers of gas in the halo, including low- and intermediate-velocity H I, Hα emission from the warm ionized gas at ~104 K, and hot X-ray-emitting gas at ~106 K. The O VI has an average velocity dispersion, b~60 km s-1, and standard deviation of 15 km s-1. Thermal broadening alone cannot explain the large observed profile widths. The average O VI absorption velocities toward high-latitude objects (|b|>45deg) range from -46 to 82 km s-1, with a high-latitude sample average of 0 km s-1 and a standard deviation of 21 km s-1. High positive velocity O VI absorbing wings extending from ~100 to ~250 km s-1 observed along 21 lines of sight may be tracing the flow of O VI into the halo

  7. Wind tunnel test of musi VI bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permata, Robby; Andika, Matza Gusto; Syariefatunnisa, Risdhiawan, Eri; Hermawan, Budi; Noordiana, Indra

    2017-11-01

    Musi VI Bridge is planned to cross the Musi River in Palembang City, South Sumatera Province, Indonesia. The main span is a steel arch type with 200 m length and side span length is 75 m. Finite element analysis results showed that the bridge has frequency ratio for torsional and heaving mode (torsional frequency/heaving frequency)=1.14. This close to unity value rises concern about aerodynamic behaviour and stability of the bridge deck under wind loading. Sectional static and free vibration wind tunnel test were performed to clarify this phenomena in B2TA3 facility in Serpong, Indonesia. The test followed the draft of Guide of Wind Tunnel Test for Bridges developed by Indonesian Ministry of Public Works. Results from wind tunnel testing show that the bridge is safe from flutter instability and no coupled motion vibration observed. Therefore, low value of frequency ratio has no effect to aerodynamic behaviour of the bridge deck. Vortex-induced vibration in heaving mode occurred in relatively low wind velocity with permissible maximum amplitude value.

  8. The Effect of Si and Al Concentration Ratios on the Removal of U(VI) under Hanford Site 200 Area Conditions-12115

    SciT

    Katsenovich, Yelena; Gonzalez, Nathan; Moreno-Pastor, Carol

    2012-07-01

    Injection of reactive gases, such as NH{sub 3}, is an innovative technique to mitigate uranium contamination in soil for a vadose zone (VZ) contaminated with radionuclides. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of the concentration ratio of silicon to aluminum in the presence of various bicarbonate concentrations on the coprecipitation process of U(VI). The concentration of Al in all tests remained unchanged at 2.8 mM. Experiments showed that the removal efficiency of uranium was not significantly affected by the different bicarbonate and U(VI) concentrations tested. For the lower Si:Al molar ratios of 2:1 and 18:1, themore » removal efficiency of uranium was relatively low (≤ 8%). For the Si:Al molar ratio of 35:1, the removal efficiency of uranium was increased to an average of ∼82% for all bicarbonate concentrations tested. At higher Si:Al molar ratios (53:1 and above), a relatively high removal efficiency of U(VI), approximately 85% and higher, was observed. These results demonstrate that the U(VI) removal efficiency is more affected by the Si:Al molar ratio than by the bicarbonate concentration in solution. The results of this experiment are promising for the potential implementation of NH{sub 3} gas injection for the remediation of U(VI) -contaminated VZ. (authors)« less

  9. Cranial nerve VI palsy after dural-arachnoid puncture.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Jennifer E; Scavone, Barbara M

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we provide a literature review of cranial nerve (CN) VI injury after dural-arachnoid puncture. CN VI injury is rare and ranges in severity from diplopia to complete lateral rectus palsy with deviated gaze. The proposed mechanism of injury is cerebrospinal fluid leakage causing intracranial hypotension and downward displacement of the brainstem. This results in traction on CN VI leading to stretch and neural demyelination. Symptoms may present 1 day to 3 weeks after dural-arachnoid puncture and typically are associated with a postdural puncture (spinal) headache. Resolution of symptoms may take weeks to months. Use of small-gauge, noncutting spinal needles may decrease the risk of intracranial hypotension and subsequent CN VI injury. When ocular symptoms are present, early administration of an epidural blood patch may decrease morbidity or prevent progression of ocular symptoms.

  10. INTELSAT VI artist concept drawing titled 'Ocean Bridge'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT) VI artist concept drawing titled 'Ocean Bridge' shows satellite built by Hughes Aircraft Company and owned and operated by INTELSAT, a 122-nation cooperative, orbiting the Earth.

  11. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type VI with optic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Voo, Irene; Allf, Bryan E; Udar, Nitin; Silva-Garcia, Rosamaria; Vance, Jeffrey; Small, Kent W

    2003-10-01

    To present the detailed clinical findings of a large family with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type VI (HMSN VI), a syndrome featuring optic atrophy. Observational case series. A detailed history was obtained and physical examination was made of the extended family of the proband for evidence of neurologic dysfunction. The OPA1 gene was screened for mutations by direct DNA sequencing. Twelve of 97 family members examined are affected with signs of HMSN VI. Three other members have either optic atrophy or peripheral neuropathy, thus allowing an appreciation of the full clinical spectrum of disease. No mutations were found in the OPA1 gene. This family demonstrates the variable expressivity of this disorder as well as incomplete penetrance. This is the largest known family with HMSN VI. No association was found with changes in the OPA1 gene.

  12. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; da Costa, Ana M Rosa; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogério; Matos, António Pedro; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-12-15

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Vi-da: vitiligo diagnostic assistance mobile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, G. A.; Nurhudatiana, A.; Bahana, R.

    2018-03-01

    Vitiligo is a skin disorder in which white patches of depigmentation appear on different parts of the body. Usually, patients come to hospitals or clinics to have their vitiligo conditions assessed. This can be very tiring to the patients, as vitiligo treatments usually take a relatively long period of time, which can range from months to years. To address this challenge, we present in this paper a prototype of an Android-based mobile application called Vi-DA, which stands for Vitiligo Diagnostic Assistance. Vi-DA consists of three subsystems, which are user sign-up subsystem, camera and image analysis subsystem, and progress report subsystem. The mobile application was developed in Java programming language and uses MySQL as the database system. Vi-DA adopts a vitiligo segmentation algorithm to segment input image into normal skin area, vitiligo skin area, and non-skin area. Results showed that Vi-DA gave comparable results to the previous system implemented in Matlab. User acceptance testing results also showed that all respondents agreed on the usefulness of the system and agreed to use Vi-DA again in the future. Vi-DA benefits both dermatologists and patients as not only a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool but also as a smart application that can be used for self-assessment at home.

  14. Lack of Collagen VI Promotes Wound-Induced Hair Growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiwen; Cescon, Matilde; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix molecule that is abundantly expressed in the skin. However, the role of collagen VI in hair follicle growth is unknown. Here, we show that collagen VI is strongly deposited in hair follicles, and is markedly upregulated by skin wounding. Lack of collagen VI in Col6a1(-/-) mice delays hair cycling and growth under physiological conditions, but promotes wound-induced hair regrowth without affecting skin regeneration. Conversely, addition of purified collagen VI rescues the abnormal wound-induced hair regrowth in Col6a1(-/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that the increased wound-induced hair regrowth of Col6a1(-/-) mice is triggered by activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and is abolished by inhibition of this pathway. These findings highlight the essential relationships between extracellular matrix (ECM) and hair follicle regeneration, and suggest that collagen VI could be a potential therapeutic target for hair loss and other skin-related diseases.

  15. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of cyanide in water.

    PubMed

    Costarramone, N; Kneip, A; Castetbon, A

    2004-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to test removal of cyanide (free cyanide and several cyanide complexes) in water, under alkaline medium (pH > or = 11), by a new potassium ferrate salt. The removal rate of free cyanide by oxidation with Fe(VI) was greater at pH 11.0 than at pH 12.0. A complete oxidation was obtained with a 2.67 Fe(VI)/CN ratio at pH 11.0. In these conditions, the rate of cyanide oxidation by Fe(VI) was slow, with a reaction rate constant estimated at 0.95 +/- 0.10 s(-1) l mol(-1) at pH 11.0 and 19.6 degrees C in this study. This study revealed that Fe(VI) did not decompose all cyanide complexes. Copper, cadmium and zinc complexes were removed efficiently by Fe(VI). Moreover, these metals were also removed from the solution by coagulation effect of Fe(OH)3, the Fe(VI) product of reaction. A particular behaviour was reported with copper, as a rapid oxidation of cyanide was observed in the presence of this metal. On the contrary, oxidation of nickel and silver complexes was incomplete.

  16. Growth of II-VI Solid Solutions in the Presence of a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C; Motakef, S.; Dudley, M.; Matyi, R.; Volz, H.

    1999-01-01

    The application of a rotating magnetic field (RMF)in the frequency range 60-400 Hz and field strength of the order of 2-8 mT to crystal growth has received increasing attention in recent years. To take full advantage of the control of fluid flow by the forces applied by the field, the liquid column must be electrically conducting. Also, the application of RMF to the directional solidification of a column of liquid can result in complete mixing in the resultant solid. Thus, the technique of RMF is suited to solvent zones and float zones where the composition of the liquid is more readily controlled. In the work we report on, numerical modeling has been applied to II-VI systems, particularly tellurium based traveling heater techniques (THM). Results for a spectrum of field strengths and acceleration levels will be presented. These show clearly the effects of competing buoyancy forces and electromagnetic stirring. Crystals of cadmium zinc telluride and mercury cadmium telluride have been grown terrestrially from a tellurium solvent zone. The effects of the RMF during these experiments will be demonstrated with micrographs showing etch pits, white beam x-ray synchrotron topographs and triple axis x-ray diffraction.

  17. 1. COMPARISON OF PLANS, SHOWING KONGENSGADE 6 (see photograph VI50 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. COMPARISON OF PLANS, SHOWING KONGENSGADE 6 (see photograph VI-50 50-2 for elevation), KONGENSGADE 8 (see photograph VI-50-3 for elevation), KONGENSGADE 9 (see photograph VI-50-3 for elevation), KONGENSGADE 17 (see photograph VI-50-5 for elevation), KONGENSGADE 56 (see photograph VI-50-8 for elevation), & KONGENSGADE 57 (see photograph VI-50-9 for elevation) - King Street Area Study, Kongensgade 5-18, 36, 37B, 51-58 (Houses), 5-18, 36-37B, 51-58 King Street, Frederiksted, St. Croix, VI

  18. Diverse anaerobic Cr(VI) tolerant bacteria from Cr(VI)-contaminated 100H site at Hanford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, R.; Phan, R.; Lam, S.; Leung, C.; Brodie, E. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2007-12-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and ground water. Cr(VI) is more soluble, toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic compared to its reduced form Cr(III). In order to stimulate microbially mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound HRC was injected into the chromium contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products, we recently investigated the diversity of the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial population present at this site and their role in Cr(VI) reduction. Positive enrichments set up at 30°C using specific defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron reducing isolate strain HAF, a sulfate reducing isolate strain HBLS and a nitrate reducing isolate, strain HLN among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identifies strain HAF as Geobacter metallireducens, strain HLN as Pseudomonas stutzeri and strain HBLS as a member of Desulfovibrio species. Strain HAF isolated with acetate as the electron donor utilized propionate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Growth was optimal at 37°C, pH of 6.5 and 0% salinity. Strain HLN isolated with lactate as electron donor utilized acetate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Optimal growth was observed at 37°C, at a pH of 7.5 and 0.3% salinity. Anaerobic active washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95 micromolar Cr(VI) within 4 hours relative to controls. Further, with 100 micromolar Cr(VI) as the sole electron acceptor, cells of strain HLN grew to cell numbers of 4.05X 107/ml over a period of 24hrs after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction by this species. 10mM lactate served as the sole electron donor. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI

  19. The biomineralization process of uranium(VI) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae - transformation from amorphous U(VI) to crystalline chernikovite.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanghao; Zheng, Xinyan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Tieshan

    2018-05-01

    Microorganisms play a significant role in uranium(VI) biogeochemistry and influence U(VI) transformation through biomineralization. In the present work, the process of uranium mineralization was investigated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The toxicity experiments showed that the viability of cell was not significantly affected by 100 mg L -1 U(VI) under 4 days of exposure time. The batch experiments showed that the phosphate concentration and pH value increased over time during U(VI) adsorption. Meanwhile, thermodynamic calculations demonstrated that the adsorption system was supersaturated with respect to UO 2 HPO 4 . The X-ray powder diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses indicated that the U(VI) was first attached onto the cell surface and reacted with hydroxyl, carboxyl, and phosphate groups through electrostatic interactions and complexation. As the immobilization of U(VI) transformed it from the ionic to the amorphous state, lamellar uranium precipitate was formed on the cell surface. With the prolongation of time, the amorphous uranium compound disappeared, and there were some crystalline substances observed extracellularly, which were well-characterized as tetragonal-chernikovite. Furthermore, the size of chernikovite was regulated at nano-level by cells, and the perfect crystal was formed finally. These findings provided an understanding of the non-reductive transformation process of U(VI) from the amorphous to crystalline state within microbe systems, which would be beneficial for the U(VI) treatment and reuse of nuclides and heavy metals.

  20. Technology-derived storage solutions for stabilizing insulin in extreme weather conditions I: the ViViCap-1 device.

    PubMed

    Pfützner, Andreas; Pesach, Gidi; Nagar, Ron

    2017-06-01

    Injectable life-saving drugs should not be exposed to temperatures <4°C/39°F or >30°C/86°F. Frequently, weather conditions exceed these temperature thresholds in many countries. Insulin is to be kept at 4-8°C/~ 39-47°F until use and once opened, is supposed to be stable for up to 31 days at room temperature (exception: 42 days for insulin levemir). Extremely hot or cold external temperature can lead to insulin degradation in a very short time with loss of its glucose-lowering efficacy. Combined chemical and engineering solutions for heat protection are employed in ViViCap-1 for disposable insulin pens. The device works based on vacuum insulation and heat consumption by phase-change material. Laboratory studies with exposure of ViViCap-1 to hot outside conditions were performed to evaluate the device performance. ViViCap-1 keeps insulin at an internal temperature < 29°C/84.2°F for a minimum of 12 h without external power requirement, even when constantly exposed to an outside temperature of 37.8°C/100°F. Bringing the device into an ambient temperature < 26°C/78.8°F reverses the phase-change process and 'recharges' the device for further use. ViViCap-1 performed within its specifications. The small and convenient device maintains the efficacy and safety of using insulin even when carried under hot weather conditions.

  1. Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hachani, Abderrahman; Lossi, Nadine S.; Hamilton, Alexander; Jones, Cerith; Bleves, Sophie; Albesa-Jové, David; Filloux, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium causing chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Such infections are associated with an active type VI secretion system (T6SS), which consists of about 15 conserved components, including the AAA+ ATPase, ClpV. The T6SS secretes two categories of proteins, VgrG and Hcp. Hcp is structurally similar to a phage tail tube component, whereas VgrG proteins show similarity to the puncturing device at the tip of the phage tube. In P. aeruginosa, three T6SSs are known. The expression of H1-T6SS genes is controlled by the RetS sensor. Here, 10 vgrG genes were identified in the PAO1 genome, among which three are co-regulated with H1-T6SS, namely vgrG1a/b/c. Whereas VgrG1a and VgrG1c were secreted in a ClpV1-dependent manner, secretion of VgrG1b was ClpV1-independent. We show that VgrG1a and VgrG1c form multimers, which confirmed the VgrG model predicting trimers similar to the tail spike. We demonstrate that Hcp1 secretion requires either VgrG1a or VgrG1c, which may act independently to puncture the bacterial envelope and give Hcp1 access to the surface. VgrG1b is not required for Hcp1 secretion. Thus, VgrG1b does not require H1-T6SS for secretion nor does H1-T6SS require VgrG1b for its function. Finally, we show that VgrG proteins are required for secretion of a genuine H1-T6SS substrate, Tse3. Our results demonstrate that VgrG proteins are not only secreted components but are essential for secretion of other T6SS substrates. Overall, we emphasize variability in behavior of three P. aeruginosa VgrGs, suggesting that, although very similar, distinct VgrGs achieve specific functions. PMID:21325275

  2. The State of Transportation in Illinois: Appendix

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-03-01

    This report provides a comprehensive assessment of the state of Illinois' surface transportation needs and discusses the ability of current revenues to meet those needs. In addition to the summary table, a separate Appendix provides detailed lists of...

  3. Appendix E - Sample Production Facility Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This sample Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan in Appendix E is intended to provide examples and illustrations of how a production facility could address a variety of scenarios in its SPCC Plan.

  4. Schistosomiasis of the appendix in Maiduguri.

    PubMed

    Gali, B M; Nggada, H A; Eni, E U

    2006-07-01

    We retrospectively studied 27 histologically diagnosed cases of schistosomiasis of the appendix at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital between January 1994 and December 2003. Of 1183 cases of appendices histologically examined, schistosomiasis was seen in 27 (2.3%).

  5. Appendix D - Sample Bulk Storage Facility Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This sample Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan in Appendix D is intended to provide examples and illustrations of how a bulk storage facility could address a variety of scenarios in its SPCC Plan.

  6. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992. Appendixes

    SciT

    Not Available

    1992-04-07

    This report contains the following appendices: Appendix A - Requirements for Undergraduate Level; Appendix B - Requirements for Graduate Level; Appendix C - Graduate Degree In Environmental Engineering; Appendix D - Non-degree Certificate Program; Appendix E - Curriculum for Associate Degree Program; Appendix F - Curriculum for NCC Program; Appendix G - Information 1991 Teleconference Series; Appendix H - Information on 1992 Teleconference Series; Appendix I - WERC interactive Television Courses; Appendix J - WERC Research Seminar Series; Appendix K - Sites for Hazardous/Radioactive Waste Management Series; Appendix L- Summary of Technology Development of the Second Year; Appendix M -more » List of Major Publications Resulting from WERC; Appendix N - Types of Equipment at WERC Laboratories.« less

  7. Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions. Appendix A-F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-20

    Module allows the separation between the control unit and the power circuits . Communications with the hostcomputer occurs via RS 232 serial port. The...hre] - D905-10123.1 ’- 43 Appendix E K- Contents: Page: Glossary of Terms 1. Principle of Construction of the DDC 4 2Thermal Circuit Of the DDC 6...Appendix E % 0 . r. fell. * re. .*......... .... 2. Thermal Circuit of the DDC: The thermal behaviour of the DDC can be represented by a lumped element

  8. Integrated Cr(VI) removal using constructed wetlands and composting.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Mar-Yam; Chowdhury, Abu Khayer Md Muktadirul Bari; Michailides, Michail K; Akratos, Christos S; Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G; Vayenas, Dimitrios V

    2015-01-08

    The present work was conducted to study integrated chromium removal from aqueous solutions in horizontal subsurface (HSF) constructed wetlands. Two pilot-scale HSF constructed wetlands (CWs) units were built and operated. One unit was planted with common reeds (Phragmites australis) and one was kept unplanted. Influent concentrations of Cr(VI) ranged from 0.5 to 10mg/L. The effect of temperature and hydraulic residence time (8-0.5 days) on Cr(VI) removal were studied. Temperature was proved to affect Cr(VI) removal in both units. In the planted unit maximum Cr(VI) removal efficiencies of 100% were recorded at HRT's of 1 day with Cr(VI) concentrations of 5, 2.5 and 1mg/L, while a significantly lower removal rate was recorded in the unplanted unit. Harvested reed biomass from the CWs was co-composted with olive mill wastes. The final product had excellent physicochemical characteristics (C/N: 14.1-14.7, germination index (GI): 145-157%, Cr: 8-10mg/kg dry mass), fulfills EU requirements and can be used as a fertilizer in organic farming. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Experiments indicating a second hydrogen ordered phase of ice VI

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, Tobias M.; Thoeny, Alexander V.; Plaga, Lucie J.; Köster, Karsten W.; Etter, Martin; Böhmer, Roland

    2018-01-01

    In the last twelve years five new ice phases were experimentally prepared. Two of them are empty clathrate hydrates and three of them represent hydrogen ordered counterparts of previously known disordered ice phases. Here, we report on hydrogen ordering in ice VI samples produced by cooling at pressures up to 2.00 GPa. Based on results from calorimetry, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction the existence of a second hydrogen ordered polymorph related to ice VI is suggested. Powder X-ray data show the oxygen network to be the one of ice VI. For the 1.80 GPa sample the activation energy from dielectric spectroscopy is 45 kJ mol–1, which is much larger than for the known hydrogen ordered proxy of ice VI, ice XV. Raman spectroscopy indicates the 1.80 GPa sample to be more ordered than ice XV. It is further distinct from ice XV in that it experiences hydrogen disordering above ≈103 K which is 26 K below the ice XV to ice VI disordering transition. Consequently, below 103 K it is thermodynamically more stable than ice XV, adding a stability region to the phase diagram of water. For the time being we suggest to call this new phase ice β-XV and to relabel it ice XVIII once its crystal structure is known. PMID:29780552

  10. Experiments indicating a second hydrogen ordered phase of ice VI.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Tobias M; Thoeny, Alexander V; Plaga, Lucie J; Köster, Karsten W; Etter, Martin; Böhmer, Roland; Loerting, Thomas

    2018-05-14

    In the last twelve years five new ice phases were experimentally prepared. Two of them are empty clathrate hydrates and three of them represent hydrogen ordered counterparts of previously known disordered ice phases. Here, we report on hydrogen ordering in ice VI samples produced by cooling at pressures up to 2.00 GPa. Based on results from calorimetry, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction the existence of a second hydrogen ordered polymorph related to ice VI is suggested. Powder X-ray data show the oxygen network to be the one of ice VI. For the 1.80 GPa sample the activation energy from dielectric spectroscopy is 45 kJ mol -1 , which is much larger than for the known hydrogen ordered proxy of ice VI, ice XV. Raman spectroscopy indicates the 1.80 GPa sample to be more ordered than ice XV. It is further distinct from ice XV in that it experiences hydrogen disordering above ≈103 K which is 26 K below the ice XV to ice VI disordering transition. Consequently, below 103 K it is thermodynamically more stable than ice XV, adding a stability region to the phase diagram of water. For the time being we suggest to call this new phase ice β-XV and to relabel it ice XVIII once its crystal structure is known.

  11. [Adsorptive Stabilization of Soil Cr (VI) Using HDTMA Modified Montmorillonite].

    PubMed

    2016-03-15

    A series of organo-montomorillonites were prepared using Na-montomorillonite and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA). The organo-montomorillonites were then investigated for the remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soils. FT-IR, XRD, SEM and N2 -BET, CEC, Zeta potential measurement were conducted to understand the structural changes of montmorillonites as different amounts of HDTMAs were added as modifier. The characterization results indicated that the clay interlayer spacing distance increased from 1. 25 nm to 2. 13 nm, the clay surface roughness decreased, the clay surface area reduced from 38.91 m² · g⁻¹ to 0.42 m² · g⁻¹, the clay exchangeable cation amount reduced from 62 cmol · kg⁻¹ to 9.9 cmol · kg⁻¹ and the clay surface charge changed from -29.1 mV to 5.59 mV as the dosage of HDTMA in montmorillonite was increased. The TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) was used to evaluate the leachate toxicity of Cr(VI). The effects of the initial soil Cr(VI) concentration, montmorillonites dosage, reaction time and HDTMA modification amount were investigated, respectively. The results revealed that modification of montmorillonites would manifest an attenuated physical adsorptive effect and an enhanced electrostatic adsorptive effect on Cr(VI), suggesting electrostatic effect was the major force that resulted in improved Cr(VI) adsorption onto HDTMA modified montmorillonites.

  12. 45 CFR Appendix F to Part 1355 - Appendix F to Part 1355

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appendix F to Part 1355 F Appendix F to Part 1355 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE...

  13. 13 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 113

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... innovation and research Small Business Act, sec. 9. Procurement automated source system. Small Business Act... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 113 A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 113 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION...

  14. 13 CFR Appendix A to Part 112 - Appendix A to Part 112

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... enterprise Executive Order 12138. Small business innovation and research Small Business Act, sec. 9... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix A to Part 112 A Appendix A to Part 112 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN...

  15. 18 CFR Appendix A to Subpart H of... - Appendix A to Subpart H of Part 35

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Rates Pt. 35, Subpt. H, App. A Appendix A to Subpart H of Part 35 Appendix A Standard Screen Format... Reference Seller and Affiliate Capacity A Installed Capacity 19,500 Workpaper. B Long-Term Firm Purchases... Capacity E Installed Capacity 8,000 Workpaper. F Long-Term Firm Purchases 500 Workpaper. G Long-Term Firm...

  16. 13 CFR Appendix A to Part 112 - Appendix A to Part 112

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... development centers Small Business Act, sec. 21 and Pub. L. 96-302. International Trade Program Small Business... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendix A to Part 112 A Appendix A to Part 112 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN...

  17. 13 CFR Appendix A to Part 1171 - Appendix A to Part 1171

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... International Trade Program Small Business Act, section 22. Technical and Management Assistance Small Business... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendix A to Part 1171 A Appendix A to Part 1171 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN...

  18. 30 CFR Appendix I to Subpart J of... - Appendix I to Subpart J of Part 7

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appendix I to Subpart J of Part 7 I Appendix I to Subpart J of Part 7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor...

  19. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    SciT

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel

    2013-07-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals.more » The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours

  20. 49 CFR Appendixes B-D to Part 99 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false [Reserved] B Appendixes B-D to Part 99 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Appendixes B-D to Part 99 [Reserved] ...

  1. 29 CFR Appendix B to Part 70 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false [Reserved] B Appendix B to Part 70 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION OR MATERIALS Appendix B to Part 70 [Reserved] ...

  2. 29 CFR Appendix B to Part 70 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false [Reserved] B Appendix B to Part 70 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION OR MATERIALS Appendix B to Part 70 [Reserved] ...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] O Appendix O to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendix O to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix L to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] L Appendix L to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendix L to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  5. 10 CFR Appendixes O-P to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false [Reserved] O Appendixes O-P to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendixes O-P to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  6. 10 CFR Appendixes O-P to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false [Reserved] O Appendixes O-P to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendixes O-P to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  7. 10 CFR Appendixes O-P to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false [Reserved] O Appendixes O-P to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendixes O-P to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  8. 10 CFR Appendixes O-P to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false [Reserved] O Appendixes O-P to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendixes O-P to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  9. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7 [Reserved] ...

  10. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] C Appendix C to Part 2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Appendix C to Part 2 [Reserved] ...

  11. 10 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] P Appendix P to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendix P to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  12. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] A Appendix A to Part 2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Appendix A to Part 2 [Reserved] ...

  13. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] D Appendix D to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendix D to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  14. 10 CFR Appendixes L-M to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false [Reserved] L Appendixes L-M to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendixes L-M to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  15. 10 CFR Appendix M to Part 50 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] M Appendix M to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Appendix M to Part 50 [Reserved] ...

  16. 48 CFR Appendix G to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendix G to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendix G to Chapter 2 [Reserved] ...

  17. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 [Reserved] ...

  18. 48 CFR Appendix G to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendix G to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendix G to Chapter 2 [Reserved] ...

  19. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 [Reserved] ...

  20. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 [Reserved] ...

  1. 48 CFR Appendix G to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendix G to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendix G to Chapter 2 [Reserved] ...

  2. 48 CFR Appendix G to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendix G to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendix G to Chapter 2 [Reserved] ...

  3. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 [Reserved] ...

  4. 48 CFR Appendix G to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendix G to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendix G to Chapter 2 [Reserved] ...

  5. Preparing Students for Success in California's Community Colleges. Technical Appendix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mejia, Marisol Cuellar; Rodriguez, Olga; Johnson, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the technical appendix that accompanies the full report, "Preparing Students for Success in California's Community Colleges." The appendix includes Data and Methods. [Supported with funding from the Sutton Family Fund. For the full report, see ED570976.

  6. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false [Reserved] C Appendix C to Part 2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Appendix C to Part 2 [Reserved] ...

  7. 17 CFR Appendix C to Part 145 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false [Reserved] C Appendix C to Part 145 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMISSION RECORDS AND INFORMATION Appendix C to Part 145 [Reserved] ...

  8. 16 CFR Appendix B to Part 698 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] B Appendix B to Part 698 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT MODEL FORMS AND DISCLOSURES Appendix B to Part 698 [Reserved] ...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix X to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix X to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 266 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR... FACILITIES Appendix X to Part 266 [Reserved] ...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 266 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR... FACILITIES Appendix X to Part 266 [Reserved] ...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix X to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix X to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 266 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR... FACILITIES Appendix X to Part 266 [Reserved] ...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix X to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 266 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR... FACILITIES Appendix X to Part 266 [Reserved] ...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 266 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false [Reserved] X Appendix X to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR... FACILITIES Appendix X to Part 266 [Reserved] ...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix V to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] V Appendix V to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix V to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix V to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false [Reserved] V Appendix V to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix V to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix V to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false [Reserved] V Appendix V to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix V to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix V to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false [Reserved] V Appendix V to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix V to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix V to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false [Reserved] V Appendix V to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix V to Part 268 [Reserved] ...

  4. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 [Reserved] ...

  5. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uygun, Murat; Feyzioğlu, Esra; Özçalışkan, Emir; Caka, Müşerref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO3 solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m2/g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities.

  6. Chromium (VI) purification using pine sawdust in batch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politi, Dorothea; Sidiras, Dimitris

    2012-12-01

    Pine sawdust, a waste generated in furniture industry, has been used as low-cost potential adsorbent. This low-cost adsorbent was used for the removal of chromium (VI) from an aqueous solution. The kinetics of adsorption and extent of adsorption at equilibrium are dependent on the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent and adsorbate. The effect of hydrogen ion concentration, contact time, adsorbent dose and initial concentration of adsorbate on the uptake of chromium were studied in batch experiments. The adsorption data has been correlated with Lagergren - Eldridge pseudofirst order kinetic model. The efficiency of adsorbent material for the removal of Cr(VI) was found to be between 13.1 and 95.6%, respectively. These results depend on the conditions of pH, contact time, sawdust dose and Cr(VI) concentration.

  7. Inactivation of bacteriophage MS2 with potassium ferrate(VI).

    PubMed

    Hu, Lanhua; Page, Martin A; Sigstam, Therese; Kohn, Tamar; Mariñas, Benito J; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2012-11-06

    Ferrate [Fe(VI); FeO(4)(2-)] is an emerging oxidizing agent capable of controlling chemical and microbial water contaminants. Here, inactivation of MS2 coliphage by Fe(VI) was examined. The inactivation kinetics observed in individual batch experiments was well described by a Chick-Watson model with first-order dependences on disinfectant and infective phage concentrations. The inactivation rate constant k(i) at a Fe(VI) dose of 1.23 mgFe/L (pH 7.0, 25 °C) was 2.27(±0.05) L/(mgFe × min), corresponding to 99.99% inactivation at a Ct of ~4 (mgFe × min)/L. Measured k(i) values were found to increase with increasing applied Fe(VI) dose (0.56-2.24 mgFe/L), increasing temperature (5-30 °C), and decreasing pH conditions (pH 6-11). The Fe(VI) dose effect suggested that an unidentified Fe byproduct also contributed to inactivation. Temperature dependence was characterized by an activation energy of 39(±6) kJ mol(-1), and k(i) increased >50-fold when pH decreased from 11 to 6. The pH effect was quantitatively described by parallel reactions with HFeO(4)(-) and FeO(4)(2-). Mass spectrometry and qRT-PCR analyses demonstrated that both capsid protein and genome damage increased with the extent of inactivation, suggesting that both may contribute to phage inactivation. Capsid protein damage, localized in the two regions containing oxidant-sensitive cysteine residues, and protein cleavage in one of the two regions may facilitate genome damage by increasing Fe(VI) access to the interior of the virion.

  8. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides

    SciT

    Ria A. Yngard; Virender K. Sharma; Jan Filip

    2008-04-15

    Cyanide is commonly found in electroplating, mining, coal gasification, and petroleum refining effluents, which require treatment before being discharged. Cyanide in effluents exists either as free cyanide or as a metal complex. The kinetics of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by an environmentally friendly oxidant, ferrate, were studied as a function of pH (9.1-10.5) and temperature (15-45{sup o}C) using a stopped-flow technique. The weak-acid dissociable cyanides were Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, and the rate-laws for the oxidation may be -d(Fe(VI))/dt = k (Fe(VI))(M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}){sup n} where n = 0.5 and 1 for Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}more » and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, respectively. The rates decreased with increasing pH and were mostly related to a decrease in concentration of the reactive protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO{sub 4}{sup -}. The stoichiometries with Fe(VI) were determined to be: 4HFeO{sub 4}{sup -} + M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} + 6H{sub 2}O {yields} 4Fe(OH){sub 3} + M{sup 2+} + 4NCO{sup -} + O{sub 2} + 4OH{sup -}. Mechanisms are proposed that agree with the observed reaction rate-laws and stoichiometries of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by Fe(VI). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is effective in removing cyanide in coke oven plant effluent, where organics are also present. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  9. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 227 - Noise Exposure Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Noise Exposure Computation A Appendix A to Part... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Pt. 227, App. A Appendix A to Part 227—Noise Exposure Computation This appendix is mandatory. I. Computation of Employee Noise Exposure A...

  10. 49 CFR Appendix B to Subchapter B... - Special Agents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special Agents B Appendix B to Subchapter B of Chapter III Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER..., Subch. B, App. B Appendix B to Subchapter B of Chapter III—Special Agents Cautionary note: This appendix...

  11. 49 CFR Appendix B to Subchapter B... - Special Agents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special Agents B Appendix B to Subchapter B of Chapter III Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER..., Subch. B, App. B Appendix B to Subchapter B of Chapter III—Special Agents Cautionary note: This appendix...

  12. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 573 - Sample Clauses

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sample Clauses B Appendix B to Part 573 Banks... INFORMATION Pt. 573, App. B Appendix B to Part 573—Sample Clauses Link to an amendment published at 74 FR... redesignated appendix B was removed, effective Jan. 1, 2012. ...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 67 - Instruction Manual

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Instruction Manual B Appendix B to...) EPA APPROVAL OF STATE NONCOMPLIANCE PENALTY PROGRAM Pt. 67, App. B Appendix B to Part 67—Instruction Manual Note: EPA will make copies of appendix B available from: Director, Stationary Source Compliance...

  14. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 202 - Model Application Forms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Model Application Forms B Appendix B to Part... CREDIT OPPORTUNITY ACT (REGULATION B) Pt. 202, App. B Appendix B to Part 202—Model Application Forms 1... appear on the creditor's form. 3. If a creditor uses an appropriate Appendix B model form, or modifies a...

  15. 49 CFR Appendix B to Subchapter B... - Special Agents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special Agents B Appendix B to Subchapter B of Chapter III Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER..., Subch. B, App. B Appendix B to Subchapter B of Chapter III—Special Agents Cautionary note: This appendix...

  16. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 275 - Obtaining Customer Authorization

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Obtaining Customer Authorization B Appendix B to... OF 1978 Pt. 275, App. B Appendix B to Part 275—Obtaining Customer Authorization A. A DoD law... feasible, obtain the customer's consent. B. Any authorization obtained under paragraph A. of this appendix...

  17. 50 CFR Appendix C to Part 622 - Fish Length Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fish Length Measurements C Appendix C to Part 622 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Appendix C to Part 622—Fish Length Measurements ER03JY96.000 Figure 1 of Appendix C to Part 622—Carapace...

  18. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part 504—Fuel Price Computation (a) Introduction. This appendix provides the equations and parameters...

  19. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advanced Simulation H Appendix H to Part... Simulation Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 67846, Nov. 12, 2013. This appendix provides guidelines... Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or D training under this appendix all required...

  20. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart P of... - Soil Classification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Soil Classification A Appendix A to Subpart P of Part 1926..., App. A Appendix A to Subpart P of Part 1926—Soil Classification (a) Scope and application—(1) Scope. This appendix describes a method of classifying soil and rock deposits based on site and environmental...

  1. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart P of... - Soil Classification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Soil Classification A Appendix A to Subpart P of Part 1926..., App. A Appendix A to Subpart P of Part 1926—Soil Classification (a) Scope and application—(1) Scope. This appendix describes a method of classifying soil and rock deposits based on site and environmental...

  2. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart P of... - Soil Classification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Soil Classification A Appendix A to Subpart P of Part 1926..., App. A Appendix A to Subpart P of Part 1926—Soil Classification (a) Scope and application—(1) Scope. This appendix describes a method of classifying soil and rock deposits based on site and environmental...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart P of... - Soil Classification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Soil Classification A Appendix A to Subpart P of Part 1926..., App. A Appendix A to Subpart P of Part 1926—Soil Classification (a) Scope and application—(1) Scope. This appendix describes a method of classifying soil and rock deposits based on site and environmental...

  4. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 704 - Model Forms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Model Forms A Appendix A to Part 704 Banks and... Pt. 704, App. A Appendix A to Part 704—Model Forms This appendix contains sample forms intended for... corporate credit union. (8) Paid-in capital is perpetual maturity and noncumulative dividend. I have read...

  5. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 704 - Model Forms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Model Forms A Appendix A to Part 704 Banks and... Pt. 704, App. A Appendix A to Part 704—Model Forms This appendix contains sample forms intended for... corporate credit union. (8) Paid-in capital is perpetual maturity and noncumulative dividend. I have read...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 227 - Noise Exposure Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Noise Exposure Computation A Appendix A to Part... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Pt. 227, App. A Appendix A to Part 227—Noise Exposure Computation This appendix is mandatory. I. Computation of Employee Noise Exposure A...

  7. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 835 - Surface Contamination Values

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Surface Contamination Values D Appendix D to Part 835 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Pt. 835, App. D Appendix D to Part 835—Surface Contamination Values The data presented in appendix D are to be used in identifying the need for...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 835 - Surface Contamination Values

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Surface Contamination Values D Appendix D to Part 835 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Pt. 835, App. D Appendix D to Part 835—Surface Contamination Values The data presented in appendix D are to be used in identifying the need for...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 835 - Surface Contamination Values

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Surface Contamination Values D Appendix D to Part 835 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Pt. 835, App. D Appendix D to Part 835—Surface Contamination Values The data presented in appendix D are to be used in identifying the need for...

  10. 50 CFR Appendix C to Part 622 - Fish Length Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fish Length Measurements C Appendix C to Part 622 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Appendix C to Part 622—Fish Length Measurements ER03JY96.000 Figure 1 of Appendix C to Part 622—Carapace...

  11. 50 CFR Appendix C to Part 622 - Fish Length Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fish Length Measurements C Appendix C to Part 622 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Appendix C to Part 622—Fish Length Measurements ER03JY96.000 Figure 1 of Appendix C to Part 622—Carapace...

  12. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 73 - Reportable Safeguards Events

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reportable Safeguards Events G Appendix G to Part 73.... G Appendix G to Part 73—Reportable Safeguards Events Pursuant to the provisions of 10 CFR 73.71 (b.... (b) Any other threatened, attempted, or committed act not previously defined in appendix G with the...

  13. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 73 - Reportable Safeguards Events

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reportable Safeguards Events G Appendix G to Part 73.... G Appendix G to Part 73—Reportable Safeguards Events Pursuant to the provisions of 10 CFR 73.71 (b.... (b) Any other threatened, attempted, or committed act not previously defined in appendix G with the...

  14. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 73 - Reportable Safeguards Events

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reportable Safeguards Events G Appendix G to Part 73.... G Appendix G to Part 73—Reportable Safeguards Events Pursuant to the provisions of 10 CFR 73.71 (b.... (b) Any other threatened, attempted, or committed act not previously defined in appendix G with the...

  15. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 73 - Reportable Safeguards Events

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reportable Safeguards Events G Appendix G to Part 73.... G Appendix G to Part 73—Reportable Safeguards Events Pursuant to the provisions of 10 CFR 73.71 (b.... (b) Any other threatened, attempted, or committed act not previously defined in appendix G with the...

  16. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 282 - Processing a Claim

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Processing a Claim D Appendix D to Part 282.... 282, App. D Appendix D to Part 282—Processing a Claim (a) Initial Component Processing. Upon receipt... apply for a waiver. (Paragraph (d) of this Appendix explains which claims qualify and the procedures for...

  17. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 636 - Glossary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Glossary D Appendix D to Part 636 National... INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Pt. 636, App. D Appendix D to Part 636—Glossary In addition to the terms listed in appendix D to part 634 of this subchapter, the following terms...

  18. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 125 - Ice Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ice Protection C Appendix C to Part 125... OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Pt. 125, App. C Appendix C to Part 125... conditions as described in appendix C of part 25 of this chapter. (c) Compliance with all or portions of this...

  19. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 202 - Sample Notification Forms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sample Notification Forms C Appendix C to Part... CREDIT OPPORTUNITY ACT (REGULATION B) Pt. 202, App. C Appendix C to Part 202—Sample Notification Forms 1. This appendix contains ten sample notification forms. Forms C-1 through C-4 are intended for use in...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 67 - Computer Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Computer Program C Appendix C to Part... APPROVAL OF STATE NONCOMPLIANCE PENALTY PROGRAM Pt. 67, App. C Appendix C to Part 67—Computer Program Note: EPA will make copies of appendix C available from: Director, Stationary Source Compliance Division, EN...

  1. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 202 - Sample Notification Forms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sample Notification Forms C Appendix C to Part... CREDIT OPPORTUNITY ACT (REGULATION B) Pt. 202, App. C Appendix C to Part 202—Sample Notification Forms 1. This appendix contains ten sample notification forms. Forms C-1 through C-4 are intended for use in...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 66 - Technical Support Document

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Technical Support Document A Appendix A to Part 66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...—Technical Support Document Note: For text of appendix A see appendix A to part 67. ...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart X of... - Ladders

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ladders A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Stairways and Ladders Pt. 1926, Subpt. X, App. A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926—Ladders This appendix serves as a non-mandatory guideline to assist...

  4. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart X of... - Ladders

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ladders A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Stairways and Ladders Pt. 1926, Subpt. X, App. A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926—Ladders This appendix serves as a non-mandatory guideline to assist...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart X of... - Ladders

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ladders A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Stairways and Ladders Pt. 1926, Subpt. X, App. A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926—Ladders This appendix serves as a non-mandatory guideline to assist...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart X of... - Ladders

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ladders A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Stairways and Ladders Pt. 1926, Subpt. X, App. A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926—Ladders This appendix serves as a non-mandatory guideline to assist...

  7. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart X of... - Ladders

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ladders A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Stairways and Ladders Pt. 1926, Subpt. X, App. A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926—Ladders This appendix serves as a non-mandatory guideline to assist...

  8. 31 CFR Appendix C to Part 560 - Eligible Procurement Bodies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligible Procurement Bodies C Appendix C to Part 560 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued..., App. C Appendix C to Part 560—Eligible Procurement Bodies This Appendix C sets forth eligible...

  9. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 24 - Statistical Report Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statistical Report Form B Appendix B to Part 24... ACQUISITION FOR FEDERAL AND FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS Pt. 24, App. B Appendix B to Part 24—Statistical Report Form This Appendix sets forth the statistical information collected from Agencies in accordance...

  10. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Simulation H Appendix H to Part... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. H Appendix H to Part 121—Advanced... ensure that all instructors and check airmen used in appendix H training and checking are highly...

  11. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 14. Appendix I: Communicating with Deaf and Hearing Impaired Patients. Appendix II: Medical Terminology. Appendix III: EMS Organizations. Appendix IV: Legislation (Ohio). Glossary of Terms. Index. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This training manual for emergency medical technicians, one of 14 modules that comprise the Emergency Victim Care textbook, contains appendixes, a glossary, and an index. The first appendix is an article on communicating with deaf and hearing-impaired patients. Appendix 2, the largest section in this manual, is an introduction to medical…

  12. 34 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Appendix I, Standards for Audit of Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Organizations, Programs, Activities, and Functions (GAO) B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 668 Education... Programs Pt. 668, Subpt. B, App. B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 668—Appendix I, Standards for Audit of... required for the practice of public accountancy by the regulatory authorities of the States.” 1 1 Letter (B...

  13. 34 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Appendix I, Standards for Audit of Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Organizations, Programs, Activities, and Functions (GAO) B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 668 Education... Programs Pt. 668, Subpt. B, App. B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 668—Appendix I, Standards for Audit of... required for the practice of public accountancy by the regulatory authorities of the States.” 1 1 Letter (B...

  14. 34 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Appendix I, Standards for Audit of Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Organizations, Programs, Activities, and Functions (GAO) B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 668 Education... Programs Pt. 668, Subpt. B, App. B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 668—Appendix I, Standards for Audit of... required for the practice of public accountancy by the regulatory authorities of the States.” 1 1 Letter (B...

  15. 5 CFR Appendix C to Part 2634 - Privacy Act and Paperwork Reduction Act Notices for Appendixes A and B

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Notices for Appendixes A and B C Appendix C to Part 2634 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT... DIVESTITURE Pt. 2634, App. C Appendix C to Part 2634—Privacy Act and Paperwork Reduction Act Notices for... (the “Ethics Act”) (5 U.S.C. App.) and subpart D of 5 CFR part 2634 of the regulations of the Office of...

  16. 5 CFR Appendix C to Part 2634 - Privacy Act and Paperwork Reduction Act Notices for Appendixes A and B

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Notices for Appendixes A and B C Appendix C to Part 2634 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT... DIVESTITURE Pt. 2634, App. C Appendix C to Part 2634—Privacy Act and Paperwork Reduction Act Notices for... (the “Ethics Act”) (5 U.S.C. App.) and subpart D of 5 CFR part 2634 of the regulations of the Office of...

  17. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H to...

  18. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  19. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  20. Work zone safety analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-11-01

    This report presents research performed analyzing crashes in work zones in the state of New Jersey so as to : identify critical areas in work zones susceptible to crashes and key factors that contribute to these crashes. A field : data collection on ...

  1. California tree seed zones

    John M. Buck; Ronald S. Adams; Jerrold Cone; M. Thompson Conkle; William J. Libby; Cecil J. Eden; Michel J. Knight

    1970-01-01

    California forest tree seed zones were established originally by Fowells (1946), with revisions proposed by Roy (1963) and Schubert (1966). The Forest Tree Seed Committee of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, has revised the original zones and updated the recording system described in the earlier reports. Fowells' (1946) Research Note...

  2. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  3. Longleaf pine site zones

    Phillip J. Craul; John S. Kush; William D. Boyer

    2005-01-01

    The authors delineate six major climatic areas of the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) region. They subdivide these areas into 21 site zones, each of which is deemed homogenous with respect to climate, physiography, and soils. The site zones are mapped and their climate, physiography, and soils described. The authors recommend that plantings of...

  4. Iowa Work Zone Fatalities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    From March through November, the Iowa DOT may have up to 500 road construction work zones, and each of the department's maintenance garages may establish one or more short-term work zones per day. Couple that with the work of cities and counties, and...

  5. Cytoarchitecture of Caudiverbera caudiverbera stage VI oocytes: a light and electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Dabiké, M; Preller, A

    1999-06-01

    The general characteristics and salient features of the full-grown stage VI Caudiverbera caudiverbera oocyte at the light and electron microscopy level are described. The oocyte is a huge cell with radial symmetry and distinct polarity. A black animal hemisphere, rich in pigment granules and containing the nucleus, is clearly distinguished from the unpigmented white-yellowish vegetal hemisphere. The cell is surrounded by a highly invaginated plasma membrane, with numerous microvilli. The cortex underlying the plasma membrane contains cortical and pigment granules, mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and coated vesicles. Cytoskeletal components, such as actin filaments and microtubules, are also found in this region. The predominant structures, distributed throughout the cell, are the yolk platelets, which show a gradient in size with small platelets in the animal half and very large ones in the vegetal zone. Mitochondria are also very abundant in both hemispheres and clouds of these organelles are found in the perinuclear region, frequently associated with microtubules. Developed Golgi complexes are present in the cytoplasm and occasionally, annulate lamellae appear towards the inner zones. The nucleus is a large structure containing numerous nucleoli. The nuclear envelope is highly invaginated, especially at the side facing the vegetal pole. It is regularly perforated by large nuclear pores. Our results show that the structural organization of Caudiverbera oocytes, although similar to that of other amphibian oocytes, differs from them especially concerning the spatial distribution of several structural components.

  6. Effect of uranium(VI) speciation on simultaneous microbial reduction of uranium(VI) and iron(III).

    PubMed

    Stewart, Brandy D; Amos, Richard T; Fendorf, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates whether it will reside in the aqueous or solid phase and thus plays an integral role in the mobility of uranium within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO2(2+) and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO. However, various factors within soils and sediments, such as U(VI) speciation and the presence of competitive electron acceptors, may limit biological reduction of U(VI). Here we examine simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in batch systems containing dissolved uranyl acetate and ferrihydrite-coated sand. Varying amounts of calcium were added to induce changes in aqueous U(VI) speciation. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% in absence of Ca or ferrihydrite, but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (without ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) proceed through different enzyme pathways within one type of organism. We quantified the rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concecentration (0-0.8 mM). The mathematical construct, implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, reveals predominant factors controlling rates and extent of uranium reduction in complex geochemical systems.

  7. Quantifying Cr(VI) Production and Export from Serpentine Soil of the California Coast Range.

    PubMed

    McClain, Cynthia N; Fendorf, Scott; Webb, Samuel M; Maher, Kate

    2017-01-03

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is generated in serpentine soils and exported to surface and groundwaters at levels above health-based drinking water standards. Although Cr(VI) concentrations are elevated in serpentine soil pore water, few studies have reported field evidence documenting Cr(VI) production rates and fluxes that govern Cr(VI) transport from soil to water sources. We report Cr speciation (i) in four serpentine soil depth profiles derived from the California Coast Range serpentinite belt and (ii) in local surface waters. Within soils, we detected Cr(VI) in the same horizons where Cr(III)-minerals are colocated with biogenic Mn(III/IV)-oxides, suggesting Cr(VI) generation through oxidation by Mn-oxides. Water-extractable Cr(VI) concentrations increase with depth constituting a 7.8 to 12 kg/km 2 reservoir of Cr(VI) in soil. Here, Cr(VI) is produced at a rate of 0.3 to 4.8 kg Cr(VI)/km 2 /yr and subsequently flushed from soil during water infiltration, exporting 0.01 to 3.9 kg Cr(VI)/km 2 /yr at concentrations ranging from 25 to 172 μg/L. Although soil-derived Cr(VI) is leached from soil at concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L, due to reduction and dilution during transport to streams, Cr(VI) levels measured in local surface waters largely remain below California's drinking water limit.

  8. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to U(VI) immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, Bulbul; Kennedy, David W; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, Jim K; Isern, Nancy G; Majors, Paul D; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells with minimal EPS, we show that (i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contribute significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; (ii) bEPS can be considered a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at lower initial U(VI) concentrations; and (iii) the U(VI) reduction efficiency is dependent upon the initial U(VI) concentration and decreases at lower concentrations. To quantify the relative contributions of sorption and reduction to U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(VI). We found that, when reduced, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated the reactivity of laEPS, while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, possibly facilitated U(VI) reduction.

  9. Contributions and Follow-Up Activities to CONFINTEA VI (USA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alamprese, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    CONFINTEA VI provided a unique lens through which to view adult education and literacy worldwide. Over 1,000 participants from 144 countries were convened to advance the recognition of adult learning and education as important elements of lifelong learning and crucial to the agendas for international education and development. The aim was to…

  10. Information Technology: Making It All Fit. Track VI: Outstanding Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers from the 1988 CAUSE conference's Track VI, Outstanding Applications, are presented. They include: "Designing DB2 Data Bases Using Entity-Relationship Modeling: A Case Study--The LSU System Worker's Compensation Project" (Cynthia M. Hadden and Sara G. Zimmerman); "Integrating Information Technology: Prerequisites for…

  11. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI in Individuals from Northern Canada.

    PubMed

    Ward, Leanne; Bardai, Ghalib; Moffatt, Pierre; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Trejo, Pamela; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type VI is a recessively inherited form of OI that is caused by mutations in SERPINF1, the gene coding for pigment-epithelium derived factor (PEDF). Here, we report on two apparently unrelated children with OI type VI who had the same unusual homozygous variant in intron 6 of SERPINF1 (c.787-10C>G). This variant created a novel splice site that led to the in-frame addition of three amino acids to PEDF (p.Lys262_Ile263insLeuSerGln). Western blotting showed that skin fibroblasts with this mutation produced PEDF but failed to secrete it. Both children were treated with intravenous bisphosphonates, but the treatment of Individual 1 was switched to subcutaneous injections of denosumab (dose 1 mg per kg body weight, repeated every 3 months). An iliac bone sample obtained after 5 denosumab injections (and 3 months after the last injection) showed no change in the increased osteoid parameters that are typical of OI type VI, but the number of osteoclasts in trabecular bone was markedly increased. This suggests that the effect of denosumab on osteoclast suppression is of shorter duration in children with OI type VI than what has previously been reported on adults with osteoporosis.

  12. 24 CFR 971.11 - HOPE VI developments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HOPE VI developments. 971.11 Section 971.11 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... DEVELOPMENT ASSESSMENT OF THE REASONABLE REVITALIZATION POTENTIAL OF CERTAIN PUBLIC HOUSING REQUIRED BY LAW...

  13. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Region VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report represents a detailed summation of existing workforce levels, training programs, career potential, and staffing level projections through 1981 for EPA Region VI. This region serves the Gulf fringe states of Texas, Arkansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. The specific pollution programs considered include air, noise, pesticides,…

  14. Leveraging Information Technology. Track VI: Hardware/Software Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers from the 1987 CAUSE conference's Track VI, Hardware/Software Strategies, are presented. They include: "Integrated Systems--The Next Steps" (Morris A. Hicks); "Administrative Microcomputing--Roads Traveled, Lessons Learned" (David L. Smallen); "Murphy's First Law and Its Application to Administrative…

  15. 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment Summary: Title VI

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview of the 1990 amendments to Title VI of the Clean Air Act, which were enacted to curb acid rain, urban air pollution and toxic air emissions. The edits to this title deal with stratospheric ozone and global climate protection.

  16. ViPiA: A Project for European Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folinas, Dimitris; Manthou, Vicky; Vlachopoulou, Maro

    2006-01-01

    The Virtual Pre-Incubator Accelerator (ViPiA) is a two-year project funded by the European Commission. The main goal of the programme is to create a training package for would-be entrepreneurs to assist them in developing their new venture concepts to a level at which they become attractive to potential investors. This paper describes and…

  17. AM(VI) partitioning studies. FY14 final report

    SciT

    Mincher, Bruce J.

    2014-10-01

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americiummore » oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.« less

  18. Removal of Cr(VI) from groundwater by Fe(0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yanjiao; Liu, Rui

    2017-11-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by iron powder (Fe(0)) columns of simulated permeable reactive barriers with and without calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Two columns filled with Fe(0) were used as Cr(VI) removal equipment running at a flow velocity of 10 ml/min at room temperature. After 200 days running of the two columns, the results showed that Fe(0) was an effective material for Cr(VI) reduction with an average removal rate of above 84.6%. The performance of Column 2 with CaCO3 was better than Column 1 without CaCO3 in terms of average Cr(VI) removal rate. The presence of CaCO3 buffered the increasing pH caused by Fe(0) corrosion in Column 2 and enhanced the removal rate of Column 2. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of Fe(0) in the three stages of running of the two columns illustrated that the coat layer of Column 1 was a little thicker than that of Column 2. Energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) results showed that the surface of Fe(0) of Column 2 contained more chromium elements. Raman spectroscopy found that all iron oxide was generated on the Fe(0) surface of Column 1 and Column 2 and chromium class objects were only detected on Fe(0) surface in Column 2.

  19. Habitable Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, D.; Lota, J.

    2012-12-01

    The location of the habitable zone around a star depends upon stellar luminosity and upon the properties of a potentially habitable planet such as its mass and near-surface volatile inventory. Stellar luminosity generally increases as a star ages whilst planetary properties change through time as a consequence of biological and geological evolution. Hence, the location of the habitable zone changes through time as a result of both stellar evolution and planetary evolution. Using the Earth's Phanerozoic temperature history as a constraint, it is shown that changes in our own habitable zone over the last 540 My have been dominated by planetary evolution rather than solar evolution. Furthermore, sparse data from earlier times suggests that planetary evolution may have dominated habitable zone development throughout our biosphere's history. Hence, the existence of a continuously habitable zone depends upon accidents of complex bio-geochemical evolution more than it does upon relatively simple stellar-evolution. Evolution of the inner margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations. Evolution of the outer margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations.

  20. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  1. Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Contains a glossary of terms related to endangered species and lists reference books, children's books, audio-visual materials, software, and activity sources on the topics. Also identifies wildlife laws and explains what they mean. An index of issues of "Ranger Rick," which includes articles on endangered species, is included. (ML)

  2. Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Provides a glossary and bibliography which includes a listing of the following: general reference books, field guides, children's books, films, filmstrips, slides, videos, coloring books, games, posters, software, activity sources, where to get more information, Ranger Rick Ocean Index, and a metric conversion chart. (RT)

  3. Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents: (1) a list of 23 questions about mammals (with answers); (2) a glossary with mammal-related words; and (3) a bibliography listing reference books, children's books, audiovisual aids, field guides, activity sources, and mammal-related articles appearing in "Ranger Rick" magazine. (ML)

  4. Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents: (1) a list of 26 questions about deserts (with answers); (2) a glossary with desert-related words; and (3) a bibliography listing general reference books, field guides, children's books, audiovisual aids, charts/posters and supplies, articles and related items appearing in "Ranger Rick" magazine, and other materials. (DH)

  5. Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nature Scope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents: (1) a glossary with astronomy-related words; (2) a list of 25 questions about astronomy (with answers); and (3) a bibliography, listing children's books, reference books, audiovisual aids, posters, activity sources, software, and articles appearing in "Ranger Rick" magazine. (JN)

  6. Mechanisms of chromium (VI)-induced apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Quinteros, Fernanda A; Machiavelli, Leticia I; Miler, Eliana A; Cabilla, Jimena P; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2008-07-30

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is a highly toxic metal. Exposure to Cr (VI) compounds may affect reproductive functions. Due to the importance of anterior pituitary hormones on reproductive physiology we have studied the effects of Cr (VI) on anterior pituitary. We previously demonstrated that, after in vivo Cr (VI) administration, Cr accumulates in the pituitary gland and affects prolactin secretion. In vitro, Cr (VI) causes apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells due to oxidative stress generation. To better understand the mechanisms involved in Cr (VI)-induced apoptosis we studied: (a) whether Cr (VI) affects the intracellular antioxidant response and (b) which of the apoptotic factors participates in Cr (VI) effect. Our results show that Cr (VI) treatment induces a decrease in catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity but does not modify glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Cr (VI) exposure causes an increase of GSH levels. p53 and Bax mRNA are also upregulated by the metal. Pifithrin alpha, a p53 transcriptional inhibitor, increases Cr (VI) cytotoxicity, suggesting a role of p53 as a survival molecule. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) could prevent Bax mRNA increase and caspase 3 activation, confirming that Cr (VI)-induced apoptosis involves oxidative stress generation.

  7. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

    SciT

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.

    2011-06-05

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent uponmore » initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.« less

  8. Diverse functions of myosin VI elucidated by an isoform-specific α-helix domain.

    PubMed

    Wollscheid, Hans-Peter; Biancospino, Matteo; He, Fahu; Magistrati, Elisa; Molteni, Erika; Lupia, Michela; Soffientini, Paolo; Rottner, Klemens; Cavallaro, Ugo; Pozzoli, Uberto; Mapelli, Marina; Walters, Kylie J; Polo, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Myosin VI functions in endocytosis and cell motility. Alternative splicing of myosin VI mRNA generates two distinct isoform types, myosin VI(short) and myosin VI(long), which differ in the C-terminal region. Their physiological and pathological roles remain unknown. Here we identified an isoform-specific regulatory helix, named the α2-linker, that defines specific conformations and hence determines the target selectivity of human myosin VI. The presence of the α2-linker structurally defines a new clathrin-binding domain that is unique to myosin VI(long) and masks the known RRL interaction motif. This finding is relevant to ovarian cancer, in which alternative myosin VI splicing is aberrantly regulated, and exon skipping dictates cell addiction to myosin VI(short) in tumor-cell migration. The RRL interactor optineurin contributes to this process by selectively binding myosin VI(short). Thus, the α2-linker acts like a molecular switch that assigns myosin VI to distinct endocytic (myosin VI(long)) or migratory (myosin VI(short)) functional roles.

  9. 78 FR 72056 - Proposed Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Christiansted, St. Croix, VI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Class D and Class E Airspace; Christiansted, St. Croix, VI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... Class E Airspace at Christiansted, St. Croix, VI, to adjust the geographic coordinates of Henry E..., Christiansted, St. Croix, VI, to bring it in concert with the FAAs aeronautical database. The coordinates would...

  10. 76 FR 18570 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment; HOPE VI Public Housing Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Information Collection for Public Comment; HOPE VI Public Housing Programs: Funding and Program Data... responses. This Notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: HOPE VI program. OMB Control... (Pub. L. 105- 276, 112 Stat. 2461, approved October 21, 1998) and revised by the HOPE VI Program...

  11. 24 CFR 972.115 - Relationship between required conversions and HOPE VI developments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conversions and HOPE VI developments. 972.115 Section 972.115 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... Relationship between required conversions and HOPE VI developments. HUD actions to approve or deny proposed HOPE VI revitalization plans must be consistent with the requirements of this subpart. Developments...

  12. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Citrus viroid VI variants from citrus in China

    Citrus viroid VI (CVd-VI) was originally found from citrus and persimmon in Japan. We report here the identification and molecular characterization of CVd-VI from four production regions of China. A total of 90 cDNA clones from nine infected citrus cultivars were sequenced. The sequence homologies o...

  13. 75 FR 80818 - Funding Availability for Title VI Grant Applications; Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration on Aging Funding Availability for Title VI... Administration on Aging is extending the date for which the Title VI grants applications for the grant period... on March 31, 2011. Funding Opportunity Title/Program Name: Older Americans Act (OAA), Title VI, Part...

  14. Dynamics of Chromium(VI) Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chao; Troyer, Lyndsay D; Catalano, Jeffrey G; Giammar, Daniel E

    2016-12-20

    The potential for new U.S. regulations for Cr(VI) in drinking water have spurred strong interests in improving technologies for Cr(VI) removal. This study examined iron electrocoagulation for Cr(VI) removal at conditions directly relevant to drinking water treatment. Cr(VI) is chemically reduced to less soluble Cr(III) species by the Fe(II) produced from an iron anode, and XANES spectra indicate that the Cr is entirely Cr(III) in solid-phases produced in electrocoagulation. The dynamics of Cr(VI) removal in electrocoagulation at pH 6 and pH 8 at both oxic and anoxic conditions can be described by a new model that incorporates Fe(II) release from the anode and heterogeneous and homogeneous reduction of Cr(VI) by Fe(II). Heterogeneous Cr(VI) reduction by adsorbed Fe(II) was critical to interpreting Cr(VI) removal at pH 6, and the Fe- and Cr-containing EC product was found to catalyze the redox reaction. Dissolved oxygen (DO) did not observably inhibit Cr(VI) removal because Fe(II) reacts with DO more slowly than it does with Cr(VI), and Cr(VI) removal was faster at higher pH. Even in the presence of common groundwater solutes, iron electrocoagulation lowered Cr(VI) concentrations to levels well below California's 10 μg/L.

  15. Detection and Persistence of Vi Antigen in Tissues of Actively Immunized Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Sidney; Currie, Julius A.; Tully, Joseph G.

    1965-01-01

    Gaines, Sidney (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), Julius A. Currie, and Joseph G. Tully. Detection and persistence of Vi antigen in tissues of actively immunized mice. J. Bacteriol. 89:776–781. 1965.—The presence, distribution, and persistence of Vi antigen in mouse tissue was determined by means of active immunization tests with tissue extracts. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with purified Vi antigen or Vi-containing bacilli. At appropriate intervals, animals were killed, and saline extracts of their tissues were prepared. Mice were immunized with these extracts and challenged 6 days later with 10 ld50 of Salmonella typhosa Ty2. Protection was afforded by tissue extracts from Vi-injected mice, but not by normal tissue extracts. That the immunizing capacity of tissue extracts from Vi-injected mice was attributable to Vi antigen was affirmed by the demonstration that these extracts stimulated the production of Vi antibody in mice, coated erythrocytes for agglutination by Vi antiserum, and inhibited agglutination of Vi-sensitized red blood cells by known Vi antisera. Vi antigen could be detected in the liver and spleen of mice injected with as little as 1 μg. In mice given 150 μg, the antigen was still present in liver tissue 231 days later. PMID:14273660

  16. 15 CFR Appendix Vi to Subpart P of... - Special-Use Areas Boundary Coordinates and Use Designations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...)—[Based on differential Global Positioning Systems data] Point Latitude Longitude 1 24 deg.56.83′ N 80 deg.27.26′ W. 2 24 deg.57.10′ N 80 deg.26.93′ W. 3 24 deg.56.99′ N 80 deg.27.42′ W. 4 24 deg.57.34′ N 80 deg.27.26′ W. 5 24 deg.56.83′ N 80 deg.27.26′ W. Eastern Sambo (Research Only)—[Based on differential...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for 2013 and Later Model Years

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... printed on white or very light paper. Any label markings for which colors are not specified must be in black and white as shown. Some portions of the label must be filled with a blue or blue-shaded color as specified in subpart D of this part. Use the color blue defined in CMYK values of 40c-10m-0y-0k, or it may...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for 2013 and Later Model Years

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... printed on white or very light paper. Any label markings for which colors are not specified must be in black and white as shown. Some portions of the label must be filled with a blue or blue-shaded color as specified in subpart D of this part. Use the color blue defined in CMYK values of 40c-10m-0y-0k, or it may...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for 2013 and Later Model Years

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... printed on white or very light paper. Any label markings for which colors are not specified must be in black and white as shown. Some portions of the label must be filled with a blue or blue-shaded color as specified in subpart D of this part. Use the color blue defined in CMYK values of 40c-10m-0y-0k, or it may...

  20. 15 CFR Appendix Vi to Subpart P of... - Special-Use Areas Boundary Coordinates and Use Designations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...)—[Based on differential Global Positioning Systems data] Point Latitude Longitude 1 24 deg.56.83′ N 80 deg... Global Positioning Systems data] Point Latitude Longitude 1 24 deg.29.84′ N 81 deg.39.59′ W. 2 24 deg.29....29.84′ N 81 deg.39.59′ W. Looe Key (Research Only)—[Based on differential Global Positioning Systems...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 268 - Recommended Technologies To Achieve Deactivation of Characteristics in Section 268.42

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .../subcategory Nonwastewaters Wastewaters D001 Ignitable Liquids based on 261.21(a)(1)—Low TOC Nonwastewater Subcategory (containing 1% to TOC) RORGSINCIN WETOX CHOXD BIODG n.a. D001 Ignitable Liquids based on 261.21(a)(1)—Ignitable Wastewater Subcategory (containing TOC) n.a. RORGSINCIN WETOX CHOXD BIODG D001...

  2. Columbia-North Pacific Region Comprehensive Framework Study of Water and Related Lands. Appendix VI. Economic Base and Projections,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-01-01

    with secondary concen t r a t i on in Subreg ions 5 arid 6. The value of production of these crops was about $85 m i l l i o n in 1 1 13 . Dry ...and tile a dj a c en t p o r t i o n of Idaho ‘ north of the Snake Ri’ er. Production of dry field peas is ce n te r e d in t h e I w i n Falls...of dry be ins and peas we re produced and their value exceeded $34 million. The production of livestock and livestock products and p o u l t ry and

  3. Applying vegetation indices to detect high water table zones in humid warm-temperate regions using satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Kaoru; Koike, Katsuaki

    2012-10-01

    This study developed a geobotanical remote sensing method for detecting high water table zones using differences in the conditions of forest trees induced by groundwater supply in a humid warm-temperate region. A new vegetation index (VI) termed added green band NDVI (AgbNDVI) was proposed to discriminate the differences. The AgbNDVI proved to be more sensitive to water stress on green vegetation than existing VIs, such as SAVI and EVI2, and possessed a strong linear correlation with the vegetation fraction. To validate a proposed vegetation index method, a 23 km2 study area was selected in the Tono region of Gifu prefecture, central Japan. The AgbNDVI values were calculated from atmospheric corrected SPOT HRV data. To correctly extract high VI points, the influence factors on forest tree growth were identified using the AgbNDVI values, DEM and forest type data; the study area was then divided into 555 domains chosen from a combination of the influence factors and forest types. Thresholds for extracting high VI points were defined for each domain based on histograms of AgbNDVI values. By superimposing the high VI points on topographic and geologic maps, most high VI points are clearly located on either concave or convex slopes, and are found to be proximal to geologic boundaries—particularly the boundary between the Pliocene gravel layer and the Cretaceous granite, which should act as a groundwater flow path. In addition, field investigations support the correctness of the high VI points, because they are located around groundwater seeps and in high water table zones where the growth increments and biomass of trees are greater than at low VI points.

  4. Effect of phosphate on U(VI) sorption to montmorillonite: Ternary complexation and precipitation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh S.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated. Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This work

  5. Effect of Phosphate on U(VI) Sorption to Montmorillonite: Ternary Complexation and Precipitation Barriers

    SciT

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated.more » Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This

  6. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  7. Speeds in school zones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-02-01

    School speed zones are frequently requested traffic controls for school areas, based on the common belief : that if the transportation agency would only install a reduced speed limit, then drivers would no longer : speed through the area. This resear...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 61 - Appendix A to Part 61

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS Pt. 61, App. A Appendix A to Part 61 EC01MY92.015... awarded; or date by which orders will be issued for the purchase of the component parts to accomplish...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 61 - Appendix A to Part 61

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS Pt. 61, App. A Appendix A to Part 61 EC01MY92.015... awarded; or date by which orders will be issued for the purchase of the component parts to accomplish...

  10. 36 CFR Appendix A to Part 907 - Appendix A to Part 907

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Pt. 907, App. A Appendix A to Part 907 (a) Specific Corporation actions categorically...) Administrative actions and operations directly related to the operation of the Corporation (e.g., purchase of...

  11. 36 CFR Appendix A to Part 907 - Appendix A to Part 907

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Pt. 907, App. A Appendix A to Part 907 (a) Specific Corporation actions categorically...) Administrative actions and operations directly related to the operation of the Corporation (e.g., purchase of...

  12. 43 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Race, Color, or National Origin Pt. 17, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17 The following statutes authorize Federal financial assistance limited to individuals of a particular race, color...

  13. 43 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Race, Color, or National Origin Pt. 17, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17 The following statutes authorize Federal financial assistance limited to individuals of a particular race, color...

  14. 43 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Race, Color, or National Origin Pt. 17, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17 The following statutes authorize Federal financial assistance limited to individuals of a particular race, color...

  15. 43 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Race, Color, or National Origin Pt. 17, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17 The following statutes authorize Federal financial assistance limited to individuals of a particular race, color...

  16. 43 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Race, Color, or National Origin Pt. 17, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17 The following statutes authorize Federal financial assistance limited to individuals of a particular race, color...

  17. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  18. Solidification of II-VI Compounds in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.; Motakef, S.; Dudley, M.; Matyi, R.

    1999-01-01

    This project is aimed at using a rotating magnetic field (RMF) to control fluid flow and transport during directional solidification of elemental and compound melts. Microgravity experiments have demonstrated that small amounts of residual acceleration of less than a micro-g can initiate and prolong fluid flow, particularly when there is a static component of the field perpendicular to the liquid solid interface. Thus a true diffusion boundary layer is not formed, and it becomes difficult to verify theories of solidification or to achieve diffusion controlled solidification. The RMF superimposes a stirring effect on an electrically conducting liquid, and with appropriate field strengths and frequencies, controlled transport of material through a liquid column can be obtained. As diffusion conditions are precluded and complete mixing conditions prevail, the technique is appropriate for traveling solvent zone or float zone growth methods in which the overall composition of the liquid can be maintained throughout the growth experiment. Crystals grown by RMF techniques in microgravity in previous, unrelated missions have shown exceptional properties. The objective of the project is two-fold, namely (1) using numerical modeling to simulate the behavior of a solvent zone with applied thermal boundary conditions and demonstrate the effects of decreasing gravity levels, or an increasing applied RMF, or both, and (2) to grow elements and II-VI compounds from traveling solvent zones both with and without applied RMFs, and to determine objectively how well the modeling predicts solidification parameters. Numerical modeling has demonstrated that, in the growth of CdTe from a tellurium solution, a rotating magnetic field can advantageously modify the shape of the liquid solid interface such that the interface is convex as seen from the liquid. Under such circumstances, the defect structure is reduced as any defects which are formed tend to grow out and not propagate. The flow

  19. Clinical and serological responses following primary and booster immunization with Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Keitel, W A; Bond, N L; Zahradnik, J M; Cramton, T A; Robbins, J B

    1994-01-01

    Clinical and serum antibody responses following intramuscular injection of two formulations of Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide (Vi) were assessed in a double-blind evaluation. Healthy adults were randomly assigned to receive a 25 micrograms dose of liquid (Vi-Liq; n = 182) or freeze-dried Vi vaccine (Vi-Lyoph; n = 55), or placebo (n = 86). Erythema and/or induration > or = 1 cm in diameter at the injection site developed in 13/182 (7%) of Vi-Liq and 3/55 (5%) of Vi-Lyoph recipients (not significant, n.s.). Fever (oral temperature > or = 100 degrees F (37.8 degrees C)) occurred in < 2% of vaccinees. The frequencies of rises of fourfold or greater and of maximal Vi antibody levels were similar in the two vaccine groups. Fourfold or greater rises in serum Vi antibody levels (RIA) developed in 53% of Vi-Lyoph and 60% of Vi-Liq recipients by 1 week (n.s.), and 98 and 93%, respectively, by 1 month (n.s.). The frequencies of adverse reactions and mean Vi antibody levels following booster immunization with Vi-Liq 27 to 34 months after primary immunization (n = 55) were similar to those observed following primary immunization, although subjects given a booster dose were more likely to develop local reactions > or = 1 cm in diameter than those given a first dose (10/55 versus 13/182, p = 0.013 by the chi 2 test). Primary and booster immunizations with the Vi vaccines are well tolerated in healthy adults; mean Vi antibody levels remain significantly elevated for up to 34 months after primary immunization.

  20. Immunization with the conjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇ against Salmonella typhi induces Vi-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Fabio; Ciabattini, Annalisa; Rondini, Simona; Pozzi, Gianni; Martin, Laura B; Medaglini, Donata

    2012-09-21

    Typhoid fever is a public health problem, especially among young children in developing countries. To address this need, a glycoconjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇, composed of the polysaccharide antigen Vi covalently conjugated to the non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin CRM₁₉₇, is under development. Here, we assessed the antibody and cellular responses, both local and systemic, following subcutaneous injection of Vi-CRM₁₉₇. The glycoconjugate elicited Vi-specific serum IgG titers significantly higher than unconjugated Vi, with prevalence of IgG1 that persisted for at least 60 days after immunization. Vi-specific IgG, but not IgA, were present in intestinal washes. Lymphocytes proliferation after restimulation with Vi-CRM₁₉₇ was observed in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. These data confirm the immunogenicity of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ and demonstrate that the vaccine-specific antibody and cellular immune responses are present also in the intestinal tract, thus strengthening the suitability of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ as a promising candidate vaccine against Salmonella Typhi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Vi conjugate typhoid vaccine is safe, elicits protective levels of IgG anti-Vi, and is compatible with routine infant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Thiem, Vu Dinh; Lin, Feng-Ying C; Canh, Do Gia; Son, Nguyen Hong; Anh, Dang Duc; Mao, Nguyen Duc; Chu, Chiayung; Hunt, Steven W; Robbins, John B; Schneerson, Rachel; Szu, Shousun C

    2011-05-01

    Typhoid fever remains a serious problem in developing countries. Current vaccines are licensed for individuals who are 5 years old or older. A conjugate of the capsular polysaccharide (CP) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Vi) bound to recombinant exoprotein A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Vi-rEPA) enhanced Vi immunogenicity and protected 2- to 5-year-olds in Vietnam. In this study, Vi-rEPA was evaluated for use in infants. A total of 301 full-term Vietnamese infants received Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) vaccines alone or with Vi-rEPA or Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid conjugate (Hib-TT) at 2, 4, and 6 months and Vi-rEPA or Hib-TT alone at 12 months. Infants were visited 6, 24, and 48 h after each injection to monitor adverse reactions. Maternal, cord, and infant sera were assayed for IgG anti-Vi and for IgG antibodies to Hib CP and the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis toxins at 7, 12, and 13 months. No vaccine-related serious adverse reactions occurred. In the Vi-rEPA group, the IgG anti-Vi geometric mean (GM) increased from the cord level of 0.66 to 17.4 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay units (EU) at 7 months, declined to 4.76 EU at 12 months, and increased to 50.1 EU 1 month after the 4th dose (95% of infants had levels of ≥ 3.5 EU, the estimated protective level). Controls had no increase of the IgG anti-Vi GM. Infants with cord anti-Vi levels of <3.5 EU responded with significantly higher IgG anti-Vi levels than those with levels of ≥ 3.5 EU. Anti-diphtheria, -tetanus, and -pertussis toxin levels were similar in all groups. Vi-rEPA was safe, induced protective anti-Vi levels, and was compatible with EPI vaccines, and it can be used in infants. High cord IgG anti-Vi levels partially suppressed infant responses to Vi-rEPA.

  2. Enhanced abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) in a soil slurry system by natural biomaterial addition.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Ahn, Chi Kyu; Kim, Young Mi; Yun, Yeoung-Sang; Park, Jong Moon

    2008-12-30

    Among various plant-based natural biomaterials, pine bark was chosen as an efficient biomaterial capable of removing toxic Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. XPS spectra indicated that Cr(VI) was abiotically reduced to Cr(III) in both liquid and solid phases. The Cr(VI)-reducing capacity of pine bark was determined as 545 (+/-1.3)mg-Cr(VI)g(-1) of it, which was 8.7 times higher than that of a common chemical Cr(VI)-reductant, FeSO4 x 7H2O. Because pine bark could completely reduce toxic Cr(VI) to less toxic or nontoxic Cr(III) even at neutral pH, it was used as an organic reductant to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil in this study. Soil slurry system using a bottle roller was applied to ex situ slurry-phase remediation experiments. In the soil slurry system, pine bark completely reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and adsorbed the reduced-Cr(III) on its surface. Abiotic remediation rate of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil increased with the increase of pine bark dosage and with the decreases of Cr(VI) and water contents. In conclusion, pine bark can be used to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil efficiently and environmentally friendly.

  3. Thermal design and TDM test of the ETS-VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaka, T.; Kanamori, K.; Takenaka, N.; Kawashima, J.; Ido, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.

    The Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) thermal design, thermal development model (TDM) test, and evaluation results are described. The allocation of the thermal control materials on the spacecraft is illustrated. The principal design approach is to minimize the interactions between the antenna tower module and the main body, and between the main body and the liquid apogee propulsion system by means of multilayer insulation blankets and low conductance graphite epoxy support structures. The TDM test shows that the thermal control subsystem is capable of maintaining the on-board components within specified temperature limits. The heat pipe network is confirmed to operate properly, and a uniform panel temperature distribution is accomplished. The thermal analytical model is experimentally verified. The validity of the thermal control subsystem design is confirmed by the modified on-orbit analytical model.

  4. Latest NASA Instrument Cost Model (NICM): Version VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mrozinski, Joe; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Fox, George; Ball, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Instrument Cost Model, NICM, is a suite of tools which allow for probabilistic cost estimation of NASA's space-flight instruments at both the system and subsystem level. NICM also includes the ability to perform cost by analogy as well as joint confidence level (JCL) analysis. The latest version of NICM, Version VI, was released in Spring 2014. This paper will focus on the new features released with NICM VI, which include: 1) The NICM-E cost estimating relationship, which is applicable for instruments flying on Explorer-like class missions; 2) The new cluster analysis ability which, alongside the results of the parametric cost estimation for the user's instrument, also provides a visualization of the user's instrument's similarity to previously flown instruments; and 3) includes new cost estimating relationships for in-situ instruments.

  5. ECG-ViEW II, a freely accessible electrocardiogram database

    PubMed Central

    Park, Man Young; Lee, Sukhoon; Jeon, Min Seok; Yoon, Dukyong; Park, Rae Woong

    2017-01-01

    The Electrocardiogram Vigilance with Electronic data Warehouse II (ECG-ViEW II) is a large, single-center database comprising numeric parameter data of the surface electrocardiograms of all patients who underwent testing from 1 June 1994 to 31 July 2013. The electrocardiographic data include the test date, clinical department, RR interval, PR interval, QRS duration, QT interval, QTc interval, P axis, QRS axis, and T axis. These data are connected with patient age, sex, ethnicity, comorbidities, age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index, prescribed drugs, and electrolyte levels. This longitudinal observational database contains 979,273 electrocardiograms from 461,178 patients over a 19-year study period. This database can provide an opportunity to study electrocardiographic changes caused by medications, disease, or other demographic variables. ECG-ViEW II is freely available at http://www.ecgview.org. PMID:28437484

  6. Formic acid interaction with the uranyl(VI) ion: structural and photochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Lucks, Christian; Rossberg, André; Tsushima, Satoru; Foerstendorf, Harald; Fahmy, Karim; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-10-07

    Complex formation between the uranyl(VI) ion and formic acid was studied by infrared absorption (IR) and X-ray absorption (EXAFS) spectroscopy as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In contrast to the acetate ion which forms exclusively a bidentate complex with uranyl(VI), the formate ion binds to uranyl(VI) in a unidentate fashion. The photochemistry of the uranyl(VI)-formic acid system was explored by DFT calculations and photoreduction of uranyl(VI) in the presence of formic acid was found to occur via an intermolecular process, that is, hydrogen abstraction from hydrogenformate by the photo-excited uranyl(VI). There is no photo-induced decarboxylation of uranyl(VI) formate via an intramolecular process, presumably due to lack of a C=C double bond.

  7. Degradation of chloramphenicol by potassium ferrate (VI) oxidation: kinetics and products.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia-Heng; Chen, Kai-Bo; Hong, Qian-Kun; Zeng, Fan-Cheng; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2017-04-01

    The oxidation of chloramphenicol (CAP) by potassium ferrate (VI) in test solution was studied in this paper. A series of jar tests were performed at bench scale with pH of 5-9 and molar ratio [VI/CAP] of 16.3:1-81.6:1. Results showed that raising VI dose could improve the treatment performance and the influence of solution pH was significant. VI is more reactive in neutral conditions, presenting the highest removal efficiency of CAP. The rate law for the oxidation of CAP by VI was first order with respect to each reactant, yielding an overall second-order reaction. Furthermore, five oxidation products were observed during CAP oxidation by VI. Results revealed that VI attacked the amide group of CAP, leading to the cleavage of the group, while benzene ring remained intact.

  8. The new geographic information system in ETVA VI.PE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xagoraris, Zafiris; Soulis, George

    2016-08-01

    ETVA VI.PE. S.A. is a member of the Piraeus Bank Group of Companies and its activities include designing, developing, exploiting and managing Industrial Areas throughout Greece. Inside ETVA VI.PE.'s thirty-one Industrial Parks there are currently 2,500 manufacturing companies established, with 40,000 employees and € 2.5 billion of invested funds. In each one of the industrial areas ETVA VI.PE guarantees the companies industrial lots of land (sites) with propitious building codes and complete infrastructure networks of water supply, sewerage, paved roads, power supply, communications, cleansing services, etc. The development of Geographical Information System for ETVA VI.PE.'s Industrial Parks started at the beginning of 1992 and consists of three subsystems: Cadastre, that manages the information for the land acquisition of Industrial Areas; Street Layout - Sites, that manages the sites sold to manufacturing companies; Networks, that manages the infrastructure networks (roads, water supply, sewerage etc). The mapping of each Industrial Park is made incorporating state-of-the-art photogrammetric, cartographic and surveying methods and techniques. Passing through the phases of initial design (hybrid GIS) and system upgrade (integrated Gis solution with spatial database), the system is currently operating on a new upgrade (integrated gIS solution with spatial database) that includes redesigning and merging the system's database schemas, along with the creation of central security policies, and the development of a new web GIS application for advanced data entry, highly customisable and standard reports, and dynamic interactive maps. The new GIS bring the company to advanced levels of productivity and introduce the new era for decision making and business management.

  9. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  10. Interaction of aerobic soil bacteria with plutonium(VI)

    SciT

    Panak, Petra J.; Nitsche, Heino

    2000-08-22

    We studied the interaction of Pu(VI) with Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 17588 and Bacillus sphaericus ATCC 14577, representatives of the main aerobic groups of soil bacteria present in the upper soil layers. The accumulation studies have shown that these soil bacteria accumulate high amounts of Pu(VI). The sorption efficiency toward Pu(VI) decreased with increasing biomass concentration due to increased agglomeration of the bacteria resulting in a decreased total surface area and number of available complexing groups. Spores of Bacillus sphaericus showed a higher biosorption than the vegetative cells at low biomass concentration which decreased significantly with increasing biomass concentration. At highermore » biomass concentrations (> 0.7 g/L), the vegetative cells of both strains and the spores of B. sphaericus showed comparable sorption efficiencies. Investigations on the pH dependency of the biosorption and extraction studies with 0.01 M EDTA solution have shown that the biosorption of plutonium is a reversible process and the plutonium is bound by surface complexation. Optical absorption spectroscopy showed that one third of the initially present Pu(VI) was reduced to Pu(V) after 24 hours. Kinetic studies and solvent extraction to separate different oxidation states of Pu after contact with the biomass provided further information on the yield and the kinetics of the bacteria-mediated reduction. Long-term studies showed that also 16% of Pu(IV) was formed after one month. The comparison of the amount of Pu(IV) formed during that time period with literature data of the Pu(V) disproportionation, indicated that the Pu(IV) seemed to be rather the result of the disproportionation of the formed Pu(V) than of a further microbial reduction.« less

  11. Biosorption of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions and ANN modelling.

    PubMed

    Nag, Soma; Mondal, Abhijit; Bar, Nirjhar; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The use of sustainable, green and biodegradable natural wastes for Cr(VI) detoxification from the contaminated wastewater is considered as a challenging issue. The present research is aimed to assess the effectiveness of seven different natural biomaterials, such as jackfruit leaf, mango leaf, onion peel, garlic peel, bamboo leaf, acid treated rubber leaf and coconut shell powder, for Cr(VI) eradication from aqueous solution by biosorption process. Characterizations were conducted using SEM, BET and FTIR spectroscopy. The effects of operating parameters, viz., pH, initial Cr(VI) ion concentration, adsorbent dosages, contact time and temperature on metal removal efficiency, were studied. The biosorption mechanism was described by the pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm model. The biosorption process was exothermic, spontaneous and chemical (except garlic peel) in nature. The sequence of adsorption capacity was mango leaf > jackfruit leaf > acid treated rubber leaf > onion peel > bamboo leaf > garlic peel > coconut shell with maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity of 35.7 mg g -1 for mango leaf. The treated effluent can be reused. Desorption study suggested effective reuse of the adsorbents up to three cycles, and safe disposal method of the used adsorbents suggested biodegradability and sustainability of the process by reapplication of the spent adsorbent and ultimately leading towards zero wastages. The performances of the adsorbents were verified with wastewater from electroplating industry. The scale-up study reported for industrial applications. ANN modelling using multilayer perception with gradient descent (GD) and Levenberg-Marquart (LM) algorithm had been successfully used for prediction of Cr(VI) removal efficiency. The study explores the undiscovered potential of the natural waste materials for sustainable existence of small and medium sector industries, especially in the third world countries by protecting the environment by eco-innovation.

  12. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone.

    PubMed

    Zachara, John M; Long, Philip E; Bargar, John; Davis, James A; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K; Freshley, Mark D; Konopka, Allan E; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P; Rockhold, Mark L; Williams, Kenneth H; Yabusaki, Steve B

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 μg/L or 0.126 μmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the

  13. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan E.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steve B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 μg/L or 0.126 μmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (< one pore volume). At the Rifle site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between

  14. Joint Services Electronics Program. Appendix

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    the accu- clude surface waves, creeping waves, multiple racy, convergence, and CPU times for the MM diffractions, shadowing effects , etc. A second ad...Method which is an approximation to the true current J Jn= A /m on the strip. The next section will discuss the - computation of the far zone...to the cavity (0 part of the incident plane wave captured by interior E•,. After a background discussion of the aperture at the open end is divided

  15. Drugs Off Campus. Final Technical Report. Appendixes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    In the 1981-82 school year, the Austin Independent School District used trained dogs and handlers to detect illegal drugs and alcohol on the campuses of two high schools. The appendixes of the evaluation designed to gather useful data concerning program effectiveness are presented here. Data from a survey of staff and students, interviews with…

  16. Appendix C: National Forest System status information

    Diane Macfarlane

    1994-01-01

    The information presented in this appendix was compiled from responses to two separate forest carnivore questionnaires distributed to Forest Service Regions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 10 in early 1993. Each region designated a primary contact to serve on the Habitat Conservation Assessment Management Team. It was the duty of each representative to provide and verify...

  17. 7 CFR 3402.16 - Appendix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendix. 3402.16 Section 3402.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of an...

  18. 7 CFR 3402.16 - Appendix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appendix. 3402.16 Section 3402.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of an...

  19. Appendix B: Methodology. [2014 Teacher Prep Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Julie; Walsh, Kate; McKee, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The "NCTQ Teacher Prep Review" evaluates the quality of programs that provide preservice preparation of public school teachers. This appendix describes the scope, methodology, timeline, staff, and standards involved in the production of "Teacher Prep Review 2014." Data collection, validation, and analysis for the report are…

  20. 7 CFR 3402.16 - Appendix.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix. 3402.16 Section 3402.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE...

  1. Mushy zone modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Smith, Richard N.; Marsh, Steven P.; Kuklinski, Robert

    A key element of mushy zone modeling is the description of the microscopic evolution of the lengthscales within the mushy zone and the influence of macroscopic transport processes. This paper describes some recent progress in developing a mean-field statistical theory of phase coarsening in adiabatic mushy zones. The main theoretical predictions are temporal scaling laws that indicate that average lengthscale increases as time 1/3, a self-similar distribution of mushy zone lengthscales based on spherical solid particle shapes, and kinetic rate constants which provide the dependences of the coarsening process on material parameters and the volume fraction of the solid phase. High precision thermal decay experiments are described which verify aspects of the theory in pure material mushy zones held under adiabatic conditions. The microscopic coarsening theory is then integrated within a macroscopic heat transfer model of one-dimensional alloy solidification, using the Double Integral Method. The method demonstrates an ability to predict the influence of macroscopic heat transfer on the evolution of primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings in Al-Cu alloys. Finally, some suggestions are made for future experimental and theoretical studies required in developing comprehensive solidification processing models.

  2. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  3. Structural and elastic properties of AIBIIIC 2 VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Singh, Bhanu P.

    2018-01-01

    The plane wave pseudo-potential method within density functional theory has been used to calculate the structural and elastic properties of AIBIIIC 2 VI semiconductors. The electronic band structure, density of states, lattice constants (a and c), internal parameter (u), tetragonal distortion (η), energy gap (Eg), and bond lengths of the A-C (dAC) and B-C (dBC) bonds in AIBIIIC 2 VI semiconductors have been calculated. The values of elastic constants (Cij), bulk modulus (B), shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (Y), Poisson's ratio (υ), Zener anisotropy factor (A), Debye temperature (ϴD) and G/B ratio have also been calculated. The values of all 15 parameters of CuTlS2 and CuTlSe2 compounds, and 8 parameters of 20 compounds of AIBIIIC 2 VI family, except AgInS2 and AgInSe2, have been calculated for the first time. Reasonably good agreement has been obtained between the calculated, reported and available experimental values.

  4. Facet-Dependent Cr(VI) Adsorption of Hematite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Hou, Xiaojing; Song, Fahui; Zhao, Jincai; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-02-16

    In this study, the adsorption process of Cr(VI) on the hematite facets was systematically investigated with synchrotron-based Cr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, density-functional theory calculation, and surface complexation models. Structural model fitting of EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that the interatomic distances of Cr-Fe were, respectively, 3.61 Å for the chromate coordinated hematite nanoplates with exposed {001} facets, 3.60 and 3.30 Å for the chromate coordinated hematite nanorods with exposed {001} and {110} facets, which were characteristic of inner-sphere complexation. In situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of two inner-sphere surface complexes with C3ν and C2ν symmetry, while the C3ν and C2ν species were assigned to monodentate and bidentate inner-sphere surface complexes with average Cr-Fe interatomic distances of 3.60 and 3.30 Å, respectively. On the basis of these experimental and theoretical results, we concluded that HCrO4(-) as dominated Cr(VI) species was adsorbed on {001} and {110} facets in inner-sphere monodentate mononuclear and bidentate binuclear configurations, respectively. Moreover, the Cr(VI) adsorption performance of hematite facets was strongly dependent on the chromate complexes formed on the hematite facets.

  5. Monolayer II-VI semiconductors: A first-principles prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hui; Chen, Nian-Ke; Zhang, S. B.; Li, Xian-Bin

    A systematic study of 32 honeycomb monolayer II-VI semiconductors is carried out by first-principles methods. It appears that BeO, MgO, CaO, ZnO, CdO, CaS, SrS, SrSe, BaTe, and HgTe honeycomb monolayers have a good dynamic stability which is revealed by phonon calculations. In addition, from the molecular dynamic (MD) simulation of other unstable candidates, we also find two extra monolayers dynamically stable, which are tetragonal BaS and orthorhombic HgS. The honeycomb monolayers exist in form of either a planar perfect honeycomb or a low-buckled 2D layer, all of which possess a band gap and most of them are in the ultraviolet region. Interestingly, the dynamically stable SrSe has a gap near visible light, and displays exotic electronic properties with a flat top of the valence band, and hence has a strong spin polarization upon hole doping. The honeycomb HgTe has been reported to achieve a topological nontrivial phase under appropriate in-plane tensile strain and spin-orbital coupling (SOC). Some II-VI partners with less than 5% lattice mismatch may be used to design novel 2D heterojunction devices. If synthesized, potential applications of these 2D II-VI families could include optoelectronics, spintronics, and strong correlated electronics. Distinguished Student (DS) Program of APS FIP travel funds.

  6. Observations of O VI Emission from the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kruk, J. W.; Murphy, E. M.; Andersson, B. G.; Blair, W. P.; Dixon, W. V.; Edelstein, J.; Fullerton, A. W.; Gry, C.; Howk, J. C.; hide

    2001-01-01

    We report the first Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) measurements of diffuse O(VI) (lambda lambda 1032,1038) emission from the general diffuse interstellar medium outside of supernova remnants or superbubbles. We observed a 30 arcsec x 30 arcsec region of the sky centered at l = 315.0 deg and b = -41.3 deg. From the observed intensities (2930 +/- 290 (random) +/- 410 (systematic) and 1790 +/- 260 (random) +/- 250 (systematic) photons/sq cm/s/sr in the 1032 and 1038 angstrom emission lines, respectively), derived equations, and assumptions about the source location, we calculate the intrinsic intensity, electron density, thermal pressure, and emitting depth. The intensities are too large for the emission to originate solely in the Local Bubble. Thus, we conclude that the Galactic thick disk and lower halo also contribute. High velocity clouds are ruled out because there are none near the pointing direction. The calculated emitting depth is small, indicating that the O(VI)-bearing gas fills a small volume. The observations can also be used to estimate the cooling rate of the hot interstellar medium and constrain models. The data also yield the first intensity measurement of the C(II) 3s 2S(1/2) to 2p 2P(3/2) emission line at 1037 angstrom and place upper limits on the intensities of ultraviolet line emission from C(I), C(III), Si(II), S(III), S(IV), S(VI), and Fe(III).

  7. Freeway work zone lane capacity.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this report is a capacity analysis of two long-term urban freeway Work Zones. Work Zone #1 : tapered four mainline lanes to two, using two separate tapers; Work Zone #2 tapered two mainline lanes to one. : Work Zone throughput was analyz...

  8. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all <2 mm size fractions but differed for the 2–8 mm size fraction. Micropore volumes, assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data, were also the same for all dry-sieved <2 mm size fractions, indicating a link between micropore volumes and mass-transfer rate properties. Pore volumes for dry-sieved size fractions exceeded values for the corresponding wet-sieved fractions. We hypothesize that repeated field wetting and drying cycles lead to the formation of aggregates and/or coatings containing (micro)pore networks which provided an additional mass-transfer resistance over that associated with individual particles. The 2–8 mm fraction exhibited a larger average and standard deviation in the distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of

  9. Critical Evaluation of State-of-the-Art In Situ Thermal Treatment Technologies for DNAPL Source Zone Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    from steel pipe , copper plate for heating distinct zones and sheet pile. Sheet pile electrodes allow for quick installation with little to no drilling...as electrodes. Electrodes constructed using Thermal Remediation Services - Electrical Resistance Heating ER-0314 18 Appendix B steel pipe are...who authored state- of-the-art descriptions for the most common in-situ thermal technologies currently employed:  Electrical Resistance Heating

  10. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI in cats - clarification regarding genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Leslie A; Grahn, Robert A; Genova, Francesca; Beccaglia, Michela; Hopwood, John J; Longeri, Maria

    2016-07-02

    The release of new DNA-based diagnostic tools has increased tremendously in companion animals. Over 70 different DNA variants are now known for the cat, including DNA variants in disease-associated genes and genes causing aesthetically interesting traits. The impact genetic tests have on animal breeding and health management is significant because of the ability to control the breeding of domestic cats, especially breed cats. If used properly, genetic testing can prevent the production of diseased animals, causing the reduction of the frequency of the causal variant in the population, and, potentially, the eventual eradication of the disease. However, testing of some identified DNA variants may be unwarranted and cause undo strife within the cat breeding community and unnecessary reduction of gene pools and availability of breeding animals. Testing for mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI (MPS VI) in cats, specifically the genetic testing of the L476P (c.1427T>C) and the D520N (c.1558G>A) variants in arylsulfatase B (ARSB), has come under scrutiny. No health problems are associated with the D520N (c.1558G>A) variant, however, breeders that obtain positive results for this variant are speculating as to possible correlation with health concerns. Birman cats already have a markedly reduced gene pool and have a high frequency of the MPS VI D520N variant. Further reduction of the gene pool by eliminating cats that are heterozygous or homozygous for only the MPS VI D520N variant could lead to more inbreeding depression effects on the breed population. Herein is debated the genetic testing of the MPS VI D520N variant in cats. Surveys from different laboratories suggest the L476P (c.1427T>C) disease-associated variant should be monitored in the cat breed populations, particularly breeds with Siamese derivations and outcrosses. However, the D520N has no evidence of association with disease in cats and testing is not recommended in the absence of L476P genotyping. Selection

  11. Fate and transport of uranium (VI) in weathered saprolite

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Young-Jin; Brooks, Scott C.; Zhang, Fan; ...

    2014-11-09

    We conducted batch and column experiments to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios (Rs/w; 0.005, 0.25, 2 kg/L) at pH 4.5 (pH of the saprolite). The rate of U loss from solution (mmole/L/h) increased with increasing Rs/w. Uranium sorption exhibited a fast phase with 80% sorption in the first eight hours for all C0 and Rs/w values and a slow phase during which the reaction slowly approached (pseudo) equilibrium overmore » the next seven days. The pH-dependency of U sorption was apparent in pH sorption edges. U(VI) sorption increased over the pH range 4e6, then decreased sharply at pH > 7.5. U(VI) sorption edges were well described by a surface complexation model using calibrated parameters and the reaction network proposed by Waite et al. (1994). Sorption isotherms measured using the same Rs/w and pH values showed a solids concentration effect where U(VI) sorption capacity and affinity decreased with increasing solids concentration. Moreover, this effect may have been due to either particle aggregation or competition between U(VI) and exchangeable cations for sorption sites. The surface complexation model with calibrated parameters was able to predict the general sorption behavior relatively well, but failed to reproduce solid concentration effects, implying the importance of appropriate design if batch experiments are to be utilized for dynamic systems. Transport of U(VI) through the packed column was significantly retarded. We also conducted transport simulations using the reactive transport model HydroGeoChem (HGC) v5.0 that incorporated the surface complexation reaction network used to model the batch data. Model parameters reported by Waite et al. (1994) provided a better prediction of U transport than optimized parameters derived from our

  12. The prediction of radiofrequency ablation zone volume using vascular indices of 3-dimensional volumetric colour Doppler ultrasound in an in vitro blood-perfused bovine liver model

    PubMed Central

    Lanctot, Anthony C; McCarter, Martin D; Roberts, Katherine M; Glueck, Deborah H; Dodd, Gerald D

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the most reliable predictor of radiofrequency (RF) ablation zone volume among three-dimensional (3D) volumetric colour Doppler vascular indices in an in vitro blood-perfused bovine liver model. Methods: 3D colour Doppler volume data of the local hepatic parenchyma were acquired from 37 areas of 13 bovine livers connected to an in vitro oxygenated blood perfusion system. Doppler vascular indices of vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI) and vascularization flow index (VFI) were obtained from the volume data using 3D volume analysis software. 37 RF ablations were performed at the same locations where the ultrasound data were obtained from. The relationship of these vascular indices and the ablation zone volumes measured from gross specimens were analyzed using a general linear mixed model fit with random effect for liver and backward stepwise regression analysis. Results: FI was significantly associated with ablation zone volumes measured on gross specimens (p = 0.0047), but explained little of the variance (Rβ2 = 0.21). Ablation zone volume decreased by 0.23 cm3 (95% confidence interval: −0.38, −0.08) for every 1 increase in FI. Neither VI nor VFI was significantly associated with ablation zone volumes (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Although FI was associated with ablation zone volumes, it could not sufficiently explain their variability, limiting its clinical applicability. VI, FI and VFI are not clinically useful in the prediction of RF ablation zone volume in the liver. Advances in knowledge: Despite a significant association of FI with ablation zone volumes, VI, FI and VFI cannot be used for their prediction. Different Doppler vascular indices need to be investigated for clinical use. PMID:27925468

  13. Dike zones on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.; Sukhanov, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Venusian dike zone structures were identified from Venera 15 and 16 radar images. These include: a zone of subparallel rows centered at 30 deg N, 7 deg E; a system of intersecting bands centered at 67 deg N, 284 deg E; polygonal systems in lavas covering the structural base uplift centered at 47 deg N, 200 deg E; a system of light bands in the region of the ring structure centered at 43 deg N, 13 deg E; and a dike band centered at 27 deg N, 36 deg E.

  14. Command Flight Path Display. Phase I and II. Appendix F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    AD -R145 858 COMMAND FLIGHT PATH DISPLAY PHASE I AND 11 APPENDIX F / (U) SYSTEMS ASSOCIATES INC LONG BEACH CA RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS DIY SEP...34- (Appendix F) .ś. SYSTEMS ASSOCIATES INC* of CALIFORNIA t. Resource Management Systems Division DTICL it~~~ll ELECTE 1 o..-- , ~SEP 2 4 1984...Availability Codos Avail and/or Dist Special "i j L i 7 7 .... Contained in this appendix are the various plots generated dur- ing data reduction. Parameters

  15. Determination of Cr(III) solids formed by reduction of Cr(VI) in a contaminated fractured bedrock aquifer: evidence for natural attenuation of Cr(VI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is toxic and can be highly mobile in many aquifer systems. Redox reactions with naturally occurring minerals and organic compounds can reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III), forming labile Cr(III) oxyhydroxide precipitates, which is a natural attenuation process. In...

  16. Kinetics of reduction of plutonium(VI) and neptunium(VI) by sulfide in neutral and alkaline solutions

    Nash, K.L.; Cleveland, J.M.; Sullivan, J.C.; Woods, M.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of reduction of plutonium(VI) and neptunium(VI) by bisulfide ion in neutral and mildly alkaline solutions has been investigated by the stopped-flow technique. The reduction of both of these ions to the pentavalent oxidation state appears to occur in an intramolecular reaction involving an unusual actinide(VI)-hydroxide-bisulfide complex. For plutonium the rate of reduction is 27.4 (??4.1) s-1 at 25??C with ??H* = +33.2 (??1.0) kJ/mol and ??S* = -106 (??4) J/(mol K). The apparent stability constant for the transient complex is 4.66 (??0.94) ?? 103 M-1 at 25??C with associated thermodynamic parameters of ??Hc = +27.7 (??0.4) kJ/mol and ??Sc = +163 (??2) J/(mol K). The corresponding rate and stability constants are determined for the neptunium system at 25??C (k3 = 139 (??30) s-1, Kc. = 1.31 (??0.32) ?? 103 M-1), but equivalent parameters cannot be determined at reduced temperatures. The reaction rate is decreased by bicarbonate ion. At pH > 10.5, a second reaction mechanism, also involving a sulfide complex, is indicated. ?? 1986 American Chemical Society.

  17. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor--model application to a field test.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-Min; Schadt, Christopher W; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-04-02

    We amended a shallow fast-flowing uranium (U) contaminated aquifer with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and subsequently monitored the biogeochemical responses for over a year. Using a biogeochemical model developed in a companion article (Tang et al., Environ. Sci. Technol.2013, doi: 10.1021/es304641b) based on microcosm tests, we simulated geochemical and microbial dynamics in the field test during and after the 2-h EVO injection. When the lab-determined parameters were applied in the field-scale simulation, the estimated rate coefficient for EVO hydrolysis in the field was about 1 order of magnitude greater than that in the microcosms. Model results suggested that precipitation of long-chain fatty acids, produced from EVO hydrolysis, with Ca in the aquifer created a secondary long-term electron donor source. The model predicted substantial accumulation of denitrifying and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and U(IV) precipitates. The accumulation was greatest near the injection wells and along the lateral boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors mixed with electron acceptors in the groundwater. While electron acceptors such as sulfate were generally considered to compete with U(VI) for electrons, this work highlighted their role in providing electron acceptors for microorganisms to degrade complex substrates thereby enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization.

  18. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 436 - Goal Setting Methodology

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... limitations; environmental conditions (tropical versus arctic, etc.); budget levels for fuel, operations..., maintenance, engineering, design, and economics, and consideration of the measures identified in Appendix C...

  19. 13 CFR Appendix A to Part 112 - Appendix A to Part 112

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OF SBA-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 112, App. A...—economic injury Small Business Act, sec. 7(b)(4). Other Federal Financial Assistance Women's business...

  20. Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)

    SciT

    CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA; FAKRA, SIRINE C .; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-01

    The speciation and distribution of Cr(VI) in the solid phase was investigated for two types of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) found at two deposition sites in the United States: gray-black (GB) granular and hard brown (HB) cemented COPR. COPR chemistry and mineralogy were investigated using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro-X-ray diffraction, complemented by laboratory analyses. GB COPR contained 30percent of its total Cr(VI) (6000 mg/kg) as large crystals(>20 ?m diameter) of a previously unreported Na-rich analog of calcium aluminum chromate hydrates. These Cr(VI)-rich phases are thought to be vulnerable to reductive and pH treatments. More than 50percent of themore » Cr(VI) was located within nodules, not easily accessible to dissolved reductants, and bound to Fe-rich hydrogarnet, hydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stable over a large pH range, thus harder to dissolve. Brownmilleritewasalso likely associated with physical entrapment of Cr(VI) in the interior of nodules. HB COPR contained no Cr(VI)-rich phases; all Cr(VI) was diffuse within the nodules and absent from the cementing matrix, with hydrogarnet and hydrotalcite being the main Cr(VI) binding phases. Treatment ofHBCOPRis challenging in terms of dissolving the acidity-resistant, inaccessible Cr(VI) compounds; the same applies to ~;;50percent of Cr(VI) in GB COPR.« less

  1. Characterization of U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes on hematite: EXAFS and electrophoretic mobility measurements

    Bargar, John R.; Reitmeyer, Rebecca; Lenhart, John J.; Davis, James A.

    2000-01-01

    We have measured U(VI) adsorption on hematite using EXAFS spectroscopy and electrophoresis under conditions relevant to surface waters and aquifers (0.01 to 10 μM dissolved uranium concentrations, in equilibrium with air, pH 4.5 to 8.5). Both techniques suggest the existence of anionic U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. Fits to EXAFS spectra indicate that U(VI) is simultaneously coordinated to surface FeO6 octahedra and carbonate (or bicarbonate) ligands in bidentate fashions, leading to the conclusion that the ternary complexes have an inner-sphere metal bridging (hematite-U(VI)-carbonato) structure. Greater than or equal to 50% of adsorbed U(VI) was comprised of monomeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes, even at pH 4.5. Multimeric U(VI) species were observed at pH ≥ 6.5 and aqueous U(VI) concentrations approximately an order of magnitude more dilute than the solubility of crystalline β-UO2(OH)2. Based on structural constraints, these complexes were interpreted as dimeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. These results suggest that Fe-oxide-U(VI)-carbonato complexes are likely to be important transport-limiting species in oxic aquifers throughout a wide range of pH values.

  2. Influence of calcium on microbial reduction of solid phase uranium(VI).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M; Wang, Zheming

    2007-08-15

    The effect of calcium on the dissolution and microbial reduction of a representative solid phase uranyl [U(VI)], sodium boltwoodite (NaUO(2)SiO(3)OH . 1.5H(2)O), was investigated to evaluate the rate-limiting step of microbial reduction of the solid phase U(VI). Microbial reduction experiments were performed in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, in a bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 6.8 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased the rate of Na-boltwoodite dissolution and U(VI) bioavailability by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) collectively revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) was a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. Under studied experimental conditions, the overall rate of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) was limited by U(VI) dissolution reactions in solutions without calcium and limited by microbial reduction in solutions with calcium. Generally, the overall rate of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) was determined by the coupling of solid phase U(VI) dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) that were all affected by calcium. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Quantifying Cr(VI) Production and Export from Serpentine Soil of the California Coast Range

    DOE PAGES

    McClain, Cynthia N.; Fendorf, Scott; Webb, Samuel M.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Here, hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is generated in serpentine soils and exported to surface and groundwaters at levels above health-based drinking water standards. Although Cr(VI) concentrations are elevated in serpentine soil pore water, few studies have reported field evidence documenting Cr(VI) production rates and fluxes that govern Cr(VI) transport from soil to water sources. We report Cr speciation (i) in four serpentine soil depth profiles derived from the California Coast Range serpentinite belt and (ii) in local surface waters. Within soils, we detected Cr(VI) in the same horizons where Cr(III)-minerals are colocated with biogenic Mn(III/IV)-oxides, suggesting Cr(VI) generation through oxidation bymore » Mn-oxides. Water-extractable Cr(VI) concentrations increase with depth constituting a 7.8 to 12 kg/km 2 reservoir of Cr(VI) in soil. Here, Cr(VI) is produced at a rate of 0.3 to 4.8 kg Cr(VI)/km 2/yr and subsequently flushed from soil during water infiltration, exporting 0.01 to 3.9 kg Cr(VI)/km 2/yr at concentrations ranging from 25 to 172 μg/L. Although soil-derived Cr(VI) is leached from soil at concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L, due to reduction and dilution during transport to streams, Cr(VI) levels measured in local surface waters largely remain below California’s drinking water limit.« less

  4. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  5. Arid Zone Hydrology

    Arid zone hydrology encompasses a wide range of topics and hydro-meteorological and ecological characteristics. Although arid and semi-arid watersheds perform the same functions as those in humid environments, their hydrology and sediment transport characteristics cannot be readily predicted by inf...

  6. Zone of intrusion study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-15

    The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF) performed an analysis using LS-DYNA simulation to investigate the zone of intrusion (ZOI) of an NCHRP Report No. 350 2000p pickup truck when impacting a 40-in. high F-shape parapet. : The ZOI for the 40-in...

  7. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  9. Crossing Comfort Zones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison, D. Soyini

    1993-01-01

    Offers a narrative based on a real event, in the form of a "docustory," describing that moment when teaching worked--when, in an instructional setting, communication was "perfect" or "excellent." Describes how three very different students, in a course on the cultures of women of color, moved beyond comfort zones while working together on a class…

  10. Reduction of ferrate(VI) and oxidation of cyanate in a Fe(VI)-TiO2-UV-NCO- system.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Kurt; Sharma, Virender K; Lin, Yekaterina; Shreve, Katherine A; Winkelmann, Catherine; Hoisington, Laura J; Yngard, Ria A

    2008-08-01

    The aqueous photocatalytic degradation of cyanate (NCO(-)), which is a long-lived neurotoxin formed during the remediation of cyanide in industrial waste streams, was studied in the ferrate(VI)-UV-TiO2-NCO(-) system. Kinetics measurements of the photocatalytic reduction of ferrate(VI) were carried out as a function of [NCO(-)], [ferrate(VI)], [O(2)], light intensity (I(o)), and amount of TiO2 in suspensions at pH 9.0. The photocatalytic reduction rate of ferrate(VI) in the studied system can be expressed as -d[Fe(VI)]/dt=kI(o)(0.5) [NCO(-)] [TiO2]. The rate of photocatalytic oxidation of cyanate with ferrate(VI) was greater than the rate in the analogous system without ferrate(VI). The possibility of involvement of reactive ferrate(V) species for this enhancement was determined by studying the reactivity of ferrate(V) with NCO(-) in a homogeneous solution using a premix pulse radiolysis technique. The rate constant for the reaction of ferrate(V) and NCO(-) in alkaline medium was estimated to be (9.60+/-0.07) x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1), which is much slower than the ferrate(VI) self-decomposition reaction (k approximately 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). An analysis of the kinetic data in the Fe(VI)-UV-TiO2-NCO(-) system suggests that ferrate(V) is not directly participating in the oxidation of cyanate. Possible reactions in the system are presented to explain results of ferrate(VI) reduction and oxidation of cyanate.

  11. Novel calcium recognition constructions in proteins: Calcium blade and EF-hand zone

    SciT

    Denesyuk, Alexander I., E-mail: adenesyu@abo.fi; Institute for Biological Instrumentation of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino 142290; Permyakov, Sergei E.

    Metal ions can regulate various cell processes being first, second or third messengers, and some of them, especially transition metal ions, take part in catalysis in many enzymes. As an intracellular ion, Ca{sup 2+} is involved in many cellular functions from fertilization and contraction, cell differentiation and proliferation, to apoptosis and cancer. Here, we have identified and described two novel calcium recognition environments in proteins: the calcium blade zone and the EF-hand zone, common to 12 and 8 different protein families, respectively. Each of the two environments contains three distinct structural elements: (a) the well-known characteristic Dx[DN]xDG motif; (b) anmore » adjacent structurally identical segment, which binds metal ion in the same way between the calcium blade zone and the EF-hand zone; and (c) the following structurally variable segment, which distinguishes the calcium blade zone from the EF-hand zone. Both zones have sequence insertions between the last residue of the zone and calcium-binding residues in positions V or VI. The long insertion often connects the active and the calcium-binding sites in proteins. Using the structurally identical segments as an anchor, we were able to construct the classical calmodulin type EF-hand calcium-binding site out of two different calcium-binding motifs from two unrelated proteins.« less

  12. Western Shallow Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California:

    SciT

    Carey, K.B.

    1987-09-01

    The general Reservoir Study of the Western Shallow Oil Zone was prepared by Evans, Carey and Crozier as Task Assignment 009 with the United States Department of Energy. This study, Appendix II addresses the first Wilhelm Sands and its sub unites and pools. Basic pressure, production and assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made by Evans, Carey and Crozier for independent verification. This study has identified the petrophysical properties and the past productive performance of the reservoir. Primary reserves have beenmore » determined and general means of enhancing future recovery have been suggested. It is hoped that this volume can now additionally serve as a take off point for exploitation engineers to develop specific programs toward the end.« less

  13. Am(VI) Extraction Final Report: FY16

    SciT

    Mincher, Bruce Jay; Grimes, Travis Shane; Tillotson, Richard Dean

    This report summarizes activities related to hexavalent Am extraction for FY16, in completion of FCR&D Milestone M3FT-16IN030103027. Activities concentrated on three areas of research: 1) centrifugal contactor hot testing, 2) Am(VI) stability studies, and 3) alternative oxidant studies. A brief summary of each task follows. Hot Testing: A new engineering-scale oxidation and solvent extraction test bed was built at Idaho National Laboratory to allow for solvent extraction testing of minor actinide separation concepts. The test bed consists of an oxidation vessel, filtration apparatus, four, 3D printed, 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors, feed/product vessels, and sample ports. This system replaced the previousmore » 3 stage, 5-cm contactor test bed that was used for the initial testing in FY14. In the FY16 hot test, a feed simulant was spiked with 243Am and 139Ce and treated with 60 g/L sodium bismuthate for two hours to oxidize the Am(III) to Am(VI). This solution was then pumped through a filter and into the four-stage centrifugal contactor setup. The organic phase solvent formulation was 1 M diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA)/dodecane. The test showed that Am(VI) was produced by bismuthate oxidation and the residual oxidant was successfully filtered without back pressure buildup. Sixty-four percent of Am was extracted in the contactors using DEHBA. Both Am and Ce were quantitatively stripped by 0.1 M H2O2. Successful demonstration of the utility of small, printable contactors suggests that hot testing of separations concepts can now be conducted more often, since it is cheaper, generates less waste, and entails much less radcon risk than previous testing. Am(VI) stability: A rigorous examination of reagents was conducted to determine if contaminants could interfere with Am oxidation and extraction. An series of DAm measurements showed that bismuthate particle size, water source, acid quality, and DAAP batch or pre-treatment had little effect on extraction

  14. Evaluation of Ohio work zone speed zones process.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to determine the effectiveness of Ohio Department of Transportation processes for establishing work zone speed zones. Researchers observed motorists speed choice upstream of a...

  15. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Y of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart Y..., Subpt. Y, App. B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Guidelines for Scientific Diving Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this appendix B are identical to those set forth at appendix...

  16. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Y of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart Y..., Subpt. Y, App. B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Guidelines for Scientific Diving Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this appendix B are identical to those set forth at appendix...

  17. Remediation of Cr(VI)-Contaminated Soil Using the Acidified Hydrazine Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yameng; Li, Fangfang; Jiang, Yuling; Yang, Weihua; Lv, Lv; Xue, Haotian; Wang, Yangyang

    2016-09-01

    Acidified hydrazine hydrate was used to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. The content of water-soluble Cr(VI) in contaminated soil was 4977.53 mg/kg. The optimal initial pH of hydrazine hydrate solution, soil to solution ratio and molar ratio of Cr(VI) to hydrazine hydrate for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil were 5.0, 3:1 and 1:3, respectively. Over 99.50 % of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the contaminated soil was reduced at the optimal condition within 30 min. The remediated soil can keep stable within 4 months. Meanwhile the total phosphorus increased from 0.47 to 4.29 g/kg, indicating that using of acidified hydrazine hydrate is an effective method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil.

  18. Research progress in the use of ferrate(VI) for the environmental remediation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J Q

    2007-07-31

    The aim of this paper is to review the research progress of using ferrate(VI) in following fields of environmental remediation: (1) water disinfection; (2) degradation of synthetic organic pollutants; (3) treatment of emerging organic pollutants; (4) oxidation of inorganic pollutants; (5) removing humic substance; (6) wastewater treatment and disinfection; and (7) sewage sludge treatment. Whilst the superior performance of potassium ferrate(VI) as an oxidant/disinfectant for the environmental remediation has been demonstrated in various recent researches, challenges have existed to the implementation of ferrate(VI) technology in full-scale water, wastewater and sewage sludge treatment owing to either the instability property of a ferrate(VI) solution or a high preparation cost of a solid ferrate(VI). In addition to this, there are some fundamental issues which have not yet been studied thoroughly which are crucial for the implementation of ferrate(VI)-these lead to the future research work recommended by this paper.

  19. Genetic Identification of an Enzymatic Se(VI) Reduction Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, N.; Kobayashi, D. Y.

    2006-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae is a biofilm-forming organism that colonizes the subterranean portions of plants. Because of its ability to catalyze the reduction of selenium oxyanions, this bacterium plays an important role in Se(0) biomineralization and Se cycling in soils. Identification of the genes that regulate selenate reductase activity is needed to elucidate the mechanisms employed by this organism to reduce Se(VI). However, the genes in E. cloacae involved in selenium reduction are currently unknown. In this study, transposon mutagenesis and direct cloning techniques were used to identify genetic regions in E. cloacae SLD1a-1 associated with selenate reductase activity. The mini-Tn5 transposon system was used to produce mutants that have lost the ability to reduce selenate. E. cloacae mutants and genomic library clones heterologously expressed in E. coli S17-1 were screened for activity on LB agar supplemented with sodium selenate. The rate of selenate reduction by the clones was measured in liquid minimal media, and the Se(0) minerals formed by the clones were examined using EXAFS, TEM, and XRD. The transposon mutagenesis experiments revealed that mutation of menaquinone biosynthesis genes inhibits selenate reduction. The direct cloning experiments showed that heterologous expression of the global anaerobic regulatory gene fnr from Enterobacter cloacae in the non Se-reducing strain E. coli S17-1 activated selenate reductase activity and the ability to precipitate Se(0) particles. Se(VI) reduction by E. coli S17-1 containing the fnr gene occurred at similar rates as E. cloacae and produced elemental selenium particles with identical morphologies and short range atomic order. These findings indicate that Se(VI) reduction by facultative anaerobes is regulated by anaerobic electron carriers and oxygen sensing transcription factors.

  20. Simultaneous determination of uranium carbide dissolution products by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sladkov, Vladimir; Fourest, Blandine

    2009-03-20

    Separation and simultaneous determination of a number of organic acid anions (oxalate, mellitate, trimellitate and benzoate) and U(VI) with direct UV detection is developed for analysis of uranium carbide (UC) dissolution products by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Reverse polarity mode is used. It is found that complex formation of U(VI) with carbonate, used as a carrier electrolyte, allows U(VI) to be determined, as negatively charged species, in a single run with organic acid anions. Some parameters such as pH value, composition of electrolyte and detection wavelength are optimized. Under the chosen conditions (carbonate buffer (ionic strength of 100 mM), pH 9.8, 0.15 mM tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB)) a complete separation is achieved. Calibration plots are linear in two ranges of concentration for U(VI) ( approximately 1 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-3)), mellitate and trimellitate ( approximately 5 x 10(-6) to 5 x 10(-4)), and about one range ( approximately 1 x 10(-4) to 5 x 10(-3)) for oxalate and benzoate. Accuracy of the procedure is checked by the "added-found" method in standard mixture solutions. Relative standard deviation is within the range of 2-10% and the recovery is in the range of 90-110%. This method is applied for the analysis of real UC dissolution samples.