Science.gov

Sample records for zoology

  1. Launch of Zoological Letters.

    PubMed

    Fukatsu, Takema; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    A new open-access journal, Zoological Letters, was launched as a sister journal to Zoological Science, in January 2015. The new journal aims at publishing topical papers of high quality from a wide range of basic zoological research fields. This review highlights the notable reviews and research articles that have been published in the first year of Zoological Letters, providing an overview on the current achievements and future directions of the journal.

  2. Introducing "Frontiers in Zoology"

    PubMed

    Heinze, Jürgen; Tautz, Diethard

    2004-09-29

    As a biological discipline, zoology has one of the longest histories. Today it occasionally appears as though, due to the rapid expansion of life sciences, zoology has been replaced by more or less independent sub-disciplines amongst which exchange is often sparse. However, the recent advance of molecular methodology into "classical" fields of biology, and the development of theories that can explain phenomena on different levels of organisation, has led to a re-integration of zoological disciplines promoting a broader than usual approach to zoological questions. Zoology has re-emerged as an integrative discipline encompassing the most diverse aspects of animal life, from the level of the gene to the level of the ecosystem.The new journal Frontiers in Zoology is the first Open Access journal focussing on zoology as a whole. It aims to represent and re-unite the various disciplines that look at animal life from different perspectives and at providing the basis for a comprehensive understanding of zoological phenomena on all levels of analysis. Frontiers in Zoology provides a unique opportunity to publish high quality research and reviews on zoological issues that will be internationally accessible to any reader at no cost.

  3. Introducing "Frontiers in Zoology"

    PubMed Central

    Heinze, Jürgen; Tautz, Diethard

    2004-01-01

    As a biological discipline, zoology has one of the longest histories. Today it occasionally appears as though, due to the rapid expansion of life sciences, zoology has been replaced by more or less independent sub-disciplines amongst which exchange is often sparse. However, the recent advance of molecular methodology into "classical" fields of biology, and the development of theories that can explain phenomena on different levels of organisation, has led to a re-integration of zoological disciplines promoting a broader than usual approach to zoological questions. Zoology has re-emerged as an integrative discipline encompassing the most diverse aspects of animal life, from the level of the gene to the level of the ecosystem. The new journal Frontiers in Zoology is the first Open Access journal focussing on zoology as a whole. It aims to represent and re-unite the various disciplines that look at animal life from different perspectives and at providing the basis for a comprehensive understanding of zoological phenomena on all levels of analysis. Frontiers in Zoology provides a unique opportunity to publish high quality research and reviews on zoological issues that will be internationally accessible to any reader at no cost. PMID:15679902

  4. Department of Vertebrate Zoology, NMNH

    Research & Collections About Us Get Involved Calendar Department ofVertebrate Zoology Red-eyed Libraries Staff Contact Us NMNH Home › Research & Collections › Department of Vertebrate Zoology the study of animals with backbones. Research in the department covers fishes, amphibians, reptiles

  5. Zoology by Self-Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Keith; Hammond, Roger

    1976-01-01

    A historical account is given of how a conventional university first-year undergraduate course in zoology has been replaced by a self-instructional one. Advantages and problems are weighed, and successful student achievement and interest are described. (LBH)

  6. Staff Directory, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, NMNH

    Research & Collections About Us Get Involved Calendar Department ofVertebrate Zoology Chestnut Mammals VZ Online Newsletter Visitor Information Research Fellowships Volunteers and Interns VZ Libraries Staff Contact Us NMNH Home › Research & Collections › Vertebrate Zoology › Staff Directory

  7. Contact Us, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, NMNH

    Contact Us NMNH Home › Research & Collections › Vertebrate Zoology › Contact Us Contacting Individual Staff Members: To contact members of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology please go to the Staff page. Most members will be linked to their own webpage that contains contact information, research

  8. Paleontological Studies Integrated into a New Evolutionary Zoology.

    PubMed

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Fukatsu, Takema

    2017-02-01

    Zoological Letters, an open access online journal launched in 2015 is entering its third year of publication, and now seeks to drive new insights in evolutionary and comparative zoology by the inclusion of paleontological studies into its scope.

  9. Holding Together a Multifunctional College Zoology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, John A.; Teska, William R.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an introductory zoology course which includes: (1) lectures organized on the basis of taxonomic relationships; (2) out-of-class reading assignments from nontraditional sources such as magazines; (3) laboratories for microscope analysis and dissection; and (4) a separate self-paced laboratory. (DS)

  10. History of College Zoology Textbooks in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staud, Margaret Crespo

    Studied were the characteristics and changes of textbooks used in college zoology instruction in the United States and the relationship of these findings to the development of college zoology instruction. The authors' professional backgrounds, the textbook audience, and the status of zoology and college education at the time each book was written…

  11. Hospice in a zoologic medicine setting.

    PubMed

    Jessup, David A; Scott, Cheryl A

    2011-06-01

    Forty years ago, Dr. Elizabeth Kubler-Ross in her landmark book On death and dying observed "maybe at the end of our days, when we have worked and given, enjoyed ourselves and suffered, we are going back to the stage that we started out with and the circle of life is closed." Just as human life expectancy has steadily increased over the last 4 or 5 decades, animal life expectancy has increased, including that of zoologic species. With this has come a need for humans to openly and frankly deal with end-of-life issues for themselves and for their animals, including those in zoos. By necessity, zoos have been dealing with problems such as aggressive pain management and triage, and efforts to incorporate end-of-life care into zoologic medicine. But these efforts have yet to include formal acknowledgment that they are a basic form of hospice. Hospice for humans, and now for companion animals, includes much more than pain relief and geriatric care. This article reviews the concepts and basic practices of hospice and the closely related field of palliative care, their relatively recent application to companion animal care, potential applications to zoologic medicine, and the ways this could provide opportunities for personal growth of zoo visitors and staff, including veterinary staff.

  12. Zoological Collections and Collecting in Cuba during the Twentieth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taboada, Gilberto Silva

    1994-01-01

    Traces the history of 20th-century zoological collections in Cuba, and the present whereabouts of Cuba's zoological collections. The historical accounts are divided into two periods: from 1902 to 1959 and from 1959 to the present. A preliminary survey of the nature, size, and current state of these collections is included. (MDH)

  13. A Comparative Study of Students' Achievement in Botany and Zoology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamir, P.

    1974-01-01

    A comparative study of student achievement in botany and zoology based on data of 10 studies conducted in 20 countries. Up to age 14, students achieve better in zoology; after age 14, students achieve better in botany. Based on the findings, recommendations are suggested regarding curriculum planning, laboratory work and the need for specific…

  14. Evolutionary computation in zoology and ecology.

    PubMed

    Boone, Randall B

    2017-12-01

    Evolutionary computational methods have adopted attributes of natural selection and evolution to solve problems in computer science, engineering, and other fields. The method is growing in use in zoology and ecology. Evolutionary principles may be merged with an agent-based modeling perspective to have individual animals or other agents compete. Four main categories are discussed: genetic algorithms, evolutionary programming, genetic programming, and evolutionary strategies. In evolutionary computation, a population is represented in a way that allows for an objective function to be assessed that is relevant to the problem of interest. The poorest performing members are removed from the population, and remaining members reproduce and may be mutated. The fitness of the members is again assessed, and the cycle continues until a stopping condition is met. Case studies include optimizing: egg shape given different clutch sizes, mate selection, migration of wildebeest, birds, and elk, vulture foraging behavior, algal bloom prediction, and species richness given energy constraints. Other case studies simulate the evolution of species and a means to project shifts in species ranges in response to a changing climate that includes competition and phenotypic plasticity. This introduction concludes by citing other uses of evolutionary computation and a review of the flexibility of the methods. For example, representing species' niche spaces subject to selective pressure allows studies on cladistics, the taxon cycle, neutral versus niche paradigms, fundamental versus realized niches, community structure and order of colonization, invasiveness, and responses to a changing climate.

  15. Evolutionary computation in zoology and ecology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Evolutionary computational methods have adopted attributes of natural selection and evolution to solve problems in computer science, engineering, and other fields. The method is growing in use in zoology and ecology. Evolutionary principles may be merged with an agent-based modeling perspective to have individual animals or other agents compete. Four main categories are discussed: genetic algorithms, evolutionary programming, genetic programming, and evolutionary strategies. In evolutionary computation, a population is represented in a way that allows for an objective function to be assessed that is relevant to the problem of interest. The poorest performing members are removed from the population, and remaining members reproduce and may be mutated. The fitness of the members is again assessed, and the cycle continues until a stopping condition is met. Case studies include optimizing: egg shape given different clutch sizes, mate selection, migration of wildebeest, birds, and elk, vulture foraging behavior, algal bloom prediction, and species richness given energy constraints. Other case studies simulate the evolution of species and a means to project shifts in species ranges in response to a changing climate that includes competition and phenotypic plasticity. This introduction concludes by citing other uses of evolutionary computation and a review of the flexibility of the methods. For example, representing species’ niche spaces subject to selective pressure allows studies on cladistics, the taxon cycle, neutral versus niche paradigms, fundamental versus realized niches, community structure and order of colonization, invasiveness, and responses to a changing climate. PMID:29492029

  16. [Zoological diagnostics of soils: imperatives, purposes, and place within soil zoology and pedology].

    PubMed

    Mordokovich, V G

    2013-01-01

    Zoological diagnostics of soils was conceived by M.S. Ghilarov as a part of soil zoology and intended to be closely related to pedology. He considered zoo-agents as an ecological factor, one among many others, of soil formation. Contemporary soil diagnostics pursues mostly utilitarian goals and is based on conservative properties of the stable part of soil substrate. However, it is admitted that these properties are generated by specific combinations of biological, chemical, and physical phenomena that are called "elementary soil processes" (ESP) and occur nowhere but in soils. Certain ESPs are associated with distinctive combinations of biota, including invertebrates. Pedobionts act as producers of detritus and contribute to humus formation, which is necessary for any ESP starting, thus being its active party. That is why animals, being the most complex and active part of the ESP system, may be treated not only as its indicators but also as its navigators. Monitoring and studying of ESPs in soil is complicated because of inevitable disturbance of soil profile natural composition. Zoo-agents, at the same time, can be registered without habitats changing. Taking into account ecological potency of soil invertebrates that participate in an ESP, spectra of their eco-groups, life forms, and results of their activity, it is possible to diagnose a soil state at different stages of certain ESPs development, with their different combinations, and in different regions or parts of natural environmental gradients.

  17. Kingdom Animalia: the zoological malaise from a microbial perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1990-01-01

    Pain and cognitive dissonance abounds amongst biologists: the plant-animal, botany-zoology wound has nearly healed and the new gash--revealed by department and budget reorganizations--is "molecular" vs. "organismic" biology. Here I contend that resolution of these tensions within zoology requires that an autopoietic-gaian view replace a mechanical-neodarwinian perspective; in the interest of brevity and since many points have been discussed elsewhere, rather than develop detailed arguments I must make staccato statements and refer to a burgeoning literature. The first central concept is that animals, all organisms developing from blastular embryos, evolved from single protist cells that were unable to reproduce their undulipodia. The second points to the usefulness of recognizing the analogy between cyclically established symbioses and meiotic sexuality.

  18. [M.S. Gilyarov's Scientific School of Soil Zoology].

    PubMed

    Chesnova, L V

    2005-01-01

    The role of M.S. Gilyarov's scientific school in the development of the subject and methodology of a new complex discipline formed in the mid-20th century--soil zoology--was considered. The establishment and evolution of the proper scientific school was periodized. The creative continuity and development of the basic laws and technical approaches included in the teacher's scientific program was demonstrated by scientific historical analysis.

  19. Critical factors for sustainable food procurement in zoological collections.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Food procurement can play an important role in sustainable food supply chain management by zoos, linking organizational operations to the biodiversity conservation and sustainability mission of zoological collections. This study therefore examines the critical factors that shape sustainable food procurement in zoo and aquariums. Using a web-based survey data was collected from 41 members of the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums (BIAZA). This included information on the sustainable food procurement practices of these institutions for both their human and animal food supply chains, as well as profile information and data on the factors contributing to and inhibiting sustainable procurement practices. Zoological collections operated by charities, and those with a certified sustainability standard, were found to have significantly higher levels of sustainable food procurement. Zoos and aquariums whose human food operations were not contracted to an external party were also found to have significantly higher levels of sustainable food procurement in their human food supply chain. The most important drivers of sustainable food procurement were cost savings, adequate financial support and improved product quality. The highest ranking barriers were higher costs, other issues taking priority and a lack of alternative suppliers. The results suggest that a number of critical factors shape sustainable food procurement in zoological collections in the British Isles. Financial factors, such as cost savings, were important considerations. The significance of mission-related factors, such as charity status, indicated that core values held by zoos and aquariums can also influence their food procurement practices. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Thirty years of the electron microscope investigation in zoology and parasitology in the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences].

    PubMed

    Shatrov, A B

    2003-01-01

    The history of the electron microscope investigations in zoology and parasitology in the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and progress in scanning and transmission electron microscope investigations in this field of biology to the moment are briefly accounted.

  1. Melding Research and Education in a Zoological Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Dustin

    The first zoo was opened in London in 1828 and was intended for scientific study, but was eventually opened to the public in 1847. Since then, public dogma has dictated the development, role, and standards concerning the use of animals across the zoological community. Too often there is disconnect between research programs, captive propagation, and public education. In the fight against human driven extinction of earth's flora and fauna, it is vital that these areas be aligned. Thus in an effort to unite research and education in a zoological setting, East Carolina University (ECU) and Sylvan Heights Bird Park (SHBP) have partnered for a collaborative project involving the study of evolution in the African brood parasitic finches (Viduidae), specifically he Pin-tailed Whydah (Vidua macroura). I attempt to quantify the educational impact of Avian Pirates and SHBP, and assess basic demographic factors that will allow insights into what areas of exhibit design pertain to education. It is important to understand what aspects of zoos facilitate visitor learning in areas of conservation and biodiversity. This is vital as Zoos are under new pressure to substantiate claims of education during visits.

  2. Tropical veterinary parasites at Harvard University's Museum of Comparative Zoology.

    PubMed

    Conn, David Bruce

    2008-12-01

    Tropical veterinary parasites have been maintained by the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) at Harvard University since the mid 1800s. Most of these are maintained by the Department of Invertebrate Zoology, but many vectors and intermediate hosts are maintained by the Departments of Entomology and Malacology. The largest collections are of avian and mammalian ticks (Acarina) that are important as both parasites and vectors. Nematodes are second in numbers, followed by cestodes, trematodes, and several minor helminth groups, crustacean parasites of fish, and protozoan parasites of various hosts. The MCZ directed or participated in several major expeditions to tropical areas around the globe in the early 1900s. Many of these expeditions focused on human parasites, but hundreds of veterinary and zoonotic parasites were also collected from these and numerous, smaller, tropical expeditions. Host sources include companion animals, livestock, laboratory species, domestic fowl, reptiles, amphibians, exotics/zoo animals, commercially important fishes, and other wildlife. Specimens are curated, either fixed whole in vials or mounted on slides as whole mounts or histopathological sections. The primary emphasis of MCZ's current work with tropical veterinary parasites is on voucher specimens from epidemiological, experimental, and clinical research.

  3. Catalogue of the type specimens in the fish collection of the National Zoological Museum, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Enqi; Xing, Yingchun; Zhang, Chunguang; Zhao, Yahui

    2015-05-22

    A checklist of type specimens housed in the National Zoological Museum, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, is presented for research and scientific communication. Included are 80 holotypes, 1 lectotype, 1 neotype, 402 paratypes and 17 syntypes of 99 species belonging to 28 families and 12 orders. With 60 species, Cypriniformes has the largest representation. All of the specimens were collected in China and neighboring countries in the past 90 years.

  4. 50 CFR 15.23 - Permits for zoological breeding or display programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Permits and Approval of Cooperative Breeding Programs § 15.23 Permits for zoological breeding or display programs. (a) Application requirements for... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permits for zoological breeding or display...

  5. 50 CFR 15.23 - Permits for zoological breeding or display programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Permits and Approval of Cooperative Breeding Programs § 15.23 Permits for zoological breeding or display programs. (a) Application requirements for... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permits for zoological breeding or display...

  6. A Study of the Comparative Effectiveness of Zoology Prerequisites at Slippery Rock State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, William Sechler

    This study compared the effectiveness of three sequences of prerequisite courses required before taking zoology. Sequence 1 prerequisite courses consisted of general biology and human biology; Sequence 2 consisted of general biology; and Sequence 3 required cell biology. Zoology students in the spring of 1972 were pretest and a posttest. The mean…

  7. American College Biology and Zoology Course Requirements: A de facto Standardized Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, Frank; And Others

    Without a formal mechanism to produce consensus, American colleges generally have come to agree on what constitutes an appropriate set of course requirements for Biology and Zoology majors. This report describes a survey of American four-year colleges and universities offering biology and/or zoology degrees. Questionnaires were sent to 741 biology…

  8. 19 CFR 10.75 - Wild animals and birds; zoological collections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. 10.75 Section 10.75 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Animals and Birds § 10.75 Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. When wild animals or birds are...

  9. 19 CFR 10.75 - Wild animals and birds; zoological collections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. 10.75 Section 10.75 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Animals and Birds § 10.75 Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. When wild animals or birds are...

  10. 19 CFR 10.75 - Wild animals and birds; zoological collections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. 10.75 Section 10.75 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Animals and Birds § 10.75 Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. When wild animals or birds are...

  11. 19 CFR 10.75 - Wild animals and birds; zoological collections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. 10... Animals and Birds § 10.75 Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. When wild animals or birds are... animals or birds were specially imported pursuant to negotiations conducted prior to importation for the...

  12. 19 CFR 10.75 - Wild animals and birds; zoological collections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. 10... Animals and Birds § 10.75 Wild animals and birds; zoological collections. When wild animals or birds are... animals or birds were specially imported pursuant to negotiations conducted prior to importation for the...

  13. Learning in human-dolphin interactions at zoological facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Diane L.

    This research aimed to better understand learning in zoological settings, particularly learning about marine mammals, by investigating the research question, what do people learn through interacting with dolphins in zoological facilities? Sociocultural situated learning theory, specifically a Community of Practice (CoP) model of learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991), was the theoretical framework. The CoP model allowed for diversity of knowledge, interest, motivations, and goals that existed among the community of animal enthusiasts at three commercial zoological facilities, and also for peripheral to more central types of participation. I collected data through interviews of spectators, visitors, and trainers (n=51), observations (n=16), and an online questionnaire of past-visitors (n=933). Data were coded, categorized, and analyzed based on the National Science Foundation's (Friedman, 2008) and the National Research Council's (2009) frameworks for informal science education. Five principal findings answered the research question. First, all participants gained new knowledge within three broad categories: (a) dolphin physiology and natural history, (b) care and training of dolphins, and (c) conservation. Second, all participants constructed personal meanings by connecting the activity to experiences, beliefs, and practices outside the interaction context. Almost all participants made associations with conservation. Third, most participants shifted their attitudes and gained a sense of personal agency about beginning or increasing stewardship actions. Fourth, visitors learned interspecies etiquette skills; trainers learned skills in dolphin training and management, people management, and teaching. Fifth, visitors had long-lasting memories of the experience that occurred eight months to 18 years in the past. Popular cultural ideas about dolphins and the ways the dolphins were represented influenced visitors' expectations and the types of learning. Potential physical

  14. Insights from Zootaxa on potential trends in zoological taxonomic activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An opinion currently shared by taxonomists and non taxonomists alike is that the work of inventorying biodiversity is unbalanced: firstly, in favour of countries in which taxonomy has been studied for a long time, and, secondly, in favour of vertebrates. In the current context of threats of species extinction, access for taxonomists to biological material and information becomes crucial if the scientific community really aims at a better knowledge of biological diversity before it is severely and irreversibly impoverished. We performed an analysis of 748 papers published in Zootaxa in 2006 and 2007, as well as 434 questionnaires sent to their authors to test these opinions. A generalization of these results to zoological taxonomy as a whole is discussed. Discussion We found that the disequilibrium is not exactly what it usually considered to be. The USA, China and Brazil are currently the three leading countries in zoological taxonomy. Each of them presents, however, a different pattern. Taxonomists from Asia and South America are younger and mainly work in universities, not museums. A bias in favour of vertebrates still exists if we refer to the effort invested in each group to produce taxonomic data, but not to the number of papers. Finally, we insist on the idea that "describing a species" is very different from "knowing a species". Summary The taxonomic involvement of a country, in terms of manpower and funding, appears to be a key factor in the development of fruitful taxonomic research. This message seems to have been understood by the countries that recently decided to increase considerably their taxonomic involvement. It still has to be received by those who did not. PMID:21418568

  15. Pathology in Captive Wild Felids at German Zoological Gardens

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Martin; Beyerbach, Martin; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study provides an overview on spontaneous diseases occurring in 38 captive wild felids submitted for necropsy by German zoological gardens between 2004 and 2013. Species included 18 tigers, 8 leopards, 7 lions, 3 cheetahs and 2 cougars with an age ranging from 0.5 to 22 years. Renal lesions, predominantly tubular alterations (intra-tubular concrements, tubular degeneration, necrosis, intra-tubular cellular debris, proteinaceous casts, dilated tubuli) followed by interstitial (lympho-plasmacytic inflammation, fibrosis, metastatic-suppurative inflammation, eosinophilic inflammation) and glomerular lesions (glomerulonephritis, glomerulosclerosis, amyloidosis) were detected in 33 out of 38 animals (87%). Tumors were found in 19 of 38 felids (50%) with 12 animals showing more than one neoplasm. The tumor prevalence increased with age. Neoplasms originated from endocrine (11), genital (8), lympho-hematopoietic (5) and alimentary organs (4) as well as the mesothelium (3). Most common neoplasms comprised uterine/ovarian leiomyomas (5/2), thyroid adenomas/adenocarcinoma (5/1), pleural mesotheliomas (3), hemangiosarcomas (2) and glossal papillomas (2). Inflammatory changes were frequently encountered in the intestine and the lung. Two young animals displayed metastatic mineralization suggestive of a vitamin D- or calcium intoxication. One tiger exhibited degenerative white matter changes consistent with an entity termed large felid leukoencephalomyelopathy. Various hyperplastic, degenerative and inflammatory changes with minor clinical significance were found in several organs. Summarized, renal lesions followed by neoplastic changes as well as inflammatory changes in lung and gastrointestinal tract represent the most frequent findings in captive wild felids living in German zoological gardens. PMID:26086731

  16. Situating and teaching 21st century zoology: revealing pattern in the form and function of animals.

    PubMed

    Russell, Anthony P

    2009-09-01

    The current challenges (increasing levels of integration in the biological sciences) facing the teaching of zoology and the structure of the zoology curriculum are explored herein. General context is provided and a more focused scrutiny of the situation in North America is presented. The changing emphases in more broadly-based biological sciences programs in North America are outlined, and their influence on the role of zoology as part of fundamental biological training is considered. The longer term impact of such changes in emphasis on the teaching of zoology is discussed, and the central role that zoology can play in dealing with both science content and science education is advanced. Based upon a focal workshop on the future of the zoology curriculum in Canada, a perspective on the challenges facing curriculum evolution is provided. Extensive curriculum redesign is called for to ensure that zoology provides a broad-scale integrative approach to the understanding of biodiversity in evolutionary, ecological and functional contexts. Barriers to, and drivers of change are identified and the need for collaborative approaches to curricular evolution is emphasized. © 2009 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  17. [A catalog of fish specimens preserved within Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences].

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Na; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2013-08-01

    As of 2013, some 178 fish type species and 2131 type specimens belonging to 4 orders and 11 families were currently being preserved at the Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology, located as art of the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. These specimens were collected from across western China, includingYunnan, Sicuan, Guizhou, Guangxi, Hunan, Chongqi, Gansu and Xinjiang. In general, most species are Cyprinidae (71 species and 1103 specimens), followed by Nemacheilidae (52 species and 556 specimens). For the convenience of research and communication, the present paper presents a detailed list of fish type species preserved in the Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology.

  18. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Drougka, E.; Foka, A.; Posantzis, D.; Giormezis, N.; Anastassiou, E.D.; Petinaki, E.; Spiliopoulou, I.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL) and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1) were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred. PMID:26623381

  19. Modernizing Natural History: Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology in Transition.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the twentieth century calls to modernize natural history motivated a range of responses. It was unclear how research in natural history museums would participate in the significant technological and conceptual changes that were occurring in the life sciences. By the 1960s, the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, was among the few university-based natural history museums that were able to maintain their specimen collections and support active research. The MVZ therefore provides a window to the modernization of natural history. This paper concentrates on the directorial transitions that occurred at the MVZ between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the MVZ had four directors: Alden H. Miller (Director 1940-1965), an ornithologist; Aldo Starker Leopold (Acting Director 1965-1966), a conservationist and wildlife biologist; Oliver P. Pearson (Director 1966-1971), a physiologist and mammalogist; and David B. Wake (Director 1971-1998), a morphologist, developmental biologist, and herpetologist. The paper explores how a diversity of overlapping modernization strategies, including hiring new faculty, building infrastructure to study live animals, establishing new kinds of collections, and building modern laboratories combined to maintain collections at the MVZ's core. The paper examines the tensions between the different modernization strategies to inform an analysis of how and why some changes were institutionalized while others were short-lived. By exploring the modernization of collections-based research, this paper emphasizes the importance of collections in the transformation of the life sciences.

  20. Conserving the zoological resources of Bangladesh under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    DAS, Bidhan C

    2009-06-01

    It is now well recognized that Bangladesh is one of the world's most vulnerable countries to climate change and sea level rise. Low levels of natural resources and a high occurrence of natural disasters further add to the challenges faced by the country. The impacts of climate change are anticipated to exacerbate these existing stresses and constitute a serious impediment to poverty reduction and economic development. Ecosystems and biodiversity are important key sectors of the economy and natural resources of the country are selected as the most vulnerable to climate change. It is for these reasons that Bangladesh should prepare to conserve its natural resources under changed climatic conditions. Unfortunately, the development of specific strategies and policies to address the effects of climate change on the ecosystem and on biodiversity has not commenced in Bangladesh. Here, I present a detailed review of animal resources of Bangladesh, an outline of the major areas in zoological research to be integrated to adapt to climate change, and identified few components for each of the aforesaid areas in relation to the natural resource conservation and management in the country. © 2009 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  1. Off to the (Earthworm) Races: A Quick and Flexible Lab Experiment for Introductory Zoology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Paul V.; Fritz, Ann H.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a hands-on, investigative lab activity for use in an introductory zoology course. Tests the behavioral hypothesis that substrate texture affects earthworm locomotor ability. Provides background information on earthworm locomotion followed by details of the lab exercise. (NB)

  2. An Interactive Exhibition about Animal Skeletons: Did the Visitors Learn Any Zoology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Laterveer-de Beer, Manon

    2002-01-01

    Explores museum visitors' understanding of skeleton exhibits and whether such exhibits increase their understanding of the zoology displayed. The exhibition under study focused on the diversity of vertebrae skeletons which were arranged according to the mode of locomotion. (DDR)

  3. Polyacrylamide gel ingestion leading to fatal intestinal obstruction in two birds in a zoological collection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christine L; Bischoff, Karyn L; Hoff, Brent

    2009-12-01

    Two birds from a zoological collection suffered fatal intestinal obstruction after each ingested single particles of polyacrylamide gel. Polyacrylamide gel, used in soils for gardening and agriculture, exists as small granules in the dehydrated state but expands markedly upon exposure to water. Polyacrylamide gel might, therefore, be an unrecognized hazard for captive and wild birds and other small animals if consumed.

  4. "Do Giraffes Ever Sit?": A Study of Visitor Perceptions at the National Zoological Park, Smithsonian Institution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Robert L.; Tymitz, Barbara L.

    This study explores why people come to the National Zoological Park, the value of their visit, what they learn, and how the overall experience of visiting the zoo affects them. The study was undertaken over six months. It is part of a series to evaluate how various bureaus of the Smithsonian Institutions influence the public through their diverse…

  5. Museum of Comparative Zoology Library--The Agassiz Library: Harvard University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Eva S.; Regen, Shari S.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the Museum of Comparative Zoology Library reflects the union between the nineteenth century natural history values of Louis Agassiz and the twentieth century library and information science methodology. Special collections, records, cataloging and classification, serials and their classification, policies, services, and procedures are…

  6. Viktor Hamburger's Department of Zoology in the 1940s: a student perspective.

    PubMed

    Wenger, B S; Wenger, E

    2001-04-01

    Eleanor and Byron Wenger were graduate students in the Department of Zoology in the 1940s. Both took several courses with Viktor, and he was thesis advisor for both of us. We have attempted to provide a summary of life in the department from a student perspective as well as our impression of Viktor's style of mentoring and guiding student research and education.

  7. The Effect of General Objectives Defined by Behavioral Objectives on Achievement in a College Zoology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushin, John W.; Baller, William

    1981-01-01

    Tests the effect of developmental level objectives on student achievement and efficiency in a zoology course. These objectives were found to have no significant effect on achievement, but they did significantly increase student efficiency in learning the content material of the module. (Author)

  8. Zoology Students' Experiences of Collaborative Enquiry in Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Tony

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an action-research case study that focuses on experiences of collaboration in a problem-based learning (PBL) course in Zoology. Our PBL model was developed as a research activity in partnership with a commercial organisation. Consequently, learning was grounded in genuine situations of practice in which a high degree of…

  9. The Relationship between College Zoology Students' Beliefs about Evolutionary Theory and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Anne; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Researchers administered surveys to college zoology students prior to, and immediately following a study of evolutionary theory, to assess their understanding and acceptance of evidence supporting the theory. Results showed students had many misconceptions about the theory. Their beliefs interfered with their ability to objectively view scientific…

  10. [Live Animals and Staged Nature : Drawing and Photography in German Popular Zoology between 1860 and 1910].

    PubMed

    Gall, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    It is the central thesis of this paper that the "biological perspective" (Lynn Nyhart) typical for Germany, with its interest in living animals, not only influenced natural history practices in many ways during the second half of the 19th century, rather also shaped the illustrations of popular zoology publications, as for example those in Brehms Thierleben. The illustrators of this period preferred to use live animals as models, which they studied in zoos. These animals were often depicted in their "natural" habitats. Since the illustrators knew only very little about these habitats, they had to be imagined. Another fashionable genre within popular zoology was the portrayal of animals fighting, which attracted attention because of their drama. The first wildlife photographers oriented themselves on the zoological illustrations and, with the aid of manipulation, staging and retouching, gave their photographs the impression of natural surroundings and drama. Yet both the illustrators and the photographers emphasized their truth to nature and - based on this - the scientific value of their pictures. In so doing, they developed a "biological" kind of wildlife photography, which, after the turn of the 19th century, allowed dedicated amateurs to create a popular zoological oeuvre that was well received by broad audiences.

  11. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds. 93.104 Section 93.104 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN...

  12. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds. 93.104 Section 93.104 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN...

  13. Effects of the Teacher's Background on Teaching and Students' Achievement in Botany and Zoology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamir, P.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of certain teacher background variables to their attitudes priorities, expectations, and instructional practices regarding botany and zoology was investigated. Teachers were grouped into three categories: botanists, zoologists, and neutrals; the academic achievement of the students of the teachers in the three categories was…

  14. "Lansania Journal of Arachnology and Zoology" - a rare and obscure Japanese natural history journal.

    PubMed

    Tennent, W John; Yasuda, Masatoshi; Morimoto, Katsura

    2008-01-01

    Publication data relating to a rare and obscure Japanese journal "Lansania Journal of Arachnology and Zoology" (1929-1941) are examined. Available facts, together with a substantial body of circumstantial and anecdotal evidence suggest that many planned issues, including several cited by independent sources as having been published, were not published. Some biographical data relating to the editor, Kyukichi Kishida (1888-1968), are provided. Titles of all papers known to have been published in "Lansania," with page numbers and claimed publication dates are presented, together with a list of 113 new zoological names proposed in the journal. Known library holdings of the journal worldwide are indicated. Details are provided of unpublished manuscripts in proof obtained from Kishida in the 1960s. The strong probability that some printed publication dates are inaccurate is discussed in detail.

  15. Movement to curtail animal dissections in zoology curriculum: review of the Indian experience.

    PubMed

    Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2007-01-01

    Animal dissections have been dropped from the curriculum in several developed countries, and virtual laboratories are taking their place, or at least the concept of the "three R's" is becoming accepted. Yet, the scenario in the developing countries in this regard has been dismal. However, recently, a movement has started in India in this area, thanks to the aggressive approach of PfA, I-CARE and InterNICHE, supported by a few zoology educators and policy makers, who joined this movement as freelancers. The aggressive campaigners against animal dissections put up convincing arguments to the orthodox zoology educators and higher education planners with such veracity that the arguments cannot be ignored. The arguments, to be presented in detail at the conference, and the campaign have been rewarded with success such that a few universities and autonomous colleges have revamped their zoology curricula so as to dispense with or reduce animal dissections. The Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India, has been the trendsetter, evolving what is known as the "Bharathidasan University Model". A memorandum from I-CARE and PfA to the University Grants Commission, Government of India, New Delhi, was sent out by the UGC to the universities with a request to consider the points positively. However, there is still a need to bring about an attitudinal change in the zoology educators and higher education planners such that they participate willingly in this endeavour. The role-players at all levels are identified and approached with a language that is understandable to each and are adequately supported by hands-on training in the alternative methods. Ultimately, the responsibility in this regard lies with the educators themselves, since they are the ones who, working in the academic committees that design the curricula, can cut down on the requirement for dissections.

  16. Additional dates of Sir Andrew Smith's Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Low, Martyn E Y; Evenhuis, Neal L

    2014-05-14

    We update the collation of the dates of publication of Smith's Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa provided by Waterhouse (1880) and Barnard (1950, 1952). In the case of nine parts, we are able to provide more accurate dates of publication (including day-dates for seven of these parts). For workers of invertebrate taxonomy, we provide an accurate date of publication for W. S. Macleay's volume on Annulosa. 

  17. The List of Available Names (LAN): A new generation for stable taxonomic names in zoology?

    PubMed

    Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A; Fautin, Daphne Gail; Michel, Ellinor

    2016-01-01

    The List of Available Names in Zoology (LAN) is an inventory of names with specific scope in time and content, presented and approved in parts, and constituted as a cumulative index of names available for use in zoological nomenclature. It was defined in Article 79 in the fourth edition of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. The LAN is likely to gain importance with the development of the online Official Registry for Zoological Nomenclature (ZooBank) as it is potentially a source of many nomenclaturally certified names. Article 79 describes the deliberative process for adding large numbers of names to the LAN simultaneously, detailing steps and chronology for submission of a candidate Part to the LAN and consideration of a candidate Part by the public and Commission, but it is largely mute about the contents of a candidate Part. It does make clear that a name within the scope of a Part but not on the LAN has no nomenclatural standing, even if it had previously been considered available, thereby preventing long-forgotten names from displacing accepted ones and the accumulation of nomina dubia. Thus, for taxa on the LAN, nomenclatural archaeology - the resurrecting of old unused names to replace by priority names in current usage - will not be worthwhile. Beyond that, it has been unclear if Article 79 is intended to document every available name known within the scope of the Part, or if its intention is to pare the inventory of available names within the scope of the Part. Consideration by the Commission and two committees to deal with the LAN have defined steps to implement Article 79 with the latter intent. Procedures for consideration of a candidate Part are defined in a manual, published as an appendix in this volume.

  18. The Plymouth Laboratory and the institutionalization of experimental zoology in Britain in the 1920s.

    PubMed

    Erlingsson, Steindór J

    2009-01-01

    The Plymouth Laboratory of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom (1884) was founded in 1888. In addition to conducting morphological and other biological research, the founders of the laboratory aimed at promoting research in experimental zoology which will be used in this paper as a synonym for e.g. experimental embryology, comparative physiology or general physiology. This dream was not fully realized until 1920. The Great War and its immediate aftermath had a positive impact on the development of the Plymouth Laboratory. The war greatly upset the operation of the Zoological Station in Naples and the ensuing crisis in its operations was closely related to the establishment of the physiological department in Plymouth in 1920. Two other key factors in the Plymouth story were the establishment of the Development Fund in 1909, which began contributing funds to the Plymouth Laboratory in 1912, and the patronage of the Cambridge zoologist George P. Bidder (1863-1954). This paper will focus on the combined influence of the Development Fund and Bidder on the development of the Plymouth Laboratory from around 1902 through the early 1920s, and the important role the laboratory played in promoting experimental zoology in Britain in the 1920s.

  19. Antibiotic resistance in conjunctival and enteric bacterial flora in raptors housed in a zoological garden.

    PubMed

    Sala, Andrea; Taddei, Simone; Santospirito, Davide; Sandri, Camillo; Magnone, William; Cabassi, Clotilde S

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in a wide range of infectious agents is a growing public health threat. Birds of prey are considered indicators of the presence of AMR bacteria in their ecosystem because of their predatory behaviour. Only few data are reported in the literature on AMR strains isolated from animals housed in zoos and none about AMR in raptors housed in zoological gardens. This study investigated the antibiotic sensitivity profile of the isolates obtained from the conjunctival and cloacal bacterial flora of 14 healthy birds of prey, 6 Accipitriformes , 3 Falconiformes and 5 Strigiformes , housed in an Italian zoological garden. Staphylococcus spp. was isolated from 50% of the conjunctival swabs, with S. xylosus as the most common species. From cloacal swabs, Escherichia coli was cultured from all animals, while Klebsiella spp. and Proteus spp. were isolated from a smaller number of birds. Worthy of note is the isolation of Escherichia fergusonii and Serratia odorifera , rarely isolated from raptors. Staphylococci were also isolated. All the isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR). To the author's knowledge, this is the first report regarding the presence of MDR strains within raptors housed in a zoological garden. Since resistance genes can be transferred to other pathogenic bacteria, this represents a potential hazard for the emergence of new MDR pathogens. In conclusion, the obtained data could be useful for ex-situ conservation programmes aimed to preserve the health of the endangered species housed in a zoo.

  20. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, David R.

    2018-01-01

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  1. Which Wild Aardvarks Are Most Suitable for Outdoor Enclosures in Zoological Gardens in the European Union?

    PubMed

    Patoka, Jiří; Vejtrubová, Markéta; Vrabec, Vladimír; Masopustová, Renata

    2018-01-01

    The aardvark is popular in many zoological gardens in the European Union. These creatures are nocturnal, and aardvarks in the wild are known to walk distances of 4 km to 7 km per night. Despite what is known about their biology, most aardvarks are kept in zoological gardens in indoor enclosures with little space for movement. This lack of space leads to a tendency toward obesity and compromised welfare. With their wide distribution in Sub-Saharan Africa, aardvarks are perceived as thermophilic nonhuman animals. Nevertheless, some records suggest they may be able to adapt to colder climates and can be active outside their burrows when temperatures fall to 2°C. These findings suggest there may be a wild African population that is suitable for partial outdoor keeping under European climatic conditions. Therefore, a climate match was computed between the source area with aardvark occurrence and a target area of the European Union. Data revealed that the Free State, a South African province, was the area with the best climate similarity, and aardvarks from this area are recommended as suitable for the aforementioned purpose.

  2. Authoritative Images. The Kiwi and the Transactions of the Zoological Society of London.

    PubMed

    Canadelli, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The first exemplar of a kiwi, the wingless bird of New Zealand, arrived in the form of a lifeless specimen in Europe in 1812. A debate was sparked over the appearance and nature of this strange creature and indeed whether it actually existed. In 1833 the Transactions of the Zoological Society of London entered the debate and the illustrations published in this journal contributed greatly to the acceptance and further study of the kiwi. Some of the most eminent British zoologists and anatomists of the time were involved, from William Yarrell to Richard Owen, and from John Gould to Abraham Dee Bartlett. This crucial period in the discussion, which would extend over two decades and would only be brought to a close with the arrival of the first living specimen in the London Zoological Garden in 1851, will be analyzed based on a detailed examination of the reports published in the Transactions and other journals. This essay will show how images of the bird were produced and used by zoologists during different stages in the early research on the bird and how these figures circulated inside and outside the zoologists' community.

  3. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks.

    PubMed

    Perkins, David R

    2018-01-01

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  4. The return of the phoenix: the 1963 International Congress of Zoology and American zoologists in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the International Congress of Zoology held in Washington D.C. in 1963 as a portrait of American zoologists' search for effective and rewarding relationships with both each other and the public. Organizers of the congress envisioned the congress as a last ditch effort to unify the disparate subdisciplines of zoology, overcome the barriers of specialization, and ward off the heady claims of more reductionist biologists. The problems zoologists faced as they worked to fulfill these ambitious goals illuminate some of the challenges faced by members of the naturalist tradition as they worked to establish disciplinary unity while seeking public support in the competitive world of twentieth century science.

  5. [The zoological garden of Amsterdam Natura Artis Magistra during world War II].

    PubMed

    Frankenhuis, Maarten Th

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to the wise management of its director, dr. Armand Sunier, and his team, 'Artis' survived the difficult war period without great losses of its animals and only material damage to some buildings. Artis has meant very much for the inhabitants of the city of Amsterdam during the war. In the first place for the employees and their families, that were kept for starvation and forced labour by extra rations of food and safe hiding places. But also for jewish persons in hiding, who could escape from a certain death by hiding in animal houses or other buildings in the garden. And also for hundreds of thousands people of Amsterdam who found in their zoological garden an oasis of relaxation in a town full of threat and violence.

  6. Real Time Analysis of Bioanalytes in Healthcare, Food, Zoology and Botany

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianqi; Ramnarayanan, Ashwin

    2017-01-01

    The growing demand for real time analysis of bioanalytes has spurred development in the field of wearable technology to offer non-invasive data collection at a low cost. The manufacturing processes for creating these sensing systems vary significantly by the material used, the type of sensors needed and the subject of study as well. The methods predominantly involve stretchable electronic sensors to monitor targets and transmit data mainly through flexible wires or short-range wireless communication devices. Capable of conformal contact, the application of wearable technology goes beyond the healthcare to fields of food, zoology and botany. With a brief review of wearable technology and its applications to various fields, we believe this mini review would be of interest to the reader in broad fields of materials, sensor development and areas where wearable sensors can provide data that are not available elsewhere. PMID:29267256

  7. Real Time Analysis of Bioanalytes in Healthcare, Food, Zoology and Botany.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianqi; Ramnarayanan, Ashwin; Cheng, Huanyu

    2017-12-21

    The growing demand for real time analysis of bioanalytes has spurred development in the field of wearable technology to offer non-invasive data collection at a low cost. The manufacturing processes for creating these sensing systems vary significantly by the material used, the type of sensors needed and the subject of study as well. The methods predominantly involve stretchable electronic sensors to monitor targets and transmit data mainly through flexible wires or short-range wireless communication devices. Capable of conformal contact, the application of wearable technology goes beyond the healthcare to fields of food, zoology and botany. With a brief review of wearable technology and its applications to various fields, we believe this mini review would be of interest to the reader in broad fields of materials, sensor development and areas where wearable sensors can provide data that are not available elsewhere.

  8. The Relationship Between College Zoology Students' Religious Beliefs and Their Ability to Objectively View the Scientific Evidence Supporting Evolutionary Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Anne; Baldwin, Beatrice

    An anonymous 12-item, multiple-choice questionnaire was administered to 218 southern college, introductory zoology students prior to and following a study of evolutionary theory to assess their understanding and acceptance of the credibility of the evidence supporting the theory. Key topics addressed were the history of evolutionary thought, basic…

  9. Member Perceptions of the One Health Initiative at a Zoological Institution

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Hannah; Niedbalski, Amy; Tate, Erin; Deem, Sharon L.

    2018-01-01

    Zoological institutions play an important role in promoting the goals of the One Health movement. We launched the Institute for Conservation Medicine (ICM) at the Saint Louis Zoo in 2011 to advance the goals of One Health. In 2016, we distributed a survey to Zoo members to evaluate member awareness and understanding of One Health and to provide direction for future communication and actions from the ICM. We hypothesized that Zoo members would be aware of One Health and care about infectious disease issues. Survey results showed Zoo members primarily cared about chronic, non-infectious diseases and their associated economic costs, with participants ranking their top three health issues of concern for humans as nutrition/obesity/diet (49%), costs of health care (48%), and cancer (37%). Zoo members were interested in the roles of zoos in One Health and found them important, but were less aware of the Saint Louis Zoo’s actions that did not directly relate to animal welfare. Only 6% of members had awareness of the term “One Health” and 16% were aware of the term “Conservation Medicine.” These results suggest that zoos may do better to tailor One Health messaging to align with member interests. Messaging and programming from the Saint Louis Zoo will now include the direct benefits to human health that zoos offer, in addition to the ICM’s more ecologically focused activities. This study offered valuable insight into how Zoo members view One Health and may serve as a template to help zoological institutions develop and promote One Health. PMID:29536015

  10. Teacher experiences in the use of the "Zoology Zone" multimedia resource in elementary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Lynne Darlene

    This interpretive research study explored the experiences of teachers with the use of the Zoology Zone multimedia resource in teaching grade three science. Four generalist teachers used the multimedia resource in the teaching of the Animal Life Cycle topic from the Alberta grade three science program. The experiences of the teachers were examined through individual interviews, classroom visits and group interviews. Three dimensions of the study, as they related to elementary science teaching using the Zoology Zone multimedia resource were examined: (a) technology as a teaching resource, (b) science education and constructivist theory, and (c) teacher learning. In the area of planning for instruction, the teachers found that using the multimedia resource demanded more time and effort than using non-computer resources because of the dependence teachers had on others for ensuring access to computer labs and setting up the multimedia resource to run on school computers. The teachers felt there was value in giving students the opportunity to independently explore the multimedia resource because it captured their attention, included appropriate content, and was designed so that students could navigate through the teaming activities easily and make choices about how to proceed with their own learning. Despite the opportunities for student directed learning, the teachers found that it was also necessary to include some teacher directed learning to ensure that students were learning the mandated curriculum. As the study progressed, it became evident that the teachers valued the social dimensions of learning by making it a priority to include lessons that encouraged student to student interaction, student to teacher interaction, small group and whole class discussion, and peer teaching. When students were engaged with the multimedia resource, the teacher facilitated learning by circulating to each student and discussing student findings. Teachers focussed primarily on the

  11. [EXPERIENCE IN THE APPLICATION OF DATABASES ON BLOODSUCKING INSECTS IN ZOOLOGICAL STUDIES].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, S G; Khalikov, R G

    2016-01-01

    The paper summarizes long-term experience of accumulating and summarizing the faunistic information by means of separate databases (DB) and information analytical systems (IAS), and also prospects of its representation by modern multi-user informational systems. The experience obtained during development and practical use of the PARHOST1 IAS for the study of the world flea fauna and work with personal databases created for the study of bloodsucking insects (lice and blackflies) is analyzed. Research collection material on type series of 57 species and subspecies of fleas of the fauna of Russia was approved as a part of multi-user information retrieval system on the web-portal of the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. According former investigations, the system allows depositing the information in the authentic form and performing its gradual transformation, i. e. its unification and structuring. In order to provide continuity of DB refill, the possibility of work of operators with different degree of competence is provided.

  12. Isolation of Ovicidal Fungi from Fecal Samples of Captive Animals Maintained in a Zoological Park.

    PubMed

    Hernández, José A; Vázquez-Ruiz, Rosa A; Cazapal-Monteiro, Cristiana F; Valderrábano, Esther; Arroyo, Fabián L; Francisco, Iván; Miguélez, Silvia; Sánchez-Andrade, Rita; Paz-Silva, Adolfo; Arias, María S

    2017-06-02

    Abstract : There are certain saprophytic fungi in the soil able to develop an antagonistic effect against eggs of parasites. Some of these fungal species are ingested by animals during grazing, and survive in their feces after passing through the digestive tract. To identify and isolate ovicidal fungi in the feces of wild captive animals, a total of 60 fecal samples were taken from different wild animals kept captive in the Marcelle Natureza Zoological Park (Lugo, Spain). After the serial culture of the feces onto Petri dishes with different media, their parasicitide activity was assayed against eggs of trematodes ( Calicophoron daubneyi ) and ascarids ( Parascaris equorum ). Seven fungal genera were identified in the feces. Isolates from Fusarium , Lecanicillium , Mucor , Trichoderma , and Verticillium showed an ovicidal effect classified as type 3, because of their ability to adhere to the eggshell, penetrate, and damage permanently the inner embryo. Penicillium and Gliocladium developed a type 1 effect (hyphae attach to the eggshell but morphological damage was not provoked). These results provide very interesting and useful information about fungi susceptible for being used in biological control procedures against parasites.

  13. Teaching Biology through Statistics: Application of Statistical Methods in Genetics and Zoology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Berlingeri, Migdalisel; Burrowes, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of mathematics into biology curricula is critical to underscore for undergraduate students the relevance of mathematics to most fields of biology and the usefulness of developing quantitative process skills demanded in modern biology. At our institution, we have made significant changes to better integrate mathematics into the undergraduate biology curriculum. The curricular revision included changes in the suggested course sequence, addition of statistics and precalculus as prerequisites to core science courses, and incorporating interdisciplinary (math–biology) learning activities in genetics and zoology courses. In this article, we describe the activities developed for these two courses and the assessment tools used to measure the learning that took place with respect to biology and statistics. We distinguished the effectiveness of these learning opportunities in helping students improve their understanding of the math and statistical concepts addressed and, more importantly, their ability to apply them to solve a biological problem. We also identified areas that need emphasis in both biology and mathematics courses. In light of our observations, we recommend best practices that biology and mathematics academic departments can implement to train undergraduates for the demands of modern biology. PMID:21885822

  14. Confronting the wildlife trade through public education at zoological institutions in Chengdu, P.R. China.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Susan; Bexell, Sarah; Ping, Xu; Zhihe, Zhang; Jing, Li Wen; Wei, Chen Hong; Yan, Hu

    2018-03-01

    The wildlife trade poses substantial threats to global biodiversity. China is a significant source of threatened species and also a market for wildlife products. Zoological parks (zoos), which are a popular leisure attraction in China as elsewhere, are increasingly conceptualized as places to educate visitors about both animals and environmental threats more generally. This paper reports on an attempt to inform Chinese zoo visitors about the threats presented by the wildlife trade, and about the opportunity to take personal actions to help protect wildlife. Results from a baseline survey of attitudes among 524 adult visitors to animal exhibits in Chengdu, China showed a high degree of concern about wildlife paired with a lack of confidence about what could be done. A sense of connection to nature, along with a perception of personal efficacy, were the strongest predictors of concern about the wildlife trade. Based in part on these results, an informational exhibit was designed and implemented in two locations in Chengdu. A survey of 533 visitors to assess the impact of the new exhibit showed that connection and perceived efficacy continued to predict concern, and that talking about the exhibit was associated with increased knowledge and concern. Though causality cannot be definitively concluded, results suggest that zoos have the potential to influence attitudes and perceived norms regarding the wildlife trade. By affirming the importance of a feeling of connection, the findings indicate that animal facilities may have an important role in fostering the human relationship to the natural world. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A capital Scot: microscopes and museums in Robert E. Grant's zoology (1815-1840).

    PubMed

    Quick, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Early nineteenth-century zoology in Britain has been characterized as determined by the ideological concerns of its proponents. Taking the zoologist Robert E. Grant as an exemplary figure in this regard, this article offers a differently nuanced account of the conditions under which natural-philosophical knowledge concerning animal life was established in post-Napoleonic Britain. Whilst acknowledging the ideological import of concepts such as force and law, it points to an additional set of concerns amongst natural philosophers - that of appropriate tool use in investigation. Grant's studies in his native Edinburgh relied heavily on the use of microscopes. On his arrival in London, however, he entered a culture in which a different set of objects - museum specimens - held greater persuasive power. This article relates changes in Grant's ideas and practices to the uneven emphases on microscopic and museological evidence amongst European, Scottish and English natural philosophers at this time. In so doing, it identifies the reliance of London-based natural philosophers on museology as constituting a limiting effect on the kinds of claim that Grant sought to make regarding the nature of life.

  16. St. George Mivart as Popularizer of Zoology in Britain and America, 1869-1881.

    PubMed

    Swain, Emma E

    2017-12-01

    Recent scholarly attentions have shifted from key actors within the scientific elite and religious authorities to scientific practitioners and popularizers who used science to pursue a wide variety of cultural purposes. The Roman Catholic zoologist St. George Mivart (1827-1900) has typically been cast as a staunch anti-Darwinian ostracized by Darwin's inner circle of scientific naturalists. Understood as a popularizer of science, his position can be re-thought. Mivart did not operate on the periphery of Victorian science. Instead, his notable contributions to the fields of zoology and anatomy and his participation in debates about the origin of the human mind, consciousness, and soul made him a central figure in the changing landscape of late-Victorian scientific culture. Through the popular periodical press and his anatomy textbook for beginners, Mivart secured a reputation as a key spokesman for science and gained authority as a leading critic of agnostic scientific naturalism. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stanislaw Smreczynskis legacy and the Department of Zoology of the Jagiellonian University of Krakow (Poland).

    PubMed

    Jaglarz, Mariusz K

    2008-01-01

    This article covers the origin and development of scientific interest in insect and amphibian developmental biology at the Department of Systematic Zoology and Zoogeography of the Jagiellonian University. The greater part of this historical account is devoted to Professor Stanislaw Smreczynski (1899-1975), the founding father of the Department, and comments on his biography and research achievements in the field of animal experimental embryology. A particular emphasis is on Smreczynski's contributions to contemporary understanding of early embryonic development of amphibians and insects as well as his expertise in Pleistocene and extant weevils (Curculionidae). A concise survey of developmental phenomena studied by some of Smreczynski's co-workers and followers is also presented, including the early embryogenesis of entognathans as well as germ cell determination and gonad formation in Drosophila virilis conducted by Jura; analysis of oogenesis in Collembola carried out by Krzysztofowicz; investigations of insects and tradigrades by Weglarska, and finally research into various aspects of ovary structure in diverse insect taxa by the Bilinski group.

  18. Diversity and community structure of butterfly of Arignar Anna Zoological Park, Chennai, Tamil Nadu.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, T; Sekar, M; Manimozhi, A; Baskar, N; Archunan, G

    2011-03-01

    Investigation was carried out on the diversity of butterfly fauna in selected localities of conservation and breeding center of Arignar Anna Zoological Park (AAZP), Chennai, Tamil Nadu. Atotal of 56 species were recorded, 15 of them belonged to Pieridae, 12 Nymphalidae, 9 Satyridae, 8 Papilionidae, 7 Danaidae, 3 Lycaenidae and 1 species each belonged to the families Acraeidae and Hesperidae. Qualitatively and quantitatively Pieridae family were comparatively dominant than that of other families. The notable addition to the 25 more species listed during this observation were compared to previous field survey. Comparison of butterfly species distribution between the different localities revealed that butterfly species richness was higher at mountain region with 52 species and lowest of 25 species at public visiting areas. Visitor's activities may be that reason for effects on butterfly distribution and lack of vegetation. Each five endemic and protected species (i.e. endangered) listed under the Wildlife (Protection)Act were highlighted greater conservation importances of the AAZP. It is suggest that butterfly species diversity generally increase with increase in vegetation and declines with the increase in disturbance.

  19. Teaching biology through statistics: application of statistical methods in genetics and zoology courses.

    PubMed

    Colon-Berlingeri, Migdalisel; Burrowes, Patricia A

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of mathematics into biology curricula is critical to underscore for undergraduate students the relevance of mathematics to most fields of biology and the usefulness of developing quantitative process skills demanded in modern biology. At our institution, we have made significant changes to better integrate mathematics into the undergraduate biology curriculum. The curricular revision included changes in the suggested course sequence, addition of statistics and precalculus as prerequisites to core science courses, and incorporating interdisciplinary (math-biology) learning activities in genetics and zoology courses. In this article, we describe the activities developed for these two courses and the assessment tools used to measure the learning that took place with respect to biology and statistics. We distinguished the effectiveness of these learning opportunities in helping students improve their understanding of the math and statistical concepts addressed and, more importantly, their ability to apply them to solve a biological problem. We also identified areas that need emphasis in both biology and mathematics courses. In light of our observations, we recommend best practices that biology and mathematics academic departments can implement to train undergraduates for the demands of modern biology.

  20. Controlling and culturing diversity: experimental zoology before World War II and Vienna's Biologische Versuchsanstalt.

    PubMed

    Logan, Cheryl A; Brauckmann, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    Founded in Vienna in 1903, the Institute for Experimental Biology pioneered the application of experimental methods to living organisms maintained for sustained periods in captivity. Its Director, the zoologist Hans Przibram, oversaw until 1938, the attempt to integrate ontogeny with studies of inheritance using precise and controlled measurements of the impact of environmental influences on the emergence of form and function. In the early years, these efforts paralleled and even fostered the emergence of experimental biology in America. But fate intervened. Though the Institute served an international community, most of its resident scientists and staff were of Jewish ancestry. Well before the Nazis entered Austria in 1938, these men and women were being fired and driven out; some, including Przibram, were eventually killed. We describe the unprecedented facilities built and the topics addressed by the several departments that made up this Institute, stressing those most relevant to the establishment and success of the Journal of Experimental Zoology, which was founded just a year later. The Institute's diaspora left an important legacy in North America, perhaps best embodied by the career of the developmental neuroscientist Paul Weiss. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. An outbreak of sarcocystosis in psittacines and a pigeon in a zoological collection in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ecco, R; Luppi, M M; Malta, M C C; Araújo, M R; Guedes, R M C; Shivaprasad, H L

    2008-12-01

    This report describes an outbreak of acute pulmonary sarcocystosis in different species of captive psittacines and in a Luzon bleeding-heart pigeon (Gallicolumba luzonica) in a zoological collection in Brazil. A majority of the birds were found dead and had exhibited no previous clinical signs. Grossly, pulmonary congestion and edema were the most-common findings. Enlarged and congested livers and spleens were also frequently observed. Microscopically, there was edema, fibrin exudation, congestion, and perivascular and interstitial lymphoplasmacytic infiltration associated with numerous sinuous schizonts of Sarcocystis sp. in the lungs. Mild to moderate myocarditis, hepatitis, splenitis, and interstitial nephritis were also observed in the birds. Immunohistochemistry confirmed Sarcocystis sp. in the capillaries of lungs, hearts, livers, and spleens of most of the birds, but also in the pancreas, kidney, intestine, proventriculus, and brain of a few birds. The probable source of Sarcocystis sp. in these birds was the wild opossum (Didelphis albiventris), a common inhabitant of a local forest that surrounds the Belo Horizonte Zoo (Fundação Zoo-Botânica). This is the first documentation of Sarcocystis infection in psittacines and a pigeon from Brazil.

  2. The case for mandatory inclusion of ethics within the zoological sciences curriculum.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, John S

    2006-03-01

    Traditionally, undergraduate science curricula include little or no "ethics," either as theory or practice. However, zoologists are currently enjoying considerable media exposure: some of it positive (as in conservation practice), but more often negative (pertaining to issues such as the use of animals for testing of drugs, and genetic engineering). More than ever before, zoologists are being asked to make value judgments, and many of these involve moral assessment; if we accept that zoologists (along with other scientists) are professionals, then we must accept that they are responsible for any decisions they make, and it then follows that they are accountable, which can have serious ramifications in cases of malpractice. Ethics involves the application of morality in a professional setting. In light of this, teaching ethics is mandatory in degree programs such as engineering and medicine. This paper contends that a key output of zoological education is the undergraduate who is cognizant of the ethical framework and constructs within which he/she must function. The paper concludes with comment on the nature and style of delivery of ethics education.

  3. The Zoology Department at Washington University (1944-1954): from undergraduate to graduate studies with Viktor Hamburger.

    PubMed

    Dunnebacke, T H

    2001-04-01

    Beginning from an undergraduate's perspective and continuing through graduate school, this student's experiences in the Department of Zoology at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri was a time of many rewarding experiences. Now, on this occasion of his 100th birthday, I wish to express my appreciation to the Chairman, Dr. Viktor Hamburger, for his teachings, his encouragement, and his friendship that has lasted over the past 56 years.

  4. Prevalence of Entamoeba species in captive primates in zoological gardens in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Carl S.; Yon, Lisa; Hossain, Maqsud

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of amoebic infection in non-human primates (NHPs) from six Zoological gardens in the United Kingdom. Initially, 126 faecal samples were collected from 37 individually identified NHPs at Twycross Zoo, UK, and were subjected to microscopic examination. A subsequent, nationwide experiment included 350 faecal samples from 89 individually identified NHPs and 73 unidentified NHPs from a number of UK captive wildlife facilities: Twycross Zoo (n = 60), Colchester Zoo (n = 3), Edinburgh Zoo (n = 6), Port Lympne Wild Animal Park (n = 58), Howletts Wild Animal Park (n = 31), and Cotswold Wildlife Park (n = 4). Samples were examined by PCR and sequencing using four specific primer sets designed to differentiate between the pathogenic E. histolytica, the non-pathogenic E. dispar, and non-pathogenic uninucleate cyst-producing Entamoeba species. In the first experiment, Entamoeba was detected in 30 primates (81.1%). Six (16.2%) primates were infected with E. histolytica species complex. The highest carriage of Entamoeba species was found in Old World Colobinae primates. In the nationwide experiment, molecular analysis of faecal samples revealed notable rates of Entamoeba infection (101 samples, 28.9%), including one sample infected with E. histolytica, 14 samples with E. dispar, and 86 samples with uninucleated-cyst producing Entamoeba species. Sequences of positive uninucleated-cyst producing Entamoeba samples from Twycross Zoo clustered with the E. polecki reference sequences ST4 reported in Homo sapiens, and are widely separated from other Entamoeba species. These findings suggest a low prevalence of the pathogenic Entamoeba infection, but notable prevalence of non-pathogenic E. polecki infection in NHPs in the UK. PMID:25097822

  5. From experimental zoology to big data: Observation and integration in the study of animal development.

    PubMed

    Bolker, Jessica; Brauckmann, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    The founding of the Journal of Experimental Zoology in 1904 was inspired by a widespread turn toward experimental biology in the 19th century. The founding editors sought to promote experimental, laboratory-based approaches, particularly in developmental biology. This agenda raised key practical and epistemological questions about how and where to study development: Does the environment matter? How do we know that a cell or embryo isolated to facilitate observation reveals normal developmental processes? How can we integrate descriptive and experimental data? R.G. Harrison, the journal's first editor, grappled with these questions in justifying his use of cell culture to study neural patterning. Others confronted them in different contexts: for example, F.B. Sumner insisted on the primacy of fieldwork in his studies on adaptation, but also performed breeding experiments using wild-collected animals. The work of Harrison, Sumner, and other early contributors exemplified both the power of new techniques, and the meticulous explanation of practice and epistemology that was marshaled to promote experimental approaches. A century later, experimentation is widely viewed as the standard way to study development; yet at the same time, cutting-edge "big data" projects are essentially descriptive, closer to natural history than to the approaches championed by Harrison et al. Thus, the original questions about how and where we can best learn about development are still with us. Examining their history can inform current efforts to incorporate data from experiment and description, lab and field, and a broad range of organisms and disciplines, into an integrated understanding of animal development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Prevalence of Entamoeba species in captive primates in zoological gardens in the UK.

    PubMed

    Regan, Carl S; Yon, Lisa; Hossain, Maqsud; Elsheikha, Hany M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of amoebic infection in non-human primates (NHPs) from six Zoological gardens in the United Kingdom. Initially, 126 faecal samples were collected from 37 individually identified NHPs at Twycross Zoo, UK, and were subjected to microscopic examination. A subsequent, nationwide experiment included 350 faecal samples from 89 individually identified NHPs and 73 unidentified NHPs from a number of UK captive wildlife facilities: Twycross Zoo (n = 60), Colchester Zoo (n = 3), Edinburgh Zoo (n = 6), Port Lympne Wild Animal Park (n = 58), Howletts Wild Animal Park (n = 31), and Cotswold Wildlife Park (n = 4). Samples were examined by PCR and sequencing using four specific primer sets designed to differentiate between the pathogenic E. histolytica, the non-pathogenic E. dispar, and non-pathogenic uninucleate cyst-producing Entamoeba species. In the first experiment, Entamoeba was detected in 30 primates (81.1%). Six (16.2%) primates were infected with E. histolytica species complex. The highest carriage of Entamoeba species was found in Old World Colobinae primates. In the nationwide experiment, molecular analysis of faecal samples revealed notable rates of Entamoeba infection (101 samples, 28.9%), including one sample infected with E. histolytica, 14 samples with E. dispar, and 86 samples with uninucleated-cyst producing Entamoeba species. Sequences of positive uninucleated-cyst producing Entamoeba samples from Twycross Zoo clustered with the E. polecki reference sequences ST4 reported in Homo sapiens, and are widely separated from other Entamoeba species. These findings suggest a low prevalence of the pathogenic Entamoeba infection, but notable prevalence of non-pathogenic E. polecki infection in NHPs in the UK.

  7. Low Usutu virus seroprevalence in four zoological gardens in central Europe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Usutu virus (USUV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus of the Japanese encephalitis virus antigenic group, caused bird die-offs in Austria, Hungary and Switzerland between 2001 and 2009. While the zoological gardens of Vienna and Zurich recorded USUV-associated mortality in different species of birds during this period, incidences in Budapest were limited to areas outside the zoo, and in the greater Basel area avian mortality due to USUV infection was not observed at all. The objectives of this investigation were to gain insight into USUV infection dynamics in captive birds in zoos with varying degrees of virus exposure and to study differences in susceptibility to USUV of different species of birds. Results 372 bird sera were collected between October 2006 and August 2007. The samples were tested in parallel by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and 90% plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT-90). 8.75%, 5.3% and 6.59% of birds in the zoos of Vienna, Zurich and Basel, respectively, showed USUV-specific antibodies by PRNT-90. No antibodies to USUV were detected in birds of the Budapest zoo. The order Strigiformes (owls) exhibited the highest USUV-seroprevalence, compared to other orders of birds. Conclusions USUV seems not to pose an imminent threat to zoo bird populations in central Europe at the moment. Depending on a variety of especially environmental factors, however, this may change at any time in the (near) future, as experienced with West Nile virus (WNV). It is therefore strongly suggested to continue with combined WNV and USUV surveillance activities in affected areas. PMID:23919825

  8. Browse diversity and iron loading in captive sumatran rhinoceroses (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis): a comparison of sanctuary and zoological populations.

    PubMed

    Candra, Dedi; Radcliffe, Robin W; Andriansyah; Khan, Mohammad; Tsu, I-Hsien; Paglia, Donald E

    2012-09-01

    Iron storage disease (ISD) is now recognized as a serious clinical disorder acquired by two species of browsing rhinoceroses, the African black (Diceros bicornis) and the Asian Sumatran (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) rhinoceroses, when displaced from their natural habitats. The most complete knowledge of ISD comes from studies of the black rhinoceros, but the Asian species is also at risk. Sumatran rhinoceroses housed in traditional zoological settings outside of range countries have suffered significant morbidity and mortality potentially related to ISD induced by diet and/or other confinement conditions. With so few animals in captivity, very little information exists on iron loading in the Sumatran rhinoceros. To better characterize the problem, we retrospectively compared captive management conditions of Sumatran rhinoceroses housed under traditional zoological care with those in two native sanctuary environments. In general, zoo rhinoceroses are offered a paucity of plants and browse species compared with their sanctuary and wild counterparts managed in native rainforest habitats. Iron analyte levels and limited histopathologic observations in these populations suggest variable tendencies to overload iron, dependent upon differences in managed diet and individual food preferences. More detailed investigation of these markedly dissimilar ex situ populations is warranted to better understand the role of nutrition and other conditions affecting iron loading in browser rhinoceroses.

  9. Fatal infection with Taenia martis metacestodes in a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) living in an Italian zoological garden.

    PubMed

    De Liberato, Claudio; Berrilli, Federica; Meoli, Roberta; Friedrich, Klaus G; Di Cerbo, Pilar; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Eleni, Claudia

    2014-10-01

    A case of fatal infection caused by larval forms of Taenia martis in a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) living in the Rome zoological garden is described. The animal, living in a semi-natural pen with other 15 conspecific individuals and being fed with fresh fruit and vegetables, yoghurt and eggs, was transported to the Istituto Zooprofilattico of Rome for post-mortem examination. The anamnesis included, ten days before the death, apathy, lack of appetite, abdominal distension and diarrhoea. A severe exudative fibrinous-purulent peritonitis with numerous adhesions between the abdominal wall and the bowel loops was detected. After intestine removal, two free and viable, 4 cm long, whitish, leaf-like parasitic forms were pinpointed. Macroscopic examination of the two parasites allowed their identification as larval stages of cestodes, identified via molecular analysis as T. martis metacestodes. This report represents the first record of T. martis infection in the host species and in a zoological garden and for the pathological relevance of the infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reproductive analysis of male and female captive jaguars (Panthera onca) in a Colombian zoological park.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Gonzalez, Santiago; Howard, Jo Gayle; Brown, Janine; Grajales, Henry; Pinzón, Jorge; Monsalve, Haydy; Moreno, María Angélica; Jimenez Escobar, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    A reproductive analysis of a captive group of jaguars (Panthera onca; n = 6) at the Santacruz Zoological Foundation in Cundinamarca, Colombia, was conducted by performing a longitudinal, noninvasive, hormonal analysis of estradiol and progestogens in females and of androgens in males. During four seasons, female jaguars confined in solitary were evaluated for ovarian activity and spontaneous ovulation, male jaguars for testicular activity. A second hormonal follow-up was conducted in the females after administration of gonadotropins. Hormones were extracted from fecal samples of three females (n = 3) and two males (n = 2). Estradiol measurements were obtained by RIA and progestogens by enzyme immunoassay. The linear mixed-effect regression showed that there was a significant effect of seasons in the concentrations of estradiol (chi square = 15.97, degrees of freedom = 3, P < 0.01). Posthoc comparisons of all pairs of seasonal means were conducted according to Tukey's honest significant difference, revealing significant differences between seasons: Dry 1 versus Rains 2 (P < 0.01), Rains 1 versus Rains 2 (P < 0.05), and Dry 2 versus Rains 2 (P < 0.05). Elevations of progestogens compatible with spontaneous ovulation occurred in three jaguars, and the linear mixed-effect regression showed that there was also a significant effect of seasons (chi square = 28.56, degrees of freedom = 3, P < 0.01). Posthoc comparisons showed significant differences only between seasons: Dry 2 versus Rains 2 (P < 0.01). The season with the lowest average concentration was Rains 2 (October, November, and December). During this season, periods of anestrous were registered that lasted between 31 and 83 days. The three females presented estradiol peaks after the administration of eCG. A noninvasive longitudinal analysis for androgens was also made (males 1 and 2) over the course of 1 year, and no significant differences were found between the different seasons. A

  11. A new era in science at Washington University, St. Louis: Viktor Hamburger's zoology department in the 1940's.

    PubMed

    Carson, H L

    2001-04-01

    In the early 1940s, the administration of the College of Arts and Sciences at Washington University, St. Louis was firmly in the hands of classical scholars who were not inclined to promote the development of modern research on scientific subjects. Funds supporting research in biology favored the School of Medicine and the Missouri Botanical Garden. Viktor Hamburger arrived at Washington University in 1935. At about the time he became the Acting Chairman of Zoology in 1942, research work in the biological departments began a dramatic surge that has continued to this day. For 65 years under his counsel and leadership, basic biology has thrived at this fine institution. As an early faculty recruit, I recount here a few personal recollections from those formative years.

  12. Elucidating Article 45.6 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature: A dichotomous key for the determination of subspecific or infrasubspecific rank

    We present an overview of the difficulties sometimes encountered when determining whether a published name following a binomen is available or infrasubspecific and unavailable, following Article 45.6 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN, 1999). We propose a dichotomous key that...

  13. Catalog of insect type specimens preserved at the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Science with corrections of some specimens

    PubMed Central

    LI, Kai-Qin; WANG, Yun-Zhen; DONG, Da-Zhi; ZHANG, Li-Kun

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a list of insect types preserved in Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology (KNHMZ). As of March, 2015, 3 412 type specimens belonging to 266 species/subspecies of 37 families in 9 orders (Odonata, Isoptera, Mantodea, Orthoptera, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera) are included. Information corrections of some specimens are provided in this article. PMID:26452692

  14. Catalog of insect type specimens preserved at the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Science with corrections of some specimens.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai-Qin; Wang, Yun-Zhen; Dong, Da-Zhi; Zhang, Li-Kun

    2015-09-18

    This article presents a list of insect types preserved in Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology (KNHMZ). As of March, 2015, 3 412 type specimens belonging to 266 species/subspecies of 37 families in 9 orders (Odonata, Isoptera, Mantodea, Orthoptera, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera) are included. Information corrections of some specimens are provided in this article.

  15. Spatial distribution, seasonality and trap preference of stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: Muscidae), adults on a 12-hectare zoological park

    Although this study was originally designed to compare the efficacy of 2 different stable fly traps within 10 sites at a 12-ha zoological park, seasonal and spatial population distribution data were simultaneously collected. The two traps included an Alsynite fiberglass cylindrical trap (AFT) and a...

  16. Spatial distribution, seasonality and trap preference of stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: Muscidae), adults on a 12-hectare zoological park

    Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) is a biting fly of extreme economic importance and can cause adverse economic effects on host animals. Within zoological parks, hosts may include practically any accessible animal (e.g., sheep, goats, cows, camels, equines, primates, canids, and felids). In many animals, e....

  17. Vocal activities reflect the temporal distribution of bottlenose dolphin social and non-social activity in a zoological park.

    PubMed

    Lima, Alice; Lemasson, Alban; Boye, Martin; Hausberger, Martine

    2017-12-01

    Under natural conditions bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) spend their time mostly feeding and then travelling, socializing, or resting. These activities are not randomly distributed, with feeding being higher in early morning and late afternoon. Social activities and vocal behavior seem to be very important in dolphin daily activity. This study aimed to describe the activity time-budget and its relation to vocal behavior for dolphins in a zoological park. We recorded behaviors and vocalizations of six dolphins over 2 months. All subjects performed more non-agonistic social interactions and play in the morning than in the afternoon. The different categories of vocalizations were distributed non-randomly throughout the day, with more chirps in the afternoon, when the animals were "less social." The most striking result was the strong correlation between activities and the categories of vocalizations produced. The results confirm the association between burst pulses and whistles with social activities, but also reveal that both are also associated with solitary play. More chirps were produced when dolphins were engaged in socio-sexual behaviors, emphasizing the need for further questioning about the function of this vocal category. This study reveals that: (i) in a group kept in zoological management, social activities are mostly present in the morning; and (ii) the acoustic signals produced by dolphins may give a reliable representation of their current activities. While more studies on the context of signal production are needed, our findings provide a useful tool for understanding free ranging dolphin behavior when they are not visible. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Space of One's Own: Barbosa du Bocage, the Foundation of the National Museum of Lisbon, and the Construction of a Career in Zoology (1851-1907).

    PubMed

    Gamito-Marques, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    This paper discusses the life and scientific work of José Vicente Barbosa du Bocage (1823-1907), a nineteenth-century Portuguese naturalist who carved a new place for zoological research in Portugal and built up a prestigious scientific career by securing appropriate physical and institutional spaces to the discipline. Although he was appointed professor of zoology at the Lisbon Polytechnic School, an institution mainly devoted to the preparatory training of military officers and engineers, he succeeded in creating the conditions that allowed him to develop consistent research in zoology at this institution. Taking advantage of the reconstruction and further improvement of the building of the Lisbon Polytechnic, following a violent fire in 1843, Bocage transferred a natural history museum formerly located at the Academy of Sciences of Lisbon to his institution, where he conquered a more prestigious place for zoology. Although successive governments were unwilling to meet Bocage's ambitions for the Zoological Section of the newly created National Museum of Lisbon, the collaborators he found in different parts of the Portuguese continental territory and colonial empire supplied him the specimens he needed to make a career as a naturalist. Bocage ultimately became a renowned specialist in Southwestern African fauna thanks to José de Anchieta, his finest collaborator. Travels to foreign museums, and the establishment of links with the international community of zoologists, proved fundamental to build up Bocage's national and international scientific reputation, as it will be exemplified by the discussion of his discovery of Hyalonema, a specimen with a controversial identity collected off the Portuguese coast.

  19. Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) infection in a leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) housed in a zoological park in north-eastern Italy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Canine heartworm (cHW) disease is now recognised as potential cause of serious disease in cats and other felids, especially in endemic areas. In March 2009, a 23-years-old male African leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) housed in a zoological park located in the Province of Padova (Veneto Region), a cHW endemic area of the north-eastern Italy, died and was immediately necropsied. A cloth completely occluding the pyloric lumen was considered the presumptive cause of death. During necropsy, six nematodes (4 males and 2 females) were found within the right ventricle of the heart and the pulmonary artery. Diagnosis of HW (Dirofilaria immitis) infection was carried out by morphological features of adult worms and microfilariae, and then confirmed by detection of circulating HW antigens using a commercial SNAP kit (IDEXX Laboratories inc., USA). D. immitis infection was also confirmed by PCR amplification of the 5S ribosomal spacer region, performed on worm fragments and microfilaraemic blood samples obtained from the right ventricle of the heart. A glomerulonephritis of immuno-mediated origin and most likely associated with the HW infection is also reported. HW chemoprophylaxis and annual serological testing on wild felids housed outdoors in endemic cHW disease areas are recommended. This is the first diagnosis of D. immitis infection in an exotic felid in Italy. PMID:20377859

  20. Animal-derived natural products of Sowa Rigpa medicine: Their pharmacopoeial description, current utilization and zoological identification.

    PubMed

    Yeshi, Karma; Morisco, Paolo; Wangchuk, Phurpa

    2017-07-31

    The Bhutanese Sowa Rigpa medicine (BSM) uses animal parts in the preparation of numerous polyingredient traditional remedies. Our study reports the taxonomical identification of medicinal animals and the description of traditional uses in English medical terminologies. To taxonomically identify the medicinal animals and their derived natural products used as a zootherapeutic agents in BSM. First, the traditional textbooks were reviewed to generate a list of animal products described as ingredients. Second, animal parts that are currently used in Bhutan were identified. Third, the ethnopharmacological uses of each animal ingredients were translated into English medical terminologies by consulting Traditional Physicians, clinical assistants, pharmacognosists, and pharmacists in Bhutan. Fourth, the animal parts were taxonomically identified and their Latin names were confirmed by crosschecking them with online animal databases and relevant scientific literature. The study found 73 natural products belonging to 29 categories derived from 45 medicinal animals (36 vertebrates and 9 invertebrates), comprising of 9 taxonomic categories and 30 zoological families. Out of 116 formulations currently produced, 87 of them contain one or more extracts and products obtained from 13 medicinal animals to treat more than 124 traditionally classified illnesses. Only five animal ingredients were found available in Bhutan and rest of the animal parts are being imported from India. Out of 73 natural products described in the traditional textbooks, only 13 of them (some omitted and few substituted by plants) are currently included in 87 formulations of BSM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. DEVRIESEASIS IN A PLUMED BASILISK (BASILISCUS PLUMIFRONS) AND CHINESE WATER DRAGONS (PHYSIGNATHUS COCINCINUS) IN A ZOOLOGIC COLLECTION.

    PubMed

    Rossier, Christophe; Hoby, Stefan; Wenker, Christian; Brawand, Stefanie Gobeli; Thomann, Andreas; Brodard, Isabelle; Jermann, Thomas; Posthaus, Horst

    2016-03-01

    Devriesea agamarum is a Gram-positive bacterium that was first described in 2008 as a causative agent of disease in lizards. Until today, reports from several countries reported the presence of this bacterium in various lizard species, which suggests a wide distribution among lizard collections. Pathologic lesions ranged from proliferative dermatitis and cheilitis to abscesses in multiple organs and septicemia in single animals, as well as entire groups. Until now, disease caused by D. agamarum has been reported in several lizard species. Because the bacterium is only identified by 16S rRNA sequencing and no commercially available identification systems contain the agent in their database, it may be underdiagnosed. This report describes a series of fatal devrieseasis in plumed basilisks (Basiliscus plumifrons) and Chinese water dragons (Physignathus cocincinus) from a zoologic collection and extends the range of susceptible species. In 3 mo, five animals died with pyogranulomatous lesions in the subcutis, the coelomic cavity, or multiple organs. In all cases, diffuse swelling or focal skin elevations of different body parts were observed. Devriesea agamarum could be isolated from lesions in all animals. A subsequent clinical survey of the lizard collection including bacteriologic investigation of oral cavity swabs indicated that bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) were carriers of D. agamarum, which suggests that this species could be a source of infection with this pathogen.

  2. Zoology, evolution, and ecology for elementary teachers in a model alliance between a university biology department and a zoo

    SciT

    DuBrul, E.F.; Lewis N.; Mesteller, P.

    Many of the goals and performance objectives for elementary science deal with hands-on experiences such as observing the characteristics of living things, sorting and classifying, and measuring and recording data. Ideal environments for learning episodes that can foster these objectives are zoos and parks or nature preserves. This poster describes a program that uses the University faculty, local master elementary teachers, and Zoo staff and facilities to: (1) educate K-6 teachers about zoology, ecology, and evolution, (2) provide practical, on-site learning exercises as examples of how teachers can develop zoo visits that will be true learning experiences, (3) help themore » participants develop zoo-related exercises of classroom use, (4) show the participants the behind-the scenes work that goes on at a zoo, and (5) establish a close rapport between the teachers and a large group of professional resource persons. We present the results of evaluations and follow-up interviews, and we note the key features of this program and suggest how our experience may be used by other partnerships.« less

  3. Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolated from the excreta of psittaciformes in a southern Brazilian zoological garden.

    PubMed

    Abegg, Maxwel Adriano; Cella, Fabiana Lucila; Faganello, Josiane; Valente, Patrícia; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene Henning

    2006-02-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, a major pathogen in immunocompromised patients, is a ubiquitous free-living fungus that can be isolated from soils, avian excreta and plant material. To further study potential saprophytic sources of this yeast in the Southern Brazilian State Rio Grande do Sul, we analyzed fecal samples from 59 species of captive birds kept in cages at a local Zoological Garden, belonging to 12 different orders. Thirty-eight environmental isolates of C. neoformans were obtained only from Psittaciformes (Psittacidae, Cacatuidae and Psittacula). Their variety and serotype were determined, and the genetic structure of the isolates was analyzed by use of the simple repetitive microsatellite specific primer M13 and the minisatellite specific primer (GACA)(4) as single primers in the PCR. The varieties were confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Thirty-three isolates (87%) were from the var. grubii, serotype A, molecular type VNI and five (13%) were Cryptococcus gattii, serotype B, molecular type VGI. All the isolates were mating type alpha. Isolates were screened for some potential virulence factors. Quantitative urease production by the environmental isolates belonging to the C. gattii was similar to the values usually obtained for clinical ones.

  4. Boveri's research at the Zoological Station Naples: Rediscovery of his original microscope slides at the University of Würzburg.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Ulrich

    2018-02-14

    Eric Davidson once wrote about Theodor Boveri: "From his own researches, and perhaps most important, his generalized interpretations, derive the paradigms that underlie modern inquiries into the genomic basis of embryogenesis" (Davidson, 1985). As luck would have it, the "primary data" of Boveri's experimental work, namely the microscope slides prepared by him and his wife Marcella during several stays at the Zoological Station in Naples (1901/02, 1911/12 and 1914), have survived at the University of Würzburg. More than 600 slides exist and despite their age they are in a surprisingly good condition. The slides are labelled and dated in Boveri's handwriting and thus can be assigned to his published experimental work on sea urchin development. The results allowed Boveri to unravel the role of the cell nucleus and its chromosomes in development and inheritance. Here, I present an overview of the slides in the context of Boveri's work along with photographic images of selected specimens taken from the original slides. It is planned to examine the slides in more detail, take high-resolution focal image series of significant specimens and make them online available. Copyright © 2018 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mortality of captive black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) at Smithsonian's National Zoological Park, 1989-2004.

    PubMed

    Bronson, Ellen; Bush, Mitchell; Viner, Tabitha; Murray, Suzan; Wisely, Samantha M; Deem, Sharon L

    2007-06-01

    Black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) mortality was investigated retrospectively based on the pathology records of 107 captive animals held at Smithsonian's National Zoological Park from 1989 to 2004. The majority of deaths in neonates were due to cannibalism (n = 42; 64.6%) and maternal trauma (n = 11; 16.9%); both of these causes of mortality decreased during the study period. Prior to 2001, juvenile mortality was most often caused by gastrointestinal disease (n = 11; 52.4%), including coccidiosis, salmonellosis, and clostridium infection. In 2001, improvements in husbandry, hygiene, and medical treatment led to decreases in juvenile mortality associated with gastrointestinal disease. The most common causes of death in adult ferrets were renal or neoplastic disease. The etiology of the high prevalence of renal disease in the last 4 yr of the study is unknown; it was not associated with increasing age or inbreeding. Improved hygiene and vigilant monitoring for signs of gastrointestinal and renal disease will continue to improve the success of the captive propagation of this species.

  6. Amendment of Articles 8, 9, 10, 21 and 78 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature to expand and refine methods of publication

    PubMed Central

    International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature has voted in favour of a revised version of the amendment to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature that was proposed in 2008. The purpose of the amendment is to expand and refine the methods of publication allowed by the Code, particularly in relation to electronic publication. The amendment establishes an Official Register of Zoological Nomenclature (with ZooBank as its online version), allows electronic publication after 2011 under certain conditions, and disallows publication on optical discs after 2012. The requirements for electronic publications are that the work be registered in ZooBank before it is published, that the work itself state the date of publication and contain evidence that registration has occurred, and that the ZooBank registration state both the name of an electronic archive intended to preserve the work and the ISSN or ISBN associated with the work. Registration of new scientific names and nomenclatural acts is not required. The Commission has confirmed that ZooBank is ready to handle the requirements of the amendment. PMID:22977348

  7. Electronic publication of new animal names - An interview with Frank-T. Krell, Commissioner of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature and Chair of the ICZN ZooBank Committee

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    On the 4th September 2012 the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature announced an amendment to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature allowing for electronic publication of the scientific names of animals. In this interview Frank-T. Krell discusses the implications of this amendment for authors wishing to publish descriptions of newly identified animal species in online and open access journals, and for the future of taxonomic science. PMID:22978411

  8. Water Sources in a Zoological Park Harbor Genetically Diverse Strains of Clostridium Perfringens Type A with Decreased Susceptibility to Metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Blanco, José L; Peláez, Teresa; Martínez-Nevado, Eva; García, Marta E

    2016-11-01

    The presence of Clostridium perfringens in water is generally regarded as an indicator of fecal contamination, and exposure to waterborne spores is considered a possible source of infection for animals. We assessed the presence and genetic diversity of C. perfringens in water sources in a zoological park located in Madrid (Spain). A total of 48 water samples from 24 different sources were analyzed, and recovered isolates were toxinotyped, genotyped by fluorophore-enhanced repetitive polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) fingerprinting and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. C. perfringens was recovered from 43.8 % of water samples and 50 % of water sources analyzed. All isolates (n = 70) were type A and 42.9 % were β2-toxigenic (i.e., cpb2+), but none contained the enterotoxin-encoding gene (cpe). Isolates belonged to 15 rep-PCR genotypes and most genetic diversity (88 %) was distributed among isolates obtained from the same sample. Most isolates displayed intermediate susceptibility (57.1 %; MIC = 16 μg ml -1 ) or resistance (5.7 %; MIC ≥ 32 μg ml -1 ) to metronidazole. No resistance to other antimicrobials was detected, although some isolates showed elevated MICs to erythromycin and/or linezolid. Finally, a marginally significant association between absence of cpb2 and decreased susceptibility to metronidazole (MIC ≥ 16 μg ml -1 ) was detected. In conclusion, our results reveal a high prevalence of C. perfringens type A in the studied water reservoirs, which constitutes a health risk for zoo animals. The elevated MICs to metronidazole observed for genetically diverse isolates is a cause of additional concern, but more work is required to clarify the significance of reduced metronidazole susceptibility in environmental strains.

  9. Complete Mitochondrial Genomes of Chimpanzee- and Gibbon-Derived Ascaris Isolated from a Zoological Garden in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yue; Niu, Lili; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Nong, Xiang; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Xuan; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2013-01-01

    Roundworms (Ascaridida: Nematoda), one of the most common soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), can cause ascariasis in various hosts worldwide, ranging from wild to domestic animals and humans. Despite the veterinary and health importance of the Ascaridida species, little or no attention has been paid to roundworms infecting wild animals including non-human primates due to the current taxon sampling and survey bias in this order. Importantly, there has been considerable controversy over the years as to whether Ascaris species infecting non-human primates are the same as or distinct from Ascaris lumbricoides infecting humans. Herein, we first characterized the complete mitochondrial genomes of two representative Ascaris isolates derived from two non-human primates, namely, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and gibbons (Hylobates hoolock), in a zoological garden of southwest China and compared them with those of A. lumbricoides and the congeneric Ascaris suum as well as other related species in the same order, and then used comparative mitogenomics, genome-wide nucleotide sequence identity analysis, and phylogeny to determine whether the parasites from chimpanzees and gibbons represent a single species and share genetic similarity with A. lumbricoides. Taken together, our results yielded strong statistical support for the hypothesis that the chimpanzee- and gibbon-derived Ascaris represent a single species that is genetically similar to A. lumbricoides, consistent with the results of previous morphological and molecular studies. Our finding should enhance public alertness to roundworms originating from chimpanzees and gibbons and the mtDNA data presented here also serves to enrich the resource of markers that can be used in molecular diagnostic, systematic, population genetic, and evolutionary biological studies of parasitic nematodes from either wild or domestic hosts. PMID:24358225

  10. Zoology: The Walking Heads.

    PubMed

    Maderspacher, Florian

    2016-03-07

    An analysis of Hox genes reveals that the body of the adorably weird tardigrades is essentially a truncated front end. This illustrates that loss and simplification are a hallmark of the evolution of animal body plans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fundamentals of Zoological Scaling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Herbert

    1982-01-01

    The following animal characteristics are considered to determine how properties and characteristics of various systems change with system size (scaling): skeletal weight, speed of running, height and range of jumping, food consumption, heart rate, lifetime, locomotive efficiency, frequency of wing-flapping, and maximum sizes of flying and hovering…

  12. Elucidating Article 45.6 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature: a dichotomous key for the determination of subspecific or infrasubspecific rank.

    PubMed

    Lingafelter, Steven W; Nearns, Eugenio H

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of the difficulties sometimes encountered when determining whether a published name following a binomen is available or infrasubspecific and unavailable, following Article 45.6 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN, 1999). We propose a dichotomous key that facilitates this determination and as a preferable method, given the convoluted and subordinate discussion, exceptions, and qualifications laid out in ICZN (1999: 49-50). Examples and citations are provided for each case one can encounter while making this assessment of availability status of names following the binomen.

  13. Professor Ernst Bresslau, founder of the Zoology Departments at the Universities of Cologne and Sao Paulo: lessons to learn from his life history.

    PubMed

    Pflüger, Hans-Joachim

    2017-06-01

    In this article, the life history of the founding father of the departments of Zoology at the Universities of Cologne and Sao Paulo, Prof. Ernst Bresslau, is described on occasion of the establishing of the "Ernst Bresslau Guest Professorship" at the University of Cologne. His main scientific achievements are discussed, in particular his research on the evolutionary origin of the mammary apparatus, in addition to his broad interest in biological topics. Among the many technical advancements that he introduced was the micro slow-motion camera developed together with the Zeiss Company which allowed to film ciliary beats at high speeds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Mosquito species composition and phenology (Diptera, Culicidae) in two German zoological gardens imply different risks of mosquito-borne pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    Heym, Eva C; Kampen, Helge; Walther, Doreen

    2018-06-01

    Due to their large diversity of potential blood hosts, breeding habitats, and resting sites, zoological gardens represent highly interesting places to study mosquito ecology. In order to better assess the risk of mosquito-borne disease-agent transmission in zoos, potential vector species must be known, as well as the communities in which they occur. For this reason, species composition and dynamics were examined in 2016 in two zoological gardens in Germany. Using different methods for mosquito sampling, a total of 2,257 specimens belonging to 20 taxa were collected. Species spectra depended on the collection method but generally differed between the two zoos, while species compositions and relative abundances varied seasonally in both of them. As both sampled zoos were located in the same climatic region and potential breeding sites within the zoos were similar, the differences in mosquito compositions are attributed to immigration of specimens from surrounding landscapes, although the different sizes of the zoos and the different blood host populations available probably also have an impact. Based on the differences in species composition and the various biological characteristics of the species, the risk of certain pathogens to be transmitted must also be expected to differ between the zoos. © 2018 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  15. The type-specimens of Caraboidea beetles (Coleoptera, Adephaga) deposited in the collections of the I.I. Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Putshkov, Alexander V; Martynov, Alexander V

    2017-03-01

    A catalogue of type specimens of species and subspecies of caraboid beetles, tiger-beetles here treated as family Cicindelidae, and ground-beetles (Carabidae) of suborder Adephaga deposited in the I.I. Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology NAS of Ukraine is provided. For all type-specimens original photos of each specimen (with label) and label data are given in the original spelling (translated to English if the original label was in Cyrillic alphabet). In some cases data concerning the current status of taxons are discussed. Nominal taxa names are alphabethically listed within each family. Altogether, 372 type specimens of 133 taxa names (species and subspecies) are included in the catalogue: 15 holotypes, 344 paratypes (120 species and subspecies) and 13 specimens (9 taxa) with other type status.

  16. Sanitary conditions of a colony of urban feral cats (Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758) in a zoological garden of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendes-de-Almeida, Flavya; Faria, Maria Carolina Ferreira; Branco, Aline Serricella; Serrão, Maria Lucia; Souza, Aline Moreira; Almosny, Nádia; Charme, Márcia; Labarthe, Norma

    2004-01-01

    The colony of urban stray cats living in the Rio de Janeiro zoological garden was studied in order to develop a population and health control program. As many cats as possible were captured during two months (47 animals) and were classified according to gender, age, weight and coat markings. They were submitted to a general health evaluation, examined for the presence of ectoparasites and sent to a surgical neutering program. All animals had a blood sample drawn for CBC, platelet count, heartworm and retroviruses detection. Capillary blood smears were made for hemoparasites detection. Coat marking and colors were tabby (59.7%), followed by solid black (17%); torbie (10.6%); bicolor (10.6%) and harlequin (2.1%). The only ectoparasites found were fleas, which infested 28% of the animals. The hemoparasites found were Haemobartonella felis (38%) and piroplasmas that could not be differentiated between Cytauxzoon spp. and Babesia spp. (47%). No cat was found infected by Dirofilaria immitis or FeLV (Feline Leukemia Virus), although FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) antibodies could be detected (21%). There was no correlation between hemoparasites and FIV infections. The estimated total cat population (mark-recapture method) was 59; 68% female and 32% male, suggesting that a neutering program is in fact needed.

  17. Chewing lice of genus Ricinus (Phthiraptera, Ricinidae) deposited at the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg, Russia, with description of a new species

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We revised a collection of chewing lice deposited at the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg, Russia. We studied 60 slides with 107 specimens of 10 species of the genus Ricinus (De Geer, 1778). The collection includes lectotype specimens of Ricinus ivanovi Blagoveshtchensky, 1951 and of Ricinus tugarinovi Blagoveshtchensky, 1951. We registered Ricinus elongatus Olfers, 1816 ex Turdus ruficollis, R. ivanovi ex Leucosticte tephrocotis and Ricinus serratus (Durrant, 1906) ex Calandrella acutirostris and Calandrella cheleensis which were not included in Price’s world checklist. New records for Russia are R. elongatus ex Turdus ruficollis; Ricinus fringillae De Geer, 1778 ex Emberiza aureola, Emberiza leucocephalos, Emberiza rustica, Passer montanus and Prunella modularis; Ricinus rubeculae De Geer, 1778 ex Erithacus rubecula and Luscinia svecica; Ricinus serratus (Durrant, 1906) ex Alauda arvensis. New records for Kyrgyzstan are R. fringillae ex E. leucocephalos and ex Fringilla coelebs. A new record for Tajikistan is R. serratus ex Calandrella acutirostris. The new species Ricinus vaderi Valan n. sp. is described with Calandra lark, Melanocorypha calandra; from Azerbaijan, as a type host. PMID:26902646

  18. Impacts of animal traffic on the Brazilian Amazon parrots (Amazona species) collection of the Quinzinho de Barros Municipal Zoological Park, Brazil, 1986-2007.

    PubMed

    Vanstreels, Ralph Eric Thijl; Teixeira, Rodrigo Hidalgo Friciello; Camargo, Luis Carlos; Nunes, Adauto Luis Veloso; Matushima, Eliana Reiko

    2010-01-01

    Eleven species of Amazon parrots (genus Amazona) are known to occur in Brazil, and nest poaching and illegal traffic pose serious conservation threats to these species. When the illegal owners realize these animals are incompatible with their expectations and lifestyle, or when the police arrests traders and owners, these trafficked animals are often considered unfit for release and sent to local zoos and captive breeders. A retrospective survey of animal and necropsy records from 1986 to 2007 was used to evaluate the impacts of animal traffic on the population composition and mortality patterns of Amazon parrots at the Quinzinho de Barros Municipal Zoological Park, Sorocaba, Brazil. Data were obtained for 374 Amazon parrots of ten Brazilian species, and there was evidence that the studied population could be split into two major groups: a majority belonging to the Amazona aestiva species and a minority belonging to the remaining species. In comparison, the animals of the first group were more frequently admitted from traffic-related origins (98 vs. 75%), had a shorter lifespan (median 301 days vs. 848 days) and a higher mortality within the first year postadmission (54 vs. 37%), were less likely to receive expensive treatments, and were more frequently housed off-exhibit. On an average, parrots were found to have a short postadmission lifespan (median 356 days), with 92.5% of the birds dying within their first five years in captivity. The paper discusses the difficult dilemmas these incoming traffic-related animals pose to zoo management and official anti-traffic policies. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Giardia duodenalis assemblages and Entamoeba species infecting non-human primates in an Italian zoological garden: zoonotic potential and management traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. are among the most common intestinal human protozoan parasites worldwide and they are frequently reported in captive non-human primates (NHP). From a public health point of view, infected animals in zoos constitute a risk for animal caretakers and visitors. In this study we carried out the molecular identification of G. duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. from nine species of primates housed in the zoological garden of Rome, to better ascertain their occurrence and zoonotic potential. Results G. duodenalis was found only in Lemur catta (47.0%). Entamoeba spp. were detected in all species studied, with the exception of Eulemur macaco and Varecia rubra. The number of positive pools ranged from 5.9% in L. catta to 81.2% in Mandrillus sphinx; in Pan troglodytes the observed prevalence was 53.6%. A mixed Entamoeba-Giardia infection was recorded only in one sample of L. catta. All G. duodenalis isolates belonged to the zoonotic assemblage B, sub assemblage BIV. Three Entamoeba species were identified: E. hartmanni, E. coli and E. dispar. Conclusions Our results highlight the importance of regularly testing animals kept in zoos for the diagnosis of zoonotic parasites, in order to evaluate their pathogenic role in the housed animals and the zoonotic risk linked to their presence. A quick detection of the arrival of pathogens into the enclosures could also be a prerequisite to limit their spread into the structure via the introduction of specific control strategies. The need for molecular identification of some parasite species/genotype in order to better define the zoonotic risk is also highlighted. PMID:21988762

  20. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY IN THE NORTH AMERICAN AMUR LEOPARD ( PANTHERA PARDUS ORIENTALIS) POPULATION IN ZOOLOGIC INSTITUTIONS FROM 1992 TO 2014.

    PubMed

    Napier, Julia E; Lund, Michael S; Armstrong, Douglas L; McAloose, Denise

    2018-03-01

    The Amur leopard ( Panthera pardus orientalis) is one of the most critically endangered leopards on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature red list. The primary objective of this retrospective study was to identify common and significant causes of morbidity and mortality in the North American Amur leopard zoo population. This information provides insights that contribute to their improved care, health, and medical management and, ultimately, affects the sustainability of this leopard subspecies in the wild. Medical records and complete postmortem reports were requested from all North American zoologic institutions that held Amur leopards in their collections from 1992 to 2014. Information from 175 individuals, representing 93% of the population (188 animals), was received. Data were reviewed generally and by subdivision into the following age groups: neonate: 0 day-3 mo ( n = 45); juvenile-young adult: 3 mo-5 yr ( n = 21); adult: 5-10 yr ( n = 17); senior: 10-15 yr ( n = 31); or geriatric: >15 yr ( n = 61). The major causes of morbidity, listed by body system for the study population, excluding neonates, were musculoskeletal (40%), reproductive (24%), dental (19%), cardiopulmonary (13%), gastrointestinal (13%), and urogenital (12%). The two most common causes of death or euthanasia, primarily in senior and geriatric animals, were chronic renal disease and neoplasia; maternal neglect and maternal trauma were most common in neonates. The largest populations in this study were neonates and geriatrics, indicating that if animals survive the neonatal period, they often live into their late teens to early 20s. This is the first comprehensive study of the causes of morbidity and mortality in the Amur leopard zoo population in North America.

  1. Cryptococcus lacticolor sp. nov. and Rhodotorula oligophaga sp. nov., novel yeasts isolated from the nasal smear microbiota of Queensland koalas kept in Japanese zoological parks.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kazuo; Maeda, Mari; Umeda, Yoshiko; Sugamata, Miho; Makimura, Koichi

    2013-07-01

    A total of 515 yeast strains were isolated from the nasal smears of Queensland koalas and their breeding environments in Japanese zoological parks between 2005 and 2012. The most frequent species in the basidiomycetous yeast biota isolated from koala nasal passages was Cryptococcus neoformans, followed by Rhodotorula minuta. R. minuta was the most frequent species in the breeding environments, while C. neoformans was rare. Seven strains representing two novel yeast species were identified. Analyses of the 26S rDNA (LSU) D1/D2 domain and nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region sequences indicated that these strains represent new species with close phylogenetic relationships to Cryptococcus and Rhodotorula. A sexual state was not found for either of these two novel yeasts. Key phenotypic characters confirmed that these strains could be placed in Cryptococcus and Rhodotorula. The names Cryptococcus lacticolor sp. nov. (type strain TIMM 10013(T) = JCM 15449(T) = CBS 10915(T) = DSM 21093(T), DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank Accession No.; AB375774 (ITS) and AB375775 (26S rDNA D1/D2 region), MycoBank ID; MB 802688, Fungal Barcoding Database ID; 3174), and Rhodotorula oligophaga sp. nov. (type strain TIMM 10017(T) = JCM 18398(T) = CBS 12623(T) = DSM 25814(T), DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank Accession No.; AB702967 (ITS) and AB702967 (26S rDNA D1/D2 region), MycoBank ID; MB 802689, Fungal Barcoding Database ID; 3175) are proposed for these new species.

  2. Vertebrate Zoology Libraries, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, NMNH

    Skip to main content. Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Donate Website Search Box published before 1840, are housed in the rare book collections of the Cullman Library of Natural History . These satellite libraries of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) Library are spread throughout

  3. Nomenclatural and taxonomic problems related to the electronic publication of new nomina and nomenclatural acts in zoology, with brief comments on optical discs and on the situation in botany.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Alain; Crochet, Pierre-André; Dickinson, Edward C; Nemésio, André; Aescht, Erna; Bauer, Aaron M; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Bour, Roger; De Carvalho, Marcelo R; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Frétey, Thierry; Jäger, Peter; Koyamba, Victoire; Lavilla, Esteban O; Löbl, Ivan; Louchart, Antoine; Malécot, Valéry; Schatz, Heinrich; Ohler, Annemarie

    2013-11-11

    In zoological nomenclature, to be potentially valid, nomenclatural novelties (i.e., new nomina and nomenclatural acts) need first to be made available, that is, published in works qualifying as publications as defined by the International Code of zoological Nomenclature ("the Code"). In September 2012, the Code was amended in order to allow the recognition of works electronically published online after 2011 as publications available for the purpose of zoological nomenclature, provided they meet several conditions, notably a preregistration of the work in ZooBank. Despite these new Rules, several of the long-discussed problems concerning the electronic publication of new nomina and nomenclatural acts have not been resolved. The publication of this amendment provides an opportunity to discuss some of these in detail. It is important to note that: (1) all works published only online before 2012 are nomenclaturally unavailable; (2) printed copies of the PDFs of works which do not have their own ISSN or ISBN, and which are not obtainable free of charge or by purchase, do not qualify as publications but must be seen as facsimiles of unavailable works and are unable to provide nomenclatural availability to any nomenclatural novelties they may contain; (3) prepublications online of later released online publications are unavailable, i.e., they do not advance the date of publication; (4) the publication dates of works for which online prepublications had been released are not those of these prepublications and it is critical that the real release date of such works appear on the actual final electronic publication, but this is not currently the case in electronic periodicals that distribute such online prepublications and which still indicate on their websites and PDFs the date of release of prepublication as that of publication of the work; (5) supplementary online materials and subsequent formal corrections of either paper or electronic publications distributed only

  4. Zoology: War of the Worms.

    PubMed

    Telford, Maximilian J; Copley, Richard R

    2016-04-25

    The phylogenetic affinities of Xenacoelomorpha - the phylum comprising Xenoturbella bocki and acoelomorph worms - are debated. Two recent studies conclude they represent the earliest branching bilaterally symmetrical animals, but additional tests may be needed to confirm this notion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Zoology: Invertebrates that Parasitize Invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-07-11

    The genome of an orthonectid, a group of highly modified parasitic invertebrates, is drastically reduced and compact, yet it shows the bilaterian gene toolkit. Phylogenetic analyses place the enigmatic orthonectids within Spiralia, although their exact placement remains uncertain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Knowing more than they can tell: An assessment of genre awareness among students in writing intensive zoology and civil engineering courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Joleen Kidwell

    Developing genre awareness as a means of "learning how to learn" in new writing situations is a goal of four recently proposed writing pedagogies that recognize the context-dependent nature of standards for "good writing" (Devitt, Reiff, and Bawarshi (2004); Beaufort (2007); Johns (2008); Downs and Wardle (2007)). Yet other scholars argue that useful genre knowledge cannot be taught explicitly in the classroom, but must be acquired tacitly through participation in a workplace or other discourse community (Dias et al. (1999); Freedman (1994); Smit (2004)). This qualitative study investigates the range of variability and potential sources of genre awareness among undergraduates who had not received explicit teaching about genre awareness. It presents students' explicit understanding of why particular genre conventions are followed in a particular context by examining what they could tell about learning the advanced lab report in writing-in-the-major courses in either Zoology or Civil Engineering. Research data includes surveys of all students in three courses (n=112), interviews with a subset in each course (n=24) and with all instructors (n=7), samples of graded student lab reports, and classroom observations. Overall, few study participants demonstrated genre awareness as defined by Devitt. Students showed limited awareness of the rhetorical purposes of the advanced lab report and even less awareness of the values and beliefs embedded in its discourse conventions. Disciplinary identification and mentoring experiences were found to be factors that might contribute to the development of genre awareness. Unexpected findings were that some insecure writers showed relatively high overall genre awareness, while some confident writers showed relatively low genre awareness. Further research is needed to refine an assessment instrument that could be readily used by other researchers. However, the instrument for assessing genre awareness that was developed for this project

  7. An annotated type catalogue of the anguid, dibamid, scincid and varanid lizards in the Department of Herpetology, Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia (Reptilia: Sauria: Anguidae, Dibamidae, Scincidae and Varanidae).

    PubMed

    Barabanov, Andrei; Milto, Konstantin

    2017-03-17

    A complete catalogue is provided for the type specimens of anguid, dibamid, scincid and varanid lizards in the herpetological collection of the Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia (ZISP), as of January 2017. The collection contains a total of 170 type specimens, representing 50 taxa in the four lizard families under consideration. Thirty-one of these taxa are regarded currently as valid. The types of four taxa (one holotype, one lectotype and two paralectotypes) could not be located in the ZISP collections in January 2017. A majority of the types are skinks (43 taxa, 155 types), many of which were described by the late Ilya Darevsky (1924-2009).

  8. Dates of publication of the Zoology parts of the Report of the Scientific Results of the Voyage of H.M.S. Challenger During the Years 1873-76.

    PubMed

    Low, Martyn E Y; Evenhuis, Neal L

    2013-01-01

    The dates of publication and exact titles of the 83 parts of the Zoology of the Report of the Scientific Results of the Voyage of H.M.S. Challenger During the Years 1873-76 are presented. Exact dates of publication for 71 of these parts have been determined using notices of their publication in contemporary publications. The dates of publication of the two Narrative volumes of the voyage of the H.M.S. Challenger (which contain available indications of new names) are also determined.

  9. The fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) described by Theodor Becker from Iran and Western China revisited in the collections of the Zoological Institute, Saint-Petersburg and Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin.

    PubMed

    Korneyev, Severyn V; Korneyev, Valery A

    2017-01-31

    The type specimens of fruit flies described by Dr. Theodor Becker based on material collected in China (Xinjiang and Xizang) and Iran by Russian expeditions directed by Petr Kozlov and Mykola Zarudny are listed and figured. They are deposited in the collection of the Zoological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg with some duplicates in the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin. Current concepts of the species, their morphological characters (illustrated by photographs of type specimens), current condition, and nomenclature are discussed.

  10. Improved capture of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) by placement of knight stick sticky fly traps protected by electric fence inside animal exhibit yards at the Smithsonian's National Zoological Park.

    PubMed

    Hogsette, Jerome A; Ose, Gregory A

    2017-12-01

    Stable flies are noxious blood-feeding pests of exotic animals at zoological parks, inflicting painful bites, and causing discomfort to animals. Stable fly management is difficult because of the flies' tendency to remain on the host animals only when feeding. Non-toxic traps can be efficient but traps placed around exhibit perimeters captured fewer-than-expected numbers of flies. By surrounding traps with square electric fence enclosures, traps could be placed in the exhibits with the host animals and compared with an equal number of traps placed along perimeter fences. During a 21-week study, traps inside exhibits captured 5× more stable flies than traps placed along exhibit perimeters. Traps inside exhibits tended to show more fluctuations in fly populations than traps along perimeters. The increased numbers of flies captured using this technique should provide relief from this pestiferous fly and greatly improve animal health and welfare. We believe this to be the first study where traps were used to capture stable flies in exhibit yards at a zoological park. © 2017 The Authors. Zoo Biology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. An annotated catalogue of the type material of Elateroidea Leach, 1815 (Coleoptera) deposited in the Coleoptera collection of the Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vinicius De Souza

    2015-03-25

    The Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo (MZSP) houses one of the most important Coleoptera collections of Brazil and Neotropical Region with nearly 900,000 adult mounted material and about 1,500,000 specimens to be mounted. The superfamily Elateroidea Leach, 1815 (including Cantharoidea) comprises about 24,077 described species in 17 families. The MZSP owns type material of Brachypsectridae LeConte & Horn, 1883, Cantharidae, 1856 (1815), Cerophytidae Latreille, 1834, Elateridae Leach 1815, Eucnemidae Eschscholtz, 1829, Lampyridae Rafinesque, 1815, Lycidae Laporte, 1836, Phengodidae LeConte, 1861 and Rhinorhipidae Lawrence, 1988. This catalogue includes type material of 166 species distributed in 69 genera. Among 1,223 type specimens, are 86 holotypes, 1,133 paratypes, 2 allotypes, 1 lectotype and 1 paralectotype.

  12. Zoology: A New Mouth for Amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Vladimir; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2016-05-09

    Deuterostomes - a key subdivision of animals - are characterized by the mouth developing anteriorly as a rupture between the outer epithelium and the foregut wall. A new study of amphioxus challenges this view and proposes separate evolutionary origins of deuterostome oral openings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Zoology: At Last an Exit for Ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-10-24

    Ctenophores, one of the most basal branches in the tree of life, have been found to have a through-gut, complete with mouth and anus. Basal animals are surprisingly complex and simplification has been rampant in animal evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. DNA fingerprinting in zoology: past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Geoffrey K; Curtis, Caitlin; Millar, Craig D; Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M

    2014-02-03

    In 1962, Thomas Kuhn famously argued that the progress of scientific knowledge results from periodic 'paradigm shifts' during a period of crisis in which new ideas dramatically change the status quo. Although this is generally true, Alec Jeffreys' identification of hypervariable repeat motifs in the human beta-globin gene, and the subsequent development of a technology known now as 'DNA fingerprinting', also resulted in a dramatic shift in the life sciences, particularly in ecology, evolutionary biology, and forensics. The variation Jeffreys recognized has been used to identify individuals from tissue samples of not just humans, but also of many animal species. In addition, the technology has been used to determine the sex of individuals, as well as paternity/maternity and close kinship. We review a broad range of such studies involving a wide diversity of animal species. For individual researchers, Jeffreys' invention resulted in many ecologists and evolutionary biologists being given the opportunity to develop skills in molecular biology to augment their whole organism focus. Few developments in science, even among the subsequent genome discoveries of the 21st century, have the same wide-reaching significance. Even the later development of PCR-based genotyping of individuals using microsatellite repeats sequences, and their use in determining multiple paternity, is conceptually rooted in Alec Jeffreys' pioneering work.

  15. Science Projects from Astronomy to Zoology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Activities for teaching about the solar system, the earth's rotation, plants, pendulums, and animal adaptation are described. Included are suggestions for building scale models to illustrate the solar system's proportions and the earth's rotation speed, and for using playground swings to demonstrate pendulum motion. (PP)

  16. Zoological Nomenclature and Speech Act Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambefort, Yves

    To know natural objects, it is necessary to give them names. This has always been done, from antiquity up to modern times. Today, the nomenclature system invented by Linnaeus in the eighteenth century is still in use, even if the philosophical principles underlying it have changed. Naming living objects still means giving them a sort of existence, since without a name they cannot be referred to, just as if they did not exist. Therefore, naming a living object is a process close to creating it. Naming is performed by means of a particular kind of text: original description written by specialists, and more often accompanied by other, ancillary texts whose purpose is to gain the acceptance and support of fellow zoologists. It is noteworthy that the actions performed by these texts are called "nomenclatural acts". These texts and acts, together with related scientific and social relationships, are examined here in the frame of speech act theory.

  17. Considerations for Treatment of Large Zoologic Collections: Fish.

    PubMed

    Erlacher-Reid, Claire D

    2018-05-01

    Aquatic species live most or all their lives in water; therefore, the health of the environment is intimately connected to their health and medical care. Understanding and maintaining appropriate husbandry and nutrition for the housed aquarium species are essential to sustain health. Most diseases of fish are secondary opportunistic infections; prevention and early diagnosis are recommended. Treatments involve environmental and/or nutritional management first, followed by targeted pharmacologic treatment to control a specific pathogen. Pharmacokinetic research evaluating the effects and safety of medications in fish are greatly needed in the peer-reviewed literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Building a Zoological Teaching Collection of Invertebrates Using Alcoholic Gel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mugnai, Riccardo; Barbosa, Julio Vianna; Baptista, Darcilio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Teaching collections are of great importance for science instruction at any level. There are several problems linked to the handling and curatorial management of this kind of collection. Among these is the relatively short life-span of specimens, due to the damage from continuous handling by students. Often the specimens used to replenish the…

  19. Teaching professionalism in science courses: anatomy to zoology.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Cheryl C

    2012-02-01

    Medical professionalism is reflected in attitudes, behaviors, character, and standards of practice. It is embodied by physicians who fulfill their duties to patients and uphold societies' trust in medicine. Professionalism requires familiarity with the ethical codes and standards established by international, governmental, institutional, or professional organizations. It also requires becoming aware of and responsive to societal controversies. Scientific uncertainty may be used to teach aspects of professionalism in science courses. Uncertainty about the science behind, and the health impacts of, climate change is one example explored herein that may be used to teach both professionalism and science. Many medical curricula provide students with information about professionalism and create opportunities for students to reflect upon and strengthen their individually evolving levels of professionalism. Faculties in basic sciences are rarely called upon to teach professionalism or deepen medical students understanding of professional standards, competencies, and ethical codes. However they have the knowledge and experience to develop goals, learning objectives, and topics relevant to professionalism within their own disciplines and medical curricula. Their dedication to, and passion for, science will support basic science faculties in designing innovative and effective approaches to teaching professionalism. This paper explores topics and formats that scientists may find useful in teaching professional attitudes, skills, and competencies in their medical curriculum. It highlights goals and learning objectives associated with teaching medical professionalism in the basic sciences. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Salmonella infection and carriage in reptiles in a zoological collection.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Meredith M; Davis, Meghan; Valitutto, Marc T; Nelson, Kenrad; Sykes, John M

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify important subspecies and serovars of Salmonella enterica in a captive reptile population and clinically relevant risk factors for and signs of illness in Salmonella-positive reptiles. DESIGN Retrospective cross-sectional study. ANIMALS 11 crocodilians (4 samples), 78 snakes (91 samples), 59 lizards (57 samples), and 34 chelonians (23 samples) at the Bronx Zoo from 2000 through 2012. PROCEDURES Data pertaining to various types of biological samples obtained from reptiles with positive Salmonella culture results and the reptiles themselves were analyzed to determine period prevalence of and risk factors for various Salmonella-related outcomes. RESULTS Serovar distribution differences were identified for sample type, reptile phylogenetic family, and reptile origin and health. Salmonella enterica subsp enterica was the most common subspecies in Salmonella cultures (78/175 [45%]), identified across all reptilian taxa. Salmonella enterica subsp diarizonae was also common (42/175 [24%]) and was recovered almost exclusively from snakes (n = 33), many of which had been clinically ill (17). Clinically ill reptiles provided 37% (64) of Salmonella cultures. Factors associated with an increased risk of illness in reptiles with a positive culture result were carnivorous diet and prior confiscation. Snakes had a higher risk of illness than other reptile groups, whereas lizards had a lower risk. Bony changes, dermatitis, and anorexia were the most common clinical signs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE This study provided new information on Salmonella infection or carriage and associated clinical disease in reptiles. Associations identified between serovars or subspecies and reptile groups or clinical disease can guide management of Salmonella-positive captive reptiles.

  1. [Surveying a zoological facility through satellite-based geodesy].

    PubMed

    Böer, M; Thien, W; Tölke, D

    2000-06-01

    In the course of a thesis submitted for a diploma degree within the Fachhochschule Oldenburg the Serengeti Safaripark was surveyed in autumn and winter 1996/97 laying in the planning foundations for the application for licences from the controlling authorities. Taking into consideration the special way of keeping animals in the Serengeti Safaripark (game ranching, spacious walk-through-facilities) the intention was to employ the outstanding satellite based geodesy. This technology relies on special aerials receiving signals from 24 satellites which circle around the globe. These data are being gathered and examined. This examination produces the exact position of this aerial in a system of coordinates which allows depicting this point on a map. This procedure was used stationary (from a strictly defined point) as well as in the movement (in a moving car). Additionally conventional procedures were used when the satellite based geodesy came to its limits. Finally a detailed map of the Serengeti Safaripark was created which shows the position and size of stables and enclosures as well as wood and water areas and the sectors of the leisure park. Furthermore the established areas of the enclosures together with an already existing animal databank have flown into an information system with the help of which the stock of animals can be managed enclosure-orientated.

  2. Home Page: Division of Birds: Department of Vertebrate Zoology: National

    } Advanced Search Plan Your Visit Exhibitions Education Research & Collections About Us Get Involved © Smithsonian Institution Home Research Collections Visitor Information Loans Destructive Sampling Genetic Resources Database VZ Libraries Related Links Staff VZ All Birds Contact Us NMNH Home › Research &

  3. Multichannel seismic/weather/Zoological monitoring of the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hello, Yann; Bonnieux, Sebastien; Sukovitch, Alexey; Argentino, Jean-Francois; Nolet, Guust

    2013-04-01

    Delays of seismic P waves are used to make scans or 3D images of the variations in seismic wave speed in the Earth's interior using the techniques of seismic tomography. Observations of such delays are ubiquitous on the continents but rare in oceanic regions. Free-drifting profiling floats that measure the temperature, salinity and current of the upper 2000 m of the ocean are used by physical oceanographers for continuous monitoring in the Argo program. Recently, seismologists developed the idea to use such floats in order to compensate for the lack of seismic delay observations, especially in the southern hemisphere. In project Globalseis, financed by a grant from the European Research Council (ERC), we have built and tested a prototype of such a seismological sensor using an Apex float from Teledyne Webb Research, a Rafos hydrophone, and electronics developed in collaboration with Osean, a small engineering firm in France. `MERMAID', for `Mobile Earthquake Recorder in Marine Areas by Independent Divers' has concuded its final design stage and a fleet of 20 units is available off the shelf. Two of these floats have been deployed in the Mediterranean sea between Nice and the island of Corsica late 2012, others will be deployed in 2013, in the South Indian Ocean and near Galapagos in the Pacific. Analysis of the first data will allow us to sharpen the wavelet-based algorithm parameters used to discriminate P-waves from the continuous input signal. Ten significant events can be stored in internal memory during an average "parking depth" drift of 10 days at a chosen depth of up to 2 km. Events are classified by interest and when the memory is full, larger events replace minor events. At the end of the preprogrammed mission the float surface and transmit data (health logs and events) in Rudics mode by Iridium satellite network. A major event will force the float to ascent at surface and transmit in a short delay the corresponding recorded data as well as its GPS position. A second, dual channel, prototype version of Mermaid using two dedicated hydrophones is designed to enlarge the band pass for acoustic signals with much higher frequency than seismic. Based on the same algorithm using wavelet transforms, Mermaid continuously analyzes acoustic signals to detect both major seismic events and weather phenomena such rain, drizzle, open sea and ice, or whale migration, during its drift phase. This extension to multi-purpose applications makes the Mermaid very attractive for the Argo program. In fact, Mermaids using passive low cost sensors form a very light and complementary solution that can be integrated with an Argo float; Mermaids listen during the passive drift while CTD data are taken during ascent and descent. Such multidisciplinary approach should allow seismologists to participate in international program such as Argo and obtain the dense ocean coverage needed to image the deep structure of the Earth.

  4. [Helminth fauna Anseriformes (Aves) in the Lodz Zoological Garden].

    PubMed

    Zuchowska, E

    1997-01-01

    In the years 1959-1990 429 birds on 30 species of Anseriformes were examined post mortem at Zoo Lódź. The helminths were found in 108 birds (25.17%) of 19 species. In infected birds there were found 4 species of trematodes: one of them, Catatropis verrucosa is in Poland new for Cygnus olor; 9 species of cestodes--7 of them are in Poland new for examined hosts; namely: Drepanidotaenia lanceolata for Dendrocygna viduata, Cygnus atratus, Branta bernicla, and Anas platyrhynchos; Microsomacanthus paracompressus for Cygnus olor; Dicranotaenia coronula for Chloephaga picta and Cairina moschata; Cloacotaenia megalops for Branta bernicla, Tschertkovilepis setigera for Cygnus olor, Anser indicus, Branta bernicla and Anas platyrhynchos; Fimbriaria fasciolaris for Cygnus olor and Chloephaga picta; Sobolevicanthus gracilis for Cygnus atratus, Chloephaga picta and Tadorna tadorna; 13 species of nematodes--7 of them are in Poland new for examined hosts, namely: Cyathostoma variegatum for Cygnus atratus, Anser indicus and Anser caerulescens; Syngamus trachea for Anser indicus; Echinuria uncinata for Anser indicus; Ganguleterakis dispar for Cgynus melanocoryphus, Cgynus olor and Anser caerulescens; Pterothominx caudinflata for Anser indicus; Amidostomum ansersis for Cygnus olor and Branta bernicla; Capillaria anatis for Anas acuta. No acanthocephalans were observed.

  5. Interns and Volunteers, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, NMNH

    Skip to main content. Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Donate Website Search Box Opportunities Internships The National Museum of Natural History offers internships in the Department of History is a prearranged, structured learning experience scheduled within a specific time frame. The

  6. Home Page, Division of Fishes, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, NMNH

    Skip to main content. Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Donate Website Search Box National Museum of Natural History, is the largest in the world, with approximately 540,000 lots (a lot the Smithsonian Learn about the history of ichthyology at the Smithsonian Institution, beginning with

  7. Zoological effects of variations in atmospheric oxygen levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloek, G.

    1982-01-01

    The role of certain gene enzymes in survival in modified atmospheres was examined. Chromosome morphology was studied. Mortality and life span were measured. Equipment to deliver various gas mixtures to the flies was designed and fabricated. To study the gene enzymes a technique called starch gel electrophoresis was needed. Equipment and supplies for this work and the study of chromosome morphology was available on the market, although some of the equipment was fabricated to save the project money.

  8. Home Page: Division of Mammals: Department of Vertebrate Zoology: NMNH

    Search Field: Search Submit: Submit {search_item} Advanced Search Plan Your Visit Exhibitions Education Resources Databases Marine Mammal Program Beaked Whale Identification Guide 3D Primates VZ Libraries Related

  9. Adaptation of the animal welfare assessment grid (AWAG) for monitoring animal welfare in zoological collections.

    PubMed

    Justice, W S M; O'Brien, M F; Szyszka, O; Shotton, J; Gilmour, J E M; Riordan, P; Wolfensohn, S

    2017-08-05

    Animal welfare monitoring is an essential part of zoo management and a legal requirement in many countries. Historically, a variety of welfare audits have been proposed to assist zoo managers. Unfortunately, there are a number of issues with these assessments, including lack of species information, validated tests and the overall complexity of these audits which make them difficult to implement in practice. The animal welfare assessment grid (AWAG) has previously been proposed as an animal welfare monitoring tool for animals used in research programmes. This computer-based system was successfully adapted for use in a zoo setting with two taxonomic groups: primates and birds. This tool is simple to use and provides continuous monitoring based on cumulative lifetime assessment. It is suggested as an alternative, practical method for welfare monitoring in zoos. British Veterinary Association.

  10. The "Biogenetic Law" in zoology: from Ernst Haeckel's formulation to current approaches.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Lennart; Levit, Georgy S; Hoßfeld, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    150 years ago, in 1866, Ernst Haeckel published a book in two volumes called "Generelle Morphologie der Organismen" (General Morphology of Organisms) in which he formulated his biogenetic law, famously stating that ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny. Here we describe Haeckel's original idea and follow its development in the thinking of two scientists inspired by Haeckel, Alexei Sewertzoff and Adolf Naef. Sewertzoff and Naef initially approached the problem of reformulating Haeckel's law in similar ways, and formulated comparable hypotheses at a purely descriptive level. But their theoretical viewpoints were crucially different. While Sewertzoff laid the foundations for a Darwinian evolutionary morphology and is regarded as a forerunner of the Modern Synthesis, Naef was one of the most important figures in 'idealistic morphology', usually seen as a type of anti-Darwinism. Both Naef and Sewertzoff aimed to revise Haeckel's biogenetic law and came to comparable conclusions at the empirical level. We end our review with a brief look at the present situation in which molecular data are used to test the "hour-glass model", which can be seen as a modern version of the biogenetic law.

  11. Teaching Biology through Statistics: Application of Statistical Methods in Genetics and Zoology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colon-Berlingeri, Migdalisel; Burrowes, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of mathematics into biology curricula is critical to underscore for undergraduate students the relevance of mathematics to most fields of biology and the usefulness of developing quantitative process skills demanded in modern biology. At our institution, we have made significant changes to better integrate mathematics into the…

  12. Fatal Ichthyocotylurus erraticus infestation in Inca terns (Larosterna inca) in a zoological collection.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Wouter; Hoyer, Mark; Verstappen, Frank; Wolters, Marno; Ijzer, Jooske; de Jong, Sara; Cremers, Herman; Kik, Marja

    2014-06-01

    In a breeding group of Inca terns (Larosterna inca), 14 birds died without antemortem signs of illness. Other than a poor body condition and a bloody cloaca, no symptoms were observed. Gross necropsy revealed severe segmental hemorrhagic enteritis with intralesional trematodes in most birds. Histopathologic examination revealed infiltration of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and granulocytes in the lamina propria of the duodenum and cross-sections of trematodes in the lumen. The parasites were identified as Ichthyocotylurus erraticus, a trematode of fish-eating birds. The cause of the infestation most likely was the feeding of unfrozen fresh fish. We describe the first case of a lethal I. erraticus infestation in Inca terns.

  13. Revisiting Abbott Thayer: non-scientific reflections about camouflage in art, war and zoology

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Roy R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the achievements of Abbott Handerson Thayer (1849–1921), an American painter and naturalist whose pioneering writings on animal camouflage addressed shared concerns among artists, zoologists and military tacticians. It discusses his beliefs about camouflage (both natural and military) in the context of his training as an artist, with particular emphasis on three of his major ideas: countershading, ruptive (or disruptive) coloration and background picturing. PMID:19000975

  14. 50 CFR 15.23 - Permits for zoological breeding or display programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... education protocol that provides information on educational materials on the ecology and/or conservation... self-sustaining population of the exotic bird species in captivity; (iii) A statement on efforts to... the population from which the exotic bird was or would be removed; (4) Whether the breeding or display...

  15. 50 CFR 15.23 - Permits for zoological breeding or display programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... education protocol that provides information on educational materials on the ecology and/or conservation... self-sustaining population of the exotic bird species in captivity; (iii) A statement on efforts to... the population from which the exotic bird was or would be removed; (4) Whether the breeding or display...

  16. 50 CFR 15.23 - Permits for zoological breeding or display programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... education protocol that provides information on educational materials on the ecology and/or conservation... self-sustaining population of the exotic bird species in captivity; (iii) A statement on efforts to... the population from which the exotic bird was or would be removed; (4) Whether the breeding or display...

  17. Neoplasia in felids at the Knoxville Zoological Gardens, 1979-2003.

    PubMed

    Owston, Michael A; Ramsay, Edward C; Rotstein, David S

    2008-12-01

    A review of medical records and necropsy reports from 1979-2003 found 40 neoplasms in 26 zoo felids, including five lions (Panthera leo, two males and three females), three leopards (Panthera pardus, two males and one female), one jaguar (Panthera onca, female), 11 tigers (Panthera tigris, three males and eight females), two snow leopards (Panthera uncia, one male and one female), two cougars (Felis concolor, one male and one female), one bobcat (Felis rufus, male), and one cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus, female). Animals that had not reached 3 yr of age or had been housed in the collection less than 3 yrs were not included in the study. Neoplasia rate at necropsy was 51% (24/47), and overall incidence of felid neoplasia during the study period was 25% (26/103). Neoplasia was identified as the cause of death or reason for euthanasia in 28% (13/47) of those necropsied. Neoplasms were observed in the integumentary-mammary (n=11), endocrine (n=10), reproductive (n=8), hematopoietic-lymphoreticular (n=5), digestive (n=3), and hepatobiliary (n=2) systems. One neoplasm was unclassified by system. Multiple neoplasms were observed in 11 animals. Both benign and malignant neoplasms were observed in all systems except for the hematopoietic-lymphoreticular systems where all processes were malignant. Of the endocrine neoplasms, those involving the thyroid and parathyroid glands predominated (n=8) over other endocrine organs and included adenomas and carcinomas. In the integumentary system, 63% (7/11) of neoplasms involved the mammary gland, with mammary carcinoma representing 83% (6/7) of the neoplasms. The rates of neoplasia at this institution, during the given time period, appears to be greater than rates found in the one other published survey of captive felids.

  18. Veno-occlusive disease in snow leopards (Panthera uncia) from zoological parks.

    PubMed

    Munson, L; Worley, M B

    1991-01-01

    Livers from 54 snow leopards, 4 days to 23 years old, that had died in 23 US zoos, were evaluated histopathologically to determine if the hepatic fibrosis, which has been noted to be prevalent in this species, was due to chronic active hepatitis from hepadnaviral infection, Ito cell proliferation, or hemosiderosis. Forty-two of 54 snow leopards had subintimal vascular fibrosis with partial or total occlusion of central and sublobular veins (veno-occlusive disease) of unknown origin. All 21 leopards older than 5 years were affected. Four leopards had chronic active hepatitis, and 12 leopards had cholangiohepatitis; but these lesions were not connected anatomically to central and sublobular venous fibrosis. Hepatocellular and Kupffer cell siderosis and Ito cell proliferation were prevalent and often coexisted with perisinusoidal, central, and sublobular venous fibrosis; but fibrosis was present in leopards without siderosis or Ito cell proliferation. The pattern and prevalence of veno-occlusive disease in these leopards was similar to that reported in captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), suggesting that a common extrinsic factor may cause the majority of hepatic disease in these large felid animals in captivity.

  19. Biology of Midwater Fishes of the Bermuda Ocean Acre (Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology. Number 452),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    agreement with Three specimens were taken in open nets, all in late Jespersen (1915) and to some extent with Sanzo (1931), , suititer. A 36 inumale...the Open ) Northi Atlantic (5’ 0 N, tcquallk aiIidlami nighit and~ (la (Table 2 1). it late sulnnier, 19’W). Eggs were taket il atdepths of’ 100-500...by night accounted f’Or niore than 80 percent of the catch at each ~ ~(Table 25). seasoin. Mhost piositive sainples (including open net and oblique E

  20. Updates to the Nomenclature of Platygastroidea in the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences

    Parabaryconus Kozlov & Kononova n. syn. is treated as a junior synonym of Cremastobaeus Ashmead; Cremastobaeus artus (Kozlov & Kononova) n. comb. is transferred from Parabaryconus; Paridris macrurous Kozlov & Le n. syn. and P. taekuli Talamas & Masner n. syn. are treated as junior synonyms of P. bis...

  1. The early-type strong emission-line supergiants of the Magellanic Clouds - A spectroscopic zoology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, S. N.; Sanduleak, N.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a spectroscopic survey of 21 early-type extreme emission line supergiants of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds using IUE and optical spectra are presented. The combined observations are discussed and the literature on each star in the sample is summarized. The classification procedures and the methods by which effective temperatures, bolometric magnitudes, and reddenings were assigned are discussed. The derived reddening values are given along with some results concerning anomalous reddening among the sample stars. The derived mass, luminosity, and radius for each star are presented, and the ultraviolet emission lines are described. Mass-loss rates are derived and discussed, and the implications of these observations for the evolution of the most massive stars in the Local Group are addressed.

  2. Zoology: Molluscs All Beneath the Sun, One Shell, Two Shells, More, or None.

    PubMed

    Sigwart, Julia D

    2017-07-24

    One great remaining problem in evolutionary biology is to understand which common ancestor could have given rise to descendants as different as giant squid and microscopic pea clams. Two new papers provide important insights into molluscan body plan disparity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Macroepidemiology of the HIVs-AIDS (HAIDS) pandemic. Insufficiently considered zoological and geopolitical aspects.

    PubMed

    Torres-Anjel, M J

    1992-06-16

    The human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs)-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or HAIDS pandemic originated from lentiviruses of nonhuman primates (thus qualifying as a zoonosis) that moved into humans in Africa. The HAIDS patients eventually die of opportunistic infections, all potentially zoonotic. The HAIDS infection remained parochial, first endemically and then epidemically, until the African urbanization that occurred in each of the countries postindependence. The latter included wars and the massive movement of soldiers (virologically naive) from the American continent to Africa and back. The HAIDS viral ecology coincided with African swine fever (ASF) in the Americas. Haiti became the focal point for both infections. Some infected Haitians also became, together with some infected drug addicts in the United States, a source of contaminated human blood for transfusions and production of plasma derivatives.

  4. Rift Valley fever outbreak, Mauritania, 1998: seroepidemiologic, virologic, entomologic, and zoologic investigations.

    PubMed

    Nabeth, P; Kane, Y; Abdalahi, M O; Diallo, M; Ndiaye, K; Ba, K; Schneegans, F; Sall, A A; Mathiot, C

    2001-01-01

    A Rift Valley fever outbreak occurred in Mauritania in 1998. Seroepidemiologic and virologic investigation showed active circulation of the Rift Valley fever virus, with 13 strains isolated, and 16% (range 1.5%-38%) immunoglobulin (Ig) M-positivity in sera from 90 humans and 343 animals (sheep, goats, camels, cattle, and donkeys). One human case was fatal.

  5. A zoological catalogue of hunted reptiles in the semiarid region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega Alves, Rômulo Romeu; Pereira Filho, Gentil Alves; Silva Vieira, Kleber; Silva Souto, Wedson Medeiros; Mendonça, Lívia Emanuelle Tavares; Montenegro, Paulofernandoguedespereira; Almeida, Waltécio de Oliveira; Silva Vieira, Washington Luiz

    2012-07-30

    The variety of interactions between human cultures and herpetofauna is the subject matter of Ethnoherpetology, a subdivision of Ethnozoology. In the semi-arid region of Brazil, many reptiles interact with human communities because of their utility or because of the risks they represent. These interactions have obvious implications for the conservation of reptiles from this region. In this context, ethnoherpetology studies are crucial because they serve as subsidies for guiding strategies for the handling and conservation of reptiles. This paper presents ethnozoological and taxonomic informations of hunted reptiles in the semiarid region of Brazil and analyse the implications on conservation that are related to the interactions between people and reptiles in this region. Taxonomic keys to identifying recorded reptiles are provided. Records of humans interacting with 38 reptile species that belong to 31 genuses and 16 families have been found. The groups with the largest numbers of recorded species were snakes (18 species), and this group was followed in number by lizards (13), chelonians (4), and crocodilians (3). The reptiles that were recorded may be used for the following purposes: medicinal purposes (24 species), food (13 species), ornamental or decorative purposes (11 species), in magical/religious practices (10 species), and as pets (10 species). Some species (n = 16) may have multiple uses. Furthermore, more than half of the species (n = 19) are commonly killed because they are considered potentially dangerous. Strategies for conserving the reptiles of the Brazilian semi-arid region must reconcile and integrate human and conservation needs.

  6. MULTIMERMAID: A dedicated multichannel seismic/weather/zoological float for monitoring of the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hello, Y. M.; Bonnieux, S.; Joubert, C.; Sukhovich, A.; Argentino, J.; Yegikyan, M.; Nolet, G.

    2013-12-01

    Delays of seismic P waves are used to make scans or 3D images of the variations in seismic wave speed in the Earth's interior using the techniques of seismic tomography. Observations of such delays are ubiquitous on the continents but rare in oceanic regions, mostly because of the large cost associated with deploying ocean-bottom seismometers. At the same time, several thousand free-drifting profiling floats measure the temperature, salinity and current of the upper 2000 m of the ocean in the Argo program, but are incapable to record and transmit seismic signals. Simons et al. (JGR, 2009) developed the idea to use such floats in order to compensate for the lack of seismic delay observations, especially in the southern hemisphere. We built and tested a prototype of such a seismological sensor using an Apex float from Teledyne Webb Research, a Rafos hydrophone, and electronics developed in collaboration with Osean, a small engineering firm in France. This `MERMAID', for `Mobile Earthquake Recorder in Marine Areas by Independent Divers', has concluded its final design stage and a fleet of 20 units is available for experiments. Since 2012, half of these floats have been deployed in the Mediterranean and in the South Indian Ocean. 10 more will be deployed early in 2014 near the Galapagos islands in the Pacific. Analysis of the first data is allowing us to sharpen the wavelet-based algorithm parameters used to discriminate P-waves from the continuous input signal and adapt it to specific noise conditions. A new multidisciplinary version of Mermaid using a dedicated hydrophone is designed to enlarge the band pass for acoustic signals with much higher frequency than seismic. By combining the same algorithm using wavelet transforms, and by adopting a different monitoring strategy with a dedicated processing, Mermaid is able to continuously analyzes acoustic signals to detect major seismic events, while at the same time regularly checking for weather phenomena such rain, drizzle, open sea and ice, or whale migration. This extension to multi-purpose applications makes the Mermaid very attractive for the Argo program. In fact, Mermaids using passive low cost sensors form a very light and complementary solution that can easily be integrated with an Argo float since CTD data are taken during ascent. Such multidisciplinary approach should allow seismologists to participate in international programs such as Argo and obtain the dense ocean coverage needed to image the deep structure of the Earth. We estimate that about 300 Mermaids, operated over a time span of five years, can provide a ray coverage beneath the oceans comparable to that now available beneath the continents with the Global Seismic Network (GSN). To compensate for the extra energy needed for multidisciplinary applications, Geoazur and Osean are developing a new float, called Multimermaid, that uses the same 17' glass sphere as the Ocean Bottom Seismometers constructed by Geoazur. The Multimermaid can navigate up to a depth of 3000 m and hold 2.5 times more battery power than a conventional float.

  7. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... been vaccinated with with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (5) That Newcastle...) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists; and (7) That the birds... vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (6) That Newcastle disease did not occur anywhere on...

  8. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... been vaccinated with with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (5) That Newcastle...) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists; and (7) That the birds... vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (6) That Newcastle disease did not occur anywhere on...

  9. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... been vaccinated with with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (5) That Newcastle...) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists; and (7) That the birds... vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (6) That Newcastle disease did not occur anywhere on...

  10. Digitising legacy zoological taxonomic literature: Processes, products and using the output

    PubMed Central

    Lyal, Christopher H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract By digitising legacy taxonomic literature using XML mark-up the contents become accessible to other taxonomic and nomenclatural information systems. Appropriate schemas need to be interoperable with other sectorial schemas, atomise to appropriate content elements and carry appropriate metadata to, for example, enable algorithmic assessment of availability of a name under the Code. Legacy (and new) literature delivered in this fashion will become part of a global taxonomic resource from which users can extract tailored content to meet their particular needs, be they nomenclatural, taxonomic, faunistic or other. To date, most digitisation of taxonomic literature has led to a more or less simple digital copy of a paper original – the output of the many efforts has effectively been an electronic copy of a traditional library. While this has increased accessibility of publications through internet access, the means by which many scientific papers are indexed and located is much the same as with traditional libraries. OCR and born-digital papers allow use of web search engines to locate instances of taxon names and other terms, but OCR efficiency in recognising taxonomic names is still relatively poor, people’s ability to use search engines effectively is mixed, and many papers cannot be searched directly. Instead of building digital analogues of traditional publications, we should consider what properties we require of future taxonomic information access. Ideally the content of each new digital publication should be accessible in the context of all previous published data, and the user able to retrieve nomenclatural, taxonomic and other data / information in the form required without having to scan all of the original papers and extract target content manually. This opens the door to dynamic linking of new content with extant systems: automatic population and updating of taxonomic catalogues, ZooBank and faunal lists, all descriptions of a taxon and its children instantly accessible with a single search, comparison of classifications used in different publications, and so on. A means to do this is through marking up content into XML, and the more atomised the mark-up the greater the possibilities for data retrieval and integration. Mark-up requires XML that accommodates the required content elements and is interoperable with other XML schemas, and there are now several written to do this, particularly TaxPub, taxonX and taXMLit, the last of these being the most atomised. We now need to automate this process as far as possible. Manual and automatic data and information retrieval is demonstrated by projects such as INOTAXA and Plazi. As we move to creating and using taxonomic products through the power of the internet, we need to ensure the output, while satisfying in its production the requirements of the Code, is fit for purpose in the future. PMID:26877659

  11. A zoological catalogue of hunted reptiles in the semiarid region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The variety of interactions between human cultures and herpetofauna is the subject matter of Ethnoherpetology, a subdivision of Ethnozoology. In the semi-arid region of Brazil, many reptiles interact with human communities because of their utility or because of the risks they represent. These interactions have obvious implications for the conservation of reptiles from this region.In this context, ethnoherpetology studies are crucial because they serve as subsidies for guiding strategies for the handling and conservation of reptiles. This paper presents ethnozoological and taxonomic informations of hunted reptiles in the semiarid region of Brazil and analyse the implications on conservation that are related to the interactions between people and reptiles in this region. Taxonomic keys to identifying recorded reptiles are provided. Records of humans interacting with 38 reptile species that belong to 31 genuses and 16 families have been found. The groups with the largest numbers of recorded species were snakes (18 species), and this group was followed in number by lizards (13), chelonians (4), and crocodilians (3). The reptiles that were recorded may be used for the following purposes: medicinal purposes (24 species), food (13 species), ornamental or decorative purposes (11 species), in magical/religious practices (10 species), and as pets (10 species). Some species (n = 16) may have multiple uses. Furthermore, more than half of the species (n = 19) are commonly killed because they are considered potentially dangerous. Strategies for conserving the reptiles of the Brazilian semi-arid region must reconcile and integrate human and conservation needs. PMID:22846258

  12. A case study of Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus) husbandry practice across 10 zoological collections.

    PubMed

    Rose, Paul E; Roffe, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    The Malayan, or Asian, tapir (Tapirus indicus) has a diminishing wild population and is becoming more common in captivity as zoos attempt to manage sustainable ex situ populations. Tapirs can be relatively easy to maintain and breed, but captive animals appear to suffer from reduced activity budgets, obesity, and poor public image. A questionnaire-based survey was designed and sent specifically to 10 collections around the world that exhibit Malayan tapirs, with the aim of assessing husbandry regimes to determine prevalence of standardized practices as well as highlighting any key differences, and to showcase good practice, thus providing information beneficial to those maintaining this species in their zoo. Twenty-five animals were included in the survey from collections across four continents. The research's major conclusions show differing dietary make-up, with a lack of forage provision, contrasting with a diverse array of enrichment protocols used. Significant differences were noted between zoos for total amount of food offered (P = 0.000) as well as ratios of forage to concentrate pellet offered (P = 0.004). Comparing food offered to male and female tapirs with published requirements for an "average" of either gender shows not all zoos providing the amount suggested in husbandry guidelines. Intelligently designed and original enrichment was provided to all animals but differences between zoos were noted in the application and "usefulness" of enrichment for individual tapir. Overall, animals are benefiting from enrichment but welfare could be further improved via consistent feeding of ad libitum forage and regular use of browse as a constituent part of daily rations. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Fatal Angiostrongylus dujardini infection in callitrichid monkeys and suricates in an Italian zoological garden.

    PubMed

    Eleni, Claudia; Di Cesare, Angela; Cavicchio, Paolo; Tonnicchia, Maria Cristina; Meoli, Roberta; di Regalbono, Antonio Frangipane; Paoletti, Barbara; Pietrobelli, Mario; De Liberato, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports four fatal cases of metastrongylid nematode Angiostrongylus dujardini infection observed in a Saguinus oedipus and a Callimico goeldii monkey and in two suricates (Suricata suricatta). All animals were kept in captivity in a zoo of central Italy. The two monkeys died with no premonitory signs, while the two-month-old suricates showed malaise, anorexia and tachypnea for a few days prior to death. Cardiomegaly and/or granulomatous pneumonia were the major anatomo-pathological findings. Inflammatory lesions were observed in the liver, heart and kidney of the suricates at histology. A. dujardini diagnosis was confirmed through both morphological identification of adult worms recovered at necropsy and molecular characterization of larvae in tissue samples. Callitrichidae and suricates are active predators and maintain their hunting behaviour in captivity and it is then likely that they were exposed to infection by preying on parasitized gastropods, intermediate hosts of A. dujardini, entering zoo enclosures from the surrounding environment. This is the first report of A. dujardini in Italy and in S. suricatta. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Addressing the Problem of Poorly Preserved Zoological Specimens: A Case Study with Turtles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert A.; Thomas, Aimée K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new use for a poorly preserved turtle specimen that teachers can easily use in demonstrating vertebrate anatomy or adaptive herpetology at the high school or college level. We give special attention to illustrating the sigmoid flexure of the neck as certain turtles withdraw their heads. This ability is anatomically and biologically…

  15. Iberian fish records in the vertebrate collection of the Museum of Zoology of the University of Navarra.

    PubMed

    Rodeles, Amaia A; Galicia, David; Miranda, Rafael

    2016-10-11

    The study of freshwater fish species biodiversity and community composition is essential for understanding river systems, the effects of human activities on rivers, and the changes these animals face. Conducting this type of research requires quantitative information on fish abundance, ideally with long-term series and fish body measurements. This Data Descriptor presents a collection of 12 datasets containing a total of 146,342 occurrence records of 41 freshwater fish species sampled in 233 localities of various Iberian river basins. The datasets also contain 148,749 measurement records (length and weight) for these fish. Data were collected in different sampling campaigns (from 1992 to 2015). Eleven datasets represent large projects conducted over several years, and another combines small sampling campaigns. The Iberian Peninsula contains high fish biodiversity, with numerous endemic species threatened by various menaces, such as water extraction and invasive species. These data may support the development of large biodiversity conservation studies.

  16. Pattern zoology in biaxially pre-stretched elastic bilayers: from wrinkles and creases to fracture-like ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rashed, Rashed; Lopez JiméNez, Francisco; Reis, Pedro

    The wrinkling of elastic bilayers under compression has been explored as a method to produce reversible surface topography, with applications ranging from microfluidics to tunable optics. We introduce a new experimental system to study the effects of pre-stretching on the instability patterns that result from the biaxial compression of thin shells bound to an elastic substrate. A pre-stretched substrate is first prepared by pressurizing an initially flat elastomeric disk and bulging it into a nearly hemispherical thick shell. The substrate is then coated with a thin layer of a polymer suspension, which, upon curing, results in a thin shell of nearly constant thickness. Releasing the pre-stretch in the substrate by deflating the system places the outer film in a state of biaxial compression, resulting in a variety of buckling patterns. We explore the parameter space by systematically varying the pre-stretch, the substrate/film stiffness mismatch, and the thickness of the film. This results in a continuous transition between different buckling patterns, from the dimples and wrinkles that are traditionally associated with the buckling of elastic bilayers, to creases and high aspect ratio `fracture-like' ridges, where the pre-stretch plays an essential role.

  17. Reproductive physiology of the female Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus): Insights from the study of a zoological colony.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J K; Schmitt, T L; Nollens, H H; Dubach, J M; Robeck, T R

    2016-01-01

    Eight captive female Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) were monitored over a 10week period, commencing at 5weeks prior to egg lay (EL), to increase our understanding of the species' reproductive biology. Females in cordoned nest sites underwent cloacal artificial insemination (AI) every 4-7days with different semen donors for each insemination. The EL interval was 97.9±3.6h (range: 84-108h) and paternity analyses revealed that conceptive inseminations occurred from 11.5 to 4.5days before oviposition. A biphasic pattern of estradiol, testosterone, progesterone and the biochemical analytes triglyceride, iron, calcium and phosphorus occurred in relation to EL, with values increasing (P<0.05) to maximal concentrations during the three weeks preceding oviposition, then decreasing (P<0.05) rapidly after oviposition completion. In comparison with post-lay (baseline) values, concentrations of estradiol and testosterone relative to the first oviposition were elevated at Week-5, and those of triglyceride, a yolk formation index, as well as iron, calcium and phosphorus, became elevated at Week-4 (P<0.05). Collective data indicate an estimated total egg formation interval of 29days, with oviducal transit of the ovulated ovum occurring over the majority of the ∼4day EL interval. These findings indicate that egg formation is prolonged with folliculogenesis initiated at 5weeks or more prior to oviposition. Consequently, the period of folliculogenesis and egg formation is estimated to overlap with the final ∼3weeks that wild females spend at sea prior to returning to land for breeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Visitor reaction to pacing behavior: influence on the perception of animal care and interest in supporting zoological institutions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lance J

    2012-01-01

    Many publications within the field of zoo animal welfare have stated the importance of decreasing stereotypic behavior (e.g., pacing) to help ensure a positive visitor experience. The idea behind these statements is that visitors want to see animals engaged in natural behavior. Additionally, it is thought that watching an animal exhibit species-appropriate behavior could help increase a visitor's connection to wildlife and ultimately their interest in conservation. However, until recently, no information was available to validate such statements. The purpose of this research was to examine people's reaction to viewing an animal engaged in pacing behavior. Participants were randomly selected to fill out a survey after watching a short video of either a tiger pacing or resting (control). Results indicate that having viewed a tiger pacing significantly decreases people's perception of the level of care animals receive at that facility. In addition, people's interest in supporting zoos decreased as a result of viewing this behavior. Results are discussed from an animal welfare, business, and conservation perspective. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Iberian fish records in the vertebrate collection of the Museum of Zoology of the University of Navarra

    PubMed Central

    Rodeles, Amaia A.; Galicia, David; Miranda, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The study of freshwater fish species biodiversity and community composition is essential for understanding river systems, the effects of human activities on rivers, and the changes these animals face. Conducting this type of research requires quantitative information on fish abundance, ideally with long-term series and fish body measurements. This Data Descriptor presents a collection of 12 datasets containing a total of 146,342 occurrence records of 41 freshwater fish species sampled in 233 localities of various Iberian river basins. The datasets also contain 148,749 measurement records (length and weight) for these fish. Data were collected in different sampling campaigns (from 1992 to 2015). Eleven datasets represent large projects conducted over several years, and another combines small sampling campaigns. The Iberian Peninsula contains high fish biodiversity, with numerous endemic species threatened by various menaces, such as water extraction and invasive species. These data may support the development of large biodiversity conservation studies. PMID:27727236

  20. An annotated type catalogue of the camel spiders (Arachnida: Solifugae) held in the Zoological Museum Hamburg.

    PubMed

    Harms, Danilo; DupÉrrÉ, Nadine

    2018-01-23

    Solifuges are an enigmatic and poorly studied group of arachnids. Commonly referred to as camel spiders or sun spiders, these animals are voracious predators of small animals and found in arid biomes of the Old World and the Americas. In this paper, we provide a catalogue for the solifuges (Arachnida: Solifugae) that are held at the Center of Natural History in Hamburg. The collections in Hamburg are predominantly historical and were accumulated by Karl Kraepelin between 1889 and 1914 with the help of other famous arachnologists such as Ferdinant Karsch and Eugène Simon. The re-study of these collections indicates that there are 38 type species and 65 type specimens from 10 families. We provide a detailed account of this material, including collection data, taxonomic updates, measurements and high-resolution images for species that are either poorly or not at all illustrated. Most specimens (70%) were collected in Africa as part of colonial expeditions or field surveys but there are also types from Western Asia (11%), and North and South America (19%). We provide an overview of the history of this collection, including a summary of the field surveys during which the specimens were collected and the arachnologists who described the material. Overall, this is the third-largest collection of solifuges in Germany with a distinct biogeographical focus and one of the largest collections of camel spiders in Europe.

  1. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in captive non-human primates of twenty-four zoological gardens in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Zhao, Bo; Li, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Niu, Lili; Deng, Jiabo; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-06-01

    Captive primates are susceptible to gastrointestinal (GIT) parasitic infections, which are often zoonotic and can contribute to morbidity and mortality. Fecal samples were examined by the means of direct smear, fecal flotation, fecal sedimentation, and fecal cultures. Of 26.51% (317/1196) of the captive primates were diagnosed gastrointestinal parasitic infections. Trichuris spp. were the most predominant in the primates, while Entamoeba spp. were the most prevalent in Old World monkeys (P < 0.05). These preliminary data will improve the management of captive primates and the safety of animal keepers and visitors. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Medical Primatology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Botany and zoology in the late seventeenth-century Philippines: the work of Georg Josef Camel SJ (1661-1706).

    PubMed

    Reyes, Raquel A G

    2009-10-01

    Georg Josef Camel (1661-1706) went to the Spanish colony of the Philippine Islands as a Jesuit lay brother in 1687, and he remained there until his death. Throughout his time in the Philippines, Camel collected examples of the flora and fauna, which he drew and described in detail. This paper offers an overview of his life, his publications and the Camel manuscripts, drawings and specimens that are preserved among the Sloane Manuscripts in the British Library and in the Sloane Herbarium at the Natural History Museum, London. It also discusses Camel's links and exchanges with scientifically minded plant collectors and botanists in London, Madras and Batavia. Among those with whom Camel corresponded were John Ray, James Petiver, and the Dutch physician Willem Ten Rhijne.

  3. Butterflies, Black swans and Dragon kings: How to use the Dynamical Systems Theory to build a "zoology" of mid-latitude circulation atmospheric extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faranda, D.; Yiou, P.; Alvarez-Castro, M. C. M.

    2015-12-01

    A combination of dynamical systems and statistical techniques allows for a robust assessment of the dynamical properties of the mid-latitude atmospheric circulation. Extremes at different spatial and time scales are not only associated to exceptionally intense weather structures (e.g. extra-tropical cyclones) but also to rapid changes of circulation regimes (thunderstorms, supercells) or the extreme persistence of weather structure (heat waves, cold spells). We will show how the dynamical systems theory of recurrence combined to the extreme value theory can take into account the spatial and temporal dependence structure of the mid-latitude circulation structures and provide information on the statistics of extreme events.

  4. Dermatomycosis caused by Paranannizziopsis australasiensis in five tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) and a coastal bearded dragon (Pogona barbata) in a zoological collection in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Masters, N J; Alexander, S; Jackson, B; Sigler, L; Chatterton, J; Harvey, C; Gibson, R; Humphrey, S; Rawdon, T G; Spence, R P; Ha, H J; McInnes, K; Jakob-Hoff, R

    2016-09-01

    Health monitoring of tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) at Auckland Zoo between 2001 and 2009 showed that 58/93 tuatara had been affected by dermatitis of unknown origin. From 2011 onwards, cases of suspected fungal dermatitis underwent extensive diagnostic investigations. Six cases of dermatomycosis were attributed to Paranannizziopsis australasiensis, five in tuatara and one in a coastal bearded dragon (Pogona barbata). Cases presented typically as raised, yellow to brown encrustations on the skin. Severe cases progressed to necrotising ulcerative dermatitis, and in the bearded dragon to fatal systemic mycosis. Following topical and systemic treatments, lesions resolved in all five tuatara. Histopathological examination of skin biopsy samples revealed dermatitis with intralesional septate branching hyphae. Fungal culture yielded isolates morphologically resembling Chrysosporium species, and isolates were submitted for molecular confirmation and sequencing of DNA. All six cases were confirmed as dermatitis due to infection with P. australasiensis, on the basis of fungal culture and DNA sequencing of isolates. These are the first reported cases of dermatomycosis associated with P. australasiensis infection in tuatara, and the first cases in which systemic therapeutic agents have been used in the treatment of such disease. Tuatara at the Auckland Zoo are now routinely examined every 3 months and tissue samples from any lesions sent for histopathology and fungal culture. Further work to elucidate the epidemiology and significance of P. australasiensis infections in reptiles in New Zealand is important for both welfare and conservation purposes.

  5. On the identity of some weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius (1745-1808) in the Museum of Zoology of Copenhagen (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea, Curculionoidea, Tenebrionoidea).

    PubMed

    Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The types of thirty-two nominal weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius are reviewed and lecto- and paralectotypes are designated for twenty-two of them. A neotype is designated for Curculiosticticus Fabricius, 1777. Protapionvaripes (Germar, 1817) is declared a nomen protectum over Curculioflavipes Fabricius, 1775. Based on a study of syntypes, Rhinomacercurculioides Fabricius, 1781 is confirmed as a member of Mycterus (Mycteridae), Bruchusundatus Fabricius, 1787 is tentatively transferred to Erotylidae, Curculiofulvirostris Fabricius, 1787 and Anthribusroboris Fabricius, 1798 are confirmed as members of Salpingus (Salpingidae), and Brachyceruscristatus Fabricius, 1798 is transferred to Tenebrionidae. Based on lectotype designation, Curculiocaninus Fabricius, 1792 is confirmed as a synonym of Sitonalineatus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Curculioinnocuus Fabricius, 1802 as a synonym of Cneorhinusbarcelonicus (Herbst, 1797). Bruchusrufipes Fabricius, 1792 is not considered an available species name, but a later use of Bruchusrufipes Olivier, 1790. Cossonusincisus Pascoe, 1885 is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Cossonusilligeri Champion, 1909 and Cossonusvulneratus Illiger, 1805 from synonymy under Cossonuscanaliculatus (Fabricius, 1792) (a primary homonym of Curculiocanaliculatus Olivier, 1791). Cossonuscanaliculatus Fabricius, 1802 is a secondary homonym of the former and is replaced with Cossonusincisus. Salpingusfulvirostris (Fabricius, 1787) is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Salpingusplanirostris (Fabricius, 1787), a primary homonym of Curculioplanirostris Piller & Mitterpacher, 1783. The following new combinations are proposed: Brachysomuserinaceus (Fabricius, 1802) (from Curculio), Bronchusferus (Gyllenhal, 1840) (from Hipporhinus), Bronchusglandifer (Fabricius, 1792) (from Curculio), Bronchusnivosus (Sparrman, 1785) (from Curculio), Bronchussparrmani (Gyllenhal, 1833) (from Hipporhinus), Coelocephalapionatrirostre (Fabricius, 1802) (from Attelabus), Nerthopssticticus (Fabricius, 1777) (from Curculio), Piezotracheluscrotalariae (Fabricius, 1802) (from Attelabus), and Poropterusgranulatus (Fabricius, 1802) (from Curculio). The junior homonym Brachycerusuva Fabricius, 1792 (non Sparrman, 1785) is replaced by Brachycerusfabricii nom. n. The following new synonymies are established: Brachycerusobesus (Fabricius, 1775) = Curculioscalaris Fabricius, 1777, syn. n., Brachydereslusitanicus (Fabricius, 1781) = Curculiomoratus Fabricius, 1798, syn. n., Brachypera (Brachypera) crinita (Boheman, 1834) = Curculiostriatus Fabricius, 1787, syn. n., Brachysomuserinaceus (Fabricius, 1802) = Brachysomusvillosulus (Germar, 1824), syn. n., Bronchusabruptecostatus (Gyllenhal, 1833) = Curculiospectrum Fabricius, 1802, syn. n., Bronchusnivosus (Sparrman, 1785) = Curculiorecurvus Fabricius, 1802, syn. n., Camptorhinustibialis (Sparrman, 1785) = Rhynchaenusalienatus Fabricius, 1802, syn. n., Coelocephalapionatrirostre (Fabricius, 1802) = Coelocephalapionluteirostre (Gerstäcker, 1854), syn. n., Cyrtoderescristatus (DeGeer, 1778) (Tenebrionidae) = Brachyceruscristatus Fabricius, 1798, syn. n., Desmidophorushebes (Fabricius, 1781) = Curculiotuberculatus Fabricius, 1792, syn. n., Donussalviae (Schrank, 1789) = Curculiodenticornis Fabricius, 1798, syn. n., Exomiasholosericeus (Fabricius, 1802) = Exomiaschevrolati (Boheman, 1842), syn. n., Nerthopssticticus (Fabricius, 1777) = Nerthopsguttatus (Olivier, 1807), syn. n., Phyllobiusoblongus (Linnaeus, 1758) = Curculiomali Fabricius, 1782, syn. n., and Rhinocyllusconicus (Froelich, 1792) = Bruchuspunctatus Fabricius, 1798, syn. n. Bronchussynthesys sp. n. is described to represent the concept of Hipporhinusspectrum sensu Marshall, 1904, a misidentification.

  6. On the identities of the molluscan names described in A Short Zoology of Tahiti in the Society Islands by Anthony Curtiss in 1938 (Mollusca: Cephalopoda, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Low, Martyn E Y; Tan, Siong Kiat

    2014-02-11

    Anthony Curtiss described two species of cephalopod and nine species of gastropod molluscs from Tahiti. Herein, we discuss and determine the identities of these eleven names. Ten of these names are considered to be junior subjective synonyms of well-known taxa, and one an unavailable name.

  7. A new blind snake of the genus Letheobia (Serpentes: Typhlopidae) from Rwanda with redescriptions of L. gracilis (Sternfeld, 1910) and L. graueri (Sternfeld, 1912) and the introduction of a non-invasive preparation procedure for scanning electron microscopy in zoology.

    PubMed

    Dehling, J Maximilian; Hinkel, Harald H; Ensikat, Hans-jÜrgen; Babilon, Kenny; Fischer, Eberhard

    2018-02-11

    A new species of blind snake in the genus Letheobia is described from Akagera National Park in eastern Rwanda. The new species is most similar to species of the L. gracilis complex, particularly L. gracilis and L. graueri. It differs from all other species of the genus by a unique combination of morphological characters, including the highest number of middorsal scale rows (834) and the most extreme elongation (total-length/midbody-width ratio 131) of all species in the genus and of any species of snake in the world; 22-22-22 longitudinal scale rows; snout in dorsal profile rounded, in lateral profile bluntly rounded with an angular horizontal edge ventrally; rostral broad, posteriorly rounded; eyes invisible; supralabial imbrication pattern T-0; tail short (1.3 percent of total length) with an apical spine; and a pink life colouration. The holotype of the new species was collected in gallery forest at a lake shore surrounded by savanna at 1300 m elevation. We produced scanning electron microscope images of the heads of the investigated specimens applying a liquid-substitution preparation procedure which does not require coating or drying and thus does not irreversibly damage the investigated samples. The obtained images allow an easy and more accurate examination of the scalation.

  8. Twelfth Annual Report of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories: A report of progress of the exploration in Wyoming and Idaho for the year 1878, Part I: Geology, paleontology, and zoology

    Hayden, F. V.

    1883-01-01

    This report includes the labors of the corps for the field season of 1878, and the office work until the close of the existence of the Survey by law June 30, 1879. Several of the members have, however, performed very important work since that time in elaborating their individual reports, which has added greatly to their interest and value.A general summary of the work for the season of 1878 will be appropriate in this connection. Owing to the length of the session, Congress did not pass the usual appropriation for the work of the Survey until July, and consequently the period for work in the field was comparatively short.The headquarters of the Survey was at Cheyenne, Wyo., the same as the preceding season. Four parties were organized, but in such a manner that in case of necessity they could be divided for special duty. All our outfit and animals were transported from Cheyenne to Point of Rocks and Green River Stations on the Union Pacific Railroad, and from thence the parties pursued their way northward to their respective fields of labor.

  9. Improved capture of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) by placement of Knight Stick sticky fly traps protected by electric fence inside animal exhibit yards at the Smithsonian’s National Zoological Park

    The stable fly is a blood-feeding pest of livestock and other animals. Traps have been used to survey stable flies and reduce populations. The Knight Stick trap is highly effective for catching stable flies and may catch more if limits on trap placement were relaxed. When working on stable fly contr...

  10. Do Zoo Visitors Need Zoology Knowledge to Understand Conservation Messages? An Exploration of the Public Understanding of Animal Biology and of the Conservation of Biodiversity in a Zoo Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dove, Tracy; Byrne, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the current knowledge and understanding about animal biology of zoo visitors and investigates whether knowledge of animal biology influences the ability of people to understand how human activity affects biodiversity. Zoos can play a role in the development of scientific literacy in the fields of animal biology and biodiversity…

  11. 50 CFR 15.21 - General application procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... purposes only: Scientific research; zoological breeding or display programs; cooperative breeding programs...: Office of Management Authority), 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Room 700, Arlington, VA 22203. Each application...

  12. 50 CFR 15.21 - General application procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... purposes only: Scientific research; zoological breeding or display programs; cooperative breeding programs...: Office of Management Authority), 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Room 700, Arlington, VA 22203. Each application...

  13. Tape-recorded Lectures With Slide Synchronization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhue, D.

    1969-01-01

    Describes "Taped Explanation Slide Synchronization" programs used for individual study or group showing in college zoology. Discusses preparation of programs, class organization, equipment, and costs. (EB)

  14. Instructional Developer as Content Specialist: Three Case Studies Utilizing the Instructional Development-Operations Research Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Stephen M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a 3-phase model (content research, specification, delivery) for instructional development-operations research and describes its application in developing courses in zoology, geology, and paleontology. (MER)

  15. Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schodde, P.; Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Reviews 17 books and curriculum materials of interest to secondary science teachers. Topics include plant science, pollution, fishes, science investigations, general zoology, neurobiology, electronics, and the environment. (MLH)

  16. 77 FR 3495 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... FR 12255, March 15, April 28, 2010. 2010. 09145A Zoological Society of 75 FR 27814, May 18, June 24, 2010. San Diego. 2010. 13802A Zoological Society of 75 FR 34766, June 18, July 28, 2010. San Diego... 15, 2011. Marine Science Center. 2011. 008519 Zoo Atlanta 75 FR 82409, December March 1, 2011. 30...

  17. An Evaluation of a Biological Slide-Tutorial Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Gordon L.

    Described is an auto-tutorial slide program for zoology students. A self-paced system was devised for observing the subject matter covered in the twelve study units of a zoology course. The post-testing evaluation revealed that students with lower grade point averages achieved scores comparable with students of higher grade point averages.…

  18. 50 CFR 223.206 - Exceptions to prohibitions relating to sea turtles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions to prohibitions relating to sea... to prohibitions relating to sea turtles. (a) Permits—(1) Scientific research, education, zoological... zoological exhibition, or to enhance the propagation or survival of threatened species of sea turtles, in...

  19. Clinical and research searching on the wild side: exploring the veterinary literature

    PubMed Central

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Stringer, Elizabeth; DeVoe, Ryan S.; Stoskopf, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Zoological medicine furthers the health and well-being of captive and free-ranging wild animals. Effective information retrieval of the zoological medicine literature demands searching multiple databases, conference proceedings, and organization websites using a wide variety of keywords and controlled vocabulary. Veterinarians, residents, students, and the librarians who serve them must have patience for multiple search iterations to capture the majority of the available knowledge. The complexities of thorough literature searches are more difficult for nondomestic animal clinical cases and research reviews as demonstrated by three search requests involving poisonous snakes, a gorilla, and spiders. Expanding and better disseminating the knowledgebase of zoological medicine will make veterinary searching easier. PMID:19626142

  20. 36 CFR § 520.9 - Soliciting, vending, debt collection, and distribution of handbills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... premises is prohibited. This rule does not apply to national or local drives for funds for welfare, health, and other purposes sponsored or approved by the National Zoological Park, concessions, or personal...

  1. 36 CFR 520.9 - Soliciting, vending, debt collection, and distribution of handbills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... premises is prohibited. This rule does not apply to national or local drives for funds for welfare, health, and other purposes sponsored or approved by the National Zoological Park, concessions, or personal...

  2. 36 CFR 520.9 - Soliciting, vending, debt collection, and distribution of handbills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... premises is prohibited. This rule does not apply to national or local drives for funds for welfare, health, and other purposes sponsored or approved by the National Zoological Park, concessions, or personal...

  3. 36 CFR 520.9 - Soliciting, vending, debt collection, and distribution of handbills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... premises is prohibited. This rule does not apply to national or local drives for funds for welfare, health, and other purposes sponsored or approved by the National Zoological Park, concessions, or personal...

  4. 36 CFR 520.9 - Soliciting, vending, debt collection, and distribution of handbills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... premises is prohibited. This rule does not apply to national or local drives for funds for welfare, health, and other purposes sponsored or approved by the National Zoological Park, concessions, or personal...

  5. Detail view of basrelief sculpture in tympanum at south wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of bas-relief sculpture in tympanum at south wall of east entrance loggia, with scale stick - National Zoological Park, Elephant House, 3001 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. North & south wall elevation of the east entrance loggia; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North & south wall elevation of the east entrance loggia; detail of pilaster base and capital - National Zoological Park, Elephant House, 3001 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Detail view of basrelief sculpture in tympanum at south wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of bas-relief sculpture in tympanum at south wall of west entrance loggia, with scale stick - National Zoological Park, Elephant House, 3001 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 76 FR 32222 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... Zoological Society of 76 FR 2408; January March 10, 2011. San Diego. 13, 2011. 27787A Virginia Aquarium & 76 FR 2408; January February 15, 2011. Marine Science 13, 2011. Center. 26030A Drexel University, 75 FR...

  9. Individualized Instruction in Great Britain: A Survey and a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, D. Keith; Hammond, Roger A.

    1981-01-01

    Presents results of a selective survey of schools using individualized instruction (II) in Great Britain and a detailed description of a particular II self-study zoology course at University College, Cardiff. (CS)

  10. Self-Instructional Materials for Underprepared Science Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedient, Douglas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Some of the students in Southern Illinois University's introductory zoology course were deficient in certain skills. The design of self-instructional modules that would be educationally sound and help overcome some problems encountered in this course is discussed. (MLW)

  11. Helping Your Local Amphibians (HYLA): An Internet-based Amphibian Course for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Tony P.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an online zoology course that was offered primarily to upper elementary and middle school teachers in which teachers were expected to take action to help the local amphibian population. (Author/YDS)

  12. Creative Rebellion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Marion E.

    1973-01-01

    The study of different phyla in zoology classes can be planned by students themselves. Experiments devised and conducted by students create more interest and ensure a better understanding of animals. (PS)

  13. The Origin of the Idea of the Mammal-like Reptile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aulie, Richard P.

    1975-01-01

    Conclusion of a three-part article in which the author discusses the implications for zoology and paleontology today and summarizes with comments on the "model" aspects of the controversy and its resolution. (BR)

  14. High School Biology: The Early Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Dorothy B.; Bybee, Rodger W.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the emergence of the biology curriculum which replaced physiology, zoology, and botany in high school science courses and supplanted an early form of general science known as natural history. (RT)

  15. 25 CFR 36.32 - Standard XII-Graduation requirements for a high school diploma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... general science area. (ii) One (1) unit in laboratory science areas, i.e., chemistry, physics, biology, zoology, laboratory anatomy. (5) Physical education—one (1) unit. (6) Practical arts—one (1) unit. Credit...

  16. 25 CFR 36.32 - Standard XII-Graduation requirements for a high school diploma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... general science area. (ii) One (1) unit in laboratory science areas, i.e., chemistry, physics, biology, zoology, laboratory anatomy. (5) Physical education—one (1) unit. (6) Practical arts—one (1) unit. Credit...

  17. 25 CFR 36.32 - Standard XII-Graduation requirements for a high school diploma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... general science area. (ii) One (1) unit in laboratory science areas, i.e., chemistry, physics, biology, zoology, laboratory anatomy. (5) Physical education—one (1) unit. (6) Practical arts—one (1) unit. Credit...

  18. 25 CFR 36.32 - Standard XII-Graduation requirements for a high school diploma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... general science area. (ii) One (1) unit in laboratory science areas, i.e., chemistry, physics, biology, zoology, laboratory anatomy. (5) Physical education—one (1) unit. (6) Practical arts—one (1) unit. Credit...

  19. Features and News: Professional Biological Societies and Environmental Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granholm, Nels H.

    1973-01-01

    Presents concrete suggestions regarding the role of individuals and groups within the Division of Invertebrate Zoology (DIZ) of the American Society of Zoologists (ASZ) regarding their contributions toward constructive environmental action. (Author/EB)

  20. 75 FR 52709 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Importation of Animals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... Collection; Importation of Animals and Poultry, Animal and Poultry Products, Certain Animal Embryos, Semen...: Importation of Animals and Poultry, Animal and Poultry Products, Certain Animal Embryos, Semen, and Zoological...

  1. 45 CFR 1180.2 - Definition of a museum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Art museums; (5) Children's museums; (6) General museums; (7) Historic houses and sites; (8) History...) Science and technology centers; (13) Specialized museums; and (14) Zoological parks. (c) For the purposes...

  2. 45 CFR 1180.2 - Definition of a museum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Art museums; (5) Children's museums; (6) General museums; (7) Historic houses and sites; (8) History...) Science and technology centers; (13) Specialized museums; and (14) Zoological parks. (c) For the purposes...

  3. 45 CFR 1180.2 - Definition of a museum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Art museums; (5) Children's museums; (6) General museums; (7) Historic houses and sites; (8) History...) Science and technology centers; (13) Specialized museums; and (14) Zoological parks. (c) For the purposes...

  4. 45 CFR 1180.2 - Definition of a museum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Art museums; (5) Children's museums; (6) General museums; (7) Historic houses and sites; (8) History...) Science and technology centers; (13) Specialized museums; and (14) Zoological parks. (c) For the purposes...

  5. Nematology—Status and Prospects: Let's Take Off Our Blinders and Broaden Our Horizons

    PubMed Central

    Van Gundy, Seymour D.

    1980-01-01

    Some aspects of current fundamental nematological research and teaching in agriculture, soil zoology, biology and medicine, and parasitology are explored as they relate to the Society of Nematologists and the science of nematology in its broadest sense. PMID:19300689

  6. 77 FR 41198 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... male and a female mountain tapir (Tapirus pinchaque), which were captive bred at the applicant's... of the species through captive breeding and conservation education. Applicant: Denver Zoological... the survival of the species through captive breeding and conservation education. Applicant: Denver...

  7. New synonymy in Cuban Tilloclytus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Anaglyptini)

    Examination of holotypes of Tilloclytus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Anaglyptini) in the Fernando de Zayas collection (Havana, Cuba) and the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University reveals that T. elongatus Zayas (1975) is a new synonym of T. rufipes Fisher (1942)....

  8. Seroepidemiological survey of pathogenic Yersinia in breeding squirrel monkeys in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Taketoshi; Une, Yumi; Lee, Ken-ichi; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Taniguchi, Takahide; Hayashidani, Hideki

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the prevalence of antibodies to pathogenic Yersinia in breeding squirrel monkeys, the serum samples of 252 squirrel monkeys from 9 zoological gardens in Japan were tested by ELISA using plasmid-encoded Yersinia outer membrane protein (Yops) as the antigen. The cutoff value was calculated by using the serum samples of the squirrel monkeys from Suriname, where no prevalence of pathogenic Yersinia have been reported. According to the cutoff value, 164 of 252 (65.1%) squirrel monkeys were considered positive against pathogenic Yersinia. These positive monkeys belonged to 8 of the 9 zoological gardens, and the percentage of the seropositive monkeys ranged from 22.2 to 89.4%. Furthermore, in one zoological garden, the positive rate of the squirrel monkeys which were over 1 year old (95.7%) was significantly higher than those which were under 1 year old (23.3%). These results suggested that pathogenic Yersinia is highly prevalent among breeding monkeys in Japan.

  9. A taxonomic study of Chinese species of the insidiosus group of Metaphycus (Hymenoptera, Encyrtidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Li, Cheng-De; Zhang, Yan-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, twelve insidiosus-group species of the genus Metaphycus Mercet from China are reviewed. Five species, M. corniae sp. n., M. cylindricus sp. n., M. deltoideus sp. n., M. transversus sp. n. and M. yaanensis sp. n., are described as new to science. A key to the females of these species is given to facilitate species recognition. Photomicrographs are provided to illustrate morphological characters of these species. All specimens, unless otherwise specified, are deposited in the National Zoological Museum of China, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. PMID:24574853

  10. Revision of the genus Pselaphomorphus Motschulsky, 1855 (Staphylinidae, Pselaphinae: Jubini). Corrections.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Vélez, Laura M

    2016-12-12

    In my revision of the genus Pselaphomorphus Motschulsky, 1855 (Vásquez-Vélez 2016) the depository of the holotype of P. cayennensis Vásquez-Vélez, 2016 was not listed. As a result, the requirements of Article 16.4.2 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature 1999) have not been met, making the name unavailable. This note aims at correcting the earlier mistake: the holotype of P. cayennensis is deposited at the Museum of natural history (Muséum d'histoire naturelle), Geneva, Switzerland.

  11. Rullierinereis imajimai nom. nov., a replacement name for R. profunda Imajima, 2009, secondary homonym to R. profunda (Hartman, 1965), formerly Namalycastis profundus.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masaatsu; Sato, Masanori

    2017-11-01

    Hartman (1965) described a nereidid species, Namalycastis profundus[sic], based on a deep-sea specimen collected from off Bermuda (1000 m deep) in the NW Atlantic. Although Hartman (1965) did not mention its etymology, the specific name is believed to be derived from the Latin adjective "profund-" meaning "deep." Because Namalycastis is feminine in gender (Glasby et al. 2016), the original specific name as masculine was incorrect and must be corrected to N. profunda for mandatory gender agreement under Articles 31.2 and 34.2 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (hereafter, "the Code") (International Commission of Zoological Nomenclature 1999).

  12. Using operant conditioning and desensitization to facilitate veterinary care with captive reptiles.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Heidi; Augustine, Lauren; Watkins, Barbara; Hope, Katharine

    2012-09-01

    In addition to being a large component of most zoological collections, reptile species are becoming more popular as family pets. Reptiles have the cognitive ability to be trained to facilitate daily husbandry and veterinary care. Desensitization and operant conditioning can alleviate some of the behavioral and physiological challenges of treating these species. A survey of reptile training programs at zoos in the United States and worldwide reveals that there are many successful training programs to facilitate veterinary care and minimize stress to the animal. Many of the techniques being used to train reptiles in zoological settings are transferable to the exotic pet clinician. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. A new species of Mollitrichosiphum Suenaga from Taiwan Island (Hemiptera, Aphididae), based on morphological characteristics and DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li-Yun; Chen, Jing; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Mollitrichosiphum Suenaga, Mollitrichosiphum tumorisiphum Qiao & Jiang, sp. n., from Fagus longipetiolata in Taiwan island is described. Siphunculi of Mollitrichosiphum tumorisiphum in alatae are distinctly swollen on the distal part, unlike those of the other known species in the genus. Updated keys to apterous and alate viviparous females of all known Chinese species of Mollitrichosiphum are provided. The specimens studied are deposited in the National Zoological Museum of China, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China and the Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom. PMID:26478705

  14. Invasive reptiles and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P P

    2010-08-01

    Although they are frequently lumped together, reptiles and amphibians belong to two very different zoological groups. Nevertheless, one fact is clear: while numerous reptile and amphibian species on Earth are in decline, others have taken advantage of trade or human movements to become established in new lands, adopting different, and sometimes unusual, strategies. The authors have taken a few examples from these two zoological groups that illustrate the majority of cases. A brief analysis of the causes and effects of their introductions into new areas reveals connections with economic interests, trade in companion animals, medical research and public health.

  15. Bronx Zoo cogeneration project

    SciT

    Rivet, P.H.

    The New York Zoological Society commenced feasibility studies for a proposed cogeneration and district heating system for the Bronz Zoo in spring 1982. Early studies focused on evaluating the Zoo's energy loads, infrastructure, and energy delivery and financing systems. The Zoological Society and New York City joined in the decision to support the construction of a system which would serve not only the Bronx Zoo but also five nearby City-funded installations, including the adjacent New York Botanical Garden. Since the submission of that study, the project has been modified in scope, scaling back to a generating capacity designed to servemore » only the Bronz Zoo.« less

  16. Discovering the Science Hidden behind Real Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desforges, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) has a huge collection of unique and curious objects from the natural world that have been loaned to us by HM Revenue and Customs after being seized at the UK border. Among the turtle shells and snake skins, the strangest of these is perhaps the freestanding rhino-foot ash tray. This single object can open up…

  17. 50 CFR 15.21 - General application procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Permits and Approval of Cooperative Breeding Programs § 15.21 General... purposes only: Scientific research; zoological breeding or display programs; cooperative breeding programs...) A person wishing to obtain a permit under this subpart or approval of cooperative breeding programs...

  18. 50 CFR 15.21 - General application procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Permits and Approval of Cooperative Breeding Programs § 15.21 General... purposes only: Scientific research; zoological breeding or display programs; cooperative breeding programs...) A person wishing to obtain a permit under this subpart or approval of cooperative breeding programs...

  19. 36 CFR 520.7 - Gambling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.7 Gambling. Participating in games for money or other personal property or the operation of gambling devices, the conduct of... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gambling. 520.7 Section 520.7...

  20. 36 CFR 520.7 - Gambling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gambling. 520.7 Section 520.7... BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.7 Gambling. Participating in games for money or other personal property or the operation of gambling devices, the conduct of...

  1. 36 CFR § 520.7 - Gambling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gambling. § 520.7 Section Â... BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.7 Gambling. Participating in games for money or other personal property or the operation of gambling devices, the conduct of...

  2. 36 CFR 520.7 - Gambling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gambling. 520.7 Section 520.7... BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.7 Gambling. Participating in games for money or other personal property or the operation of gambling devices, the conduct of...

  3. ASSESSMENT OF IN VITRO ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY IN KRAFT MILL EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of In Vitro Androgenic Activity in Feedlot Effluent. Lambright, CS 1 , Guillette, LJ, Jr.2, Gray, LE, Jr.1 , 1USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC, 2 University of Florida, Dept. of Zoology, Gainesville FL

    Recent studies have shown the presence of androgenic activity in water...

  4. Archaeological and Geomorphological Survey of the Downstream Corridor, Saylorville Lake, Iowa.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    unrelated studies, for anthropology is essentially a fields as diverse as art and zoology. No other field offers more sinteic displre i h adr uplone...mind as well. Conceptually, the three methodologies are almost identical to those employed by Davis (1977) in her surveys of Paleolithic sites in the

  5. Record of genus Xestophrys Redtenbacher, 1891 (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae; Copiphorini) and description of one new species from India.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Mohd Kaleemullah; Usmani, Mohd Kamil

    2018-03-04

    The study deals with one new record of genus Xestophrys Redtenbacher, 1891 (Conocephalinae: Copiphorinae) and one new species from India, and provides species descriptions and illustrations of the male. All type specimens are deposited in the Zoology Museum, Aligarh Muslim University, India.

  6. 76 FR 18239 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... enhancement of the survival of the species. Applicant: Daniel Fore, Austin, TX; PRT-37816A; Applicant: Robert... Argentina for the purpose of scientific research. Applicant: Museum of Zoology and Herbarium, University of... legally accessioned into the permittee's collection for scientific research. This notification covers...

  7. The Elephants Teach: Creative Writing since 1880

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, David Gershom

    2006-01-01

    When Vladimir Nabokov was up for a chair in literature at Harvard, the linguist Roman Jakobson protested: "What's next? Shall we appoint elephants to teach zoology?" That anecdote, with which D. G. Myers begins "The Elephants Teach", perfectly frames the issues this book tackles. Myers explores more than a century of debate over how writing should…

  8. 77 FR 298 - Endangered Species Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... Species: Asian elephant (Elephas maximus). Applicant: Topeka Zoological Park, Topeka, KS; PRT-52995A The...), leopard (Panthera pardus), Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), and Asian elephant (Elephas maximus... pardus) and Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), to enhance their propagation or survival. This notification...

  9. 77 FR 42325 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Issuance of Recovery Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... Department of Health and Environment 064685 01/01/2012 06/30/2017 Detroit Zoo Dakota Zoological Society... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R6-ES-2012-N159; FXES11130600000D2-123-FF06E00000] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Issuance of Recovery Permits AGENCY: Fish and...

  10. 78 FR 64971 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Permits Issued

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    .../8/13 2/7/16 EAST BAY ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 85448A 4/5/13 4/4/16 SHANAHAN, SETH A 231424 4/5/13 4/4/16.../13 4/4/17 HAGAR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 089980 4/12/13 4/11/17 OBERHOFF, DWAYNE N 180579 4/12/13 4/11...

  11. CLASSIFICATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PFIESTERIA AND PFIESTERIA-LIKE SPECIES. (R827084)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dinoflagellates can be classified both botanically and zoologically; however, they are
    typically put in the botanical division Pyrrhophyta. As a group they appear most related to the
    protistan ciliates and apicomplexans at the ultrastructure level. Within the Pyrrhophyta ar...

  12. 9 CFR 93.105 - Inspection at the port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) All commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds, including hatching eggs of ratites, but... an international airport, serviced by Customs, as well as, for Canadian-origin hatching eggs of ratites, ports listed in § 93.107 (c). However, hatching eggs of ratites may be shipped, in bond, from the...

  13. 9 CFR 93.105 - Inspection at the port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) All commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds, including hatching eggs of ratites, but... an international airport, serviced by Customs, as well as, for Canadian-origin hatching eggs of ratites, ports listed in § 93.107 (c). However, hatching eggs of ratites may be shipped, in bond, from the...

  14. 9 CFR 93.105 - Inspection at the port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) All commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds, including hatching eggs of ratites, but... an international airport, serviced by Customs, as well as, for Canadian-origin hatching eggs of ratites, ports listed in § 93.107 (c). However, hatching eggs of ratites may be shipped, in bond, from the...

  15. 36 CFR 520.7 - Gambling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gambling. 520.7 Section 520.7... BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.7 Gambling. Participating in games for money or other personal property or the operation of gambling devices, the conduct of...

  16. 19 CFR 12.29 - Plumage and eggs of wild birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) fully-manufactured artificial flies used for fishing, (4) plumage on game birds killed in foreign.... State game departments, municipal game farms or parks, and public museums, zoological parks or societies... CFR 16.3). The eggs of certain game or migratory birds imported for hatching, such as ducks, geese...

  17. The Natural Classroom: A Directory of Field Courses, Programs, and Expeditions in the Natural Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Jack R.

    The purpose of this book is to increase awareness of the numerous seminars, short courses, field courses, workshops, and programs for teachers, students, naturalists, and independent scholars. These programs emphasize the natural sciences including general biology, botany, zoology, ecology, marine biology, ichthyology, microbiology, natural…

  18. Short Training Course in Oceanography. Red Sea & Gulf of Aden Programme (PERSGA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This document presents a training course in oceanography intended for Junior Bachelor of Science (B.S.) graduates in physics, mathematics, chemistry, zoology, botany or geology to give them the minimum qualifications required to work in any of the marine science stations. This 14-week course, organized by the Arab League Educational, Cultural and…

  19. Emergency Contraception and RU-486 (Mifepristone): Do Bioethical Discussions Improve Learning and Retention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodensteiner, Karin J.

    2012-01-01

    To systematically investigate whether the inclusion of a bioethical discussion improves the learning and retention of biological content, students in two sections of an introductory zoology class were taught the biology behind emergency contraception and RU-486. Students in one section of the course participated in a bioethical discussion, whereas…

  20. Support for Society for Marine Mammalogy 2015 Biennial Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Communicating Science Speakers: • Jane Lubchenco – Distinguished Professor of Zoology and Valley Professor of Marine Biology , Oregon State University...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. FINAL REPORT Support for Society for Marine Mammalogy 2015...Biennial Conference Frances Gulland The Marine Mammal Center 2000 Bunker Rd. Fort Cronkhite Sausolito, CA 94965 phone: (415) 289-7344 fax

  1. AAZPA Annual Conference Proceedings (Columbus, Ohio, September 8-12, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums, Wheeling, WV.

    Papers presented at the 1985 conference of the American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums (AAZPA) are provided in these proceedings. The papers are listed alphabetically by first author in the subject index (table of contents) under these headings: birds (seven papers); conservation and research (eight papers); education (14 papers);…

  2. Perceived Disgust and Personal Experiences are Associated with Acceptance of Dissections in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol; Leskova, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Animal dissections are essential parts of anatomy/zoology courses, but their effectiveness is influenced by student attitudes and emotions. Here we examined attitudes toward dissections in 397 prospective biology teachers enrolling two Slovak universities. Perceived disgust of dissections negatively correlated with other attitudes toward…

  3. What is the Purpose of Biology in Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, J. Steve; Nichols, B. Kim

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes a debate over biology education that took place during a symposium sponsored by the School Science and Mathematics editors in 1908. The six published symposium contributions were meant to address such questions as whether zoology, botany, and human physiology should be studied in one biology course, and what the general purposes for…

  4. Teaching Information Literacy and Scientific Process Skills: An Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souchek, Russell; Meier, Marjorie

    1997-01-01

    Describes an online searching and scientific process component taught as part of the laboratory for a general zoology course. The activities were designed to be gradually more challenging, culminating in a student-developed final research project. Student evaluations were positive, and faculty indicated that student research skills transferred to…

  5. Science Choices and Preferences of Middle and Secondary School Students in Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, J. Hugh; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined grades 6-12 students' (N=2000) preferences and choices regarding science subjects and relationships of these preferences to school type, age, and sex. Findings indicate that zoology and human anatomy/physiology were most preferred while ecology was least preferred. These and other findings are related to a previous study conducted in…

  6. Field Museum of Natural History Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Benjamin W.; Fawcett, W. Peyton

    1986-01-01

    Founded in 1894 to support museum research, the Field Museum of Natural History Library specializes in fields of anthropology, archaeology, botany, geology, palaeontology, and zoology. A rich serials collection and numerous special collections serve both the scientific community and wider public as noncirculating reference collection and through…

  7. Evaluation Techniques for Individualized Instruction: Revision and Summative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englert, DuWayne C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes the collection and analysis of summative data for a slide/tape self-instruction program on an introductory zoology course. Points of concern regarding curricular changes, teaching assistant training, student use, student performance evaluation, development, and revision are discussed from their unique perspectives within the summative…

  8. Who's Who in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Colin

    1983-01-01

    Provides top-rated programs (by university) in biochemistry, botany, cellular/molecular biology, microbiology, physiology, and zoology. Overall scores included with each program were obtained from 1,848 biologists who were asked to rate programs in terms of faculty quality and their effectiveness in educating graduate students. (Author/JN)

  9. Life Sciences and Allied Fields: Indexes and Abstracts, Book Review Indexes, Serials Bibliographies, Translations. Bibliographic Series No. 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colpitts, D. Corinne

    The information sources for the life sciences and allied fields listed were selected from the holdings of the Arkansas University library. Citations include indexes and abstracts dealing with national and international literature in medicine, the biological sciences, environmental science, veterinary medicine, agriculture, botany, and zoology, as…

  10. The Year in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Discover, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights major accomplishments, developments, and research in the sciences during 1982, focusing on the space sciences, astronomy, medicine, biology, psychology, chemistry, physics, environment, and zoology. Includes a brief statement of the 1982 Nobel Prize winners' research in medicine, chemistry, and physics. (JN)

  11. Teaching for Transformative Experience in Science: An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Two Instructional Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of two teaching elements (the artistic crafting of content and the modeling and scaffolding of perception and value) at fostering transformative experiences among students in a high school zoology class. Student outcomes were compared to the outcomes of students in a class taught with a case-based method. Significantly…

  12. An Analysis of Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) in a Science Lecture Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walvoord, Mark E.; Hoefnagels, Marielle H.; Gaffin, Douglas D.; Chumchal, Matthew M.; Long, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) is an online tool being used to integrate a writing component in classrooms. In an introductory zoology lecture class, the authors found that CPR-assigned scores were significantly higher than instructor-assigned scores on two of three essay assignments. They also found that neither students' technical-writing skills…

  13. A Cross-Age Study of Student Understanding of the Concept of Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Susan L.; Marek, Edmund A.

    1991-01-01

    Examines seventh grade life science students, tenth grade biology students, and college zoology students for understanding of the concept of diffusion. Describes the differences among the grade levels in sound or partial understanding, misconceptions, and no understanding. Discusses the effect of developmental level on understanding. (KR)

  14. How-to-Do-It: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Forestry Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipko, Stephen J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a four- to six-week minicourse featuring topics from language arts, law, history, sociology, mathematics, art, and woodworking in addition to botany, zoology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Student study is divided into five phases: tree-ring analysis; forest history; seedling competition; genetic improvement and cloning; and a…

  15. Who's Afraid of Something New?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Today, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Metro High, St. Louis, is described in pictures and words. The school, started in 1972, is a small, experimental school, which encourages self instruction, community involvement, and the use of real situations as learning experiences. The Zoology class, for instance, visits the zoo to study the animals. (SM)

  16. A Cross-Age Study of Student Understanding of the Concept of Homeostasis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Susan L.; Marek, Edmund A.

    1992-01-01

    The conceptual views of homeostasis held by students (n=300) in seventh grade life science, tenth grade biology, and college zoology were examined. A biographical questionnaire, the results from two Piagetian-like developmental tasks, and a concept evaluation statement of homeostasis were collected from each student. Understanding of the concept…

  17. Inquiry-Based Teaching: An Example of Descriptive Science in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehorek, Susan J.

    2004-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning is more work than passive learning, and there is a body of students who prefer to take the easier route. But there is also a body of students who wish to explore science. Two descriptive evolutionary experiments conducted by university freshman/sophomore biology majors, enrolled in General Zoology are described.

  18. Several nomenclatural clarifications on genus-group names in the Aphididae (Hemiptera Sternorrhyncha)

    The aphidologists attending the Eighth International Symposium on Aphids, held in Fremantle (Western Australia, 2005), charged us with the preparation of a Part of the List of Available Names in Zoology devoted to the aphid genus-group names. Our work was greatly facilitated by reference to the list...

  19. Case Studies in CAL!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, David F., Ed.; Smith, P. R., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Ten papers focus on applications in specific curriculum areas, modelling and simulation, and computer managed learning. Projects described include voice support for the visually handicapped, distance education, and industrial training, as well as teaching applied mathematics, several facets of engineering, zoology, and, with videodisc, observation…

  20. Evaluation Techniques for Individualized Instruction: Development and Formative Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedient, Douglas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Steps used in the formative evaluation of a project designed to incorporate self-instructional materials in an introductory zoology course included techniques which: (1) involved colleagues in the material development; (2) assessed relevant student characteristics, expectations, and evaluations; and (3) were used in the examinations. (MBR)

  1. "Careful, Now You Are Both the Learner and the Teacher!": Student Teachers' Evaluation of Inquiry-Based Peer Lecturing as a Tool in Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seroussi, Dominique-Esther; Yaffe, Yossi; Sharon, Rakefet

    2017-01-01

    Linking between pedagogical content knowledge and high-level subject-matter knowledge in science teacher training remains a challenge. This paper analyses the reaction of beginning student teachers to an activity designed for this purpose, "peer lecturing." This activity was a part of the requirements of an introductory zoology course,…

  2. The Year in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Discover, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Highlights scientific accomplishments in 1981. Focuses on space sciences, medicine, geology, chemistry, physics, zoology, paleontology, environmental problems, and genetics including such topics as the Space Shuttle, Mount St. Helen's endangered species, genetic engineering, and the scientists associated with these accomplishments. (JN)

  3. A New Perspective on Teamwork in Teaching: A Report on German Lectures in the Biological Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brancaforte, Charlotte; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A university German department cooperated with the Zoology Department to offer a series of 13 lectures in biology, delivered in German by university scientists on their fields of research. This report discusses the background and atmosphere of the project, evaluates its effects and suggests improvements. (CHK)

  4. Science Education: An Experiment in Facilitating the Learning of Neurophysiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Herbert

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the experiences of a zoology professor attempting to construct a student-centered course in neurophysiology. Various aspects of the organization and conduct of the course are described, including the beginning experience, topics of interest, lecture, laboratory, computer simulation, examinations, student lectures. Evaluation of the…

  5. The Theory of Biology and the Education of Biologists: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, S. A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Questions on evolutionary theory and the philosophy of biology were given to zoology students at three levels: third-year undergraduates; fourth year, honours; and graduates. Responses were assessed independently by a zoologist, an educator, and a philosopher. No students had failed conventional courses, but each author failed nearly half the…

  6. Drawing to Learn Science: Legacies of Agassiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    The use of visual representation to learn science can be traced to Louis Agassiz, Harvard Professor of Zoology, in the mid-19th century. In Agassiz's approach, students were to study nature through carefully observing, drawing and then thinking about what the observations might add up to. However, implementation of Agassiz's student-centered…

  7. A Communication Device for Interfacing Slide/Audio Tape Programs with the Microcomputer for Computer-Assisted Self-Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostetler, Jerry C.; Englert, Duwayne C.

    1987-01-01

    Presents description of an interface device which ties in microcomputers and slide/tape presentations for computer assisted instruction. Highlights include the use of this technology in an introductory undergraduate zoology course; a discussion of authoring languages with emphasis on SuperPILOT; and hardware and software design for the interface.…

  8. What is Sociobiology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Edward O.

    1978-01-01

    The excitement of sociobiology comes from the promise of the role it will play in humanistic investigation. Its potential importance beyond zoology lies in its logical position as the bridging discipline between the natural sciences on the one hand and social sciences and humanities on the other. (Author/AM)

  9. 36 CFR 520.13 - Items to be checked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Items to be checked. 520.13 Section 520.13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.13...

  10. 36 CFR 520.13 - Items to be checked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Items to be checked. 520.13 Section 520.13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.13...

  11. 36 CFR § 520.13 - Items to be checked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Items to be checked. § 520.13 Section § 520.13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.13...

  12. 36 CFR 520.13 - Items to be checked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Items to be checked. 520.13 Section 520.13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.13...

  13. 36 CFR 520.13 - Items to be checked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Items to be checked. 520.13 Section 520.13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION § 520.13...

  14. Exploring Use of New Media in Environmental Education Contexts: Introducing Visitors' Technology Use in Zoos Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocco, Victor; Danter, Elizabeth H.; Heimlich, Joseph E.; Dunckel, Betty A.; Myers, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Modern zoological gardens have invested substantial resources in technology to deliver environmental education concepts to visitors. Investment in these media reflects a currently unsubstantiated belief that visitors will both use and learn from these media alongside more traditional and less costly displays. This paper proposes a model that…

  15. Energy Underground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Catherina L.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a unit to study the cycling of matter and energy through speleology using cooperative learning groups. Integrates the topic with zoology, biogeochemistry, paleontology, and meteorology. Includes a sample rubric for a salt block cave presentation, unit outline, and processes for studying matter and energy processes in caves. (Author/KHR)

  16. University Curricula in the Marine Sciences and Related Fields. Academic Years 1969-70 and 1970-71.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-01-01

    Associate Professor Krause , Dale C., Associate Professor 112 McMaster, Robert L., Ph.D., Associate Professor Smayda, Theodore J., Dr., Philos...Associate Professor of Zoology Division of Physical Sciences Allison, Edwin C., Ph.D., Professor of Geology Berger, Wolfgang , Ph.D., Assistant Professor of

  17. Publication List - New York State Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Museum, Albany.

    Presented is a list of publications in six areas: (1) Anthropology and Archeology, (2) Botany, (3) Entomology, (4) Zoology, (5) Geology and Paleontology, and (6) Miscellaneous. This list was produced by the New York State Department of Education in cooperation with the New York State Museum. The list includes the publication number, author(s),…

  18. Ibex-associated malignant catarrhal fever-like disease in a group of bongo antelope (Tragelaphus euryceros)

    A private zoological facility experienced an outbreak of fatal malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in a group of bongo antelope (Tragelaphus euryceros). Three periparturient female bongos exhibited an acute onset of anorexia beginning ~6 weeks after being housed with a Nubian ibex (Capra nubiana). Disea...

  19. Scaffolding Critical Thinking in the Zone of Proximal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wass, Rob; Harland, Tony; Mercer, Alison

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores student experiences of learning to think critically. Twenty-six zoology undergraduates took part in the study for three years of their degree at the University of Otago, New Zealand. Vygotsky's developmental model of the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) provided a framework as we examined how critical thinking was developed.…

  20. Sharpening a Tool for Teaching: The Zone of Proximal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wass, Rob; Golding, Clinton

    2014-01-01

    Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) provides an important understanding of learning, but its implications for teachers are often unclear or limited and could be further explored. We use conceptual analysis to sharpen the ZPD as a teaching tool, illustrated with examples from teaching critical thinking in zoology. Our conclusions are…

  1. Blue Tigers, Black Tapirs, & the Pied Raven of the Faroe Islands: Teaching Genetic Drift Using Real-Life Animal Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robischon, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Genetic drift is a concept of population genetics that is central to understanding evolutionary processes and aspects of conservation biology. It is frequently taught using rather abstract representations. I introduce three real-life zoological examples, based on historical and recent color morphs of tigers, tapirs, and ravens, that can complement…

  2. 25 CFR 36.32 - Standard XII-Graduation requirements for a high school diploma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., zoology, laboratory anatomy. (5) Physical education—one (1) unit. (6) Practical arts—one (1) unit. Credit... diploma. 36.32 Section 36.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE BASIC EDUCATION OF INDIAN CHILDREN AND NATIONAL CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY...

  3. Oscar Riddle's Science, a Special Bird, & the Founding of the NABT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandervoort, Frances S.

    2013-01-01

    Oscar Riddle, born in Indiana in 1877, was an ardent evolutionist and a key player in the founding of the National Association of Biology Teachers in 1938. He studied heredity and behavior in domestic pigeons and doves with Charles O. Whitman of the University of Chicago, received his Ph.D. in zoology in 1907, and in 1912 began a long career at…

  4. 78 FR 50083 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... a 5-year period. Applicant: Zoological Society of San Diego, San Diego, CA; PRT-08827B The applicant requests a permit to re-import a live female African elephant (Loxodonta africana) born in the wild for the... conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Pinto Ranch, Hunt, TX; PRT-13263B The applicant...

  5. 76 FR 77006 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    .... This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant... covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Virginia Zoological... notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Busch Gardens...

  6. 78 FR 76171 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Theresa.... This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant...-year period. Applicant: Memphis Zoological Garden, Memphis, TN; PRT-671021 The applicant requests...

  7. Aliens in the Classroom: Fantastical Creatures as Tools in Teaching Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Ronald Allan L.

    2013-01-01

    Creatures from science fiction and fantasy can be used to illustrate key concepts and principles in biology. This article describes a project for a university-level general zoology course wherein the students classify, down to at least the phylum level, "animals" from the Alien Species Wiki (2013). This is an online database of creatures from…

  8. 50 CFR 223.206 - Exceptions to prohibitions relating to sea turtles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sea turtles. 223.206 Section 223.206 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... Exceptions to prohibitions relating to sea turtles. (a) Permits—(1) Scientific research, education... purposes, for zoological exhibition, or to enhance the propagation or survival of threatened species of sea...

  9. 50 CFR 223.206 - Exceptions to prohibitions relating to sea turtles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... sea turtles. 223.206 Section 223.206 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... Exceptions to prohibitions relating to sea turtles. (a) Permits—(1) Scientific research, education... purposes, for zoological exhibition, or to enhance the propagation or survival of threatened species of sea...

  10. 50 CFR 223.206 - Exceptions to prohibitions relating to sea turtles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sea turtles. 223.206 Section 223.206 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... Exceptions to prohibitions relating to sea turtles. (a) Permits—(1) Scientific research, education... purposes, for zoological exhibition, or to enhance the propagation or survival of threatened species of sea...

  11. Myotrioza myopori Taylor, a designation of the type species for the genus Myotrioza gen. nov. (Psylloidea: Triozidae).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gary S

    2016-04-04

    Taylor et al. (2016) described twenty new species in one new genus of Australian jumping plant-lice from the plant family Scrophulariaceae but did not nominate a type species, a requirement under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature under Article 13.3 to make the genus name available (ICZN 1999).

  12. 9 CFR 93.103 - Import permits for birds; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND..., commercial birds, research birds, zoological birds, and performing or theatrical birds, intended for... Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road...

  13. 9 CFR 93.103 - Import permits for birds; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND..., commercial birds, research birds, zoological birds, and performing or theatrical birds, intended for... Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road...

  14. 9 CFR 93.103 - Import permits for birds; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND..., commercial birds, research birds, zoological birds, and performing or theatrical birds, intended for... Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road...

  15. 9 CFR 93.103 - Import permits for birds; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND..., commercial birds, research birds, zoological birds, and performing or theatrical birds, intended for... Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road...

  16. 9 CFR 93.103 - Import permits for birds; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND..., commercial birds, research birds, zoological birds, and performing or theatrical birds, intended for... Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road...

  17. 77 FR 74507 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... not operate to the disadvantage of the endangered species, and (3) the granted permit would be.... Zoological Park. 2012. 82880A Big Game Studio 77 FR 54604; September 5, October 17, 2012. 2012. 83520A Donald...; fax (703) 358-2280. Brenda Tapia, Program Analyst/Data Administrator, Branch of Permits, Division of...

  18. Environmental Medicine Specialist (AFSC 90850).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Univ., Gunter AFS, Ala. Extension Course Inst.

    This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for environmental medical specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are (1) control of communicable diseases (principles of epidemiology and biology; food, waterborne, airborne, and sexually transmitted diseases; medical zoology;…

  19. Haemaphysalis (Ornithophysalis) phasiana (Acari: Ixodidae) in the Republic of Korea: Two province records and habitat descriptions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    2000) Prevalence of Lyme disease Borrelia spp. in ticks from migratory birds on the Japanese mainland. Applied Environmental Microbiology, 66, 982–986...in Japan and the isolation of Lyme disease spirochetes from bird-feeding ticks. Japanese Journal of Sanitary Zoology, 44, 315-326. Ree, H.I. (2005

  20. Diseases of whooping cranes seen during annual migration of the Rocky Mountain flock

    Snyder, S. Bret; Richard, Michael J.; Drewien, Roderick C.; Thomas, Nancy J.; Thilsted, John P.; Junge, Randall E.

    1991-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of ill whooping cranes of the Rocky Mountain flock was provided by a zoological facility. Cases of avian cholera, lead poisoning and avian tuberculosis were encountered. The zoo efforts were an adjunct to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Whooping Crane Recovery Plan.

  1. A Kinesthetic Model Demonstrating Molecular Interactions Involved in Anterior-Posterior Pattern Formation in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Kristin R.

    2008-01-01

    Prerequisites for the Developmental Biology course at Augustana College are introductory courses in zoology and cell biology. After introductory courses students appreciate the fact that proteins have three-dimensional structures; however, they often fail to recognize how protein interactions with other cellular components can lead to specific…

  2. 9 CFR 93.105 - Inspection at the port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Birds § 93.105 Inspection at the port of entry. (a) All commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds, including hatching eggs of ratites, but...

  3. Active Engagement with Assessment and Feedback Can Improve Group-Work Outcomes and Boost Student Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, G. W.

    2017-01-01

    This study involves evaluation of a novel iterative group-based learning task developed to enable students to actively engage with assessment and feedback in order to improve the quality of their written work. The students were all in the final semester of their final year of study and enrolled on either BSc Zoology or BSc Marine and Freshwater…

  4. An acute multispecies episode of sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever in captive wild animals in an Italian zoo

    In July 2011, in a zoological garden in Rome, Italy, malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), a fatal, systemic disease of Artiodactyls, was suspected on the basis of neurological signs and gross lesions observed in a banteng, the first animal to die of this infection. An MCF type-specific, one-step PCR wit...

  5. [Scabies among the Zoo mammals].

    PubMed

    Zuchowska, E

    1991-01-01

    Scabies was observed in 9 species of mammals at the Zoological Garden of Lódź in years 1957-1989. Sarcoptes scabiei spp. was found in capybaras, tapirs and camelids. Notoedres cati was recorded from the siberian tiger, but Notoedres sp. from the Erinaceus europaeus. Scabies was also found in a wild dead Tapla europaea at the Zoo area.

  6. First record of the subfamily Anoplophilinae (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) from Russia with description of a new species of the genus Alpinanoplophilus Ishikawa, 1993.

    PubMed

    Storozhenko, Sergey Yu

    2015-06-17

    The subfamily Anoplophilinae (Rhaphidophopridae) is recorded from Russia for the first time. Alpinanoplophilus kurilensis Storozhenko, sp. nov. is described from Kunashir Island. The holotype of the new species is deposited in the Zoological Institute of Russian Academy of Science (St. Petersburg, Russia). A revised key to the species of the genus Alpinanoplophilus Ishikawa, 1993 is provided.

  7. Smithsonian's NOAHS: Keepers of the Ark. The New Explorers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Louisa; McCoy, Barbara; Leong, Kirsten; Wallace, Gwendolyn; Barwick, Allen; Reymund, Trudi

    The New Opportunities in Animal Health Sciences (NOAHS) Center at the National Zoological Park in Washington, DC. is dedicated to expanding understanding of the biological factors, including the critical role of biodiversity, that influence animal survival. This set of activities includes a description of NOAHS and the NOAHS mission, and letters…

  8. Improving Ion Mobility Spectrometry Detection Methods for Trace Forensics and Military Field Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-11

    UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES F. EDWARD HEBERT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 4301 JONES BRIDGE ROAD BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20814-4799...ofPublic Health (Dr.P.H.) Master ofScience Degrees Departmental -Clinical Psychology -Environmental Health Sciences -Medical Psychology -Medical...Zoology -Pathology Interdisciplinary -Emerging Infectious Diseases -Molecular & Cell Biology -Neuroscience -Molecular & Cell Biology -Public Health Masters

  9. The Amateur Zoologist: Explorations and Investigations. Amateur Science Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Mary

    This book contains over 30 investigations and activities that can be used or adapted for science fair projects. It outlines basic techniques and procedures that can be applied to zoological investigations. Projects and activities described include: finding out how many different kinds of insects and other arthropods live in nearby fields and…

  10. 9 CFR 93.500 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... under this part may be obtained from the Area Veterinarian in Charge, Veterinary Services, for the State... Veterinarian in Charge, Veterinary Services, for the State of destination of the shipment. Region. Any defined.... Veterinary Services. The Veterinary Services unit of the Department. Zoological park. A professionally...

  11. 9 CFR 93.500 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... under this part may be obtained from the Area Veterinarian in Charge, Veterinary Services, for the State... Veterinarian in Charge, Veterinary Services, for the State of destination of the shipment. Region. Any defined.... Veterinary Services. The Veterinary Services unit of the Department. Zoological park. A professionally...

  12. 45 CFR 1180.2 - Definition of a museum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Art museums; (5) Children's museums; (6) General museums; (7) Historic houses and sites; (8) History museums; (9) Nature centers; (10) Natural history and anthropology museums; (11) Planetariums; (12) Science and technology centers; (13) Specialized museums; and (14) Zoological parks. (c) For the purposes...

  13. THE COMMUNITY RESOURCES POOL SEMINAR DESCRIPTIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SATURDAY MORNING SEMINARS FOR ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS WERE CONDUCTED WITH PROFESSIONAL RESOURCE PERSONS AS TEACHERS. THE PROGRAM WAS VOLUNTARY. THREE 9-WEEK SEMINARS WERE CONDUCTED IN THE FALL. SUBJECTS STUDIED WERE MICROBIOLOGY AND ZOOLOGY (6TH GRADE), COMPUTER MATH (7TH AND 8TH GRADE), AND CHEMISTRY (GRADES 9-12). DURING THE…

  14. Malignant mast cell tumor in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; White, M R; Janovitz, E B

    1997-01-01

    In November 1995, a malignant mast cell tumor (mastocytoma) was diagnosed in an adult African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) from a zoological park (West Lafayette, Indiana, USA). The primary mast cell tumor presented as a firm subcutaneous mass along the ventrum of the neck. Metastasis to the right submandibular lymph node occurred.

  15. A Strategy for Reorientation of Post-Graduate Courses in Life Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaraman, J.

    1975-01-01

    The Binational Conference on Life Sciences in Bangalore in 1971 made recommendations for reorganization of teaching and research in life sciences (e.g. integration of botany and zoology departments). The author notes administrative reasons why changes have not been implemented and outlines notes administrative reasons why changes have not been…

  16. Chekhovichia, a new generic replacement name for Rotalites Leleshus 1970 (Anthozoa: Heliolitoidea) non Lamarck 1801 (Protista: Foraminifera).

    PubMed

    Doweld, Alexander B

    2015-10-29

    The genus Rotalites was established by Leleshus (1970: 97) for fossil Upper Silurian heliolitoids (Anthozoa) from Southern Tien Shan. However, the name is preoccupied by Rotalites Lamarck (1801: 401) of Foraminifera (Protista) (cf. Loeblich & Tappan, 1987). In accordance with the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, Chekhovichia nom. nov. is proposed here as a replacement name for Rotalites Leleshus non Lamarck.

  17. IN VITRO ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY OF KRAFT MILL EFFLUENT IS ASSOCIATED WITH MASCULINIZATION OF FEMALE FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Vitro Androgenic Activity of Kraft Mill Effluent is Associated with Masculinization of Female Fish. Lambright, CS 1 , Parks, LG 1, Orlando, E 2, Guillette, LJ, Jr.2, Ankley, G 3, Gray, LE, Jr.1 , 1USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC, 2 University of Florida, Dept. of Zoology, Gainesville ...

  18. Promoting Student Learning through the Integration of Lab and Lecture: The Seamless Biology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrowes, Patricia; Nazario, Gladys

    2008-01-01

    The authors engaged in an education experiment to determine if the integration of lab and lecture activities in zoology and botany proved beneficial to student learning and motivation toward biology. Their results revealed that this strategy positively influenced students' academic achievement, conceptual understanding, and ability to apply…

  19. Is Biology Boring? Student Attitudes toward Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Pavol; Prokop, Matel; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2007-01-01

    The study examines the interests and attitudes of school students toward biology: through their interest in out-of-school activities and their attitude towards lessons as measured by interest, importance and difficulty. Biology lessons were relatively popular with the greatest preference found among students learning zoology. Girls showed…

  20. Start Young!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Penni

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early interest in science and how effective it is on career choice in adult stages of life. Recommends starting mathematics and science activities in preschool and kindergarten. Describes how to create a career-oriented learning center in the classroom with examples of kitchen chemistry, nutrition/botany, zoology,…

  1. High School Biology Today: What the Committee of Ten Did Not Anticipate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Since the recommendation of biology (or natural history, as it used to be called) in 1893 as part of the high school science curriculum, biology was considered a descriptive subject. In the late 1890s biology consisted of zoology, botany, and physiology. The group that decided on the high school science course configuration was the Committee of…

  2. 50 Years of JBE: The Evolution of Biology as a School Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    When the "Journal of Biological Education" was first published in 1967, biology was still very much the Cinderella of the three school sciences in many countries. Most selective secondary school biology courses readily betrayed their origins as an unconvincing coalition of botany and zoology. In the non-selective secondary modern…

  3. Academic Performance and Pass Rates: Comparison of Three First-Year Life Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, C. T.

    2009-01-01

    First year students' academic performance in three Life Science courses (Botany, Zoology and Bioscience) was compared. Pass rates, as well as the means and distributions of final marks were analysed. Of the three components (coursework, practical and theory examinations) contributing to the final mark of each course, students performed best in the…

  4. Dissertation Citations in Organismal Biology at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale: Implications for Collection Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabe, Jonathan; Imre, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We report on a citation analysis of Ph.D. dissertations in plant biology and zoology at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, undertaken to test the common assumption that scientists favor current research to such an extent that journal backfiles can be de-emphasized in academic library collections. Results demonstrate otherwise. The study is…

  5. Assessing and Analyzing the Performance of Students in College Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, William C., Jr.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The study investigated specific student behavior in introductory and advanced college laboratories in botany, chemistry, geology, physics, and zoology. Behaviors were observed, described, and classified with no effort made to induce change, detail underlying conditions, or identify correlates. (Author/RE)

  6. The Natural Area: Teaching Tool and Community Catalyst

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Roger M.; Grimm, Floyd M., III

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the properties desirable in a natural area to be used as a teaching tool in college courses such as general biology, botany, zoology, entomology, and ecology. Describes the use of a natural area at Harford Community College, Maryland, and outlines the community involvement in planning and utilizing the area. (JR)

  7. Assessing and Analyzing Behavior Strategies of Instructors in College Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, William C., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Analyzed are university instructor behaviors in introductory and advanced level laboratories of botany, chemistry, geology, physics and zoology. Science Laboratory Interaction Categories--Teacher (SLIC) was used to assess 15 individual categories of teacher behaviors in the areas of questioning, giving directions, transmitting information,…

  8. A catalogue of the types of Stratiomyidae (Diptera: Brachycera) in the collection of the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fachin, Diego Aguilar; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker

    2015-02-12

    Following a recommendation of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, a catalogue of the type specimens of Stratiomyidae (Diptera: Brachycera) held in the collection of the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil (MZUSP) is provided, with information on 30 type specimens (including 14 primary types) of 17 Neotropical species.

  9. Genetic structure of the Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) population: Are tigers in Sikhote-Alin and southwest Primorye truly isolated?

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Pavel A; Rozhnov, Vyatcheslav V; Krasnenko, Anna U; Lukarevskiy, Victor S; Naidenko, Sergey V; Hernandez-Blanco, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    We used molecular genetic analyses to noninvasively identify individual Amur tigers and define subpopulations of tigers in the Russian Far East. We identified 63 individuals after genotyping 256 feces, 7 hair and 11 blood samples collected within southern, central and northern Sikhote-Alin, as well as Southwest Primorye. Analysis of nuclear DNA at 9 microsatellite loci demonstrated greater genetic similarity between animals from southern and northern Sikhote-Alin (some 500 km apart) than between animals from Ussuriskii State Nature Reserve and Southwest Primorye (less than 10 km apart at their nearest point), suggesting that a true barrier exists preventing movements of tigers between Southwest Primorye and the southern Sikhote-Alin Mountains. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Influence of incubation temperature on sea turtle hatchling quality.

    PubMed

    Booth, David T

    2017-09-01

    Since the 1980s it has been known that incubation temperature influences the sex ratio of sea turtle hatchlings emerging from their nests, and there has been much speculation on how global climate change might threaten sea turtle populations by raising nest temperatures and causing highly female-biased hatchling sex ratios. More recently, studies have indicated that incubation temperature can also influence the size and locomotor performance of sea turtle hatchlings. Here I review recent studies that have explored the influence of incubation temperature on sea turtle hatchling quality in terms of hatchling morphology and locomotor performance. I also discuss the likely underlying mechanisms responsible for incubation temperature-induced differences in hatchling locomotor performance, and how an increase in nest temperature associated with global warming might affect recruitment of sea turtle hatchlings. © 2017 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Metaorganisms as the new frontier

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Thomas C.G.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Because it appears that almost all organisms are part of an interdependent meta-organism, an understanding of the underlying host-microbe species associations, and of its evolution and molecular underpinnings, has become the new frontier in zoology. The availability of novel highthroughput sequencing methods together with the conceptual understanding that advances mostly originate at the intersection of traditional disciplinary boundaries, enable biologists to dissect the mechanisms that control the interdependent associations of species. In this perspective article, we outline some of the issues in interspecies interactions, present two case studies illuminating the necessity of interfacial research when addressing complex and fundamental zoological problems, and show that an interdisciplinary approach that seeks to understand co-evolved multi-species relationships will connect genomes, phenotypes, ecosystems and the evolutionary forces that have shaped them. We hope that this article inspires other collaborations of a similar nature on the diverse landscape commonly referred to as “zoology”. PMID:21737250

  12. Conflict resolution of grammar and gender for avian species-group names under Article 31.2.2 of the ICZN Code: is gender agreement worth it?

    PubMed

    Schodde, Richard; Bock, Walter

    2016-06-22

    We analyze recent nomenclatural treatment of selected avian species-group names that may be either adjective and variable or noun and invariable. In 27 such names, we found that 14 previously identified as adjectives are nouns under Article 31.2.2 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. Five of them may require correction in current checklists; they are bresilius in Ramphocelus bresilius (Linnaeus, 1766) to bresilia, germana in Amblyornis macgregoriae germana Rothschild, 1910 to germanus, argentinus in Muscisaxicola cinereus argentinus Hellmayr, 1932 to argentina, martinicus in Porphyrio martinicus (Linnaeus, 1766) to martinica, and moluccus in Threskiornis moluccus (Cuvier, 1829) to molucca. Mindful of the compounding effect of species-genus recombination from taxonomic revision, we reach the conclusion, not new, that the requirement for gender agreement in species-group names is the single biggest cause of nomenclatural instability in zoology. To resolve it, we support replacing gender agreement by original spellings for species-group names.

  13. Relicts from Tertiary Australasia: undescribed families and subfamilies of songbirds (Passeriformes) and their zoogeographic signal.

    PubMed

    Schodde, Richard; Christidis, Les

    2014-04-14

    A number of hitherto unrecognized, deeply divergent taxa of Australasian songbirds have been revealed by DNA sequence studies in the last decade. Differentiation among them is at levels equivalent to family and subfamily rank among songbirds generally. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to name and describe eleven of them formally under Articles 13.1, 13.2, 16.1 and 16.2 of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature so that they are made available for use in zoology. The taxa are: families Oreoicidae, Eulacestomatidae, Rhagologidae, Ifritidae and Melampittidae, and subfamilies Pachycareinae, Oreoscopinae, Toxorhamphinae, Oedistomatinae, Peltopsinae and Lamproliinae. The families to which the subfamilies belong are documented. Morphological and behavioural traits of the new family-group taxa are discussed; reasons for taxonomic rankings are summarized; and grounds for the geographic origin of corvoid songbirds, to which all the new families belong, are briefly addressed. One new genus,Megalampitta in Melampittidae, is also described.

  14. Exposure of Asian Elephants and Other Exotic Ungulates to Schmallenberg Virus.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Fieke M; La Rocca, S Anna; Khatri, Meenakshi; Lopez, Javier; Steinbach, Falko; Dastjerdi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an emerging Orthobunyavirus, first described in 2011 in cattle in Germany and subsequently spread throughout Europe, affecting mainly ruminant livestock through the induction of foetal malformations. To gain a better understanding of the spectrum of susceptible species and to assess the value of current SBV serological assays, screening of serum samples from exotic artiodactyls and perissodactyls collected at the Living Collections from the Zoological Society of London (Whipsnade and London Zoos) and Chester Zoo was carried out. There was compelling evidence of SBV infection in both zoological collections. The competitive ELISA has proved to be applicable for the detection of SBV in exotic Bovidae, Cervidae, Suidae, Giraffidae and most notably in endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), but unreliable for the screening of Camelidae, for which the plaque reduction neutralisation test was considered the assay of choice.

  15. Iron storage disease in tapirs.

    PubMed

    Bonar, Christopher J; Trupkiewicz, John G; Toddes, Barbara; Lewandowski, Albert H

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies of serum iron and iron binding capacity have indicated that tapirs could be at risk of developing hemochromatosis. However, in recent surveys of pathologic findings in tapirs, hemochromatosis was not reported as a cause of death. This study reviews necropsy reports from three species of tapir (Baird's tapir [Tapirus bairdii], Malayan tapir [Tapirus indicus], and Brazilian tapir [Tapirus terrestris]) at the Philadelphia Zoological Garden between 1902 and 1994. Twelve cases of hemosiderosis, including fatal hemochromatosis in two Baird's tapirs, were found among 19 cases examined histologically. Hemochromatosis has previously been reported in the horse, rhinoceros, and in one Brazilian tapir. Dietary factors were investigated but could not be confirmed to have contributed to the incidence of hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis in the three species of tapir in the Philadelphia Zoological Garden collection.

  16. Photokinesis and Djopsin gene expression analysis during the regeneration of planarian eyes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zimei; Yuwen, Yanqing; Sima, Yingxu; Dong, Yanping; Zhan, Huina; Chen, Guangwen; Liu, Dezeng

    2017-03-01

    Planarians provide the ideal model for studying eye development, with their simple eye structure and exceptionally rapid regeneration. Here, we observed the eye morphogenesis, photophobic behavior, spectral sensitivity and expression pattern of Djopsin in the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica. The results showed that: (i) Djopsin encoding the putative protein belonged to the rhabdomeric opsins group and displayed high conservation during animal evolution; (ii) planarians displayed diverse photophobic response to different visible wavelengths and were more sensitive to light blue (495 nm) and yellow (635 nm); (iii) the morphogenesis and functional recovery of eyes were related to the expression pattern of Djopsin during head regeneration; and (iv) Djopsin gene plays a major role in functional recovery during eye regeneration and visual system maintenance in adult planarians. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. The application of the Internet of Things to animal ecology.

    PubMed

    Guo, Songtao; Qiang, Min; Luan, Xiaorui; Xu, Pengfei; He, Gang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Xi, Luo; Jin, Xuelin; Shao, Jianbin; Chen, Xiaojiang; Fang, Dingyi; Li, Baoguo

    2015-11-01

    For ecologists, understanding the reaction of animals to environmental changes is critical. Using networked sensor technology to measure wildlife and environmental parameters can provide accurate, real-time and comprehensive data for monitoring, research and conservation of wildlife. This paper reviews: (i) conventional detection technology; (ii) concepts and applications of the Internet of Things (IoT) in animal ecology; and (iii) the advantages and disadvantages of IoT. The current theoretical limits of IoT in animal ecology are also discussed. Although IoT offers a new direction in animal ecological research, it still needs to be further explored and developed as a theoretical system and applied to the appropriate scientific frameworks for understanding animal ecology. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Taxonomic etymology – in search of inspiration

    PubMed Central

    Jóźwiak, Piotr; Rewicz, Tomasz; Pabis, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a review of the etymology of zoological taxonomic names with emphasis on the most unusual examples. The names were divided into several categories, starting from the most common – given after morphological features – through inspiration from mythology, legends, and classic literature but also from fictional and nonfictional pop-culture characters (e.g., music, movies or cartoons), science, and politics. A separate category includes zoological names created using word-play and figures of speech such as tautonyms, acronyms, anagrams, and palindromes. Our intention was to give an overview of possibilities of how and where taxonomists can find the inspirations that will be consistent with the ICZN rules and generate more detail afterthought about the naming process itself, the meaningful character of naming, as well as the recognition and understanding of names. PMID:26257573

  19. Four odontocete species change hearing levels when warned of impending loud sound.

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Paul E; Supin, Alexander Ya; Pacini, Aude F; Kastelein, Ronald A

    2018-03-01

    Hearing sensitivity change was investigated when a warning sound preceded a loud sound in the false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens), the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), the beluga whale (Delphinaperus leucas) and the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena). Hearing sensitivity was measured using pip-train test stimuli and auditory evoked potential recording. When the test/warning stimuli preceded a loud sound, hearing thresholds before the loud sound increased relative to the baseline by 13 to 17 dB. Experiments with multiple frequencies of exposure and shift provided evidence of different amounts of hearing change depending on frequency, indicating that the hearing sensation level changes were not likely due to a simple stapedial reflex. © 2017 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. For the greater credibility: Jesuit science and education in modern Portugal (1858-1910).

    PubMed

    Malta Romeiras, Francisco

    2018-03-01

    Upon the restoration of the Society of Jesus in Portugal in 1858, the Jesuits founded two important colleges that made significant efforts in the promotion of hands-on experimental teaching of the natural sciences. At the Colégio de Campolide (Lisbon, 1858-1910) and the Colégio de São Fiel (Louriçal do Campo, 1863-1910) the Jesuits created modern chemistry and physics laboratories, organized significant botanical, zoological and geological collections, promoted scientific expeditions with their students to observe eclipses and to collect novel species of animals and plants, and engaged in original research work in physics, botany, and zoology. The successful implementation of modern scientific practices gained these colleges public recognition as the most prominent secondary institutions in nineteenth-century Portugal, and this made a major contribution to countering the widespread and commonly accepted anti-Jesuit accusations of obscurantism and scientific backwardness.

  1. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Vertebrates and Invertebrates Pacific Ocean Region. Report 3. Amphidromous Macrofauna of Hawaiian Island Streams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    history pat- Chordata, Class Osteichthyes; Mol- terns occur in many areas of partic- lusca, Class Gastropoda ; and ular concern to agencies of the Arthropoda...Endemic (Randall, 1840) Phylum Mollusca Class Gastropoda Order Pulmonata Neritina granosa hihiwai Endemic Sowerby, 1825 wi Neritina vespertina hapawai...pp. Thesis. Zoology Department, 24 Haynes, A. 1988. Notes on the Park Resources Studies Unit, stream neritids ( Gastropoda ; Department of Botany

  2. Historical Perspectives on the Use of Microscopes in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, James L

    2017-01-01

    The use of microscopes in dentistry has become quite popular since the late 1980s. However, its origin for dental applications can be traced to the early 20th century, when a microscope, invented by an American biologist named Greenough, working in the Zeiss Company, was adapted for use in dentistry. Initially it had been used in botany, metallurgy, and zoology, in addition to revolutionizing the study of coral and entomology. Copyright American Academy of the History of Dentistry.

  3. [Alternative sources for a history of sciences].

    PubMed

    Edler, F

    In this study we call attention to the importance of Manguinhos' scientific collections, which preserve a major portion of the memory of scientific practice as developed by Brazilian researchers in the field of biomedical sciences. We make use of these collections to approach some little-known aspects of scientific activity: the historical evaluation of forms of zoological classification and efforts as legitimating scientific practice.

  4. An Unwelcome Future: Updating United States Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Strategy Regarding Emerging Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-23

    botany, zoology, microbiology , physiology, biochemistry, and related subjects. This broad term is used throughout the strategy to emphasize the...exports for U.S. based food items, and developing long-term distrust of U.S. products. This is a short list of the likely outcomes of a major biological...successfully deliver a payload directly into the mouse’s stomach wall.21 The micro-motors then dissolved in the acid of the stomach, leaving no trace .22

  5. Physical Effects of Beach Nourishment on Sea Turtle Nesting, Delray Beach, Florida. Environmental Impact Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    Turtles (Cheidra serptina)," Canadian Journal of Zoology, Vol 62, pp 2401-2403. Hendrickson, J. R. 1958. " The Green Turtle , CheZonia mydas (Linn.), in...sea turtle nests in the United States are located in beaches that have been nourished or renourished. Questions have been raised about how physical...changes In the beaches will affect the nesting activities of these sea turtles that use nourished beaches for nesting.’) This study was conducted to

  6. Identifying and managing an adverse food reaction in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus) by an elimination diet trial.

    PubMed

    Monson, Sara; Minter, Larry J; Krouse, Marissa; De Voe, Ryan S

    2014-06-01

    A 16-yr-old polar bear (Ursus maritimus) presented with severe diarrhea shortly following transfer to the North Carolina Zoological Park. Multiple diagnostic procedures were performed over several months and the cause of the chronic diarrhea was inconclusive. Histologically, colonic mucosal biopsies were consistent with severe chronic eosinophilic and lymphoplasmacytic colitis with no evidence of etiologic agents present. A dietary elimination trial was conducted and an adverse food reaction to the dog chow in the diet was confirmed.

  7. The Geology of Guadalcanal: A Selected Bibliography of the Geology, Natural History, and the History of Guadalcanal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Guinea. But critics say that the code will be useless unless island governments back it up with laws that can be enforced. "The code is a quick fix, not a...water are privately described as "unworkable" and "mad". Critics see them as a smoke screen designed to divert attention from a disastrous logging...Walter Creighton. 1969. A New Frog of the Genus Discodeles (Ranidae) from Guadalcanal Island. Cambridge, Mass .: Museum of Comparative Zoology

  8. Southern Hemisphere Humpback Whales Wintering Off Central America: Insights from Water Temperature into the Longest Mammalian Migration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA 5Apartado 292-2300, San José, Costa Rica 6Department of Zoology and Marine Mammal Research Unit, Fisheries Centre, University...temperate to polar waters within the same hemisphere. Both Mathews (1937) and Mackintosh (1942), however, reported humpback whale catches near the...codes bear no relationship to Southern Hemisphere stock designations by the IWC. Southern humpback whales off Central America K. Rasmussen et al. 3 Biol

  9. Movements of Two Satellite-tagged Pygmy Killer Whales (Feresa attenuata) Off the Island of Hawaii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    ac- cessed January 2009) using two independent methods: distance between consecutive locations, and rate and bearings among consecutive movement...Ross Sea, Antarctica. Polar Biology 31:1461–1468. Andrews, K. R., L. Karczmarski, W. W. L. Au, et al. 2010. Rolling stones and stable homes: Social...variation and evidence for population structure in eastern North Pacific false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens). Canadian Journal of Zoology 85

  10. Construction of New Energetics Buildings at the High Explosive Research and Development Facility (HERD) Final Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    fox and bobcat. On occasion the Florida black bear is found in the Sandhills ecological association (U.S. Air Force, 1995). 06/23/03 Construction...tropical air during the summer and continental polar air during the winter. There are two major seasons, summer and winter. Summer occurs from April...Department of Zoology and Wildlife Science and Alabama Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Auburn University, Auburn, AL. 30 August

  11. Worldwide Emerging Environmental Issues Affecting the U.S. Military. April 2008 Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Arctic faster, harder - Polar bears may be at even greater risk http://www.wwf.ca/NewsAndFacts/NewsRoom/default.asp?section=archive&page=display&ID =1586...Derek Smith, professor of infectious disease informatics at Cambridge University’s Department of Zoology , and colleagues at Los Alamos National...ice shelves are breaking off or cracking at a higher rate than feared, noted polar ice researchers who accompanied Canadian Rangers on a patrol

  12. Biodiversity technologies: tools as change agents

    PubMed Central

    Snaddon, Jake; Petrokofsky, Gillian; Jepson, Paul; Willis, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    A meeting on Biodiversity Technologies was held by the Biodiversity Institute, Oxford on the 27–28 of September 2012 at the Department of Zoology, University of Oxford. The symposium brought together 36 speakers from North America, Australia and across Europe, presenting the latest research on emerging technologies in biodiversity science and conservation. Here we present a perspective on the general trends emerging from the symposium. PMID:23221877

  13. Species decline: A perspective on extinction, recovery, and propagation

    Carpenter, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    This keynote address was presented at the Conference on the Conservation of Endangered Species in Zoological Parks and Aquariums on April 18, 1982 at the National Aquarium in Baltimore. It outlines 1) future trends in the world's environment, resources, and population; 2) factors affecting species decline; 3) reasons for preserving life forms; and 4) techniques, with emphasis on captive propagation, used to assist in species recovery.

  14. Marine Science in Southern Wales.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-05

    George Deacon, founder and formerly head of the UK Institute of Oceanographic Sciences, and Sir Alister Hardy, professor emeritus from Oxford University... head up the new oceandraphy program at its inception. Undergraduate teaching began in 1968 with 30 students, and the first gradu- ates in oceanography...Wales. Zoology Prof. E.W. Knight-Jones collaborates with his wife, Phyllis, in the study of the nervous systems, behavior, and embryology of enteropneusta

  15. Analysis and Assessment of Impacts on Biodiversity: Investigating Alternative Futures for the California Mojave Desert

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    in conservation evaluation. Biological Conservation 50:1-11. Maizel, M., R. D. White, S. Gage, L . Osbome, R. Root, S. Stitt and G. Muehlbach. 2000...Bedward, M., R. L . Pressey and D. A. Keith. 1992. A new approach for selecting fully representative reserve networks: Addressing efficiency, reserve...chuckwalla, Sauromalus obesus. University of California Publications in Zoology 101:1-60. Best, T. L . 1995. Spermophilus mohavensis. Mammalian Species

  16. Deployment Area Selection and Land Withdrawal/Acquisition. M-X/MPS (M-X/Multiple Protective Shelter) Environmental Technical Report. Native Americans Nevada/Utah.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-02

    Northern Paiute, Shoshone, Ute, and Southern Paiute peoples developed solutions to natural limitations based upon botanical and zoological expertise and...Land Management and the Forest Service. Other Land-based Activities (3.1.5.2.2) The tribe intends to build a hydroponic greenhouse which will utilize the...other development goals--notably the development of a hydroponic greenhouse utilizing flow from natural wdrm springs on the reservation, and development

  17. Open-Ocean Movements of a Satellite-Tagged Blainville’s Beaked Whale (Mesoplodon densirostris): Evidence for an Offshore Population in Hawaii?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    2008). Satellite tracking reveals distinct movement patterns for Type B and Type C killer whales in the southern Ross Sea, Antarctica. Polar Biology...Deakos, M. H., . . . Mahaffy, S. D. (2008). False killer whales (Pseudorca crassi- dens) around the main Hawaiian Islands: Long-term site fidelity...ern North Pacific false killer whales (Pseudorca crassi- dens). Canadian Journal of Zoology, 85, 783-794. http:// dx.doi.10.1139/Z07-059 Chivers, S. J

  18. Comments on the status of revived old names for some North American birds

    Banks, R.C.; Browning, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss 44 instances of the use of generic, specific, or subspecific names that differ from those generally in use for North American (sensu AOU 1957) birds. These names are generally older than the names presently used and have been revived on the basis of priority. We examine the basis for the proposed changes and make recommendations as to which names should properly be used in an effort to promote nomenclatural stability in accordance with the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature.

  19. Proceedings of the American chestnut symposium

    William L. MacDonald; Franklin C. Cech; John Luchok; Clay Smith

    1978-01-01

    The year was 1904; the place the Bronx Zoological Park in New York City; the beginning of perhaps the greatest single natural catastrophe in the annals of forest history—the discovery of chestnut blight. In less than 50 years more than 80 percent of the American chestnut trees in the eastern hardwood forests were dead; the rest were dying. A tree species that once...

  20. Effects of Stress and Nicotine on Cognitive Function in Male and Female Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-20

    abnormal psychology 109:188-97 84. Shih RA, Glass TA, Bandeen-Roche K, Carlson MC, Bolla KI, et al. 2006. Environmental lead exposure and cognitive...submitted to the Faculty of the Medical and Clinical Psychology Graduate Program Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences In partial...Molecular & Cell Biology -Neuroscience Departmental -Cli.nical Psychology -Environmental Health Sciences -Medical Psychology -Medical Zoology

  1. First record of the genus Ctenipocoris (Heteroptera: Naucoridae) in Central America, with a preliminary key to the American species and description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Federico

    2013-10-31

    A new naucorid species, Ctenipocoris oscari Herrera NEW SPECIES, is herein described for Costa Rica. It is the first species to be described in Central America and the sixth American species. Comparative notes are provided to differentiate this species from the others. Type material is deposited at the Zoological Museum of the University of Costa Rica (MZUCR), San José, Costa Rica. A preliminary key to the American species of the genus is provided.

  2. Zulma Ageitos de Castellanos: Publications and status of described taxa.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Javier H; Urteaga, Diego; Teso, Valeria

    2015-10-28

    Zulma Ageitos de Castellanos was an Argentinian malacologist working in the "Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo" at La Plata University where she taught invertebrate zoology between 1947 and 1990. Her scientific publications are listed in chronological order. Described genus-group and species-group taxa are listed. Information about the type locality and type material, and taxonomic remarks are also provided. Finally, type material of all described taxa was requested and, when located, illustrated.

  3. [Osteomyelitis and papillary renal adenoma in a red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens)].

    PubMed

    Kummerfeld, M; Knieriem, A; Wohlsein, P

    2008-11-01

    A 13 year-old female Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens) kept in a zoological garden was euthanatized due to poor general condition. Pathological examination revealed a chronic bacterial ulcerative to necrotizing dermatitis and osteomyelitis at the lower jaw with subsequent pyogranulomatous pneumonia and diffuse hydropic degeneration of the liver. Additionally, in the kidney a papillary renal adenoma was found. Immunohistochemistry revealed an expression of cytokeratins 8 and/or 19 indicating an origin from the renal tubular epithelium.

  4. Cladocera from bottom deposits as an indicator of changes in climate and ecological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolova, L. A.

    2018-01-01

    Diatoms, pollen, and remains of higher vegetation are used as indicator groups in paleoecological studies. Using certain groups of zoological indicators such as planktonic and benthic organisms (Ostracoda, Cladocera, Chironomidae) has recently become popular in paleolimnology and paleoecology. This study aims to estimate the possibilities, benefits, problems and prospects of Cladocera use in the composition of zoothanatocoenosis of lakes’ sediments as one of the biological indicators in paleoenvironmental studies and paleoreconstructions of abiotic conditions of the past.

  5. The anatomy of the mermaid.

    PubMed

    Heppell, D

    Investigation of the anatomy of the mermaid and of mermaid lore has revealed a tangled web of stories, sightings and specimens of the most diverse nature, extending worldwide into the realms of folklore and legend, zoology and cryptozoology, anatomy, physiology, radiography and folk medicine, ethnography, social history and the history of science. The stereotype we know as the mermaid is surely a fit subject for further serious study

  6. North elevation and second floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North elevation and second floor plan. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Includes physics, geology, and zoology departments shelving. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 4, job no. 311. Scales 1/8 inch to the foot (elevations) and 1/2 inch to the foot (shelving). February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. An Empirical System for Assessing the Impact of Aptitude Requirement Adjustments on Air Force Initial Skills Training.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    below do not apply. (6) lTiansaction Numbcr. Each indi idual transacti. Control performance tests and materials onlN wkhen they is numbered in...Science 3.0 31 Management 2.9 11 Geometry 4.2 32 Marketing 2.7 12 Journalism 3.4 33 Mechanical Theory 3.4 13 Zoology 3.8 34 Merchandising 2.2 14

  8. Fatal Balamuthia mandrillaris infection in a gorilla - first case of balamuthiasis in Germany.

    PubMed

    Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin; Kunze, Marius; Zöller, Martina; Roos, Christian; Kiderlen, Albrecht F; Ludwig, Carsten; Kaup, Franz-Josef

    2011-12-01

    A 12-year-old female western lowland gorilla died in a zoological garden in Germany after exhibiting general neurological signs. Balamuthia mandrillaris was identified as causative agent by indirect immunofluorescent staining of brain sections and confirmed by PCR and respective sequencing. The animal suffered from a chronic progressive necrotizing amebic meningoencephalitis. This is the first case of Balamuthia amebic encephalitis in Germany. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Pragmatic and Idiosyncratic Acts in Human Everyday Routines: The Counterpart of Compulsive Rituals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-25

    Mort3, and David Eilam1 1Department of Zoology, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978, Israel 2Departments of Psychology and Anthropology, Washington...Introduction Repetitive actions are prevalent in normal and abnormal behavior [7]. In normal behavior, repetitive performance takes the form of...unconscious as repository of chronic goals and motives, in: Gollwitzer PM, Bargh JA, Editors. The psychology of action: Linking cognition and

  10. Studies on a middle Pennsylvanian compression-impression flora from the overburden of the Herrin (No. 6) coal at Carterville, Illinois

    SciT

    Gastaldo, R.A.

    Titles and authors of Ph.D dissertations and M.S. theses are listed as completed or near completion in the following areas of study related to coal: botany (10), chemistry (10), community development (1), economics (1), electrical science and systems engineering (1), forestry (7), geography (2), geology (23), health education (2), mathematics (1), zoology (24), mining engineering (9), plant and soil science (4), political science (2), and thermal and environmental engineering (3).

  11. Ecology of estuaries

    SciT

    Kennish, M.J.

    This book is a summary of information available on estuarine ecology, that reviews concepts and problems of estuaries and assesses the value of these coastal systems. It investigates such topics as water circulation and mixing, trace elements, nutrients, organic matter, and sedimentary processes, with reviews on more than two decades of intense study. Chapters reflect contributions from a variety of interdisciplinary sciences including botany, chemistry, ecology, geology, physics, and zoology.

  12. European Science Notes. Volume 41, Number 5.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    Lisbon, from the food and beverage industry. Portugal. The absorption process is fast--it does not require long contact between the fungal mass and the...thousand square meters of buildings were large, the Norwegian authorities estab- consumed by a fire which, at its height, lished the Center for Disaster...riculture and Food Research Council, De- gests that components of both the D-loop partment of Zoology, University of Cam- endoribonuclease and the DNA primase

  13. An occurence records database of Irregular Echinoids (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Melo, Alejandra; Solís-Marín, Francisco Alonso; Buitrón-Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Research on echinoderms in Mexico began in the late nineteenth century. We present a dataset that includes the taxonomic and geographic information of irregular echinoids from Mexico, housed in four collections: 1) Colección Nacional de Equinodermos "Ma. Elena Caso Muñoz" from the Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología (ICML), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM); 2) Invertebrate Zoology Collection, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C., United States of America (USA); 3) Invertebrate Collection, Museum of Comparative Zoology, University of Harvard, Boston, Massachusetts, USA and 4) Invertebrate Zoology, Peabody Museum, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. A total of six orders, 17 families, 35 genera and 68 species are reported, 37 distributed in the Pacific coast and 31 in the Atlantic coast, none of them was found in both coasts. The most diverse region is the Gulf of California (S=32); the most diverse order is Spatangoida with 31 species reported in mexican waters.

  14. Endoparasites of exotic ungulates from the Giraffidae and Camelidae families kept ex situ.

    PubMed

    Nosal, Paweł; Kowal, Jerzy; Kornaś, Sławomir; Wyrobisz, Anna; Skotnicki, Józef; Basiaga, Marta; Plucińska, Natalia E

    2016-01-01

    Giraffes and camels are popular attractions at zoological gardens. In order to present the diversity of parasites infecting exotic ungulates from zoos, faecal samples from three giraffes and six camels from both the Silesian Zoological Garden in Chorzów, and Kraków Zoological Garden, were examined. The research was carried out over a ten-month period in 2013 and 2014. In total, 100 faecal samples from 18 animals were analysed with the use of the McMaster method. Moreover, coccidian oocysts were incubated to investigate their development and larvoscopic examination was conducted to detect the presence of nematode species. Giraffes were infected with coccidia from the genus Eimeria, and gastrointestinal nematodes from the Strongylida order, and Trichuris and Aonhotheca genera. One male giraffe was uninfected. The level of infection in giraffes was low when compared to camels kept in both of the zoos. Limited contact with other animal species contributed greatly to the lower level of infection in camels from Kraków Zoo than those from Chorzów, which were kept in the same enclosure as alpacas and Shetland ponies.

  15. Evolutionary changes of Hox genes and relevant regulatory factors provide novel insights into mammalian morphological modifications.

    PubMed

    Li, Kui; Sun, Xiaohui; Chen, Meixiu; Sun, Yingying; Tian, Ran; Wang, Zhengfei; Xu, Shixia; Yang, Guang

    2018-01-01

    The diversity of body plans of mammals accelerates the innovation of lifestyles and the extensive adaptation to different habitats, including terrestrial, aerial and aquatic habitats. However, the genetic basis of those phenotypic modifications, which have occurred during mammalian evolution, remains poorly explored. In the present study, we synthetically surveyed the evolutionary pattern of Hox clusters that played a powerful role in the morphogenesis along the head-tail axis of animal embryos and the main regulatory factors (Mll, Bmi1 and E2f6) that control the expression of Hox genes. A deflected density of repetitive elements and lineage-specific radical mutations of Mll have been determined in marine mammals with morphological changes, suggesting that evolutionary changes may alter Hox gene expression in these lineages, leading to the morphological modification of these lineages. Although no positive selection was detected at certain ancestor nodes of lineages, the increased ω values of Hox genes implied the relaxation of functional constraints of these genes during the mammalian evolutionary process. More importantly, 49 positively-selected sites were identified in mammalian lineages with phenotypic modifications, indicating adaptive evolution acting on Hox genes and regulatory factors. In addition, 3 parallel amino acid substitutions in some Hox genes were examined in marine mammals, which might be responsible for their streamlined body. © 2017 The Authors. Integrative Zoology published by International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Metaorganisms as the new frontier.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Thomas C G; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2011-09-01

    Because it appears that almost all organisms are part of an interdependent metaorganism, an understanding of the underlying host-microbe species associations, and of evolution and molecular underpinnings, has become the new frontier in zoology. The availability of novel high-throughput sequencing methods, together with the conceptual understanding that advances mostly originate at the intersection of traditional disciplinary boundaries, enable biologists to dissect the mechanisms that control the interdependent associations of species. In this review article, we outline some of the issues in inter-species interactions, present two case studies illuminating the necessity of interfacial research when addressing complex and fundamental zoological problems, and show that an interdisciplinary approach that seeks to understand co-evolved multi-species relationships will connect genomes, phenotypes, ecosystems and the evolutionary forces that have shaped them. We hope that this article inspires other collaborations of a similar nature on the diverse landscape commonly referred to as "zoology". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. "Enfant Terrible": Lancelot Hogben's Life and Work in the 1920s.

    PubMed

    Erlingsson, Steindór J

    2016-08-01

    Until recently the British zoologist Lancelot Hogben (1895-1975) has usually appeared as a campaigning socialist, an anti-eugenicist or a popularizer of science in the literature. The focus has mainly been on Hogben after he became a professor of social biology at the London School of Economics in 1930. This paper focuses on Hogben's life in the 1920s. Early in the decade, while based in London, he focused on cytology, but in 1922, after moving to Edinburgh, he turned his focus on experimental zoology, first concentrating on vertebrate endocrinology and later moving over to the comparative physiology of invertebrate muscle. In the early 1920s Hogben played an active role in the development of experimental zoology in Britain. As such he was a fearless critic of evolutionary and metaphysical speculations. But in this period Hogben's career prospects were seriously hampered by his confrontational nature and serious depression. As a result he was forced to leave Britain in 1925. He first accepted a position in Canada and in the period 1927-1930 he was a professor of zoology in South Africa. This paper will also add crucial new material to James Tabery's recent discussion of the history behind Hogben's ideas about the interaction of heredity and environment in individual development. In addition a previously unknown Lamarckian controversy will be discussed.

  18. Multiple detection of zoonotic variegated squirrel bornavirus 1 RNA in different squirrel species suggests a possible unknown origin for the virus.

    PubMed

    Schlottau, Kore; Hoffmann, Bernd; Homeier-Bachmann, Timo; Fast, Christine; Ulrich, Rainer G; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Donata

    2017-09-01

    The recently discovered variegated squirrel bornavirus 1 (VSBV-1) caused the death of three squirrel breeders in Germany. Subsequent first screening of squirrels with in vivo collected swab samples and a VSBV-1-specific RT-qPCR revealed not only variegated squirrel infections (Sciurus variegatoides), but also Prevost's squirrels (Callosciurus prevostii) as positive for VSBV-1 genome. In this study, 328 squirrels were tested using the established RT-qPCR assays. In 16 individual animals VSBV-1 RNA could be detected; 15 individuals were from small breedings and zoological gardens in Germany, with the remaining individual being from a zoological garden in Croatia. Positive animals belonged to the species C. prevostii, C. finlaysonii, and Tamiops swinhoei within the subfamily Callosciurinae and Sciurus granatensis within the subfamily Sciurinae. Repeated non-invasive oral swab sampling in one holding indicated positive animals months after a first negative result. Besides the oral swabs, VSBV-1 was also detected in fecal (pool) samples allowing the future monitoring of squirrel holdings based on RT-qPCR investigation of such samples. The detection in zoological gardens emphasizes the need for further investigations into the transmission route to humans in order to develop rational public health measures for prevention of transmission. Finally, the detection of several closely related VSBV-1 sequences in squirrels from different subfamilies raises questions as to the origin of the virus.

  19. Feeding live invertebrate prey in zoos and aquaria: Are there welfare concerns?

    PubMed

    Keller, Martha

    2017-09-01

    Invertebrates constitute more than 90% of all species on earth, however, as a rule, humans do not regard invertebrates as creatures that can suffer and they are generally seen as creatures that should be eliminated. As a result, the importance of their welfare may be grossly unappreciated. For instance, the feeding of live food is often viewed as a good method of enrichment and invertebrates are commonly used as live prey in many zoological facilities. As a result, zoos may send mixed messages to their patrons in that welfare is considered only for the invertebrates that are part of their zoological collection and not necessarily for the invertebrates used as feed. Research indicates that many invertebrates possess nociceptors, opioid receptors, and demonstrate behavioral responses indicative of pain sensation. In addition, in some taxa, there may be evidence of higher cognitive functions such as emotions and learning, although studies in this area of research are preliminary and sparse. Therefore, the possibility for suffering exists in many invertebrate species and as such, zoological facilities have an ethical responsibility to take their welfare into consideration. This paper discusses the current research regarding invertebrates' capacity for suffering and discusses methods facilities can use to improve the welfare of their invertebrate live prey. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Lineage-specific evolution of bitter taste receptor genes in the giant and red pandas implies dietary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lei; Wu, Qi; Wang, Le; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Fuwen

    2018-03-01

    Taste 2 receptors (TAS2R) mediate bitterness perception in mammals, thus are called bitter taste receptors. It is believed that these genes evolved in response to species-specific diets. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens styani) in the order Carnivora are specialized herbivores with an almost exclusive bamboo diet (>90% bamboo). Because bamboo is full of bitter tasting compounds, we hypothesized that adaptive evolution has occurred at TAS2R genes in giant and red pandas throughout the course of their dietary shift. Here, we characterized 195 TAS2R genes in 9 Carnivora species and examined selective pressures on these genes. We found that both pandas harbor more putative functional TAS2R genes than other carnivores, and pseudogenized TAS2R genes in the giant panda are different from the red panda. The purifying selection on TAS2R1, TAS2R9 and TAS2R38 in the giant panda, and TAS2R62 in the red panda, has been strengthened throughout the course of adaptation to bamboo diet, while selective constraint on TAS2R4 and TAS2R38 in the red panda is relaxed. Remarkably, a few positively selected sites on TAS2R42 have been specifically detected in the giant panda. These results suggest an adaptive response in both pandas to a dietary shift from carnivory to herbivory, and TAS2R genes evolved independently in the 2 pandas. Our findings provide new insight into the molecular basis of mammalian sensory evolution and the process of adaptation to new ecological niches. © 2017 The Authors. Integrative Zoology published by International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Impact of rewilding, species introductions and climate change on the structure and function of the Yukon boreal forest ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Rudy; Boutin, Stan; Jung, Thomas S; Krebs, Charles J; Taylor, Shawn

    2018-03-01

    Community and ecosystem changes are happening in the pristine boreal forest ecosystem of the Yukon for 2 reasons. First, climate change is affecting the abiotic environment (temperature, rainfall and growing season) and driving changes in plant productivity and predator-prey interactions. Second, simultaneously change is occurring because of mammal species reintroductions and rewilding. The key ecological question is the impact these faunal changes will have on trophic dynamics. Primary productivity in the boreal forest is increasing because of climatic warming, but plant species composition is unlikely to change significantly during the next 50-100 years. The 9-10-year population cycle of snowshoe hares will persist but could be reduced in amplitude if winter weather increases predator hunting efficiency. Small rodents have increased in abundance because of increased vegetation growth. Arctic ground squirrels have disappeared from the forest because of increased predator hunting efficiency associated with shrub growth. Reintroductions have occurred for 2 reasons: human reintroductions of large ungulates and natural recolonization of mammals and birds extending their geographic ranges. The deliberate rewilding of wood bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus canadensis) has changed the trophic structure of this boreal ecosystem very little. The natural range expansion of mountain lions (Puma concolor), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and American marten (Martes americana) should have few ecosystem effects. Understanding potential changes will require long-term monitoring studies and experiments on a scale we rarely deem possible. Ecosystems affected by climate change, species reintroductions and human alteration of habitats cannot remain stable and changes will be critically dependent on food web interactions. © 2017 The Authors. Integrative Zoology published by International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John

  2. Epidemiology of sarcoptic mange in free-ranging raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in Yokohama, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kido, N; Itabashi, M; Takahashi, M; Futami, M

    2013-01-16

    Free-ranging raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) from Nogeyama Zoological Gardens, Kanazawa Zoological Gardens, and Yokohama Zoological Gardens frequently rescued dogs having Sarcoptes scabiei infestation. However, the epidemiology of S. scabiei infestation has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the epidemiology of S. scabiei infestation in raccoon dogs and its influence on the population of masked palm civets in Yokohama, Japan. We examined records of raccoon dog rescue between 1981 and 2010 and classified the dogs into the following 4 categories on the basis of the reason for rescue: dogs with S. scabiei infestation, scabies-infested dogs involved in car accidents, uninfested dogs involved in car accidents, and other reasons for rescue. We found that the number of dogs rescued due to car accidents and other reasons increased from 1989 onwards, and an S. scabiei outbreak was recorded since 1993. The infestation spread from the southern to the northern regions of Yokohama. The total number of raccoon dogs rescued annually peaked in 1995 and declined thereafter. The number of masked palm civets (Paguma larvata) rescued gradually increased with a decline in the number of raccoon dogs rescued. In the present study, we revealed the epidemiology of S. scabiei infestation in the raccoon dog. The outbreak might be induced by the increased population density, and the infestation spread immediately from the southern to the northern regions of Yokohama since 1993. Further, the population of masked palm civets may have increased due to the decrease in the population of the raccoon dog. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Outstanding Soviet zoologist and parasitologist E. N. Pavlovsky--the creator of the theory of natural foci of disease].

    PubMed

    Pavlovskyĭ, L N

    2011-01-01

    The article presents information on the outstanding Soviet Zoology and Parasitology, Academician of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Hero of Socialist Labour, Lieutenant-General of the Medical Service E. N. Pavlovsky, the author of more than 1500 scientific papers, the founder of scientific school, one of the few scholars the twentieth century, approaching the level of scientists and encyclopedists. Considered its contribution to the study of natural foci of diseases has promoted the development of environmental trends in parasitology.

  4. Molpa: A newly recorded genus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) from China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Yang, Zhen; Liu, Chun-Xiang; Zong, Cheng

    2017-12-20

    The genus Molpa Walker was previously considered to be disjunctly distributed in broad-leaf rain forests in India and Malaysia. Here we report one new species Molpa dulongensis sp. nov. from subtropic broad-leaf rain forests in southwestern Yunnan Province in China. This is a part of the Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot area. So we can infer that Molpa is continuously distributed in broad-leaf rain forests found in Oriental Region. Redescription of the genus Molpa and description of the new species Molpa dulongensis sp. nov. are provided. The types are deposited in Insect Collection of Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China (IZCAS).

  5. Detection of European bat lyssavirus 2 (EBLV-2) in a Daubenton's bat (Myotis daubentonii) from Magdeburg, Germany.

    PubMed

    Freuling, Conrad M; Kliemt, Jeannette; Schares, Susann; Heidecke, Dietrich; Driechciarz, René; Schatz, Juliane; Müller, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In Europe bat rabies in Daubenton's bats (Myotisdaubentonii) and in Pond bats (Myotis dasycneme) caused by the European bat lyssavirus 2 (EBLV-2) has been confirmed in less than 20 cases to date. Here we report the second encounter of this virus species in Germany. A Daubenton's bat found grounded in the zoological garden in Magdeburg died shortly after. In the frame of a retrospective study the bat carcass was eventually transferred to the national reference laboratory for rabies at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute for rabies diagnosis. Lyssavirus was isolated and characterized as EBLV-2.

  6. The Results of Development of the Project ZOOINT and its Future Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, I. S.; Lobanov, A. L.; Alimov, A. F.; Medvedev, S. G.; Golikov, A. A.

    The work on a computerization of main processes of accumulation and analysis of the collection, expert and literary data on a systematics and faunistics of various taxa of animal (a basis of studying of a biological diversity) was started in the Zoological Institute in 1987. In 1991 the idea of creating of the software package, ZOOlogical INTegrated system (ZOOINT) was born. ZOOINT could provide a loading operation about collections and simultaneously would allow to analyze the accumulated data with the help of various queries. During execution, the project ZOOINT was transformed slightly and has given results a little bit distinguished from planned earlier, but even more valuable. In the Internet the site about the information retrieval system (IRS) ZOOINT was built also ( ZOOINT ). The implementation of remote access to the taxonomic information, with possibility to work with databases (DB) of the IRS ZOOINT in the on-line mode was scheduled. It has required not only innovation of computer park of the developers and users, but also mastering of new software: language HTML, operating system of Windows NT, and technology of Active Server Pages (ASP). One of the serious problems of creating of databases and the IRS on zoology is the problem of representation of hierarchical classification. Building the classifiers, specialized standard taxonomic databases, which have obtained the name ZOOCOD solved this problem. The lately magnified number of attempts of creating of taxonomic electronic lists, tables and DB has required development of some primary rules of unification of zoological systematic databases. These rules assume their application in institutes of the biological profile, in which the processes of a computerization are very slowly, and the building of databases is in the most rudimentary state. These some positions and the standards of construction of biological (taxonomic) databases should

  7. Microbial biomass and ATP in smelter-polluted forest humus

    SciT

    Baath, E.; Arnebrant, K.; Nordgren, A.

    Many aspects of microbial activity in soil have been studied in connection with heavy metal pollution, but few investigations have included microbial biomass. To study how biomass-C and ATP were affected over a wide range of metal concentrations, these variables have been measured around the Gusum brass mill in south Sweden. Near the smelter more than 20,000 ppm Cu + Zn g{sup {minus}1} dry soil have been found. This area has been extensively studied form microbiological, zoological and botanical points of view.

  8. The Peacock versus the louse (pediculus humanus corporis): one soldier's contribution to combating trench fever in the First World War.

    PubMed

    Peacock, A; Pearson, W

    2010-09-01

    Trench fever became a major worry for the Allied High Command during the First World War because of its debilitating effects on troop performance. The causes of the fever were not previously known, but entomological research identified the body louse (pediculus humanus corporis) as the carrier, and the Royal Army Medical Corps developed effective methods of control through disinfestation. These were markedly influenced by the researches of a young entomologist, Alexander David Peacock, which were conducted under campaign conditions. Peacock subsequently occupied a Chair of Zoology at St. Andrews University for 30 years.

  9. Is photography-based taxonomy really inadequate, unnecessary, and potentially harmful for biological sciences? A reply to Ceríaco et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Stephen E

    2017-01-26

    An opinion piece was recently published in this journal which, remarkably, is less than one page in length, but has 493 authors (signatories) and has gained over 15 thousand reads on ResearchGate in a very short time. Ceríaco et al. (2016) argue for a blanket ban to be imposed on the uncommon practice of basing new species descriptions in zoology on photographic evidence only of the animal. I herein aim to show that their argument is a non sequitur, i.e. their stated reasons do not support their desired conclusion.

  10. Rediscovery of Bembidion (Lymnaeum) nigropiceum (Marsham) (= puritanum Hayward) in Massachusetts, with remarks on biology and habitat (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Bembidiini)

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Robert L.; Rykken, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Bembidion (Lymnaeum) nigropiceum (Marsham) (=puritanum Hayward), a European species introduced into Massachusetts but presumed not to have become established, has been rediscovered during the Boston Harbor Islands All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory undertaken by the Museum of Comparative Zoology and the National Park Service. A summary is presented of treatment of this species in North America. Data on specimens collected are presented, along with observations on habitat and biology. Some speculations are presented about its highly specialized habitat in the gravel pushed up by high tide, which may act as a food-trapping sieve. A few words are included about future actions needed to resolve questions of distribution and behavior. PMID:22379389

  11. A replacement name for Thomasella Santos-Silva, Bezark Martins (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae).

    PubMed

    Santos-Silva, Antonio; Bezark, Larry G

    2018-03-14

            Santos-Silva et al. (2012) described Thomasella as a new genus of Rhinotragini to include a single species from Panama: Ommata (Eclipta) igniventris Giesbert, 1991. However, Thomasella is a junior homonym of Thomasella Fredericks, 1928 (Brachiopoda). To resolve this homonym, in accordance with the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, we are proposing Neothomasella as a new replacement name (nomen novum) for Thomasella Santos-Silva et al. (2012). The new name is a compound of the prefix "neo-" (from Greek νεο-, meaning "new") + Thomasella; feminine gender.

  12. [Cathedrals to sciences or temples of knowledge? The museums of natural sciences of Cordoba, Argentina, by the end of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Tognetti, L

    2001-01-01

    The museums of Botany, Mineralogy and Zoology of the Facultad de Ciencias Físico-Matemáticas were created along with a world wide phenomenon, defined by some authors as the "museum movement," in a time the basics of this movement were being restructured. Thus, this work intends to go over the building stage of the natural history museums in a peripheral domain --- Cordoba by the end of the 19th century --- in order to partially understand this transition process. The strategy is to analyze the collections and find out how and why they were gathered. Two other aspects are also relevant: the human resources and the funds these institutions were granted.

  13. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993. Volume 9. Rome Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Walter Field: Electrical Engineering MS Laboratory: RL/IR Electrical Engineering University of Maine Vol-Page No: 9- 9 Orono, ME 4469-0000 Swindal, J...0000 Tipton, Kevin Field: Zoology MS Laboratory: AL/CF Nutrition and Food Scienc Auburn University Vol-Page No: 7-11 Auburn, AL 36849-5605 Tornow ...deterministic analysis assumed only 1-17 one handling. w ~vA-A-, PPIMAJý PATH Legen(3ND P"ysCaI LinK (forwarid VPC P’ýs Cal L-,* (reverse VPC) Figure 8. OPNET

  14. Darwin's legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susskind, Leonard

    2009-07-01

    Charles Darwin was no theoretical physicist, and I am no biologist. Yet, as a theoretical physicist, I have found much to think about in Darwin's legacy - and in that of his fellow naturalist Alfred Russell Wallace. Darwin's style of science is not usually thought of as theoretical and certainly not mathematical: he was a careful observer of nature, kept copious notes, contributed to zoological collections; and eventually from his vast repertoire of observation deduced the idea of natural selection as the origin of species. The value of theorizing is often dismissed in the biological sciences as less important than observation; and Darwin was the master observer.

  15. Family-group names for termites (Isoptera), redux.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Forty-eight family-group names are identified for insects among the Isoptera (termites), representing a nearly 19% increase since the last compilation less than 10 years ago. Accordingly, these names are newly catalogued, including various updates from the original summary. The name Reticulitermitidae is recognized as a nomen nudum while Caatingatermitinae is newly considered a nomen invalidum, and neither is available in zoological nomenclature. A catalogue of the suprafamilial names for Isoptera is appended. The name Xylophagodea is formally proposed for the Isoptera + Cryptocercidae clade.

  16. Family-group names for termites (Isoptera), redux

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Forty-eight family-group names are identified for insects among the Isoptera (termites), representing a nearly 19% increase since the last compilation less than 10 years ago. Accordingly, these names are newly catalogued, including various updates from the original summary. The name Reticulitermitidae is recognized as a nomen nudum while Caatingatermitinae is newly considered a nomen invalidum, and neither is available in zoological nomenclature. A catalogue of the suprafamilial names for Isoptera is appended. The name Xylophagodea is formally proposed for the Isoptera + Cryptocercidae clade. PMID:22287896

  17. Data standards, sense and stability: Scratchpads, the ICZN and ZooBank

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Edward; Michel, Ellinor

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The International Commission of Zoological Nomenclature has used the Scratchpads platform (currently being developed and maintained by ViBRANT) as the foundation for its redesigned website and as a platform for engaging with its users. The existing Scratchpad tools, with extensions to provide additional functions, have allowed for a major transformation in presentation of linked nomenclatural tools. Continued development of the new website will act as a springboard for the ICZN to participate more fully in the wider community of biodiversity informatics. PMID:22207812

  18. Data Processing System (DPS) software with experimental design, statistical analysis and data mining developed for use in entomological research.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi-Yi; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2013-04-01

    A comprehensive but simple-to-use software package called DPS (Data Processing System) has been developed to execute a range of standard numerical analyses and operations used in experimental design, statistics and data mining. This program runs on standard Windows computers. Many of the functions are specific to entomological and other biological research and are not found in standard statistical software. This paper presents applications of DPS to experimental design, statistical analysis and data mining in entomology. © 2012 The Authors Insect Science © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. Comment on Spracklandus Hoser, 2009 (Reptilia, Serpentes, ELAPIDAE): request for confirmation of availability of the generic name and for the nomenclatural validation of the journal in which it was published (Case 3601; BZN 70:234–237; 71:30–38; 133-135,181-182 ,252-253)

    Rhodin, Anders G.J.; Kaiser, Hinrich; van Dijk, Peter Paul; Wüster, Wolfgang; O’Shea, Mark; Archer, Michael; Auliya, Mark; Boitani, Luigi; Bour, Roger; Clausnitzer, Viola; Contreras-MacBeath, Topiltzin; Crother, Brian I.; Daza, Juan M.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Flores-Villela, Oscar; Frazier, Jack; Fritz, Uwe; Gardner, Alfred L.; Gascon, Claude; Georges, Arthur; Glaw, Frank; Grazziotin, Felipe G.; Groves, Colin P.; Haszprunar, Gerhard; Havaš, Peter; Hero, Jean-Marc; Hoffmann, Michael; Hoogmoed, Marinus S.; Horne, Brian D.; Iverson, John B.; Jäch, Manfred; Jenkins, Christopher L.; Jenkins, Richard K.B.; Kiester, A. Ross; Keogh, J. Scott; Lacher, Thomas E.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Luiselli, Luca; Mahler, D. Luke; Mallon, David P.; Mast, Roderic; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Measey, John; Mittermeier, Russell A.; Molur, Sanjay; Mosbrugger, Volker; Murphy, Robert W.; Naish, Darren; Niekisch, Manfred; Ota, Hidetoshi; Parham, James F.; Parr, Michael J.; Pilcher, Nicolas J.; Pine, Ronald H.; Rylands, Anthony B.; Sanderson, James G.; Savage, Jay M.; Schleip, Wulf; Scrocchi, Gustavo J.; Shaffer, H. Bradley; Smith, Eric N.; Sprackland, Robert; Stuart, Simon N.; Vetter, Holger; Vitt, Laurie J.; Waller, Tomás; Webb, Grahame; Wilson, Edward O.; Zaher, Hussam; Thomson, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In Case 3601 Raymond Hoser has asked the Commission to validate for the purposes of nomenclature the name Spracklandus Hoser, 2009, and ‘the journal in which it was published,’ issue 7 of the Australasian Journal of Herpetology (AJH). We note that the entire run of AJH has been written, edited, and published solely by Hoser. Although his requests to the Commission were presented as narrow and, in his words, ‘routine matters,’ we are convinced that they represent an important tipping-point with broad implications of major concern for zoological taxonomy and nomenclature as a whole and, by extension, the greater scientific community. Since Hoser’s actions and works have failed to follow scientific best practices (e.g. Turtle Taxonomy Working Group, 2007, 2014; Kaiser et al., 2013; Kaiser, 2014) and both the Commission’s general Recommendations and Code of Ethics in Appendix A, the global herpetological community has widely rejected his taxonomic decisions and resultant nomenclature. This has unfortunately caused a confusing dual nomenclature to develop in the herpetological community, with most boycotting or ignoring Hoser’s 700+ new names coined in the AJH, while he and a few personal followers actively promote their usage. We believe that suppression of the name Spracklandus, and all issues of AJH, is the only effective way to bring this contentious and confusing issue to resolution. The plenary power available under Article 81.1 of the Code exist specifically to allow the Commission to make rulings in individual cases that disturb stability and cause confusion, whether the works are Code-compliant or not. We maintain that it is in the interest of nomenclatural stability, not only for herpetology, but for all of zoological taxonomy, that the plenary power be invoked to declare the works in AJH unavailable, regardless of any narrow interpretation of their technical Code-compliance. We present our arguments for rejection of the validity of AJH in the

  20. Diphtheroid colitis in a Boa constrictor infected with amphibian Entamoeba sp.

    PubMed

    Richter, Barbara; Kübber-Heiss, Anna; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2008-05-06

    A female boa (Boa constrictor) from a zoological collection was submitted for necropsy after sudden death. Prominent pathological findings included a diphtheroid colitis, endoparasitism, focal pneumonia and inclusion bodies typical for inclusion body disease (IBD). In the colon entamoebae were identified, which differed in size and distribution from Entamoeba invadens. Gene sequence analysis of the 18S ribosomal RNA revealed 100% similarity with an Entamoeba species from the African bullfrog (Pyxicephalus adspersus), probably Entamoeba ranarum. The snake was possibly immunosuppressed, and the source of infection remains unclear. This is the first report of an infection with an amphibian Entamoeba species associated with colitis in a snake.

  1. Diet at the Roman Village of Virovitica Kiskorija South, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Sostarić, Renata; Radović, Sinisa; Vucković, Kristina Jelincić; Roguljić, Ivana Ozanić

    2015-12-01

    The Virovitica Kiskorija South site was a Roman village. In this paper archaeological, archaeobotanical, and archaeo-zoological finds are presented and interpreted, then compared with similar sites and information available from ancient sources. The site was divided into complexes that made a whole. The finds within each complex are presented and compared to similar archaeological sites, as well as data from ancient written sources. The goal of the paper is to determine which kind of diet was present at this Roman village in Pannonia, and to analyze the differences and similarities between this village and analogous sites.

  2. Fish mycobacteriosis (Tuberculosis)

    Parisot, T.J.; Wood, J.W.

    1959-01-01

    The etiologic agent for the bacterial disease, "fish tuberculosis" (more correctly "mycobacteriosis"), was first observed in carp in 189& from a pond in France. Subsequently similar agents have been isolated from or observed in fish in fresh water, salt water, and brackish water, in fish in aquaria, hatcheries, and natural habitat~ (wild populations of fish). The disease has been recognized as an important infection among hatchery reared salmonid fishes on the West Coast of the United States, and in aquarium fishes such as the neon tetra, the Siamese fighting fish, and in salt water fish held in zoological displays.

  3. Acute amaurotic epilepsy caused by lead poisoning in non-human primates

    SciT

    Zook, B.C.; Sauer, R.M.; Garner, F.M.

    1972-09-15

    Lead poisoning was diagnosed in all of 14 simian primates that died of acute amaurotic epilepsy at the National Zoological Park. Two primates from the Antwerp Zoo included in the original description of acute amaurotic epilepsy were also retrospectively found to have lead poisoning. Diagnosis was based on history, clinical signs, histologic brain lesions, available source of lead, acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies in renal and hepatic cells, and excess lead in liver specimens. It was concluded that acute amaurotic epilepsy should be considered a clinical syndrome of lead intoxication.

  4. Alwyne (Wyn) Cooper Wheeler (1929-2005) and the libraries of the Natural History Museum, London.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ann

    2009-01-01

    As a senior scientist working in the Fish Section of the Department of Zoology at the Natural History Museum, Alwyne (Wyn) Wheeler was a regular library user and well-known to library staff. Always amiable and helpful, and possessing a broad general knowledge of natural history as well as expertise on fishes, Wyn interacted with library staff at all levels. A close working relationship developed where he contributed to section library management and collection building. He also published catalogues of some of the library's most important art collections. This paper celebrates the collaboration between Museum scientist Wyn Wheeler and librarians at the National History Museum.

  5. [Science and nation: romanticism and natural history in the works of E. J. da Silva Maia].

    PubMed

    Kury, L

    1998-01-01

    The works of physician and naturalist Emílio Joaquim da Silva Maia (1808-59) can be viewed as a scientific project that discovers Brazil and its inhabitants. Maia's nationalism and his romantic view of nature formed the underpinnings of his scientific theories, especially his studies on zoological geography. He subordinated the issue of the biological specificity of different regions of the world to his era's debates on the construction of Brazil as an independent nation. In his interpretations of European natural history, Maia endeavored to understand Brazilian nature as a specific achievement of the Cosmos, in keeping with Alexander von Humboldt's approach.

  6. MS Anderson checks on the CEBAS

    1998-01-22

    STS089-357-003 (22-31 Jan. 1998) --- Astronaut Michael P. Anderson, STS-89 mission specialist, works on Endeavour's middeck with the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS), an experiment developed by the German Space Agency (DLR). The CEBAS mini-module, a middeck habitat for aquatic organisms, enables scientists to conduct various gravity-related experiments in the areas of zoology, botany and developmental biology, as well as in interdisciplinary areas such as scientific research on artificial ecosystems. Photo credit: NASA

  7. U.S. Tundra Biome-International Biological Program. U.S. Tundra Biome Publication List.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    Stairs and R.D. Mitchell, Eds.). Columbus: Ohio State University Press, pp. 179-232. /Bib 34-2495/ Miller, P.C. sod L.L. Tieszen (1972) A preliminary...mosses. Ohio Journal of Science, 74(l): 55-59. (1820) /Bib 32-2806/ Rastorfer, J.R. (1976) Caloric values of three Alaskan-Arctic mosses. The Bryologist...and M.K. Yousef (1978) Energy expenditures in reindeer walking on roads and tundra. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 56(2): 215-223. (4053) /Bib 32-3645

  8. Revision of Southern Hemisphere taxa referred to Fosterella (Crustacea: Cirripedia), and their extinction in response to Pleistocene cooling.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, John

    2015-11-01

    Extensive barnacle coquinas (barnamols) formed around New Zealand's North and Chatham Islands during the late Pliocene to early Pleistocene. The inner-shelf megabalanine Fosterella is the primary constituent of these lithofacies, which also include epifaunal bivalves, bryozoans and less modified balanids like Notobalanus and Notomegabalanus. The status of genus Fosterella is reviewed, 3 species are retained and a new genus, Porobalanus, is proposed for Fosterella hennigi, a species restricted to the Early Pliocene of Cockburn Island, Antarctica. Significantly, Fosterella did not survive the New Zealand Pleistocene, although Notobalanus and Notomegabalanus, which have fossil records extending back to the Early Miocene, remain important components of present day cool-temperate Southern Hemisphere faunas. Extinction of Fosterella, in shelf waters off Argentina, is explained through a combination of changing circulatory and sedimentary regimes, competition for food and space, predation and physiological constraints. The driver of these factors was rapid regional cooling. Zoobank registration: urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:DBB1CB34-83E4-48BA-AA10-81823017F37A. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Distinctive diet-tissue isotopic discrimination factors derived from the exclusive bamboo-eating giant panda.

    PubMed

    Han, Han; Wei, Wei; Nie, Yonggang; Zhou, Wenliang; Hu, Yibo; Wu, Qi; Wei, Fuwen

    2016-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis is very useful in animal ecology, especially in diet reconstruction and trophic studies. Differences in isotope ratios between consumers and their diet, termed discrimination factors, are essential for studies of stable isotope ecology and are species-specific and tissue-specific. Given the specialized bamboo diet and clear foraging behavior, here, we calculated discrimination factors for carbon and nitrogen isotopes from diet to tissues (tooth enamel, hair keratin and bone collagen) for the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), a species derived from meat-eating ancestors. Our results showed that carbon discrimination factor obtained from giant panda tooth enamel (ε 13 C diet-enamel = 10.0‰) and nitrogen discrimination factors from hair keratin (Δ 15 N diet-hair = 2.2‰) and bone collagen (Δ 15 N diet-collagen = 2.3‰) were lower, and carbon discrimination factors from hair keratin (Δ 13 C diet-hair = 5.0‰) and bone collagen (Δ 13 C diet-collagen = 6.1‰) were higher than those of other mammalian carnivores, omnivores and herbivores. Such distinctive values are likely the result of a low-nutrient and specialized bamboo diet, carnivore-like digestive system and exceptionally low metabolism in giant pandas. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Characteristics of Wind-Infective Farms of the 2006 Bluetongue Serotype 8 Epidemic in Northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Sedda, Luigi; Morley, David; Brown, Heidi E

    2015-09-01

    Bluetongue is a Culicoides-borne viral disease of livestock. In 2006, northern Europe experienced a major outbreak of this disease with devastating effects on the livestock industry. The outbreak quickly spread over the region, primarily affecting cattle and sheep. A previous analysis of the role of vector flight and wind in the spread of this virus across northern Europe indicated that infection at 1,326 (65%) of the reported infected farms could be traced back to just 599 (29%) farms (wind-infective farms). Rather than focusing on presence or absence of vectors or difference between infected and non-infected farms, we investigate the zoological and environmental characteristics of these 599 wind-infective farms (which can be thought of as super-spreaders) in order to characterize what makes them distinct from non-infective farms. Differences in temperature, precipitation, and the density of sheep at individual farms were identified between these two groups. These environmental and zoological factors are known to affect vector abundance and may have promoted bluetongue virus transmission. Identifying such ecological differences can help in the description and quantification of relative risk in affected areas.

  11. Salmonella surveillance in a collection of rattlesnakes (Crotalus spp.).

    PubMed

    Grupka, Lisa M; Ramsay, Edward C; Bemis, David A

    2006-09-01

    Over the past 15 yr, Salmonella enterica ssp. arizonae (IIIa) 56:z4,z23:- has repeatedly been isolated from individual Crotalus willardi rattlesnakes with progressively debilitating osteomyelitis at the Knoxville Zoological Gardens. In April 2004, the serotype was linked with a fatal case of septicemia in another Crotalus species in this collection. Although the association of IIIa 56:z4,z23:- with disease in this colony of C. willardi is well established, prior disease or isolation of this serotype outside of the C. willardi colony had not been documented previously, and the serotype's distribution throughout the remainder of the Crotalus collection had yet to be determined. Forty-one fecal samples were obtained from each individual (n = 36) or exhibit group (n = 5) of crotalid snakes, representing nine species, housed at the zoo. Salmonella spp. were isolated from every sample, with 21 different serotypes. The 21 serotypes were distributed among S. enterica ssp. I (24%), IIIa (9%), and IIIb (67%). Although not recovered in the primary study, S. arizonae 56:z4,z23:- was recovered from additional samples taken from two C. willardi willardi. Although the overall recovery rate of this serotype from feces has been low, it seems that its distribution among the Crotalus collection at Knoxville Zoological Gardens remains largely restricted to the C. willardi species.

  12. A blind climber: The first evidence of ultrasonic echolocation in arboreal mammals.

    PubMed

    Panyutina, Aleksandra A; Kuznetsov, Alexander N; Volodin, Ilya A; Abramov, Alexei V; Soldatova, Irina B

    2017-03-01

    The means of orientation is studied in the Vietnamese pygmy dormouse Typhlomys chapensis, a poorly known enigmatic semi-fossorial semi-arboreal rodent. Data on eye structure are presented, which prove that Typhlomys (translated as "the blind mouse") is incapable of object vision: the retina is folded and retains no more than 2500 ganglion cells in the focal plane, and the optic nerve is subject to gliosis. Hence, Typhlomys has no other means for rapid long-range orientation among tree branches other than echolocation. Ultrasonic vocalization recordings at the frequency range of 50-100 kHz support this hypothesis. The vocalizations are represented by bouts of up to 7 more or less evenly-spaced and uniform frequency-modulated sweep-like pulses in rapid succession. Structurally, these sweeps are similar to frequency-modulated ultrasonic echolocation calls of some bat species, but they are too faint to be revealed with a common bat detector. When recording video simultaneously with the ultrasonic audio, a significantly greater pulse rate during locomotion compared to that of resting animals has been demonstrated. Our findings of locomotion-associated ultrasonic vocalization in a fast-climbing but weakly-sighted small mammal ecotype add support to the "echolocation-first theory" of pre-flight origin of echolocation in bats. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Patterns and causes of geographic variation in bat echolocation pulses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tinglei; Wu, Hui; Feng, Jiang

    2015-05-01

    Evolutionary biologists have a long-standing interest in how acoustic signals in animals vary geographically, because divergent ecology and sensory perception play an important role in speciation. Geographic comparisons are valuable in determining the factors that influence divergence of acoustic signals. Bats are social mammals and they depend mainly on echolocation pulses to locate prey, to navigate and to communicate. Mounting evidence shows that geographic variation of bat echolocation pulses is common, with a mean 5-10 kHz differences in peak frequency, and a high level of individual variation may be nested in this geographical variation. However, understanding the geographic variation of echolocation pulses in bats is very difficult, because of differences in sample and statistical analysis techniques as well as the variety of factors shaping the vocal geographic evolution. Geographic differences in echolocation pulses of bats generally lack latitudinal, longitudinal and elevational patterns, and little is known about vocal dialects. Evidence is accumulating to support the fact that geographic variation in echolocation pulses of bats may be caused by genetic drift, cultural drift, ecological selection, sexual selection and social selection. Future studies could relate geographic differences in echolocation pulses to social adaptation, vocal learning strategies and patterns of dispersal. In addition, new statistical techniques and acoustic playback experiments may help to illustrate the causes and consequences of the geographic evolution of echolocation pulse in bats. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Sharks senses and shark repellents.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nathan S; Collin, Shaun P

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 70 years of research on shark repellents, few practical and reliable solutions to prevent shark attacks on humans or reduce shark bycatch and depredation in commercial fisheries have been developed. In large part, this deficiency stems from a lack of fundamental knowledge of the sensory cues that drive predatory behavior in sharks. However, the widespread use of shark repellents is also hampered by the physical constraints and technical or logistical difficulties of deploying substances or devices in an open-water marine environment to prevent an unpredictable interaction with a complex animal. Here, we summarize the key attributes of the various sensory systems of sharks and highlight residual knowledge gaps that are relevant to the development of effective shark repellents. We also review the most recent advances in shark repellent technology within the broader historical context of research on shark repellents and shark sensory systems. We conclude with suggestions for future research that may enhance the efficacy of shark repellent devices, in particular, the continued need for basic research on shark sensory biology and the use of a multi-sensory approach when developing or deploying shark repellent technology. © 2014 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Reproductive strategies in males of the world's southernmost lizards.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Jimena B; Medina, Marlin; Kubisch, Erika L; Scolaro, José A; Ibargüengoytía, Nora R

    2017-03-01

    Reproductive and life history patterns in reptiles are tightly related to the environmental conditions, so male reproductive cycles have been historically characterized as continuous, for tropical lizards, or seasonal, for temperate lizards. However, males of Liolaemus and Phymaturus lizards (Liolaemidae), from cold temperate climates of high altitudes or latitudes in Argentina and Chile, have developed a variety of reproductive cycles to coordinate with the short female reproductive season and to deal with the low frequency of reproductive females in the population. Using gonadal histology and morphological analysis, we describe the male reproductive biology, fat storage and sexual dimorphism of the viviparous lizards Liolaemus sarmientoi and Liolaemus magellanicus that inhabit an austral grass steppe at 51°S, in the southern limit of the American continent. Males of L. sarmientoi and L. magellanicus are reproductively available during the entire activity season of approximately 5 months. In addition, males of both species exhibit greater body sizes than females in morphological variables relevant in sexual selection. Meanwhile, females of both species exhibit larger inter-limb length than conspecific males, which suggests fecundity selection to increase space for a larger litter size. The continuous sperm production throughout the activity season allows these liolaemids to mate at any time when females ovulate, representing a selective advantage to deal with the short activity season and the adversities of the cold environment they inhabit. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. The potential drivers in forming avian biodiversity hotspots in the East Himalaya Mountains of Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Fumin; Qu, Yanhua; Song, Gang; Alström, Per; Fjeldså, Jon

    2015-03-01

    Little has been published to describe or interpret Asian biodiversity hotspots, including those in the East Himalayan Mountains of Southwest China (HMSC), thus making necessary a review of the current knowledge. The Pliocene and Pleistocene geological and glacial histories of the Asian continent differ from those of Europe and North America, suggesting different mechanisms of speciation and extinction, and, thus, different responses to climate changes during the Quaternary glaciations. This short review summarizes potential drivers in shaping and maintaining high species richness and endemism of birds in the HMSC. The geographical location at the junction of different biogeographical realms, the wide range of habitats and climates along the extensive elevational range, the complex topography and the distinct geological history of this region have probably contributed to the evolution of an exceptionally species-rich and endemic-rich, specialized montane avian fauna. The Mountain systems in the HMSC may have provided refugia where species survived during the glacial periods and barriers for preventing species dispersal after the glacial periods. More studies are required to further test this refugia hypothesis by comparing more cold-tolerent and warm-tolerent species. © 2014 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Telemetry research on elusive wildlife: A synthesis of studies on giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Connor, Thomas; Hull, Vanessa; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    Telemetry studies that track animals through space and time can lead to advances in scientific understanding that are vital in conservation efforts. For example, telemetry studies of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) have shed light on many aspects of panda biology, but small sample sizes in each separate study make it difficult to draw broad conclusions. To overcome this problem we conducted the first synthesis of all 5 panda telemetry studies conducted to date. Using these data we investigated patterns in 6 main topics: home range, space-use interactions, core areas, movement patterns, seasonal migration and natal dispersal. We found that panda home range sizes do not vary between 2 main mountain ranges (Qionglai and Qinling), as was previously believed. Our results also suggest that female pandas increase their movement in the mating season: a behavior typically attributed only to males. We found and summarized telemetry and genetic evidence for female natal dispersal in the giant panda. Our synthesis highlights the need for additional research relating panda behavior to human disturbance factors, and can aid future studies on giant pandas as well as other species. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Seventy-five years of masting and rodent population peaks in Norway: Why do wood mice not follow the rules?

    PubMed

    Selås, Vidar

    2016-09-01

    Wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) populations are expected to show a peak in autumn in the year after a mast year of sessile oak (Quercus petraea), because stored acorns increase winter survival. In Aust-Agder, South Norway, only 16 of 34 mast years from 1939-2014 were followed by a year with a peak in the wood mouse population. For many of the remaining instances, there rather was a minor peak 2 or 3 years after the mast. In multiple logistic regression models, the probability of a wood mouse population peak after a mast year of sessile oak was positively related to a snow-corrected temperature index of the previous winter and negatively to a small rodent population index of the previous autumn. The present study thus supports the hypothesis that longer periods with snow-free ground and subzero temperatures negatively affect wood mouse winter survival. Because it may be difficult for wood mice to survive on a diet consisting of acorns alone, the negative relationship with the rodent population index of the previous year is most likely caused by an over-exploitation of necessary alternative food resources, such as other plant seeds and arthropods. Stored acorns not utilized during one winter are assumed to benefit wood mice in a succeeding winter, giving a delayed population peak relative to the mast year. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Species longevity in North American fossil mammals.

    PubMed

    Prothero, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    Species longevity in the fossil record is related to many paleoecological variables and is important to macroevolutionary studies, yet there are very few reliable data on average species durations in Cenozoic fossil mammals. Many of the online databases (such as the Paleobiology Database) use only genera of North American Cenozoic mammals and there are severe problems because key groups (e.g. camels, oreodonts, pronghorns and proboscideans) have no reliable updated taxonomy, with many invalid genera and species and/or many undescribed genera and species. Most of the published datasets yield species duration estimates of approximately 2.3-4.3 Myr for larger mammals, with small mammals tending to have shorter species durations. My own compilation of all the valid species durations in families with updated taxonomy (39 families, containing 431 genera and 998 species, averaging 2.3 species per genus) yields a mean duration of 3.21 Myr for larger mammals. This breaks down to 4.10-4.39 Myr for artiodactyls, 3.14-3.31 Myr for perissodactyls and 2.63-2.95 Myr for carnivorous mammals (carnivorans plus creodonts). These averages are based on a much larger, more robust dataset than most previous estimates, so they should be more reliable for any studies that need species longevity to be accurately estimated. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Noninvasive genetics provides insights into the population size and genetic diversity of an Amur tiger population in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Hu, Yibo; Ma, Tianxiao; Nie, Yonggang; Xie, Yan; Wei, Fuwen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding population size and genetic diversity is critical for effective conservation of endangered species. The Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) is the largest felid and a flagship species for wildlife conservation. Due to habitat loss and human activities, available habitat and population size are continuously shrinking. However, little is known about the true population size and genetic diversity of wild tiger populations in China. In this study, we collected 55 fecal samples and 1 hair sample to investigate the population size and genetic diversity of wild Amur tigers in Hunchun National Nature Reserve, Jilin Province, China. From the samples, we determined that 23 fecal samples and 1 hair sample were from 7 Amur tigers: 2 males, 4 females and 1 individual of unknown sex. Interestingly, 2 fecal samples that were presumed to be from tigers were from Amur leopards, highlighting the significant advantages of noninvasive genetics over traditional methods in studying rare and elusive animals. Analyses from this sample suggested that the genetic diversity of wild Amur tigers is much lower than that of Bengal tigers, consistent with previous findings. Furthermore, the genetic diversity of this Hunchun population in China was lower than that of the adjoining subpopulation in southwest Primorye Russia, likely due to sampling bias. Considering the small population size and relatively low genetic diversity, it is urgent to protect this endangered local subpopulation in China. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. A comparison of reproductive parameters of female Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) in the wild and captivity.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiayin; Guo, Yurong; Stott, Philip; Jiang, Guangshun; Ma, Jianzhang

    2016-01-01

    A healthy population of captive Amur tigers might assist recovery of the wild population in Northeast China if individuals were properly prepared and considered suitable for release in the wild. We analyzed the breeding records of 68 female Amur tigers from 1995 to 2010 in the Hengdaohezi Felid Breeding Center of China and compared the reproductive parameters of this population to wild female Amur tigers. We found that the reproductive parameters of the captive population (the age of first parturition, length of gestation and litter survival rate) were not significantly different from those of wild Amur tigers. Differences in birth date and litter size between wild and captive populations may be caused by management protocols for the captive population or insufficient field data from the wild population. Reproductive parameters of females giving birth after losing a litter were similar to parameters of females that did not lose a litter, except for birth date. These results provide no indication of major problems in using captive females for a breeding program for release of cubs into the wild, but additional information is still needed to assess their suitability. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. The Lushan earthquake and the giant panda: impacts and conservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zejun; Yuan, Shibin; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Mingchun

    2014-06-01

    Earthquakes not only result in a great loss of human life and property, but also have profound effects on the Earth's biodiversity. The Lushan earthquake occurred on 20 Apr 2013, with a magnitude of 7.0 and an intensity of 9.0 degrees. A distance of 17.0 km from its epicenter to the nearest distribution site of giant pandas recorded in the Third National Survey was determined. Making use of research on the Wenchuan earthquake (with a magnitude of 8.0), which occurred approximately 5 years ago, we briefly analyze the impacts of the Lushan earthquake on giant pandas and their habitat. An earthquake may interrupt ongoing behaviors of giant pandas and may also cause injury or death. In addition, an earthquake can damage conservation facilities for pandas, and result in further habitat fragmentation and degradation. However, from a historical point of view, the impacts of human activities on giant pandas and their habitat may, in fact, far outweigh those of natural disasters such as earthquakes. Measures taken to promote habitat restoration and conservation network reconstruction in earthquake-affected areas should be based on requirements of giant pandas, not those of humans. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Do human activities influence survival and orientation abilities of larval fishes in the ocean?

    PubMed

    Siebeck, Ulrike E; O'Connor, Jack; Braun, Christoph; Leis, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    The larval stages of most marine fishes spend days to weeks in the pelagic environment, where they must find food and avoid predators in order to survive. Some fish only spend part of their life history in the pelagic environment before returning to their adult habitat, for example, a coral reef. The sensory systems of larval fish develop rapidly during the first few days of their lives, and here we concentrate on the various sensory cues the fish have available to them for survival in the pelagic environment. We focus on the larvae of reef fishes because most is known about them. We also review the major threats caused by human activities that have been identified to have worldwide impact and evaluate how these threats may impact larval-fish survival and orientation abilities. Many human activities negatively affect larval-fish sensory systems or the cues the fish need to detect. Ultimately, this could lead to decreased numbers of larvae surviving to settlement, and, therefore, to decreased abundance of adult fishes. Although we focus on species wherein the larvae and adults occupy different habitats (pelagic and demersal, respectively), it is important to acknowledge that the potential anthropogenic effects we identify may also apply to larvae of species like tuna and herring, where both larvae and adults are pelagic. © 2014 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. A new species of Asterocheres (Copepoda, Siphonostomatoida) with a redescription of A. complexus Stock, 1960 and A. sarsi Bandera & Conradi, 2009.

    PubMed

    Bandera, Eugenia; Conradi, Mercedes

    2014-07-07

    The present paper reviews the material of three species of Asterocheres Boeck 1859 deposited in four different Zoological European museums as part of the ongoing taxonomical revision of this genus. Asterocheres sarsi Bandera & Conradi 2009, the species described by Sars in 1915 as Ascomyzon latum (Brady 1880) and lately recognized as a distinct species by Bandera and Conradi in 2009 is fully described in this paper from material collected by Sars in Norway in 1915 and deposited in The Natural History Museum of the University of Oslo. Asterocheres complexus Stock, 1960 which has been sometimes confused with A. sarsi is redescribed from material collected by Stock in France in 1959 and deposited in the Zoological Museum of the University of Amsterdam. Furthermore, a new species, previously misidentified as A. suberitis Gieisbrecht 1897, from the Norman`s collection of The Natural History Museum of London, is described as A. eugenioi, new species. These three species, A. complexus, A. eugenioi, and A. sarsi share the general appearance of body thanks to the pointed posterolateral angle of the epimeral area of somite bearing leg 3, sometimes slightly produced into backwardly directed processes, and somite bearing leg 4 largely concealed under somite bearing leg 3.

  5. First Asian record of Panthera (Leo) fossilis (Mammalia, Carnivora, Felidae) in the Early Pleistocene of Western Siberia, Russia.

    PubMed

    Sotnikova, Marina V; Foronova, Irina V

    2014-08-01

    A lion-like pantherine felid is described as Panthera (Leo) fossilis from the late Early Pleistocene sediments of the Kuznetsk Basin (Western Siberia, Russia). The find of P. fossilis first recorded in Asia considerably extends the current notion of the eastward expansion of the most ancient lions. The Siberian lion is geologically the oldest form and is dimensionally among the largest members of the group of fossil lions on the Eurasian continent. Although known by mandibular remains only, it is readily distinguished from Panthera (Leo) spelaea by a heavy built mandibular corpus with rectangular profile in the cheek teeth area, a deep, well-outlined and narrow anterior section of the masseteric fossa, and a large p4 supported by a big unreduced anterior root. The Siberian lion shares these features with the European Middle Pleistocene P. fossilis and the American Late Pleistocene P. (Leo) atrox, which suggests their close relationship. P. atrox originated from P. fossilis and was isolated in North America south of the Late Pleistocene ice sheets. This explains why the American lion has retained more primitive features than the coeval Eurasian cave lion P. (L.) spelaea. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Serum concentrations of vitamin D metabolites, vitamins A and E, and carotenoids in six canid and four ursid species at four zoos.

    PubMed

    Crissey, S; Ange, K; Slifka, K; Bowen, P; Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis, M; Langman, C; Sadler, W; Ward, A

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional status for six captive canid species (n=34) and four captive ursid species (n=18) were analyzed. The species analyzed included: African wild dog (Lycaon pictus), arctic fox (Alopex lagopus), gray wolf (Canis lupus), maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baleiyi), red wolf (Canis rufus), brown bear (Ursus arctos), polar bear (Ursus maritimus), spectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatus), and sun bear (Ursus malayanus). Diet information was collected for these animals from each participating zoo (Brookfield Zoo, Fort Worth Zoo, Lincoln Park Zoological Gardens, and North Carolina Zoological Park). The nutritional composition of the diet for each species at each institution met probable dietary requirements. Blood samples were collected from each animal and analyzed for vitamin D metabolites 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)(2)D, vitamin A (retinol, retinyl stearate, retinyl palmitate), vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol) and selected carotenoids. Family differences were found for 25(OH)D, retinol, retinyl stearate, retinyl palmitate and gamma-tocopherol. Species differences were found for all detectable measurements. Carotenoids were not detected in any species. The large number of animals contributing to these data, provides a substantial base for comparing the nutritional status of healthy animals and the differences among them.

  7. Genomic resources and genetic diversity of captive lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis).

    PubMed

    Bock, Friederike; Gallus, Susanne; Janke, Axel; Hailer, Frank; Steck, Beatrice L; Kumar, Vikas; Nilsson, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    The lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) is a spiral-horned antelope native to northeastern Africa. Individuals kept in zoological gardens are suspected to be highly inbred due to few founder individuals and a small breeding stock. A morphological study suggested two distinct subspecies of the lesser kudu. However, subspecies designation and population structure in zoological gardens has not been analyzed using molecular markers. We analyzed one mitochondrial marker and two nuclear intron loci (total: 2,239 nucleotides) in 52 lesser kudu individuals. Of these, 48 individuals were bred in captivity and sampled from seven different zoos. The four remaining individuals were recently captured in Somalia and are currently held in the Maktoum zoo. Maternally inherited mitochondrial sequences indicate substantial amounts of genetic variation in the zoo populations, while the biparentally inherited intron sequences are, as expected, less variable. The analyzed individuals show 10 mitochondrial haplotypes with a maximal distance of 10 mutational steps. No prominent subspecies structure is detectable in this study. For further studies of the lesser kudu population genetics, we present microsatellite markers from a low-coverage genome survey using 454 sequencing technology. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Impacts of natural history and exhibit factors on carnivore welfare.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lance J; Ivy, Jamie A; Vicino, Greg A; Schork, Ivana G

    2018-04-06

    To improve the welfare of nonhuman animals under professional care, zoological institutions are continuously utilizing new methods to identify factors that lead to optimal welfare. Comparative methods have historically been used in the field of evolutionary biology but are increasingly being applied in the field of animal welfare. In the current study, data were obtained from direct behavioral observation and institutional records representing 80 individual animals from 34 different species of the order Carnivora. Data were examined to determine if a variety of natural history and animal management factors impacted the welfare of animals in zoological institutions. Output variables indicating welfare status included behavioral diversity, pacing, offspring production, and infant mortality. Results suggested that generalist species have higher behavioral diversity and offspring production in zoos compared with their specialist counterparts. In addition, increased minimum distance from the public decreased pacing and increased offspring production, while increased maximum distance from the public and large enclosure size decreased infant mortality. These results have implications for future exhibit design or renovation, as well as management practices and priorities for future research.

  9. Prevalence of Amblyomma gervaisi ticks on captive snakes in Tamil Nadu.

    PubMed

    Catherine, B R; Jayathangaraj, M G; Soundararajan, C; Bala Guru, C; Yogaraj, D

    2017-12-01

    Ticks are the important ectoparasites that occur on snakes and transmit rickettsiosis, anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis. A total of 62 snakes (Reticulated python, Indian Rock Python, Rat snakes and Spectacled cobra) were examined for tick infestation at Chennai Snake Park Trust (Guindy), Arignar Anna Zoological Park (Vandalur) and Rescue centre (Velachery) in Tamil Nadu from September, 2015 to June, 2016. Ticks from infested snakes were collected and were identified as Amblyomma gervaisi (previously known as Aponomma gervaisi ). Overall occurrence of tick infestation on snakes was 66.13%. Highest prevalence of tick infestation was observed more on Reticulated Python ( Python reticulatus , 90.91%) followed by Indian Rock Python ( Python molurus , 88.89%), Spectacled cobra ( Naja naja, 33.33%) and Rat snake ( Ptyas mucosa, 21.05%). Highest prevalence of ticks were observed on snakes reared at Chennai Snake Park Trust, Guindy (83.33%), followed by Arignar Anna Zoological Park, Vandalur (60.00%) and low level prevalence of 37.50% on snakes at Rescue centre, Velachery. Among the system of management, the prevalence of ticks were more on captive snakes (70.37%) than the free ranging snakes (37.5%). The presences of ticks were more on the first quarter when compared to other three quarters and were highly significant ( P  ≤ 0.01).

  10. Sperm traits differ between winged and wingless males of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior.

    PubMed

    Schrempf, Alexandra; Moser, Astrid; Delabie, Jacques; Heinze, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Size and shape of sperm cells vary tremendously throughout the animal kingdom. The adaptive significance of this variation is not fully understood. In addition to sperm-female interactions and the environmental conditions, the risk of sperm competition might affect number, morphology and other "quality" traits of sperm. In the male-diphenic ant Cardiocondyla obscurior, winged sneaker males have limited sperm number, because their testes degenerate shortly after adult emergence, as is typical for males of social Hymenoptera. In contrast, wingless fighter males continuously replenish their sperm supply due to their exceptional lifelong spermatogenesis. While winged males usually have to compete with several other winged males for virgin queens, wingless males are able to monopolize queens by killing all other rivals. Hence, this presents a unique system to investigate how alternative reproductive tactics and associated physiology affect sperm morphology and viability. We found that sperm-limited males invest into sperm number instead of sperm size. Variance in sperm length is smaller in winged males, probably reflecting that they have to compete with several other males. Finally, sperm viability is equally high in both male phenotypes. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Visual landmark-directed scatter-hoarding of Siberian chipmunks Tamias sibiricus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongyuan; Li, Jia; Wang, Zhenyu; Yi, Xianfeng

    2016-05-01

    Spatial memory of cached food items plays an important role in cache recovery by scatter-hoarding animals. However, whether scatter-hoarding animals intentionally select cache sites with respect to visual landmarks in the environment and then rely on them to recover their cached seeds for later use has not been extensively explored. Furthermore, there is a lack of evidence on whether there are sex differences in visual landmark-based food-hoarding behaviors in small rodents even though male and female animals exhibit different spatial abilities. In the present study, we used a scatter-hoarding animal, the Siberian chipmunk, Tamias sibiricus to explore these questions in semi-natural enclosures. Our results showed that T. sibiricus preferred to establish caches in the shallow pits labeled with visual landmarks (branches of Pinus sylvestris, leaves of Athyrium brevifrons and PVC tubes). In addition, visual landmarks of P. sylvestris facilitated cache recovery by T. sibiricus. We also found significant sex differences in visual landmark-based food-hoarding strategies in Siberian chipmunks. Males, rather than females, chipmunks tended to establish their caches with respect to the visual landmarks. Our studies show that T. sibiricus rely on visual landmarks to establish and recover their caches, and that sex differences exist in visual landmark-based food hoarding in Siberian chipmunks. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Serum concentrations of lipids, vitamin d metabolites, retinol, retinyl esters, tocopherols and selected carotenoids in twelve captive wild felid species at four zoos.

    PubMed

    Crissey, Susan D; Ange, Kimberly D; Jacobsen, Krista L; Slifka, Kerri A; Bowen, Phyllis E; Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis, Maria; Langman, Craig B; Sadler, William; Kahn, Stephen; Ward, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Serum concentrations of several nutrients were measured in 12 captive wild felid species including caracal (Felis caracal), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), cougar (Felis concolor), fishing cat (Felis viverrinus), leopard (Panthera pardus), lion (Panthera leo), ocelot (Felis pardalis), pallas cat (Felis manul), sand cat (Felis margarita), serval (Felis serval), snow leopard (Panthera uncia) and tiger (Panthera tigris). Diet information was collected for these animals from each participating zoo (Brookfield Zoo, Fort Worth Zoo, Lincoln Park Zoological Gardens and North Carolina Zoological Park). The nutritional composition of the diets at each institution met the probable dietary requirements for each species except for the pallas cat. Blood samples were collected from each animal (n = 69) and analyzed for lipids (total cholesterol, triacylglycerides, HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol), vitamin D metabolites [25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D) and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)(2)D)], vitamin A (retinol, retinyl stearate and retinyl palmitate), vitamin E (alpha- and gamma-tocopherol) and selected carotenoids. Species differences were found for all except triacylglycerides and 1,25(OH)(2)D. Genus differences were found for retinol, retinyl palmitate, retinyl stearate, gamma-tocopherol and beta-carotene. Circulating nutrient concentrations for many of the species in this study have not been reported previously and most have not been compared with the animals' dietary intakes. The large number of animals analyzed provides a substantial base for comparing the serum nutrient concentrations of healthy animals, for both wild and captive exotic species.

  13. Thermoregulatory value of cracking-clay soil shelters for small vertebrates during extreme desert conditions.

    PubMed

    Waudby, Helen P; Petit, Sophie

    2017-05-01

    Deserts exhibit extreme climatic conditions. Small desert-dwelling vertebrates have physiological and behavioral adaptations to cope with these conditions, including the ability to seek shelter. We investigated the temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) regulating properties of the soil cracks that characterize the extensive cracking-clay landscapes of arid Australia, and the extent of their use by 2 small marsupial species: fat-tailed and stripe-faced dunnarts (Sminthopsis crassicaudata and Sminthopsis macroura). We measured hourly (over 24-h periods) the T and RH of randomly-selected soil cracks compared to outside conditions, during 2 summers and 2 winters. We tracked 17 dunnarts (8 Sminthopsis crassicaudata and 9 Sminthopsis macroura) to quantify their use of cracks. Cracks consistently moderated microclimate, providing more stable conditions than available from non-crack points, which often displayed comparatively dramatic fluctuations in T and RH. Both dunnart species used crack shelters extensively. Cracks constitute important shelter for small animals during extreme conditions by providing a stable microclimate, which is typically cooler than outside conditions in summer and warmer in winter. Cracks likely play a fundamental sheltering role by sustaining the physiological needs of small mammal populations. Globally, cracking-clay areas are dominated by agricultural land uses, including livestock grazing. Management of these systems should focus not only on vegetation condition, but also on soil integrity, to maintain shelter resources for ground-dwelling fauna. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. One hundred years of population ecology: Successes, failures and the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Charles J

    2015-05-01

    Population ecology is the most mature of the three subdisciplines of ecology partly because it has a solid mathematical foundation and partly because it can address the primary questions of distribution and abundance with experimental protocols. Yet there is much left to do to integrate our population knowledge into community and ecosystem ecology to help address the global issues of food security and the conservation of biodiversity. Many different approaches are now being developed to bring about this integration and much more research will be necessary to decide which if any will be most useful in achieving our goals of explaining the changes we see in the distribution and abundance of animals and plants. Food web ecology would appear to be the best approach at present because it uses the detailed information of the population ecology of particular species in combination with data on consumer-resource interactions to apply to the applied problems of biodiversity conservation, food security, pest management and disease prevention. If we can use our understanding of population ecology to address the practical problems of our time in a creative way, we will benefit both the human population and the Earth's biodiversity. Much remains to be done. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Effects of short photoperiod on energy intake, thermogenesis, and reproduction in desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueying; Zhao, Zhijun; Vasilieva, Nina; Khrushchova, Anastasia; Wang, Dehua

    2015-03-01

    Desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii) are the least known species in the genus Phodopus with respect to ecology and physiology, and deserve scientific attention, particularly because of their small body size. Here, the responses of energy metabolism and reproductive function to short photoperiods in desert hamsters were investigated. Male and female desert hamsters were acclimated to either long day (LD) (L:D 16:8 h) or short day (SD) photoperiods (L:D 8:16 h) for three months, and then the females were transferred back to an LD photoperiod for a further five months, while at the end of the SD acclimation the males were killed and measurements were taken for serum leptin as well as molecular markers for thermogenesis. We found that like the other two species from the genus Phodopus, the desert hamsters under SD decreased body mass, increased adaptive thermogenesis as indicated by elevated mitochondrial protein content and uncoupling protein-1 content in brown adipose tissue, and suppressed reproduction compared to those under LD. However, different from the other two species, desert hamsters did not show any differences in energy intake or serum leptin concentration between LD and SD. These data suggest that different species from the same genus respond in different ways to the environmental signals, and the desert adapted species are not as sensitive to change in photoperiod as the other two species. © 2014 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. The "Tears of the Virgin" at Lakes Entrance, southeast Australia were made by the intertidal barnacle Chthamalus antennatus (Cirripedia: Thoracica) and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, John S; Newman, William A

    2017-05-01

    Curious eroded depressions, most resembling an eye shedding an elongate tear, are found in gently sloping, intertidal, carbonate-rich arenite outcropping on the sea coast near Lakes Entrance, Victoria, southeast Australia. The depressions, known locally as "Tears of the Virgin," are evidently formed by multiple generations of a barnacle, Chthamalus antennatus Darwin, 1854 in association with cyanobacteria. While the round part of a depression offers the barnacle a modicum of protection from impacts during high tides, it is also partially inhabited by cyanobacteria, which extend into and tend to fill the elongate tear. As such, this appears to be the first case of mutualism between a higher invertebrate and cyanobacteria, with the cyanobacteria reducing the barnacle's risk of desiccation while receiving metabolic wastes from it during low tides. It is also the first record of a balanomorph barnacle eroding calcareous arenite beneath its shell, the net effect of which would be expected to reduce its adhesion to the substrate. However, the siliceous residue, resulting from the barnacle's dissolution of the more than 80% of the calcite-rich sedimentary rock, is sequestered in delicate folds on the inside of the shell wall as it grows. A brief review of cirripedes capable of excavation includes the first photographic documentation of excavation of a mollusc shell by a verrucomorph. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. ["Artificial animals etc." Popular natural history and bourgeois curiosity around 1900].

    PubMed

    Wessely, Christina

    2008-01-01

    During the 19th and early 20th century zoological gardens ranged among the most prominent places of popular natural history While aristocratic owners of earlier menageries installed animal collections mostly to symbolize their power over nature as well as to display their extensive diplomatic relations, the zoological gardens founded from the 1830s onwards all over Europe by members of the local bourgeois elites were supposed to mediate their social and political values by "enjoyably educating" a broader public. The new zoos were introduced as places at the antipodes of the frenzy, noise and motion of modern urban life, as spaces of pure, authentic nature whose observation would teach people a reasonable and responsible way of life in a civilised bourgeois community. Taking the Berlin Zoo as an example this paper questions these programmatic imaginations by showing how popular Naturkunde (natural history) was informed by cultures of urban entertainment and spectacle. It discusses the numerous relations and productive tensions that evolved out of the establishment of a "realm of nature" in the middle of the ever growing modern metropolis and investigates the consequences the zoo's rise as "the city's most important attraction" around the turn of the century had for the public perception of natural history as well as for the institution's scientific program.

  18. Yolk-sac larval development of the substrate-brooding cichlid Archocentrus nigrofasciatus in relation to temperature.

    PubMed

    Vlahos, Nikolaos; Vasilopoulos, Michael; Mente, Eleni; Hotos, George; Katselis, George; Vidalis, Kosmas

    2015-09-01

    In order to conserve and culture the cichlid fish Archocentrus nigrofasciatus, more information about its reproductive biology and its larval behavior and morphogenesis is necessary. Currently, temperatures ranging from 21 to 27 °C are used in ornamental aquaculture hatcheries. Lower temperatures are preferred to reduce the costs of water heating, and 23 °C is usually the selected temperature. However, there is limited information on culturing protocols for ornamental species and most of the information generated on this topic remains scarce. Thus, the present study examines the morphological development of Archocentrus nigrofasciatus during the yolk-sac period up to the age of 100 h post-hatching in relation to 2 temperature regimes used in ornamental aquaculture: a temperature of 27 °C (thermal optimum) and a decreased temperature of 23 °C (thermal tolerance). The results of this study suggest that the 27 °C temperature generates intense morphological changes in yolk-sac development in a shorter period. This has advantages as it reduces the time of yolk-sac larval development, and, thus, minimizes the transition phase to exogenous feeding and maximizes the efficiency at which yolk is converted into body tissues. The present paper provides necessary information to produce freshwater ornamental fish with better practices so as to increase larval survival and capitalize on time for growth. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Correlations between phytohemagglutinin response and leukocyte profile, and bactericidal capacity in a wild rodent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Zhijun

    2015-05-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced swelling is widely used to investigate cell-mediated and innate immunity across different vertebrate taxa. However, its physiological mechanism is still an open question due to the complexity of the involved immune components. In the present study, we measured the synchronous variations of PHA response, the proportion of different subtypes of leukocytes, as well as serum bactericidal capacity in circulation blood at 6, 12 and 24 h after PHA versus PBS injection in striped hamster, Cricetulus barabensis. First, the results showed that PHA responses reached a peak at 6 h postinjection, then sharply declined at 12 h and 24 h postinjection. Serum bactericidal capacity was higher at 6 h and 12 h than at 24 h. The proportion of different subtypes of leukocytes, as well as the ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes did not display significant changes across different time points. Second, PHA response was positively correlated with the proportion of neutrophils and serum bactericidal capacity. The proportion of monocytes was negatively correlated with that of eosinophils and neutrophils. The proportion of basophils was negatively correlated with that of lymphocytes. Our results indicate that earlier enhanced PHA response is important for the striped hamster to cope with changing environmental conditions due to its small body mass, and the increased components of innate immunity in circulation blood may contribute to the enhancement of PHA swelling response. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Apes, skulls and drums: using images to make ethnographic knowledge in imperial Germany.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Marissa H

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, I discuss the development and use of images employed by the Dresden Royal Museum for Zoology, Anthropology and Ethnography to resolve debates about how to use visual representation as a means of making ethnographic knowledge. Through experimentation with techniques of visual representation, the founding director, A.B. Meyer (1840-1911), proposed a historical, non-essentialist approach to understanding racial and cultural difference. Director Meyer's approach was inspired by the new knowledge he had gained through field research in Asia-Pacific as well as new forms of imaging that made highly detailed representations of objects possible. Through a combination of various techniques, he developed new visual methods that emphasized intimate familiarity with variations within any one ethnic group, from skull shape to material ornamentation, as integral to the new disciplines of physical and cultural anthropology. It is well known that photographs were a favoured form of visual documentation among the anthropological and ethnographic sciences at the fin de siècle. However, in the scholarly journals of the Dresden museum, photographs, drawings, tables and etchings were frequently displayed alongside one another. Meyer sought to train the reader's eye through organized arrangements that represented objects from multiple angles and at various levels of magnification. Focusing on chimpanzees, skulls and kettledrums from Asia-Pacific, I track the development of new modes of making and reading images, from zoology and physical anthropology to ethnography, to demonstrate how the museum visually historicized humankind.

  1. Taxonomic research on deep-sea macrofauna in the South China Sea using the Chinese deep-sea submersible Jiaolong.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinzheng

    2017-07-01

    This paper reviews the taxonomic and biodiversity studies of deep-sea invertebrates in the South China Sea based on the samples collected by the Chinese manned deep-sea submersible Jiaolong. To date, 6 new species have been described, including the sponges Lophophysema eversa, Saccocalyx microhexactin and Semperella jiaolongae as well as the crustaceans Uroptychus jiaolongae, Uroptychus spinulosus and Globospongicola jiaolongi; some newly recorded species from the South China Sea have also been reported. The Bathymodiolus platifrons-Shinkaia crosnieri deep-sea cold seep community has been reported by Li (2015), as has the mitochondrial genome of the glass sponge L. eversa by Zhang et al. (2016). The population structures of two dominant species, the shrimp Shinkaia crosnieri and the mussel Bathymodiolus platifrons, from the cold seep Bathymodiolus platifrons-Shinkaia crosnieri community in the South China Sea and the hydrothermal vents in the Okinawa Trough, were compared using molecular analysis. The systematic position of the shrimp genus Globospongicola was discussed based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. © 2017 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Ecological role of the giant root-rat (Tachyoryctes macrocephalus) in the Afroalpine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Šklíba, Jan; Vlasatá, Tereza; Lövy, Matěj; Hrouzková, Ema; Meheretu, Yonas; Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio; Šumbera, Radim

    2017-07-01

    Rodents with prevailing subterranean activity usually play an important role in the ecosystems of which they are a part due to the combined effect of herbivory and soil perturbation. This is the case for the giant root-rat Tachyoryctes macrocephalus endemic to the Afroalpine ecosystem of the Bale Mountains, Ethiopia. We studied the impact of root-rats on various ecosystem features within a 3.5-ha study locality dominated by Alchemilla pasture, which represents an optimal habitat for this species, in 2 periods of a year. The root-rats altered plant species composition, reducing the dominant forb, Alchemilla abyssinica, while enhancing Salvia merjame and a few other species, and reduced vegetation cover, but not the fresh plant biomass. Where burrows were abandoned by root-rats, other rodents took them over and A. abyssinica increased again. Root-rat burrowing created small-scale heterogeneity in soil compactness due to the backfilling of some unused burrow segments. Less compacted soil tended to be rich in nutrients, including carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, which likely affected the plant growth on sites where the vegetation has been reduced as a result of root-rat foraging and burrowing. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. The Prime Minister and the platypus: A paradox goes to war.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Natalie

    2012-03-01

    In February 1943, in the midst of the Second World War, Prime Minister Winston Churchill demanded that a live duck-billed platypus be sent from Australia to Britain. A vigorous male was shipped off but died shortly before arrival in Britain. This request can only be understood if placed in the context of Churchill's passion for exotic pets as well as the rich history of aristocratic menageries and live diplomatic gifts. Obtaining an animal hitherto unseen alive in Europe would have been a great zoological achievement for London Zoo and secured British authority in heated historical taxonomical debates. This zoological triumph, coupled with accomplishing an extravagant enterprise in the middle of war-time austerity would have boosted public morale. Most importantly, despite its death, the platypus, served as a token for mediating the soured relations between Australia and Britain. Churchill's platypus provides a unique case of animal collecting that incorporates effects on international diplomacy and public relations along with a great private eccentricity and passion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hearing characteristics of cephalopods: modeling and environmental impact study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Shi, Feng; Song, Jiakun; Zhang, Xugang; Yu, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods (octopus, squid and cuttlefish) are some of the most intriguing molluscs, and they represent economically important commercial marine species for fisheries. Previous studies have shown that cephalopods are sensitive to underwater particle motion, especially at low frequencies in the order of 10 Hz. The present paper deals with quantitative modeling of the statocyst system in three cephalopod species: Octopus vulgaris, Sepia officinalis and Loligo vulgaris. The octopus's macula/statolith organ was modeled as a 2nd-order dynamic oscillator using parameter values estimated from scanning electron micrograph images. The modeling results agree reasonably well with experimental data (acceleration threshold) in the three cephalopod species. Insights made from quantitative modeling and simulating the particle motion sensing mechanism of cephalopods elucidated their underwater particle motion detection capabilities. Sensitivity to emerging environmental issues, such as low frequency noise caused by near-shore wind farms and increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the ocean, and sensitivity to sounds produced by impending landslides were investigated in octopus using the model. © 2014 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Unravelling the nature of Waiparaconus, a pennatulacean (Cnidaria: Octocorallia) from the Late Mesozoic-Early Cainozoic of the Southern Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, John S; Campbell, Hamish J; Maurizot, Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Enigmatic calcareous conical fossils have been known from marine Paleocene-Eocene sequences of New Zealand since the early 1870s. More recently, similar fossils have been recorded from both Late Cretaceous marine sequences of Western Australia, New Caledonia and Antarctica, and possibly from the Eocene of South America. The present paper extends the record to the late Cretaceous of New Caledonia. These remains are unlike any living taxa, and have been variously interpreted as molluscs (rudistid bivalves), cirripedes (stalked barnacles), annelids and inorganic structures. Assignation to the Cirripedia has been refuted by Buckeridge (1983, 1993), who proposed that the material would be better placed within the Cnidaria. We investigate this hypothesis in light of the New Caledonian material and by comparison with living gorgonians and pennatulaceans, and demonstrate that Waiparaconus is best placed within the Pennatulacea. Waiparaconus zelandicus varies in form somewhat, with 3 morphotypes defined and reinforced by geography. Comment is provided on the imperative to fit organic remains into known groups, with reflection on what may happen if taxa are left in insertae sedis. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Long-term patterns in Iberian hare population dynamics in a protected area (Doñana National Park) in the southwestern Iberian Peninsula: Effects of weather conditions and plant cover.

    PubMed

    Carro, Francisco; Soriguer, Ramón C

    2017-01-01

    The Iberian hare (Lepus granatensis) is a widely distributed endemic species in the Iberian Peninsula. To improve our knowledge of its population dynamics, the relative abundance and population trends of the Iberian hare were studied in the autumns of 1995-2012 in a protected area (Doñana National Park) by spotlighting in 2 different habitats: marshland and ecotones. The average relative abundance was 0.38 hare/km (SD = 0.63) in the marshland and 3.6 hares/km (SD = 4.09) in ecotones. The Iberian hare population exhibited local interannual fluctuations and a negative population trend during the study period (1995-2012). The results suggest that its populations are in decline. The flooding of parts of the marshland in June, July and October favor hare abundance in the ecotone. Hare abundance in the marshland increases as the flooded surface area increases in October. These effects are more pronounced if the rains are early (October) and partially flood the marsh. By contrast, when marsh grasses and graminoids are very high and thick (as measured using the aerial herbaceous biomass [biomass marshland] as a proxy), the abundance of hares decreases dramatically as does the area of the marsh that is flooded (in November). © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Effects of thinning on scatter-hoarding by rodents in temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Yu, Jing; Sichilima, Alfred M; Wang, Weirui; Lu, Jiqi

    2016-05-01

    Deforestation and thinning are human activities that can destabilize the forest ecological system and, consequently, impact significantly on habitat and behavior of forest-dwelling animals. This hypothesis was tested in Yugong in the Mount Taihangshan area by comparing the tracks of tagged seeds of Armeniaca sibirica. in sites of unthinned and thinned forests. Our results showed that: (i) the diversity of vegetation and rodents drastically reduced in sites with thinned forests, compared to unthinned sites; (ii) the amount of both removed and scatter-hoarded seeds significantly declined in sites with thinned forests, compared with the unthinned sites; (iii) there was no significant difference observed in the distance of seed dispersal between the thinned and unthinned areas; and (iv) the thinning did not show a significant change to the model of cache size. These results suggested that the thinning of forests negatively influenced the species richness and food-hoarding behavior of rodents. In addition, the results indicated that the weakened scattered-hoarding might be disadvantageous to seedling recruitment and forest restoration. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Pneumonia from Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in a red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens).

    PubMed

    Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Gibbons, Lynda M; Jefferies, Ryan; Morgan, Eric R; Wenzlow, Nanny; Redrobe, Sharon P

    2009-03-01

    A 9-year-old, male, captive red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens) in an urban zoo in the United Kingdom presented with respiratory distress and weight loss. The animal was euthanatized, and a postmortem examination was performed. The lungs were diffusely consolidated with extensive mineralization. Microscopically, there was extensive obliteration of normal pulmonary architecture by sheets and coalescing nodules of partially mineralized fibrous tissue and granulomatous inflammation centered on large numbers of nematode larvae and eggs. First stage nematode larvae were isolated from lung tissue and were characterized as Angiostrongylus vasorum on the basis of their morphology and sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and the entire second internal transcribed spacer. Although A. vasorum has previously been reported in red pandas in a zoological collection in Denmark, this study is the first reported case in the United Kingdom and occurs against a background of geographical spread and increased incidence of disease in domestic and wild canids. Angiostrongylus vasorum should be considered a differential diagnosis for respiratory disease in the red panda and taken into account when planning parasite and pest control programs for zoological collections.

  9. New species of the giant deep-sea isopod genus Bathynomus (Crustacea, Isopoda, Cirolanidae) from Hainan Island, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Kou, Qi; Chen, Jun; Li, Xinzheng; He, Lisheng; Wang, Yong

    2017-07-01

    Several specimens of the giant deep-sea isopod genus Bathynomus were collected by a deep-sea lander at a depth of 898 m near Hainan Island in the northern South China Sea. After careful examination, this material and the specimens collected from the Gulf of Aden, north-western Indian Ocean, previously reported as Bathynomus sp., were identified to be the same as a new species to the genus. Bathynomus jamesi sp. nov. can be distinguished from the congeners by: the distal margin of pleotelson with 11 or 13 short straight spines and central spine not bifid; uropodal endopod and exopod with distolateral corner slightly pronounced; clypeus with lateral margins concave; and antennal flagellum extending when extended posteriorly reaches the pereonite 3. In addition, Bathynomus jamesi sp. nov. is also supported by molecular analyses based on mitochondrial COI and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The distribution range of the new species includes the western Pacific and north-western Indian Ocean. © 2017 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. A spotlight on snow leopard conservation in China.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Justine S; Zhang, Chengcheng; Shi, Kun; Riordan, Philip

    2016-07-01

    China holds the greatest proportion of the snow leopard's (Panthera uncia) global range and is central to their conservation. The country is also undergoing unprecedented economic growth, which increases both the threats to the snow leopard and the opportunities for its conservation. In this paper we aim to review published literature (from 1950 to 2014) in English and Mandarin on snow leopard ecology and conservation in China in order to identify thematic and geographic research gaps and propose research priorities. We first retrieved all published items that considered snow leopards in China (n = 106). We extracted from these papers 274 reports of snow leopard presence in China. We then reviewed a subset of papers (n = 33) of this literature, which specifically focused on snow leopard ecology and conservation within China. We introduced a thematic framework that allows a structured and comprehensive assessment of findings. This framework recognizes 4 critical and interrelated topics underpinning snow leopard ecology and conservation: habitat (distribution and protected area coverage); prey (distribution and abundance, predator-prey relationships); human interactions (hunting and trade, livestock interactions and conflicts); and the underlying policy context. Significant gains in knowledge as well as research gaps and priorities are discussed with reference to our framework. The modest quantity and limited scope of published research on the snow leopard in China calls for a continued and intensified effort to inform and support national conservation policies. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Contextual influences on animal decision-making: Significance for behavior-based wildlife conservation and management.

    PubMed

    Owen, Megan A; Swaisgood, Ronald R; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2017-01-01

    Survival and successful reproduction require animals to make critical decisions amidst a naturally dynamic environmental and social background (i.e. "context"). However, human activities have pervasively, and rapidly, extended contextual variation into evolutionarily novel territory, potentially rendering evolved animal decision-making mechanisms and strategies maladaptive. We suggest that explicitly focusing on animal decision-making (ADM), by integrating and applying findings from studies of sensory ecology, cognitive psychology, behavioral economics and eco-evolutionary strategies, may enhance our understanding of, and our ability to predict how, human-driven changes in the environment and population demography will influence animal populations. Fundamentally, the decisions animals make involve evolved mechanisms, and behaviors emerge from the combined action of sensory integration, cognitive mechanisms and strategic rules of thumb, and any of these processes may have a disproportionate influence on behavior. Although there is extensive literature exploring ADM, it generally reflects a canalized, discipline-specific approach that lacks a unified conceptual framework. As a result, there has been limited application of ADM theory and research findings into predictive models that can enhance management outcomes, even though it is likely that the relative resilience of species to rapid environmental change is fundamentally a result of how ADM is linked to contextual variation. Here, we focus on how context influences ADM, and highlight ideas and results that may be most applicable to conservation biology. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Dispersal of invasive Phytolacca americana seeds by birds in an urban garden in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Yang, Wen; Fang, Shubo; Li, Xinhai; Liu, Zhanchen; Leng, Xin; An, Shuqing

    2017-01-01

    Although seed dispersal is a key process determining the regeneration and spread of invasive plant populations, few studies have explicitly addressed the link between dispersal vector behavior and seedling recruitment to gain insight into the invasion process within an urban garden context. We evaluated the role of bird vectors in the dispersal of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), a North American herb that is invasive in urban gardens in China. Fruiting P. americana attracted both generalist and specialist bird species that fed on and dispersed its seeds. The generalist species Pycnonotus sinensis and Urocissa erythrorhyncha were the most frequent dispersers. Seedling numbers of P. americana were strongly associated with the perching behavior of frugivorous birds. If newly recruited bird species use seedling-safe perching sites, the P. americana will regenerate faster, which would enhance its invasive potential. Based on our observations, we conclude that the 2 main bird vectors, P. sinensis and U. erythrorhyncha, provide potential effective dispersal agents for P. americana. Our results highlight the role of native birds in seed dispersal of invasive plants in urban gardens. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. An optimized high quality male DNA extraction from spermatophores in open thelycum shrimp species.

    PubMed

    Planella, Laia; Heras, Sandra; Vera, Manuel; García-Marín, José-Luis; Roldán, María Inés

    2017-09-01

    The crucial step of most of the current genetic studies is the extraction of DNA of sufficient quantity and quality. Several genomic DNA isolation methods have been described to successfully obtain male DNA from shrimp species. However, all current protocols require invasive handling methods with males for DNA isolation. Using Aristeus antennatus as a model we tested a reliable non-invasive differential DNA extraction method to male DNA isolation from spermatophores attached to female thelycum. The present protocol provides high quality and quantity DNA for polymerase chain reaction amplification and male genotyping. This new approach could be useful to experimental shrimp culture to select sires with relevant genetic patterns for selective breeding programs. More importantly, it can be applied to identify the mating pairs and male structure in wild populations of species as A. antennatus, where males are often difficult to capture. Our method could be also valuable for biological studies on other spermatophore-using species, such as myriapods, arachnids and insects. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Seed traits and taxonomic relationships determine the occurrence of mutualisms versus seed predation in a tropical forest rodent and seed dispersal system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenyu; Cao, Lin; Zhang, Zhibin

    2014-06-01

    Although many studies have been carried out on plant-animal mutualistic assemblages, the roles of functional traits and taxonomy in determining both whether interactions involve mutualisms or predation and the structure of such assemblages are unclear. We used semi-natural enclosures to quantitatively assess the interaction strengths between seeds of 8 sympatric tree species and 4 rodent species in a tropical forest in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan, Southwest China. We found 2 clusters of species in the seed-rodent network represented by 2 genera in the Fagaceae (Castanopsis, Lithocarpus). Compared to seeds of 3 Castanopsis species, seeds with heavy weight, hard coat or caloric content (including 3 Lithocarpus species) were eaten less and more frequently hoarded by rodents. In turn, hoarded seeds showed less predation and more mutualism with rodents. Our results suggest that seed traits significantly affected the hoarding behavior of rodents, and, consequently, the occurrence of mutualisms and predation as well as assemblage structure in the plant-animal seed dispersal system. Taxonomically-related species with similar seed traits as functional groups belong to the same substructures in the assemblage. Our results indicate that both seed traits and taxonomic relationships may simplify thinking about seed dispersal systems by helping to elucidate whether interactions are likely to be dominated by predation or mutualism. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. [The Essen-based steel producer Alfred Krupp (1812-1887) as a reader of the flora and fauna of the Gulf of Naples. A look at the relationship of Anton Dohrn (1840-1909) to the house Krupp].

    PubMed

    Müller, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    A unfavourable notice written by industrial magnate Alfred Krupp (1812-1887) has been discovered on the posterior cover sheet of the first volume of the monumental series Fauna und Flora des Golfes von Neapel, edited by the Zoological Station at Naples (1880) Krupp's handwritten statement affords the opportunity to discuss in more detail the intricate relationship between the founder of the first marine biology station, Anton Dohrn (1840-1909), and the owner of the greatest steel factory in Europe, the Krupp-family at Essen. Although Anton Dohrn did not know about Krupp's disapproving comment he had a fine unerring instinct for the mentality of his negotiating partner, whose way of thinking rather aimed at the practical success and completion of armament factory, preventing thus a the serious rapprochement between the two personalities. Even when the Krupp-heir, Friedrich Alfred Krupp, later devoted to questions about marine biology in his new built house at Capri, and was willing to support the Zoological Station with high sponsoring, Anton Dohrn maintained a reserved attitude towards the Krupp's offer to support the marine research financially. Likewise, he remained unimpressed, when the steel magnate was shook by the smear campaign in Capri that ultimately led to Krupp's death in November 1902.

  16. The development and application of a multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) system for identifying subspecies, individuals and sex in tigers.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zheng-Ting; Uphyrkina, Olga V; Fomenko, Pavel; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2015-07-01

    Poaching and trans-boundary trafficking of tigers and body parts are threatening the world's last remaining wild tigers. Development of an efficient molecular genetic assay for tracing the origins of confiscated specimens will assist in law enforcement and wildlife forensics for this iconic flagship species. We developed a multiplex genotyping system "tigrisPlex" to simultaneously assess 22 short tandem repeat (STR, or microsatellite) loci and a gender-identifying SRY gene, all amplified in 4 reactions using as little as 1 ng of template DNA. With DNA samples used for between-run calibration, the system generates STR genotypes that are directly compatible with voucher tiger subspecies genetic profiles, hence making it possible to identify subspecies via bi-parentally inherited markers. We applied "tigrisPlex" to 12 confiscated specimens from Russia and identified 6 individuals (3 females and 3 males), each represented by duplicated samples and all designated as Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) with high confidence. This STR multiplex system can serve as an effective and versatile approach for genetic profiling of both wild and captive tigers as well as confiscated tiger products, fulfilling various conservation needs for identifying the origins of tiger samples. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW OF THE PREVALENCE OF MYELOLIPOMA IN GOELDI'S MONKEYS (CALLIMICO GOELDII).

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Laura M; Langan, Jennifer N; Warneke, Mark R; Kinsel, Michael J; Allender, Matthew C

    2015-06-01

    Myelolipomas are mesenchymal tumors composed of adipose and hematopoietic tissue. They have been reported in many species, including domestic dogs and cats, birds, mustelids, wild felids, and nonhuman primates. Myelolipomas in Callitrichidae have been reported at postmortem examination and rarely antemortem. Multiple cases of hepatic myelolipomas associated with morbidity in Chicago Zoological Society's collection of Goeldi's monkeys (Callimico goeldii) prompted a global retrospective study to determine the prevalence and investigate factors associated with this condition. A total of 842 postmortem examination reports (1965-2013) collected from 133 captive collections were reviewed. Myelolipomas were reported in 17.2% (n=145) of animals, with significantly more female cases than male (P=0.023). There was a significantly older mean age at death in affected animals (134 months) compared to unaffected animals (79 months) (P<0.0001). Myelolipomas were diagnosed in the liver in all affected animals, and rarely in the adrenal or spleen. One in five (22.1%) affected Callimico had notable morbidity associated with this disease, which is markedly different from the primarily benign reports in other species. To identify disease, prevent morbidity from hepatic myelolipoma, and improve care of Callimico species in zoological collections, new Species Survival Plan (SSP) medical management recommendations include incorporating abdominal ultrasonographic examination during routine physical examinations in addition to previously recommended hematological and serum biochemical evaluations. Future studies are merited to examine the prevalence, risk factors, health effects, and treatment options of myelolipoma in living collections.

  18. The face of conservation responding to a dynamically changing world.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, Ruscena; Trainor, Anne M; Michel, Nicole; Shirey, Patrick D; Swaisgood, Ronald R; Tallamy, Doug; Cook-Patton, Susan C

    2015-09-01

    In its 40-year history, the science of conservation has faced unprecedented challenges in terms of environmental damage and rapid global change, and environmental problems are only increasing as greater demands are placed on limited natural resources. Conservation science has been adapting to keep pace with these changes. Here, we highlight contemporary and emerging trends and innovations in conservation science that we believe represent the most effective responses to biodiversity threats. We focus on specific areas where conservation science has had to adjust its approach to address emerging threats to biodiversity, including habitat destruction and degradation, climate change, declining populations and invasive species. We also document changes in attitudes, norms and practices among conservation scientists. A key component to success is engaging and maintaining public support for conservation, which can be facilitated through the use of technology. These recent trends in conservation and management are innovative and will assist in optimizing conservation strategies, increasing our leverage with the general public and tackling our current environmental challenges. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Reduced egg shell permeability affects embryonic development and hatchling traits in Lycodon rufozonatum and Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenqi; Zhao, Bo; Chen, Ye; DU, Weiguo

    2018-01-01

    The response of embryos to unpredictable hypoxia is critical for successful embryonic development, yet there remain significant gaps in our understanding of such responses in reptiles with different types of egg shell. We experimentally generated external regional hypoxia by sealing either the upper half or bottom half of the surface area of eggs in 2 species of reptiles (snake [Lycodon rufozonatum] with parchment egg shell and Chinese soft-shelled turtle [Pelodiscus sinensis] with rigid egg shell), then monitored the growth pattern of the opaque white patch in turtle eggs (a membrane that attaches the embryo to the egg shell and plays an important role in gas exchange), the embryonic heart rate, the developmental rate and the hatchling traits in turtle and snake eggs in response to external regional hypoxia. The snake embryos from the hypoxia treatments facultatively increased their heart rate during incubation, and turtle embryos from the upper-half hypoxia treatment enhanced their growth of the opaque white patch. Furthermore, the incubation period and hatching success of embryos were not affected by the hypoxia treatment in these 2 species. External regional hypoxia significantly affected embryonic yolk utilization and offspring size in the snake and turtle. Compared to sham controls, embryos from the upper-half hypoxia treatment used less energy from yolk and, therefore, developed into smaller hatchlings, but embryos from the bottom-half hypoxia treatment did not. © 2017 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. In memoriam : Miriam Dorothy (Posner) Finkel (1916-1999).

    SciT

    Reilly, C. A.; Environmental Research

    Miriam P. Finkel, pioneer radiobiologist, passed away on August 20, 1999, at her home in Tucson, AZ. She was born on January 22, 1916, in Chicago to Russian immigrants. She spent much of her youth in Davenport, IA. She returned to Chicago for her college education, and received a B.S. in zoology in 1938 from the University of Chicago. While continuing her formal education in zoology, Miriam served as a laboratory instructor at Wilson Junior College. She received her Ph.D. in 1944 from the University of Chicago. She began her scientific career at the dawning of the nuclear age andmore » seized upon the scientific opportunity present in the new field of radiobiology to be a life-long contributor to the understanding of the biological effects of radiation. Her technical insights and discoveries helped form the foundation for many of the health standards (i.e. permissible levels of internal radionuclide exposure) in use today. She also made a significant contribution to the field of molecular biology. Her isolation of a murine osteogenic sarcoma virus, the Finkel-Biskis-Jenkins or FBJ virus, led to fundamental discoveries in viral-induced tumors and ultimately provided the now universally used molecular biological tool, the FOS gene.« less

  1. Diet, dietary selectivity and density of South American grey fox, Lycalopex griseus, in Central Chile.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Pedreros, Andrés; Yáñez, José; Norambuena, Heraldo V; Zúñiga, Alfredo

    2018-01-01

    The South American grey fox Lycalopex griseus is a canid widely distributed in southern South America; however, some aspects of its biology are still poorly known. We studied the diet and density of L. griseus in the Lago Peñuelas Biosphere Reserve, in Central Chile. The trophic niche breadth was B = 6.16 (B sta = 0.47) and prey diversity was H' = 2.46 (H max ' = 3.17, J' = 0.78). The highest proportions of prey consumed in the diet were Oryctolagus cuniculus (52.21%) and other mammals (32.78%). We compared these results with a latitudinal gradient of diet results for this species in Chile. L. griseus eats mostly mammals (>90% of total prey), consuming the rodent Phyllotis darwini and reptiles in the northern zone; Oryctolagus cuniculus, Octodon degus and Abrocoma bennetti in the central zone; Abrothrix spp. and lagomorphs in the southern zone; and Lepus capensis and Ovis aries in the austral zone. The estimated density of L. griseus in Lago Peñuelas NR was 1.3 foxes/km 2 . © 2017 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Helminth parasites of freshwater fishes from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, in the Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico: inventory and biogeographical implications.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Aguilar, Rogelio; Martínez-Aquino, Andrés; Espinosa-Pérez, Héctor; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2014-06-01

    As part of an ongoing inventory of the helminth parasites of freshwater fishes in Mexico, 570 individual fish were collected between Apr 2008 and Oct 2011 in 26 localities along the Cuatro Ciénegas region in Coahuila State, northern Mexico. Seventeen species of hosts, mostly corresponding to Nearctic freshwater elements, were studied. A total of 8324 individual worms were collected during this survey, representing 25 species of helminths, of which 9 were digeneans, 3 monogeneans, 3 acanthocephalans, 9 nematodes and 1 cestode. Most of the records in this checklist represent new host or locality records. The information provided in this checklist may be helpful for our understanding of the biodiversity and historical biogeography of this host-parasite system, because in the Cuatro Ciénegas region occur a Nearctic freshwater fish fauna, along with Neotropical and endemic elements, and from a biogeographical point of view, this may represent a transitional area. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Reflections about chance in my career, and on the top-down regulated world.

    PubMed

    Banse, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Paraphrasing Pasteur, in scientific work Fortuna favors only the prepared mind. This is illustrated by my career after an incidental escape from the former German East Prussia just ahead of the Red Army, my switch in Kiel from zoology to oceanography, and my learning of a vacancy in Seattle. Treated here are the accidental discovery of upwelling during the southwest monsoon along India's west coast, studies of benthic polychaetous annelids in the Oregonian zoogeographic province, the discovery of phytoplankton blooms and an absence of upwelling during the northeast monsoon in the northern Arabian Sea, and an ocean-wide description of the seasonality of satellite-derived chlorophyll. My admonition is that grazing rather than cell division rate regulates the abundance and size composition of phytoplankton and affects the dynamics of the understudied zooplankton. I end with a pessimistic view about predicting the vertical flux of particulate organic matter from the euphotic layer with an accuracy useful for deep-sea carbon budgets.

  4. The next new Madrid earthquake

    SciT

    Atkinson, W.

    1988-01-01

    Scientists who specialize in the study of Mississippi Valley earthquakes say that the region is overdue for a powerful tremor that will cause major damage and undoubtedly some casualties. The inevitability of a future quake and the lack of preparation by both individuals and communities provided the impetus for this book. It brings together applicable information from many disciplines: history, geology and seismology, engineering, zoology, politics and community planning, economics, environmental science, sociology, and psychology and mental health to provide a perspective of the myriad impacts of a major earthquake on the Mississippi Valley. The author addresses such basic questionsmore » as What, actually, are earthquakes How do they occur Can they be predicted, perhaps even prevented He also addresses those steps that individuals can take to improve their chances for survival both during and after an earthquake.« less

  5. Finite Element Analysis and Understanding the Biomechanics and Evolution of Living and Fossil Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayfield, Emily J.

    2007-05-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is a technique that reconstructs stress, strain, and deformation in a digital structure. Although commonplace in engineering and orthopedic science for more than 30 years, only recently has it begun to be adopted in the zoological and paleontological sciences to address questions of organismal morphology, function, and evolution. Current research tends to focus on either deductive studies that assume a close relationship between form and function or inductive studies that aim to test this relationship, although explicit hypothesis-testing bridges these two standpoints. Validation studies have shown congruence between in vivo or in vitro strain and FE-inferred strain. Future validation work on a broad range of taxa will assist in phylogenetically bracketing our extinct animal FE-models to increase confidence in our input parameters, although currently, FEA has much potential in addressing questions of form-function relationships, providing appropriate questions are asked of the existing data.

  6. A Universal Animal Welfare Framework for Zoos

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Ron; Carter, Scott; Allard, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The Detroit Zoological Society's (DZS) Center for Zoo Animal Welfare (CZAW) was created to advance the science and policy of the welfare of exotic nonhuman animals in captivity. This important part of the DZS mission is achieved through assessments of, and research on, the welfare of animals in zoos; by recognizing extraordinary achievement in the advancement of animal welfare; by widely sharing knowledge through a bibliographic resource center; by conducting professional training for animal care staff; and by convening important discussions in the form of international symposia. This special issue of the Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science features selected papers from the most recent international CZAW symposium held at the Detroit Zoo in November 2014, as well as a universal framework for zoo animal welfare developed by the DZS. PMID:26440494

  7. Observational Evidence of Magnetic Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.

    2012-03-01

    The observational evidence in supporting the presence of magnetic waves in the outer solar atmosphere is growing rapidly - we will discuss recent observations and place them in context with salient observations made in the past. While the clear delineation of these magnetic wave "modes" is unclear, much can be learned about the environment in which they originated and possibly how they are removed from the system from the observations. Their diagnostic power is, as yet, untapped and their energy content (both as a mechanical source for the heating of coronal material and acceleration of the solar wind) remains in question, but can be probed observationally - raising challenges for modeling efforts. We look forward to the IRIS mission by proposing some sample observing sequences to help resolve some of the zoological issues present in the literature.

  8. The nudibranch names mentioned as n.sp. in Bergh (1861) are almost all nomina nuda (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia: Nudibranchia).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kathe; Nielsen, Claus

    2014-01-06

    In a publication in Danish from 1861, Bergh described the nematocysts found in a number of nudibranch species. Many of the species had been described previously, but a number were new and given names, but without a description. These species are nomina nuda. We have translated the "descriptions", including the foot-notes, and reproduced the original plate to show that only the nematocysts (real or assumed) were described. The only species given a short description fulfilling the requirements of the ICZN is Pleurophyllidia quadrilateralis, which was described as the only species in the new genus Sancara. This in turn was shown to be a junior synonym of Linguella de Blainville, 1823. All the species were subsequently described anatomically in detail and made valid in a number of papers, and most of the type material is located in the Zoological Museum, Copenhagen (Natural History Museum of Denmark). The names in current use have been given.

  9. Root symbionts: Powerful drivers of plant above- and belowground indirect defenses.

    PubMed

    Rasmann, Sergio; Bennett, Alison; Biere, Arjen; Karley, Alison; Guerrieri, Emilio

    2017-12-01

    Soil microbial mutualists of plants, including mycorrhizal fungi, non-mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, have been typically characterized for increasing nutrient acquisition and plant growth. More recently, soil microbes have also been shown to increase direct plant defense against above- and belowground herbivores. Plants, however, do not only rely on direct defenses when attacked, but they can also recruit pest antagonists such as predators and parasitoids, both above and belowground, mainly via the release of volatile organic compounds (i.e., indirect defenses). In this review, we illustrate the main features and effects of soil microbial mutualists of plants on plant indirect defenses and discuss possible applications within the framework of sustainable crop protection against root- and shoot-feeding arthropod pests. We indicate the main knowledge gaps and the future challenges to be addressed in the study and application of these multifaceted interactions. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Response to the Point of View of Gregory B. Pauly, David M. Hillis, and David C. Cannatella, by the Anuran Subcommittee of the SSAR/HL/ASIH Scientific and Standard English Names List

    Frost, Darrel R.; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Mendelson, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    The Point of View by Gregory Pauly, David Hillis, and David Cannatella misrepresents the motives and activities of the anuran subcommittee of the Scientific and Standard English Names Committee, contains a number of misleading statements, omits evidence and references to critical literature that have already rejected or superseded their positions, and cloaks the limitations of their nomenclatural approach in ambiguous language. Their Point of View is not about promoting transparency in the process of constructing the English Names list, assuring that its taxonomy is adequately reviewed, or promoting nomenclatural stability in any global sense. Rather, their Point of View focuses in large part on a single publication, The Amphibian Tree of Life, which is formally unrelated to the Standard English Names List, and promotes an approach to nomenclature mistakenly asserted by them to be compatible with both the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and one of its competitors, the PhyloCode.

  11. Michael Akam and the rise of evolutionary developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Stern, David L.; Dawes-Hoang, Rachel E.

    2010-01-01

    Michael Akam has been awarded the 2007 Kowalevsky medal for his many research accomplishments in the area of evolutionary developmental biology. We highlight three tributaries of Michael’s contribution to evolutionary developmental biology. First, he has made major contributions to our understanding of development of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Second, he has maintained a consistent focus on several key problems in evolutionary developmental biology, including the evolving role of Hox genes in arthropods and, more recently, the evolution of segmentation mechanisms. Third, Michael has written a series of influential reviews that have integrated progress in developmental biology into an evolutionary perspective. Michael has also made a large impact on the field through his effective mentorship style, his selfless promotion of younger colleagues, and his leadership of the University Museum of Zoology at Cambridge and the European community of evolutionary developmental biologists. PMID:20209429

  12. [THE PRESENT STATE OF EPIZOOTOLOGICAL MONITORING OF THE NATURAL FOCI OF INFECTIONS IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION].

    PubMed

    Trankvilevsky, D V; Tsarenko, V A; Zhukov, V I

    2016-01-01

    The facilities of the Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare play a leading role in epizootological monitoring. The specialists (zoologists and entomologists) of Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers do basic work in the subjects of the Russian Federation. The data obtained in the participation of different ministries and departments are used to analyze the results of monitoring. The latter is one of the important steps in the management of the epidemic, process in natural focal infections. In recent years, there has been an unjustified reduction in the volume of studies in the natural foci. This negatively affects the reliability of estimates and predictions of the epidemic activity of the natural foci of infections. Ensuring the national, security of the Russian Federation, epidemiological surveillance, and control of its natural foci requires staffing and appropriate professional training in the zoological and entomological subdivisions of the Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare.

  13. APPLICATION OF NONINVASIVE PREGNANCY DIAGNOSIS IN BACTRIAN CAMELS (CAMELUS BACTRIANUS) USING CUBONI REACTION AND BARIUM CHLORIDE TEST.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Tamara; Brandlová, Karolína; Lukešová, Daniela

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy diagnoses in half-tamed animals are often very complicated. This study aimed to examine the alternative noninvasive and cheap methods of pregnancy diagnosis from urine in domestic Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus). Urine from 14 female camels kept in four European zoologic gardens was collected and tested by two chemical tests--Cuboni reaction and barium chloride test. The Cuboni reaction was significantly (P<0.01) affected by the pregnancy status of female camels. The total accuracy of the Cuboni reaction was 70.5% but it increased significantly (P<0.05) in the time leading up to parturition. The accuracy was 100% in the 3rd third of pregnancy. Urine of nonpregnant females did not react with a solution of barium chloride while, contrary to other studies, white precipitates formed mostly (80 to 100%) in urine of pregnant females. This study concluded that the Cuboni reaction is applicable for pregnancy diagnosis in camels.

  14. Conscientious workmen or booksellers' hacks? The professional identities of science writers in the mid-nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, Aileen

    2005-06-01

    Existing scholarship on the debates over expertise in mid-nineteenth-century Britain has demonstrated the importance of popular writings on the sciences to definitions of scientific authority. Yet while men of science might position themselves in opposition to the stereotype of the merely popular writer, the self-identity of the popular writer remained ambiguous. This essay examines the careers of William Charles Linnaeus Martin (1798-1864) and Thomas Milner (1808-ca. 1883) and places them in the context of others who made their living by writing works on the sciences for the general reader. Martin wrote on zoology and Milner moved between astronomy, geology, and geography. The essay unravels the close but ambivalent relationship between the professions of authorship and of science and highlights writing as another aspect of scientific practice. Both writers were moderately financially successful, but Martin's sense of failure and Milner's satisfaction reflect their contrasting images of their professional identity.

  15. Nobel prize winner trading card (CIRCA 1952). Elie Metchnikoff.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Dale E

    2003-03-01

    Russian doctor and bacteriologist, born in Ivanowca in 1845. He began his studies in Kharkov, continuing them at the Universities of Giessen, Gothingen, and Munich, later being named Professor of Zoology in Odessa in 1870. In the Canary Islands, he completed some anthropological works, but dedicated himself especially to studies of marine fauna. In 1887, much taken by the work of Pasteur, he wrote to him asking for a position in his laboratories; in a short time he became one of the principal collaborators with the master, especially in works concerning bacteriology. These were an inspiration to him, and led him to his famous theory of phagocytosis, the defensive act whereby white blood cells protect an organism against pathogenic microbes. Metchnikoff supposed that old age was avoidable, and subscribed to the materialistic school of thought. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1908. (With the complements of the Jose Lopez Luis Cigarillo Factory, Tenerife).

  16. Animal Salmonella surveillance in Peninsular Malaysia, 1981-1985.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, P. G.; Sivanandan, S. P.; Yee, H. T.

    1988-01-01

    During the 5-year (1981-5) surveillance period, 2322 salmonella isolations were recorded from animals and other non-human sources in Peninsular Malaysia. This was an increase of 356% over the preceding 5-year period. The 83 serotypes isolated were recovered from 41 sources. Of these 34 were new serotypes bringing the total number of serotypes isolated from non-human sources to date up 97. Food animals and edible animal products accounted for 92.2% of the total isolations, with cattle and beef accounting for 70% of the total. Salmonella dublin was the most frequently isolated serotype, whereas S. typhimurium had the widest zoological distribution. More than 80% of the non-human salmonella serotypes have also been reported in man in this country. PMID:3378581

  17. Megatibicen n. gen., a new North American cicada genus (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Cryptotympanini).

    PubMed

    Sanborn, Allen F; Heath, Maxine S

    2016-09-16

    The genus Tibicen has had a confusing history (see summary in Boulard and Puissant 2014; Marshall and Hill 2014; Sanborn 2014). Boulard and his colleague (Boulard 1984; 1988; 1997; 2001; 2003; Boulard and Puissant 2013; 2014; 2015) have argued for the suppression of Tibicen and the taxa derivatived from it in favor of Lyristes Horváth. Boulard's argument for suppression was first described in Melville and Sims (1984) who presented the case for suppression to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature with further comments made by Hamilton (1985), Boulard (1985), and Lauterer (1985). A lack of action resulted in additional comments being published in 2014 again supporting the retention (Sanborn 2014; Marshall and Hill 2014) or the suppression (Boulard and Puissant 2014) of Tibicen.

  18. Bounding species distribution models

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  19. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  20. Nocturnal activity patterns of northern myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) during the maternity season in West Virginia (USA)

    Johnson, J.B.; Edwards, J.W.; Ford, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal activity patterns of northern myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) at diurnal roost trees remain largely uninvestigated. For example, the influence of reproductive status, weather, and roost tree and surrounding habitat characteristics on timing of emergence, intra-night activity, and entrance at their roost trees is poorly known. We examined nocturnal activity patterns of northern myotis maternity colonies during pregnancy and lactation at diurnal roost trees situated in areas that were and were not subjected to recent prescribed fires at the Fernow Experimental Forest, West Virginia from 2007 to 2009. According to exit counts and acoustic data, northern myotis colony sizes were similar between reproductive periods and roost tree settings. However, intra-night activity patterns differed slightly between reproductive periods and roost trees in burned and non-burned areas. Weather variables poorly explained variation in activity patterns during pregnancy, but precipitation and temperature were negatively associated with activity patterns during lactation. ?? Museum and Institute of Zoology PAS.