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Sample records for zr-based bulk amorphous

  1. The influence of Sc addition on the welding microstructure of Zr-based bulk metallic glass: The stability of the amorphous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shing Hoa; Kuo, Pei Hung; Tsang, Hsiao Tsung; Jeng, Rong Ruey; Lin, Yu Lon

    2007-10-01

    Pulsed direct current autogeneous tungsten inert gas arc welding was conducted on rods of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 and (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10)99.98Sc0.02 under two different cooling conditions. The crystalline precipitates in the fusion zone of BMG Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 were confirmed by microfocused x-ray diffraction pattern analysis as Zr2Ni and Zr2(Cu,Al) intermetallic compounds. In contrast, BMG with Sc addition (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10)99.98Sc0.02 shows an excellent stable glass forming ability. The fusion zone of BMG (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10)99.98Sc0.02 remains in the same amorphous state as that of the amorphous base metal when the weld is cooled with accelerated cooling.

  2. Fracture Behavior of Zr-BASED Bulk Metallic Glass Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Oh, Sang-Yeob

    The fracture behavior of a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal under impact loading using subsize V-shaped Charpy specimens was investigated. Influences of loading rate on the fracture behavior of amorphous Zr-Al-Ni-Cu alloy were examined. As a result, the maximum load and absorbed fracture energy under impact loading were lower than those under quasi-static loading. A large part of the absorbed fracture energy in the Zr-based BMG was consumed in the process for crack initiation and not for crack propagation. In addition, fractographic characteristics of BMGs, especially the initiation and development of shear bands at the notch tip were investigated. Fractured surfaces under impact loading are smoother than those under quasi-static loading. The absorbed fracture energy appeared differently depending on the appearance of the shear bands developed. It can be found that the fracture energy and fracture toughness of Zr-based BMG are closely related with the extent of shear bands developed during fracture.

  3. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; ...

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  4. Tribological characterisation of Zr-based bulk metallic glass in simulated physiological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, L.

    2011-10-01

    Due to their excellent wear resistant properties and high strength, as well as a low Young's modulus, Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are potentially suitable biomaterials for low-friction arthroplasty. The wear characteristics of the Zr60.14Cu22.31Fe4.85Al9.7Ag3 bulk amorphous alloy against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) compared to a CoCrMo/UHMWPE combination were investigated in two different wear screening test devices, reciprocating and unidirectional. Hank's solution and sterile calf bovine serum were selected as the lubricant fluid media. It was found that different fluid media had insignificant effect on polyethylene wear against BMG counterfaces. The wear behaviour obtained on both test devices demonstrated that Zr-based BMG achieved UHMWPE counterface wear rates superior to conventional cast CoCrMo alloy, where the wear rate of UHMWPE is decreased by over 20 times. The tribological performance of these joints is superior to that of conventional metal-on-polymer designs. Contact angle measurements suggested that the advantage of BMG over a CoCrMo alloy counterface is attributed to its highly hydrophilic surfaces.

  5. Friction stir welding of Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y. S.; Fujii, H.; Maeda, M.; Nakata, K.; Kimura, H.; Inoue, A.; Nogi, K.

    2009-05-01

    A Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 bulk metallic glass plate was successfully welded below its crystallization temperature by friction stir welding. The flash formation and heat concentration at the shoulder edge was minimized using a wider tool and the angle of the recessed shoulder surface was 3°. To analyze the crystallization of the base material and stir zone, the microstructure and mechanical properties were analyzed using DSC, XRD, TEM, and micro-hardness. As a result, it was found that the amorphous structure and original mechanical properties were maintained in the whole joints.

  6. Toughness of Wear-Resistant Cu-Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Laura M.

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have the potential to exhibit exceptional wear-resistance due to their high hardness and strength. Combined with their other unique properties, this makes them ideal candidates for a wide range of technological applications (e.g. gears, bearings, biomaterials). In the course of this dissertation, high-glass-forming bulk metallic glasses are prepared and characterized in order to identify wear-resistant compositions and optimize their toughness. First, a comprehensive study identifies a class of Cu-Zr-based BMGs that exhibit more exceptional wear performance than other BMGs. The results demonstrate that when BMGs are designed properly, they exhibit wear properties that compete with, and can surpass, state-of-the-art engineering materials. It is identified that, in order to optimize the wear performance of Cu-Zr-based BMG gears, toughness should be maximized. Second, the notch toughness of wear-resistant Cu43Zr 43Al7Be7 BMGs with in-situ crystallization is investigated. In order to identify in-situ crystallization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Cu K? radiation, extremely long dwell times and high X-ray fluxes are required. This demonstrates the importance of reporting operating parameters when trying to evaluate the amorphous nature of BMGs. XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are used to identify the metastable crystalline phase. The notch toughness is found to correlate closely with the amount of crystallization and the composition of the remaining amorphous matrix. Finally, the effect of substituting standard-grade zirconium lump (99.8% excluding up to 4% hafnium) for high-purity zirconium crystal bar (99.5%) in Cu43Zr43Al7Be7 is investigated. Introducing low-purity zirconium significantly decreases the glass-forming-ability and reduces the notch toughness of the BMG. Furthermore, Weibull statistics provide an analysis of the variability in toughness for high-purity ingots

  7. Zr-based bulk metallic glass as a cylinder material for high pressure apparatuses

    DOE PAGES

    Komatsu, Kazuki; Munakata, Koji; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; ...

    2015-05-12

    Zirconium-based bulk metallic glass (Zr-based BMG) has outstanding properties as a cylinder mate- rial for piston-cylinder high pressure apparatuses and is especially useful for neutron scattering. The piston-cylinder consisting of a Zr-based BMG cylinder with outer/inner diameters of 8.8/2.5 mm sustains pressures up to 1.81 GPa and ruptured at 2.0 GPa, with pressure values determined by the superconduct- ing temperature of lead. The neutron attenuation of Zr-based BMG is similar to that of TiZr null-scattering alloy and more transparent than that of CuBe alloy. No contamination of sharp Bragg reflections is observed in the neutron diffraction pattern for Zr-based BMG.more » The magnetic susceptibility of Zr-based BMG is similar to that of CuBe alloy; this leads to a potential application for measurements of magnetic properties under pressure.« less

  8. The electrochemical Evaluation of a Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass in a Phosphate-Buffered Saline Electrolyte

    SciT

    Morrison, M. L.; Buchanan, R. A.; Leon, R. V.

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) represent an emerging class of materials with an amorphous structure and a unique combination of properties. The objectives of this investigation were to define the electrochemical behavior of a specific Zr-based BMG alloy in a physiologically relevant environment and to compare these properties to standard, crystalline biomaterials as well as other Zr-based BMG compositions. Cyclic-anodic-polarization studies were conducted with a Zr{sub 52.5}Cu{sub 17.9}Ni{sub 14.6}Al{sub 10.0}Ti{sub 5.0} (at %) BMG in a phosphate-buffered saline electrolyte with a physiologically relevant oxygen content at 37 C. The results were compared to three common, crystalline biomaterials: CoCrMo, 316L stainless steel,more » and Ti-6Al-4V. The BMG alloy was found to have a lower corrosion penetration rate (CPR), as compared to the 316L stainless steel, and an equivalent CPR, as compared to the CoCrMo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Furthermore, the BMG alloy demonstrated better localized corrosion resistance than the 316L stainless steel. However, the localized corrosion resistance of the BMG alloy was not as high as those of the CoCrMo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys in the tested environment. The excellent electrochemical properties demonstrated by the BMG alloy are combined with a low modulus and unparalleled strength. This unique combination of properties dramatically demonstrates the potential for amorphous alloys as a new generation of biomaterials.« less

  9. Plastic deformation behaviors of Ni- and Zr-based bulk metallic glasses subjected to nanoindentation

    SciT

    Weizhong, Liang, E-mail: wzliang1966@126.com; Zhiliang, Ning; Zhenqian, Dang

    2013-12-15

    Plastic deformation behaviors of Ni{sub 42}Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 21.5}Al{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}Si{sub 3.5} and Zr{sub 51}Ti{sub 5}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 25}Al{sub 9} bulk metallic glasses at room temperature were studied by nanoindentation testing and atomic force microscopy under equivalent indentation experimental conditions. The different chemical composition of these two bulk metallic glasses produced variant tendencies for displacement serrated flow to occur during the loading process. The nanoindentation strain rate was calculated as a function of indentation displacement in order to verify the occurrence of displacement serrated flow at different loading rates. Atomic force microscopy revealed decreasing numbers of discrete shear bands around the indentationmore » sites as loading rates increased from 0.025 to 2.5 mNs{sup −1}. Variations in plastic deformation behaviors between Ni and Zr-based glasses materials can be explained by the different metastable microstructures and thermal stabilities of the two materials. The mechanism governing plastic deformation of these metallic glasses was analyzed in terms of an established model of the shear transformation zone. - Highlights: • Plastic deformation of Ni- and Zr-based BMG is studied under identical conditions • Zr-based BMG undergoes a greater extent of plastic deformation than Ni-based BMG • Nanoindentation strain rate is studied to clarify variation in plastic deformation • Metastable microstructure, thermal stability affect BMG plastic deformation.« less

  10. Degradation of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses used in load-bearing implants: A tribocorrosion appraisal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo-Hua; Aune, Ragnhild E; Mao, Huahai; Espallargas, Nuria

    2016-07-01

    Owing to the amorphous structure, Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) have been demonstrating attractive properties for potential biomedical applications. In the present work, the degradation mechanisms of Zr-based BMGs with nominal compositions Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 and Zr65Cu18Ni7Al10 as potential load-bearing implant material were investigated in a tribocorrosion environment. The composition-dependent micro-mechanical and tribological properties of the two BMGs were evaluated prior to the tribocorrosion tests. The sample Zr65-BMG with a higher Zr content exhibited increased plasticity but relatively reduced wear resistance during the ball-on-disc tests. Both BMGs experienced abrasive wear after the dry wear test under the load of 2N. The cross-sectional subsurface structure of the wear track was examined by Focused Ion Beam (FIB). The electrochemical properties of the BMGs in simulated body fluid were evaluated by means of potentiodynamic polarization and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The spontaneous passivation of Zr-based BMGs in Phosphate Buffer Saline solution was mainly attributed to the highly concentrated zirconium cation (Zr(4+)) in the passive film. The tribocorrosion performance of the BMGs was investigated using a reciprocating tribometer equipped with an electrochemical cell. The more passive nature of the Zr65-BMG had consequently a negative influence on its tribocorrosion resistance, which induced the wear-accelerated corrosion and eventually speeded-up the degradation process. It has been revealed the galvanic coupling was established between the depassivated wear track and the surrounding passive area, which is the main degradation mechanism for the passive Zr65-BMG subjected to the tribocorrosion environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Zr-BASED Amorphous and Crystalline Composite Coating on Ti Substrate by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, D. M.; Zhang, D. C.; Peng, W.; Luo, Z. C.; Wu, X. Q.; Wang, Y. M.; Lin, J. G.

    2014-02-01

    A thin strip of a Zr-based alloy with a composition of Zr60Cu25Fe5Al10 (in atom percent) was used as a raw material, and the composite coatings containing Zr-based amorphous phase and crystallites on Ti substrate were fabricated by a one-step laser cladding method without protection. The microstructure, phase constitution, microhardness and wear properties of the coatings were investigated. The results indicate that the microstructure of the coatings is strongly dependent on the laser scanning speed under the conditions of the laser power of 1300 W and laser beam diameter of 6 mm, and the composite coating mainly containing amorphous phase with a small amount of the crystallites can be obtained at the laser scanning speed of 10 mm/s. The composite coating exhibits much higher microhardness than the pure Ti substrate, and thus it behaves superior wear resistance in comparison with the substrate.

  12. Wear resistance of CuZr-based amorphous-forming alloys against bearing steel in 3.5% NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiulin; Wang, Hui; Bao, Yayun; Zheng, Dingcong

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the amorphous-crystalline microstructure on the tribocorrosion of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), 6 mm diameter rods of Cu46-xZr47Al7Agx (x = 0, 2, 4) amorphous-forming alloys with in situ crystalline and amorphous phases were fabricated by arc-melting and Cu-mould casting. Using a pin-on-disc tribometer, the tribo-pair composed by CuZr-based amorphous-forming alloys and AISI 52100 steel were studied in 3.5% NaCl solution. With the increase of Ag content from 0 to 4 at.%, the compressive fracture strength and the average hardness decrease firstly and then increase. Moreover, 4 at.% Ag addition increases the amount of amorphous phase obviously and inhibits the formation of brittle crystalline phase, resulting in the improvement of corrosion resistance and the corrosive wear resistance. The primary wear mechanism of the BMG composites is abrasive wear accompanying with corrosive wear. The tribocorrosion mass loss of Cu42Zr47Al7Ag4 composite is 1.5 mg after 816.8 m sliding distance at 0.75 m s-1 sliding velocity under 10 N load in NaCl solution. And the volume loss evaluated from the mass loss is about 20 times lower than that of AISI 304 SS. Thus, Cu42Zr47Al7Ag4 composite may be a good candidate in the tribology application under marine environment.

  13. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage during Compressive Deformation of Amorphous Zr-Based Foams with Aligned, Elongated Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Marie E.; Dunand, David C.

    2013-07-01

    Acoustic emission methods are used to investigate the evolution of internal microfractural damage during uniaxial compression of amorphous Zr-based foams with aligned, elongated pores. The foams are fabricated by means of densifying a blend of crystalline W powders and amorphous Zr-based powders with two oxygen contents (0.078 and 0.144 wt pct) by warm equal channel angular extrusion, followed by dissolution of the elongated W phase from the fully densified amorphous matrix. For the high-oxygen foams, prior powder boundaries in the amorphous struts promote damage that accumulates during compression, resulting in energy-absorbing properties comparable with the low-oxygen foams without stress-concentrating powder boundaries. The influence of pore orientation on the evolution of microfracture damage and the ability of the foams to accumulate damage without catastrophic failure is also investigated: pores oriented from 24 to 68 deg to the loading direction promote wall bending, resulting in foams with more diffuse damage and better energy-absorbing properties.

  14. Structural and mechanical modifications induced on Zr-based bulk metallic glass by laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunhu; Fu, Jie; Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    In this study, surface modification of a Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (vit1) bulk metallic glass (BMG) has been studied in an effort to improve the mechanical properties by laser shock peening (LSP) treatment. The phase structure, mechanical properties, and microstructural evolution of the as-cast and LSP treated specimens were systematically investigated. It was found that the vit1 BMG still consisted of fully amorphous structure after LSP treatment. Measurements of the heat relaxation indicate that a large amount of free volume is introduced into vit1 BMG during LSP process. LSP treatment causes a decrease of hardness attributable to generation of free volume. The plastic deformation ability of vit1 BMG was investigated under three-point bending conditions. The results demonstrate that the plastic strain of LSP treated specimen is 1.83 times as large as that of the as-cast specimen. The effect of LSP technology on the hardness and plastic deformation ability of vit1 BMG is discussed on the basis of free volume theory. The high dense shear bands on the side surface, the increase of striations and critical shear displacement on the tensile fracture region, and more uniform dimples structure on the compressive fracture region also demonstrate that the plasticity of vit1 BMG can be enhanced by LSP.

  15. Fatigue-Induced Damage in Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chih-Pin; Yuan, Tao; Dmowski, Wojciech; Wang, Gong-Yao; Freels, Matt; Liaw, Peter K.; Li, Ran; Zhang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, we investigate the effect of “fatigue” on the fatigue behavior and atomic structure of Zr-based BMGs. Fatigue experiments on the failed-by-fatigue samples indicate that the remnants generally have similar or longer fatigue life than the as-cast samples. Meanwhile, the pair-distribution-function (PDF) analysis of the as-cast and post-fatigue samples showed very small changes of local atomic structures. These observations suggest that the fatigue life of the 6-mm in-diameter Zr-based BMG is dominated by the number of pre-existing crack-initiation sites in the sample. Once the crack initiates in the specimen, the fatigue-induced damage is accumulated locally on these initiated sites, while the rest of the region deforms elastically. The results suggest that the fatigue failure of BMGs under compression-compression fatigue experiments is a defect-controlled process. The present work indicates the significance of the improved fatigue resistance with decreasing the sample size. PMID:23999496

  16. How does spallation microdamage nucleate in bulk amorphous alloys under shock loading?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Zhang, H. S.; Ma, J.; Dai, L. H.

    2011-11-01

    Specially designed plate-impact experiments have been conducted on a Zr-based amorphous alloy using a single-stage light gas gun. To understand the microdamage nucleation process in the material, the samples are subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of identical amplitude (˜ 3.18 GPa) but with different durations (83-201 ns). A cellular pattern with an equiaxed shape is observed on the spallation surface, which shows that spallation in the tested amorphous alloy is a typical ductile fracture and that microvoids have been nucleated during the process. Based on the observed fracture morphologies of the spallation surface and free-volume theory, we propose a microvoid nucleation model of bulk amorphous alloys. It is found that nucleation of microvoids at the early stage of spallation in amorphous alloys results from diffusion and coalescence of free volume, and that high mean tensile stress plays a dominant role in microvoid nucleation.

  17. Laser Shock Peening on Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass and Its Effect on Plasticity: Experiment and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yunfeng; Xie, Xie; Antonaglia, James; Winiarski, Bartlomiej; Wang, Gongyao; Shin, Yung C.; Withers, Philip J.; Dahmen, Karin A.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-05-01

    The Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a new family of attractive materials with good glass-forming ability and excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength and good wear resistance, which make them candidates for structural and biomedical materials. Although the mechanical behavior of BMGs has been widely investigated, their deformation mechanisms are still poorly understood. In particular, their poor ductility significantly impedes their industrial application. In the present work, we show that the ductility of Zr-based BMGs with nearly zero plasticity is improved by a laser shock peening technique. Moreover, we map the distribution of laser-induced residual stresses via the micro-slot cutting method, and then predict them using a three-dimensional finite-element method coupled with a confined plasma model. Reasonable agreement is achieved between the experimental and modeling results. The analyses of serrated flows reveal plentiful and useful information of the underlying deformation process. Our work provides an easy and effective way to extend the ductility of intrinsically-brittle BMGs, opening up wider applications of these materials.

  18. Laser shock peening on Zr-based bulk metallic glass and its effect on plasticity: Experiment and modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Yunfeng; Xie, Xie; Antonaglia, James; ...

    2015-05-20

    The Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a new family of attractive materials with good glass-forming ability and excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength and excellent wear resistance, which make them candidates for structural and biomedical materials. Although the mechanical behavior of BMGs has been widely investigated, their deformation mechanisms are still poorly understood. In particular, their poor ductility significantly impedes their industrial application. In the present work, we show that the ductility of Zr-based BMGs with nearly zero plasticity is improved by a laser shock peening technique. Moreover, we map the distribution of laser-induced residual stresses via themore » micro-slot cutting method, and then predict them using a three dimensional finite-element method coupled with a confined plasma model. Reasonable agreement is achieved between the experimental and modeling results. The analysis of serrated flow reveals plentiful and useful information of the underlying deformation process. As a result, our work provides an easy and effective way to extend the ductility of intrinsically-brittle BMGs, opening up wider applications of these materials.« less

  19. Superconducting state parameters of bulk amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Well recognized empty core pseudopotential of Ashcroft is used to investigate the superconducting state parameters viz; electron-phonon coupling strength λ, Coulomb pseudopotential μ*, transition temperature T C , isotope effect exponent α and effective interaction strength N O V of some (Ni33Zr67)1- x V x ( x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15) bulk amorphous alloys. We have incorporated five different types of local field correction functions, proposed by Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S) to show the effect of exchange and correlation on the aforesaid properties. Very strong influence of the various exchange and correlation functions is concluded from the present study. The T C obtained from local field correction function proposed by Sarkar et al. (S) is in excellent agreement with available theoretical data. Quadratic T C equation has been proposed providing successfully the T C values of bulk amorphous alloys under consideration. Also, the present results are found in qualitative agreement with other such earlier reported data, which confirm the superconducting phase in the s bulk amorphous alloys.

  20. Four-point-bending-fatigue behavior of the Zr-based Vitreloy 105 bulk metallic glass

    SciT

    Morrison, M. L.; Buchanan, R. A.; Liaw, Peter K

    The purpose of this study was to make a direct comparison between four-point-bending and uniaxial fatigue tests with the Zr{sub 52.5}Cu{sub 17.9}Ni{sub 14.6}Al{sub 10.0}Ti{sub 5.0} (at.%) BMG alloy (Vitreloy 105). The fatigue lifetimes in four-point bending were found to be greater than those reported in uniaxial testing. However, the fatigue-endurance limit found in four-point bending was slightly less than that reported for uniaxial fatigue. Thus, the significant differences between fatigue studies in the literature are not likely due to this difference in testing geometry. On the contrary, the fatigue lifetimes were found to be highly dependent upon surface defects andmore » material quality. The four-point-bending-fatigue performance of the Vit 105 alloy was found to be greater than most BMGs and similar to the 300 M high-strength steel and other crystalline alloys in spite of not being 'perfectly amorphous.' Due to the detrimental effects of these inhomogeneities and wear at the supporting pins, this fatigue behavior can be assumed to be a conservative estimate of the potential fatigue performance of a perfectly amorphous and homogeneous BMG.« less

  1. Mechanical relaxation in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass: Analysis based on physical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, J. C.; Pelletier, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanical relaxation behavior in a Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 bulk metallic glass is investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis in both temperature and frequency domains. Master curves can be obtained for the storage modulus G' and for the loss modulus G'', confirming the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle. Different models are discussed to describe the main (α) relaxation, e.g., Debye model, Havriliak-Negami (HN) model, Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) model, and quasi-point defects (QPDs) model. The main relaxation in bulk metallic glass cannot be described using a single relaxation time. The HN model, the KWW model, and the QPD theory can be used to fit the data of mechanical spectroscopy experiments. However, unlike the HN model and the KWW model, some physical parameters are introduced in QPD model, i.e., atomic mobility and correlation factor, giving, therefore, a new physical approach to understand the mechanical relaxation in bulk metallic glasses.

  2. Temperature rise and flow of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses under high shearing stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiguo; Ma, Mingzhen; Song, Aijun; Liang, Shunxing; Hao, Qiuhong; Tan, Chunlin; Jing, Qin; Liu, Riping

    2011-11-01

    Deformation of the bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and the creation and propagation of the shear bands are closely interconnected. Shearing force was loaded on Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10.0Be22.5(Vit.1) BMGs by cutting during the turning of the BMG rod. The temperature rise of alloy on the shear bands was calculated and the result showed that it could reach the temperature of the super-cooled liquid zone or exceed the melting point. The temperature rise caused viscous fluid flow and brought about the deformation of BMGs. This suggested that the deformation of BMGs was derived, at least to some extent, from the adiabatic shear temperature rise.

  3. Tribological studies of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with different states

    SciT

    Jiang, Feng; Qu, Jun; Fan, Guojiang

    The tribological characteristics of a bulk-metallic glass (BMG) Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10.0Ti5.0 (Vit 105) with different states have been studied. Friction and wear tests were conducted using a ball-on-flat reciprocating sliding apparatus against AISI E52100 bearing steel under dry condition. The observed wear resistance in an ascending order is deformed, crept, relaxed, and as-cast. Results suggested that the wear process of BMG alloys involved abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation. The differences in hardness, free volume, and embrittlement at different states significantly affected the friction and wear behaviors of the BMG alloys.

  4. Corrosion fatigue studies on a bulk glassy Zr-based alloy under three-point bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grell, Daniel; Wilkin, Yannic; Gostin, Petre F.; Gebert, Annett; Kerscher, Eberhard

    2016-12-01

    Corrosion fatigue (CF) tests were carried out on bulk glassy Zr52.5Cu17.9Al10Ni14.6Ti5 (Vitreloy 105) samples under load-controlled three-point bending conditions with a load ratio of R = 0.1 in 0.01 M Na2SO4 + 0.01 M NaCl electrolyte. During cyclic testing, the bar-shaped specimens were polarized in situ at constant potentials and the current was monitored. Three different anodic potentials within the interval between the pitting potential EP and the repassivation potential ER, and three different load amplitudes were applied. In some cases, in situ microscopic observations revealed the formation of black corrosion products in the vicinity of the crack tip during anodic polarization. Fractographic analysis revealed a clear distinction between two modes of crack growth characterized by smooth dissolution induced regions on the one hand and slim fast fracture areas on the other hand. Both alternating features contributed to a broad striated corrosion fatigue fracture surface. Moreover, further fatigue tests were carried out under free corrosion conditions yielding additional information on crack initiation and crack propagation period by means of the open circuit potential (OCP) changes. Thereby, a slight increase in OCP was detected after rupture of the passive layer due to bare metal exposed to the electrolyte. The electrochemical response increased continuously according to stable crack propagation until fracture occurred. Finally, the fracture surfaces of the corrosion fatigue samples were investigated by energy dispersive X-ray with the objective of analyzing the elemental distribution after anodic dissolution. Interestingly, anodic polarization at a near repassivation potential of -50 mV vs. SCE (Saturated Calomel Electrode, E = 0.241 V vs. SHE, Standard Hydrogen Electrode) led to favorable effects on the fatigue lifetime. In conclusion, all results are conflated to a corrosion fatigue model for bulk glassy Vitreloy 105 under anodic polarization in chloride

  5. Rapid Relaxation and Embrittlement of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses by Electropulsing

    SciT

    Yiu, P; Chen, Y. C.; Chu, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical relaxation and embrittlement of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 bulk metallic glasses were achieved rapidly by the direct current electropulsing treatment. The temperature profile was recorded by an infrared camera and it was found to be non-uniform in the treated specimen. Specifically, temperatures below the glass transition temperature, near and above the crystallization temperature could be ach- ieved, respectively, at different locations in the same treated specimen. Two sets of nanoindentation were conducted. While the first set investigated the mechanical properties of three individually elec- tropulsed specimens with different conditions, the second set indented a single treated specimen along its temperature gradient. Bothmore » sets of indentation revealed that by Joule heating to different tempera- tures, relaxation, embrittlement, and crystallization were significantly accelerated by electrical pulses. Results suggest that electropulsing provides an opportunity to simultaneously achieve plastic forming and mechanical property control of metallic glasses.« less

  6. Effect of high strain rates on peak stress in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunny, George; Yuan, Fuping; Prakash, Vikas; Lewandowski, John

    2008-11-01

    The mechanical behavior of Zr41.25Ti13.75Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (LM-1) has been extensively characterized under quasistatic loading conditions; however, its mechanical behavior under dynamic loading conditions is currently not well understood. A Split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and a single-stage gas gun are employed to characterize the mechanical behavior of LM-1 in the strain-rate regime of 102-105/s. The SHPB experiments are conducted with a tapered insert design to mitigate the effects of stress concentrations and preferential failure at the specimen-insert interface. The higher strain-rate plate-impact compression-and-shear experiments are conducted by impacting a thick tungsten carbide (WC) flyer plate with a sandwich sample comprising a thin bulk metallic glass specimen between two thicker WC target plates. Specimens employed in the SHPB experiments failed in the gage-section at a peak stress of approximately 1.8 GPa. Specimens in the high strain-rate plate-impact experiments exhibited a flow stress in shear of approximately 0.9 GPa, regardless of the shear strain-rate. The flow stress under the plate-impact conditions was converted to an equivalent flow stress under uniaxial compression by assuming a von Mises-like material behavior and accounting for the plane strain conditions. The results of these experiments, when compared to the previous work conducted at quasistatic loading rates, indicate that the peak stress of LM-1 is essentially strain rate independent over the strain-rate range up to 105/s.

  7. Deformation behavior, corrosion resistance, and cytotoxicity of Ni-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Qiu, C L; Chen, Q; Chan, K C; Zhang, S M

    2008-07-01

    Two Ni-free bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) of Zr(60)Nb(5)Cu(22.5)Pd(5)Al(7.5) and Zr(60)Nb(5)Cu(20)Fe(5)Al(10) were successfully prepared by arc-melting and copper mold casting. The thermal stability and crystallization were studied using differential scanning calorimetry. It demonstrates that the two BMGs exhibit very good glass forming ability with a wide supercooled liquid region. A multi-step process of crystallization with a preferential formation of quasicrystals occurred in both BMGs under continuous heating. The deformation behavior of the two BMGs was investigated using quasi-static compression testing. It reveals that the BMGs exhibit not only superior strength but also an extended plasticity. Corrosion behaviors of the BMGs were investigated in phosphate buffered solution by electrochemical polarization. The result shows that the two BMGs exhibit excellent corrosion resistance characterized by low corrosion current densities and wide passive regions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the passive film formed after anodic polarization was highly enriched in zirconium, niobium, and aluminum oxides. This is attributed to the excellent corrosion resistance. Additionally, the potential cytotoxicity of the two Ni-free BMGs was evaluated through cell culture for 1 week followed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and SEM observation. The results indicate that the two Ni-free BMGs exhibit as good biocompatibility as Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and thus show a promising potential for biomedical applications. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Bulk amorphous steels based on Fe alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lu, ZhaoPing; Liu, Chain T.

    2006-05-30

    A bulk amorphous alloy has the approximate composition: Fe.sub.(100-a-b-c-d-e)Y.sub.aMn.sub.bT.sub.cM.sub.dX.sub.e wherein: T includes at least one of the group consisting of: Ni, Cu, Cr and Co; M includes at least one of the group consisting of W, Mo, Nb, Ta, Al and Ti; X includes at least one of the group consisting of Co, Ni and Cr; a is an atomic percentage, and a<5; b is an atomic percentage, and b.ltoreq.25; c is an atomic percentage, and c.ltoreq.25; d is an atomic percentage, and d.ltoreq.25; and e is an atomic percentage, and 5.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.30.

  9. Pair distribution function study and mechanical behavior of as-cast and structurally relaxed Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Cang; Liaw, P. K.; Wilson, T. W.; Choo, H.; Gao, Y. F.; Liu, C. T.; Proffen, Th.; Richardson, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Contrary to reported results on structural relaxation inducing brittleness in amorphous alloys, the authors found that structural relaxation actually caused an increase in the strength of Zr55Cu35Al10 bulk metallic glass (BMG) without changing the plasticity. Three dimensional models were rebuilt for the as-cast and structurally relaxed BMGs by reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulations based on the pair distribution function (PDF) measured by neutron scattering. Only a small portion of the atom pairs was found to change to more dense packing. The concept of free volume was defined based on the PDF and RMC studies, and the mechanism of mechanical behavior was discussed.

  10. Biocompatible Ni-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with high-Zr-content: compositional optimization for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Hua, Nengbin; Huang, Lu; Chen, Wenzhe; He, Wei; Zhang, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The present study designs and prepares Ni-free Zr60+xTi2.5Al10Fe12.5-xCu10Ag5 (at.%, x=0, 2.5, 5) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) by copper mold casting for potential biomedical application. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility of the Zr-based BMGs are evaluated by investigating mechanical properties, bio-corrosion behavior, and cellular responses. It is found that increasing the content of Zr is favorable for the mechanical compatibility with a combination of low Young's modulus, large plasticity, and high notch toughness. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the Zr-based BMGs are corrosion resistant in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The bio-corrosion resistance of BMGs is improved with the increase in Zr content, which is attributed to the enrichment in Zr and decrease in Al concentration in the surface passive film of alloys. Regular cell responses of mouse MC3T3-E1 cells, including cell adhesion and proliferation, are observed on the Zr-Ti-Al-Fe-Cu-Ag BMGs, which reveals their general biosafety. The high-Zr-based BMGs exhibit a higher cell proliferation activity in comparison with that of pure Zr and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility can be used to guide the future design of biocompatible Zr-based BMGs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Zr-based bulk metallic glass for future stent applications: Materials properties, finite element modeling, and in vitro human vascular cell response.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Pu, Chao; Fisher, Richard K; Mountain, Deidra J H; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K; Zhang, Wei; He, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Despite the prevalent use of crystalline alloys in current vascular stent technology, new biomaterials are being actively sought after to improve stent performance. In this study, we demonstrated the potential of a Zr-Al-Fe-Cu bulk metallic glass (BMG) to serve as a candidate stent material. The mechanical properties of the Zr-based BMG, determined under both static and cyclic loadings, were characterized by high strength, which would allow for the design of thinner stent struts to improve stent biocompatibility. Finite element analysis further complemented the experimental results and revealed that a stent made of the Zr-based BMG was more compliant with the beats of a blood vessel, compared with medical 316L stainless steel. The Zr-based BMG was found to be corrosion resistant in a simulated body environment, owing to the presence of a highly stable ZrO2-rich surface passive film. Application-specific biocompatibility studies were conducted using human aortic endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. The Zr-Al-Fe-Cu BMG was found to support stronger adhesion and faster coverage of endothelial cells and slower growth of smooth muscle cells than 316L stainless steel. These results suggest that the Zr-based BMG could promote re-endothelialization and potentially lower the risk of restenosis, which are critical to improve vascular stent implantation integration. In general, findings in this study raised the curtain for the potential application of BMGs as future candidates for stent applications. Vascular stents are medical devices typically used to restore the lumen of narrowed or clogged blood vessel. Despite the clinical success of metallic materials in stent-assisted angioplasty, post-surgery complications persist due to the mechanical failures, corrosion, and in-stent restenosis of current stents. To overcome these hurdles, strategies including new designs and surface functionalization have been exercised. In addition, the development of new materials with

  12. The structural properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses subjected to high pressure torsion at different temperatures

    SciT

    Boltynjuk, E. V., E-mail: boltynjuk@gmail.com; Ubyivovk, E. V.; Kshumanev, A. M.

    2016-06-17

    The structural properties of a Zr{sub 62}Cu{sub 22}Al{sub 10}Fe{sub 5}Dy{sub 1} bulk metallic glasses were investigated. Cylindrical rods of the Zr{sub 62}Cu{sub 22}Al{sub 10}Fe{sub 5}Dy{sub 1} BMG were subjected to high pressure torsion at temperatures of 20°C and 150°C. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy were used to determine peculiarities of the modified structure. Analysis of fracture surfaces, nanohardness measurements were conducted to investigate the influence of structural changes on mechanical behavior of processed samples.

  13. Structures and mechanical behaviors of Zr55Cu35Al10 bulk amorphous alloys at ambient and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Cang; Liaw, P. K.; Haas, V.; Wall, J. J.; Choo, H.; Inoue, A.; Liu, C. T.

    2006-07-01

    Based on a systematic study of pair distribution functions, carried out at cryogenic and ambient temperatures, on as-cast and crystallized ternary Zr-based bulk amorphous alloys (BAAs), we found that the atoms in BAAs are inhomogenously distributed at a local atomic level. They exist as different clusters with significantly shorter bond lengths than their crystallized counterpart structures—intermetallic compounds, and these structures exist stably in the amorphous state. This results in additional free volume, which is about ˜7% larger than that measured by the Archimedes method. The compressive strength measured at ˜77K was found to be ˜16% larger than that measured at 298K . In this study, an amorphous structural model is proposed, in which strongly bonded clusters acting as units are randomly distributed and strongly correlated to one another, as the free volume forms between clusters. Simulations with reverse Monte Carlo were performed by combining icosehadral and cubic structures as the initial structures for the BAA. The simulations show results consistent with our model. An attempt has been made to connect the relationship between amorphous structures and their mechanical properties.

  14. Comparison of Structural Relaxation Behavior in As-Cast and Pre-Annealed Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses Just below Glass Transition

    DOE PAGES

    Haruyama, Osami; Yoshikawa, Kazuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yoshikatsu; ...

    2015-04-25

    In this paper, the α-relaxation of pre-annealed Zr 55Cu 30Ni 5Al 10 bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) was compared with that of as-cast Zr-based BMGs including Zr 55Cu 30Ni 5Al 10. The α-relaxation was investigated by volume relaxation. The relaxation behavior was well described by a stretched exponential relaxation function, Φ (t) ≈ exp [ - (t/τ α ) β α ], with the isothermal relaxation time, τ α, and the Kohlrausch exponent, β α. The β α exhibited the strong temperature dependence for the pre-annealed BMG, while the weak temperature dependence was visualized for the as-cast BMG similar to themore » dynamic relaxation. The τ α’s were modified by Moynihan and Narayanaswamy-Tool-Moynihan methods that reduce the difference in the thermal history of sample. Finally, as a result, the relaxation kinetics in the glass resembled that of a liquid deduced from the behavior of viscosity in the supercooled liquid.« less

  15. Effect of MoSi2 Content on Dry Sliding Tribological Properties of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Longfei; Yang, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 bulk metallic glass and its composites were prepared by suction casting into a copper mold. The effect of MoSi2 content on the tribological behavior of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 BMG was studied by using a high-speed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The results indicate that the friction coefficient and wear resistance of the BMGs can be improved by a certain amount of crystalline phase induced by MoSi2 content from 1 to 3% and deteriorated with MoSi2 content of 4%. The wear mechanism of both the metallic glass and its composite is abrasive wear. The mechanism of crystalline phase-dependent tribological properties of the composite was discussed based on the wear track and mechanical properties in the present work. The wear behavior of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 BMG and its composite indicates that a good combination of the toughness and the hardness can make the composite be well wear resistant.

  16. Dual self-organised shear banding behaviours and enhanced ductility in phase separating Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. Q.; Song, K. K.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, L.; Cui, W. C.; Qin, Y. S.; Han, X. L.; Xue, Q. S.; Peng, C. X.; Sarac, B.; Spieckermann, F.; Kaban, I.; Eckert, J.

    2018-07-01

    The multiplication and interaction of self-organised shear bands often transform to a stick-slip behaviour of a major shear band along the primary shear plane, and ultimately the major shear band becomes runaway and terminates the plasticity of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). Here, we examined the deformation behaviours of the nanoscale phase-separating Zr65-xCu25Al10Fex (x = 5 and 7.5 at.%) BMGs. The formation of multi-step phase separation, being mainly governed by nucleation and growth, results in the microstructural inhomogeneity on a wide range of length-scales and leads to obviously macroscopic and repeatable ductility. The good deformability can be attributed to two mechanisms for stabilizing shear banding process, i.e. the mutual interaction of multiple shear bands away from the major shear band and the delaying slip-to-failure of dense fine shear bands around the major shear band, both of which show a self-organised criticality yet with different power-law exponents. The two mechanisms could come into effect in the intermediate (stable) and later plastic deformation regime, respectively. Our findings provide a possibility to enhance the shear banding stability over the whole plastic deformation through a proper design of microstructure heterogeneities.

  17. Surface Mechanoengineering of a Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass via Ar-Nanobubble Doping to Probe Cell Sensitivity to Rigid Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Lu; Tian, Mengkun; Wu, Dong; ...

    2017-11-24

    In this paper, a new materials platform, utilizing the amorphous microstructure of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and the versatility of ion implantation, was developed for the fundamental investigation of cell responses to substrate-rigidity variations in the gigapascal modulus range, which was previously unattainable with polymeric materials. The surface rigidity of a Zr-Al- Ni-Cu-Y BMG was modulated with low-energy Ar-ion implantation owing to the impartment of Ar nanobubbles into the amorphous matrix. Surface softening was achieved due to the formation of nanobubble-doped transitional zones in the Zrbased BMG substrate. Bone-forming cell studies on this newly designed platform demonstrated that mechanical cues,more » accompanied with the potential effects of other surface properties (i.e. roughness, morphology, and chemistry), contributed to modulating cell behaviors. Cell adhesion and actin filaments were found to be less established on less stiff surfaces, especially on the surface with an elastic modulus of 51 GPa. Cell growth appeared to be affected by surface mechanical properties. A lower stiffness was generally related to a higher growth rate. Findings in this study broadened our fundamental understanding concerning the mechanosensing of bone cells on stiff substrates. It also suggests that surface mechano-engineering of metallic materials could be a potential strategy to promote osseointegration of such materials for bone-implant applications. Further investigations are proposed to fine tune the ion implantation variables in order to further distinguish the surface-mechanical effect on bone-forming cell activities from the contributions of other surface properties.« less

  18. Surface Mechanoengineering of a Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass via Ar-Nanobubble Doping to Probe Cell Sensitivity to Rigid Materials

    SciT

    Huang, Lu; Tian, Mengkun; Wu, Dong

    In this paper, a new materials platform, utilizing the amorphous microstructure of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and the versatility of ion implantation, was developed for the fundamental investigation of cell responses to substrate-rigidity variations in the gigapascal modulus range, which was previously unattainable with polymeric materials. The surface rigidity of a Zr-Al- Ni-Cu-Y BMG was modulated with low-energy Ar-ion implantation owing to the impartment of Ar nanobubbles into the amorphous matrix. Surface softening was achieved due to the formation of nanobubble-doped transitional zones in the Zrbased BMG substrate. Bone-forming cell studies on this newly designed platform demonstrated that mechanical cues,more » accompanied with the potential effects of other surface properties (i.e. roughness, morphology, and chemistry), contributed to modulating cell behaviors. Cell adhesion and actin filaments were found to be less established on less stiff surfaces, especially on the surface with an elastic modulus of 51 GPa. Cell growth appeared to be affected by surface mechanical properties. A lower stiffness was generally related to a higher growth rate. Findings in this study broadened our fundamental understanding concerning the mechanosensing of bone cells on stiff substrates. It also suggests that surface mechano-engineering of metallic materials could be a potential strategy to promote osseointegration of such materials for bone-implant applications. Further investigations are proposed to fine tune the ion implantation variables in order to further distinguish the surface-mechanical effect on bone-forming cell activities from the contributions of other surface properties.« less

  19. A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid Metal Structures and Electronic Equilibrium - 154041

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0027 A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium-based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid -Metal Structures and...to 16 Dec 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium-based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid -Metal...including Al, Cu, Ni, Zr, Mg, Pd, Ga , Ca. Many new Al-based amorphous alloys were found within the numerous alloy systems studied in this project, and

  20. Densification behavior, nanocrystallization, and mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashish Kumar

    Fe-based amorphous alloys are gaining increasing attention due to their exceptional wear and corrosion resistance for potential structural applications. Two major challenges that are hindering the commercialization of these amorphous alloys are difficulty in processing of bulk shapes (diameter > 10 mm) and lack of ductility. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is evolving as a promising technique for processing bulk shapes of amorphous and nanocrystalline materials. The objective of this work is to investigate densification behavior, nanocrystallization, and mechanical properties of SPS sintered Fe-based amorphous alloys of composition Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6. SPS processing was performed in three distinct temperature ranges of amorphous alloys: (a) below glass transition temperature (Tg), (b) between Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx), and (c) above Tx. Punch displacement data obtained during SPS sintering was correlated with the SPS processing parameters such as temperature, pressure, and sintering time. Powder rearrangement, plastic deformation below T g, and viscous flow of the material between Tg and Tx were observed as the main densification stages during SPS sintering. Micro-scale temperature distributions at the point of contact and macro-scale temperature distribution throughout the sample during SPS of amorphous alloys were modeled. The bulk amorphous alloys are expected to undergo structural relaxation and nanocrystallization during SPS sintering. X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to investigate the evolution of nanocrystallites in SPS sintered Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys. The SANS analysis showed significant scattering for the samples sintered in the supercooled region indicating local structural and compositional changes with the profuse nucleation of nano-clusters (~4 nm). Compression tests and microhardness were performed on the samples sintered at different

  1. Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently ‘brittle’ material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2–4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses. PMID:24755683

  2. Anomalous shear band characteristics and extra-deep shock-affected zone in Zr-based bulk metallic glass treated with nanosecond laser peening.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanpeng; Xu, Guangyue; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Zhe; Guo, Yacong; Huang, Chenguang; Wei, Bingchen

    2017-03-07

    The effects of nanosecond laser peening on Zr 41 Ti 14 Cu 12.5 Ni 10 Be 22.5 metallic glass were investigated in this study. The peening treatment produced an extra-deep shock-affected zone compared to crystal metal. As opposed to the conventional shear bands, numerous arc shear bands appeared and aggregated in the vertical direction of the laser beam, forming basic units for accommodating plastic deformation. The arc shear bands exhibited short and discrete features near the surface of the material, then grew longer and fewer at deeper peened layer depths, which was closely related to the laser shock wave attenuation. An energy dissipation model was established based on Hugoniot Elastic Limit and shear band characteristics to represent the formation of an extra-deep shock-affected zone. The results presented here suggest that the bulk modification of metallic glass with a considerable affected depth is feasible. Further, they reveal that nanosecond laser peening is promising as an effective approach to tuning shear bands for improved MGs ductility.

  3. Crystallization Behavior of A Bulk Amorphous Mg62Cu26Y12 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shyue-Sheng; Chin, Tsung-Shune; Su, Kuo-Chang

    1994-07-01

    The crystallization temperature, the associated activation energy and the crystallized structure of a bulk amorphous Mg62Cu26Y12 alloy with a diameter of 2.5 mm were studied. It possesses a one-step crystallization behavior. The crystallization reaction was found to be represented by: AM(MG62Cu26Y12)→Mg2Cu+MgY+CuY+Mg, ( Tx=188°C, Eac=134 kJ/mol) where AM represents the amorphous state, T x the crystallization temperature at an infinitesimal heating rate, and E ac the associated activation energy. The amount of crystalline phases were found to be Mg2Cu:MgY:CuY=76:17:7. The Mg phase is identifiable only by high resolution electron microscopy, not by X-ray diffraction. The crystallization leads to a sharp rise in electrical resistivity which is reversed to those of iron-based amorphous alloys.

  4. Cladding of Mg alloy with Zr based BMG Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, A. K.; Oh, Y. S.; Faisal, M. K.; Kim, N. J.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, an attempt has been made to clad AZ31 magnesium alloy with Zr-based bulk metallic glassy alloy (Vit-1), by casting method. The interface studies conducted using SEM-EDS line scan indicate that a good bond is formed at the clad interface of Zr and Mg. And the mechanism involved is discussed herein.

  5. Surface and bulk crystallization of amorphous solid water films: Confirmation of “top-down” crystallization

    SciT

    Yuan, Chunqing; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-01-11

    Here, the crystallization kinetics of nanoscale amorphous solid water (ASW) films are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). TPD measurements are used to probe surface crystallization and RAIRS measurements are used to probe bulk crystallization. Isothermal TPD results show that surface crystallization is independent of the film thickness (from 100 to 1000 ML). Conversely, the RAIRS measurements show that the bulk crystallization time increases linearly with increasing film thickness. These results suggest that nucleation and crystallization begin at the ASW/vacuum interface and then the crystallization growth front propagates linearly into the bulk. This mechanism wasmore » confirmed by selective placement of an isotopic layer (5% D 2O in H 2O) at various positions in an ASW (H 2O) film. In this case, the closer the isotopic layer was to the vacuum interface, the earlier the isotopic layer crystallized. These experiments provide direct evidence to confirm that ASW crystallization in vacuum proceeds by a “top-down” crystallization mechanism.« less

  6. Method of casting articles of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.; Peker, A.

    1998-08-25

    A casting charge of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy is cast into a mold from a temperature greater than its crystallized melting temperature, and permitted to solidify to form an article. The oxygen content of the casting charge is limited to an operable level, as excessively high oxygen contents produce premature crystallization during the casting operation. During melting, the casting charge is preferably heated to a temperature above a threshold temperature to eliminate heterogeneous crystallization nucleation sites within the casting charge. The casting charge may be cast from above the threshold temperature, or it may be cooled to the casting temperature of more than the crystallized melting point but not more than the threshold temperature, optionally held at this temperature for a period of time, and thereafter cast. 8 figs.

  7. Bulk Formation of Metallic Glasses and Amorphous Silicon from the Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1985-01-01

    By using metallic glass compositions with a high relative glass transition temperature, such as Pd40Ni40P20, homogeneous nucleation also becomes negligible. Large (5g) masses of this alloys were obtained using a molten B2O3 flux. Presently, bulk glass formation in iron based glasses is being investigated. It is expected that if an undercooling of about 250K can be achieved in a Ge or Si melt, formation of the amorphous semiconductor phase (rather than the crystal) may be kinetically favored. The volumetric behavior of undercooled liquid Ga droplet dispersion is investigated by dilatometry. A theoretical model (both analytical and numerical) was developed for transient nucleation in glass forming melts. The model, originally designed for isothermal conditions, was extended to continuous quenching. It is being applied to glass formation in various metallic and oxide systems. A further refinement will be the inclusion of diffusion controlled interfacial rearrangements governing the growth of the crystal embryos.

  8. Method of casting articles of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    1998-01-01

    A casting charge of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy is cast into a mold from a temperature greater than its crystallized melting temperature, and permitted to solidify to form an article. The oxygen content of the casting charge is limited to an operable level, as excessively high oxygen contents produce premature crystallization during the casting operation. During melting, the casting charge is preferably heated to a temperature above a threshold temperature to eliminate heterogeneous crystallization nucleation sites within the casting charge. The casting charge may be cast from above the threshold temperature, or it may be cooled to the casting temperature of more than the crystallized melting point but not more than the threshold temperature, optionally held at this temperature for a period of time, and thereafter cast.

  9. In situ observation of defect annihilation in Kr ion-irradiated bulk Fe/amorphous-Fe 2 Zr nanocomposite alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, K. Y.; Fan, Z.; Chen, Y.; ...

    2014-08-26

    Enhanced irradiation tolerance in crystalline multilayers has received significant attention lately. However, little is known on the irradiation response of crystal/amorphous nanolayers. We report on in situ Kr ion irradiation studies of a bulk Fe 96Zr 4 nanocomposite alloy. Irradiation resulted in amorphization of Fe 2Zr and formed crystal/amorphous nanolayers. α-Fe layers exhibited drastically lower defect density and size than those in large α-Fe grains. In situ video revealed that mobile dislocation loops in α-Fe layers were confined by the crystal/amorphous interfaces and kept migrating to annihilate other defects. This study provides new insights on the design of irradiation-tolerant crystal/amorphousmore » nanocomposites.« less

  10. Communication: Distinguishing between bulk and interface-enhanced crystallization in nanoscale films of amorphous solid water.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chunqing; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2017-01-21

    The crystallization of amorphous solid water (ASW) nanoscale films was investigated using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. Two ASW film configurations were studied. In one case the ASW film was deposited on top of and capped with a decane layer ("sandwich" configuration). In the other case, the ASW film was deposited on top of a decane layer and not capped ("no cap" configuration). Crystallization of ASW films in the "sandwich" configuration is about eight times slower than in the "no cap." Selective placement of an isotopic layer (5% D 2 O in H 2 O) at various positions in an ASW (H 2 O) film was used to determine the crystallization mechanism. In the "sandwich" configuration, the crystallization kinetics were independent of the isotopic layer placement whereas in the "no cap" configuration the closer the isotopic layer was to the vacuum interface, the earlier the isotopic layer crystallized. These results are consistent with a mechanism whereby the decane overlayer suppresses surface nucleation and provide evidence that the observed ASW crystallization in "sandwich" films is the result of uniform bulk nucleation.

  11. Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys with iron contents as high as 82 at%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Feng; Liu, Xue; Zhao, Shao-Fan; Ding, Hong-Yu; Yao, Ke-Fu

    2015-07-01

    Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys (BAAs) with high Fe contents are advantageous due to their high saturation magnetization and low cost. However, preparing Fe-based BAAs with Fe contents higher than 80 at% is difficult due to their poor glass forming abilities (GFA). In this study, an Fe81P8.5C5.5B2Si3 BAA with a diameter of 1 mm and a saturation magnetization of 1.56 T was successfully prepared using the fluxing and copper mold casting methods. In addition, by introducing a small amount of elemental Mo to the alloy, an Fe82Mo1P6.5C5.5B2Si3 BAA rod with a diameter of 1 mm, a high saturation magnetization of 1.59 T, a high yield stress of 3265 MPa, and a clear plasticity of 1.3% was prepared in the same way. The cost effectiveness and good magnetic properties of these newly-developed Fe-based BAAs with Fe contents as high as 82 at% would be advantageous and promising for industrial applications.

  12. Second amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation in Cu(60)Ti(20)Zr(20) bulk metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Cao, Q P; Li, J F; Zhang, P N; Horsewell, A; Jiang, J Z; Zhou, Y H

    2007-06-20

    The second amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation in Cu(60)Ti(20)Zr(20) bulk metallic glass was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffractometry. The difference of the Gibbs free energies between the amorphous phase and the crystalline products during the transformation is estimated to be about 2.46 kJ mol(-1) at 753 K, much smaller than the 61 kJ mol(-1) obtained assuming that it is a polymorphic transformation. It was revealed that the phase transformation occurs through a eutectic crystallization of Cu(51)Zr(14) and Cu(2)TiZr, having an effective activation energy of the order of 400 kJ mol(-1). The average Avrami exponent n is about 2.0, indicating that the crystallization is diffusion controlled.

  13. EFFECT OF PRE-ALLOYING CONDITION ON THE BULK AMORPHOUS ALLOY ND(60)FE(30)AL(10).

    SciT

    OCONNOR,A.S.; LEWIS,L.H.; MCCALLUM,R.W.

    Bulk metallic glasses are materials that require only modest cooling rates to obtain amorphous solids directly from the melt. Nd{sub 60}Fe{sub 30}Al{sub 10} has been reported to be a ferromagnetic bulk metallic glass that exhibits high coercivity, a combination unlike conventional Nd-based amorphous magnetic alloys. To clarify the relationship between short-range order and high coercivity in glassy Nd{sub 60}Fe{sub 30}Al{sub 10}, experiments were performed to verify the existence of a homogeneous liquid state prior to rapid solidification. Alloys were prepared by various pre-alloying routes and then melt-spun. Arc-melted alloys were prepared for melt spinning using three different protocols involving: (1)more » alloying all three elements at once, (2) forming a Nd-Fe alloy which was subsequently alloyed with Al, and (3) forming a Fe-Al alloy for subsequent alloying with Nd. XRD, DTA, and magnetic measurement data from the resultant ribbons indicate significant differences in both the glassy fraction and the crystalline phase present in the as-spun material. These observed differences are attributed to the presence of highly stable nanoscopic aluminide-and/or silicide-phases, or motes, present in the melt prior to solidification. These motes would affect the short-range order and coercivity of the resultant glassy state and are anticipated to provide heterogeneous nucleation sites for crystallization.« less

  14. Composition-controlled active-passive transition and corrosion behavior of Fe-Cr(Mo)-Zr-B bulk amorphous steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jiajia; Wu, Yidong; Wang, Tan; Liu, Yanhui; Hui, Xidong

    2018-07-01

    Various corrosive environments in daily life and industry have put forward high requirement on corrosion resistance of metals, especially steels. Unlike the strict demand in Cr content of crystalline stainless steels, amorphous steels (ASs) with lower Cr content can be endowed with outstanding corrosion resistance, while the intrinsic mechanism is not fully understood. Herein, we present a novel Fe92-x-y-zCrxMoyZr8Bz (6 ≤ x ≤ 40, 0 ≤ y ≤ 22, and 12 ≤ z ≤ 18) bulk amorphous steel (BAS) forming system and reveal the synergistic effect of Cr and Mo in determining the chemical stability of oxide films. It has been found the Fe92-x-zCrxZr8Bz BASs with 1 mm in diameter display a Cr-controlling active-passive transition at the Cr threshold of ∼25% in 1 M hydrochloric acid. When adding minor Mo into the BASs, the Cr threshold can be remarkably reduced by forming favorable hexavalent Mo oxides. The generation of Mo6+ is facilitated by atomic selective dissolution at the interface and can promote the passivation. In contrast, when the Cr content of the Mo-doped glasses exceeds 25%, few Mo6+ oxides would produce as the prior formation of protective passive films inhibits the further oxidation of Mo. Therefore, manipulating the active-passive transition properly is crucial to designing ASs with high stainlessness.

  15. Low Thermal Conductivity of Bulk Amorphous Si1- x Ge x Containing Nano-Sized Crystalline Particles Synthesized by Ball-Milling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusamy, Omprakash; Nishino, Shunsuke; Ghodke, Swapnil; Inukai, Manabu; Sobota, Robert; Adachi, Masahiro; Kiyama, Makato; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Santhanakrishnan, Harish; Ikeda, Hiroya; Hayakawa, Yasuhiro

    2018-06-01

    Amorphous Si0.65Ge0.35 powder containing a small amount of nano-sized crystalline particles was synthesized by means of the mechanical alloying process. Hot pressing for 24 h under the pressure of 400 MPa at 823 K, which is below the crystallization temperature, allowed us to obtain bulk amorphous Si-Ge alloy containing a small amount of nanocrystals. The thermal conductivity of the prepared bulk amorphous Si-Ge alloy was extremely low, showing a magnitude of less than 1.35 Wm-1 K-1 over the entire temperature range from 300 K to 700 K. The sound velocity of longitudinal and transverse waves for the bulk amorphous Si0.65Ge0.35 were measured, and the resulting values were 5841 m/s and 2840 m/s, respectively. The estimated mean free path of phonons was kept at the very small value of ˜ 4.2 nm, which was mainly due to the strong scattering limit of phonons in association with the amorphous structure.

  16. Production and Characterization of Bulk MgB2 Material made by the Combination of Crystalline and Carbon Coated Amorphous Boron Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Koblischka, M. R.; Murakami, M.

    2017-07-01

    The object of this investigation is to reduce the cost of bulk production and in the same time to increase the critical current performance of bulk MgB2 material. High-purity commercial powders of Mg metal (99.9% purity) and two types of crystalline (99% purity) and 16.5 wt% carbon-coated, nanometer-sized amorphous boron powders (98.5% purity) were mixed in a nominal composition of MgB2 to reduce the boron cost and to see the effect on the superconducting and magnetic properties. Several samples were produced mixing the crystalline boron and carbon-coated, nanometer-sized amorphous boron powders in varying ratios (50:50, 60:40, 70:30, 80:20, 90:10) and synthesized using a single-step process using the solid state reaction around 800 °C for 3 h in pure argon atmosphere. The magnetization measurements exhibited a sharp superconducting transition temperature with T c, onset around 38.6 K to 37.2 K for the bulk samples prepared utilizing the mixture of crystalline boron and 16.5% carbon-coated amorphous boron. The critical current density at higher magnetic field was improved with addition of carbon-coated boron to crystalline boron in a ratio of 80:20. The highest self-field Jc around 215,000 A/cm2 and 37,000 A/cm2 were recorded at 20 K, self-field and 2 T for the sample with a ratio of 80:10. The present results clearly demonstrate that the bulk MgB2 performance can be improved by adding carbon-coated nano boron to crystalline boron, which will be attractive to reduce the cost of bulk MgB2 material for several industrial applications.

  17. Microstructural development at weld interface between Zr-based glassy alloy and stainless steel by resistance microwelding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, S.; Minami, M.; Soeda, A.; Matsushima, M.; Takahashi, M.; Yokoyama, Y.; Fujimoto, K.

    2012-08-01

    Zr-based bulk metallic glasses are expected to be welded to conventional structural alloys. Dissimilar welding of metallic glasses to stainless steel was carried out by resistance microwelding. The metallurgical analysis of the weld interface revealed the welding mechanism. A thin reaction layer was formed between the two liquid materials. The melting of stainless steel should be limited to obtain sound joints.

  18. Recent advances in bulk metallic glasses for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Li, H F; Zheng, Y F

    2016-05-01

    With a continuously increasing aging population and the improvement of living standards, large demands of biomaterials are expected for a long time to come. Further development of novel biomaterials, that are much safer and of much higher quality, in terms of both biomedical and mechanical properties, are therefore of great interest for both the research scientists and clinical surgeons. Compared with the conventional crystalline metallic counterparts, bulk metallic glasses have unique amorphous structures, and thus exhibit higher strength, lower Young's modulus, improved wear resistance, good fatigue endurance, and excellent corrosion resistance. For this purpose, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have recently attracted much attention for biomedical applications. This review discusses and summarizes the recent developments and advances of bulk metallic glasses, including Ti-based, Zr-based, Fe-based, Mg-based, Zn-based, Ca-based and Sr-based alloying systems for biomedical applications. Future research directions will move towards overcoming the brittleness, increasing the glass forming ability (GFA) thus obtaining corresponding bulk metallic glasses with larger sizes, removing/reducing toxic elements, and surface modifications. Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), also known as amorphous alloys or liquid metals, are relative newcomers in the field of biomaterials. They have gained increasing attention during the past decades, as they exhibit an excellent combination of properties and processing capabilities desired for versatile biomedical implant applications. The present work reviewed the recent developments and advances of biomedical BMGs, including Ti-based, Zr-based, Fe-based, Mg-based, Zn-based, Ca-based and Sr-based BMG alloying systems. Besides, the critical analysis and in-depth discussion on the current status, challenge and future development of biomedical BMGs are included. The possible solution to the BMG size limitation, the brittleness of BMGs has been

  19. The Construction and Validation of All-Atom Bulk-Phase Models of Amorphous Polymers Using the TIGER2/TIGER3 Empirical Sampling Method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, Sanjeeva; Latour, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    A new empirical sampling method termed “temperature intervals with global exchange of replicas and reduced radii” (TIGER3) is presented and demonstrated to efficiently equilibrate entangled long-chain molecular systems such as amorphous polymers. The TIGER3 algorithm is a replica exchange method in which simulations are run in parallel over a range of temperature levels at and above a designated baseline temperature. The replicas sampled at temperature levels above the baseline are run through a series of cycles with each cycle containing four stages – heating, sampling, quenching, and temperature level reassignment. The method allows chain segments to pass through one another at elevated temperature levels during the sampling stage by reducing the van der Waals radii of the atoms, thus eliminating chain entanglement problems. Atomic radii are then returned to their regular values and re-equilibrated at elevated temperature prior to quenching to the baseline temperature. Following quenching, replicas are compared using a Metropolis Monte Carlo exchange process for the construction of an approximate Boltzmann-weighted ensemble of states and then reassigned to the elevated temperature levels for additional sampling. Further system equilibration is performed by periodic implementation of the previously developed TIGER2 algorithm between cycles of TIGER3, which applies thermal cycling without radii reduction. When coupled with a coarse-grained modeling approach, the combined TIGER2/TIGER3 algorithm yields fast equilibration of bulk-phase models of amorphous polymer, even for polymers with complex, highly branched structures. The developed method was tested by modeling the polyethylene melt. The calculated properties of chain conformation and chain segment packing agreed well with published data. The method was also applied to generate equilibrated structural models of three increasingly complex amorphous polymer systems: poly(methyl methacrylate), poly

  20. Semiconductor to metallic transition in bulk accumulated amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide dual gate thin-film transistor

    SciT

    Chun, Minkyu; Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Jang, Jin, E-mail: jjang@khu.ac.kr

    We investigated the effects of top gate voltage (V{sub TG}) and temperature (in the range of 25 to 70 {sup o}C) on dual-gate (DG) back-channel-etched (BCE) amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) characteristics. The increment of V{sub TG} from -20V to +20V, decreases the threshold voltage (V{sub TH}) from 19.6V to 3.8V and increases the electron density to 8.8 x 10{sup 18}cm{sup −3}. Temperature dependent field-effect mobility in saturation regime, extracted from bottom gate sweep, show a critical dependency on V{sub TG}. At V{sub TG} of 20V, the mobility decreases from 19.1 to 15.4 cm{sup 2}/V ⋅ s with increasingmore » temperature, showing a metallic conduction. On the other hand, at V{sub TG} of - 20V, the mobility increases from 6.4 to 7.5cm{sup 2}/V ⋅ s with increasing temperature. Since the top gate bias controls the position of Fermi level, the temperature dependent mobility shows metallic conduction when the Fermi level is above the conduction band edge, by applying high positive bias to the top gate.« less

  1. Fracture behaviors under pure shear loading in bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cen; Gao, Meng; Wang, Chao; Wang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Tzu-Chiang

    2016-12-23

    Pure shear fracture test, as a special mechanical means, had been carried out extensively to obtain the critical information for traditional metallic crystalline materials and rocks, such as the intrinsic deformation behavior and fracture mechanism. However, for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the pure shear fracture behaviors have not been investigated systematically due to the lack of a suitable test method. Here, we specially introduce a unique antisymmetrical four-point bend shear test method to realize a uniform pure shear stress field and study the pure shear fracture behaviors of two kinds of BMGs, Zr-based and La-based BMGs. All kinds of fracture behaviors, the pure shear fracture strength, fracture angle and fracture surface morphology, are systematically analyzed and compared with those of the conventional compressive and tensile fracture. Our results indicate that both the Zr-based and La-based BMGs follow the same fracture mechanism under pure shear loading, which is significantly different from the situation of some previous research results. Our results might offer new enlightenment on the intrinsic deformation and fracture mechanism of BMGs and other amorphous materials.

  2. Fracture behaviors under pure shear loading in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cen; Gao, Meng; Wang, Chao; Wang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Tzu-Chiang

    2016-12-01

    Pure shear fracture test, as a special mechanical means, had been carried out extensively to obtain the critical information for traditional metallic crystalline materials and rocks, such as the intrinsic deformation behavior and fracture mechanism. However, for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the pure shear fracture behaviors have not been investigated systematically due to the lack of a suitable test method. Here, we specially introduce a unique antisymmetrical four-point bend shear test method to realize a uniform pure shear stress field and study the pure shear fracture behaviors of two kinds of BMGs, Zr-based and La-based BMGs. All kinds of fracture behaviors, the pure shear fracture strength, fracture angle and fracture surface morphology, are systematically analyzed and compared with those of the conventional compressive and tensile fracture. Our results indicate that both the Zr-based and La-based BMGs follow the same fracture mechanism under pure shear loading, which is significantly different from the situation of some previous research results. Our results might offer new enlightenment on the intrinsic deformation and fracture mechanism of BMGs and other amorphous materials.

  3. Molecular packing and electronic processes in amorphous-like polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells with fullerene intercalation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ting; Xu, Haihua; Grancini, Giulia; Mai, Jiangquan; Petrozza, Annamaria; Jeng, U-Ser; Wang, Yan; Xin, Xin; Lu, Yong; Choon, Ng Siu; Xiao, Hu; Ong, Beng S; Lu, Xinhui; Zhao, Ni

    2014-06-09

    The interpenetrating morphology formed by the electron donor and acceptor materials is critical for the performance of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic (PV) cells. In this work we carried out a systematic investigation on a high PV efficiency (>6%) BHJ system consisting of a newly developed 5,6-difluorobenzo[c] thiadiazole-based copolymer, PFBT-T20TT, and a fullerene derivative. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering measurements reveal the lower-ordered nature of the BHJ system as well as an intermixing morphology with intercalation of fullerene molecules between the PFBT-T20TT lamella. Steady-state and transient photo-induced absorption spectroscopy reveal ultrafast charge transfer (CT) at the PFBT-T20TT/fullerene interface, indicating that the CT process is no longer limited by exciton diffusion. Furthermore, we extracted the hole mobility based on the space limited current (SCLC) model and found that more efficient hole transport is achieved in the PFBT-T20TT:fullerene BHJ as compared to pure PFBT-T20TT, showing a different trend as compared to the previously reported highly crystalline polymer:fullerene blend with a similar intercalation manner. Our study correlates the fullerene intercalated polymer lamella morphology with device performance and provides a coherent model to interpret the high photovoltaic performance of some of the recently developed weakly-ordered BHJ systems based on conjugated polymers with branched side-chain.

  4. Processing and characterization of Zr-based metallic glass by laser direct deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Heehun

    Bulk Metallic Glass has become famous for its exceptional mechanical and corrosion properties. Especially, Zirconium has been the prominent constituent in Bulk Metallic Glass due to its superior glass forming ability, the ability to form amorphous phase with low cooling rate, thereby giving advantages in structural applications. In this study, Zirconium powder was alloyed with Aluminum, Nickel and Copper powder at an atomic ratio of 65:10:10:15, respectively. Using the ball milling process to mix the powders, Zr65Al10Ni 10Cu15 amorphous structure was manufactured by laser direct deposition. Laser power and laser scanning speed were optimized to increase the fraction of amorphous phase. X-ray Diffraction confirmed the existence of both amorphous and crystalline phase by having a wide halo peak and sharp intense peak in the spectrum. Differential Scanning Calorimetry proved the presence of amorphous phase and glass transition was observed to be around 655 K. Scanning electron microscopy showed the microstructure of the deposited sample to have repetitive amorphous and crystalline phase as XRD examined. Crystalline phase resulted from the laser reheating and remelting process due to subsequent laser scan. Laser direct deposited amorphous/crystalline composite showed Vickers Hardness of 670 Hv and exhibited improved corrosion resistance in comparison to fully-crystallized sample. The compression test showed that, due to the existence of crystalline phase, fracture strain of Zr65Al10Ni10Cu 15 amorphous composites was enhanced from less than 2% to as high as 5.7%, compared with fully amorphous metallic glass.

  5. Martensitic transformation in a B2-containing CuZr-based BMG composite revealed by in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Gian; Lee, Chanho; Hong, Sung Hwan; ...

    2017-06-27

    Here, CuZr-based bulk-metallic-glass (BMG) composites reinforced by a B2-type CuZr crystalline-phase (CP) have been widely studied, and exhibit that the plastic deformation of the CP induces martensitic transformation from the B2 to B19', which plays a dominant role in the deformation behavior and mechanical properties. In the present study, 2.0% Co containing CuZr-based BMG composites were investigated using in-situ neutron-diffraction technique. The in-situ neutron-diffraction results reveal the continuous load transfer from the glass matrix to B2 CP and martensitic transformation from the B2 CP to B19' during the deformation of the composite. Moreover, it was found that the martensitic transformationmore » is initiated at the applied stress higher than 1500 MPa, and is significantly suppressed during the deformation, as compared to other 0.5% Co-containing CuZr-based BMG composites. Based on these in-situ neutron-diffraction results, the martensitic transformation is strongly affected by the amount of the addition of Co, which determines the mechanical properties of CP-reinforced BMG composites, such as ductility and hardening capability.« less

  6. Martensitic transformation in a B2-containing CuZr-based BMG composite revealed by in situ neutron diffraction

    SciT

    Song, Gian; Lee, Chanho; Hong, Sung Hwan

    Here, CuZr-based bulk-metallic-glass (BMG) composites reinforced by a B2-type CuZr crystalline-phase (CP) have been widely studied, and exhibit that the plastic deformation of the CP induces martensitic transformation from the B2 to B19', which plays a dominant role in the deformation behavior and mechanical properties. In the present study, 2.0% Co containing CuZr-based BMG composites were investigated using in-situ neutron-diffraction technique. The in-situ neutron-diffraction results reveal the continuous load transfer from the glass matrix to B2 CP and martensitic transformation from the B2 CP to B19' during the deformation of the composite. Moreover, it was found that the martensitic transformationmore » is initiated at the applied stress higher than 1500 MPa, and is significantly suppressed during the deformation, as compared to other 0.5% Co-containing CuZr-based BMG composites. Based on these in-situ neutron-diffraction results, the martensitic transformation is strongly affected by the amount of the addition of Co, which determines the mechanical properties of CP-reinforced BMG composites, such as ductility and hardening capability.« less

  7. Local melting to design strong and plastically deformable bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yue-Sheng; Han, Xiao-Liang; Song, Kai-Kai; Tian, Yu-Hao; Peng, Chuan-Xiao; Wang, Li; Sun, Bao-An; Wang, Gang; Kaban, Ivan; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Recently, CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites reinforced by the TRIP (transformation-induced plasticity) effect have been explored in attempt to accomplish an optimal of trade-off between strength and ductility. However, the design of such BMG composites with advanced mechanical properties still remains a big challenge for materials engineering. In this work, we proposed a technique of instantaneously and locally arc-melting BMG plate to artificially induce the precipitation of B2 crystals in the glassy matrix and then to tune mechanical properties. Through adjusting local melting process parameters (i.e. input powers, local melting positions, and distances between the electrode and amorphous plate), the size, volume fraction, and distribution of B2 crystals were well tailored and the corresponding formation mechanism was clearly clarified. The resultant BMG composites exhibit large compressive plasticity and high strength together with obvious work-hardening ability. This compelling approach could be of great significance for the steady development of metastable CuZr-based alloys with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:28211890

  8. Production and properties of high strength Ni free Zr-based BMGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M.; Wang, W. H.

    2014-06-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are well known for very attractive physical, mechanical and thermal properties. Zr-based BMGs are used as structural materials in sports goods, electronics, jewelry, medical and aerospace applications. Ni free Zr48Cu36Al8M8 (M = Nb, Ti and Ta) BMGs are successfully synthesized by Cu mold casting technique. Differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) results show that the Zr48Cu36Al8Nb8 BMG have good thermal stability, wide supercooled liquid region of 80 K and contain the double stage crystallization. The alloy has fracture strength of 1.953 GPa. Shear angle was measured to be in the range of 43.5±5° for the alloy studied. Vicker's hardness of the BMGs was found to be over 500 Hv for the as cast alloy which enhanced about 11 % more by annealing up to 600 °C/20 min. Intersected shear bands were observed. The observed promising mechanical and thermal properties showed that BMG studied can be used for industrial applications.

  9. Synchrotron x-ray scattering investigations of oxygen-induced nucleation in a Zr-based glass-forming alloy.

    SciT

    Wall, J. J.; Almer, J. D.; Vogel, S. C.

    The metallic glass-forming alloy VIT-105 (Zr{sub 52.5}Cu{sub 17.9}Ni{sub 14.6}Al{sub 10}Ti{sub 5}) was used to study the effect of oxygen on nucleation. Ex situ synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments performed on as-cast samples showed that oxygen leads to the formation of tetragonal and/or cubic phases, depending on oxygen content. The samples crystallized into either a primitive tetragonal phase or the so-called fcc 'big cube' phase in a glassy matrix. A subsequent discussion on the role of oxygen in heterogeneous nucleation in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses is presented.

  10. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  11. Effects of working pressure and annealing on bulk density and nanopore structures in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Keisuke; Kikuchi, Mitsuho; Ota, Masato; Sasase, Masato; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kumomi, Hideya; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2017-03-01

    Microstructures of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) thin films of different densities were analyzed. Device-quality a-IGZO films were deposited under optimum conditions, e.g., the total pressure P tot = 0.55 Pa produced high film densities of ˜6.1 g/cm3, while a very high P tot = 5.0 Pa produced low film densities of 5.5 g/cm3. Both films formed uniform high-density layers in the vicinity of the glass substrate, 10-20 nm in thickness depending on P tot, while their growth mode changed to a sparse columnar structure in thicker regions. X-ray reflectivity and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry provided different results on densification by post deposition thermal annealing; i.e., the latter has a higher sensitivity. High-Z-contrast images obtained by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy were also useful for detecting nanometer-size non uniformity even in device-quality a-IGZO films.

  12. Amorphous Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    A proposed mobile robot, denoted the amorphous rover, would vary its own size and shape in order to traverse terrain by means of rolling and/or slithering action. The amorphous rover was conceived as a robust, lightweight alternative to the wheeled rover-class robotic vehicle heretofore used in exploration of Mars. Unlike a wheeled rover, the amorphous rover would not have a predefined front, back, top, bottom, or sides. Hence, maneuvering of the amorphous rover would be more robust: the amorphous rover would not be vulnerable to overturning, could move backward or sideways as well as forward, and could even narrow itself to squeeze through small openings.

  13. James C. McGroddy Prize Talk: Development and Applications of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Akihisa

    2009-03-01

    We realized, through detailed amorphous material investigations in the 1980's, that a number of metallic glassy alloys of multi-component La-, Mg- and Zr-based systems exhibit a large supercooled-liquid region prior to crystallization. The stabilization phenomenon of these supercooled liquid should enable us to fabricate, by slow cooling processes, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with critical diameters larger than several millimeters. Caltech's group also succeeded the fabrication of BMG in Zr-based alloy system in 1993. Since then, much attention has been paid to BMGs because of their novel characteristics in basic science and engineering aspects and new materials science and engineering fields have emerged for BMGs. Based on knowledge obtained thus far, we have successfully developed new BMGs with technologically-important transition metals, such as Zr-, Ti-, Fe-, Co-, Ni- and Cu-based alloys. Currently, the maximum diameter for glass formation reaches 30 mm for Zr- and Cu-based systems, 12 mm for Ti-based system, 18 mm for Fe-Co-based system and 20 mm for Ni-based system, even employing the copper mold casting technique. These large size BMGs possess nearly the same fundamental properties as those of the BMGs with smaller diameters. BMGs with diameters above 10 mm can be formed in Zr-Al-Ni-Cu system with Zr compositions higher than 65 at% and they exhibit excellent properties, such as high Poisson's ratio, high ductility, high fracture toughness, high fatigue strength and high stability of mechanical properties to annealing-induced embrittlement. The new Ti-based BMGs without allergic and toxic elements should exhibit good compatibility to bio-tissues. Applications of BMGs in Fe-, Co-, Ti- and Zr-based systems have advanced many devices including the following; choke coil, power inductor, electro magnetic shielding, magnetic and position sensors, micro-geared motor, pressure sensor, Coriolis flowmeter, surface coating layer, precise polishing medium, magnetic and

  14. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    PubMed

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  15. Nanometer scale atomic structure of zirconium based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinwoo

    We have studied the nanometer scale structure of bulk metallic glass (BMG) using fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM). The nanometer scale medium range order (MRO) in BMG is of significant interest because of its possible relationship to the properties, but the experimental study of the MRO is difficult because conventional diffraction techniques are not sensitive to the MRO scale. FEM is a quantitative transmission electron microscopy technique which measures the nanoscale structural fluctuation associated with MRO in amorphous materials, and provides information about the size, distribution, and internal structure of MRO. In this work, we developed an improved method for FEM using energy-filtered STEM nanodiffraction with highly coherent probes with size up to 11nm in a state-of-the-art Cs- corrected STEM. We also developed an effective way to eliminate the effect of sample thickness variation to the FEM data by using Z-contrast images as references. To study the detailed structure of MRO, we developed a hybrid reverse Monte Carlo (H-RMC) simulation which combines an empirical atomic potential and the FEM data. H-RMC generated model structures that match the experimental data at short and medium range. In addition, the subtle rotational symmetries in the FEM nanodiffraction patterns were analyzed by angular correlation function to reveal more details of the internal structure of MRO. Our experiments and simulations show that Zr-based BMG contains pseudo-planar, crystal-like MRO as well as icosahedral clusters in its nanoscale structure. We found that some icosahedral clusters may be connected, and that structural relaxation by annealing increases the population of icosahedral clusters.

  16. A High Strain-Rate Investigation of a Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass and an HTPB Polymer Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    95 8. Lankford J. (1977) Compressive strength and microplasticity in polycrystalline alumina. Journal of Materials Science 12, 791-796. 9...Letters 45, 615-616. 59. Lankford J. (1977) Compressive strength and microplasticity in polycrystalline alumina. Journal of Materials Science 12, 791

  17. Shield gas induced cracks during nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Noguchi, Jun; Yan, Jiwang

    2016-10-01

    Laser processing techniques have been given increasing attentions in the field of metallic glasses (MGs). In this work, effects of two kinds of shield gases, nitrogen and argon, on nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based MG were comparatively investigated. Results showed that compared to argon gas, nitrogen gas remarkably promoted the formation of cracks during laser irradiation. Furthermore, crack formation in nitrogen gas was enhanced by increasing the peak laser power intensity or decreasing the laser scanning speed. X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the reason for enhanced cracks in nitrogen gas was the formation of ZrN.

  18. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  19. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  20. Fast surface crystallization of amorphous griseofulvin below T g.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Jona, Janan; Nagapudi, Karthik; Wu, Tian

    2010-08-01

    To study crystal growth rates of amorphous griseofulvin (GSF) below its glass transition temperature (T (g)) and the effect of surface crystallization on the overall crystallization kinetics of amorphous GSF. Amorphous GSF was generated by melt quenching. Surface and bulk crystal growth rates were determined using polarized light microscope. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Raman microscopy were used to identify the polymorph of the crystals. Crystallization kinetics of amorphous GSF powder stored at 40 degrees C (T (g)-48 degrees C) and room temperature (T (g)-66 degrees C) was monitored using XRPD. Crystal growth at the surface of amorphous GSF is 10- to 100-fold faster than that in the bulk. The surface crystal growth can be suppressed by an ultrathin gold coating. Below T (g), the crystallization of amorphous GSF powder was biphasic with a rapid initial crystallization stage dominated by the surface crystallization and a slow or suspended late stage controlled by the bulk crystallization. GSF exhibits the fastest surface crystallization kinetics among the known amorphous pharmaceutical solids. Well below T (g), surface crystallization dominated the overall crystallization kinetics of amorphous GSF powder. Thus, surface crystallization should be distinguished from bulk crystallization in studying, modeling and controlling the crystallization of amorphous solids.

  1. Thermal stability and specular reflection behaviour of CoNbZr-based bottom spin valves with nano-oxide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Soo; Lee, Seong-Rae

    2004-06-01

    The thermal stability and specularity aspects of a CoNbZr-based bottom spin valve (SV) employing a nano-oxide layer (NOL) were investigated. The magnetoresistance (MR) ratio of the as-deposited CoNbZr-based bottom SV increased by 62% (from 6.3 to 10.2%) with incorporation of the NOL. The enhancement of the MR ratio was considered to be due to the specular effect ( increased from 0.722 to 1.363 cm) of the NOL. The MR ratio of a Ta-based bottom SV decreased by about 45% (from 6.9 to 3.8%) when the samples were annealed at 300 °C for 240 min. By contrast, the MR ratio of the CoNbZr-based bottom SV with NOL increase d by 14 % (from 10.2 to 11.7%). The root mean square roughness value of the CoNbZr layer (0.07 nm) was superior to that of the Ta layer (0.43 nm). Although Mn in IrMn diffused out to the surface through the active layers resulting in the formation of Mn oxide at the surface in the CoNbZr-based bottom SV, no trace of Mn was found in the active layers and no significant degradation occurred.

  2. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  3. Magnetomechanical coupling in thermal amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, H. George E.; Ilyin, Valery; Mondal, Chandana; Procaccia, Itamar

    2018-05-01

    Standard approaches to magnetomechanical interactions in thermal magnetic crystalline solids involve Landau functionals in which the lattice anisotropy and the resulting magnetization easy axes are taken explicitly into account. In glassy systems one needs to develop a theory in which the amorphous structure precludes the existence of an easy axis, and in which the constituent particles are free to respond to their local amorphous surroundings and the resulting forces. We present a theory of all the mixed responses of an amorphous solid to mechanical strains and magnetic fields. Atomistic models are proposed in which we test the predictions of magnetostriction for both bulk and nanofilm amorphous samples in the paramagnetic phase. The application to nanofilms with emergent self-affine free interfaces requires a careful definition of the film "width" and its change due to the magnetostriction effect.

  4. Immobilization of silver nanoparticles in Zr-based MOFs: induction of apoptosis in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Congcong; Yang, Jian; Gu, Jinlou

    2018-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are a potential class of nanomaterial for antibiosis and chemotherapeutic effects against human carcinoma cells. However, the DNA-damaging ability of free AgNPs pose the critical issues in their biomedical applications. Herein, we demonstrated a facile method to capture Ag+ ions and reduce them into active AgNPs within Zr-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of UiO-66 with a mild reductant of DMF (AgNPs@UiO-66(DMF)). The average diameters of UiO-66 carriers and AgNPs were facilely controlled to be 140 and 10 nm, respectively. The obtained UiO-66 nanocarriers exhibited excellent biocompatibility and could be effectively endocytosed by cancer cells. Additionally, the AgNPs@UiO-66(DMF) could rapidly release Ag+ ions and efficiently inhibit the growth of cancer cells. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of the encapsulated AgNPs were calculated to be 2.7 and 2.45 μg mL-1 for SMMC-7721 and HeLa cells, respectively, which were much lower than those of free AgNPs in the reported works. Therefore, the developed AgNPs@UiO-66(DMF) not only maintained the therapeutic effect against cancer cells but also reduced the dosage of free AgNPs in chemotherapy treatment. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Activation characteristics of multiphase Zr-based hydrogen storage alloys for Ni/MH rechargeable batteries

    SciT

    Lee, H.; Lee, S.M.; Lee, J.Y.

    1999-10-01

    AB{sub 2} type Zr-based Laves phase alloys have been studied for possible use as negative electrodes of Ni/MH batteries with high hydrogen storage capacity. However, these alloys have the serious problem of slow activation owing to the formation of surface oxide films. To overcome this problem, alloys with multiphase microstructures have been developed. These alloys become electrochemically active via the creation of micropores by the dissolution of soluble oxide components such as vanadium oxide. However, this phenomenon has been described based only on changes in the chemical composition of the oxide layer. In the present study, this phenomenon is approachedmore » with respect to interactions between the constituent phases. An electrochemical analysis of constituent phases showed that the second phase, resulting in localized Ni-rich pits on the alloy surface. The presence of microcracks at the periphery of the Ni-rich pits after 30 h exposure to KOH electrolyte implies that hydrogen is absorbed preferentially at Ni-rich pits, thereby forming a large active surface area. However, such multiphase alloys have poor cycle durability due to the persistent dissolution of components in the second phase. Through Cr substitution, the authors have developed a family of durable alloys to prevent this unwanted dissolution from the second phase.« less

  6. Development of Cu Clad Cu-Zr Based Metallic Glass and Its Solderability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terajima, Takeshi; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa

    Soldering is a candidate technique for joining metallic glasses. It can be processed far below the crystallization temperatures of the various metallic glasses so that there is no possibility of crystallization. However, wettability of Cu-Zr based metallic glass by Pb free solder is poor because a strong surface oxide film interferes direct contact between them. To overcome the problem, Cu thin film clad metallic glass was developed. It was preliminary produced by casting a melt of Cu36Zr48Al8Ag8 pre-alloy into Cu mold cavity, inside which Cu thin film with 2 mm in thickness was set on the wall. Cu36Zr48Al8Ag8 metallic glass, whose surface Cu thin film was welded to, was successfully produced. From the microstructure analyses, it was found that reaction layer was formed at the interface between Cu and Cu36Zr48Al8Ag8 metallic glass, however, there was no oxide in the Cu clad layer. Solderability to the metallic glass was drastically increased. The Cu clad layer played an important role to prevent the formation of surface oxide film and consequently improved the solderability.

  7. Breakaway phenomenon of Zr-based alloys during a high-temperature oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong Hyuk; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The breakaway oxidation phenomena in Zr-based alloys were studied in the temperature range of 950-1200 °C for up to 36 000 s by using a modified thermo-gravimetric analyzer. After the oxidation tests, the oxidation behaviors, breakaway oxidation time, hydrogen pick-up contents, and oxidation rate constants of the alloys were systematically evaluated in this study. The breakaway oxidation time was shortened with an increase of the Sn content in the Zr alloys. A breakaway oxidation phenomenon could be caused by the transition of a tetragonal oxide phase into a monoclinic one, and the oxide transition could lead to form the oxide cracks in both the lateral and radial directions. The cracks within the oxide layer could result in catastrophic increase in the weight gain rates and rapid increase the hydrogen pick-up within the oxygen-stabilized α-Zr and prior β-Zr layers. The oxidation rate constants calculated from the post-breakaway data in the Zr alloys with breakaway oxidation behaviors matched well with the values from both the Baker-Just and Cathcart-Pawel correlations.

  8. Methane Adsorption in Zr-Based MOFs: Comparison and Critical Evaluation of Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The search for nanoporous materials that are highly performing for gas storage and separation is one of the contemporary challenges in material design. The computational tools to aid these experimental efforts are widely available, and adsorption isotherms are routinely computed for huge sets of (hypothetical) frameworks. Clearly the computational results depend on the interactions between the adsorbed species and the adsorbent, which are commonly described using force fields. In this paper, an extensive comparison and in-depth investigation of several force fields from literature is reported for the case of methane adsorption in the Zr-based Metal–Organic Frameworks UiO-66, UiO-67, DUT-52, NU-1000, and MOF-808. Significant quantitative differences in the computed uptake are observed when comparing different force fields, but most qualitative features are common which suggests some predictive power of the simulations when it comes to these properties. More insight into the host–guest interactions is obtained by benchmarking the force fields with an extensive number of ab initio computed single molecule interaction energies. This analysis at the molecular level reveals that especially ab initio derived force fields perform well in reproducing the ab initio interaction energies. Finally, the high sensitivity of uptake predictions on the underlying potential energy surface is explored. PMID:29170687

  9. Amorphous Metals and Composites as Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Agnes, Gregory S. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A mirror or mirror assembly fabricated by molding, pressing, assembling, or depositing one or more bulk metal glass (BMG), bulk metal glass composite (BMGMC), or amorphous metal (AM) parts and where the optical surface and backing of the mirror can be fabricated without machining or polishing by utilizing the unique molding capabilities of this class of materials.

  10. Mechanical rejuvenation in bulk metallic glass induced by thermo-mechanical creep

    SciT

    Tong, Yang; Dmowski, W.; Bei, Hongbin

    Using high energy X-ray diffraction we studied the temperature, stress, and time effect on structural changes in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass induced by thermo-mechanical creep. Pair distribution functions obtained from two-dimensional diffraction patterns show that thermo-mechanical creep induces structural disordering, but only when the stress beyond a threshold is applied. A similar threshold behavior was observed for anelastic strain. We conclude that anelastic creep strain induces rejuvenation, whereas plastic strain does not.

  11. Mechanical rejuvenation in bulk metallic glass induced by thermo-mechanical creep

    DOE PAGES

    Tong, Yang; Dmowski, W.; Bei, Hongbin; ...

    2018-02-16

    Using high energy X-ray diffraction we studied the temperature, stress, and time effect on structural changes in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass induced by thermo-mechanical creep. Pair distribution functions obtained from two-dimensional diffraction patterns show that thermo-mechanical creep induces structural disordering, but only when the stress beyond a threshold is applied. A similar threshold behavior was observed for anelastic strain. We conclude that anelastic creep strain induces rejuvenation, whereas plastic strain does not.

  12. Amorphization reaction in thin films of elemental Cu and Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Ahn, C. C.; Ratner, E. R.

    1989-10-01

    Compositionally modulated thin films of Cu and Y were prepared in an ultrahigh-vacuum dc ion-beam deposition chamber. The amorphization reaction was monitored by in situ x-ray-diffraction measurements. Growth of amorphous Cu1-xYx is observed at room temperature with the initial formation of a Cu-rich amorphous phase. Further annealing in the presence of unreacted Y leads to Y enrichment of the amorphous phase. Growth of crystalline CuY is observed for T=469 K. Transmission-electron-microscopy measurements provide real-space imaging of the amorphous interlayer and growth morphology. Models are developed, incorporating metastable interfacial and bulk free-energy diagrams, for the early stage of the amorphization reaction.

  13. Bulk undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattamis, T. Z.

    1984-01-01

    Bulk undercooling methods and procedures will first be reviewed. Measurement of various parameters which are necessary to understand the solidification mechanism during and after recalescence will be discussed. During recalescence of levitated, glass-encased large droplets (5 to 8 mm diam) high speed temperature sensing devices coupled with a rapid response oscilloscope are now being used at MIT to measure local thermal behavior in hypoeutectic and eutectic binary Ni-Sn alloys. Dendrite tip velocities were measured by various investigators using thermal sensors or high speed cinematography. The confirmation of the validity of solidification models of bulk-undercooled melts is made difficult by the fineness of the final microstructure, the ultra-rapid evolution of the solidifying system which makes measurements very awkward, and the continuous modification of the microstructure which formed during recalescence because of precipitation, remelting and rapid coarsening.

  14. Theory of amorphous ices.

    PubMed

    Limmer, David T; Chandler, David

    2014-07-01

    We derive a phase diagram for amorphous solids and liquid supercooled water and explain why the amorphous solids of water exist in several different forms. Application of large-deviation theory allows us to prepare such phases in computer simulations. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between these two amorphous solids. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. Whereas the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly aging glasses, their melting can lead quickly to the formation of crystalline ice. Further, melting of the higher density amorphous solid at low pressures takes place in steps, transitioning to the lower-density glass before accessing a nonequilibrium liquid from which ice coarsens.

  15. Theory of amorphous ices

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2014-01-01

    We derive a phase diagram for amorphous solids and liquid supercooled water and explain why the amorphous solids of water exist in several different forms. Application of large-deviation theory allows us to prepare such phases in computer simulations. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between these two amorphous solids. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. Whereas the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly aging glasses, their melting can lead quickly to the formation of crystalline ice. Further, melting of the higher density amorphous solid at low pressures takes place in steps, transitioning to the lower-density glass before accessing a nonequilibrium liquid from which ice coarsens. PMID:24858957

  16. Characteristics of amorphous kerogens fractionated from terrigenous sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Noriyuki

    1984-02-01

    A preliminary attempt to fractionate amorphous kerogens from terrigenous bulk kerogen by a benzene-water two phase partition method under acidic condition was made. Microscopic observation revealed that amorphous kerogens and structured kerogens were fractionated effectively by this method. Characteristics of the amorphous and structured kerogens fractionated by this method were examined by some chemical analyses and compared with those of the bulk kerogen and humic acid isolated from the same rock sample (Haizume Formation, Pleistocene, Japan). The elemental and infrared (IR) analyses showed that the amorphous kerogen fraction had the highest atomic H/C ratio and the lowest atomic N/C ratio and was the richest in aliphatic structures and carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups. Quantities of fatty acids from the saponification products of each geopolymer were in agreement with the results of elemental and IR analyses. Distribution of the fatty acids was suggestive that more animal lipids participate in the formation of amorphous kerogens because of the abundance of relatively lower molecular weight fatty acids (such as C 16 and C 18 acids) in saponification products of amorphous kerogens. On the other hand, although the amorphous kerogen fraction tends to be rich in aliphatic structures compared with bulk kerogen of the same rock samples, van Krevelen plots of elemental compositions of kerogens from the core samples (Nishiyama Oil Field, Tertiary, Japan) reveal that the amorphous kerogen fraction is not necessarily characterized by markedly high atomic H/C ratio. This was attributed to the oxic environment of deposition and the abundance of biodegraded terrestrial amorphous organic matter in the amorphous kerogen fraction used in this work.

  17. Devitrification of amorphous celecoxib.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Piyush; Bansal, Arvind K

    2005-09-30

    The purpose of this research was to analyze the devitrification of amorphous celecoxib (CEL) in the presence of different stressors (temperature, pressure, and/or humidity) encountered during processing of solid dosage forms. Amorphous CEL was prepared in situ in the analytical instruments, as well as in laboratory, by quench-cooling of melt process, and analyzed by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, microscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Amorphous CEL prepared in situ in the analytical instruments was resistant to crystallization under the influence of temperature and/or pressure, because of its protection from the external environment during preparation. These samples exhibited structural relaxation during annealing at 25 degrees C/0% relative humidity (RH) for 16 hours. Generation of amorphous CEL in the laboratory resulted in partially crystalline samples, because of exposure to environmental temperature and humidity, resulting in incomplete vitrification. Subjection to thermal stress favored crystallization of amorphous CEL into metastable polymorphic forms, which were not obtained by solvent recrystallization approach. Temperature and humidity were identified as the major factors promoting devitrification of amorphous CEL, leading to loss of solubility advantage. Exposure to International Conference on Harmonization-specified accelerated stability storage conditions (40 degrees C/75% RH) resulted in complete devitrification of amorphous CEL within 15 days. The phase-transformation process of amorphous CEL along the temperature scale was examined visually, as well as spectrally. This propensity for devitrification of amorphous CEL seemed to depend on the strength of differential molecular interactions between the amorphous and crystalline form.

  18. Investigation of superconducting interactions and amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janocko, M. A.; Jones, C. K.; Gavaler, J. R.; Deis, D. W.; Ashkin, M.; Mathur, M. P.; Bauerle, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Research papers on superconducting interactions and properties and on amorphous materials are presented. The search for new superconductors with improved properties was largely concentrated on the study of properties of thin films. An experimental investigation of interaction mechanisms revealed no new superconductivity mechanism. The properties of high transition temperature, type 2 materials prepared in thin film form were studied. A pulsed field solenoid capable of providing fields in excess of 300 k0e was developed. Preliminary X-ray measurements were made of V3Si to determine the behavior of cell constant deformation versus pressure up to 98 kilobars. The electrical properties of amorphous semiconducting materials and bulk and thin film devices, and of amorphous magnetic materials were investigated for developing radiation hard, inexpensive switches and memory elements.

  19. Application of thin layer activation technique for surface wear studies in Zr based materials using charged particle induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, D. P.; Pal, Sujit; Parthasarathy, R.; Mathur, P. K.; Kohli, A. K.; Limaye, P. K.

    1998-09-01

    Thin layer activation (TLA) technique has been developed in Zr based alloy materials, e.g., zircaloy II, using 40 MeV α-particles from Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre at Calcutta. A brief description of the methodology of TLA technique is presented to determine the surface wear. The sensitivity of the measurement of surface wear in zircaloy material is found to be 0.22±0.05 μm. The surface wear is determined by TLA technique in zircaloy material which is used in pressurised heavy water reactor and the values have been compared with that obtained by conventional technique for the analytical validation of the TLA technique.

  20. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  1. Extremely hard amorphous-crystalline hybrid steel surface produced by deformation induced cementite amorphization

    SciT

    Guo, Wei; Meng, Yifei; Zhang, Xie

    Amorphous and nanograined (NG) steels are two categories of strong steels. However, over the past decade, their application has been hindered by their limited plasticity, the addition of expensive alloying elements, and processing challenges associated with producing bulk materials. Here in this work, we report that the surface of a carburized Fe-Mn-Si martensitic steel with extremely low elemental alloying additions can be economically fabricated into an amorphous-nanocrystalline hybrid structure. Atom probe tomography and nanobeam diffraction of a hard turned steel surface together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal that the original cementite surface structure experiences a size-dependent amorphization and phasemore » transformation during heavy plastic deformation. MD simulations further show that the martensite-cementite interface serves as a nucleation site for cementite amorphization, and that cementite can become disordered if further strained when the cementite particles are relatively small. These graded structures exhibit a surface hardness of ~16.2 GPa, which exceeds the value of ~8.8 GPa for the original nanocrystalline martensitic steel and most nanocrystalline steels reported before. Finally, this practical and cost-efficient approach for producing a hard surface with retained bulk ductility and toughness can provide expanded opportunities for producing an amorphous-crystalline hybrid structure in steels and other alloy systems.« less

  2. Extremely hard amorphous-crystalline hybrid steel surface produced by deformation induced cementite amorphization

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Wei; Meng, Yifei; Zhang, Xie; ...

    2018-04-11

    Amorphous and nanograined (NG) steels are two categories of strong steels. However, over the past decade, their application has been hindered by their limited plasticity, the addition of expensive alloying elements, and processing challenges associated with producing bulk materials. Here in this work, we report that the surface of a carburized Fe-Mn-Si martensitic steel with extremely low elemental alloying additions can be economically fabricated into an amorphous-nanocrystalline hybrid structure. Atom probe tomography and nanobeam diffraction of a hard turned steel surface together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal that the original cementite surface structure experiences a size-dependent amorphization and phasemore » transformation during heavy plastic deformation. MD simulations further show that the martensite-cementite interface serves as a nucleation site for cementite amorphization, and that cementite can become disordered if further strained when the cementite particles are relatively small. These graded structures exhibit a surface hardness of ~16.2 GPa, which exceeds the value of ~8.8 GPa for the original nanocrystalline martensitic steel and most nanocrystalline steels reported before. Finally, this practical and cost-efficient approach for producing a hard surface with retained bulk ductility and toughness can provide expanded opportunities for producing an amorphous-crystalline hybrid structure in steels and other alloy systems.« less

  3. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  4. Calculations of hydrogen diffusivity in Zr-based alloys: Influence of alloying elements and effect of stress

    SciT

    Yu, J.; Jiang, C.; Zhang, Y.

    This report summarizes the progress on modeling hydrogen diffusivity in Zr-based alloys. The presence of hydrogen (H) can detrimentally affect the mechanical properties of many metals and alloys. To mitigate these detrimental effects requires fundamental understanding of the thermodynamics and kinetics governing H pickup and hydride formation. In this work, we focus on H diffusion in Zr-based alloys by studying the effects of alloying elements and stress, factors that have been shown to strongly affect H pickup and hydride formation in nuclear fuel claddings. A recently developed accelerated kinetic Monte Carlo method is used for the study. It is foundmore » that for the alloys considered here, H diffusivity depends weakly on composition, with negligible effect at high temperatures in the range of 600-1200 K. Therefore, the small variation in compositions of these alloys is likely not a major cause of the very different H pickup rates. In contrast, stress strongly affects H diffusivity. This effect needs to be considered for studying hydride formation and delayed hydride cracking.« less

  5. In Situ Probes of Capture and Decomposition of Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants by Zr-Based Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciT

    Plonka, Anna M.; Wang, Qi; Gordon, Wesley O.

    Recently, Zr-based metal organic frameworks (MOFs) were shown to be among the fastest catalysts of nerve-agent hydrolysis in solution. Here, we report a detailed study of the adsorption and decomposition of a nerve-agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), on UiO-66, UiO-67, MOF-808, and NU-1000 using synchrotron-based X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray absorption, and infrared spectroscopy, which reveals key aspects of the reaction mechanism. The diffraction measurements indicate that all four MOFs adsorb DMMP (introduced at atmospheric pressures through a flow of helium or air) within the pore space. In addition, the combination of X-ray absorption and infrared spectra suggests direct coordination ofmore » DMMP to the Zr6 cores of all MOFs, which ultimately leads to decomposition to phosphonate products. Our experimental probes into the mechanism of adsorption and decomposition of chemical warfare agent simulants on Zr-based MOFs open new opportunities in rational design of new and superior decontamination materials.« less

  6. In Situ Probes of Capture and Decomposition of Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants by Zr-Based Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciT

    Plonka, Anna M.; Wang, Qi; Gordon, Wesley O.

    Zr-based metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have been recently shown to be among the fastest catalysts of nerve-agent hydrolysis in solution. We report a detailed study of the adsorption and decomposition of a nerve-agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), on UiO-66, UiO-67, MOF-808, and NU-1000 using synchrotron-based X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray absorption, and infrared spectroscopy, which reveals key aspects of the reaction mechanism. The diffraction measurements indicate that all four MOFs adsorb DMMP (introduced at atmospheric pressures through a flow of helium or air) within the pore space. In addition, the combination of X-ray absorption and infrared spectra suggests direct coordination ofmore » DMMP to the Zr6 cores of all MOFs, which ultimately leads to decomposition to phosphonate products. These experimental probes into the mechanism of adsorption and decomposition of chemical warfare agent simulants on Zr-based MOFs open new opportunities in rational design of new and superior decontamination materials.« less

  7. In Situ Probes of Capture and Decomposition of Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants by Zr-Based Metal Organic Frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Plonka, Anna M.; Wang, Qi; Gordon, Wesley O.; ...

    2016-12-30

    Recently, Zr-based metal organic frameworks (MOFs) were shown to be among the fastest catalysts of nerve-agent hydrolysis in solution. Here, we report a detailed study of the adsorption and decomposition of a nerve-agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), on UiO-66, UiO-67, MOF-808, and NU-1000 using synchrotron-based X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray absorption, and infrared spectroscopy, which reveals key aspects of the reaction mechanism. The diffraction measurements indicate that all four MOFs adsorb DMMP (introduced at atmospheric pressures through a flow of helium or air) within the pore space. In addition, the combination of X-ray absorption and infrared spectra suggests direct coordination ofmore » DMMP to the Zr6 cores of all MOFs, which ultimately leads to decomposition to phosphonate products. Our experimental probes into the mechanism of adsorption and decomposition of chemical warfare agent simulants on Zr-based MOFs open new opportunities in rational design of new and superior decontamination materials.« less

  8. Amorphous surface layer versus transient amorphous precursor phase in bone - A case study investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Von Euw, Stanislas; Ajili, Widad; Chan-Chang, Tsou-Hsi-Camille; Delices, Annette; Laurent, Guillaume; Babonneau, Florence; Nassif, Nadine; Azaïs, Thierry

    2017-09-01

    The presence of an amorphous surface layer that coats a crystalline core has been proposed for many biominerals, including bone mineral. In parallel, transient amorphous precursor phases have been proposed in various biomineralization processes, including bone biomineralization. Here we propose a methodology to investigate the origin of these amorphous environments taking the bone tissue as a key example. This study relies on the investigation of a bone tissue sample and its comparison with synthetic calcium phosphate samples, including a stoichiometric apatite, an amorphous calcium phosphate sample, and two different biomimetic apatites. To reveal if the amorphous environments in bone originate from an amorphous surface layer or a transient amorphous precursor phase, a combined solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment has been used. The latter consists of a double cross polarization 1 H→ 31 P→ 1 H pulse sequence followed by a 1 H magnetization exchange pulse sequence. The presence of an amorphous surface layer has been investigated through the study of the biomimetic apatites; while the presence of a transient amorphous precursor phase in the form of amorphous calcium phosphate particles has been mimicked with the help of a physical mixture of stoichiometric apatite and amorphous calcium phosphate. The NMR results show that the amorphous and the crystalline environments detected in our bone tissue sample belong to the same particle. The presence of an amorphous surface layer that coats the apatitic core of bone apatite particles has been unambiguously confirmed, and it is certain that this amorphous surface layer has strong implication on bone tissue biogenesis and regeneration. Questions still persist on the structural organization of bone and biomimetic apatites. The existing model proposes a core/shell structure, with an amorphous surface layer coating a crystalline bulk. The accuracy of this model is still debated because amorphous calcium

  9. The composition of secondary amorphous phases under different environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Rampe, E. B.; Horgan, B. H. N.; Dehouck, E.; Morris, R. V.

    2017-12-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns measured by the CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover demonstrate that amorphous phases are major components ( 15-60 wt%) of all rock and soil samples in Gale Crater. The nature of these phases is not well understood and could be any combination of primary (e.g., glass) and secondary (e.g., silica, ferrihydrite) phases. Secondary amorphous phases are frequently found as weathering products in soils on Earth, but these materials remain poorly characterized. Here we study a diverse suite of terrestrial samples including: sediments from recently de-glaciated volcanoes (Oregon), modern volcanic soils (Hawaii), and volcanic paleosols (Oregon) in order to determine how formation environment, climate, and diagenesis affect the abundance and composition of amorphous phases. We combine bulk XRD mineralogy with bulk chemical compositions (XRF) to calculate the abundance and bulk composition of the amorphous materials in our samples. We then utilize scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to study the composition of individual amorphous phases at the micrometer scale. XRD analyses of 8 samples thus far indicate that the abundance of amorphous phases are: modern soils (20-80 %) > paleosols (15-40 %) > glacial samples (15-30 %). Initial calculations suggest that the amorphous components consist primarily of SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, FeO and Fe2O3, with minor amounts of other oxides (e.g., MgO, CaO, Na2O). Compared to their respective crystalline counterparts, calculations indicate bulk amorphous components enriched in SiO2 for the glacial sample, and depleted in SiO2 for the modern soil and paleosol samples. STEM analyses reveal that the amorphous components consist of a number of different phases. Of the two samples analyzed using STEM thus far, the secondary amorphous phases have compositions with varying ratios of SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, and Fe-oxides, consistent with mass

  10. Biocompatibility Study of Zirconium-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses for Orthopedic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Chuang, Andrew; Cao, Zheng; Liaw, Peter K.

    2010-07-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) represent an emerging class of materials that offer an attractive combination of properties, such as high strength, low modulus, good fatigue limit, and near-net-shape formability. The BMGs have been explored in mechanical, chemical, and magnetic applications. However, little research has been attracted in the biomedical field. In this work, we study the potential of BMGs for the orthopedic repair and replacement. We report the biocompatibility study of zirconium (Zr)-based solid BMGs using mouse osteoblast cells. Cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation are compared to Ti-6Al-4V, a well-studied alloy biomaterial. Our in-vitro study has demonstrated that cells cultured on the Zr-based BMG substrate showed higher attachment, alkaline phosphatase activity, and bone matrix deposition compared to those grown on the control Ti alloy substrate. Cytotoxicity staining also revealed the remarkable viability of cells growing on the BMG substrates.

  11. First-Principles Prediction of Densities of Amorphous Materials: The Case of Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoritaka; Matsushita, Yu-ichiro

    2018-02-01

    A novel approach to predict the atomic densities of amorphous materials is explored on the basis of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) in density functional theory. Despite the determination of the atomic density of matter being crucial in understanding its physical properties, no first-principles method has ever been proposed for amorphous materials until now. We have extended the conventional method for crystalline materials in a natural manner and pointed out the importance of the canonical ensemble of the total energy in the determination of the atomic densities of amorphous materials. To take into account the canonical distribution of the total energy, we generate multiple amorphous structures with several different volumes by CPMD simulations and average the total energies at each volume. The density is then determined as the one that minimizes the averaged total energy. In this study, this approach is implemented for amorphous silicon (a-Si) to demonstrate its validity, and we have determined the density of a-Si to be 4.1% lower and its bulk modulus to be 28 GPa smaller than those of the crystal, which are in good agreement with experiments. We have also confirmed that generating samples through classical molecular dynamics simulations produces a comparable result. The findings suggest that the presented method is applicable to other amorphous systems, including those for which experimental knowledge is lacking.

  12. In Vivo Evaluation of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Osteosynthesis Devices

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Kazuhiro; Hiromoto, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) show higher strength and lower Young’s modulus than Ti-6Al-4V alloy and SUS 316L stainless steel. This study aimed to perform in vivo evaluations of Zr65Al7.5Ni10Cu17.5 BMGs for osteosynthesis devices. In the study for intramedullary implants, osteotomies of the femoral bones were performed in male Wistar rats and were stabilized with Zr65Al7.5Ni10Cu17.5 BMGs, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, or 316L stainless steel intramedullary nails for 12 weeks. In the study for bone surface implants, Zr65Al7.5Ni10Cu17.5 BMGs ribbons were implanted on the femur surface for 6 weeks. Local effects on the surrounding soft tissues of the implanted BMGs were assessed by histological observation. Implanted materials’ surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). In the study for intramedullary implants, bone healing after osteotomy was assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and mechanical tests. Histological observation showed no findings of the biological effects. SEM-EDS showed no noticeable change on the surface of BMGs, while Ca and P deposition was seen on the Ti-6Al-4V alloy surface, and irregularities were seen on the 316L stainless steel surface. Mechanical test and peripheral QCT showed that, although there was no significant difference, bone healing of BMGs was more than that of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The results indicated that Zr-based BMGs can lead to bone healing equal to or greater than Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Zr-based BMGs exhibited the advantage of less bone bonding and easier implant removal compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy. In conclusion, Zr-based BMGs are promising for osteosynthesis devices that are eventually removed. PMID:28773792

  13. Pharmaceutical Amorphous Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jog, Rajan; Burgess, Diane J

    2017-01-01

    There has been a tremendous revolution in the field of nanotechnology, resulting in the advent of novel drug delivery systems known as nanomedicines for diagnosis and therapy. One of the applications is nanoparticulate drug delivery systems which are used to improve the solubility and oral bioavailability of poorly soluble compounds. This is particularly important because most of the molecules emerging from the drug discovery pipeline in recent years have problems associated with solubility and bioavailability. There has been considerable focus on nanocrystalline materials; however, amorphous nanoparticles have the advantage of synergistic mechanisms of enhancing dissolution rates (due to their nanosize range and amorphous nature) as well as increasing supersaturation levels (due to their amorphous nature). An example of this technology is Nanomorph TM , developed by Soliqus/Abbott, wherein the nanosize drug particles are precipitated in an amorphous form in order to enhance the dissolution rate. This along with other simple and easily scalable manufacturing techniques for amorphous nanoparticles is described. In addition, the mechanisms of formation of amorphous nanoparticles and several physicochemical properties associated with amorphous nanoparticles are critically reviewed. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silcon under shock compression

    DOE PAGES

    Remington, B. A.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Zhao, S.; ...

    2015-11-06

    High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111} slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. This amorphization is produced by the combined effect of high magnitude hydrostatic and shear stresses under dynamic shock compression. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energymore » changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. As a result, the nucleation of amorphization is analyzed qualitatively by classical nucleation theory.« less

  15. Pressure Induced Liquid-to-Liquid Transition in Zr-based Supercooled Melts and Pressure Quenched Glasses.

    PubMed

    Dmowski, W; Gierlotka, S; Wang, Z; Yokoyama, Y; Palosz, B; Egami, T

    2017-07-26

    Through high-energy x-ray diffraction and atomic pair density function analysis we find that Zr-based metallic alloy, heated to the supercooled liquid state under hydrostatic pressure and then quenched to room temperature, exhibits a distinct glassy structure. The PDF indicates that the Zr-Zr distances in this glass are significantly reduced compared to those quenched without pressure. Annealing at the glass transition temperature at ambient pressure reverses structural changes and the initial glassy state is recovered. This result suggests that pressure causes a liquid-to-liquid phase transition in this metallic alloy supercooled melt. Such a pressure induced transition is known for covalent liquids, but has not been observed for metallic liquids. The High Pressure Quenched glasses are stable in ambient conditions after decompression.

  16. Pressure Induced Liquid-to-Liquid Transition in Zr-based Supercooled Melts and Pressure Quenched Glasses

    SciT

    Dmowski, W.; Gierlotka, S.; Wang, Z.

    Through high-energy x-ray diffraction and atomic pair density function analysis we find that Zr-based metallic alloy, heated to the supercooled liquid state under hydrostatic pressure and then quenched to room temperature, exhibits a distinct glassy structure. The PDF indicates that the Zr-Zr distances in this glass are significantly reduced compared to those quenched without pressure. Annealing at the glass transition temperature at ambient pressure reverses structural changes and the initial glassy state is recovered. This result suggests that pressure causes a liquid-to-liquid phase transition in this metallic alloy supercooled melt. Such a pressure induced transition is known for covalent liquids,more » but has not been observed for metallic liquids. The High Pressure Quenched glasses are stable in ambient conditions after decompression.« less

  17. Amorphous ribbon transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meydan, T.; Overshott, K. J.

    1984-02-01

    Amorphous ribbon transducers have been investigated which consist of toroidally wound amorphous ribbon with a primary (magnetizing) winding and secondary (search coil) windings. The application of a force to the ribbon gives a linear search coil voltage against applied force characteristic. The positioning of the windings with respect to the applied force has been studied, and it is shown that the effect of the applied force is localized. Domain studies have shown that the applied force produces domain wall motion which can be correlated to the performance. These results have elucidated the operation of ac amorphous ribbon transducers and enabled improved designs to be produced.

  18. Study of Adsorption and Desorption Performances of Zr-Based Metal–Organic Frameworks Using Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Zheng, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic pore systems and high surface areas of flexible metal–organic framework materials make them excellent candidates to be used in different kinds of adsorption processes. However, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of therapeutic drugs on metal–organic frameworks in solution are not fully developed. Here, we systematically investigated the adsorption and desorption behaviors of a typical therapeutic drug, verapamil, over several Zr-based metal–organic frameworks [e.g., Zr-FUM, UiO-66(Zr), UiO-66(Zr)-NH2 and UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH] as well as ZrO2 in an acetonitrile solution by using paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to other materials, UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH demonstrated a superior adsorption performance to verapamil due to their strong acid-base and/or hydrogen-bond interactions, and the adsorption process fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. As verapamil-adsorbed materials were used for desorption experiments, ZrO2 demonstrated the most favorable desorption performance, whereas UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH yielded the poorest desorption capability. These Zr-based materials had also been coated at the surface with filter papers for the analysis of various drugs and proteins in the process of paper spray mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated that among the studied materials, ZrO2-coated paper gave the most favorable desorption performance as a pure drug solution, whereas the paper from UiO-66(Zr) demonstrated the optimal capability in the analyses of therapeutic drugs in a complex matrix (e.g., blood) and a protein (e.g., myoglobin). PMID:28773131

  19. Study of Adsorption and Desorption Performances of Zr-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Zheng, Yajun; Zhang, Zhiping

    2017-07-08

    The dynamic pore systems and high surface areas of flexible metal-organic framework materials make them excellent candidates to be used in different kinds of adsorption processes. However, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of therapeutic drugs on metal-organic frameworks in solution are not fully developed. Here, we systematically investigated the adsorption and desorption behaviors of a typical therapeutic drug, verapamil, over several Zr-based metal-organic frameworks [e.g., Zr-FUM, UiO-66(Zr), UiO-66(Zr)-NH₂ and UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH] as well as ZrO₂ in an acetonitrile solution by using paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to other materials, UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH demonstrated a superior adsorption performance to verapamil due to their strong acid-base and/or hydrogen-bond interactions, and the adsorption process fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. As verapamil-adsorbed materials were used for desorption experiments, ZrO₂ demonstrated the most favorable desorption performance, whereas UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH yielded the poorest desorption capability. These Zr-based materials had also been coated at the surface with filter papers for the analysis of various drugs and proteins in the process of paper spray mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated that among the studied materials, ZrO₂-coated paper gave the most favorable desorption performance as a pure drug solution, whereas the paper from UiO-66(Zr) demonstrated the optimal capability in the analyses of therapeutic drugs in a complex matrix (e.g., blood) and a protein (e.g., myoglobin).

  20. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  1. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  2. Amorphous and Metastable Microcrystalline Rapidly Solidified Alloys: Status and Potential.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    stability. 9. More effective quenching techniques should be studied, to produce thicker amorphous tapes for magnetic applications. 10. The production of bulk ...for some metallic glasses * excellent magnetic properties for metallic glasses * high strength, toughness and excellent fatigue and crack growth...Forming 65 Chapter 8 - PROPERTIES OF METALLIC GLASSES 69 Magnetic Properties 69 Electrical Properties 81 Mechanical Properties 83 Radiation Stability 101

  3. Formation of amorphous materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable amorphous or fine crystalline materials are formed by solid state reactions by diffusion of a metallic component into a solid compound or by diffusion of a gas into an intermetallic compound. The invention can be practiced on layers of metals deposited on an amorphous substrate or by intermixing powders with nucleating seed granules. All that is required is that the diffusion of the first component into the second component be much faster than the self-diffusion of the first component. The method is practiced at a temperature below the temperature at which the amorphous phase transforms into one or more crystalline phases and near or below the temperature at which the ratio of the rate of diffusion of the first component to the rate of self-diffusion is at least 10.sup.4. This anomalous diffusion criteria is found in many binary, tertiary and higher ordered systems of alloys and appears to be found in all alloy systems that form amorphous materials by rapid quenching. The method of the invention can totally convert much larger dimensional materials to amorphous materials in practical periods of several hours or less.

  4. Amorphous Diamond for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. P.

    2002-03-01

    Pure carbon films can exhibit surprising complexity in structure and properties. Amorphous diamond (tetrahedrally-coordinated amorphous carbon) is an amorphous quasi-two phase mixture of four-fold and three-fold coordinated carbon which is produced by pulsed excimer laser deposition, an energetic deposition process that leads to film growth by sub-surface carbon implantation and the creation of local metastability in carbon bonding. Modest annealing, < 900K, produces significant irreversible strain relaxation which is thermally activated with activation energies ranging from < 1 eV to > 2 eV. During annealing the material remains amorphous, but there is a detectable increase in medium-range order as measured by fluctuation microscopy. The strain relaxation permits the residual strain in the films to be reduced to < 0.00001, which is a critical requirement for the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Amorphous diamond MEMS have been fabricated in order to evaluate the mechanical properties of this material under tension and flexure, and this has enabled the determination of elastic modulus (800 GPa), tensile strength (8 GPa), and fracture toughness (8 MPa m^1/2). In addition, amorphous diamond MEMS structures have been fabricated to measure internal dissipation and surface adhesion. The high hardness and strength and hydrophobic nature of the surface makes this material particularly suitable for the fabrication of high wear resistance and low stiction MEMS. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a Lockheed Martin Co., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Spallation behaviour of a Zr-bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Z.; Huang, X.; Shen, L. T.; Dai, L. H.

    2012-08-01

    Plate impact experiments have been conducted on a Zr-based bulk metal glass (BMG) using a single stage light gas gun. To understand the spallation process of the material, samples were subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of the same amplitude but different durations. Fractographs of spallation surface and fracture features were characterized and the fracture mechanism of different regions of the spallation surface was discussed. Morphology of the spallation surface in the Zr-BMG exhibited a typical equiaxial cellular pattern and porous microstructure. These experiments revealed that, subjected to hydro-tensile stresses, the microdamage of the spallation occurred in the Zr-BMG is microvoids; the spallation in the Zr-BMG is resulted from nucleation, growth and coalescence of microvoids; and the time needed for these microvoids nucleation is less than 100 ns with a stress amplitude of 3.18 GPa.

  6. The Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Zr-Based Metallic Glass under Different Strain Rate Compressions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao-Hsing; Tsai, Chih-Kai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the high strain rate deformation behavior and the microstructure evolution of Zr-Cu-Al-Ni metallic glasses under various strain rates were investigated. The influence of strain and strain rate on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior, as well as microstructural properties was also investigated. Before mechanical testing, the structure and thermal stability of the Zr-Cu-Al-Ni metallic glasses were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimeter. The mechanical property experiments and microstructural observations of Zr-Cu-Al-Ni metallic glasses under different strain rates ranging from 10−3 to 5.1 × 103 s−1 and at temperatures of 25 °C were investigated using compressive split-Hopkinson bar (SHPB) and an MTS tester. An in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) nanoindenter was used to carry out compression tests and investigate the deformation behavior arising at nanopillars of the Zr-based metallic glass. The formation and interaction of shear band during the plastic deformation were investigated. Moreover, it was clearly apparent that the mechanical strength and ductility could be enhanced by impeding the penetration of shear bands with reinforced particles. PMID:28788034

  7. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  8. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciT

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting ofmore » a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.« less

  9. Amorphous Carbon Nanospheres

    SciT

    None

    Amorphous carbon nanosphere used as the anode material for Li-intercalation in Lithium-ion energy storage. This structure was obtained through a thermal annealing process at a temperature of 3000 degree Kelvin, simulated using the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code on the LCRC Fusion resource. Science: Kah Chun Lau and Larry Curtiss Visualization: Aaron Knoll, Mark Hereld and Michael E. Papka

  10. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

  11. Amorphous and nanocrystalline luminescent Si and Ge obtained via a solid-state chemical metathesis synthesis route

    SciT

    McMillan, Paul F.; Gryko, Jan; Bull, Craig

    A new solid-state metathesis synthesis route was applied to obtain bulk samples of amorphous or microcrystalline Si and Ge. The method involves reaction of Zintl phases such as NaSi or NaGe, with ammonium or metal (e.g., CuCl, CoBr{sub 2}) halides. The driving force for the solid-state reaction is provided by the formation of alkali halides and the transition metals or metal silicides, or gaseous ammonia and hydrogen. The semiconductors were purified by washing to remove other solid products. The amorphous semiconductors were obtained in bulk form from reactions carried out at 200-300{sup o}C. Syntheses at higher temperatures gave rise tomore » microcrystalline semiconductors, or to micro-/nanocrystalline particles contained within the amorphous material. Similar crystalline/amorphous composites were obtained after heat treatment of bulk amorphous materials.« less

  12. Amorphous and nanocrystalline luminescent Si and Ge obtained via a solid-state chemical metathesis synthesis route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Paul F.; Gryko, Jan; Bull, Craig; Arledge, Richard; Kenyon, Anthony J.; Cressey, Barbara A.

    2005-03-01

    A new solid-state metathesis synthesis route was applied to obtain bulk samples of amorphous or microcrystalline Si and Ge. The method involves reaction of Zintl phases such as NaSi or NaGe, with ammonium or metal (e.g., CuCl, CoBr 2) halides. The driving force for the solid-state reaction is provided by the formation of alkali halides and the transition metals or metal silicides, or gaseous ammonia and hydrogen. The semiconductors were purified by washing to remove other solid products. The amorphous semiconductors were obtained in bulk form from reactions carried out at 200-300 °C. Syntheses at higher temperatures gave rise to microcrystalline semiconductors, or to micro-/nanocrystalline particles contained within the amorphous material. Similar crystalline/amorphous composites were obtained after heat treatment of bulk amorphous materials.

  13. Deformation-induced localized solid-state amorphization in nanocrystalline nickel.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuang; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Qing; Lian, Jianshe

    2012-01-01

    Although amorphous structures have been widely obtained in various multi-component metallic alloys, amorphization in pure metals has seldom been observed and remains a long-standing scientific curiosity and technological interest. Here we present experimental evidence of localized solid-state amorphization in bulk nanocrystalline nickel introduced by quasi-static compression at room temperature. High-resolution electron microscope observations illustrate that nano-scale amorphous structures present at the regions where severe deformation occurred, e.g. along crack paths or surrounding nano-voids. These findings have indicated that nanocrystalline structures are highly desirable for promoting solid-state amorphization, which may provide new insights for understanding the nature of the crystalline-to-amorphous transformation and suggested a potential method to produce elemental metallic glasses that have hardly been available hitherto through rapid solidification.

  14. Deformation-induced localized solid-state amorphization in nanocrystalline nickel

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuang; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Qing; Lian, Jianshe

    2012-01-01

    Although amorphous structures have been widely obtained in various multi-component metallic alloys, amorphization in pure metals has seldom been observed and remains a long-standing scientific curiosity and technological interest. Here we present experimental evidence of localized solid-state amorphization in bulk nanocrystalline nickel introduced by quasi-static compression at room temperature. High-resolution electron microscope observations illustrate that nano-scale amorphous structures present at the regions where severe deformation occurred, e.g. along crack paths or surrounding nano-voids. These findings have indicated that nanocrystalline structures are highly desirable for promoting solid-state amorphization, which may provide new insights for understanding the nature of the crystalline-to-amorphous transformation and suggested a potential method to produce elemental metallic glasses that have hardly been available hitherto through rapid solidification. PMID:22768383

  15. [Microcosmic mechanisms of amorphous indomethacin crystallization and the influence of nano-coating on crystallization].

    PubMed

    Hui, Ou-Yang; Yi, Tao; Zheng, Qin; Liu, Feng

    2011-06-01

    Amorphous drugs have higher solubility, better oral bioavailability and are easier to be absorbed than their crystalline counterparts. However, the amorphous drugs, with weak stability, are so easy to crystallize that they will lose the original advantages. Polarization microscope, scanning electron microscope, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractomer and Raman spectroscopy were used to study the microcosmic crystallization mechanisms of amorphous indometacin and the performance of the drug crystals. The results showed that the growth rate of amorphous indometacin crystals at the free surface was markedly faster than that through the bulk, and that the crystal growth rate decreased observably after spraying an ultrathin melting gold (10 nm) at the free surface of the drug. These results indicated that the high growth rates of amorphous drugs crystals at the free surface were the key to their stability and that an ultrathin coating could be applied to enhance the stability of amorphous drugs.

  16. Inhibiting surface crystallization of amorphous indomethacin by nanocoating.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tian; Sun, Ye; Li, Ning; de Villiers, Melgardt M; Yu, Lian

    2007-04-24

    An amorphous solid (glass) may crystallize faster at the surface than through the bulk, making surface crystallization a mechanism of failure for amorphous pharmaceuticals and other materials. An ultrathin coating of gold or polyelectrolytes inhibited the surface crystallization of amorphous indomethacin (IMC), an anti-inflammatory drug and model organic glass. The gold coating (10 nm) was deposited by sputtering, and the polyelectrolyte coating (3-20 nm) was deposited by an electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly of cationic poly(dimethyldiallyl ammonium chloride) (PDDA) and anionic sodium poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) in aqueous solution. The coating also inhibited the growth of existing crystals. The inhibition was strong even with one layer of PDDA. The polyelectrolyte coating still permitted fast dissolution of amorphous IMC and improved its wetting and flow. The finding supports the view that the surface crystallization of amorphous IMC is enabled by the mobility of a thin layer of surface molecules, and this mobility can be suppressed by a coating of only a few nanometers. This technique may be used to stabilize amorphous drugs prone to surface crystallization, with the aqueous coating process especially suitable for drugs of low aqueous solubility.

  17. Rotary bulk solids divider

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  18. ROTARY BULK SOLIDS DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer JR., Richard P.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  19. Microstructure and hydrogenation properties of a melt-spun non-stoichiometric Zr-based Laves phase alloy

    SciT

    Zhang, Tiebang, E-mail: tiebangzhang@nwpu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yunlong; Li, Jinshan

    2016-01-15

    Alloy with composition of Zr{sub 0.9}Ti{sub 0.1}V{sub 1.7} off normal stoichiometric proportion is selected to investigate the effect of defects introduced by non-stoichiometry on hydrogenation kinetics of Zr–Ti–V Laves phase alloys. Microstructure and phase constituent of melt-spun ribbons have been investigated in this work. The activation process, hydrogenation kinetics, thermodynamics characteristics and hydride phase constituent of as-cast alloy and melt-spun ribbons are also compared. Comparing with the as-cast alloy, the dominant Laves phase ZrV{sub 2} is preserved, V-BCC phase is reduced and α-Zr phase is replaced by a small amount of Zr{sub 3}V{sub 3}O phase in melt-spun ribbons. Melt-spun ribbonsmore » exhibit easy activation and fast initial hydrogen absorption on account of the increased specific surface area. However, the decrease in unit cell volume of the dominant phase leads to the decrease in hydrogen absorption capacity. Melt-spinning technique raises the equilibrium pressure and decreases the stability of hydride due to the decrease of unit cell volume and the elimination of α-Zr phase, respectively. Melt-spun ribbons with fine grains show improved hydrogen absorption kinetics comparing with that of the as-cast alloy. Meanwhile, the prevalent micro twins observed within melt-spun ribbons are believed to account for the improved hydrogen absorption kinetics. - Highlights: • Role of defects on hydrogenation kinetics of Zr-based alloys is proposed. • Microstructure and hydrogenation properties of as-cast/melt-spun alloy are compared. • Melt-spinning technique improves the hydrogenation kinetics of Zr{sub 0.9}Ti{sub 0.1}V{sub 1.7} alloy. • Refined grains and twin defects account for improved hydrogen absorption kinetics.« less

  20. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  1. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  2. Amorphous to amorphous transition in particle rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Atul; Sane, A.; Ghosh, Shankar; Bhattacharya, S.

    2012-09-01

    Space-filling assemblies of athermal hydrophobic particles floating at an air-water interface, called particle rafts, are shown to undergo an unusual phase transition between two amorphous states, i.e., a low density “less-rigid” state and a high density “more-rigid” state, as a function of particulate number density (Φ). The former is shown to be a capillary bridged solid and the latter is shown to be a frictionally coupled one. Simultaneous studies involving direct imaging as well as measuring its mechanical response to longitudinal and shear stresses show that the transition is marked by a subtle structural anomaly and a weakening of the shear response. The structural anomaly is identified from the variation of the mean coordination number, mean area of the Voronoi cells, and spatial profile of the displacement field with Φ. The weakened shear response is related to local plastic instabilities caused by the depinning of the contact line of the underlying fluid on the rough surfaces of the particles.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of bulk metallic glasses prepared by laser direct deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xiaoyang

    Fe-based and Zr-based metallic glasses have attracted extensive interest for structural applications due to their excellent glass forming ability, superior mechanical properties, unique thermal and corrosion properties. In this study, the feasibility of synthesizing metallic glasses with good ductility by laser direct deposition is explored. Both in-situ synthesis with elemental powder mixture and ex-situ synthesis with prealloyed powder are discussed. Microstructure and properties of laser direct deposited metallic glass composites are analyzed. Synthesis of Fe-Cr-Mo-W-Mn-C-Si-B metallic glass composite with a large fraction of amorphous phase was accomplished using laser direct deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy investigations revealed the existence of amorphous structure. Microstructure analyses by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated the periodically repeated microstructures of amorphous and crystalline phases. Partially crystallized structure brought by laser reheating and remelting during subsequent laser scans aggregated in the overlapping area between each scan. XRD analysis showed that the crystalline particle embedded in the amorphous matrix was Cr 1.07Fe18.93 phase. No significant microstructural differences were found from the first to the last layer. Microhardness of the amorphous phase (HV0.2 1591) showed a much higher value than that of the crystalline phase (HV0.2 947). Macrohardness of the top layer had a value close to the microhardness of the amorphous region. Wear resistance property of deposited layers showed a significant improvement with the increased fraction of amorphous phase. Zr65Al10Ni10Cu15 amorphous composites with a large fraction of amorphous phase were in-situ synthesized by laser direct deposition. X-ray diffraction confirmed the existence of both amorphous and crystalline phases. Laser parameters were optimized in order to increase the fraction of amorphous phase

  4. Amorphous-amorphous transition in a porous coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Bennett, Thomas D; Kojima, Tatsuhiro; Keen, David A; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Kawano, Masaki

    2017-07-04

    The amorphous state plays a key role in porous coordination polymer and metal-organic framework phase transitions. We investigate a crystalline-to-amorphous-to-amorphous-to-crystalline (CAAC) phase transition in a Zn based coordination polymer, by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. We show that the system shows two distinct amorphous phases upon heating. The first involves a reversible transition to a desolvated form of the original network, followed by an irreversible transition to an intermediate phase which has elongated Zn-I bonds.

  5. Synthesis of quenchable amorphous diamond

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Zhidan; Yang, Liuxiang; Zeng, Qiaoshi; ...

    2017-08-22

    Diamond owes its unique mechanical, thermal, optical, electrical, chemical, and biocompatible materials properties to its complete sp 3-carbon network bonding. Crystallinity is another major controlling factor for materials properties. Although other Group-14 elements silicon and germanium have complementary crystalline and amorphous forms consisting of purely sp 3 bonds, purely sp 3-bonded tetrahedral amorphous carbon has not yet been obtained. In this letter, we combine high pressure and in situ laser heating techniques to convert glassy carbon into “quenchable amorphous diamond”, and recover it to ambient conditions. Our X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments on themore » recovered sample and computer simulations confirm its tetrahedral amorphous structure and complete sp 3 bonding. This transparent quenchable amorphous diamond has, to our knowledge, the highest density among amorphous carbon materials, and shows incompressibility comparable to crystalline diamond.« less

  6. Synthesis of quenchable amorphous diamond

    SciT

    Zeng, Zhidan; Yang, Liuxiang; Zeng, Qiaoshi

    Diamond owes its unique mechanical, thermal, optical, electrical, chemical, and biocompatible materials properties to its complete sp 3-carbon network bonding. Crystallinity is another major controlling factor for materials properties. Although other Group-14 elements silicon and germanium have complementary crystalline and amorphous forms consisting of purely sp 3 bonds, purely sp 3-bonded tetrahedral amorphous carbon has not yet been obtained. In this letter, we combine high pressure and in situ laser heating techniques to convert glassy carbon into “quenchable amorphous diamond”, and recover it to ambient conditions. Our X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments on themore » recovered sample and computer simulations confirm its tetrahedral amorphous structure and complete sp 3 bonding. This transparent quenchable amorphous diamond has, to our knowledge, the highest density among amorphous carbon materials, and shows incompressibility comparable to crystalline diamond.« less

  7. Thermally activated diffusion of copper into amorphous carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Appy, David; Wallingford, Mark; Jing, Dapeng; ...

    2017-07-11

    Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the authors characterize the thermally activated changes that occur when Cu is deposited on amorphous carbon supported on Si at 300 K, then heated to 800 K. The authors compare data for Cu on the basal plane of graphite with pinning defects, where scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that coarsening is the main process in this temperature range. Coarsening begins at 500–600 K and causes moderate attenuation of the Cu photoelectron signal. For Cu on amorphous carbon, heating to 800 K causes Cu to diffuse into the bulk of the film, based on the strong attenuation ofmore » the Cu signal. Diffusion into the bulk of the amorphous carbon film is confirmed by changes in the shape of the Cu 2 p inelastic tail, and by comparison of attenuation between Cu 2 p and Cu 3 p lines. The magnitude of the photoelectron signal attenuation is compatible with Cu distributed homogeneously throughout the amorphous carbon film, and is not compatible with Cu at or below the C–Si interface under the conditions of our experiments. As a result, desorption is not significant at temperatures up to 800 K.« less

  8. High pressure synthesis of amorphous TiO2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quanjun; Liu, Ran; Wang, Tianyi; Xu, Ke; Dong, Qing; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jing; Liu, Bingbing

    2015-09-01

    Amorphous TiO2 nanotubes with diameters of 8-10 nm and length of several nanometers were synthesized by high pressure treatment of anatase TiO2 nanotubes. The structural phase transitions of anatase TiO2 nanotubes were investigated by using in-situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The starting anatase structure is stable up to ˜20GPa, and transforms into a high-density amorphous (HDA) form at higher pressure. Pressure-modified high- to low-density transition was observed in the amorphous form upon decompression. The pressure-induced amorphization and polyamorphism are in good agreement with the previous results in ultrafine TiO2 nanoparticles and nanoribbons. The relationship between the LDA form and α-PbO2 phase was revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study. In addition, the bulk modulus (B0 = 158 GPa) of the anatase TiO2 nanotubes is smaller than those of the corresponding bulks and nanoparticles (180-240 GPa). We suggest that the unique open-ended nanotube morphology and nanosize play important roles in the high pressure phase transition of TiO2 nanotubes.

  9. High-pressure Irreversible Amorphization of La1/3NbO3

    SciT

    I Halevy; A Hen; A Broide

    2011-12-31

    The crystallographic structure of La{sub 1/3}NbO{sub 3} perovskite was studied at high pressures using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron radiation. High-pressure energy dispersive (EDS) x-ray diffraction and high-pressure angle dispersive (ADS) x-ray diffraction revealed an irreversible amorphization at {approx}10 GPa. A large change in the bulk modulus accompanied the high-pressure amorphization.

  10. On the crystallization kinetics of Zr-(Co,Ni)-Al bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, X. M.; Zhang, Q. F.; Duan, X. Y.; Wang, X. C.; Jiang, Y. H.; Zhou, R.; Tan, J.

    2017-07-01

    Zr-based amorphous alloys are promising materials applied in engineering field, due to their strong glass-forming ability, outstanding mechanical properties and relatively low cost. In this work, the crystallization kinetics of Zr56Co18-xNixAl16 (x = 0, 2, 4 and 8; marked as Ni0, Ni2, Ni4 and Ni8, respectively) alloys are investigated in detail. The results show that, due to the addition of Ni, the glass transition of the alloys presents obvious dynamic characteristics, i.e., with the increasing heating rate, all characteristic temperatures are shifted to higher temperature. By fitting the Kissinger equation, the glass transition activation energy of Ni8 is the highest, indicating that Ni8 is much more difficult to crystallize. Therefore, the Ni8 alloy has the strongest anti-crystallization ability in the Zr56Co18-xNixAl16 alloys investigated.

  11. Cavitation instability in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L. H.; Huang, X.; Ling, Z.

    2015-09-01

    Recent experiments have shown that fracture surfaces of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) usually exhibit an intriguing nanoscale corrugation like fractographic feature mediated by nanoscale void formation. We attribute the onset of this nanoscale corrugation to TTZs (tension transformation zones) mediated cavitation. In our recent study, the spall experiments of Zr-based BMG using a single-stage light gas gun were performed. To uncover the mechanisms of the spallation damage nucleation and evolution, the samples were designed to be subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of identical amplitude but with different durations by making use of the multi-stress pulse and the double-flyer techniques. It is clearly revealed that the macroscopic spall fracture in BMGs originates from the nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro-voids. Then, a microvoid nucleation model of BMGs based on free volume theory is proposed, which indicates that the nucleation of microvoids at the early stage of spallation in BMGs is resulted from diffusion and coalescence of free volume. Furthermore, a theoretical model of void growth in BMGs undergoing remote dynamic hydrostatic tension is developed. The critical condition of cavitation instability is obtained. It is found that dynamic void growth in BMGs can be well controlled by a dimensionless inertial number characterizing the competition between intrinsic and extrinsic time scales. To unveil the atomic-level mechanism of cavitation, a systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of spallation behaviour of a binary metallic glass with different impact velocities was performed. It is found that micro-void nucleation is determined TTZs while the growth is controlled by shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale.

  12. Pressure-jump induced rapid solidification of melt: a method of preparing amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiuru; Jia, Ru; Zhang, Doudou; Yuan, Chaosheng; Shao, Chunguang; Hong, Shiming

    2018-04-01

    By using a self-designed pressure-jump apparatus, we investigated the melt solidification behavior in rapid compression process for several kinds of materials, such as elementary sulfur, polymer polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and poly-ethylene-terephthalate, alloy La68Al10Cu20Co2 and Nd60Cu20Ni10Al10. Experimental results clearly show that their melts could be solidified to be amorphous states through the rapid compression process. Bulk amorphous PEEK with 24 mm in diameter and 12 mm in height was prepared, which exceeds the size obtained by melt quenching method. The bulk amorphous sulfur thus obtained exhibited extraordinarily high thermal stability, and an abnormal exothermic transition to liquid sulfur was observed at around 396 K for the first time. Furthermore, it is suggested that the glass transition pressure and critical compression rate exist to form the amorphous phase. This approach of rapid compression is very attractive not only because it is a new technique of make bulk amorphous materials, but also because novel properties are expected in the amorphous materials solidified by the pressure-jump within milliseconds or microseconds.

  13. X-Ray Amorphous Phases in Terrestrial Analog Volcanic Sediments: Implications for Amorphous Phases in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. J.; Horgan, B.; Rampe, E.; Dehouck, E.; Morris, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) amorphous phases have been found as major components (approx.15-60 wt%) of all rock and soil samples measured by the CheMin XRD instrument in Gale Crater, Mars. The nature of these phases is not well understood and could be any combination of primary (e.g., glass) and secondary (e.g., allophane) phases. Amorphous phases form in abundance during surface weathering on Earth. Yet, these materials are poorly characterized, and it is not certain how properties like composition and structure change with formation environment. The presence of poorly crystalline phases can be inferred from XRD patterns by the appearance of a low angle rise (< or approx.10deg 2(theta)) or broad peaks in the background at low to moderate 2(theta) angles (amorphous humps). CheMin mineral abundances combined with bulk chemical composition measurements from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) have been used to estimate the abundance and composition of the XRD amorphous materials in soil and rock samples on Mars. Here we apply a similar approach to a diverse suite of terrestrial samples - modern soils, glacial sediments, and paleosols - in order to determine how formation environment, climate, and diagenesis affect the abundance and composition of X-ray amorphous phases.

  14. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  15. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  16. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  17. Replication of surface features from a master model to an amorphous metallic article

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Bakke, Eric; Peker, Atakan

    1999-01-01

    The surface features of an article are replicated by preparing a master model having a preselected surface feature thereon which is to be replicated, and replicating the preselected surface feature of the master model. The replication is accomplished by providing a piece of a bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy, contacting the piece of the bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy to the surface of the master model at an elevated replication temperature to transfer a negative copy of the preselected surface feature of the master model to the piece, and separating the piece having the negative copy of the preselected surface feature from the master model.

  18. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  19. Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films

    SciT

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to materialmore » within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.« less

  20. Stability of Ni-bsed bulk metallic glasses

    SciT

    Tokarz, Michelle L; Speakman, Scott A; Porter, Wallace D

    Several ternary (Ni{sub x}Nb{sub y}Sn{sub z}) refractory alloy glasses (RAGs) were studied at elevated temperatures in order to assess the stability of the amorphous state, i.e. devitrification, and to identify subsequent phase transformations in these materials. differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments indicated a complex phase transformation sequence with several distinct crystallization and melting events being recorded above the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}. Below T{sub g} the RAG samples were studied with an in situ environmental X-ray furnace facility, which allowed step-wise isothermal ramping experiments commencing at a temperature below the reduced temperature of T/T{sub g} {approx} 0.80. Distinct crystallinemore » phases were observed when T/T{sub g} {approx} 0.84 for ternary RAG alloys, while similar experiments on Zr-based Vit 106 glass alloys did not reveal any apparent phase separation until T/T{sub g} {approx} 0.96. The phase separation kinetics followed an Arrhenius type of relationship with Ni{sub 3}Sn, and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} being the principle crystalline precipitates.« less

  1. A new activation process for a Zr-based alloy as a negative electrode for Ni/MH electric vehicle batteries

    SciT

    Yu, J.S.; Lee, H.; Lee, S.M.

    1999-12-01

    The effects of a combination hot-immersion and slow-charging method on the activation of a Zr-based alloy were investigated. A Zr{sub 0.7}Ti{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.3}V{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 1.0} alloy electrode was treated with two steps: alloy electrodes were immersed at 80 C for 12 h in a KOH solution and then charged at a low current density for one cycle. It was found that the alloy electrode activation was greatly improved after this hot-immersion and slow-charging treatment, and furthermore the treated electrodes were fully activated at the first normal cycle. The effects of this treatment are discussed on the basis of resultsmore » obtained by scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. The hot-immersion and slow-charging method was successfully applied to the formation process of 80 Ah Ni/MH cells using this Zr-based alloy.« less

  2. The effect of surface pre-conditioning treatments on the local composition of Zr-based conversion coatings formed on aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerezo, J.; Vandendael, I.; Posner, R.; de Wit, J. H. W.; Mol, J. M. C.; Terryn, H.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of different alkaline, acidic and thermal pre-conditioning treatments applied to different Al alloy surfaces. The obtained results are compared to the characteristics of Zr-based conversion coatings that were subsequently generated on top of these substrates. Focus is laid on typical elemental distributions on the sample surfaces, in particular on the amount of precipitated functional additives such as Cu species that are present in the substrate matrix as well as in the conversion bath solutions. To this aim, Field Emission Auger Electron spectra, depth profiles and surface maps with superior local resolution were acquired and compared to scanning electron microscopy images of the sample. The results show how de-alloying processes, which occur at and around intermetallic particles in the Al matrix during typical industrial alkaline or acidic cleaning procedures, provide a significant source of crystallization cores for any following coating processes. This is in particular due for Cu-species, as the resulting local Cu structures on the surface strongly affect the film formation and compositions of state-of-the-art Zr-based films. The findings are highly relevant for industrial treatments of aluminium surfaces, especially for those that undergo corrosion protection and painting process steps prior to usage.

  3. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  4. Methods of amorphization and investigation of the amorphous state.

    PubMed

    Einfal, Tomaž; Planinšek, Odon; Hrovat, Klemen

    2013-09-01

    The amorphous form of pharmaceutical materials represents the most energetic solid state of a material. It provides advantages in terms of dissolution rate and bioavailability. This review presents the methods of solid- -state amorphization described in literature (supercooling of liquids, milling, lyophilization, spray drying, dehydration of crystalline hydrates), with the emphasis on milling. Furthermore, we describe how amorphous state of pharmaceuticals differ depending on the method of preparation and how these differences can be screened by a variety of spectroscopic (X-ray powder diffraction, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, atomic pairwise distribution, infrared spectroscopy, terahertz spectroscopy) and calorimetry methods.

  5. The XRD Amorphous Component in John Klein Drill Fines at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Ming,, Douglas W.; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Bish, David L; Chipera, Steve; Downs, Robert; Morrison, Shaunna; Gellert, Ralf; Campbell, Iain; hide

    2013-01-01

    Drill fines of mudstone (targets John Klein and Cumberland) from the Sheepbed unit at Yel-lowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL payload elements including the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin), APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments. CheMin XRD results show a variety of crystalline phases including feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, oxides, oxyhydroxides, sulfates, sulfides, a tri-octahedral smectite, and XRD amorphous material. The drill fines are distinctly different from corresponding analyses of the global soil (target Rocknest) in that the mudstone samples contained detectable phyllosilicate. Here we focus on John Klein and combine CheMin and APXS data to calculate the chemical composition and concentration of the amorphous component. The chemical composition of the amorphous plus smectite component for John Klein was calculated by subtracting the abundance-weighted chemical composition of the individual XRD crystalline components from the bulk composition of John Kline as measured by APXS. The chemical composition of individual crystalline components was determined either by stoichiometry (e.g., hematite and magnetite) or from their unit cell parameters (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene). The chemical composition of the amorphous + smectite component (approx 71 wt.% of bulk sample) and bulk chemical composition are similar. In order to calculate the chemical composition of the amorphous component, a chemical composition for the tri-octahedral smectite must be assumed. We selected two tri-octahedral smectites with very different MgO/(FeO + Fe2O3) ratios (34 and 1.3 for SapCa1 and Griffithite, respectively). Relative to bulk sample, the concentration of amorphous and smectite components are 40 and 29 wt.% for SapCa1 and 33 and 36 wt.% for Griffithite. The amount of smectite was calculated by requiring the MgO concentration to be approx 0 wt.% in the amorphous component. Griffithite is the preferred smectite because

  6. Kinetically Controlled Two-Step Amorphization and Amorphous-Amorphous Transition in Ice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuanlong; Yong, Xue; Tse, John S; Smith, Jesse S; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-09-29

    We report the results of in situ structural characterization of the amorphization of crystalline ice Ih under compression and the relaxation of high-density amorphous (HDA) ice under decompression at temperatures between 96 and 160 K by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The results show that ice Ih transforms to an intermediate crystalline phase at 100 K prior to complete amorphization, which is supported by molecular dynamics calculations. The phase transition pathways show clear temperature dependence: direct amorphization without an intermediate phase is observed at 133 K, while at 145 K a direct Ih-to-IX transformation is observed; decompression of HDA shows a transition to low-density amorphous ice at 96 K and ∼1  Pa, to ice Ic at 135 K and to ice IX at 145 K. These observations show that the amorphization of compressed ice Ih and the recrystallization of decompressed HDA are strongly dependent on temperature and controlled by kinetic barriers. Pressure-induced amorphous ice is an intermediate state in the phase transition from the connected H-bond water network in low pressure ices to the independent and interpenetrating H-bond network of high-pressure ices.

  7. Kinetically Controlled Two-Step Amorphization and Amorphous-Amorphous Transition in Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chuanlong; Yong, Xue; Tse, John S.; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-09-01

    We report the results of in situ structural characterization of the amorphization of crystalline ice Ih under compression and the relaxation of high-density amorphous (HDA) ice under decompression at temperatures between 96 and 160 K by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The results show that ice Ih transforms to an intermediate crystalline phase at 100 K prior to complete amorphization, which is supported by molecular dynamics calculations. The phase transition pathways show clear temperature dependence: direct amorphization without an intermediate phase is observed at 133 K, while at 145 K a direct Ih-to-IX transformation is observed; decompression of HDA shows a transition to low-density amorphous ice at 96 K and ˜1 Pa , to ice Ic at 135 K and to ice IX at 145 K. These observations show that the amorphization of compressed ice Ih and the recrystallization of decompressed HDA are strongly dependent on temperature and controlled by kinetic barriers. Pressure-induced amorphous ice is an intermediate state in the phase transition from the connected H-bond water network in low pressure ices to the independent and interpenetrating H-bond network of high-pressure ices.

  8. Kinetically Controlled Two-Step Amorphization and Amorphous-Amorphous Transition in Ice

    SciT

    Lin, Chuanlong; Yong, Xue; Tse, John S.

    We report the results of in situ structural characterization of the amorphization of crystalline ice Ih under compression and the relaxation of high-density amorphous (HDA) ice under decompression at temperatures between 96 and 160 K by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The results show that ice Ih transforms to an intermediate crystalline phase at 100 K prior to complete amorphization, which is supported by molecular dynamics calculations. The phase transition pathways show clear temperature dependence: direct amorphization without an intermediate phase is observed at 133 K, while at 145 K a direct Ih-to-IX transformation is observed; decompression of HDA shows a transitionmore » to low-density amorphous ice at 96 K and ~ 1 Pa , to ice Ic at 135 K and to ice IX at 145 K. These observations show that the amorphization of compressed ice Ih and the recrystallization of decompressed HDA are strongly dependent on temperature and controlled by kinetic barriers. Pressure-induced amorphous ice is an intermediate state in the phase transition from the connected H-bond water network in low pressure ices to the independent and interpenetrating H-bond network of high-pressure ices.« less

  9. High thermal conductivity in electrostatically engineered amorphous polymers

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Apoorv; Li, Chen; Kim, Gun-Ho; Gidley, David; Pipe, Kevin P.; Kim, Jinsang

    2017-01-01

    High thermal conductivity is critical for many applications of polymers (for example, packaging of light-emitting diodes), in which heat must be dissipated efficiently to maintain the functionality and reliability of a system. Whereas uniaxially extended chain morphology has been shown to significantly enhance thermal conductivity in individual polymer chains and fibers, bulk polymers with coiled and entangled chains have low thermal conductivities (0.1 to 0.4 W m−1 K−1). We demonstrate that systematic ionization of a weak anionic polyelectrolyte, polyacrylic acid (PAA), resulting in extended and stiffened polymer chains with superior packing, can significantly enhance its thermal conductivity. Cross-plane thermal conductivity in spin-cast amorphous films steadily grows with PAA degree of ionization, reaching up to ~1.2 W m−1 K−1, which is on par with that of glass and about six times higher than that of most amorphous polymers, suggesting a new unexplored molecular engineering strategy to achieve high thermal conductivities in amorphous bulk polymers. PMID:28782022

  10. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  11. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  12. Deduced elasticity of sp3-bonded amorphous diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballato, J.; Ballato, A.

    2017-11-01

    Amorphous diamond was recently synthesized using high temperature and pressure techniques [Z. Zeng, L. Yang, Q. Zeng, H. Lou, H. Sheng, J. Wen, D. J. Miller, Y. Meng, W. Yang, W. L. Mao, and H. K. Mao, Nat. Commun. 8, 322 (2017)]. Here, selected physical properties of this new phase of carbon are deduced using an extension of the Voigt-Reuss-Hill (VRHx) methodology whereby single crystal values are averaged over all orientations to yield values for the amorphous analog. Specifically, the elastic constants were deduced to be c11 = 1156.5 GPa, c12 = 87.6 GPa, and c44 = 534.5 GPa, whereas the Young's modulus, bulk modulus, and Poisson's ratio were also estimated to be 1144.2 GPa, 443.9 GPa, and 0.0704, respectively. These numbers are compared with experimental and theoretical literature values for other allotropic forms, specifically, Lonsdaleite, and two forms each of graphite and amorphous carbon. It is unknown at this time how the high temperature and pressure synthesis approach employed influences the structure, hence properties, of amorphous diamond at room temperature. However, the values provided herein constitute a baseline against which future structure/property/processing analyses can be compared.

  13. A study of stress-induced phase transformation and micromechanical behavior of CuZr-based alloy by in-situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Dongmei; Mu, Juan; Chen, Yan; ...

    2017-03-01

    The stress-induced phase transformation and micromechanical behavior of CuZr-based alloy were investigated by in-situ neutron diffraction. The pseudoelastic behavior with a pronounced strain-hardening effect is observed. The retained martensite nuclei and the residual stress obtained from the 1st cycle reduce the stress threshold for the martensitic transformation. A critical stress level is required for the reverse martensitic transformation from martensite to B2 phase. An increase of intensity for the B2 (110) plane in the 1st cycle is caused by the twinning along the {112}<111> twinning system. The convoluted stress partitioning influenced by the elastic and transformation anisotropy along with themore » newly formed martensite determines the microstress partitioning of the studied CuZr-based alloy. The reversible martensitic transformation is responsible for the pseudoelasticity. The macro mechanical behavior of the pure B2 phase can be divided into 3 stages, which are mediated by the evolvement of the martensitic transformation. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan (http://energy.gov/downloads/doe-public-access-plan).« less

  14. A study of stress-induced phase transformation and micromechanical behavior of CuZr-based alloy by in-situ neutron diffraction

    SciT

    Wang, Dongmei; Mu, Juan; Chen, Yan

    The stress-induced phase transformation and micromechanical behavior of CuZr-based alloy were investigated by in-situ neutron diffraction. The pseudoelastic behavior with a pronounced strain-hardening effect is observed. The retained martensite nuclei and the residual stress obtained from the 1st cycle reduce the stress threshold for the martensitic transformation. A critical stress level is required for the reverse martensitic transformation from martensite to B2 phase. An increase of intensity for the B2 (110) plane in the 1st cycle is caused by the twinning along the {112}<111> twinning system. The convoluted stress partitioning influenced by the elastic and transformation anisotropy along with themore » newly formed martensite determines the microstress partitioning of the studied CuZr-based alloy. The reversible martensitic transformation is responsible for the pseudoelasticity. The macro mechanical behavior of the pure B2 phase can be divided into 3 stages, which are mediated by the evolvement of the martensitic transformation. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan (http://energy.gov/downloads/doe-public-access-plan).« less

  15. High-density amorphous ice: A path-integral simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    2012-09-01

    Structural and thermodynamic properties of high-density amorphous (HDA) ice have been studied by path-integral molecular dynamics simulations in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. Interatomic interactions were modeled by using the effective q-TIP4P/F potential for flexible water. Quantum nuclear motion is found to affect several observable properties of the amorphous solid. At low temperature (T = 50 K) the molar volume of HDA ice is found to increase by 6%, and the intramolecular O-H distance rises by 1.4% due to quantum motion. Peaks in the radial distribution function of HDA ice are broadened with respect to their classical expectancy. The bulk modulus, B, is found to rise linearly with the pressure, with a slope ∂B/∂P = 7.1. Our results are compared with those derived earlier from classical and path-integral simulations of HDA ice. We discuss similarities and discrepancies with those earlier simulations.

  16. Criticality in Bulk Metallic Glass Constituent Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Rodrigo Miguel Ojeda; Graedel, T. E.; Pekarskaya, Evgenia; Schroers, Jan

    2017-11-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), which readily form amorphous phases during solidification, are increasingly being used in first applications of watch components, electronic casings, and sporting goods. The compositions of BMGs typically include four to six elements. Various political and geological factors have recently led to supply disruptions for several metals, including some present in BMG compositions. In this work, we assess the "criticality" of 22 technologically interesting BMG compositions, compare the results with those for three common engineering alloy groups, and derive recommendations for BMG composition choices from a criticality perspective. The criticality of BMGs is found to be generally much higher compared with those for the established engineering alloys. Therefore, criticality concerns should also be considered in the choice between existing and developing novel BMGs.

  17. Enamel-like apatite crown covering amorphous mineral in a crayfish mandible

    PubMed Central

    Bentov, Shmuel; Zaslansky, Paul; Al-Sawalmih, Ali; Masic, Admir; Fratzl, Peter; Sagi, Amir; Berman, Amir; Aichmayer, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Carbonated hydroxyapatite is the mineral found in vertebrate bones and teeth, whereas invertebrates utilize calcium carbonate in their mineralized organs. In particular, stable amorphous calcium carbonate is found in many crustaceans. Here we report on an unusual, crystalline enamel-like apatite layer found in the mandibles of the arthropod Cherax quadricarinatus (freshwater crayfish). Despite their very different thermodynamic stabilities, amorphous calcium carbonate, amorphous calcium phosphate, calcite and fluorapatite coexist in well-defined functional layers in close proximity within the mandible. The softer amorphous minerals are found primarily in the bulk of the mandible whereas apatite, the harder and less soluble mineral, forms a wear-resistant, enamel-like coating of the molar tooth. Our findings suggest a unique case of convergent evolution, where similar functional challenges of mastication led to independent developments of structurally and mechanically similar, apatite-based layers in the teeth of genetically remote phyla: vertebrates and crustaceans. PMID:22588301

  18. High-density amorphous ice: nucleation of nanosized low-density amorphous ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonauer, Christina M.; Seidl-Nigsch, Markus; Loerting, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the crystallization temperature of different forms of expanded high-density amorphous ice (eHDA) was scrutinized. Crystallization at pressures 0.05-0.30 GPa was followed using volumetry and powder x-ray diffraction. eHDA samples were prepared via isothermal decompression of very high-density amorphous ice at 140 K to different end pressures between 0.07-0.30 GPa (eHDA0.07-0.3). At 0.05-0.17 GPa the crystallization line T x (p) of all eHDA variants is the same. At pressures  >0.17 GPa, all eHDA samples decompressed to pressures  <0.20 GPa exhibit significantly lower T x values than eHDA0.2 and eHDA0.3. We rationalize our findings with the presence of nanoscaled low-density amorphous ice (LDA) seeds that nucleate in eHDA when it is decompressed to pressures  <0.20 GPa at 140 K. Below ~0.17 GPa, these nanosized LDA domains are latent within the HDA matrix, exhibiting no effect on T x of eHDA<0.2. Upon heating at pressures  ⩾0.17 GPa, these nanosized LDA nuclei transform to ice IX nuclei. They are favored sites for crystallization and, hence, lower T x . By comparing crystallization experiments of bulk LDA with the ones involving nanosized LDA we are able to estimate the Laplace pressure and radius of ~0.3-0.8 nm for the nanodomains of LDA. The nucleation of LDA in eHDA revealed here is evidence for the first-order-like nature of the HDA  →  LDA transition, supporting water’s liquid-liquid transition scenarios.

  19. Pressure-Induced Amorphization and a New High Density Amorphous Metallic Phase in Matrix-Free Ge Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Niccolo R C; Zhang, Yuanpeng; Little, William R; Karatutlu, Ali; Ersoy, Osman; Haynes, Peter D; Molteni, Carla; Hine, Nicholas D M; Hernandez, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Jesus; Rodriguez, Fernando; Brazhkin, Vadim V; Sapelkin, Andrei

    2015-11-11

    Over the last two decades, it has been demonstrated that size effects have significant consequences for the atomic arrangements and phase behavior of matter under extreme pressure. Furthermore, it has been shown that an understanding of how size affects critical pressure-temperature conditions provides vital guidance in the search for materials with novel properties. Here, we report on the remarkable behavior of small (under ~5 nm) matrix-free Ge nanoparticles under hydrostatic compression that is drastically different from both larger nanoparticles and bulk Ge. We discover that the application of pressure drives surface-induced amorphization leading to Ge-Ge bond overcompression and eventually to a polyamorphic semiconductor-to-metal transformation. A combination of spectroscopic techniques together with ab initio simulations were employed to reveal the details of the transformation mechanism into a new high density phase-amorphous metallic Ge.

  20. Three-dimensional nanomechanical mapping of amorphous and crystalline phase transitions in phase-change materials.

    PubMed

    Grishin, Ilja; Huey, Bryan D; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2013-11-13

    The nanostructure of micrometer-sized domains (bits) in phase-change materials (PCM) that undergo switching between amorphous and crystalline phases plays a key role in the performance of optical PCM-based memories. Here, we explore the dynamics of such phase transitions by mapping PCM nanostructures in three dimensions with nanoscale resolution by combining precision Ar ion beam cross-sectional polishing and nanomechanical ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) mapping. Surface and bulk phase changes of laser written submicrometer to micrometer sized amorphous-to-crystalline (SET) and crystalline-to-amorphous (RESET) bits in chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 PCM are observed with 10-20 nm lateral and 4 nm depth resolution. UFM mapping shows that the Young's moduli of crystalline SET bits exceed the moduli of amorphous areas by 11 ± 2%, with crystalline content extending from a few nanometers to 50 nm in depth depending on the energy of the switching pulses. The RESET bits written with 50 ps pulses reveal shallower depth penetration and show 30-50 nm lateral and few nanometer vertical wavelike topography that is anticorrelated with the elastic modulus distribution. Reverse switching of amorphous RESET bits results in the full recovery of subsurface nanomechanical properties accompanied with only partial topography recovery, resulting in surface corrugations attributed to quenching. This precision sectioning and nanomechanical mapping approach could be applicable to a wide range of amorphous, nanocrystalline, and glass-forming materials for 3D nanomechanical mapping of amorphous-crystalline transitions.

  1. The contribution of vapor deposition to amorphous rims on lunar soil grains. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Mckay, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Recent analysis analytical electron microscope study of lunar soils showed that the approximately 60-nm-wide amorphous rims surrounding many lunar soils grains exhibit distinct compositional differences from their hosts. On average, the amorphous rim compositions reflect the local bulk soil composition with the exceptions of Si and S, which are enriched relative to the bulk soil. These chemical trends led us to propose that the amorphous rims were in fact deposits of impact-generated vapors produced during regolith gardening, a hypothesis that runs contrary to the generally accepted view that the rims are produced through amorphization of the outer parts of mineral grains by interaction with the solar wind. Analytical data are reported for amorphous rims on individual minerals in lunar soils in order to show that the magnitude of the chemical differences between rim and host are so great that they require a major addition of foreign elements to the grain surfaces. The average composition of amorphous rims is listed as a function of host mineralogy as determined in microtone thin sections using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry in the transmission electron microscope. As the host mineral becomes chemically more complex, the chemical differences are not as clear. The average rim compositions are remarkably similar and are independent of the host grain mineralogy. Whether there are 'sputtering' or radiation effects superimposed on the vapor-deposited material can be debated. We do not explicitly exclude the effects of radiation damage as a contributing factor to the formation of amorphous rims; we are merely emphasizing the major role played by condensed vapors in the formation of amorphous rims on lunar soil grains.

  2. Castable Amorphous Metal Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Davis, Gregory L.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Shapiro, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    A revolutionary way to produce a mirror and mirror assembly is to cast the entire part at once from a metal alloy that combines all of the desired features into the final part: optical smoothness, curvature, flexures, tabs, isogrids, low CTE, and toughness. In this work, it has been demonstrated that castable mirrors are possible using bulk metallic glasses (BMGs, also called amorphous metals) and BMG matrix composites (BMGMCs). These novel alloys have all of the desired mechanical and thermal properties to fabricate an entire mirror assembly without machining, bonding, brazing, welding, or epoxy. BMGs are multi-component metal alloys that have been cooled in such a manner as to avoid crystallization leading to an amorphous (non-crystalline) microstructure. This lack of crystal structure and the fact that these alloys are glasses, leads to a wide assortment of mechanical and thermal properties that are unlike those observed in crystalline metals. Among these are high yield strength, carbide-like hardness, low melting temperatures (making them castable like aluminum), a thermoplastic processing region (for improving smoothness), low stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratios, relatively low CTE, density similar to titanium alloys, high elasticity and ultra-smooth cast parts (as low as 0.2-nm surface roughness has been demonstrated in cast BMGs). BMGMCs are composite alloys that consist of a BMG matrix with crystalline dendrites embedded throughout. BMGMCs are used to overcome the typically brittle failure observed in monolithic BMGs by adding a soft phase that arrests the formation of cracks in the BMG matrix. In some cases, BMGMCs offer superior castability, toughness, and fatigue resistance, if not as good a surface finish as BMGs. This work has demonstrated that BMGs and BMGMCs can be cast into prototype mirrors and mirror assemblies without difficulty.

  3. Amorphization and thermal stability of aluminum-based nanoparticles prepared from the rapid cooling of nanodroplets: effect of iron addition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shifang; Li, Xiaofan; Deng, Huiqiu; Deng, Lei; Hu, Wangyu

    2015-03-07

    Despite an intensive investigation on bimetallic nanoparticles, little attention has been paid to their amorphization in the past few decades. The study of amorphization on a nanoscale is of considerable significance for the preparation of amorphous nanoparticles and bulk metallic glass. Herein, we pursue the amorphization process of Al-based nanoparticles with classic molecular dynamics simulations and local structural analysis techniques. By a comparative study of the amorphization of pure Al and Fe-doped Al-based nanodroplets in the course of rapid cooling, we find that Fe addition plays a very important role in the vitrification of Al-based nanodroplets. Owing to the subsurface segregated Fe atoms with their nearest neighbors tending to form relatively stable icosahedral (ICO) clusters, the Fe-centred cluster network near the surface effectively suppresses the crystallization of droplets from surface nucleation and growth as the concentration of Fe attains a certain value. The glass formation ability of nanodroplets is suggested to be enhanced by the high intrinsic inner pressure as a result of small size and surface tension, combined with the dopant-inhibited surface nucleation. In addition, the effect of the size and the added concentration of nanoparticles on amorphization and the thermal stability of the amorphous nanoparticles are discussed. Our findings reveal the amorphization mechanism in Fe-doped Al-based nanoparticles and provide a theoretical guidance for the design of amorphous materials.

  4. Effects of chemical composition and test conditions on the dynamic tensile response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Laws, K.; Martinez, D.; Trujillo, C. P.; Brown, A. D.; Cerreta, E. K.; Hazell, P. J.; Ferry, M.; Quadir, M. Z.; Jiang, J.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of impact velocity and temperature on the dynamic mechanical behavior of two bulk metallic (BMG) alloys with slightly different elemental compositions (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38) have been investigated. Bullet-shaped samples were accelerated by a gas gun to speeds in the 400˜600m/s range and tested at both room temperature and 250°C. The samples impacted steel extrusion dies which subjected the bullets to high strains at relatively high strain-rates. The extruded fragments were subsequently soft recovered by using low density foams and examined by means of optical/scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that shear banding was the dictating mechanism responsible for the fracture of all BMGs. At room temperature, the Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 alloy exhibited a higher resistance to fragmentation than the Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38 alloy. At 250°C, significant melting was observed in the recovered fragments of both alloys, which indicates that the BMG glassy structure undergoes a melting process and deformation likely occurs homogeneously.

  5. Preparation of bulk superhard B-C-N nanocomposite compact

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yusheng [Los Alamos, NM; He, Duanwei [Sichuan, CN

    2011-05-10

    Bulk, superhard, B--C--N nanocomposite compacts were prepared by ball milling a mixture of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, encapsulating the ball-milled mixture at a pressure in a range of from about 15 GPa to about 25 GPa, and sintering the pressurized encapsulated ball-milled mixture at a temperature in a range of from about 1800-2500 K. The product bulk, superhard, nanocomposite compacts were well sintered compacts with nanocrystalline grains of at least one high-pressure phase of B--C--N surrounded by amorphous diamond-like carbon grain boundaries. The bulk compacts had a measured Vicker's hardness in a range of from about 41 GPa to about 68 GPa.

  6. Monitoring the recrystallisation of amorphous xylitol using Raman spectroscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Palomäki, Emmi; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Ehlers, Henrik; Svedström, Kirsi; Huotari, Simo; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2016-07-11

    In this paper we present a fast model system for monitoring the recrystallization of quench-cooled amorphous xylitol using Raman spectroscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering. The use of these two methods enables comparison between surface and bulk crystallization. Non-ordered mesoporous silica micro-particles were added to the system in order to alter the rate of crystallization of the amorphous xylitol. Raman measurements showed that adding silica to the system increased the rate of surface crystallization, while X-ray measurements showed that the rate of bulk crystallization decreased. Using this model system it is possible to measure fast changes, which occur in minutes or within a few hours. Raman-spectroscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering were found to be complementary techniques when assessing surface and bulk crystallization of amorphous xylitol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Origin of anomalous inverse notch effect in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Zhou, H. F.; Wang, Z. T.; Li, Y.; Gao, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding notch-related failure is crucial for the design of reliable engineering structures. However, substantial controversies exist in the literature on the notch effect in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), and the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the apparent confusion is still poorly understood. Here we investigate the physical origin of an inverse notch effect in a Zr-based metallic glass, where the tensile strength of the material is dramatically enhanced, rather than decreased (as expected from the stress concentration point of view), by introduction of a notch. Our experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that the seemingly anomalous inverse notch effect is in fact caused by a transition in failure mechanism from shear banding at the notch tip to cavitation and void coalescence. Based on our theoretical analysis, the transition occurs as the stress triaxiality in the notched sample exceeds a material-dependent threshold value. Our results fill the gap in the current understanding of BMG strength and failure mechanism by resolving the conflicts on notch effects and may inspire re-interpretation of previous reports on BMG fracture toughness where pre-existing notches were routinely adopted.

  8. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  9. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  10. Bulk crystalline optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renninger, W. H.; Kharel, P.; Behunin, R. O.; Rakich, P. T.

    2018-06-01

    Control of long-lived, high-frequency phonons using light offers a path towards creating robust quantum links, and could lead to tools for precision metrology with applications to quantum information processing. Optomechanical systems based on bulk acoustic-wave resonators are well suited for this goal in light of their high quality factors, and because they do not suffer from surface interactions as much as their microscale counterparts. However, so far these phonons have been accessible only electromechanically, using piezoelectric interactions. Here, we demonstrate customizable optomechanical coupling to macroscopic phonon modes of a bulk acoustic-wave resonator at cryogenic temperatures. These phonon modes, which are formed by shaping the surfaces of a crystal into a plano-convex phononic resonator, yield appreciable optomechanical coupling rates, providing access to high acoustic quality factors (4.2 × 107) at high phonon frequencies (13 GHz). This simple approach, which uses bulk properties rather than nanostructural control, is appealing for the ability to engineer optomechanical systems at high frequencies that are robust against thermal decoherence. Moreover, we show that this optomechanical system yields a unique form of dispersive symmetry-breaking that enables phonon heating or cooling without an optical cavity.

  11. Enhanced Physical Stability of Amorphous Drug Formulations via Dry Polymer Coating.

    PubMed

    Capece, Maxx; Davé, Rajesh

    2015-06-01

    Although amorphous solid drug formulations may be advantageous for enhancing the bioavailability of poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients, they exhibit poor physical stability and undergo recrystallization. To address this limitation, this study investigates stability issues associated with amorphous solids through analysis of the crystallization behavior for acetaminophen (APAP), known as a fast crystallizer, using a modified form of the Avrami equation that kinetically models both surface and bulk crystallization. It is found that surface-enhanced crystallization, occurring faster at the free surface than in the bulk, is the major impediment to the stability of amorphous APAP. It is hypothesized that a novel use of a dry-polymer-coating process referred to as mechanical-dry-polymer-coating may be used to inhibit surface crystallization and enhance stability. The proposed process, which is examined, simultaneously mills and coats amorphous solids with polymer, while avoiding solvents or solutions, which may otherwise cause stability or crystallization issues during coating. It is shown that solid dispersions of APAP (64% loading) with a small particle size (28 μm) could be prepared and coated with the polymer, carnauba wax, in a vibratory ball mill. The resulting amorphous solid was found to have excellent stability as a result of inhibition of surface crystallization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  12. The performances of proto-type Ni/MH secondary batteries using Zr-based hydrogen storage alloys and filamentary type Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, Ho; Kim, Jin-Ho; Lee, Paul S.; Lee, Jai-Young

    2001-04-01

    For the purpose of developing a Zr-based Laves phase alloy with higher capacity and better performance for electrochemical application, extensive work has been carried out. After careful alloy design of ZrMn2-based hydrogen storage alloys through varying their stoichiometry by means of substituting or adding alloying elements, the Zr0.9Ti0.1(Mn0.7V0.5Ni1.4)0.92 with high capacity (392 mAh/g at the 0.25C) and improved performance (comparable to that of commercialized AB5 type alloy) was developed. Another endeavor was made to improve the poor activation property and the low rate capability of the developed Zr-based Laves phase alloy for commercialization. The combination method of hot-immersion and slow-charging was introduced. It was found that electrode activation was greatly improved after hot immersion at 80°C for 12h followed by charging at 0.05C. The effects of this method are discussed in comparison with other activation methods. The combination method was successfully applied to the formation process of 80 Ah Ni/MH cells. A series of systematic investigations has been rendered to analyze the inner cell pressure characteristics of a sealed type Ni-MH battery. It was found that the increase of inner cell pressure in the sealed type Ni/MH battery of the above-mentioned Zr-Ti-Mn-V-Ni alloy was mainly due to the accumulation of oxygen gas during charge/discharge cycling. The fact identified that the surface catalytic activity was affected more dominantly by the oxygen recombination reaction than the reaction surface area was also identified. In order to improve the surface catalytic activity of a Zr-Ti-Mn-V-Ni alloy, which is closely related to the inner pressure behavior in a sealed cell, the electrode was fabricated by mixing the alloy with Cu powder and a filamentary type of Ni and replacing 75% of the carbon black with them; thus, the inner cell pressure rarely increases with cycles due to the active gas recombination reaction. Measurements of the surface

  13. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-21

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO 2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm 2 , accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO 2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  14. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  15. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  16. Water clusters in amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Authelin, Jean-Rene; MacKenzie, Alan P; Rasmussen, Don H; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous materials, although lacking the long-range translational and rotational order of crystalline and liquid crystalline materials, possess certain local (short-range) structure. This paper reviews the distribution of one particular component present in all amorphous pharmaceuticals, that is, water. Based on the current understanding of the structure of water, water molecules can exist in either unclustered form or as aggregates (clusters) of different sizes and geometries. Water clusters are reported in a range of amorphous systems including carbohydrates and their aqueous solutions, synthetic polymers, and proteins. Evidence of water clustering is obtained by various methods that include neutron and X-ray scattering, molecular dynamics simulation, water sorption isotherm, concentration dependence of the calorimetric Tg , dielectric relaxation, and nuclear magnetic resonance. A review of the published data suggests that clustering depends on water concentration, with unclustered water molecules existing at low water contents, whereas clusters form at intermediate water contents. The transition from water clusters to unclustered water molecules can be expected to change water dependence of pharmaceutical properties, such as rates of degradation. We conclude that a mechanistic understanding of the impact of water on the stability of amorphous pharmaceuticals would require systematic studies of water distribution and clustering, while such investigations are lacking. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  18. Tetrahedral bonding in amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. R.

    1996-12-01

    Electron configurations close to the tetrahedral 0034-4885/59/12/002/img1 hybridization are found in pure amorphous carbon at a concentration which depends on preparation conditions. Tetrahedral bonding at levels of approximately 80% is found in amorphous carbons formed from beams of carbon ions with energies in a `window' between 20 eV and approximately 500 eV. Suitable techniques for its formation include cathodic arc deposition, ion beam deposition and laser ablation. Similar material appears to be formed by pressure treatment of fullerene precursors and by displacement damage in diamond. Highly tetrahedral forms of amorphous carbon (ta-C) show electronic, optical and mechanical properties which approach those of diamond and are quite different from amorphous carbons with low 0034-4885/59/12/002/img1 content. Useful techniques for determining the 0034-4885/59/12/002/img1 content include electron energy loss spectroscopy, electron and neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of this material by simulating its structure in the computer with a range of techniques from empirical potentials to ab initio quantum mechanics. The structure shows departures from an idealized glassy state of diamond which would have a random tetrahedral network structure as used to describe amorphous silicon and germanium. A surprising feature of the structure simulated using ab initio methods is the presence of small rings containing three or four 0034-4885/59/12/002/img1 carbon atoms. The electronic and optical properties are strongly influenced by the residual of 0034-4885/59/12/002/img5 carbon. Applications to electronic devices are at an early stage with the demonstration of photoconductivity and some simple junction devices. Applications as a wear resistant coating are promising, since the theoretically predicted high values of elastic constants, comparable to but less than those of diamond, are achieved experimentally

  19. Amorphous Semiconductors: From Photocatalyst to Computer Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, Mayur

    Amorphous semiconductors are useful in many applications like solar cells, thin film displays, sensors, electrophotography, etc. The dissertation contains four projects. In the first three projects, semiconductor glasses which are a subset of amorphous semiconductors were studied. The last project is about exploring the strengths and constraints of two analysis programs which calculate the particle size information from experimental Small Angle X-ray Scattering data. By definition, glasses have a random atomic arrangement with no order beyond the nearest neighbor, but strangely there exists an Intermediate Range Order (IRO). The origin of IRO is still not clearly understood, but various models have been proposed. The signature of IRO is the First Sharp Diffraction Peak(FSDP) observed in x-ray and neutron scattering data. The FSDP of TiO 2 SiO2 glass photocatalyst with different Ti:Si ratio from SAXS data was measured to test the theoretical models. The experimental results along with its computer simulation results strongly supported one of two leading models. It was also found that the effect of doping IRO on TiO2 SiO2 is severe in mesoporous form than the bulk form. Glass semiconductors in mesoporous form are very useful photocatalysts due to their large specific surface area. Solar energy conversion of photocatalysts greatly depends on their bandgap, but very few photocatalysts have the optical bandgap covering the whole visible region of solar spectrum leading to poor efficiency. A physical method was developed to manipulate the bandgap of mesoporous photocatalysts, by using the anisotropic thermal expansion and stressed glass network properties of mesoporous glasses. The anisotropic thermal expansion was established by S/WAXS characterization of mesoporous silica (MCM-41). The residual stress in the glass network of mesoporous glasses was already known for an earlier work. The new method was initially applied on mesoporous TiPO4, and the results were

  20. Bulk superhard B-C-N nanocomposite compact and method for preparing thereof

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yusheng; He, Duanwei

    2004-07-06

    Bulk, superhard, B-C-N nanocomposite compact and method for preparing thereof. The bulk, superhard, nanocomposite compact is a well-sintered compact and includes nanocrystalline grains of at least one high-pressure phase of B-C-N surrounded by amorphous diamond-like carbon grain boundaries. The bulk compact has a Vicker's hardness of about 41-68 GPa. It is prepared by ball milling a mixture of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, encapsulating the ball-milled mixture, and sintering the encapsulated ball-milled mixture at a pressure of about 5-25 GPa and at a temperature of about 1000-2500 K.

  1. Density Functional Theory Calculations of the Role of Defects in Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johlin, Eric; Wagner, Lucas; Buonassisi, Tonio; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2010-03-01

    Amorphous silicon holds promise as a cheap and efficient material for thin-film photovoltaic devices. However, current device efficiencies are severely limited by the low mobility of holes in the bulk amorphous silicon material, the cause of which is not yet fully understood. This work employs a statistical analysis of density functional theory calculations to uncover the implications of a range of defects (including internal strain and substitution impurities) on the trapping and mobility of holes, and thereby also on the total conversion efficiency. We investigate the root causes of this low mobility and attempt to provide suggestions for simple methods of improving this property.

  2. Enhanced photoconductivity by melt quenching method for amorphous organic photorefractive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimura, S.; Fujihara, T.; Sassa, T.; Kinashi, K.; Sakai, W.; Ishibashi, K.; Tsutsumi, N.

    2014-10-01

    For many optical semiconductor fields of study, the high photoconductivity of amorphous organic semiconductors has strongly been desired, because they make the manufacture of high-performance devices easy when controlling charge carrier transport and trapping is otherwise difficult. This study focuses on the correlation between photoconductivity and bulk state in amorphous organic photorefractive materials to probe the nature of the performance of photoconductivity and to enhance the response time and diffraction efficiency of photorefractivity. The general cooling processes of the quenching method achieved enhanced photoconductivity and a decreased filling rate for shallow traps. Therefore, sample processing, which was quenching in the present case, for photorefractive composites significantly relates to enhanced photorefractivity.

  3. Amorphization induced by focused ion beam milling in metallic and electronic materials.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yoon; Hong, Ki Jung; Shin, Kwang Soo

    2013-08-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling using high-energy gallium ions is widely used in the preparation of specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the energetic ion beam induces amorphization on the edge of specimens during milling, resulting in a mischievous influence on the clearness of high-quality transmission electron micrographs. In this work, the amorphization induced by the FIB milling was investigated by TEM for three kinds of materials, metallic materials in bulk shape, and semiconductive and electronic ceramic materials as a substrate for the deposition of thin films.

  4. Amorphous lithium lanthanum titanate for solid-state microbatteries

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Wang, Ziying; Xin, Huolin L.; ...

    2016-12-16

    Lithium lanthanum titanate (LLTO) is a promising solid state electrolyte for solid state batteries due to its demonstrated high bulk ionic conductivity. However, crystalline LLTO has a relatively low grain boundary conductivity, limiting the overall material conductivity. In this work, we investigate amorphous LLTO (a-LLTO) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). By controlling the background pressure and temperature we are able to optimize the ionic conductivity to 3 × 10 –4 S/cm and electronic conductivity to 5 × 10 –11 S/cm. XRD, TEM, and STEM/EELS analysis confirm that the films are amorphous and indicate that oxygen background gasmore » is necessary during the PLD process to decrease the oxygen vacancy concentration, decreasing the electrical conductivity. Amorphous LLTO is deposited onto high voltage LiNi 0.5Mn 1.5O 4 (LNMO) spinel cathode thin films and cycled up to 4.8 V vs. Li showing excellent capacity retention. Finally, these results demonstrate that a-LLTO has the potential to be integrated into high voltage thin film batteries.« less

  5. The bonding of protective films of amorphic diamond to titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. B.; Davanloo, F.; Lee, T. J.; Jander, D. R.; You, J. H.; Park, H.; Pivin, J. C.

    1992-04-01

    Films of amorphic diamond can be deposited from laser plasma ions without the use of catalysts such as hydrogen or fluorine. Prepared without columnar patterns of growth, the layers of this material have been reported to have ``bulk'' values of mechanical properties that have suggested their usage as protective coatings for metals. Described here is a study of the bonding and properties realized in one such example, the deposition of amorphic diamond on titanium. Measurements with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy showed that the diamond coatings deposited from laser plasmas were chemically bonded to Ti substrates in 100-200-Å-thick interfacial layers containing some crystalline precipitates of TiC. Resistance to wear was estimated with a modified sand blaster and in all cases the coating was worn away without any rupture or deterioration of the bonding layer. Such wear was greatly reduced and lifetimes of the coated samples were increased by a factor of better than 300 with only 2.7 μm of amorphic diamond.

  6. Effect of Multiple Alloying Elements on the Glass-Forming Ability, Thermal Stability, and Crystallization Behavior of Zr-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazlov, A. I.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Ketov, S. V.; Suryanarayana, C.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.

    2018-02-01

    Effect of multiple alloying elements on the glass-forming ability, thermal stability, and crystallization behavior of Zr-based glass-forming alloys were studied in the present work. We investigated the effect of complete or partial substitution of Ti and Ni with similar early and late transition metals, respectively, on the glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of the Zr50Ti10Cu20Ni10Al10 alloy. Poor correlation was observed between different parameters indicating the glass-forming ability and the critical size of the obtained glassy samples. Importance of the width of the crystallization interval is emphasized. The kinetics of primary crystallization, i.e., the rate of nucleation and rate of growth of the nuclei of primary crystals is very different from that of the eutectic alloys. Thus, it is difficult to estimate the glass-forming ability only on the basis of the empirical parameters not taking into account the crystallization behavior and the crystallization interval.

  7. Influence of amorphous content on compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose.

    PubMed

    Ziffels, S; Steckel, H

    2010-03-15

    Modified lactoses are widely used as filler-binders in direct compression of tablets. Until today, little about the compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose is known. In this study, a new method to prepare anhydrous alpha-lactose from alpha-lactose monohydrate by desiccation with heated ethanol was evaluated and the influence of amorphous content in the lactose powder prior to modification on powder properties, compaction behaviour and storage stability was determined. The modification process led to anhydrous alpha-lactose with decreased bulk and tapped density, increased flow rate and significantly higher specific surface area. Due to the higher specific surface area, the compaction behaviour of the anhydrous alpha-lactose was found to be significantly better than the compaction behaviour of powder blends consisting of alpha-lactose monohydrate and amorphous lactose. An influence of the amorphous content prior to modification could be observed only at higher compaction forces. In general, tablets of modified powders needed longer time to disintegrate directly after compression. However, the storage stability of modified tablets was found to be better compared to the amorphous-crystalline tablets which were influenced by storage conditions, initial crushing strength as well as amorphous content due to the re-crystallization of amorphous lactose during storage. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Amorphization of nanocrystalline 3C-SiC irradiated with Si+ ions

    SciT

    Jiang, Weilin; Wang, H.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation induced amorphization in nanocrystalline and single crystal 3C-SiC has been studied using 1 MeV Si+ ions under identical irradiation conditions at room temperature and 400 K. The disordering behavior has been characterized using in-situ ion channeling and ex-situ x-ray diffraction methods. The results show that, compared to single crystal 3C-SiC, full amorphization of small 3C-SiC grains (~3.8 nm in size) at room temperature occurs at a slightly lower dose. Grain size decreases with increasing dose until a fully amorphized state is attained. The amorphization dose increases at 400 K relative to room temperature. However, at 400 K, the dosemore » for amorphization for 2.0 nm grains is about a factor of 4 and 8 smaller than for 3.0 nm grains and bulk single crystal 3C-SiC, respectively. The behavior is attributed to the dominance of defect-stimulated interfacial amorphization.« less

  9. Bulk viscous quintessential inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    In a spatially-flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe, the incorporation of bulk viscous process in general relativity leads to an appearance of a nonsingular background of the universe that both at early and late times depicts an accelerated universe. These early and late scenarios of the universe can be analytically calculated and mimicked, in the context of general relativity, by a single scalar field whose potential could also be obtained analytically where the early inflationary phase is described by a one-dimensional Higgs potential and the current acceleration is realized by an exponential potential. We show that the early inflationary universe leads to a power spectrum of the cosmological perturbations which match with current observational data, and after leaving the inflationary phase, the universe suffers a phase transition needed to explain the reheating of the universe via gravitational particle production. Furthermore, we find that at late times, the universe enters into the de Sitter phase that can explain the current cosmic acceleration. Finally, we also find that such bulk viscous-dominated universe attains the thermodynamical equilibrium, but in an asymptotic manner.

  10. Explosive bulk charge

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  11. Bulk muscles, loose cables

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, Chamari R D G; Kodali, Venkata

    2014-01-01

    The accessibility and usage of body building supplements is on the rise with stronger internet marketing strategies by the industry. The dangers posed by the ingredients in them are underestimated. A healthy young man came to the emergency room with palpitations and feeling unwell. Initial history and clinical examination were non-contributory to find the cause. ECG showed atrial fibrillation. A detailed history for any over the counter or herbal medicine use confirmed that he was taking supplements to bulk muscle. One of the components in these supplements is yohimbine; the onset of symptoms coincided with the ingestion of this product and the patient is symptom free after stopping it. This report highlights the dangers to the public of consuming over the counter products with unknown ingredients and the consequential detrimental impact on health. PMID:25326558

  12. Bulk muscles, loose cables.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Chamari R D G; Kodali, Venkata

    2014-10-17

    The accessibility and usage of body building supplements is on the rise with stronger internet marketing strategies by the industry. The dangers posed by the ingredients in them are underestimated. A healthy young man came to the emergency room with palpitations and feeling unwell. Initial history and clinical examination were non-contributory to find the cause. ECG showed atrial fibrillation. A detailed history for any over the counter or herbal medicine use confirmed that he was taking supplements to bulk muscle. One of the components in these supplements is yohimbine; the onset of symptoms coincided with the ingestion of this product and the patient is symptom free after stopping it. This report highlights the dangers to the public of consuming over the counter products with unknown ingredients and the consequential detrimental impact on health. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Bulk material handling system

    DOEpatents

    Kleysteuber, William K.; Mayercheck, William D.

    1979-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a bulk material handling system particularly adapted for underground mining and includes a monorail supported overhead and carrying a plurality of conveyors each having input and output end portions with the output end portion of a first of the conveyors positioned above an input end portion of a second of the conveyors, a device for imparting motion to the conveyors to move the material from the input end portions toward the output end portions thereof, a device for supporting at least one of the input and output end portions of the first and second conveyors from the monorail, and the supporting device including a plurality of trolleys rollingly supported by the monorail whereby the conveyors can be readily moved therealong.

  14. Catalyzed Preparation of Amorphous Chalcogenides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-30

    hydrogen sulfide through lanthanum isopropoxide in dry benzene, as the solvent. The powder obtained was heat-treated in hydrogen sulfide finally 15...producing single-phase crystalline lanthanum sulfide (La2S3) . Amorphous particles were also prepared by reacting titanium tetrapropoxide [Ti...OC3H7)4] and hydrogen sulfide. Resulting powder was heat-treated in flowing hydrogen sulfide to produce crystalline titanium sulfide (TiS2) . 20

  15. Modeling of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sourabh; Rez, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Many species (e.g. sea urchin) form amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phases that subsequently transform into crystalline CaCO3. It is certainly possible that ACC might have up to 10 wt% Mg and ˜3 wt% of water. The structure of ACC and mechanisms by which it transforms to crystalline phase are still unknown. Our goal here is to determine an atomic structure model that is consistent with diffraction and IR measurements of ACC. For this purpose a calcite supercell with 24 formula units (120 atoms) was constructed. Various configurations with 6 Mg atoms substituting for Ca (6 wt%) and 3-5 H2O molecules (2.25- 3.75 wt%) inserted in the spaces between Ca atoms, were relaxed using VASP. Most noticeable effects were the tilts of CO3 groups and distortion of Ca sub-lattice, especially in the case of water. The distributions of nearest Ca-Ca distance and CO3 tilts were extracted from those configurations. We also performed the same analysis starting with aragonite. Sampling from above distributions we built models for amorphous calcite/aragonite of size ˜1700 nm^3. We found that the induced distortions were not enough to generate a diffraction pattern typical of an amorphous material. Next we studied diffraction pattern of several nano-crystallites as recent studies suggest that amorphous calcite might be composed of nano- crystallites. We could then generate a diffraction pattern that appeared similar to that from ACC, for a nano-crystallite of size ˜2 nm^3.

  16. A predictive structural model for bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Laws, K. J.; Miracle, D. B.; Ferry, M.

    2015-01-01

    Great progress has been made in understanding the atomic structure of metallic glasses, but there is still no clear connection between atomic structure and glass-forming ability. Here we give new insights into perhaps the most important question in the field of amorphous metals: how can glass-forming ability be predicted from atomic structure? We give a new approach to modelling metallic glass atomic structures by solving three long-standing problems: we discover a new family of structural defects that discourage glass formation; we impose efficient local packing around all atoms simultaneously; and we enforce structural self-consistency. Fewer than a dozen binary structures satisfy these constraints, but extra degrees of freedom in structures with three or more different atom sizes significantly expand the number of relatively stable, ‘bulk' metallic glasses. The present work gives a new approach towards achieving the long-sought goal of a predictive capability for bulk metallic glasses. PMID:26370667

  17. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, Michael A.; Raupp, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  18. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors.

    PubMed

    Marrs, Michael A; Raupp, Gregory B

    2016-07-26

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm² and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate.

  19. Microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys, and their effects on tribological behavior. The results indicate that the surface oxide layers present on amorphous alloys are effective in providing low friction and a protective film against wear in air. Clustering and crystallization in amorphous alloys can be enhanced as a result of plastic flow during the sliding process at a low sliding velocity, at room temperature. Clusters or crystallines with sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on the wear surface. Temperature effects lead to drastic changes in surface chemistry and friction behavior of the alloys at temperatures to 750 C. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the alloys to the surface upon heating and impart to the surface oxides at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The oxides increase friction while the boron nitride reduces friction drastically in vacuum.

  20. Microfabricated Bulk Piezoelectric Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barham, Oliver M.

    Piezoelectric voltage transformers (PTs) can be used to transform an input voltage into a different, required output voltage needed in electronic and electro- mechanical systems, among other varied uses. On the macro scale, they have been commercialized in electronics powering consumer laptop liquid crystal displays, and compete with an older, more prevalent technology, inductive electromagnetic volt- age transformers (EMTs). The present work investigates PTs on smaller size scales that are currently in the academic research sphere, with an eye towards applications including micro-robotics and other small-scale electronic and electromechanical sys- tems. PTs and EMTs are compared on the basis of power and energy density, with PTs trending towards higher values of power and energy density, comparatively, indicating their suitability for small-scale systems. Among PT topologies, bulk disc-type PTs, operating in their fundamental radial extension mode, and free-free beam PTs, operating in their fundamental length extensional mode, are good can- didates for microfabrication and are considered here. Analytical modeling based on the Extended Hamilton Method is used to predict device performance and integrate mechanical tethering as a boundary condition. This model differs from previous PT models in that the electric enthalpy is used to derive constituent equations of motion with Hamilton's Method, and therefore this approach is also more generally applica- ble to other piezoelectric systems outside of the present work. Prototype devices are microfabricated using a two mask process consisting of traditional photolithography combined with micropowder blasting, and are tested with various output electri- cal loads. 4mm diameter tethered disc PTs on the order of .002cm. 3 , two orders smaller than the bulk PT literature, had the followingperformance: a prototype with electrode area ratio (input area / output area) = 1 had peak gain of 2.3 (+/- 0.1), efficiency of 33 (+/- 0

  1. The effect of high energy concentration source irradiation on structure and properties of Fe-based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarczyk, Wirginia

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses exhibit metastable structure and maintain this relatively stable amorphous state within certain temperature range. High intensity laser beam was used for the surface irradiation of Fe-Co-B-Si-Nb bulk metallic glasses. The variable parameter was laser beam pulse energy. For the analysis of structure and properties of bulk metallic glasses and their surface after laser remelting the X-ray analysis, microscopic observation and test of mechanical properties were carried out. Examination of the nanostructure of amorphous materials obtained by high pressure copper mold casting method and the irradiated with the use of TITAN 80-300 HRTEM was carried out. Nanohardness and reduced Young's modulus of particular amorphous and amorphous-crystalline material zone of the laser beam were examined with the use of Hysitron TI950 Triboindenter nanoindenter and with the use of Berkovich's indenter. The XRD and microscopic analysis showed that the test material is amorphous in its structure before irradiation. Microstructure observation with electron transmission microscopy gave information about alloy crystallization in the irradiated process. Identification of given crystal phases allows to determine the kind of crystal phases created in the first place and also further changes of phase composition of alloy. The main value of the nanohardness of the surface prepared by laser beam has the order of magnitude similar to bulk metallic glasses formed by casting process irrespective of the laser beam energy used. Research results analysis showed that the area between parent material and fusion zone is characterized by extraordinarily interesting structure which is and will be the subject of further analysis in the scope of bulk metallic glasses amorphous structure and high energy concentration source. The main goal of this work is the results' presentation of structure and chosen properties of the selected bulk metallic glasses after casting process and after irradiation

  2. Interaction of alkanes with an amorphous methanol film at 15-180 K

    SciT

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2005-09-15

    The hydrogen-bond imperfections and glass-liquid transition of the amorphous methanol film have been investigated on the basis of the film dewetting and the incorporation/desorption of alkane molecules adsorbed on the surface. The butane is incorporated completely in the bulk of the porous methanol film up to 70 K. At least two distinct states exist for the incorporated butane; one is assignable to solvated molecules in the bulk and the other is weakly bound species at the surface or in the subsurface site. For the nonporous methanol film, the uptake of butane in the bulk is quenched but butane forms amore » surface complex with methanol above 80 K. The butane incorporated in the bulk of the glassy methanol film is released at 120 K, where dewetting of the methanol film occurs simultaneously due to evolution of the supercooled liquid phase.« less

  3. Photochromic amorphous molecular materials and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Yasuhiko; Utsumi, Hisayuki; Ujike, Toshiki; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Moriwaki, Kazuyuki; Nagahama, Daisuke; Nakano, Hideyuki

    2003-01-01

    Two novel classes of photochromic amorphous molecular materials based on azobenzene and dithienylethene were designed and synthesized. They were found to readily form amorphous glasses with well-defined glass-transition temperatures when the melt samples were cooled on standing in air and to exhibit photochromism in their amorphous films as well as in solution. Photochromic properties of these materials are discussed in relation to their molecular structures. Surface relief grating was formed on the amorphous films of azobenzene-based photochromic amorphous molecular materials by irradiation with two coherent Ar + laser beams. Dual image was formed at the same location of the films of dithienylethene-based photochromic amorphous molecular materials by irradiation with two linearly polarized light beams perpendicular to each other.

  4. On Structure and Properties of Amorphous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical, optical, magnetic and electronic properties of amorphous materials hold great promise towards current and emergent technologies. We distinguish at least four categories of amorphous (glassy) materials: (i) metallic; (ii) thin films; (iii) organic and inorganic thermoplastics; and (iv) amorphous permanent networks. Some fundamental questions about the atomic arrangements remain unresolved. This paper focuses on the models of atomic arrangements in amorphous materials. The earliest ideas of Bernal on the structure of liquids were followed by experiments and computer models for the packing of spheres. Modern approach is to carry out computer simulations with prediction that can be tested by experiments. A geometrical concept of an ideal amorphous solid is presented as a novel contribution to the understanding of atomic arrangements in amorphous solids. PMID:28824158

  5. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  6. Amorphization of nanocrystalline monoclinic ZrO2 by swift heavy ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fengyuan; Wang, Jianwei; Lang, Maik; Toulemonde, Marcel; Namavar, Fereydoon; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Jiaming; Ewing, Rodney C; Lian, Jie

    2012-09-21

    Bulk ZrO(2) polymorphs generally have an extremely high amorphization tolerance upon low energy ion and swift heavy ion irradiation in which ballistic interaction and ionization radiation dominate the ion-solid interaction, respectively. However, under very high-energy irradiation by 1.33 GeV U-238, nanocrystalline (40-50 nm) monoclinic ZrO(2) can be amorphized. A computational simulation based on a thermal spike model reveals that the strong ionizing radiation from swift heavy ions with a very high electronic energy loss of 52.2 keV nm(-1) can induce transient zones with temperatures well above the ZrO(2) melting point. The extreme electronic energy loss, coupled with the high energy state of the nanostructured materials and a high thermal confinement due to the less effective heat transport within the transient hot zone, may eventually be responsible for the ionizing radiation-induced amorphization without transforming to the tetragonal polymorph. The amorphization of nanocrystalline zirconia was also confirmed by 1.69 GeV Au ion irradiation with the electronic energy loss of 40 keV nm(-1). These results suggest that highly radiation tolerant materials in bulk forms, such as ZrO(2), may be radiation sensitive with the reduced length scale down to the nano-metered regime upon irradiation above a threshold value of electronic energy loss.

  7. High strength nanostructured Al-based alloys through optimized processing of rapidly quenched amorphous precursors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Lee, Gwang-Yeob; Park, Gyu-Hyeon; Kim, Hyeon-Ah; Lee, A-Young; Scudino, Sergio; Prashanth, Konda Gokuldoss; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2018-01-18

    We report the methods increasing both strength and ductility of aluminum alloys transformed from amorphous precursor. The mechanical properties of bulk samples produced by spark-plasma sintering (SPS) of amorphous Al-Ni-Co-Dy powders at temperatures above 673 K are significantly enhanced by in-situ crystallization of nano-scale intermetallic compounds during the SPS process. The spark plasma sintered Al 84 Ni 7 Co 3 Dy 6 bulk specimens exhibit 1433 MPa compressive yield strength and 1773 MPa maximum strength together with 5.6% plastic strain, respectively. The addition of Dy enhances the thermal stability of primary fcc Al in the amorphous Al-TM -RE alloy. The precipitation of intermetallic phases by crystallization of the remaining amorphous matrix plays important role to restrict the growth of the fcc Al phase and contributes to the improvement of the mechanical properties. Such fully crystalline nano- or ultrafine-scale Al-Ni-Co-Dy systems are considered promising for industrial application because their superior mechanical properties in terms of a combination of very high room temperature strength combined with good ductility.

  8. Acquisition of a Modified Suction Casting Instrument for the Fabrication of Radiation Tolerant Bulk nNanostructured Metallic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-13

    Cu/ Nb films”, Philos. Mag., 84, 1021-1028, (2004). [23] D. H. Ryan, J. M. D. Coey, “Magnetic properties of iron-rich Fe- Zr glasses”, Phys. Rev. B...2226, (1982). [26] K. Fukamichi, R. J. Gambino, T. R. McGuire, “ Electrical resistivity and Hall effect in FeZr amorphous sputtered films”, J. Appl...fabricate several bulk nanostructured metallic materials. In particular we fabricated bulk nanostructured Fe- Zr alloys via suction casting technique. The as

  9. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  10. Preparation, glass forming ability, crystallization and deformation of (zirconium, hafnium)-copper-nickel-aluminum-titanium-based bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaofeng

    Multicomponent Zr-based bulk metallic glasses are the most promising metallic glass forming systems. They exhibit great glass forming ability and fascinating mechanical properties, and thus are considered as potential structural materials. One potential application is that they could be replacements of the depleted uranium for making kinetic energy armor-piercing projectiles, but the density of existing Zr-based alloys is too low for this application. Based on the chemical and crystallographic similarities between Zr and Hf, we have developed two series of bulk metallic glasses with compositions of (HfxZr1-x) 52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 and (HfxZr1-x) 57Cu20Ni8Al10Ti5 ( x = 0--1) by gradually replacing Zr by Hf. Remarkably increased density and improved mechanical properties have been achieved in these alloys. In these glasses, Hf and Zr play an interchangeable role in determining the short range order. Although the glass forming ability decreases continuously with Hf addition, most of these alloys remain bulk glass-forming. Recently, nanocomposites produced from bulk metallic glasses have attracted wide attention due to improved mechanical properties. However, their crystalline microstructure (the grain size and the crystalline volume fraction) has to be optimized. We have investigated crystallization of (Zr, Hf)-based bulk metallic glasses, including the composition dependence of crystallization paths and crystallization mechanisms. Our results indicate that the formation of high number density nanocomposites from bulk metallic glasses can be attributed to easy nucleation and slowing-down growth processes, while the multistage crystallization behavior makes it more convenient to control the microstructure evolution. Metallic glasses are known to exhibit unique plastic deformation behavior. At low temperature and high stress, plastic flow is localized in narrow shear bands. Macroscopic investigations of shear bands (e.g., chemical etching) suggest that the internal

  11. The Amorphous Composition of Three Mudstone Samples from Gale Crater: Implications for Weathering and Diagenetic Processes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Bristow, T. F.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Morrison, S. M.; Sutter, B.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is exploring the lowermost formation of Gale crater's central mound. Within this formation, three samples named Marimba, Quela, and Sebina have been analyzed by the CheMin X-ray diffractometer and the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) to determine mineralogy and bulk elemental chemistry, respectively. Marimba and Quela were also analyzed by the SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) instrument to characterize the type and abundance of volatile phases detected in evolved gas analyses (EGA). CheMin data show similar proportions of plagioclase, hematite, and Ca-sulfates along with a mixture of di- and trioctahedral smectites at abundances of approximately 28, approximately 16, and approximately 18 wt% for Marimba, Quela, and Sebina. Approximately 50 wt% of each mudstone is comprised of X-ray amorphous and trace crystalline phases present below the CheMin detection limit (approximately 1 wt%). APXS measurements reveal a distinct bulk elemental chemistry that cannot be attributed to the clay mineral variation alone indicating a variable amorphous phase assemblage exists among the three mudstones. To explore the amorphous component, the calculated amorphous composition and SAM EGA results are used to identify amorphous phases unique to each mudstone. For example, the amorphous fraction of Marimba has twice the FeO wt% compared to Quela and Sebina yet, SAM EGA data show no evidence for Fe-sulfates. These data imply that Fe must reside in alternate Fe-bearing amorphous phases (e.g., nanophase iron oxides, ferrihydrite, etc.). Constraining the composition, abundances, and proposed identity of the amorphous fraction provides an opportunity to speculate on the past physical, chemical, and/or diagenetic processes which produced such phases in addition to sediment sources, lake chemistry, and the broader geologic history of Gale crater.

  12. Models for Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sourabh

    Many species e.g. sea urchin form amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phases that subsequently transform into crystalline CaCO3. It is certainly possible that the biogenic ACC might have more than 10 wt% Mg and ˜3 wt% of water. The structure of ACC and the mechanisms by which it transforms to crystalline phase are still poorly understood. In this dissertation our goal is to determine an atomic structure model that is consistent with diffraction and IR measurements of ACC. For this purpose a calcite supercell with 24 formula units, containing 120 atoms, was constructed. Various configurations with substitution of Ca by 6 Mg ions (6 wt.%) and insertion of 3-5 H 2O molecules (2.25-3.75 wt.%) in the interstitial positions of the supercell, were relaxed using a robust density function code VASP. The most noticeable effects were the tilts of CO3 groups and the distortion of Ca sub-lattice, especially in the hydrated case. The distributions of Ca-Ca nearest neighbor distance and CO3 tilts were extracted from various configurations. The same methods were also applied to aragonite. Sampling from the calculated distortion distributions, we built models for amorphous calcite/aragonite of size ˜ 1700 nm3 based on a multi-scale modeling scheme. We used these models to generate diffraction patterns and profiles with our diffraction code. We found that the induced distortions were not enough to generate a diffraction profile typical of an amorphous material. We then studied the diffraction profiles from several nano-crystallites as recent studies suggest that ACC might be a random array of nano-cryatallites. It was found that the generated diffraction profile from a nano-crystallite of size ˜ 2 nm3 is similar to that from the ACC.

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of binary Cu64Zr36 bulk metallic glass: Validation of the cluster-plus-glue-atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Zhang, Chong; Wang, Lu; Zhao, JiJun; Dong, Chuang; Wen, Bin; Wang, Qing

    2011-06-01

    We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of Cu64Zr36 alloy at descending temperatures (from 2000 K to 400 K) and discussed the evolution of short-range order with temperature. The pair-correlation functions, coordination numbers, and chemical compositions of the most abundant local clusters have been analyzed. We found that icosahedral short-range order exists in the liquid, undercooled, and glass states, and it becomes dominant in the glass states. Moreover, we demonstrated the existence of Cu-centered Cu8Zr5 icosahedral clusters as the major local structural unit in the Cu64Zr36 amorphous alloy. This finding agrees well with our previous cluster model of Cu-Zr-based BMG as well as experimental evidences from synchrotron x ray and neutron diffraction measurements.

  14. Influence of thin-film metallic glass coating on fatigue behavior of bulk metallic glass: Experiments and finite element modeling

    SciT

    Yu, Chia-Chi; Chu, Jinn P.; Jia, Haoling

    In this paper, a coating of the Zr-based thin-film metallic glass (TFMG) was deposited on the Zr 50Cu 30Al 10Ni 10 bulk metallic glass (BMG) to investigate shear-band evolution under four-point-bend fatigue testing. The fatigue endurance-limit of the TFMG-coated samples is ~ 33% higher than that of the BMG. The results of finite-element modeling (FEM) revealed a delay in the shear-band nucleation and propagation in TFMG-coated samples under applied cyclic-loading. The FEM study of spherical indentation showed that the redistribution of stress by the TFMG coating prevents localized shear-banding in the BMG substrate. Finally, the enhanced fatigue characteristics of themore » BMG substrates can be attributed to the TFMG coatings retarding shear-band initiation at defects on the surface of the BMG.« less

  15. Influence of thin-film metallic glass coating on fatigue behavior of bulk metallic glass: Experiments and finite element modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Chia-Chi; Chu, Jinn P.; Jia, Haoling; ...

    2017-03-21

    In this paper, a coating of the Zr-based thin-film metallic glass (TFMG) was deposited on the Zr 50Cu 30Al 10Ni 10 bulk metallic glass (BMG) to investigate shear-band evolution under four-point-bend fatigue testing. The fatigue endurance-limit of the TFMG-coated samples is ~ 33% higher than that of the BMG. The results of finite-element modeling (FEM) revealed a delay in the shear-band nucleation and propagation in TFMG-coated samples under applied cyclic-loading. The FEM study of spherical indentation showed that the redistribution of stress by the TFMG coating prevents localized shear-banding in the BMG substrate. Finally, the enhanced fatigue characteristics of themore » BMG substrates can be attributed to the TFMG coatings retarding shear-band initiation at defects on the surface of the BMG.« less

  16. Phobos: Observed bulk properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pätzold, Martin; Andert, Tom; Jacobson, Robert; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Dehant, Véronique

    2014-11-01

    This work is a review of the mass determinations of the Mars moon Phobos by spacecraft close flybys, by solving for the Martian gravity field and by the analysis of secular orbit perturbations. The absolute value and accuracy is sensitive on the knowledge and accuracy of the Phobos ephemeris, of the spacecraft orbit, other perturbing forces acting on the spacecraft and the resolution of the Martian gravity field besides the measurement accuracy of the radio tracking data. The mass value and its error improved from spacecraft mission to mission or from the modern analysis of “old” tracking data but these solutions depend on the accuracy of the ephemeris at the time of observation. The mass value seems to settle within the range of GMPh=(7.11±0.09)×10-4 km3 s-2 which covers almost all mass values from close flybys and “distant” encounters within its 3-σ error (1.5%). Using the volume value determined from MEX HRSC imaging, the bulk density is (1873±31) kg m-3 (3-σ error or 1.7%), a low value which suggests that Phobos is either highly porous, is composed partially of light material or both. The determination of the gravity coefficients C20 and C22 from the Mars Express 2010 close flyby does not allow to draw conclusion on the internal structure. The large errors do not distinguish whether Phobos is homogeneous or not. In view of theories of the Phobos' origin, one possibility is that Phobos is not a captured asteroid but accreted from a debris disk in Mars orbit as a second generation solar system object.

  17. Characterization of Two Distinct Amorphous Forms of Valsartan by Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Skotnicki, Marcin; Apperley, David C; Aguilar, Juan A; Milanowski, Bartłomiej; Pyda, Marek; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-01-04

    Valsartan (VAL) is an antihypertensive drug marketed in an amorphous form. Amorphous materials can have different physicochemical properties depending on preparation method, thermal history, etc., but the nature of such materials is difficult to study by diffraction techniques. This study characterizes two different amorphous forms of valsartan (AR and AM) using solid-state NMR (SSNMR) as a primary investigation tool, supported by solution-state NMR, FT-IR, TMDSC, and dissolution tests. The two forms are found to be clearly distinct, with a significantly higher level of structural arrangement in the AR form, as observed in (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H SSNMR. (13)C and (15)N NMR indicates that the fully amorphous material (AM) contains an approximately equal ratio of cis-trans conformers about the amide bond, whereas the AR form exists mainly as one conformer, with minor conformational "defects". (1)H ultrafast MAS NMR shows significant differences in the hydrogen bonding involving the tetrazole and acid hydrogens between the two materials, while (15)N NMR shows that both forms exist as a 1,2,3,4-tetrazole tautomer. NMR relaxation times show subtle differences in local and bulk molecular mobility, which can be connected with the glass transition, the stability of the glassy material, and its response to aging. Counterintuitively the fully amorphous material is found to have a significantly lower dissolution rate than the apparently more ordered AR material.

  18. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  19. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  20. Computer simulation of the matrix-inclusion interphase in bulk metallic glass based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotin, V.; Hermann, H.; Eckert, J.

    2011-10-01

    Atomistic models for matrix-inclusion systems are generated. Analyses of the systems show that interphase layers of finite thickness appear interlinking the surface of the nanocrystalline inclusion and the embedding amorphous matrix. In a first approximation, the interphase is characterized as an amorphous structure with a density slightly reduced compared to that of the matrix. This result holds for both monatomic hard sphere systems and a Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 alloy simulated by molecular dynamics (MD). The elastic shear and bulk modulus of the interphase are calculated by simulated deformation of the MD systems. Both moduli diminish with decreasing density but the shear modulus is more sensitive against density reduction by one order of magnitude. This result explains recent observations of shear band initiation at the amorphous-crystalline interface during plastic deformation.

  1. Amorphous-Metal-Film Diffusion Barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporation of N into Ni/W films reduces reactivity with Si substrate. Paper describes reactions between Si substrates and deposited amorphous Ni/W or Ni/N/W films. Thermal stability of amorphous Ni/W films as diffusion barriers in Si markedly improved by introduction of N into Ni/W films during deposition.

  2. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  3. Method of making amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1982-01-01

    The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a low molecular weight (e.g., 1000-5000) thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  4. Electron beam recrystallization of amorphous semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of crystalline films of silicon, germanium, and cadmium sulfide on substrates of plastic and glass were investigated. Amorphous films of germanium, silicon, and cadmium sulfide on amorphous substrates of glass and plastic were converted to the crystalline condition by electron bombardment.

  5. Tritiated amorphous silicon for micropower applications

    SciT

    Kherani, N.P.; Kosteski, T.; Zukotynski, S.

    1995-10-01

    The application of tritiated amorphous silicon as an intrinsic energy conversion semiconductor for radioluminescent structures and betavoltaic devices is presented. Theoretical analysis of the betavoltaic application shows an overall efficiency of 18% for tritiated amorphous silicon. This is equivalent to a 330 Ci intrinsic betavoltaic device producing 1 mW of power for 12 years. Photoluminescence studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, a-Si:H, show emission in the infra-red with a maximum quantum efficiency of 7.2% at 50 K; this value drops by 3 orders of magnitude at a temperature of 300 K. Similar studies of hydrogenated amorphous carbon show emission in themore » visible with an estimated quantum efficiency of 1% at 300 K. These results suggest that tritiated amorphous carbon may be the more promising candidate for room temperature radioluminescence in the visible. 18 refs., 5 figs.« less

  6. Solid-state diffusion in amorphous zirconolite

    SciT

    Yang, C.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-11-14

    We discuss how structural disorder and amorphization affect solid-state diffusion, and consider zirconolite as a currently important case study. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we disentangle the effects of amorphization and density, and show that a profound increase of solid-state diffusion takes place as a result of amorphization. Importantly, this can take place at the same density as in the crystal, representing an interesting general insight regarding solid-state diffusion. We find that decreasing the density in the amorphous system increases pre-factors of diffusion constants, but does not change the activation energy in the density range considered. We also findmore » that atomic species in zirconolite are affected differently by amorphization and density change. Our microscopic insights are relevant for understanding how solid-state diffusion changes due to disorder and for building predictive models of operation of materials to be used to encapsulate nuclear waste.« less

  7. NREL/industry interaction: Amorphous silicon alloy research team formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luft, Werner

    1994-06-01

    The low material cost and proven manufacturability of amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy photovoltaic technology make it ideally suited for large-scale terrestrial applications. The present efficiency of a-Si alloy modules is, however, much lower than the 15% stable efficiency that would lead to significant penetration of the electric utility bulk-power market. The slow progress in achieving high stabilized a-Si alloy module efficiencies may in part be attributed to the fact that only in the last few years did we emphasize stable efficiencies. A mission-focused integrated effort among the a-Si PV industry, universities, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) would help. To foster research integration, NREL has established four research teams with significant industry participation. In the 11 months since the research team formation, a close interaction among the a-Si PV industry, universities, and NREL has been achieved and has resulted in mission-directed research.

  8. A comparison of the amorphization of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) and aluminosilicate zeolites by ball-milling.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Emma F; Bennett, Thomas D; Cairns, Andrew B; Brownbill, Nick J; Goodwin, Andrew L; Keen, David A; Chater, Philip A; Blanc, Frédéric; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2016-03-14

    X-ray diffraction has been used to investigate the kinetics of amorphization through ball-milling at 20 Hz, for five zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) - ZIF-8, ZIF-4, ZIF-zni, BIF-1-Li and CdIF-1. We find that the rates of amorphization for the zinc-containing ZIFs increase with increasing solvent accessible volume (SAV) in the sequence ZIF-8 > ZIF-4 > ZIF-zni. The Li-B analogue of the dense ZIF-zni amorphizes more slowly than the corresponding zinc phase, with the behaviour showing a correlation with their relative bulk moduli and SAVs. The cadmium analogue of ZIF-8 (CdIF-1) amorphizes more rapidly than the zinc counterpart, which we ascribe primarily to its relatively weak M-N bonds as well as the higher SAV. The results for the ZIFs are compared to three classical zeolites - Na-X, Na-Y and ZSM-5 - with these taking up to four times longer to amorphize. The presence of adsorbed solvent in the pores is found to render both ZIF and zeolite frameworks more resistant to amorphization. X-ray total scattering measurements show that amorphous ZIF-zni is structurally indistinguishable from amorphous ZIF-4 with both structures retaining the same short-range order that is present in their crystalline precursors. By contrast, both X-ray total scattering measurements and (113)Cd NMR measurements point to changes in the local environment of amorphous CdIF-1 compared with its crystalline CdIF-1 precursor.

  9. Effect of Sn addition on glassy Si-Te bulk sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanna, Jagannatha K.; Roy, Diptoshi; Varma, Sreevidya G.; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Das, Chandasree

    2018-05-01

    Bulk Si20Te79Sn1 glass is prepared by melt-quenching method, amorphous nature of the as-quenched glass is confirmed by XRD. I-V characteristics reveals that Si20Te79Sn1 bulk sample exhibits threshold type electrical switching behavior. The thermal parameters such as crystallization temperature, glass transition temperature are obtained using differential scanning calorimetry. The crystalline peak study of the sample annealed at crystallization temperature for 2 hr shows that the Sn atom interact with Si or Te but do not interact with the Si-Te matrix in a greater extent and it forms a separate phase network individually.

  10. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  11. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  12. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  13. Nonlinear optical imaging for sensitive detection of crystals in bulk amorphous powders.

    PubMed

    Kestur, Umesh S; Wanapun, Duangporn; Toth, Scott J; Wegiel, Lindsay A; Simpson, Garth J; Taylor, Lynne S

    2012-11-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of second-order nonlinear imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC) to quantify crystallinity in drug-polymer blends, including solid dispersions. Second harmonic generation (SHG) can potentially exhibit scaling with crystallinity between linear and quadratic depending on the nature of the source, and thus, it is important to determine the response of pharmaceutical powders. Physical mixtures containing different proportions of crystalline naproxen and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) were prepared by blending and a dispersion was produced by solvent evaporation. A custom-built SONICC instrument was used to characterize the SHG intensity as a function of the crystalline drug fraction in the various samples. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used as complementary methods known to exhibit linear scaling. SONICC was able to detect crystalline drug even in the presence of 99.9 wt % HPMCAS in the binary mixtures. The calibration curve revealed a linear dynamic range with a R(2) value of 0.99 spanning the range from 0.1 to 100 wt % naproxen with a root mean square error of prediction of 2.7%. Using the calibration curve, the errors in the validation samples were in the range of 5%-10%. Analysis of a 75 wt % HPMCAS-naproxen solid dispersion with SONICC revealed the presence of crystallites at an earlier time point than could be detected with PXRD and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, results from the crystallization kinetics experiment using SONICC were in good agreement with Raman spectroscopy and PXRD. In conclusion, SONICC has been found to be a sensitive technique for detecting low levels (0.1% or lower) of crystallinity, even in the presence of large quantities of a polymer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Peculiarities of Vibration Characteristics of Amorphous Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gets, Kirill V.; Subbotin, Oleg S.; Belosludov, Vladimir R.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamic properties of low (LDA), high (HDA) and very high (VHDA) density amorphous ices were investigated within the approach based on Lattice Dynamics simulations. In this approach, we assume that the short-range molecular order mainly determines the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of amorphous ices. Simulation cell of 512 water molecules with periodical boundary conditions and disordering allows us to study dynamical properties and dispersion curves in the Brillouin zone of pseudo-crystal. Existence of collective phenomena in amorphous ices which is usual for crystals but anomalous for disordered phase was confirmed in our simulations. Molecule amplitudes of delocalized (collective) as well as localized vibrations have been considered.

  15. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  16. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states.

  17. Irradiation and Thermal Annealing Effects in Amorphous Magnetic Alloys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David G.

    Irradiation with protons, electrons, and alpha particles produces effects in amorphous magnetic alloys (Fe(,x)Ni(,80)P(,20-y)B(,y), where x was 20, 27, 34, or 40 and y was either 6 or 20) that appear analogous to effects produced by thermal annealing. The work presented in this dissertation represents an extension of work performed by Franz('(1)) and/or Donnelly.('(2)) The work of Franz, Donnelly, and this author has been a coordinated investigation into various aspects of radiation damage and thermal annealing effects in the above-mentioned amorphous alloys' magnetic properties. Upon either irradiation or thermal annealing, the Curie temperature, T(,c), is enhanced in these alloys. Also the relative permeability, (mu)(,r), is raised as much as seven-fold. Electrolytic layer removal experiments on proton-irradiated (0.25-MeV) samples conclusively demonstrate that the particle irradiation does not merely heat the sample bulk. Annealing studies performed on both irradiated and as-quenched samples suggested, via T(,c) measurement, that a structural relaxation process had taken place. The structural relaxation takes place as a result of a macroscopic heating in the case of the annealed samples and it is postulated that the structural relaxation takes place as a result of a miroscopic heating about the particle track (thermal spike mechanism) in the case of the irradiated samples. This work also presents preliminary results concerning the influence of irradiation and thermal annealing on the crystallization process in these alloys. The results of DSC and electrical resistivity (above room temperature) are presented. Using electrical resistivity as an indicator, a series of isothermal recrystallization measurements were performed using samples of 2.25-MeV proton-irradiated, 200(DEGREES)C-annealed, and as-quenched Fe(,20)Ni(,60)P(,14)B(,6). The activation energy for the onset of recrystallization is 2.0 eV for as-quenched samples and is 5.3 eV for the irradiated and

  18. Pressure-induced reversible amorphization and an amorphous-amorphous transition in Ge₂Sb₂Te₅ phase-change memory material.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhimei; Zhou, Jian; Pan, Yuanchun; Song, Zhitang; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-06-28

    Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) is a technologically very important phase-change material that is used in digital versatile disks-random access memory and is currently studied for the use in phase-change random access memory devices. This type of data storage is achieved by the fast reversible phase transition between amorphous and crystalline GST upon heat pulse. Here we report pressure-induced reversible crystalline-amorphous and polymorphic amorphous transitions in NaCl structured GST by ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. We have showed that the onset amorphization of GST starts at approximately 18 GPa and the system become completely random at approximately 22 GPa. This amorphous state has a cubic framework (c-amorphous) of sixfold coordinations. With further increasing pressure, the c-amorphous transforms to a high-density amorphous structure with trigonal framework (t-amorphous) and an average coordination number of eight. The pressure-induced amorphization is investigated to be due to large displacements of Te atoms for which weak Te-Te bonds exist or vacancies are nearby. Upon decompressing to ambient conditions, the original cubic crystalline structure is restored for c-amorphous, whereas t-amorphous transforms to another amorphous phase that is similar to the melt-quenched amorphous GST.

  19. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  20. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Wong, Frank M. G. [Livermore, CA; Haslam, Jeffery J [Livermore, CA; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Lavernia, Enrique J [Davis, CA; Blue, Craig A [Knoxville, TN; Graeve, Olivia A [Reno, NV; Bayles, Robert [Annandale, VA; Perepezko, John H [Madison, WI; Kaufman, Larry [Brookline, MA; Schoenung, Julie [Davis, CA; Ajdelsztajn, Leo [Walnut Creek, CA

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  1. Amorphization strategy affects the stability and supersaturation profile of amorphous drug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Kiew, Tie Yi; Yang, Yue; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2014-05-05

    Amorphous drug nanoparticles have recently emerged as a promising bioavailability enhancement strategy of poorly soluble drugs attributed to the high supersaturation solubility generated by the amorphous state and fast dissolution afforded by the nanoparticles. Herein we examine the effects of two amorphization strategies in the nanoscale, i.e., (1) molecular mobility restrictions and (2) high energy surface occupation, both by polymer excipient stabilizers, on the (i) morphology, (ii) colloidal stability, (iii) drug loading, (iv) amorphous state stability after three-month storage, and (v) in vitro supersaturation profiles, using itraconazole (ITZ) as the model drug. Drug-polyelectrolyte complexation is employed in the first strategy to prepare amorphous ITZ nanoparticles using dextran sulfate as the polyelectrolyte (ITZ nanoplex), while the second strategy employs pH-shift precipitation using hydroxypropylmethylcellulose as the surface stabilizer (nano-ITZ), with both strategies resulting in >90% ITZ utilization. Both amorphous ITZ nanoparticles share similar morphology (∼300 nm spheres) with the ITZ nanoplex exhibiting better colloidal stability, albeit at lower ITZ loading (65% versus 94%), due to the larger stabilizer amount used. The ITZ nanoplex also exhibits superior amorphous state stability, attributed to the ITZ molecular mobility restriction by electrostatic complexation with dextran sulfate. The higher stability, however, is obtained at the expense of slower supersaturation generation, which is maintained over a prolonged period, compared to the nano-ITZ. The present results signify the importance of selecting the optimal amorphization strategy, in addition to formulating the excipient stabilizers, to produce amorphous drug nanoparticles having the desired characteristics.

  2. Toughening Fe-based Amorphous Coatings by Reinforcement of Amorphous Carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Li, Yi-Cheng; Yasir, Muhammad; Wang, Hai-Tao; Liu, Lin

    2017-06-22

    Toughening of Fe-based amorphous coatings meanwhile maintaining a good corrosion resistance remains challenging. This work reports a novel approach to improve the toughness of a FeCrMoCBY amorphous coating through in-situ formation of amorphous carbon reinforcement without reducing the corrosion resistance. The Fe-based composite coating was prepared by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying using a pre-mixed Fe-based amorphous/nylon-11 polymer feedstock powders. The nylon-11 powders were in-situ carbonized to amorphous carbon phase during thermal spraying process, which homogeneously distributed in the amorphous matrix leading to significant enhancement of toughness of the coating. The mechanical properties, including hardness, impact resistance, bending and fatigue strength, were extensively studied by using a series of mechanical testing techniques. The results revealed that the composite coating reinforced by amorphous carbon phase exhibited enhanced impact resistance and nearly twice-higher fatigue strength than that of the monolithic amorphous coating. The enhancement of impact toughness and fatigue properties is owed to the dumping effect of the soft amorphous carbon phase, which alleviated stress concentration and decreased crack propagation driving force.

  3. Amorphous Phases on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ruff, S. W.; Horgan, B.; Dehouck, E.; Achilles, C. N.; Ming, D. W.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Both primary (volcanic/impact glasses) and secondary (opal/silica, allophane, hisingerite, npOx, S-bearing) amorphous phases appear to be major components of martian surface materials based on orbital and in-situ measurements. A key observation is that whereas regional/global scale amorphous components include altered glass and npOx, local scale amorphous phases include hydrated silica/opal. This suggests widespread alteration at low water-to-rock ratios, perhaps due to snow/ice melt with variable pH, and localized alteration at high water-to-rock ratios. Orbital and in-situ measurements of the regional/global amorphous component on Mars suggests that it is made up of at least three phases: npOx, amorphous silicate (likely altered glass), and an amorphous S-bearing phase. Fundamental questions regarding the composition and the formation of the regional/global amorphous component(s) still remain: Do the phases form locally or have they been homogenized through aeolian activity and derived from the global dust? Is the parent glass volcanic, impact, or both? Are the phases separate or intimately mixed (e.g., as in palagonite)? When did the amorphous phases form? To address the question of source (local and/or global), we need to look for variations in the different phases within the amorphous component through continued modeling of the chemical composition of the amorphous phases in samples from Gale using CheMin and APXS data. If we find variations (e.g., a lack of or enrichment in amorphous silicate in some samples), this may imply a local source for some phases. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the weathering products may give insight into the formation mechanisms of the parent glass (e.g., impact glasses contain higher Al and lower Si [30], so we might expect allophane as a weathering product of impact glass). To address the question of whether these phases are separate or intimately mixed, we need to do laboratory studies of naturally altered samples made

  4. Characterization of Zeolite in Zeolite-Geopolymer Hybrid Bulk Materials Derived from Kaolinitic Clays

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Hayami; Hashimoto, Shinobu; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Zeolite-geopolymer hybrid materials have been formed when kaolin was used as a starting material. Their characteristics are of interest because they can have a wide pore size distribution with micro- and meso-pores due to the zeolite and geopolymer, respectively. In this study, Zeolite-geopolymer hybrid bulk materials were fabricated using four kinds of kaolinitic clays (a halloysite and three kinds of kaolinite). The kaolinitic clays were first calcined at 700 °C for 3 h to transform into the amorphous aluminosilicate phases. Alkali-activation treatment of the metakaolin yielded bulk materials with different amounts and types of zeolite and different compressive strength. This study investigated the effects of the initial kaolinitic clays on the amount and types of zeolite in the resultant geopolymers as well as the strength of the bulk materials. The kaolinitic clays and their metakaolin were characterized by XRD analysis, chemical composition, crystallite size, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR analysis, and specific surface area measurements. The correlation between the amount of zeolite formed and the compressive strength of the resultant hybrid bulk materials, previously reported by other researchers was not positively observed. In the studied systems, the effects of Si/Al and crystalline size were observed. When the atomic ratio of Si/Al in the starting kaolinitic clays increased, the compressive strength of the hybrid bulk materials increased. The crystallite size of the zeolite in the hybrid bulk materials increased with decreasing compressive strength of the hybrid bulk materials. PMID:28809241

  5. Looking for a bulk point

    SciT

    Maldacena, Juan; Simmons-Duffin, David; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    Here, we consider Lorentzian correlators of local operators. In perturbation theory, singularities occur when we can draw a position-space Landau diagram with null lines. In theories with gravity duals, we can also draw Landau diagrams in the bulk. We also argue that certain singularities can arise only from bulk diagrams, not from boundary diagrams. As has been previously observed, these singularities are a clear diagnostic of bulk locality. We analyze some properties of these perturbative singularities and discuss their relation to the OPE and the dimensions of double-trace operators. In the exact nonperturbative theory, we expect no singularity at thesemore » locations. Finally, we prove this statement in 1+1 dimensions by CFT methods.« less

  6. Looking for a bulk point

    DOE PAGES

    Maldacena, Juan; Simmons-Duffin, David; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2017-01-03

    Here, we consider Lorentzian correlators of local operators. In perturbation theory, singularities occur when we can draw a position-space Landau diagram with null lines. In theories with gravity duals, we can also draw Landau diagrams in the bulk. We also argue that certain singularities can arise only from bulk diagrams, not from boundary diagrams. As has been previously observed, these singularities are a clear diagnostic of bulk locality. We analyze some properties of these perturbative singularities and discuss their relation to the OPE and the dimensions of double-trace operators. In the exact nonperturbative theory, we expect no singularity at thesemore » locations. Finally, we prove this statement in 1+1 dimensions by CFT methods.« less

  7. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  8. Using containerless methods to develop amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Benmore, C J; Suthar, K J; Tamalonis, A J; Alderman, O L G; Sendelbach, S; Kondev, V; Yarger, J; Rey, C A; Byrn, S R

    2017-01-01

    Many pipeline drugs have low solubility in their crystalline state and require compounding in special dosage forms to increase bioavailability for oral administration. The use of amorphous formulations increases solubility and uptake of active pharmaceutical ingredients. These forms are rapidly gaining commercial importance for both pre-clinical and clinical use. Synthesis of amorphous drugs was performed using an acoustic levitation containerless processing method and spray drying. The structure of the products was investigated using in-situ high energy X-ray diffraction. Selected solvents for processing drugs were investigated using acoustic levitation. The stability of amorphous samples was measured using X-ray diffraction. Samples processed using both spray drying and containerless synthesis were compared. We review methods for making amorphous pharmaceuticals and present data on materials made by containerless processing and spray drying. It was shown that containerless processing using acoustic levitation can be used to make phase-pure forms of drugs that are known to be difficult to amorphize. The stability and structure of the materials was investigated in the context of developing and making clinically useful formulations. Amorphous compounds are emerging as an important component of drug development and for the oral delivery of drugs with low solubility. Containerless techniques can be used to efficiently synthesize small quantities of pure amorphous forms that are potentially useful in pre-clinical trials and for use in the optimization of clinical products. Developing new pharmaceutical products is an essential enterprise to improve patient outcomes. The development and application of amorphous pharmaceuticals to increase absorption is rapidly gaining importance and it provides opportunities for breakthrough research on new drugs. There is an urgent need to solve problems associated with making formulations that are both stable and that provide high

  9. Picosecond Electronic Relaxations In Amorphous Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauc, Jan

    1983-11-01

    Using the pump and probe technique the relaxation processes of photogenerated carriers in amorphous tetrahedral semiconductors and chalcogenide glasses in the time domain from 0.5 Ps to 1.4 ns have been studied. The results obtained on the following phenomena are reviewed: hot carrier thermalization in amorphous silicon; trapping of carriers in undoped a-Si:H; trapping of carriers in deep traps produced by doping; geminate recombination in As2S3-xSex glasses.

  10. Heterogeneous water oxidation: surface activity versus amorphization activation in cobalt phosphate catalysts.

    PubMed

    González-Flores, Diego; Sánchez, Irene; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Klingan, Katharina; Heidkamp, Jonathan; Chernev, Petko; Menezes, Prashanth W; Driess, Matthias; Dau, Holger; Montero, Mavis L

    2015-02-16

    Is water oxidation catalyzed at the surface or within the bulk volume of solid oxide materials? This question is addressed for cobalt phosphate catalysts deposited on inert electrodes, namely crystallites of pakhomovskyite (Co3(PO4)2⋅8 H2O, Pak) and phosphate-containing Co oxide (CoCat). X-ray spectroscopy reveals that oxidizing potentials transform the crystalline Pak slowly (5-8 h) but completely into the amorphous CoCat. Electrochemical analysis supports high-TOF surface activity in Pak, whereas its amorphization results in dominating volume activity of the thereby formed CoCat material. In the directly electrodeposited CoCat, volume catalysis prevails, but not at very low levels of the amorphous material, implying high-TOF catalysis at surface sites. A complete picture of heterogeneous water oxidation requires insight in catalysis at the electrolyte-exposed "outer surface", within a hydrated, amorphous volume phase, and modes and kinetics of restructuring upon operation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Phase transitions of amorphous solid acetone in confined geometry investigated by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sunghwan; Kang, Hani; Kim, Jun Soo; Kang, Heon

    2014-11-26

    We investigated the phase transformations of amorphous solid acetone under confined geometry by preparing acetone films trapped in amorphous solid water (ASW) or CCl4. Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) were used to monitor the phase changes of the acetone sample with increasing temperature. An acetone film trapped in ASW shows an abrupt change in the RAIRS features of the acetone vibrational bands during heating from 80 to 100 K, which indicates the transformation of amorphous solid acetone to a molecularly aligned crystalline phase. Further heating of the sample to 140 K produces an isotropic solid phase, and eventually a fluid phase near 157 K, at which the acetone sample is probably trapped in a pressurized, superheated condition inside the ASW matrix. Inside a CCl4 matrix, amorphous solid acetone crystallizes into a different, isotropic structure at ca. 90 K. We propose that the molecularly aligned crystalline phase formed in ASW is created by heterogeneous nucleation at the acetone-water interface, with resultant crystal growth, whereas the isotropic crystalline phase in CCl4 is formed by homogeneous crystal growth starting from the bulk region of the acetone sample.

  12. Influence of density and environmental factors on decomposition kinetics of amorphous polylactide - Reactive molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Mlyniec, A; Ekiert, M; Morawska-Chochol, A; Uhl, T

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of the surrounding environment and the initial density on the decomposition kinetics of polylactide (PLA). The decomposition of the amorphous PLA was investigated by means of reactive molecular dynamics simulations. A computational model simulates the decomposition of PLA polymer inside the bulk, due to the assumed lack of removal of reaction products from the polymer matrix. We tracked the temperature dependency of the water and carbon monoxide production to extract the activation energy of thermal decomposition of PLA. We found that an increased density results in decreased activation energy of decomposition by about 50%. Moreover, initiation of decomposition of the amorphous PLA is followed by a rapid decline in activation energy caused by reaction products which accelerates the hydrolysis of esters. The addition of water molecules decreases initial energy of activation as well as accelerates the decomposition process. Additionally, we have investigated the dependency of density on external loading. Comparison of pressures needed to obtain assumed densities shows that this relationship is bilinear and the slope changes around a density equal to 1.3g/cm(3). The conducted analyses provide an insight into the thermal decomposition process of the amorphous phase of PLA, which is particularly susceptible to decomposition in amorphous and semi-crystalline PLA polymers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Can amorphization take place in nanoscale interconnects?

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Joshi, K L; van Duin, A C T; Haque, M A

    2012-03-09

    The trend of miniaturization has highlighted the problems of heat dissipation and electromigration in nanoelectronic device interconnects, but not amorphization. While amorphization is known to be a high pressure and/or temperature phenomenon, we argue that defect density is the key factor, while temperature and pressure are only the means. For nanoscale interconnects carrying modest current density, large vacancy concentrations may be generated without the necessity of high temperature or pressure due to the large fraction of grain boundaries and triple points. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) experiments on 200 nm thick (80 nm average grain size) aluminum specimens. Electron diffraction patterns indicate partial amorphization at modest current density of about 10(5) A cm(-2), which is too low to trigger electromigration. Since amorphization results in drastic decrease in mechanical ductility as well as electrical and thermal conductivity, further increase in current density to about 7 × 10(5) A cm(-2) resulted in brittle fracture failure. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations predict the formation of amorphous regions in response to large mechanical stresses (due to nanoscale grain size) and excess vacancies at the cathode side of the thin films. The findings of this study suggest that amorphization can precede electromigration and thereby play a vital role in the reliability of micro/nanoelectronic devices.

  14. Quantum confinement of nanocrystals within amorphous matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusk, Mark T.; Collins, Reuben T.; Nourbakhsh, Zahra; Akbarzadeh, Hadi

    2014-02-01

    Nanocrystals encapsulated within an amorphous matrix are computationally analyzed to quantify the degree to which the matrix modifies the nature of their quantum-confinement power—i.e., the relationship between nanocrystal size and the gap between valence- and conduction-band edges. A special geometry allows exactly the same amorphous matrix to be applied to nanocrystals of increasing size to precisely quantify changes in confinement without the noise typically associated with encapsulating structures that are different for each nanocrystal. The results both explain and quantify the degree to which amorphous matrices redshift the character of quantum confinement. The character of this confinement depends on both the type of encapsulating material and the separation distance between the nanocrystals within it. Surprisingly, the analysis also identifies a critical nanocrystal threshold below which quantum confinement is not possible—a feature unique to amorphous encapsulation. Although applied to silicon nanocrystals within an amorphous silicon matrix, the methodology can be used to accurately analyze the confinement softening of other amorphous systems as well.

  15. Radiation-Induced Amorphization of Crystalline Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fama, M.; Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    We study radiation-induced amorphization of crystalline ice, ana lyzing the resu lts of three decades of experiments with a variety of projectiles, irradiation energy, and ice temperature, finding a similar trend of increasing resistance of amorphization with temperature and inconsistencies in results from different laboratories. We discuss the temperature dependence of amorphization in terms of the 'thermal spike' model. We then discuss the common use of the 1.65 micrometer infrared absorption band of water as a measure of degree of crystallinity, an increasingly common procedure to analyze remote sensing data of astronomical icy bodies. The discussion is based on new, high quality near-infrared refl ectance absorption spectra measured between 1.4 and 2.2 micrometers for amorphous and crystalline ices irradiated with 225 keV protons at 80 K. We found that, after irradiation with 10(exp 15) protons per square centimeter, crystalline ice films thinner than the ion range become fully amorphous, and that the infrared absorption spectra show no significant changes upon further irradiation. The complete amorphization suggests that crystalline ice observed in the outer Solar System, including trans-neptunian objects, may results from heat from internal sources or from the impact of icy meteorites or comets.

  16. Increasing Ti-6Al-4V brazed joint strength equal to the base metal by Ti and Zr amorphous filler alloys

    SciT

    Ganjeh, E., E-mail: navidganjehie@sina.kntu.ac.ir; Sarkhosh, H.; Bajgholi, M.E.

    Microstructural features developed along with mechanical properties in furnace brazing of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using STEMET 1228 (Ti-26.8Zr-13Ni-13.9Cu, wt.%) and STEMET 1406 (Zr-9.7Ti-12.4Ni-11.2Cu, wt.%) amorphous filler alloys. Brazing temperatures employed were 900-950 Degree-Sign C for the titanium-based filler and 900-990 Degree-Sign C for the zirconium-based filler alloys, respectively. The brazing time durations were 600, 1200 and 1800 s. The brazed joints were evaluated by ultrasonic test, and their microstructures and phase constitutions analyzed by metallography, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since microstructural evolution across the furnace brazed joints primarily depends on their alloying elements such as Cu, Ni andmore » Zr along the joint. Accordingly, existence of Zr{sub 2}Cu, Ti{sub 2}Cu and (Ti,Zr){sub 2}Ni intermetallic compounds was identified in the brazed joints. The chemical composition of segregation region in the center of brazed joints was identical to virgin filler alloy content which greatly deteriorated the shear strength of the joints. Adequate brazing time (1800 s) and/or temperature (950 Degree-Sign C for Ti-based and 990 Degree-Sign C for Zr-based) resulted in an acicular Widmanstaetten microstructure throughout the entire joint section due to eutectoid reaction. This microstructure increased the shear strength of the brazed joints up to the Ti-6Al-4V tensile strength level. Consequently, Ti-6Al-4V can be furnace brazed by Ti and Zr base foils produced excellent joint strengths. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature or time was the main factors of controlling braze joint strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing a Widmanstaetten microstructure generates equal strength to base metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brittle intermetallic compounds like (Ti,Zr){sub 2}Ni/Cu deteriorate shear strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti and Zr base filler alloys were the best choice for

  17. Dynamic fracture instability of tough bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J. X.; Ling, Z.; Jiang, M. Q.; Zhang, H. S.; Dai, L. H.

    2008-04-01

    We report the observations of a clear fractographic evolution from vein pattern, dimple structure, and then to periodic corrugation structure, followed by microbranching pattern, along the crack propagation direction in the dynamic fracture of a tough Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (Vit.1) bulk metallic glass (BMGs) under high-velocity plate impact. A model based on fracture surface energy dissipation and void growth is proposed to characterize this fracture pattern transition. We find that once the dynamic crack propagation velocity reaches a critical fraction of Rayleigh wave speed, the crack instability occurs; hence, crack microbranching goes ahead. Furthermore, the correlation between the critical velocity of amorphous materials and their intrinsic strength such as Young's modulus is uncovered. The results may shed new insight into dynamic fracture instability for BMGs.

  18. 7 CFR 201.40 - Bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Sampling in the Administration of the Act § 201.40 Bulk. Bulk seeds or screenings shall be sampled by inserting a long probe or thrusting the hand into the bulk as circumstances require in at least seven... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bulk. 201.40 Section 201.40 Agriculture Regulations of...

  19. 7 CFR 201.40 - Bulk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Sampling in the Administration of the Act § 201.40 Bulk. Bulk seeds or screenings shall be sampled by inserting a long probe or thrusting the hand into the bulk as circumstances require in at least seven... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bulk. 201.40 Section 201.40 Agriculture Regulations of...

  20. Bulk viscosity of molecular fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Frederike; Matar, Omar K.; Müller, Erich A.

    2018-05-01

    The bulk viscosity of molecular models of gases and liquids is determined by molecular simulations as a combination of a dilute gas contribution, arising due to the relaxation of internal degrees of freedom, and a configurational contribution, due to the presence of intermolecular interactions. The dilute gas contribution is evaluated using experimental data for the relaxation times of vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. The configurational part is calculated using Green-Kubo relations for the fluctuations of the pressure tensor obtained from equilibrium microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. As a benchmark, the Lennard-Jones fluid is studied. Both atomistic and coarse-grained force fields for water, CO2, and n-decane are considered and tested for their accuracy, and where possible, compared to experimental data. The dilute gas contribution to the bulk viscosity is seen to be significant only in the cases when intramolecular relaxation times are in the μs range, and for low vibrational wave numbers (<1000 cm-1); This explains the abnormally high values of bulk viscosity reported for CO2. In all other cases studied, the dilute gas contribution is negligible and the configurational contribution dominates the overall behavior. In particular, the configurational term is responsible for the enhancement of the bulk viscosity near the critical point.

  1. Amorphous Ge quantum dots embedded in crystalline Si: ab initio results.

    PubMed

    Laubscher, M; Küfner, S; Kroll, P; Bechstedt, F

    2015-10-14

    We study amorphous Ge quantum dots embedded in a crystalline Si matrix through structure modeling and simulation using ab initio density functional theory including spin-orbit interaction and quasiparticle effects. Three models are generated by replacing a spherical region within diamond Si by Ge atoms and creating a disordered bond network with appropriate density inside the Ge quantum dot. After total-energy optimisations of the atomic geometry we compute the electronic and optical properties. We find three major effects: (i) the resulting nanostructures adopt a type-I heterostructure character; (ii) the lowest optical transitions occur only within the Ge quantum dots, and do not involve or cross the Ge-Si interface. (iii) for larger amorphous Ge quantum dots, with diameters of about 2.0 and 2.7 nm, absorption peaks appear in the mid-infrared spectral region. These are promising candidates for intense luminescence at photon energies below the gap energy of bulk Ge.

  2. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    DOEpatents

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  3. Feasibility of using bulk metallic glass for self-expandable stent applications.

    PubMed

    Praveen Kumar, Gideon; Jafary-Zadeh, Mehdi; Tavakoli, Rouhollah; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-10-01

    Self-expandable stents are widely used to restore blood flow in a diseased artery segment by keeping the artery open after angioplasty. Despite the prevalent use of conventional crystalline metallic alloys, for example, nitinol, to construct self-expandable stents, new biomaterials such as bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are being actively pursued to improve stent performance. Here, we conducted a series of analyses including finite element analysis and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the feasibility of using a prototypical Zr-based BMG for self-expandable stent applications. We model stent crimping of several designs for different percutaneous applications. Our results indicate that BMG-based stents with diamond-shaped crowns suffer from severe localization of plastic deformation and abrupt failure during crimping. As a possible solution, we further illustrate that such abrupt failure could be avoided in BMG-based stents without diamond shape crowns. This work would open a new horizon for a quest toward exploiting superior mechanical and functional properties of metallic glasses to design future stents. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1874-1882, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Structure of Liquid and Amorphous Hafnia.

    PubMed

    Gallington, Leighanne C; Ghadar, Yasaman; Skinner, Lawrie B; Weber, J K Richard; Ushakov, Sergey V; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Stan, Marius; Low, John J; Benmore, Chris J

    2017-11-10

    Understanding the atomic structure of amorphous solids is important in predicting and tuning their macroscopic behavior. Here, we use a combination of high-energy X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and molecular dynamics simulations to benchmark the atomic interactions in the high temperature stable liquid and low-density amorphous solid states of hafnia. The diffraction results reveal an average Hf-O coordination number of ~7 exists in both the liquid and amorphous nanoparticle forms studied. The measured pair distribution functions are compared to those generated from several simulation models in the literature. We have also performed ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations that show density has a strong effect on the polyhedral connectivity. The liquid shows a broad distribution of Hf-Hf interactions, while the formation of low-density amorphous nanoclusters can reproduce the sharp split peak in the Hf-Hf partial pair distribution function observed in experiment. The agglomeration of amorphous nanoparticles condensed from the gas phase is associated with the formation of both edge-sharing and corner-sharing HfO 6,7 polyhedra resembling that observed in the monoclinic phase.

  5. The Structure of Liquid and Amorphous Hafnia

    SciT

    Gallington, Leighanne; Ghadar, Yasaman; Skinner, Lawrie

    Understanding the atomic structure of amorphous solids is important in predicting and tuning their macroscopic behavior. Here, we use a combination of high-energy X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and molecular dynamics simulations to benchmark the atomic interactions in the high temperature stable liquid and low-density amorphous solid states of hafnia. The diffraction results reveal an average Hf–O coordination number of ~7 exists in both the liquid and amorphous nanoparticle forms studied. The measured pair distribution functions are compared to those generated from several simulation models in the literature. We have also performed ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations that showmore » density has a strong effect on the polyhedral connectivity. The liquid shows a broad distribution of Hf–Hf interactions, while the formation of low-density amorphous nanoclusters can reproduce the sharp split peak in the Hf–Hf partial pair distribution function observed in experiment. The agglomeration of amorphous nanoparticles condensed from the gas phase is associated with the formation of both edge-sharing and corner-sharing HfO 6,7 polyhedra resembling that observed in the monoclinic phase.« less

  6. The Structure of Liquid and Amorphous Hafnia

    DOE PAGES

    Gallington, Leighanne; Ghadar, Yasaman; Skinner, Lawrie; ...

    2017-11-10

    Understanding the atomic structure of amorphous solids is important in predicting and tuning their macroscopic behavior. Here, we use a combination of high-energy X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and molecular dynamics simulations to benchmark the atomic interactions in the high temperature stable liquid and low-density amorphous solid states of hafnia. The diffraction results reveal an average Hf–O coordination number of ~7 exists in both the liquid and amorphous nanoparticle forms studied. The measured pair distribution functions are compared to those generated from several simulation models in the literature. We have also performed ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations that showmore » density has a strong effect on the polyhedral connectivity. The liquid shows a broad distribution of Hf–Hf interactions, while the formation of low-density amorphous nanoclusters can reproduce the sharp split peak in the Hf–Hf partial pair distribution function observed in experiment. The agglomeration of amorphous nanoparticles condensed from the gas phase is associated with the formation of both edge-sharing and corner-sharing HfO 6,7 polyhedra resembling that observed in the monoclinic phase.« less

  7. Amorphous Silica-Promoted Lysine Dimerization: a Thermodynamic Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Nishiuchi, Kumiko; Nishii, Akari; Fukushi, Keisuke

    2018-03-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played a crucial role in the abiotic polymerization of amino acids that preceded the origin of life. Nevertheless, it remains unclear where the prebiotic process took place on the primitive Earth, because the amino acid-mineral interaction and its dependence on environmental conditions have yet to be understood adequately. Here we examined experimentally the adsorption of L-lysine (Lys) and its dimer (LysLys) on amorphous silica over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, adsorbate concentration, and the solid/water ratio, and determined the reaction stoichiometries and the equilibrium constants based on the extended triple-layer model (ETLM). The retrieved ETLM parameters were then used, in combination with the equilibrium constant for the peptide bond formation in bulk water, to calculate the Lys-LysLys equilibrium in the presence of amorphous silica under various aqueous conditions. Results showed that the silica surface favors Lys dimerization, and the influence varies greatly with changing environmental parameters. At slightly alkaline pH (pH 9) in the presence of a dilute NaCl (1 mM), the thermodynamically attainable LysLys from 0.1 mM Lys reached a concentration around 50 times larger than that calculated without silica. Because of the versatility of the ETLM, which has been applied to describe a wide variety of biomolecule-mineral interactions, future experiments with the reported methodology are expected to provide a significant constraint on the plausible geological settings for the condensation of monomers to polymers, and the subsequent chemical evolution of life.

  8. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciT

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield usingmore » low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the

  9. Stabilisation of Ce-Cu-Fe amorphous alloys by addition of Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelhar, Luka; Ferčič, Jana; Boulet, Pascal; Maček-Kržmanc, Marjeta; Šturm, Sašo; Lamut, Martin; Markoli, Boštjan; Kobe, Spomenka; Dubois, Jean-Marie

    2016-10-01

    The present work describes the formation of amorphous alloys in the (Al1-xCex)62Cu25Fe13 quaternary system (0 ≤ x ≤ 1). When the amount of Ce falls in the range 0.67 ≤ x ≤ 0.83, the alloys obtained exhibit a completely amorphous structure confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction. Otherwise, at compositions x = 0.5, 0.58, 0.92 and 1, a primary crystalline phase forms together with an amorphous matrix. The crystallisation temperature (Tx) decreases with increasing Ce content, varying from 593 K for x = 0.5-383 K for x = 1. Composition x = 0.75 is considered as the best glass former, exhibiting a large supercooled liquid region of 40 K width that precedes crystallisation. In order to form bulk amorphous alloys, ribbons with this later composition were consolidated into few millimetre thick discs using pulsed electric current sintering at different temperatures, yet preserving the amorphous structure. Meanwhile, increasing temperature above 483 K triggers crystallisation of a primary phase isostructural to AlCe3. Further increase in the temperature up to 573 K yields a higher fraction of the crystalline phase. Testing mechanical properties, using nanoindentation, revealed that both elastic modulus (E) and hardness (H) depend on the Al content, ranging from E = 85.6 ± 3.7 GPa and H = 6.2 ± 0.7 GPa for x = 0.5 down to E = 39.8 ± 1.0 GPa and H = 3.1 ± 0.2 GPa for x = 0.92.

  10. Application of computational thermodynamics in the study of magnsium alloys and bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hongbo

    In this thesis, the application of the computational thermodynamics has been explored on two subjects, the study of magnesium alloys (Chapter 1-5) and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) (Chapter 6-9). For the former case, a strategy of experiments coupled with the CALPHAD approach was employed to establish a thermodynamic description of the quaternary system Mg-Al-Ca-Sr focusing on the Mg-rich phase equilibria. Multicomponent Mg-rich alloys based on the MgAl-Ca-Sr system are one of the most promising candidates for the high temperature applications in the transportation industry. The Mg-Al-Ca-Sr quaternary consists of four ternaries and six binaries. Thermodynamic descriptions of all constituent binaries are available in the literature. Thermodynamic descriptions of the two key ternaries, Mg-Al-Sr and Mg-Al-Ca, were obtained by an efficient and reliable methodology, combining computational thermodynamics with key experiments. The obtained thermodynamic descriptions were validated by performing extensive comparisons between the calculations and experimental information. Thermodynamic descriptions of the other two ternaries, MgCa-Sr and Al-Ca-Sr, were obtained by extrapolation. For the later case, a computational thermodynamic strategy was formulated to obtain a minor but optimum amount of additional element into a base alloy to improve its glass forming ability (GFA). This was done through thermodynamically calculating the maximum liquidus depressions caused by various alloying addition (or replacement) schemes. The success of this approach has been examined in two multicomponent systems, Zr-based Zr-Cu-Ni-Al-Ti and Cu-rich Cu-Zr-Ti-Y. For both cases, experimental results showed conclusively that the GFA increases more than 100% from the base alloy to the one with minor but optimal elemental addition. Furthermore, a thermodynamic computational approach was employed to identify the compositions of Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Al alloys exhibiting low-lying liquidus surfaces, which tend to

  11. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  12. Rigid Amorphous Fraction in PLA Electrospun Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebe, Peggy; Ma, Qian; Simona Cozza, Erika; Pyda, Marek; Mao, Bin; Zhu, Yazhe; Monticelli, Orietta

    2013-03-01

    Electrospun fibers of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were formed by adopting a high-speed rotating wheel as the counter-electrode. The molecular orientation, crystallization mechanism, and phase structure and transitions of the aligned ES fibers were investigated. Using thermal analysis and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), we evaluated the confinement that exists in as-spun amorphous, and heat-treated semicrystalline, fibers. Differential scanning calorimetry confirmed the existence of a constrained amorphous phase in as-spun aligned fibers, without the presence of crystals or fillers to serve as fixed physical constraints. Using WAXS, for the first time the mesophase fraction, consisting of oriented amorphous PLA chains, was quantitatively characterized in nanofibers. The authors acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation, Polymers Program under grant DMR-0602473. ESC acknowledges a Ph.D. grant supported by Italian Ministry of Education and Scientific Research.

  13. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yutao U T; Killian, Christopher E; Olson, Ian C; Appathurai, Narayana P; Amasino, Audra L; Martin, Michael C; Holt, Liam J; Wilt, Fred H; Gilbert, P U P A

    2012-04-17

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC · H(2)O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC · H(2)O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC · H(2)O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC · H(2)O in vitro.

  14. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yutao U. T.; Killian, Christopher E.; Olson, Ian C.; Appathurai, Narayana P.; Amasino, Audra L.; Martin, Michael C.; Holt, Liam J.; Wilt, Fred H.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC·H2O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC·H2O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC·H2O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC·H2O in vitro. PMID:22492931

  15. Aluminum induced crystallization of amorphous Ge thin films on insulating substrate

    SciT

    Singh, Ch. Kishan, E-mail: kisn@igcar.gov.in; Tah, T.; Sunitha, D. T.

    2016-05-23

    Aluminium (metal) induced crystallization of amorphous Ge in bilayer and multilayer Ge/Al thin films deposited on quartz substrate at temperature well below the crystallization temperature of bulk Ge is reported. The crystallization of poly-Ge proceeds via formations of dendritic crystalline Ge grains in the Al matrix. The observed phases were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The microstructure of Al thin film layer was found to have a profound influence on such crystallization process and formation of dendritic grains.

  16. The Amorphous Component in Martian Basaltic Soil in Global Perspective from MSL and MER Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Downs, R. T.; Gellert, R.; Treiman, A. H.; Yen, A. S.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The mineralogy instrument CheMin onboard the MSL rover Curiosity analyzed by transmission XRD [1] the <150 microns size fraction of putative global basaltic martian soil from scoops 4 and 5 of the Rocknest aeolian bedform (sol 81-120). Here, we combine chemical (APXS) and mineralogical (Mossbauer; MB) results from the MER rovers with chemical (APXS) and mineralogical (CheMin) results from Curiosity to constrain the relative proportions of amorphous and crystalline components, the bulk chemical composition of those components, and the

  17. Capillarity creates single-crystal calcite nanowires from amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kröger, Roland; Charnock, John M; Christenson, Hugo K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2011-12-23

    Single-crystal calcite nanowires are formed by crystallization of morphologically equivalent amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles within the pores of track etch membranes. The polyaspartic acid stabilized ACC is drawn into the membrane pores by capillary action, and the single-crystal nature of the nanowires is attributed to the limited contact of the intramembrane ACC particle with the bulk solution. The reaction environment then supports transformation to a single-crystal product. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  19. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul [Northridge, CA; Hays, Charles C [Pasadena, CA; Johnson, William L [Pasadena, CA

    2007-07-17

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  20. The Phagocytosis and Toxicity of Amorphous Silica

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Knecht, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Inhalation of crystalline silica is known to cause an inflammatory reaction and chronic exposure leads to lung fibrosis and can progress into the disease, silicosis. Cultured macrophages bind crystalline silica particles, phagocytose them, and rapidly undergo apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which particles are bound and internalized and the reason particles are toxic is unclear. Amorphous silica has been considered to be a less toxic form, but this view is controversial. We compared the uptake and toxicity of amorphous silica to crystalline silica. Methodology/Principal Findings Amorphous silica particles are phagocytosed by macrophage cells and a single internalized particle is capable of killing a cell. Fluorescent dextran is released from endo-lysosomes within two hours after silica treatment and Caspase-3 activation occurs within 4 hours. Interestingly, toxicity is specific to macrophage cell lines. Other cell types are resistant to silica particle toxicity even though they internalize the particles. The large and uniform size of the spherical, amorphous silica particles allowed us to monitor them during the uptake process. In mCherry-actin transfected macrophages, actin rings began to form 1-3 minutes after silica binding and the actin coat disassembled rapidly following particle internalization. Pre-loading cells with fluorescent dextran allowed us to visualize the fusion of phagosomes with endosomes during internalization. These markers provided two new ways to visualize and quantify particle internalization. At 37°C the rate of amorphous silica internalization was very rapid regardless of particle coating. However, at room temperature, opsonized silica is internalized much faster than non-opsonized silica. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that amorphous and crystalline silica are both phagocytosed and both toxic to mouse alveolar macrophage (MH-S) cells. The pathway leading to apoptosis appears to be similar in both

  1. The phagocytosis and toxicity of amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Gilberti, Renée M; Knecht, David A

    2011-02-02

    Inhalation of crystalline silica is known to cause an inflammatory reaction and chronic exposure leads to lung fibrosis and can progress into the disease, silicosis. Cultured macrophages bind crystalline silica particles, phagocytose them, and rapidly undergo apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which particles are bound and internalized and the reason particles are toxic is unclear. Amorphous silica has been considered to be a less toxic form, but this view is controversial. We compared the uptake and toxicity of amorphous silica to crystalline silica. Amorphous silica particles are phagocytosed by macrophage cells and a single internalized particle is capable of killing a cell. Fluorescent dextran is released from endo-lysosomes within two hours after silica treatment and Caspase-3 activation occurs within 4 hours. Interestingly, toxicity is specific to macrophage cell lines. Other cell types are resistant to silica particle toxicity even though they internalize the particles. The large and uniform size of the spherical, amorphous silica particles allowed us to monitor them during the uptake process. In mCherry-actin transfected macrophages, actin rings began to form 1-3 minutes after silica binding and the actin coat disassembled rapidly following particle internalization. Pre-loading cells with fluorescent dextran allowed us to visualize the fusion of phagosomes with endosomes during internalization. These markers provided two new ways to visualize and quantify particle internalization. At 37 °C the rate of amorphous silica internalization was very rapid regardless of particle coating. However, at room temperature, opsonized silica is internalized much faster than non-opsonized silica. Our results indicate that amorphous and crystalline silica are both phagocytosed and both toxic to mouse alveolar macrophage (MH-S) cells. The pathway leading to apoptosis appears to be similar in both cases. However, the result suggests a mechanistic difference

  2. Bulk density of small meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya, J.-B.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Brown, P. G.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: Here we report on precise metric and photometric observations of 107 optical meteors, which were simultaneously recorded at multiple stations using three different intensified video camera systems. The purpose is to estimate bulk meteoroid density, link small meteoroids to their parent bodies based on dynamical and physical density values expected for different small body populations, to better understand and explain the dynamical evolution of meteoroids after release from their parent bodies. Methods: The video systems used had image sizes ranging from 640 × 480 to 1360 × 1036 pixels, with pixel scales from 0.01° per pixel to 0.05° per pixel, and limiting meteor magnitudes ranging from Mv = +2.5 to +6.0. We find that 78% of our sample show noticeable deceleration, allowing more robust constraints to be placed on density estimates. The density of each meteoroid is estimated by simultaneously fitting the observed deceleration and lightcurve using a model based on thermal fragmentation, conservation of energy and momentum. The entire phase space of the model free parameters is explored for each event to find ranges of parameters which fit the observations within the measurement uncertainty. Results: (a) We have analysed our data by first associating each of our events with one of the five meteoroid classes. The average density of meteoroids whose orbits are asteroidal and chondritic (AC) is 4200 kg m-3 suggesting an asteroidal parentage, possibly related to the high-iron content population. Meteoroids with orbits belonging to Jupiter family comets (JFCs) have an average density of 3100 ± 300 kg m-3. This high density is found for all meteoroids with JFC-like orbits and supports the notion that the refractory material reported from the Stardust measurements of 81P/Wild 2 dust is common among the broader JFC population. This high density is also the average bulk density for the 4 meteoroids with orbits belonging to the Ecliptic shower-type class (ES) also

  3. The Metastable Persistence of Vapor-Deposited Amorphous Ice at Anomalously High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the gas release, vaporization behavior and infrared (IR) spectral properties of amorphous and crystalline water ice have direct application to cometary and planetary outgassing phenomena and contribute to an understanding of the physical properties of astrophysical ices. Several investigators report anomalous phenomena related to the warming of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs. However gas release, ice volatilization and IR spectral features are secondary or tertiary manifestations of ice structure or morphology. These observations are useful in mimicking the bulk physical and chemical phenomena taking place in cometary and other extraterrestrial ices but do not directly reveal the structural changes which are their root cause. The phenomenological interpretation of spectral and gas release data is probably the cause of somewhat contradictory explanations invoked to account for differences in water ice behavior in similar temperature regimes. It is the microstructure, micromorphology and microchemical heterogeneity of astrophysical ices which must be characterized if the mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena are to be understood. We have been using a modified Transmission Electron Microscope to characterize the structure of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs as a function of their deposition, temperature history and composition. For the present experiments, pure water vapor is deposited at high vacuum onto a 15 K amorphous carbon film inside an Hitachi H-500H TEM. The resulting ice film (approx. 0.05 micrometers thick) is warmed at the rate of 1 K per minute and diffraction patterns are collected at 1 K intervals. These patterns are converted into radial intensity distributions which are calibrated using patterns of crystalline gold deposited on a small part of the carbon substrate. The small intensity contributed by the amorphous substrate is removed by background subtraction. The proportions of amorphous and crystalline material

  4. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  5. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  6. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  7. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.

    2017-09-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  8. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons.

    PubMed

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A; Frazier, Matthew J; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V; Marcus, Matthew A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2017-09-12

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed "vital effects," that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO 3 ). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO 2 increases, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  9. Investigation of Local Ordering in Amorphous Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Gary Guoyou

    The intent of the research described in this dissertation, as indicated by the title, is to provide a better understanding of the structure of amorphous material. The possibility of using electron microscopy to study the amorphous structure is investigated. Chapter 1 gives a brief introduction to the understanding and modeling of the amorphous structure, electron microscopy and the image analysis in general. The difficulty of using 2-D images to infer 3-D structures information is illustrated in Chapter 2, where it is shown that some high resolution images are not qualitatively different from images of white -noises weak-phase objects or those of random atomic arrangements. The means of obtaining statistical information from these images is given in Chapters 3 and 5, where the quantitative differences between experimental images and simulated white-noise or simulated images corresponding to random arrangements are revealed. The use of image processing techniques in electron microscopy and the possible artifacts are presented in Chapter 4. The pattern recognition technique outlined in Chapter 6 demonstrates a feasible mode of scanning transition electron microscope operation. Statistical analysis can be effectively performed on a large number of nano-diffraction patterns from, for example, locally ordered samples. Some recent developments in physics as well as in electron microscopy are briefly reviewed, and their possible applications in the study of amorphous structures are discussed in Chapter 7.

  10. Effect of stress on amorphous bent cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Kunimori, Osamu

    1992-07-01

    The effect of stress on bent amorphous cores with positive magnetostriction has been investigated. Tension has been applied to the ribbon while winding into the toroid to improve the magnetic properties of the core. The properties of the coercive force of the tension winding core due to applied tension have been made clear from the observation of the domain structure.

  11. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  12. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  13. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    DOE PAGES

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang -Yu; ...

    2017-08-28

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO 3).more » We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO 2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.« less

  14. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    SciT

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang -Yu

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO 3).more » We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO 2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.« less

  15. TRANSIENT AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE IN FORMING ENAMEL

    PubMed Central

    Beniash, Elia; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Lam, Raymond S.K.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, begins as a three-dimensional network of nanometer size mineral particles, suspended in a protein gel. This mineral network serves as a template for mature enamel formation. To further understand the mechanisms of enamel formation we characterized the forming enamel mineral at an early secretory stage using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectromicroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FTIR microspectroscopy and polarized light microscopy. We show that the newly formed enamel mineral is amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), which eventually transforms into apatitic crystals. Interestingly, the size, shape and spatial organization of these amorphous mineral particles and older crystals are essentially the same, indicating that the mineral morphology and organization in enamel is determined prior to its crystallization. Mineralization via transient amorphous phases has been previously reported in chiton teeth, mollusk shells, echinoderm spicules and spines, and recent reports strongly suggest the presence transient amorphous mineral in forming vertebrate bones. The present finding of transient ACP in murine tooth enamel suggests that this strategy might be universal. PMID:19217943

  16. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2017-01-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya. PMID:28847944

  17. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  18. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  19. 49 CFR 172.514 - Bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings. 172.514 Section 172.514... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.514 Bulk packagings. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, each person who offers for transportation a bulk packaging which contains a hazardous material...

  20. Crystallization of biogenic hydrous amorphous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyono, A.; Yokooji, M.; Chiba, T.; Tamura, T.; Tuji, A.

    2017-12-01

    Diatom, Nitzschia cf. frustulum, collected from Lake Yogo, Siga prefecture, Japan was cultured in laboratory. Organic components of the diatom cell were removed by washing with acetone and sodium hypochlorite. The remaining frustules were studied by SEM-EDX, FTIR spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the spindle-shaped morphology of diatom frustule was composed of hydrous amorphous silica. Pressure induced phase transformation of the diatom frustule was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. With exposure to 0.3 GPa at 100 oC, Raman band corresponding to quartz occurred at ν = 465 cm-1. In addition, Raman bands known as a characteristic Raman pattern of moganite was also observed at 501 cm-1. From the integral ratio of Raman bands, the moganite content in the probed area was estimated to be approximately 50 wt%. With the pressure and temperature effect, the initial morphology of diatom frustule was completely lost and totally changed to a characteristic spherical particle with a diameter of about 2 mm. With keeping the compression of 5.7 GPa at 100 oC, a Raman band assignable to coesite appeared at 538 cm-1. That is, with the compression and heating, the hydrous amorphous silica can be readily crystallized into quartz, moganite, and coesite. The first-principles calculations revealed that a disiloxane molecule stabilized in a trans configuration is twisted 60o and changed into the cis configuration with a close approach of water molecule. It is therefore a reasonable assumption that during crystallization of hydrous amorphous silica, the Si-O-Si bridging unit with the cis configuration would survive as a structural defect and then crystallized into moganite by keeping the geometry. This hypothesis is adaptable to the phase transformation from hydrous amorphous silica to coesite as well, because coesite has the four-membered rings and easily formed from the hydrous amorphous silica under high pressure and high

  1. Flexoelectricity as a bulk property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta, Raffaele

    2010-03-01

    Piezoelectric composites can be created using nonpiezoelectric materials, by exploiting flexoelectricity. This is by definition the linear response of polarization to strain gradient, and is symmetry-allowed even in elemental crystals. However, the basic issue whether flexoelectricity is a bulk or a surface material property is open. We mention that the analogous issue about piezoelectricity is nontrivial either.^1 In this first attempt towards a full theory of flexoelectricity we prove that, for a simple class of strain and strain gradients, flexoelectricity is indeed a bulk effect. The key ingredients of the present theory are the long-range perturbations linearly induced by a unit displacement of a single nucleus in an otherwise perfect crystal: to leading order these are dipolar, quadrupolar, and octupolar. The corresponding tensors have rank 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Whereas dipoles and quadrupoles provide the piezoelectric response,^1 we show that dipoles and octupoles provide the flexoelectric response in nonpiezoelectric crystals. We conjecture that the full dipole and octupole tensors provide the flexoelectric response to the most general form of strain gradient. Our problem has a close relationship to the one of the ``absolute'' deformation potentials, which is based on a similar kind of dipolar and octupolar tensors.^2 ^1 R. M. Martin, Phys. Rev. B 5, 1607 (1972). ^2 R. Resta, L. Colombo and S. Baroni, Phys. Rev. B 41, 12538 (1990).

  2. NREL/industry interaction: Amorphous silicon alloy research team formation

    SciT

    Luft, W.

    1994-06-30

    The low material cost and proven manufacturability of amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy photovoltaic technology make it ideally suited for large-scale terrestrial applications. The present efficiency of a-Si alloy modules is, however, much lower than the 15% stable efficiency that would lead to [ital significant] penetration of the electric utility bulk-power market. The slow progress in achieving high stabilized a-Si alloy module efficiencies may in part be attributed to the fact that only in the last few years did we emphasize stable efficiencies. A mission-focused integrated effort among the a-Si PV industry, universities, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) wouldmore » help. To foster research integration, NREL has established four research teams with significant industry participation. In the 11 months since the research team formation, a close interaction among the a-Si PV industry, universities, and NREL has been achieved and has resulted in mission-directed research.« less

  3. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications. PMID:26785682

  4. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-20

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 10(6) and 3.72 × 10(6) respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  5. Size effect on atomic structure in low-dimensional Cu-Zr amorphous systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W B; Liu, J; Lu, S H; Zhang, H; Wang, H; Wang, X D; Cao, Q P; Zhang, D X; Jiang, J Z

    2017-08-04

    The size effect on atomic structure of a Cu 64 Zr 36 amorphous system, including zero-dimensional small-size amorphous particles (SSAPs) and two-dimensional small-size amorphous films (SSAFs) together with bulk sample was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. We revealed that sample size strongly affects local atomic structure in both Cu 64 Zr 36 SSAPs and SSAFs, which are composed of core and shell (surface) components. Compared with core component, the shell component of SSAPs has lower average coordination number and average bond length, higher degree of ordering, and lower packing density due to the segregation of Cu atoms on the shell of Cu 64 Zr 36 SSAPs. These atomic structure differences in SSAPs with various sizes result in different glass transition temperatures, in which the glass transition temperature for the shell component is found to be 577 K, which is much lower than 910 K for the core component. We further extended the size effect on the structure and glasses transition temperature to Cu 64 Zr 36 SSAFs, and revealed that the T g decreases when SSAFs becomes thinner due to the following factors: different dynamic motion (mean square displacement), different density of core and surface and Cu segregation on the surface of SSAFs. The obtained results here are different from the results for the size effect on atomic structure of nanometer-sized crystalline metallic alloys.

  6. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  7. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  8. 17 CFR 5.23 - Notice of bulk transfers and bulk liquidations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Notice of bulk transfers and bulk liquidations. 5.23 Section 5.23 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION OFF-EXCHANGE FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS § 5.23 Notice of bulk transfers and bulk liquidations...

  9. 75 FR 34682 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ...] RIN 1625-AB47 Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk... on June 17, 2010, entitled ``Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code.'' This correction provides correct information with regard to the...

  10. Defect-induced solid state amorphization of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei; Carvajal, Teresa; Koslowski, Marisol

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the process of mechanically induced amorphization in small molecule organic crystals under extensive deformation. In this work, we develop a model that describes the amorphization of molecular crystals, in which the plastic response is calculated with a phase field dislocation dynamics theory in four materials: acetaminophen, sucrose, γ-indomethacin, and aspirin. The model is able to predict the fraction of amorphous material generated in single crystals for a given applied stress. Our results show that γ-indomethacin and sucrose demonstrate large volume fractions of amorphous material after sufficient plastic deformation, while smaller amorphous volume fractions are predicted in acetaminophen and aspirin, in agreement with experimental observation.

  11. Amorphous Analogs of Martian Global Soil: Pair Distribution Function Analyses and Implications for Scattering Models of Chemin X-ray Diffraction Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achilles, C. N.; Bish, D. L.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Soils on Mars have been analyzed by the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) and most recently by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Chemical analyses from a majority of soil samples suggest that there is a relatively uniform global soil composition across much of the planet. A soil site, Rocknest, was sampled by the MSL science payload including the CheMin X-ray diffractometer and the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). Che- Min X-ray diffraction (XRD) data revealed crystalline phases and a broad, elevated background, indicating the presence of amorphous or poorly ordered materials (Fig 1). Based on the chemical composition of the bulk soil measured by APXS and the composition of crystalline phases derived from unit-cell parameters determined with CheMin data, the percentages of crystalline and amorphous phases were calculated at 51% and 49%, respectively. Attempts to model the amorphous contribution to CheMin XRD patterns were made using amorphous standards and full-pattern fitting methods and show that the broad, elevated background region can be fitted by basaltic glass, allophane, and palagonite. However, the modeling shows only that these phases have scattering patterns similar to that for the soil, not that they represent unique solutions. Here, we use pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to determine the short-range order of amorphous analogs in martian soils and better constrain the amorphous material detected by CheMin.

  12. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Nanointermetallic Phase Dispersed Al65Cu20Ti15 Amorphous Matrix Composite Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, D.; Mitra, R.; Ojo, O. A.; Lojkowski, W.; Manna, I.

    2011-08-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline intermetallic phase dispersed amorphous matrix composite prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of mechanically alloyed Al65Cu20Ti15 amorphous powder in the temperature range 573 K to 873 K (300 °C to 600 °C) with 1.2 GPa pressure were studied. Phase identification by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microstructural investigation by transmission electron microscopy confirmed that sintering in this temperature range led to partial crystallization of the amorphous powder. The microstructures of the consolidated composites were found to have nanocrystalline intermetallic precipitates of Al5CuTi2, Al3Ti, AlCu, Al2Cu, and Al4Cu9 dispersed in amorphous matrix. An optimum combination of density (3.73 Mg/m3), hardness (8.96 GPa), compressive strength (1650 MPa), shear strength (850 MPa), and Young's modulus (182 GPa) were obtained in the composite hot isostatically pressed ("hipped") at 773 K (500 °C). Furthermore, these results were compared with those from earlier studies based on conventional sintering (CCS), high pressure sintering (HPS), and pulse plasma sintering (PPS). HIP appears to be the most preferred process for achieving an optimum combination of density and mechanical properties in amorphous-nanocrystalline intermetallic composites at temperatures ≤773 K (500 °C), while HPS is most suited for bulk amorphous alloys. Both density and volume fraction of intermetallic dispersoids were found to influence the mechanical properties of the composites.

  13. Atomic-scale bonding of bulk metallic glass to crystalline aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. X.; Liu, W. D.; Wang, J. T.; Yan, H. H.; Li, X. J.; Huang, Y. J.; Wei, X. S.; Shen, J.

    2008-08-01

    A Ti40Zr25Cu12Ni3Be20 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was welded to a crystalline aluminum by the parallel plate explosive welding method. Experimental evidence and numerical simulation show that atomic-scale bonding between the BMG and the crystalline aluminum can be achieved, and the weldment on the BMG side can retain its amorphous state without any indication of crystallization in the welding process. Nanoindentation tests reveal that the interface of the explosive joints exhibits a significant increase in hardness compared to the matrix on its two sides. The joining of BMG and crystalline materials opens a window to the applications of BMGs in engineering.

  14. Improved Vemurafenib Dissolution and Pharmacokinetics as an Amorphous Solid Dispersion Produced by KinetiSol® Processing.

    PubMed

    Ellenberger, Daniel J; Miller, Dave A; Kucera, Sandra U; Williams, Robert O

    2018-03-14

    Vemurafenib is a poorly soluble, low permeability drug that has a demonstrated need for a solubility-enhanced formulation. However, conventional approaches for amorphous solid dispersion production are challenging due to the physiochemical properties of the compound. A suitable and novel method for creating an amorphous solid dispersion, known as solvent-controlled coprecipitation, was developed to make a material known as microprecipitated bulk powder (MBP). However, this approach has limitations in its processing and formulation space. In this study, it was hypothesized that vemurafenib can be processed by KinetiSol into the same amorphous formulation as MBP. The KinetiSol process utilizes high shear to rapidly process amorphous solid dispersions containing vemurafenib. Analysis of the material demonstrated that KinetiSol produced amorphous, single-phase material with acceptable chemical purity and stability. Values obtained were congruent to analysis conducted on the comparator material. However, the materials differed in particle morphology as the KinetiSol material was dense, smooth, and uniform while the MBP comparator was porous in structure and exhibited high surface area. The particles produced by KinetiSol had improved in-vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic performance for vemurafenib compared to MBP due to slower drug nucleation and recrystallization which resulted in superior supersaturation maintenance during drug release. In the in-vivo rat pharmacokinetic study, both amorphous solid dispersions produced by KinetiSol exhibited mean AUC values at least two-fold that of MBP when dosed as a suspension. It was concluded that the KinetiSol process produced superior dosage forms containing vemurafenib with the potential for substantial reduction in patient pill burden.

  15. Development of High Strength Ni-Cu-Zr-Ti-Si-Sn In-Situ Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Reinforced by Hard B2 Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyo Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hae Jin; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Jeong Tae; Na, Young Sang; Lim, Ka Ram; Wang, Wei-Min; Kim, Ki Buem

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, the influence of atomic ratio of Zr to Ti on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ni-Cu-Zr-Ti-Si-Sn alloys is investigated. The alloys were designed by fine replacement of Ti for Zr from Ni39Cu20Zr36-xTixSi2Sn3. The increase of Ti content enhances glass forming ability of the alloy by suppression of formation of (Ni, Cu)10(Zr, Ti)7 phase during solidification. With further increasing Ti content up to 24 at.%, the B2 phase is introduced in the amorphous matrix with a small amount of B19' phase from alloy melt. The bulk metallic glass composite containing B2 phase with a volume fraction of 10 vol% exhibits higher fracture strength ( 2.5 GPa) than that of monolithic bulk metallic glass ( 2.3 GPa). This improvement is associated to the individual mechanical characteristics of the B2 phase and amorphous matrix. The B2 phase exhibits higher hardness and modulus than those of amorphous matrix as well as effective stress accommodation up to the higher stress level than the yield strength of amorphous matrix. The large stress accommodation capacity of the hard B2 phase plays an important factor to improve the mechanical properties of in situ Ni-based bulk metallic glass composites.

  16. Localization and stability in damageable amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Tommasi, D.; Marzano, S.; Puglisi, G.; Saccomandi, G.

    2010-01-01

    In the present article, based on a recently proposed model (De Tommasi et al. in J Rheol 50:495-512, 2006; Phys Rev Lett 100:085502, 2008), we analyze the influence of the microstructure properties on the damage behavior of amorphous materials. In accordance with the experimental observations, different scenarios of damage nucleation and evolution are associated to different material distributions at the microscale. In particular, we observe the possibilities of uniform or localized damage and strain geometries with a macroscopic behavior that may range from brittle to ductile or rubber-like. To describe the possibility of extending our stability analysis to three-dimensional damageable amorphous bodies we consider a simple boundary value problem of engineering interest.

  17. New transformations between crystalline and amorphous ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Chen, L. C.; Mao, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    High-pressure optical and spectroscopic techniques were used to obtain directly the ice I(h) - hda-ice transformation in a diamond-anvil cell, and the stability of the amorphous form is examined as functions of pressure and temperature. It is demonstrated that hda-ice transforms abruptly at 4 GPa and 77 K to a crystalline phase close in structure to orientationally disordered ice-VII and to a more highly ordered, ice-VIII-like structure at higher temperatures. This is the first time that an amorphous solid is observed to convert to a crystalline solid at low temperatures by compression alone. Phase transitions of this type may be relevant on icy planetary satellites, and there may also be implications for the high-pressure behavior of silica.

  18. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L.; Haller, Eugene E.

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  19. Study of an amorphous alloy core transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafalski, A.; Frost, D. C.

    1994-05-01

    Amorphous core transformers (ACT) have become a technological and commercial reality and there are an estimated 400,000 units installed worldwide [1]. Their applications reflect changes in buying practices, where the efficiency evaluation is an important factor in the purchasing decision for distribution transformers. Use of the total ownership cost (TOC) concept facilities the selection of a transformer on the basis of its performance. This concept is used in this paper to investigate the feasibility of applying a distribution ACT in Western Australian (WA). A 10 kVA ACT, evaluated by the TOC method, was compared with a traditional silicon iron core transformer of the same rating. The cost of amorphous metal (relative to alternative materials), the distribution load profile, and the values of capitalised loss costs are factors which affect the cost effectiveness of ACTs.

  20. Intense photoluminescence from amorphous tantalum oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Minmin; Zhang, Zhengjun; Miao, Wei

    2006-07-01

    Tantalum oxide films were deposited on silicon substrates at a temperature of ˜450°C by heating a pure tantalum foil in a rough vacuum. The films were amorphous in structure and consisted of fully oxidized Ta2O5 and (TaOx, x <2.5) suboxides. This feature resulted in strong visible light emission from the films further oxidized in the air at temperatures of 200-300°C. The mechanism for this photoluminescence behavior of the amorphous tantalum oxide films was also investigated and discussed. This study suggests that wide-band-gap materials could act as effective visible light emitters and provides a simple route to synthesize such materials.

  1. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    DOE PAGES

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; ...

    2015-11-13

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning’ transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaoticmore » behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. As a result, these findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched.« less

  2. Short-range correlations control the G/K and Poisson ratios of amorphous solids and metallic glasses

    SciT

    Zaccone, Alessio; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2014-01-21

    The bulk modulus of many amorphous materials, such as metallic glasses, behaves nearly in agreement with the assumption of affine deformation, namely that the atoms are displaced just by the amount prescribed by the applied strain. In contrast, the shear modulus behaves as for nonaffine deformations, with additional displacements due to the structural disorder which induce a marked material softening to shear. The consequence is an anomalously large ratio of the bulk modulus to the shear modulus for disordered materials characterized by dense atomic packing, but not for random networks with point atoms. We explain this phenomenon with a microscopicmore » derivation of the elastic moduli of amorphous solids accounting for the interplay of nonaffinity and short-range particle correlations due to excluded volume. Short-range order is responsible for a reduction of the nonaffinity which is much stronger under compression, where the geometric coupling between nonaffinity and the deformation field is strong, whilst under shear this coupling is weak. Predictions of the Poisson ratio based on this model allow us to rationalize the trends as a function of coordination and atomic packing observed with many amorphous materials.« less

  3. Ultrathin amorphous coatings on lunar dust grains.

    PubMed

    Bibring, J P; Duraud, J P; Durrieu, L; Jouret, C; Maurette, M; Meunier, R

    1972-02-18

    UItrathin amorphous coatings have been observed by high-voltage electron microscopy on micrometer-sized dust grains from the Apollo 11, Apollo 12, Apollo 14, and Luna 16 missions. Calibration experiments show that these coatings result from an "ancient" implantation of solar wind ions in the grains. This phenomenon has interdisciplinary applications concerning the past activity of the sun, the lunar albedo, the ancient lunar atmosphere and magnetic field, the carbon content of lunar soils, and lunar dynamic processes.

  4. Design Requirements for Amorphous Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Young, J. A.; Harrison, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the piezoelectric activity in amorphous piezoelectric polymers is presented. The criteria required to render a polymer piezoelectric are discussed. Although piezoelectricity is a coupling between mechanical and electrical properties, most research has concentrated on the electrical properties of potentially piezoelectric polymers. In this work, we present comparative mechanical data as a function of temperature and offer a summary of polarization and electromechanical properties for each of the polymers considered.

  5. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, R.C.

    1985-02-11

    Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  6. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  7. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  8. Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2011-07-01

    Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride have been prepared using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane as a template. The amine groups present on the surface of these nanopillars were exploited for functionalization with oleic acid in order to stabilize the nanostructure at the aqueous-organic interface and also for the immobilization of metal nanoparticles and protein. These immobilised nanoparticles were found to have good catalytic activity.

  9. Pulsed Laser Beam Welding of Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 Bulk Metallic Glass.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ling; Datye, Amit; Huang, Jiankang; Ketkaew, Jittisa; Woo Sohn, Sung; Zhao, Shaofan; Wu, Sujun; Zhang, Yuming; Schwarz, Udo D; Schroers, Jan

    2017-08-11

    We used pulsed laser beam welding method to join Pd 43 Cu 27 Ni 10 P 20 (at.%) bulk metallic glass and characterized the properties of the joint. Fusion zone and heat-affected zone in the weld joint can be maintained completely amorphous as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. No visible defects were observed in the weld joint. Nanoindentation and bend tests were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the weld joint. Fusion zone and heat-affected zone exhibit very similar elastic moduli and hardness when compared to the base material, and the weld joint shows high ductility in bending which is accomplished through the operation of multiple shear bands. Our results reveal that pulsed laser beam welding under appropriate processing parameters provides a practical viable method to join bulk metallic glasses.

  10. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  11. Interactions of hydrogen with amorphous hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas'ev, Valeri V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2017-02-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the interaction of hydrogen with amorphous hafnia (a -HfO2 ) using a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. Injection of atomic hydrogen, its diffusion towards electrodes, and ionization can be seen as key processes underlying charge instability of high-permittivity amorphous hafnia layers in many applications. Hydrogen in many wide band gap crystalline oxides exhibits negative-U behavior (+1 and -1 charged states are thermodynamically more stable than the neutral state) . Our results show that in a -HfO2 hydrogen is also negative-U, with charged states being the most thermodynamically stable at all Fermi level positions. However, metastable atomic hydrogen can share an electron with intrinsic electron trapping precursor sites [Phys. Rev. B 94, 020103 (2016)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.020103] forming a [etr -+O -H ] center, which is lower in energy on average by about 0.2 eV. These electron trapping sites can affect both the dynamics and thermodynamics of the interaction of hydrogen with a -HfO2 and the electrical behavior of amorphous hafnia films in CMOS devices.

  12. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski <111> silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  13. Amorphous silicon as high index photonic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, T.; Harke, A.; Horn, O.; Amthor, J.; Müller, J.

    2009-05-01

    Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) photonics has become an attractive research topic within the area of integrated optics. This paper aims to fabricate SOI-structures for optical communication applications with lower costs compared to standard fabrication processes as well as to provide a higher flexibility with respect to waveguide and substrate material choice. Amorphous silicon is deposited on thermal oxidized silicon wafers with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The material is optimized in terms of optical light transmission and refractive index. Different a-Si:H waveguides with low propagation losses are presented. The waveguides were processed with CMOS-compatible fabrication technologies and standard DUV-lithography enabling high volume production. To overcome the large mode-field diameter mismatch between incoupling fiber and sub-μm waveguides three dimensional, amorphous silicon tapers were fabricated with a KOH etched shadow mask for patterning. Using ellipsometric and Raman spectroscopic measurements the material properties as refractive index, layer thickness, crystallinity and material composition were analyzed. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments of amorphous thin films and rib waveguides were performed aiming to tune the refractive index of the deposited a-Si:H waveguide core layer after deposition.

  14. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  15. Solid-state amorphization of rebamipide and investigation on solubility and stability of the amorphous form.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xinnuo; Xu, Kailin; Li, Shanshan; Tang, Peixiao; Xiao, Ying; Li, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Solid-state amorphization of crystalline rebamipide (RBM) was realized by ball milling and spray drying. The amorphous content of samples milled for various time was quantified using X-ray powder diffraction. Crystalline RBM and three amorphous RBM obtained by milling and spray drying were characterized by morphological analysis, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy. The crystal structure of RBM was first determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition, the solubility and dissolution rate of the RBM samples were investigated in different media. Results indicated that the solubility and the dissolution rates of spray-dried RBM-PVP in different media were highly improved compared with crystalline RBM. The physical stabilities of the three amorphous RBM were systematically investigated, and the stability orders under different storage temperatures and levels of relative humidity (RH) were both as follows: spray dried RBM < milled RBM < spray dried RBM-PVP. A direct glass-to-crystal transformation was induced under high RH, and the transformation rate rose with increasing RH. However, amorphous RBM could stay stable at RH levels lower than 57.6% (25 °C).

  16. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying.

    PubMed

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Laitinen, Riikka

    2015-12-03

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in the spray-dried formulations the remaining crystallinity originated from SLS only. The best dissolution properties and a "spring and parachute" effect were found for SVS spray-dried from a 5% SLS solution without LYS. Despite the presence of at least partially crystalline SLS in the mixtures, all the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from aqueous surfactant solutions was able to produce formulations with improved physical stability for amorphous SVS.

  17. Underlying role of mechanical rigidity and topological constraints in physical sputtering and reactive ion etching of amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Gyanendra; Dhungana, Shailesh; Nordell, Bradley J.; Caruso, Anthony N.; Paquette, Michelle M.; Lanford, William A.; King, Sean W.

    2018-05-01

    Analytical expressions describing ion-induced sputter or etch processes generally relate the sputter yield to the surface atomic binding energy (Usb) for the target material. While straightforward to measure for the crystalline elemental solids, Usb is more complicated to establish for amorphous and multielement materials due to composition-driven variations and incongruent sublimation. In this regard, we show that for amorphous multielement materials, the ion-driven yield can instead be better understood via a consideration of mechanical rigidity and network topology. We first demonstrate a direct relationship between Usb, bulk modulus, and ion sputter yield for the elements, and then subsequently prove our hypothesis for amorphous multielement compounds by demonstrating that the same relationships exist between the reactive ion etch (RIE) rate and nanoindentation Young's modulus for a series of a -Si Nx :H and a -Si OxCy :H thin films. The impact of network topology is further revealed via application of the Phillips-Thorpe theory of topological constraints, which directly relates the Young's modulus to the mean atomic coordination () for an amorphous solid. The combined analysis allows the trends and plateaus in the RIE rate to be ultimately reinterpreted in terms of the atomic structure of the target material through a consideration of . These findings establish the important underlying role of mechanical rigidity and network topology in ion-solid interactions and provide additional considerations for the design and optimization of radiation-hard materials in nuclear and outer space environments.

  18. Relative entropy equals bulk relative entropy

    DOE PAGES

    Jafferis, Daniel L.; Lewkowycz, Aitor; Maldacena, Juan; ...

    2016-06-01

    We consider the gravity dual of the modular Hamiltonian associated to a general subregion of a boundary theory. We use it to argue that the relative entropy of nearby states is given by the relative entropy in the bulk, to leading order in the bulk gravitational coupling. We also argue that the boundary modular flow is dual to the bulk modular flow in the entanglement wedge, with implications for entanglement wedge reconstruction.

  19. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  20. Aspects of silicon bulk lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsberg, P. T.

    1985-01-01

    The best lifetimes attained for bulk crytalline silicon as a function of doping concentrations are analyzed. It is assumed that the dopants which set the Fermi level do not contribute to the recombination traffic which is due to the unknown defect. This defect is assumed to have two charge states: neutral and negative, the neutral defect concentration is frozen-in at some temperature T sub f. The higher doping concentrations should include the band-band Auger effect by using a generalization of the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism. The generalization of the SRH mechanism is discussed. This formulation gives a straightforward procedure for incorporating both band-band and band-trap Auger effects in the SRH procedure. Two related questions arise in this context: (1) it may sometimes be useful to write the steady-state occupation probability of the traps implied by SRH procedure in a form which approximates to the Fermi-Dirac distribution; and (2) the effect on the SRH mechanism of spreading N sub t levels at one energy uniformly over a range of energies is discussed.

  1. Infrared emission from hydrogenated amorphous carbon and amorphous carbon grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duley, W. W.; Jones, A. P.; Taylor, S. D.; Williams, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The correlations deduced by Boulanger et al. (1990) from IRAS maps of the Chamaeleon, Taurus and Ursa Major molecular cloud complexes are interpreted in terms of the evolutionary hydrogenated amorphous carbon model of interstellar dust. In particular, regions of relatively strong 12-micron emission may be regions where recently accreted carbon is being converted by ambient UV to small PAHs in situ. Regions of weak 12-micron emission are probably quiescent regions where carbon has been annealed to amorphous carbon. Observational consequences of these inferences are briefly described.

  2. Pair distribution functions of amorphous organic thin films from synchrotron X-ray scattering in transmission mode

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Chenyang; Teerakapibal, Rattavut; Yu, Lian; ...

    2017-07-10

    Using high-brilliance high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation, for the first time the total scattering of a thin organic glass film deposited on a strongly scattering inorganic substrate has been measured in transmission mode. The organic thin film was composed of the weakly scattering pharmaceutical substance indomethacin in the amorphous state. The film was 130 µm thick atop a borosilicate glass substrate of equal thickness. The atomic pair distribution function derived from the thin-film measurement is in excellent agreement with that from bulk measurements. This ability to measure the total scattering of amorphous organic thin films in transmission will enable accurate in situmore » structural studies for a wide range of materials.« less

  3. Electrically Active Defects In Solar Cells Based On Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction After Irradiation By Heavy Xe Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmatha, Ladislav; Mikolášek, Miroslav; Stuchlíková, L'ubica; Kósa, Arpád; Žiška, Milan; Hrubčín, Ladislav; Skuratov, Vladimir A.

    2015-11-01

    The contribution is focused on the diagnostics of structures with a heterojunction between amorphous and crystalline silicon prepared by HIT (Heterojunction with an Intrinsic Thin layer) technology. The samples were irradiated by Xe ions with energy 167 MeV and doses from 5 × 108 cm-2 to 5 × 1010 cm-2. Radiation defects induced in the bulk of Si and at the hydrogenated amorphous silicon and crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) interface were identified by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS). Radiation induced A-centre traps, boron vacancy traps and different types of divacancies with a high value of activation energy were observed. With an increased fluence of heavy ions the nature and density of the radiation induced defects was changed.

  4. Nanostructuring one-dimensional and amorphous lithium peroxide for high round-trip efficiency in lithium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arghya; Wong, Raymond A; Park, Woonghyeon; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Ohta, Toshiaki; Jung, Yousung; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2018-02-14

    The major challenge facing lithium-oxygen batteries is the insulating and bulk lithium peroxide discharge product, which causes sluggish decomposition and increasing overpotential during recharge. Here, we demonstrate an improved round-trip efficiency of ~80% by means of a mesoporous carbon electrode, which directs the growth of one-dimensional and amorphous lithium peroxide. Morphologically, the one-dimensional nanostructures with small volume and high surface show improved charge transport and promote delithiation (lithium ion dissolution) during recharge and thus plays a critical role in the facile decomposition of lithium peroxide. Thermodynamically, density functional calculations reveal that disordered geometric arrangements of the surface atoms in the amorphous structure lead to weaker binding of the key reaction intermediate lithium superoxide, yielding smaller oxygen reduction and evolution overpotentials compared to the crystalline surface. This study suggests a strategy to enhance the decomposition rate of lithium peroxide by exploiting the size and shape of one-dimensional nanostructured lithium peroxide.

  5. Pair distribution functions of amorphous organic thin films from synchrotron X-ray scattering in transmission mode

    SciT

    Shi, Chenyang; Teerakapibal, Rattavut; Yu, Lian

    2017-07-10

    Using high-brilliance high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation, for the first time the total scattering of a thin organic glass film deposited on a strongly scattering inorganic substrate has been measured in transmission mode. The organic thin film was composed of the weakly scattering pharmaceutical substance indomethacin in the amorphous state. The film was 130 µm thick atop a borosilicate glass substrate of equal thickness. The atomic pair distribution function derived from the thin-film measurement is in excellent agreement with that from bulk measurements. This ability to measure the total scattering of amorphous organic thin films in transmission will enable accuratein situstructuralmore » studies for a wide range of materials.« less

  6. Charging and breakdown in amorphous dielectrics: Phenomenological modeling approach and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sambit

    Amorphous dielectrics of different thicknesses (nm to mm) are used in various applications. Low temperature processing/deposition of amorphous thin-film dielectrics often result in defect-states or electronic traps. These traps are responsible for increased leakage currents and bulk charge trapping in many associated applications. Additional defects may be generated during regular usage, leading to electrical breakdown. Increased leakage currents, charge trapping and defect generation/breakdown are important and pervasive reliability concerns in amorphous dielectrics. We first explore the issue of charge accumulation and leakage in amorphous dielectrics. Historically, charge transport in amorphous dielectrics has been presumed, depending on the dielectric thickness, to be either bulk dominated (Frenkel-Poole (FP) emission) or contact dominated (Fowler-Nordheim tunneling). We develop a comprehensive dielectric charging modeling framework which solves for the transient and steady state charge accumulation and leakage currents in an amorphous dielectric, and show that for intermediate thickness dielectrics, the conventional assumption of FP dominated current transport is incorrect, and may lead to false extraction of dielectric parameters. We propose an improved dielectric characterization methodology based on an analytical approximation of our model. Coupled with ab-initio computed defect levels, the dielectric charging model explains measured leakage currents more accurately with lesser empiricism. We study RF-MEMS capacitive switches as one of the target applications of intermediate thickness amorphous dielectrics. To achieve faster analysis and design of RF-MEMS switches in particular, and electro-mechanical actuators in general, we propose a set of fundamental scaling relationships which are independent of specific physical dimensions and material properties; the scaling relationships provide an intrinsic classification of all electro-mechanical actuators

  7. Ultra-Small-Angle X-ray Scattering – X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy Studies of Incipient Structural Changes in Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Based Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, F.; Allen, A.J.; Levine, L.E.; Espinal, L.; Antonucci, J.M.; Skrtic, D.; O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Ilavsky, J.

    2012-01-01

    The local structural changes in amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) based dental composites were studied under isothermal conditions using both static, bulk measurement techniques and a recently developed methodology based on combined ultra-small angle X-ray scattering – X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (USAXS-XPCS), which permits a dynamic approach. While results from conventional bulk measurements do not show clear signs of structural change, USAXS-XPCS results reveal unambiguous evidence for local structural variations on a similar time scale to that of water loss in the ACP fillers. A thermal-expansion based simulation indicates that thermal behavior alone does not account for the observed dynamics. Together, these results suggest that changes in the water content of ACP affect the composite morphology due to changes in ACP structure that occur without an amorphous-to-crystalline conversion. It is also noted that biomedical materials research could benefit greatly from USAXS-XPCS, a dynamic approach. PMID:22374649

  8. Two-phase quasi-equilibrium in β-type Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L.; Pauly, S.; Tang, M. Q.; Eckert, J.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of cast Ti/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) containing β-Ti still remains ambiguous. This is why to date the strategies and alloys suitable for producing such BMGCs with precisely controllable volume fractions and crystallite sizes are still rather limited. In this work, a Ti-based BMGC containing β-Ti was developed in the Ti-Zr-Cu-Co-Be system. The glassy matrix of this BMGC possesses an exceptional glass-forming ability and as a consequence, the volume fractions as well as the composition of the β-Ti dendrites remain constant over a wide range of cooling rates. This finding can be explained in terms of a two-phase quasi-equilibrium between the supercooled liquid and β-Ti, which the system attains on cooling. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium allows predicting the crystalline and glassy volume fractions by means of the lever rule and we succeeded in reproducing these values by slight variations in the alloy composition at a fixed cooling rate. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium could be of critical importance for understanding and designing the microstructures of BMGCs containing the β-phase. Its implications on the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phase are elaborated. PMID:26754315

  9. Amorphous-silicon module hot-spot testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Hot spot heating occurs when cell short-circuit current is lower than string operating current. Amorphous cell hot spot are tested to develop the techniques required for performing reverse bias testing of amorphous cells. Also, to quantify the response of amorphous cells to reverse biasing. Guidelines are developed from testing for reducing hot spot susceptibility of amorphous modules and to develop a qualification test for hot spot testing of amorphous modules. It is concluded that amorphous cells undergo hot spot heating similarly to crystalline cells. Comparison of results obtained with submodules versus actual modules indicate heating levels lower in actual modules. Module design must address hot spot testing and hot spot qualification test conducted on modules showed no instabilities and minor cell erosion.

  10. Bulk oxygen vacancies enriched TiO2 and its enhanced visible photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liming; Ma, Xujun; Sun, Na; Chen, Feng

    2018-05-01

    Via a vacuum thermal treatment, oxygen vacancy (Ov) was introduced into TiO2 bulk lattice during the phase transformation from amorphous TiO2 to anatase. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirm the involvement of Ov causes more violent changes in both bulk and surface structure. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) demonstrated as-obtained V350 gets about a 40-times enhanced Ov signal compared with pure TiO2 (A350) and a 10-times larger signal than that of common Ov modified TiO2 (A450-V350), which clearly illustrates the high concentration of Ov in its bulk lattice. The much enriched Ovs in both bulk and surface lattices of TiO2 help V350 get an enhanced capacity in either visible light harvest or photocarriers generation. And a much higher visible photocatalytic activity for Aicd Orange 7 degradation was finally achieved by V350.

  11. Elastic Anomaly and Polyamorphic Transition in (La, Ce)-based Bulk Metallic Glass under Pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Qi, Xintong; Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; ...

    2017-04-07

    In this paper, we discovered that in association with the polyamorphism of La 32Ce 32Al 16Ni 5Cu 15 bulk metallic glass, the acoustic velocities, measured up to 12.3 GPa using ultrasonic interferometry, exhibit velocity minima at 1.8 GPa for P wave and 3.2 GPa for S wave. The low and high density amorphous states are distinguished by their distinct pressure derivatives of the bulk and shear moduli. The elasticity, permanent densification, and polyamorphic transition are interpreted by the topological rearrangement of solute-centered clusters in medium-range order (MRO) mediated by the 4f electron delocalization of Ce under pressure. The precisely measuredmore » acoustic wave travel times which were used to derive the velocities and densities provided unprecedented data to document the evolution of the bulk and shear elastic moduli associated with a polyamorphic transition in La 32Ce 32Al 16Ni 5Cu 15 bulk metallic glass and can shed new light on the mechanisms of polyamorphism and structural evolution in metallic glasses under pressure.« less

  12. The dynamic crossover in water does not require bulk water.

    PubMed

    Turton, David A; Corsaro, Carmelo; Martin, David F; Mallamace, Francesco; Wynne, Klaas

    2012-06-14

    Many of the anomalous properties of water may be explained by invoking a second critical point that terminates the coexistence line between the low- and high-density amorphous states in the liquid. Direct experimental evidence of this point, and the associated polyamorphic liquid-liquid transition, is elusive as it is necessary for liquid water to be cooled below its homogeneous-nucleation temperature. To avoid crystallization, water in the eutectic LiCl solution has been studied but then it is generally considered that "bulk" water cannot be present. However, recent computational and experimental studies observe cooperative hydration in which case it is possible that sufficient hydrogen-bonded water is present for the essential characteristics of water to be preserved. For femtosecond optical Kerr-effect and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, we observe in each case a fractional Stokes-Einstein relation with evidence of the dynamic crossover appearing near 220 K and 250 K respectively. Spectra obtained in the glass state also confirm the complex nature of the hydrogen-bonding modes reported for neat room-temperature water and support predictions of anomalous diffusion due to "worm-hole" structure.

  13. Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten-bearing Alloys and Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS-6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-14-73 Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten...Technology, Boise State University, Army Research Laboratory Project Title: Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten-bearing Alloys and Composites...Our year 3 tasks, as laid out in the project proposal, were to 1) Consolidate amorphous or nanocrystalline powder blends 2) Mechanical testing

  14. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of this...

  15. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of this...

  16. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of this...

  17. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of this...

  18. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of this...

  19. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bulk storage. 127.313 Section 127.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The operator...

  20. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bulk storage. 127.313 Section 127.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The operator...

  1. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bulk storage. 127.313 Section 127.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The operator...

  2. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bulk storage. 127.313 Section 127.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The operator...

  3. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bulk storage. 127.313 Section 127.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The operator...

  4. Temporal soil bulk density following tillage

    Soil is the medium for air, energy, water, and chemical transport between the atmosphere and the solid earth. Soil bulk density is a key variable impacting the rate at which this transport occurs. Typically, soil bulk density is measured by the gravimetric method, where a sample of known volume is t...

  5. 76 FR 8658 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code..., the Coast Guard amended its regulations governing the carriage of solid hazardous materials in bulk to... hazardous bulk solid materials not addressed in the amended regulations. This notice announces that the...

  6. Caltech Center for Structural and Amorphous Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-10

    Flores, D. Suh, R. Howell, P. Asoka -Kumar, P.A. Sterne, and R. H. Dauskardt, "Flow and Fracture of Bulk Metallic Glass Alloys and Their Composites...Behavior of Zr-Ti-Cu-Ni-Be Bulk Metallic Glass Alloys," Materials Transactions, JIM, 42 [4], 638-641, 2001. K. M. Flores, D. Suh, P. Asoka -Kumar, P.A...Materials Research, 17[5], 1153-1161, 2002. D. Suh, P. Asoka -Kumar and R. H. Dauskardt, "The Effects of Hydrogen on Viscoelastic Relaxation in Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu

  7. Rapid Annealing Of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine effects of rapid annealing on films of amorphous hydrogenated carbon. Study represents first efforts to provide information for applications of a-C:H films where rapid thermal processing required. Major finding, annealing causes abrupt increase in absorption and concomitant decrease in optical band gap. Most of change occurs during first 20 s, continues during longer annealing times. Extend of change increases with annealing temperature. Researchers hypothesize abrupt initial change caused by loss of hydrogen, while gradual subsequent change due to polymerization of remaining carbon into crystallites or sheets of graphite. Optical band gaps of unannealed specimens on silicon substrates lower than those of specimens on quartz substrates.

  8. On the crystallization of amorphous germanium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, F.; Komem, Y.; Bendayan, M.; Beserman, R.

    1993-06-01

    The incubation time for crystallization of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films, deposited by e-gun, was studied as a function of temperature between 150 and 500°C by means of both in situ transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of t0 follows an Arrhenius curve with an activation energy of 2.0 eV for free-sustained a-Ge films. In the case where the a-Ge films were on Si 3N 4 substrate, the activation energy of the incubation process was 1.3 eV.

  9. Photoconductivity response time in amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriaenssens, G. J.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Fuhs, W.; Jansen, J.; Öktü, Ö.

    1995-04-01

    The photoconductivity response time of amorphous semiconductors is examined theoretically on the basis of standard definitions for free- and trapped-carrier lifetimes, and experimentally for a series of a-Si1-xCx:H alloys with x<0.1. Particular attention is paid to its dependence on carrier generation rate and temperature. As no satisfactory agreement between models and experiments emerges, a simple theory is developed that can account for the experimental observations on the basis of the usual multiple-trappping ideas, provided a small probability of direct free-carrier recombination is included. The theory leads to a stretched-exponential photocurrent decay.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anup

    The general and practical inversion of diffraction data - producing a computer model correctly representing the material explored - is an important unsolved problem for disordered materials. Such modeling should proceed by using our full knowledge base, both from experiment and theory. In this dissertation, we introduce a robust method, Force-Enhanced Atomic Refinement (FEAR), which jointly exploits the power of ab initio atomistic simulation along with the information carried by diffraction data. As a preliminary trial, the method has been implemented using empirical potentials for amorphous silicon (a-Si) and silica ( SiO2). The models obtained are comparable to the ones prepared by the conventional approaches as well as the experiments. Using ab initio interactions, the method is applied to two very different systems: amorphous silicon (a-Si) and two compositions of a solid electrolyte memory material silver-doped GeSe3. It is shown that the method works well for both the materials. Besides that, the technique is easy to implement, is faster and yields results much improved over conventional simulation methods for the materials explored. It offers a means to add a priori information in first principles modeling of materials, and represents a significant step toward the computational design of non-crystalline materials using accurate interatomic interactions and experimental information. Moreover, the method has also been used to create a computer model of a-Si, using highly precise X-ray diffraction data. The model predicts properties that are close to the continuous random network models but with no a priori assumptions. In addition, using the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations (AIMD) we explored the doping and transport in hydrogenated amorphous silicon a-Si:H with the most popular impurities: boron and phosphorous. We investigated doping for these impurities and the role of H in the doping process. We revealed the network motion and H hopping induced by

  11. Magnetron-Sputtered Amorphous Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Mehra, M.; Khanna, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous coatings of refractory metal/metalloid-based alloys deposited by magnetron sputtering provide extraordinary hardness and wear resistance. Sputtering target fabricated by thoroughly mixing powders of tungsten, rhenium, and boron in stated proportions and pressing at 1,200 degrees C and 3,000 lb/in. to second power (21 MPa). Substrate lightly etched by sputtering before deposition, then maintained at bias of - 500 V during initial stages of film growth while target material sputtered onto it. Argon gas at pressure used as carrier gas for sputter deposition. Coatings dense, pinhole-free, extremely smooth, and significantly resistant to chemical corrosion in acidic and neutral aqueous environments.

  12. Obstacles using amorphous materials for volume applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Albert; Reininger, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This contribution is especially focussed on the attempt to use amorphous or nanocrystalline metals in position sensor applications and to describe the difficulties and obstacles encountered in coherence with the development of appropriate industrial high volume series products in conjunction with the related quality requirements. The main motivation to do these investigations was to beat the generally known sensors especially silicon based Hall-sensors as well as AMR- and GMR-sensors - well known from mobile phones and electronic storage devices like hard discs and others - in terms of cost-effectiveness and functionality.

  13. Optical multilayers with an amorphous fluoropolymer

    SciT

    Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Lindsey, E.F.

    1994-07-01

    Multilayered coatings were made by physical vapor deposition (PVD) of a perfluorinated amorphous polymer, Teflon AF2400, together with other optical materials. A high reflector at 1064 run was made with ZnS and AF2400. An all-organic 1064-nm reflector was made from AF2400 and polyethylene. Oxide (HfO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}) compatibility was also tested. Each multilayer system adhered to itself. The multilayers were influenced by coating stress and unintentional temperature rises during PVD deposition.

  14. Thermally induced evolution of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangolini, Filippo; Rose, Franck; Hilbert, James; Carpick, Robert W.

    2013-10-01

    The thermally induced structural evolution of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films was investigated in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for annealing temperatures up to 500 °C. A model for the conversion of sp3- to sp2-hybridized carbon in a-C:H vs. temperature and time was developed and applied to determine the ranges of activation energies for the thermally activated processes occurring. The energies are consistent with ordering and clustering of sp2 carbon, scission of sp3 carbon-hydrogen bonds and formation of sp2 carbon, and direct transformation of sp3- to sp2-hybridized carbon.

  15. Metal transport and remobilisation in a basin affected by acid mine drainage: the role of ochreous amorphous precipitates.

    PubMed

    Consani, Sirio; Carbone, Cristina; Dinelli, Enrico; Balić-Žunić, Tonci; Cutroneo, Laura; Capello, Marco; Salviulo, Gabriella; Lucchetti, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Metal-polluted mine waters represent a major threat to the quality of waters and sediments in a downstream basin. At the confluence between acidic mine waters and the unpolluted waters of the Gromolo Torrent (Liguria, North-West Italy), the massive formation of an ochreous amorphous precipitate takes place. This precipitate forms a soft blanket that covers the torrent bed and can be observed down to its mouth in the sea. The aim of this work is to evaluate the dispersion of metals in the Gromolo Torrent basin from the abandoned Cu-Fe sulphide mine of Libiola to the Ligurian Sea and to assess the metal remobilisation from the amorphous precipitates. The mineralogy of the superficial sediments collected in the torrent bed and the concentrations of different elements of environmental concern (Cu, Zn, Cd, Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, As, and Sb) were therefore analysed. The results showed that the precipitates contain high concentration of Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn, significantly modifying the bulk chemistry of the Gromolo Torrent sediments. In order to evaluate the possible remobilisation of ecotoxic elements from the amorphous precipitates, bulk leaching tests were performed with both deionised and seawater. Bulk leaching tests with deionised water mobilised primarily high Pb amounts, but also relatively high concentrations of Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn are released in the leachate. In seawater tests, Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn were released in smaller amounts, while other elements like Mn, Cd, Co, and Ni increased in the released fraction. Pb was still strongly released as in deionised water experiments. The results show that the interaction of precipitates and seawater can remobilise high concentrations of metals, thus affecting the surrounding environment.

  16. Influence of isotopic disorder on solid state amorphization and polyamorphism in solid H2O -D2O solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromnitskaya, E. L.; Danilov, I. V.; Lyapin, A. G.; Brazhkin, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a low-temperature and high-pressure ultrasonic study of elastic properties of isotopic H2O-D2O solid solutions, comparing their properties with those of the isotopically pure H2O and D2O ices. Measurements were carried out for solid state amorphization (SSA) from 1h to high-density amorphous (HDA) ice upon compression up to 1.8 GPa at 77 K and for the temperature-induced (77 -190 K ) u-HDA (unrelaxed HDA) → e-HDA (expanded HDA) → low-density amorphous (LDA )→1 c cascade of ice transformations near room pressure. There are many similarities in the elasticity behaviour of H2O ,D2O , and H2O-D2O solid solutions, including the softening of the shear elastic modulus as a precursor of SSA and the HDA →LDA transition. We have found significant isotopic effects during H/D substitution, including elastic softening of H2O -D2O solid solutions with respect to the isotopically pure ices in the case of the bulk moduli of ices 1c and 1h and for both bulk and shear elastic moduli of HDA ice at high pressures (>1 GPa ) . This softening is related to the configurational isotopic disorder in the solid solutions. At low pressures, the isotope concentration dependence of the elastic moduli of u-HDA ice changes remarkably and becomes monotonic with pronounced change of the bulk modulus (≈20 %) .

  17. Spinodal decomposition in amorphous metal-silicate thin films: Phase diagram analysis and interface effects on kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; McIntyre, P. C.

    2002-11-01

    Among several metal silicate candidates for high permittivity gate dielectric applications, the mixing thermodynamics of the ZrO2-SiO2 system were analyzed, based on previously published experimental phase diagrams. The driving force for spinodal decomposition was investigated in an amorphous silicate that was treated as a supercooled liquid solution. A subregular model was used for the excess free energy of mixing of the liquid, and measured invariant points were adopted for the calculations. The resulting simulated ZrO2-SiO2 phase diagram matched the experimental results reasonably well and indicated that a driving force exists for amorphous Zr-silicate compositions between approx40 mol % and approx90 mol % SiO2 to decompose into a ZrO2-rich phase (approx20 mol % SiO2) and SiO2-rich phase (>98 mol % SiO2) through diffusional phase separation at a temperature of 900 degC. These predictions are consistent with recent experimental reports of phase separation in amorphous Zr-silicate thin films. Other metal-silicate systems were also investigated and composition ranges for phase separation in amorphous Hf, La, and Y silicates were identified from the published bulk phase diagrams. The kinetics of one-dimensional spinodal decomposition normal to the plane of the film were simulated for an initially homogeneous Zr-silicate dielectric layer. We examined the effects that local stresses and the capillary driving force for component segregation to the interface have on the rate of spinodal decomposition in amorphous metal-silicate thin films.

  18. Amorphization of Indomethacin by Co-Grinding with Neusilin US2: amorphization kinetics, physical stability and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Deepak; Bogner, Robin H

    2006-10-01

    To quantify the effects of the ratio of indomethacin to Neusilin US2 and the processing humidity on the amorphization kinetics, stability and nature of the interaction. A porcelain jar mill with zirconia balls was used to affect conversion of the physical mixtures (48 g) of indomethacin and Neusilin US2 (in the ratios 1:1 to 1:5) to amorphous states at room temperature (25 degrees C) employing either 0% RH or 75% RH. The percent crystallinity in the samples was determined from ATR-FTIR scans chemometrically. The physical stability of these co-ground amorphous powders was evaluated at 40 degrees C/75% RH and 40 degrees C/0% RH. The lower the ratio of indomethacin to Neusilin US2, the faster is the amorphization during co-grinding. Higher humidity facilitates amorphization with a more pronounced effect at the lower ratio of indomethacin to Neusilin US2. There is further amorphization of some of the partially amorphized samples on storage at 40 degrees C/75% RH for 3 months. Hydrogen bonding and surface interaction between metal ions of Neusilin US2 and indomethacin can explain changes in the FTIR spectra. The processing humidity and the ratio of indomethacin to Neusilin US2 are important factors to be considered to affect amorphization during ball milling. Amorphous indomethacin can be stabilized by co-grinding with Neusilin US2.

  19. Studies of the crystallization of amorphous trehalose using simultaneous gravimetric vapor sorption/near IR (GVS/NIR) and "modulated" GVS/NIR.

    PubMed

    Moran, Abigail; Buckton, Graham

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of changes in the amorphous state on the crystallization of trehalose. Amorphous trehalose is known to stabilize biomaterials; hence, an understanding of crystallization is vital. Amorphous trehalose, prepared by spray-drying, was exposed to either a single step (0-75%) in relative humidity (RH) or to modulated 0-75-0% RH to cause crystallization. For the single-step experiment, two samples crystallized in a predictable manner to form the dihydrate. One sample, while notionally identical, did not crystallize in the same way and showed a mass loss throughout the time at 75% RH, with a final mass less than that expected for the dihydrate. The idiosyncratic sample was seen to have a starting near infrared (NIR) spectra similar to that exhibited by anhydrous crystalline trehalose, implying that short-range order in the amorphous material (or a small amount of crystalline seed, not detectable using powder X-ray diffraction) caused the sample to fail to form the dihydrate fully when exposed to high RH. The modulated RH study showed that the amorphous material interacted strongly with water; the intensity of the NIR traces was not proportional to mass of water but rather the extent of hydrogen bonding. Subsequent crystallization of this sample clearly was a partial formation of the dihydrate, but with the bulk of the sample then shielded such that it was unable to show significant sorption when exposed to elevated RH. It has been shown that the nature of the amorphous form will alter the way in which samples crystallize. With oscillation in RH, it was possible to further understand the interactions between water and amorphous trehalose.

  20. Accelerated Physical Stability Testing of Amorphous Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mehak; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-08-01

    The goal was to develop an accelerated physical stability testing method of amorphous dispersions. Water sorption is known to cause plasticization and may accelerate drug crystallization. In an earlier investigation, it was observed that both the increase in mobility and decrease in stability in amorphous dispersions was explained by the "plasticization" effect of water (Mehta et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics 2016, 13 (4), 1339-1346). In this work, the influence of water concentration (up to 1.8% w/w) on the correlation between mobility and crystallization in felodipine dispersions was investigated. With an increase in water content, the α-relaxation time as well as the time for 1% w/w felodipine crystallization decreased. The relaxation times of the systems, obtained with different water concentration, overlapped when the temperature was scaled (Tg/T). The temperature dependencies of the α-relaxation time as well as the crystallization time were unaffected by the water concentration. Thus, the value of the coupling coefficient, up to a water concentration of 1.8% w/w, was approximately constant. Based on these findings, the use of "water sorption" is proposed to build predictive models for crystallization in slow crystallizing dispersions.

  1. Memristive effects in oxygenated amorphous carbon nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, T. A.; Koelmans, W. W.; Jonnalagadda, V. P.; Le Gallo, M.; Santini, C. A.; Sebastian, A.; Eleftheriou, E.; Craciun, M. F.; Wright, C. D.

    2018-01-01

    Computing with resistive-switching (memristive) memory devices has shown much recent progress and offers an attractive route to circumvent the von-Neumann bottleneck, i.e. the separation of processing and memory, which limits the performance of conventional computer architectures. Due to their good scalability and nanosecond switching speeds, carbon-based resistive-switching memory devices could play an important role in this respect. However, devices based on elemental carbon, such as tetrahedral amorphous carbon or ta-C, typically suffer from a low cycling endurance. A material that has proven to be capable of combining the advantages of elemental carbon-based memories with simple fabrication methods and good endurance performance for binary memory applications is oxygenated amorphous carbon, or a-CO x . Here, we examine the memristive capabilities of nanoscale a-CO x devices, in particular their ability to provide the multilevel and accumulation properties that underpin computing type applications. We show the successful operation of nanoscale a-CO x memory cells for both the storage of multilevel states (here 3-level) and for the provision of an arithmetic accumulator. We implement a base-16, or hexadecimal, accumulator and show how such a device can carry out hexadecimal arithmetic and simultaneously store the computed result in the self-same a-CO x cell, all using fast (sub-10 ns) and low-energy (sub-pJ) input pulses.

  2. Emergent interparticle interactions in thermal amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendelman, Oleg; Lerner, Edan; Pollack, Yoav G.; Procaccia, Itamar; Rainone, Corrado; Riechers, Birte

    2016-11-01

    Amorphous media at finite temperatures, be them liquids, colloids, or glasses, are made of interacting particles that move chaotically due to thermal energy, continuously colliding and scattering off each other. When the average configuration in these systems relaxes only at long times, one can introduce effective interactions that keep the mean positions in mechanical equilibrium. We introduce a framework to determine the effective force laws that define an effective Hessian that can be employed to discuss stability properties and the density of states of the amorphous system. We exemplify the approach with a thermal glass of hard spheres; these experience zero forces when not in contact and infinite forces when they touch. Close to jamming we recapture the effective interactions that at temperature T depend on the gap h between spheres as T /h [C. Brito and M. Wyart, Europhys. Lett. 76, 149 (2006), 10.1209/epl/i2006-10238-x]. For hard spheres at lower densities or for systems whose binary bare interactions are longer ranged (at any density), the emergent force laws include ternary, quaternary, and generally higher-order many-body terms, leading to a temperature-dependent effective Hessian.

  3. Method for improving the stability of amorphous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.

    2004-03-30

    A method of producing a metastable degradation resistant amorphous hydrogenated silicon film is provided, which comprises the steps of growing a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, the film having an exposed surface, illuminating the surface using an essentially blue or ultraviolet light to form high densities of a light induced defect near the surface, and etching the surface to remove the defect.

  4. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  5. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rajeewa R.

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  6. Electrically conducting ternary amorphous fully oxidized materials and their application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giauque, Pierre (Inventor); Nicolet, Marc (Inventor); Gasser, Stefan M. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta A. (Inventor); Cherry, Hillary (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Electrically active devices are formed using a special conducting material of the form Tm--Ox mixed with SiO2 where the materials are immiscible. The immiscible materials are forced together by using high energy process to form an amorphous phase of the two materials. The amorphous combination of the two materials is electrically conducting but forms an effective barrier.

  7. Pressure-induced transformations in amorphous silicon: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcez, K. M. S.; Antonelli, A.

    2014-02-01

    We study the transformations between amorphous phases of Si through molecular simulations using the environment dependent interatomic potential (EDIP) for Si. Our results show that upon pressure, the material undergoes a transformation from the low density amorphous (LDA) Si to the high density amorphous (HDA) Si. This transformation can be reversed by decompressing the material. This process, however, exhibits clear hysteresis, suggesting that the transformation LDA ↔ HDA is first-order like. The HDA phase is predominantly five-fold coordinated, whereas the LDA phase is the normal tetrahedrally bonded amorphous Si. The HDA phase at 400 K and 20 GPa was submitted to an isobaric annealing up to 800 K, resulting in a denser amorphous phase, which is structurally distinct from the HDA phase. Our results also show that the atomic volume and structure of this new amorphous phase are identical to those of the glass obtained by an isobaric quenching of the liquid in equilibrium at 2000 K and 20 GPa down to 400 K. The similarities between our results and those for amorphous ices suggest that this new phase is the very high density amorphous Si.

  8. Image quality and radiation dose on digital chest imaging: comparison of amorphous silicon and amorphous selenium flat-panel systems.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Klaus; Smeets, Peter; Vereecken, Ludo; De Hauwere, An; Duyck, Philippe; De Man, Robert; Verstraete, Koenraad; Thierens, Hubert

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the image quality and radiation dose in chest imaging using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector system and an amorphous selenium flat-panel detector system. In addition, the low-contrast performance of both systems with standard and low radiation doses was compared. In two groups of 100 patients each, digital chest radiographs were acquired with either an amorphous silicon or an amorphous selenium flat-panel system. The effective dose of the examination was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters placed in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. The image quality of the digital chest radiographs was assessed by five experienced radiologists using the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images. In addition, a contrast-detail phantom study was set up to assess the low-contrast performance of both systems at different radiation dose levels. Differences between the two groups were tested for significance using the two-tailed Mann-Whitney test. The amorphous silicon flat-panel system allowed an important and significant reduction in effective dose in comparison with the amorphous selenium flat-panel system (p < 0.0001) for both the posteroanterior and lateral views. In addition, clinical image quality analysis showed that the dose reduction was not detrimental to image quality. Compared with the amorphous selenium flat-panel detector system, the amorphous silicon flat-panel detector system performed significantly better in the low-contrast phantom study, with phantom entrance dose values of up to 135 muGy. Chest radiographs can be acquired with a significantly lower patient radiation dose using an amorphous silicon flat-panel system than using an amorphous selenium flat-panel system, thereby producing images that are equal or even superior in quality to those of the amorphous selenium flat-panel detector system.

  9. Investigation on Explosive Welding of Zr53Cu35Al12 Bulk Metallic Glass with Crystalline Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianrui; Chen, Pengwan; Zhou, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    A Zr53Cu35Al12 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was welded to a crystalline Cu using explosive welding technique. The morphology and the composition of the composite were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The investigation indicated that the BMG and Cu were tightly joined together without visible defects, and a thin diffusion layer appeared at the interface. The captured jet at the end of the welding region mostly comes from the Cu side. Amorphous and partially crystallized structures have been observed within the diffusion layer, but the BMG in close proximity to the interface still retains its amorphous state. Nanoindentation tests reveal that the interface exhibits an increment in hardness compared with the matrix on both sides.

  10. Molecular Dynamical Simulation of Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deangelis, Freddy; Henry, Asegun

    While current descriptions of thermal transport exists for well-ordered materials such as crystal latices, new methods are needed to describe thermal transport in disordered materials, including amorphous solids. Because such structures lack periodic, long-range order, a group velocity cannot be defined for thermal modes of vibration; thus, the phonon gas model cannot be applied to these structures. Instead, a new framework must be applied to analyze such materials. Using a combination of density functional theory and molecular dynamics, we have analyzed thermal transport in amorphous structures, chiefly amorphous germanium. The analysis allows us to categorize vibrational modes as propagons, diffusons, or locons, and to determine how they contribute to thermal conductivity within amorphous structures. This method is also being extended to other disordered structures such as amorphous polymers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE-1148903.

  11. Mechanism of solid state amorphization of glucose upon milling.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, N; Willart, J F; Dudognon, E; Danède, F; Descamps, M

    2013-02-07

    Crystalline α-glucose is known to amorphize upon milling at -15 °C while it remains structurally invariant upon milling at room temperature. We have taken advantage of this behavior to compare the microstructural evolutions of the material in both conditions in order to identify the essential microstructural features which drive the amorphization process upon milling. The investigations have been performed by differential scanning calorimetry and by powder X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that two different amorphization mechanisms occur upon milling: an amorphization at the surface of crystallites due to the mechanical shocks and a spontaneous amorphization of the crystallites as they reach a critical size, which is close to 200 Å in the particular case of α-glucose.

  12. Picosecond amorphization of SiO2 stishovite under tension.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Masaaki; Ryuo, Emina; Yoshida, Kimiko; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Vashishta, Priya; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2017-05-01

    It is extremely difficult to realize two conflicting properties-high hardness and toughness-in one material. Nano-polycrystalline stishovite, recently synthesized from Earth-abundant silica glass, proved to be a super-hard, ultra-tough material, which could provide sustainable supply of high-performance ceramics. Our quantum molecular dynamics simulations show that stishovite amorphizes rapidly on the order of picosecond under tension in front of a crack tip. We find a displacive amorphization mechanism that only involves short-distance collective motions of atoms, thereby facilitating the rapid transformation. The two-step amorphization pathway involves an intermediate state akin to experimentally suggested "high-density glass polymorphs" before eventually transforming to normal glass. The rapid amorphization can catch up with, screen, and self-heal a fast-moving crack. This new concept of fast amorphization toughening likely operates in other pressure-synthesized hard solids.

  13. Direct-patterned optical waveguides on amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Steve; Bond, Tiziana C.; Bond, Steven W.; Pocha, Michael D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2005-08-02

    An optical waveguide structure is formed by embedding a core material within a medium of lower refractive index, i.e. the cladding. The optical index of refraction of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (p-Si), in the wavelength range between about 1.2 and about 1.6 micrometers, differ by up to about 20%, with the amorphous phase having the larger index. Spatially selective laser crystallization of amorphous silicon provides a mechanism for controlling the spatial variation of the refractive index and for surrounding the amorphous regions with crystalline material. In cases where an amorphous silicon film is interposed between layers of low refractive index, for example, a structure comprised of a SiO.sub.2 substrate, a Si film and an SiO.sub.2 film, the formation of guided wave structures is particularly simple.

  14. Picosecond amorphization of SiO2 stishovite under tension

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Masaaki; Ryuo, Emina; Yoshida, Kimiko; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Vashishta, Priya; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2017-01-01

    It is extremely difficult to realize two conflicting properties—high hardness and toughness—in one material. Nano-polycrystalline stishovite, recently synthesized from Earth-abundant silica glass, proved to be a super-hard, ultra-tough material, which could provide sustainable supply of high-performance ceramics. Our quantum molecular dynamics simulations show that stishovite amorphizes rapidly on the order of picosecond under tension in front of a crack tip. We find a displacive amorphization mechanism that only involves short-distance collective motions of atoms, thereby facilitating the rapid transformation. The two-step amorphization pathway involves an intermediate state akin to experimentally suggested “high-density glass polymorphs” before eventually transforming to normal glass. The rapid amorphization can catch up with, screen, and self-heal a fast-moving crack. This new concept of fast amorphization toughening likely operates in other pressure-synthesized hard solids. PMID:28508056

  15. Bulk Leisure--Problem or Blessing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beland, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    With an increasing number of the nation's work force experiencing "bulk leisure" time because of new work scheduling procedures, parks and recreation offices are encouraged to examine their program scheduling and content. (JM)

  16. Appendix D - Sample Bulk Storage Facility Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This sample Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan in Appendix D is intended to provide examples and illustrations of how a bulk storage facility could address a variety of scenarios in its SPCC Plan.

  17. Atomistic structures of nano-engineered SiC and radiation-induced amorphization resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Kenta; Ishimaru, Manabu; Sato, Kazuhisa; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Shannon, Steven; Weber, William J.

    2015-10-01

    Nano-engineered 3C-SiC thin films, which possess columnar structures with high-density stacking faults and twins, were irradiated with 2 MeV Si ions at cryogenic and room temperatures. From cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy observations in combination with Monte Carlo simulations based on the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter code, it was found that their amorphization resistance is six times greater than bulk crystalline SiC at room temperature. High-angle bright-field images taken by spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that the distortion of atomic configurations is localized near the stacking faults. The resultant strain field probably contributes to the enhancement of radiation tolerance of this material.

  18. Atomistic structures of nano-engineered SiC and radiation-induced amorphization resistance

    DOE PAGES

    Imada, Kenta; Ishimaru, Manabu; Sato, Kazuhisa; ...

    2015-06-18

    In this paper, nano-engineered 3C–SiC thin films, which possess columnar structures with high-density stacking faults and twins, were irradiated with 2 MeV Si ions at cryogenic and room temperatures. From cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy observations in combination with Monte Carlo simulations based on the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter code, it was found that their amorphization resistance is six times greater than bulk crystalline SiC at room temperature. High-angle bright-field images taken by spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that the distortion of atomic configurations is localized near the stacking faults. Finally, the resultant strain fieldmore » probably contributes to the enhancement of radiation tolerance of this material.« less

  19. Effect of silane dilution on intrinsic stress in glow discharge hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbison, J. P.; Williams, A. J.; Lang, D. V.

    1984-02-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic stress in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H) films grown by rf glow discharge decomposition of silane diluted to varying degrees in argon are presented. Films are found to grow under exceedingly high compressive stress. Low values of macroscopic film density and low stress values are found to correlate with high growth rate. An abrupt drop in stress occurs between 2 and 3% silane at precisely the point where columnar growth morphology appears. No corresponding abrupt change is noted in density, growth rate, or plasma species concentrations as determined by optical emissioin spectroscopy. Finally a model of diffusive incorporation of hydrogen or some gaseous impurity during growth into the bulk of the film behind the growing interface is proposed to explain the results.

  20. Grazing incidence X-ray absorption characterization of amorphous Zn-Sn-O thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, S. L.; Ma, Q.; Buchholz, D. B.; Chang, R. P. H.; Bedzyk, M. J.; Mason, T. O.

    2016-05-01

    We report a surface structure study of an amorphous Zn-Sn-O (a-ZTO) transparent conducting film using the grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique. By setting the measuring angles far below the critical angle at which the total external reflection occurs, the details of the surface structure of a film or bulk can be successfully accessed. The results show that unlike in the film where Zn is severely under coordinated (N < 4), it is fully coordinated (N = 4) near the surface while the coordination number around Sn is slightly smaller near the surface than in the film. Despite a 30% Zn doping, the local structure in the film is rutile-like.

  1. Sixfold-coordinated amorphous polymorph of SiO2 under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoko; Funamori, Nobumasa

    2008-12-19

    We have developed synchrotron x-ray absorption and diffraction techniques for measuring the density and structure of noncrystalline materials at high pressures and have applied them to studying the behavior of SiO2 glass. The density, coordination number, and Si-O bond length at a pressure of 50 GPa were measured to be 4.63 g/cm;{3}, 6.3, and 1.71 A, respectively. Based on the density data measured in this study and the sound velocity data available in the literature, the bulk modulus at 50 GPa was estimated to be 390 GPa, which is consistent with the pressure dependence of the density in the vicinity of 50 GPa. These results, together with the knowledge from our exploratory study, suggest that SiO2 glass behaves as a single amorphous polymorph having a sixfold-coordinated structure at pressures above 40-45 GPa up to at least 100 GPa.

  2. Amorphous Slater-Pauling like behaviour in magnetic nanoparticles alloys synthesized in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Paul; Ménard, David; Meunier, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Nanoparticles of Fe, Co, Ni, and their alloys, with an average diameter of 12 nm were synthesized in liquids using a laser. Their saturation magnetization exhibited a Slater-Pauling-like behaviour with two main differences compared to that expected in bulk materials. First, the amplitude of the magnetization was found to be roughly 5 times smaller. Second, the disappearance of the ferromagnetic (FM) behaviour occurred at Ni instead of the expected Ni0.6Cu0.4. The behaviour can be explained by the presence of non-magnetic oxidized shells which reduced the fraction of ferromagnetic atoms and induce through strain an amorphous structure in the metallic core. Annealing at 500 K leads to some crystallization of the particles and thus to a partial recovery of the expected magnetization.

  3. Elastic moduli in nano-size samples of amorphous solids: System size dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Yossi; Procaccia, Itamar

    2012-08-01

    This letter is motivated by some recent experiments on pan-cake-shaped nano-samples of metallic glass that indicate a decline in the measured shear modulus upon decreasing the sample radius. Similar measurements on crystalline samples of the same dimensions showed a much more modest change. In this letter we offer a theory of this phenomenon; we argue that such results are generically expected for any amorphous solid, with the main effect being related to the increased contribution of surfaces with respect to the bulk when the samples get smaller. We employ exact relations between the shear modulus and the eigenvalues of the system's Hessian matrix to explore the role of surface modes in affecting the elastic moduli.

  4. Dark current in multilayer stabilized amorphous selenium based photoconductive x-ray detectors

    SciT

    Frey, Joel B.; Belev, George; Kasap, Safa O.

    2012-07-01

    We report on experimental results which show that the dark current in n-i-p structured, amorphous selenium films is independent of i-layer thickness in samples with consistently thick blocking layers. We have observed, however, a strong dependence on the n-layer thickness and positive contact metal chosen. These results indicate that the dominant source of the dark current is carrier injection from the contacts and any contribution from carriers thermally generated in the bulk of the photoconductive layer is negligible. This conclusion is supported by a description of the dark current transients at different applied fields by a model which assumes onlymore » carrier emission over a Schottky barrier. This model also predicts that while hole injection is initially dominant, some time after the application of the bias, electron injection may become the dominant source of dark current.« less

  5. Recovery of Stishovite-Structure at Ambient Conditions out of Shock-Generated Amorphous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. N.; Tschauner, O.; Asimow, P. D.; Ahrens, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    We show that bulk amorphous silica recovered from shock wave experiments on quartz to 56 GPa is not a true glass but rather keeps a large degree of long range structural information that can be recovered by static cold recompression to 13 GPa. At this pressure shock-retrieved silica assumes the structure of crystalline stishovite. This amorphous-crystal transition is characterized by long coherence length, resulting in formation of large crystallites. Therefore, the shock-recovered amorphous material studied here is a slightly disordered six-fold coordinated silica phase but not a glass, which possesses only medium range order [1]. It is therefore most likely that stishovite or a structurally closely related solid phase represent the state this material had assumed during shock, while post-shock heating to 500 -1000 K [2-4] induces the observed slight disorder. This probable memory-effect allows for physically more precise characterization of diaplectic silica `glass' and may be extended to other diaplectic `glasses' [1] O.Tschauner, S.N. Luo, P.D.Asimow, T.J. Ahrens, Am. Min. in print (2006) [2] J. Wackerle, Journal of Applied Physics, 33, 922 - 937 (1962) [3] M.B. Boslough, Journal of Geophysical Research, 93, 6477 - 9484 (1988) [4] S.N. Luo, T.J. Ahrens, P.D. Asimow, Journal of Geophysical Research, 108, 2421- 2434 (2003) Supported under the NNSA Cooperative Agreement DE-FC88-01NV14049 and under NASA PGG Grant NNG04G107G and Contribution # 9144, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology.

  6. Surface Brillouin scattering study of the surface excitations in amorphous silicon layers produced by ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Comins, J. D.; Every, A. G.; Stoddart, P. R.; Pang, W.; Derry, T. E.

    1998-11-01

    Thin amorphous silicon layers on crystalline silicon substrates have been produced by argon-ion bombardment of (001) silicon surfaces. Thermally induced surface excitations characteristic of this example of a soft-on-hard system have been investigated by surface Brillouin scattering (SBS) as a function of scattering-angle and amorphous-layer thickness. At large scattering angles or for sufficiently large layer thickness, a second peak is present in the SBS spectrum near the low-energy threshold for the continuum of bulk excitations of the system. The measured spectra are analyzed on the basis of surface elastodynamic Green's functions, which successfully simulate their detailed appearance and identify the second peak as either a Sezawa wave (true surface wave) or a pseudo-Sezawa wave (attenuated surface wave) depending on the scattering parameters. The attributes of the pseudo-Sezawa wave are described; these include its asymmetrical line shape and variation in intensity with k∥d (the product of the surface excitation wave vector and the layer thickness), and its emergence as the Sezawa wave from the low-energy side of the Lamb shoulder at a critical value of k∥d. Furthermore, the behavior of a pronounced minimum in the Lamb shoulder near the longitudinal wave threshold observed in the experiments is reported and is found to be in good agreement with the calculated spectra. The elastic constants of the amorphous silicon layer are determined from the velocity dispersion of the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave and the minimum in the Lamb shoulder.

  7. Faecal bulking efficacy of Australasian breakfast cereals.

    PubMed

    Monro, John A

    2002-01-01

    Faecal bulk may play an important role in preventing a range of disorders of the large bowel, but as yet there is little information available on the relative faecal bulking capacities of various foods. Breakfast cereals are often promoted as a good source of potential bulk for 'inner health' because they provide dietary fibre, but their relative abilities to provide faecal bulk per se have not been described. The faecal bulking efficacy of 28 representative Australasian breakfast cereals was therefore measured. A rat model developed for the purpose, and shown to give similar responses as humans to cereal fibres, was used to measure faecal bulking efficacy as increases in fully hydrated faecal weight/100 g diet, based on precise measurements of food intake, faecal dry matter output and faecal water-holding capacity (g water held without stress/g faecal dry matter). Compared to a baseline diet containing 50% sucrose, increments in hydrated faecal weight due to 50% breakfast cereal ranged from slightly negative (Cornflakes, -2 g/100 g diet) to about 80 g/100 g diet (San Bran). Most breakfast cereals increased hydrated faecal weight by between 10 and 20 g/100 g diet from a baseline of 21 +/- 1.5 g/100 g diet, but four products containing high levels of wheat bran had an exceptionally large impact on hydrated faecal weight (increment > 20 g/100 g diet), and the changes resulted more from relative changes in dry matter output than in faecal water retention/gram. However, as faecal water retention was about 2.5 g water/g faecal dry matter on average, increases in dry matter represented large increases in faecal water load. Faecal bulking indices (FBI) for most of the breakfast cereals were less than 20 (wheat bran = 100). The content of wheat bran equivalents for faecal bulk (WBE(fb)) in the breakfast cereals was calculated from FBI. Most breakfast cereals contributed, per serve, less than 10% of a theoretical daily reference value for faecal bulk (DRV(fb) = 63 WBE

  8. Defect generation in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by positive bias stress at elevated temperature

    SciT

    Um, Jae Gwang; Mativenga, Mallory; Jang, Jin, E-mail: jjang@khu.ac.kr

    2014-04-07

    We report on the generation and characterization of a hump in the transfer characteristics of amorphous indium gallium zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by positive bias temperature stress. The hump depends strongly on the gate bias stress at 100 °C. Due to the hump, the positive shift of the transfer characteristic in deep depletion is always smaller that in accumulation. Since, the latter shift is twice the former, with very good correlation, we conclude that the effect is due to creation of a double acceptor, likely to be a cation vacancy. Our results indicate that these defects are located near the gate insulator/activemore » layer interface, rather than in the bulk. Migration of donor defects from the interface towards the bulk may also occur under PBST at 100 °C.« less

  9. Conductivity of laser printed copper structures limited by nano-crystal grain size and amorphous metal droplet shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Shoshana; Zenou, Michael; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of the morphology and electrical properties of copper structures which are printed by laser induced forward transfer from bulk copper. The percentage of voids and the oxidation levels are too low to account for the high resistivities (~4 to 14 times the resistivity of bulk monocrystalline copper) of these structures. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of slices cut from the printed areas using a focused ion beam (FIB) show nano-sized crystal structures with grain sizes that are smaller than the electron free path length. Scattering from such grain boundaries causes a significant increase in the resistivity and can explain the measured resistivities of the structures. The TEM images also show a nano-amorphous layer (~5 nm) at the droplet boundaries which also contributes to the overall resistivity. Such morphological characteristics are best explained by the ultrafast cooling rate of the molten copper droplets during printing.

  10. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, R.; Loomis, G.E.; Thomas, I.M.

    1999-03-16

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (ca. 1.10--1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm. 2 figs.

  11. Optical coatings of variable refractive index and high laser-resistance from physical-vapor-deposited perfluorinated amorphous polymer

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Robert; Loomis, Gary E.; Thomas, Ian M.

    1999-01-01

    Variable index optical single-layers, optical multilayer, and laser-resistant coatings were made from a perfluorinated amorphous polymer material by physical vapor deposition. This was accomplished by physically vapor depositing a polymer material, such as bulk Teflon AF2400, for example, to form thin layers that have a very low refractive index (.about.1.10-1.31) and are highly transparent from the ultra-violet through the near infrared regime, and maintain the low refractive index of the bulk material. The refractive index can be varied by simply varying one process parameter, either the deposition rate or the substrate temperature. The thus forming coatings may be utilized in anti-reflectors and graded anti-reflection coatings, as well as in optical layers for laser-resistant coatings at optical wavelengths of less than about 2000 nm.

  12. Tritiated amorphous silicon films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosteski, Tome

    The do saddle-field glow discharge deposition technique has been used to bond tritium within an amorphous silicon thin film network using silane and elemental tritium in the glow discharge. The concentration of tritium is approximately 7 at. %. Minimal outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) at room temperature suggests that tritium is bonded stably. Tritium effusion only occurred at temperatures above the film's growth temperature. The radioactive decay of tritium results in the production of high-energy beta particles. Each beta particle can generate on average approximately 1300 electron-hole pairs in a-Si:H:T. Electrical conductivity of a-Si:H:T is shown to be due to a thermally activated process and due to the generation of excess carriers by the beta particles. p-i-n betavoltaic devices have been made with a-Si:H:T in the intrinsic (i-) region. The i-region consisted of either a-Si:H:T, or a thin section of a-Si:H:T (a Delta layer) sandwiched between undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The excess carriers generated in the i-region are separated by the device's built-in electric field. Short-circuit currents (Isc ), open-circuit voltages (Voc), and power have been measured and correlated to the generation of excess carriers in the i-region. Good devices were made at a substrate temperature of 250°C and relatively large flow rates of silane and tritium; this ensures that there are more monohydride bonds than dihydride bonds. Under dark conditions, Isc, and Voc have been found to decrease rapidly. This is consistent with the production of silicon neutral dangling bonds (5 x 1017cm-3 per day) from the loss of tritium due to its transmutation into helium. Dangling bonds reduce carrier lifetime and weaken the electric field in the i-region. The short-circuit current from Delta layer devices decreased more slowly and settled to higher values for narrower Delta layers. This is because the dangling bonds are

  13. High-Density Amorphous Ice, the Frost on Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1995-01-01

    Most water ice in the universe is in a form which does not occur naturally on Earth and of which only minimal amounts have been made in the laboratory. We have encountered this 'high-density amorphous ice' in electron diffraction experiments of low-temperature (T less than 30 K) vapor-deposited water and have subsequently modeled its structure using molecular dynamics simulations. The characteristic feature of high-density amorphous ice is the presence of 'interstitial' oxygen pair distances between 3 and 4 A. However, we find that the structure is best described as a collapsed lattice of the more familiar low-density amorphous form. These distortions are frozen in at temperatures below 38 K because, we propose, it requires the breaking of one hydrogen bond, on average, per molecule to relieve the strain and to restructure the lattice to that of low-density amorphous ice. Several features of astrophysical ice analogs studied in laboratory experiments are readily explained by the structural transition from high-density amorphous ice into low-density amorphous ice. Changes in the shape of the 3.07 gm water band, trapping efficiency of CO, CO loss, changes in the CO band structure, and the recombination of radicals induced by low-temperature UV photolysis all covary with structural changes that occur in the ice during this amorphous to amorphous transition. While the 3.07 micrometers ice band in various astronomical environments can be modeled with spectra of simple mixtures of amorphous and crystalline forms, the contribution of the high-density amorphous form nearly always dominates.

  14. The electronic and optical properties of amorphous silica with hydrogen defects by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Dahua; Xiang, Baoyan; Hu, Cheng; Qian, Kai; Cheng, Xinlu

    2018-04-01

    Hydrogen can be trapped in the bulk materials in four forms: interstitial molecular H2, interstitial atom H, O‑H+(2Si=O–H)+, Si‑H‑( {{4O}}\\bar \\equiv {{Si&x2212H}})‑ to affect the electronic and optical properties of amorphous silica. Therefore, the electronic and optical properties of defect-free and hydrogen defects in amorphous silica were performed within the scheme of density functional theory. Initially, the negative charged states hydrogen defects introduced new defect level between the valence band top and conduction band bottom. However, the neutral and positive charged state hydrogen defects made both the valence band and conduction band transfer to the lower energy. Subsequently, the optical properties such as absorption spectra, conductivity and loss functions were analyzed. It is indicated that the negative hydrogen defects caused the absorption peak ranging from 0 to 2.0 eV while the positive states produced absorption peaks at lower energy and two strong absorption peaks arose at 6.9 and 9.0 eV. However, the neutral hydrogen defects just improved the intensity of absorption spectrum. This may give insights into understanding the mechanism of laser-induced damage for optical materials. Project supported by the Science and Technology of Hubei Provincial Department of Education (No. B2017098).

  15. New Cu-Free Ti-Based Composites with Residual Amorphous Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Nicoara, Mircea; Locovei, Cosmin; Șerban, Viorel Aurel; Parthiban, R.; Calin, Mariana; Stoica, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Titanium-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are considered to have potential for biomedical applications because they combine favorable mechanical properties and good biocompatibility. Copper represents the most common alloying element, which provides high amorphization capacity, but reports emphasizing cytotoxic effects of this element have risen concerns about possible effects on human health. A new copper-free alloy with atomic composition Ti42Zr10Pd14Ag26Sn8, in which Cu is completely replaced by Ag, was formulated based on Morinaga’s d-electron alloy design theory. Following this theory, the actual amount of alloying elements, which defines the values of covalent bond strength Bo and d-orbital energy Md, situates the newly designed alloy inside the BMG domain. By mean of centrifugal casting, cylindrical rods with diameters between 2 and 5 mm were fabricated from this new alloy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-rays diffraction (XRD), as well as microstructural analyses using optical and scanning electron microscopy (OM/SEM) revealed an interesting structure characterized by liquid phase-separated formation of crystalline Ag, as well as metastable intermetallic phases embedded in residual amorphous phases. PMID:28773455

  16. Compressibility determination by electrical resistance measurement: a universal method for both crystalline and amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaozhi; He, Duanwei; Xu, Chao; Ren, Xiangting; Zhou, Xiaoling; Liu, Shenzuo

    2012-12-01

    A new method is introduced for investigating the compressibility of solids under high pressure by in situ electrical resistance measurement of a manganin wire, which is wrapped around the sample. This method does not rely on the lattice parameters measurement, and the continuous volume change of the sample versus pressure can be obtained. Therefore, it is convenient to look at the compressibility of solids, especially for the X-ray diffraction amorphous materials. The I-II and II-III phase transition of Bi accompanying with volume change of 4.5% and 3.5% has been detected using the method, respectively, while the volume change for the phase transition of Tl occurring at 3.67 GPa is determined as 0.5%. The fit of the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to our data yields a zero-pressure bulk modulus K 0=28.98±0.03 GPa for NaCl and 6.97±0.02 GPa for amorphous red phosphorus.

  17. Laser-driven formation of a high-pressure phase in amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Salleo, Alberto; Taylor, Seth T; Martin, Michael C; Panero, Wendy R; Jeanloz, Raymond; Sands, Timothy; Génin, François Y

    2003-12-01

    Because of its simple composition, vast availability in pure form and ease of processing, vitreous silica is often used as a model to study the physics of amorphous solids. Research in amorphous silica is also motivated by its ubiquity in modern technology, a prominent example being as bulk material in transmissive and diffractive optics for high-power laser applications such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF). In these applications, stability under high-fluence laser irradiation is a key requirement, with optical breakdown occurring when the fluence of the beam is higher than the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the material. The optical strength of polished fused silica transmissive optics is limited by their surface LIDT. Surface optical breakdown is accompanied by densification, formation of point defects, cratering, material ejection, melting and cracking. Through a combination of electron diffraction and infrared reflectance measurements we show here that synthetic vitreous silica transforms partially into a defective form of the high-pressure stishovite phase under high-intensity (GW cm(-2)) laser irradiation. This phase transformation offers one suitable mechanism by which laser-induced damage grows catastrophically once initiated, thereby dramatically shortening the service lifetime of optics used for high-power photonics.

  18. Multi-Step Crystallization of Barium Carbonate: Rapid Interconversion of Amorphous and Crystalline Precursors.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Michael L; Smeets, Paul J M; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Joester, Derk

    2017-12-11

    The direct observation of amorphous barium carbonate (ABC), which transforms into a previously unknown barium carbonate hydrate (herewith named gortatowskite) within a few hundred milliseconds of formation, is described. In situ X-ray scattering, cryo-, and low-dose electron microscopy were used to capture the transformation of nanoparticulate ABC into gortatowskite crystals, highly anisotropic sheets that are up to 1 μm in width, yet only about 10 nm in thickness. Recrystallization of gortatowskite to witherite starts within 30 seconds. We describe a bulk synthesis and report a first assessment of the composition, vibrational spectra, and structure of gortatowskite. Our findings indicate that transient amorphous and crystalline precursors can play a role in aqueous precipitation pathways that may often be overlooked owing to their extremely short lifetimes and small dimensions. However, such transient precursors may be integral to the formation of more stable phases. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The energy landscape of glassy dynamics on the amorphous hafnium diboride surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Mallek, Justin; Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R.; Girolami, Gregory S.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Direct visualization of the dynamics of structural glasses and amorphous solids on the sub-nanometer scale provides rich information unavailable from bulk or conventional single molecule techniques. We study the surface of hafnium diboride, a conductive ultrahigh temperature ceramic material that can be grown in amorphous films. Our scanning tunneling movies have a second-to-hour dynamic range and single-point current measurements extend that to the millisecond-to-minute time scale. On the a-HfB2 glass surface, two-state hopping of 1-2 nm diameter cooperatively rearranging regions or "clusters" occurs from sub-milliseconds to hours. We characterize individual clusters in detail through high-resolution (<0.5 nm) imaging, scanning tunneling spectroscopy and voltage modulation, ruling out individual atoms, diffusing adsorbates, or pinned charges as the origin of the observed two-state hopping. Smaller clusters are more likely to hop, larger ones are more likely to be immobile. HfB2 has a very high bulk glass transition temperature Tg, and we observe no three-state hopping or sequential two-state hopping previously seen on lower Tg glass surfaces. The electronic density of states of clusters does not change when they hop up or down, allowing us to calibrate an accurate relative z-axis scale. By directly measuring and histogramming single cluster vertical displacements, we can reconstruct the local free energy landscape of individual clusters, complete with activation barrier height, a reaction coordinate in nanometers, and the shape of the free energy landscape basins between which hopping occurs. The experimental images are consistent with the compact shape of α-relaxors predicted by random first order transition theory, whereas the rapid hopping rate, even taking less confined motion at the surface into account, is consistent with β-relaxations. We make a proposal of how "mixed" features can show up in surface dynamics of glasses.

  20. Buckling instability in amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. D.; Narumi, K.; Naramoto, H.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we report the buckling instability in amorphous carbon films on mirror-polished sapphire (0001) wafers deposited by ion beam assisted deposition at various growth temperatures. For the films deposited at 150 °C, many interesting stress relief patterns are found, which include networks, blisters, sinusoidal patterns with π-shape, and highly ordered sinusoidal waves on a large scale. Starting at irregular buckling in the centre, the latter propagate towards the outer buckling region. The maximum length of these ordered patterns reaches 396 µm with a height of ~500 nm and a wavelength of ~8.2 µm. However, the length decreases dramatically to 70 µm as the deposition temperature is increased to 550 °C. The delamination of the film appears instead of sinusoidal waves with a further increase of the deposition temperature. This experimental observation is correlated with the theoretic work of Crosby (1999 Phys. Rev. E 59 R2542).

  1. Amorphous titania/carbon composite electrode materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John T.; Jansen, Andrew; Joyce, Christopher D.

    2017-05-09

    An isolated salt comprising a compound of formula (H.sub.2X)(TiO(Y).sub.2) or a hydrate thereof, wherein X is 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), and Y is oxalate anion (C.sub.2O.sub.4.sup.-2), when heated in an oxygen-containing atmosphere at a temperature in the range of at least about 275.degree. C. to less than about 400.degree. C., decomposes to form an amorphous titania/carbon composite material comprising about 40 to about 50 percent by weight titania and about 50 to about 60 percent by weight of a carbonaceous material coating the titania. Heating the composite material at a temperature of about 400 to 500.degree. C. crystallizes the titania component to anatase. The titania materials of the invention are useful as components of the cathode or anode of a lithium or lithium ion electrochemical cell.

  2. Polarization Stability of Amorphous Piezoelectric Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Su, J.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Harrison, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    Amorphous polyimides containing polar functional groups have been synthesized and investigated for potential use as high temperature piezoelectric sensors. The thermal stability of the piezoelectric effect of one polyimide was evaluated as a function of various curing and poling conditions under dynamic and static thermal stimuli. First, the polymer samples were thermally cycled under strain by systematically increasing the maximum temperature from 50 C to 200 C while the piezoelectric strain coefficient was being measured. Second, the samples were isothermally aged at an elevated temperature in air, and the isothermal decay of the remanent polarization was measured at room temperature as a function of time. Both conventional and corona poling methods were evaluated. This material exhibited good thermal stability of the piezoelectric properties up to 100 C.

  3. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions. PMID:27876859

  4. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phonon Dispersion in Amorphous Ni-Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, A. M.

    2007-06-01

    The well-known model potential is used to investigate the longitudinal and transverse phonon dispersion curves for six Ni-based binary amorphous alloys, viz. Ni31Dy69, Ni33Y67, Ni36Zr64, Ni50Zr50, Ni60 Nb40, and Ni81B19. The thermodynamic and elastic properties are also computed from the elastic limits of the phonon dispersion curves. The theoretical approach given by Hubbard-Beeby is used in the present study to compute the phonon dispersion curves. Five local field correction functions proposed by Hartree, Taylor, Ichimaru-Utsumi, Farid et al. and Sarkar et al. are employed to see the effect of exchange and correlation in the aforesaid properties.

  6. Spark plasma sintering of bulk SrAl2O4-Sr3Al2O6 eutectic glass with wide-band optical window.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaxi; Lu, Nan; He, Gang; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Jianqiang; Li, Jiangtao

    2018-06-15

    SrAl 2 O 4 -Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 eutectic glass was prepared by using an aerodynamic levitator equipped with a CO 2 laser device. A bulk transparent amorphous sample was obtained by the spark plasma sintering (SPS) of the prepared eutectic glass. XRD, a UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer and FT-IR were employed to characterize the phase evolution and optical properties. The results show that the bulk SrAl 2 O 4 -Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 samples fabricated by the containerless process and SPS between 852 °C-857 °C were fully amorphous. The amorphous sample has a wide transparent window between 270 nm and 6.2 μm. The average refractive index in the visible light region is 1.680 and the Abbe number is 27.4. The prepared bulk SrAl 2 O 4 -Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 eutectic glass with the wide-band optical window may be a promising candidate for optical applications.

  7. Spark plasma sintering of bulk SrAl2O4-Sr3Al2O6 eutectic glass with wide-band optical window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaxi; Lu, Nan; He, Gang; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Jianqiang; Li, Jiangtao

    2018-06-01

    SrAl2O4-Sr3Al2O6 eutectic glass was prepared by using an aerodynamic levitator equipped with a CO2 laser device. A bulk transparent amorphous sample was obtained by the spark plasma sintering (SPS) of the prepared eutectic glass. XRD, a UV–vis-NIR spectrophotometer and FT-IR were employed to characterize the phase evolution and optical properties. The results show that the bulk SrAl2O4-Sr3Al2O6 samples fabricated by the containerless process and SPS between 852 °C–857 °C were fully amorphous. The amorphous sample has a wide transparent window between 270 nm and 6.2 μm. The average refractive index in the visible light region is 1.680 and the Abbe number is 27.4. The prepared bulk SrAl2O4-Sr3Al2O6 eutectic glass with the wide-band optical window may be a promising candidate for optical applications.

  8. Defects in Amorphous Semiconductors: The Case of Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jamblinne de Meux, A.; Pourtois, G.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.

    2018-05-01

    Based on a rational classification of defects in amorphous materials, we propose a simplified model to describe intrinsic defects and hydrogen impurities in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a -IGZO). The proposed approach consists of organizing defects into two categories: point defects, generating structural anomalies such as metal—metal or oxygen—oxygen bonds, and defects emerging from changes in the material stoichiometry, such as vacancies and interstitial atoms. Based on first-principles simulations, it is argued that the defects originating from the second group always act as perfect donors or perfect acceptors. This classification simplifies and rationalizes the nature of defects in amorphous phases. In a -IGZO, the most important point defects are metal—metal bonds (or small metal clusters) and peroxides (O - O single bonds). Electrons are captured by metal—metal bonds and released by the formation of peroxides. The presence of hydrogen can lead to two additional types of defects: metal-hydrogen defects, acting as acceptors, and oxygen-hydrogen defects, acting as donors. The impact of these defects is linked to different instabilities observed in a -IGZO. Specifically, the diffusion of hydrogen and oxygen is connected to positive- and negative-bias stresses, while negative-bias illumination stress originates from the formation of peroxides.

  9. A study of the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite on melt quenched Bioglass using surface sensitive shallow angle X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Martin, R A; Twyman, H; Qiu, D; Knowles, J C; Newport, R J

    2009-04-01

    Melt quenched silicate glasses containing calcium, phosphorous and alkali metals have the ability to promote bone regeneration and to fuse to living bone. These glasses, including 45S5 Bioglass((R)) [(CaO)(26.9)(Na(2)O)(24.4)(SiO(2))(46.1)(P(2)O(5))(2.6)], are routinely used as clinical implants. Consequently there have been numerous studies on the structure of these glasses using conventional diffraction techniques. These studies have provided important information on the atomic structure of Bioglass((R)) but are of course intrinsically limited in the sense that they probe the bulk material and cannot be as sensitive to thin layers of near-surface dissolution/growth. The present study therefore uses surface sensitive shallow angle X-ray diffraction to study the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite on Bioglass((R)) samples, pre-reacted in simulated body fluid (SBF). Unreacted Bioglass((R)) is dominated by a broad amorphous feature around 2.2 A(-1) which is characteristic of sodium calcium silicate glass. After reacting Bioglass((R)) in SBF a second broad amorphous feature evolves ~1.6 A(-1) which is attributed to amorphous calcium phosphate. This feature is evident for samples after only 4 h reacting in SBF and by 8 h the amorphous feature becomes comparable in magnitude to the background signal of the bulk Bioglass((R)). Bragg peaks characteristic of hydroxyapatite form after 1-3 days of reacting in SBF.

  10. Investigation of thermally activated deformation in amorphous PMMA and Zr-Cu-Al bulk metallic glasses with broadband nanoindentation creep

    J.B. Puthoff; J.E. Jakes; H. Cao; D.S. Stone

    2009-01-01

    The development of nanoindentation test systems with high data collection speeds has made possible a novel type of indentation creep test: broadband nanoindentation creep (BNC). Using the high density of data points generated and analysis techniques that can model the instantaneous projected indent area at all times during a constant-load indentation experiment, BNC...

  11. Simulated glass transition of poly(ethylene oxide) bulk and film: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaofu

    2011-09-29

    Stepwise cooling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out on the bulk and film models for poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) to understand glass transition of amorphous polymer films. Three types of properties--density, energy, and dynamics--are computed and plotted against the temperature for the two systems. It has been confirmed that all these properties can reveal glass transition in both PEO bulk and film systems. All the determined glass transition temperatures (T(g)'s) drop in the same order of magnitude to the experimental data available. Among various methods, the T(g)'s obtained from the density and energy data are close to each other if the same space regions are defined, which can suggest the same free volume theory, and dynamic T(g)'s obtained from mean-squared displacements (MSDs) are highest, which can suggest the kinetic theory for structural relaxation. Consistently, all these T(g)'s obtained using different methods show that the T(g)'s of PEO film are lower than those of PEO bulk. The free surface layers of polymer films dictate this offset. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Enhanced stability of thin film transistors with double-stacked amorphous IWO/IWO:N channel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dong; Pi, Shubin; Yang, Jianwen; Tiwari, Nidhi; Ren, Jinhua; Zhang, Qun; Liu, Po-Tsun; Shieh, Han-Ping

    2018-06-01

    In this work, bottom-gate top-contact thin film transistors with double-stacked amorphous IWO/IWO:N channel layer were fabricated. Herein, amorphous IWO and N-doped IWO were deposited as front and back channel layers, respectively, by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The electrical characteristics of the bi-layer-channel thin film transistors (TFTs) were examined and compared with those of single-layer-channel (i.e., amorphous IWO or IWO:N) TFTs. It was demonstrated to exhibit a high mobility of 27.2 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and an on/off current ratio of 107. Compared to the single peers, bi-layer a-IWO/IWO:N TFTs showed smaller hysteresis and higher stability under negative bias stress and negative bias temperature stress. The enhanced performance could be attributed to its unique double-stacked channel configuration, which successfully combined the merits of the TFTs with IWO and IWO:N channels. The underlying IWO thin film provided percolation paths for electron transport, meanwhile, the top IWO:N layer reduced the bulk trap densities. In addition, the IWO channel/gate insulator interface had reduced defects, and IWO:N back channel surface was insensitive to the ambient atmosphere. Overall, the proposed bi-layer a-IWO/IWO:N TFTs show potential for practical applications due to its possibly long-term serviceability.

  13. Poly(methyl methacrylate) coating of soft magnetic amorphous and crystalline Fe,Co-B nanoparticles by chemical reduction.

    PubMed

    Fernández Barquín, L; Yedra Martínez, A; Rodríguez Fernández, L; Rojas, D P; Murphy, F J; Alba Venero, D; Ruiz González, L; González-Calbet, J; Fdez-Gubieda, M L; Pankhurst, Q A

    2012-03-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of a collection of nanoparticles coated by Poly(methyl methacrylate) through a wet chemical synthesis have been investigated. The particles display either an amorphous (M = Fe, Co) M-B arrangement or a mixed structure bcc-Fe and fcc-Co + amorphous M-B. Both show the presence of a metal oxi-hydroxide formed in aqueous reduction. The organic coating facilitates technological handling. The cost-effective synthesis involves a reduction in a Poly(methyl methacrylate) aqueous solution of iron(II) or cobalt(II) sulphates (< 0.5 M) by sodium borohydride (< 0.5 M). The particles present an oxidized component, as deduced from X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer and Fe- and Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy. For the ferrous alloys, this Fe-oxide is alpha-goethite, favoured by the aqueous solution. The Poly(methyl methacrylate) coating is confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In pure amorphous core alloys there is a drastic change of the coercivity from bulk to around 30 Oe in the nanoparticles. The mixed structured alloys also lie in the soft magnetic regime. Magnetisation values at room temperature range around 100 emu/g. The coercivity stems from multidomain particles and their agglomeration, triggering the dipolar interactions.

  14. Structural convergence properties of amorphous InGaZnO4 from simulated liquid-quench methods.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Jacob C; Fast, Dylan B; Hanken, Benjamin E; Mustard, Thomas J L; Laurita, Geneva; Chiang, Tsung-Han; Keszler, Douglas A; Subramanian, Mas A; Wager, John F; Dolgos, Michelle R; Rustad, James R; Cheong, Paul Ha-Yeon

    2017-11-14

    The study of structural properties of amorphous structures is complicated by the lack of long-range order and necessitates the use of both cutting-edge computer modeling and experimental techniques. With regards to the computer modeling, many questions on convergence arise when trying to assess the accuracy of a simulated system. What cell size maximizes the accuracy while remaining computationally efficient? More importantly, does averaging multiple smaller cells adequately describe features found in bulk amorphous materials? How small is too small? The aims of this work are: (1) to report a newly developed set of pair potentials for InGaZnO 4 and (2) to explore the effects of structural parameters such as simulation cell size and numbers on the structural convergence of amorphous InGaZnO 4 . The total number of formula units considered over all runs is found to be the critical factor in convergence as long as the cell considered contains a minimum of circa fifteen formula units. There is qualitative agreement between these simulations and X-ray total scattering data - peak trends and locations are consistently reproduced while intensities are weaker. These new IGZO pair potentials are a valuable starting point for future structural refinement efforts.

  15. Solubility advantage of amorphous pharmaceuticals: I. A thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Murdande, Sharad B; Pikal, Michael J; Shanker, Ravi M; Bogner, Robin H

    2010-03-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in advancing amorphous pharmaceuticals as an approach for achieving adequate solubility. Due to difficulties in the experimental measurement of solubility, a reliable estimate of the solubility enhancement ratio of an amorphous form of a drug relative to its crystalline counterpart would be highly useful. We have developed a rigorous thermodynamic approach to estimate enhancement in solubility that can be achieved by conversion of a crystalline form to the amorphous form. We rigorously treat the three factors that contribute to differences in solubility between amorphous and crystalline forms. First, we calculate the free energy difference between amorphous and crystalline forms from thermal properties measured by modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). Secondly, since an amorphous solute can absorb significant amounts of water, which reduces its activity and solubility, a correction is made using water sorption isotherm data and the Gibbs-Duhem equation. Next, a correction is made for differences in the degree of ionization due to differences in solubilities of the two forms. Utilizing this approach the theoretically estimated solubility enhancement ratio of 7.0 for indomethacin (amorphous/gamma-crystal) was found to be in close agreement with the experimentally determined ratio of 4.9. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  16. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Based-Microparticles for Peptide Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tewes, Frederic; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-01-20

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to interact with proteins, for example, in biogenic ACC, to form stable amorphous phases. The control of amorphous/crystalline and inorganic/organic ratios in inhalable calcium carbonate microparticles may enable particle properties to be adapted to suit the requirements of dry powders for pulmonary delivery by oral inhalation. For example, an amorphous phase can immobilize and stabilize polypeptides in their native structure and amorphous and crystalline phases have different mechanical properties. Therefore, inhalable composite microparticles made of inorganic (i.e., calcium carbonate and calcium formate) and organic (i.e., hyaluronan (HA)) amorphous and crystalline phases were investigated for peptide and protein pulmonary aerosol delivery. The crystalline/amorphous ratio and polymorphic form of the inorganic component was altered by changing the microparticle drying rate and by changing the ammonium carbonate and HA initial concentration. The bioactivity of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT), coprocessed with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a model protein with peptidase inhibitor activity, was maintained during processing and the microparticles had excellent aerodynamic properties, making them suitable for pulmonary aerosol delivery. The bioavailability of sCT after aerosol delivery as sCT and AAT-loaded composite microparticles to rats was 4-times higher than that of sCT solution.

  17. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Merget, R; Bauer, T; Küpper, H U; Philippou, S; Bauer, H D; Breitstadt, R; Bruening, T

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic ("thermal" or "fumed") silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physicochemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no study

  18. Nanopatterned bulk metallic glass-based biomaterials modulate macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Shayan, Mahdis; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Morris, Aaron H; Cheung, Bettina; Smith, Ryan; Schroers, Jan; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2018-06-01

    macrophage interactions with nanopatterned bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a class of metallic alloys with amorphous microstructure and formability like polymers. We show that nanopatterned BMGs modulate macrophage polarization and transiently induce less fibrotic and more angiogenic responses. Overall, we demonstrate nanopatterning of BMG implants as a technique to polarize macrophages and modulate the FBR. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pressure-induced reversible amorphization and an amorphous–amorphous transition in Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change memory material

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhimei; Zhou, Jian; Pan, Yuanchun; Song, Zhitang; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is a technologically very important phase-change material that is used in digital versatile disks-random access memory and is currently studied for the use in phase-change random access memory devices. This type of data storage is achieved by the fast reversible phase transition between amorphous and crystalline GST upon heat pulse. Here we report pressure-induced reversible crystalline-amorphous and polymorphic amorphous transitions in NaCl structured GST by ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. We have showed that the onset amorphization of GST starts at approximately 18 GPa and the system become completely random at approximately 22 GPa. This amorphous state has a cubic framework (c-amorphous) of sixfold coordinations. With further increasing pressure, the c-amorphous transforms to a high-density amorphous structure with trigonal framework (t-amorphous) and an average coordination number of eight. The pressure-induced amorphization is investigated to be due to large displacements of Te atoms for which weak Te–Te bonds exist or vacancies are nearby. Upon decompressing to ambient conditions, the original cubic crystalline structure is restored for c-amorphous, whereas t-amorphous transforms to another amorphous phase that is similar to the melt-quenched amorphous GST. PMID:21670255

  20. Pressure-induced amorphization in orthorhombic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}: An intrinsic character of crystal

    SciT

    Li, Quanjun; Zhang, Huafang; Cheng, Benyuan

    2014-05-21

    The phase transition of orthorhombic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} was investigated by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The orthorhombic phase transforms into an amorphous form completely at 24.7 GPa. A bulk modulus B{sub 0} = 139 (9) GPa for the orthorhombic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} is derived from the P-V data. We suggest that the pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be attributed to the unstability of the a axis under high pressure leads to the connections of polyhedral breaking down and even triggers disorder of the whole crystal frame. These results demonstrate that the PIA is an intrinsic charactermore » of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} which depends on its orthorhombic crystal structure rather than nanosize effects. This study provides a new kind of bulk material for investigating PIA in metal oxides.« less

  1. The dependence of the modulation transfer function on the blocking layer thickness in amorphous selenium x-ray detectors

    SciT

    Hunter, David M.; Belev, Gueorgi; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni

    2007-08-15

    Blocking layers are used to reduce leakage current in amorphous selenium detectors. The effect of the thickness of the blocking layer on the presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) and on dark current was experimentally determined in prototype single-line CCD-based amorphous selenium (a-Se) x-ray detectors. The sampling pitch of the detectors evaluated was 25 {mu}m and the blocking layer thicknesses varied from 1 to 51 {mu}m. The blocking layers resided on the signal collection electrodes which, in this configuration, were used to collect electrons. The combined thickness of the blocking layer and a-Se bulk in each detector was {approx}200 {mu}m. Asmore » expected, the dark current increased monotonically as the thickness of the blocking layer was decreased. It was found that if the blocking layer thickness was small compared to the sampling pitch, it caused a negligible reduction in MTF. However, the MTF was observed to decrease dramatically at spatial frequencies near the Nyquist frequency as the blocking layer thickness approached or exceeded the electrode sampling pitch. This observed reduction in MTF is shown to be consistent with predictions of an electrostatic model wherein the image charge from the a-Se is trapped at a characteristic depth within the blocking layer, generally near the interface between the blocking layer and the a-Se bulk.« less

  2. On the Plasticity of Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie

    Mechanical behaviors of amorphous materials under external stress are central to various phenomena including earthquakes and landslides. Most amorphous materials possess a well defined yield stress when thermal fluctuations are negligible. Only when the shear stress is above the yield stress, the material can flow as a fluid, otherwise it deforms as a solid. There are accumulating evidences that the yielding transition between the flowing and solid phase is a critical phenomenon, and one evidence is the long ranged correlations of plastic strain during adiabatic shear. In spite of this, we still have not fully understood the associated critical exponents and their scaling relations. In the last decade, it has been widely accepted that the elementary rearrangements in amorphous solids are not well-defined topological defects as crystals, instead they are local irreversible rearrangements of a few particles, denoted as shear transformations. Because a single shear transformation changes the local arrangement of particles, it therefore generates an elastic stress field propagating over the whole system. The resulting changes in the local stresses in other regions of the system may in turn trigger more shear transformations. A central feature that complicates the yielding transition is the long range and anisotropic stress field generated by shear transformations. This peculiar interaction between shear transformations leads to two important characteristics: 1.the mechanical noises generated by plastic deformation are broadly distributed 2.those regions that are undergoing plastic deformation has equal probability to make other parts of the material to be more stable or more unstable, depending on the direction between them. In this thesis, we show that these two important factors leads to a singular density of shear transformations, P( x) xtheta at small x, where x is a local measure of stability, namely, the extra stress one needs to add locally to reach the elastic

  3. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  4. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices.

  5. Dissolution and analysis of amorphous silica in marine sediments.

    Eggimann, D.W.; Manheim, F. T.; Betzer, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    The analytical estimation of amorphous silica in selected Atlantic and Antarctic Ocean sediments, the U.S.G.S. standard marine mud (MAG-1), A.A.P.G. clays, and samples from cultures of a marine diatom, Hemidiscus, has been examined. Our values for amorphous silica-rich circum-Antarctic sediments are equal to or greater than literature values, whereas our values for a set of amorphous silica-poor sediments from a transect of the N. Atlantic at 11oN, after appropriate correction for silica released from clays, are significantly lower than previous estimates from the same region. -from Authors

  6. Lifetime of excitons localized in Si nanocrystals in amorphous silicon

    SciT

    Gusev, O. B.; Belolipetskiy, A. V., E-mail: alexey.belolipetskiy@mail.ioffe.ru; Yassievich, I. N.

    2016-05-15

    The introduction of nanocrystals plays an important role in improving the stability of the amorphous silicon films and increasing the carrier mobility. Here we report results of the study on the photoluminescence and its dynamics in the films of amorphous hydrogenated silicon containing less than 10% of silicon nanocrystals. The comparing of the obtained experimental results with the calculated probability of the resonant tunneling of the excitons localized in silicon nanocrystals is presented. Thus, it has been estimated that the short lifetime of excitons localized in Si nanocrystal is controlled by the resonant tunneling to the nearest tail state ofmore » the amorphous matrix.« less

  7. Amorphous photonic crystals with only short-range order.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Yafeng; Dong, Biqin; Zhan, Tianrong; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian

    2013-10-04

    Distinct from conventional photonic crystals with both short- and long-range order, amorphous photonic crystals that possess only short-range order show interesting optical responses owing to their unique structural features. Amorphous photonic crystals exhibit unique light scattering and transport, which lead to a variety of interesting phenomena such as isotropic photonic bandgaps or pseudogaps, noniridescent structural colors, and light localization. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in the study of amorphous photonic crystals are summarized, focusing on their unique optical properties, artificial fabrication, bionspiration, and potential applications. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Intrinsic charge trapping in amorphous oxide films: status and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Jack; Kaviani, Moloud; Gao, David; El-Sayed, Al-Moatasem; Afanas’ev, Valeri V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2018-06-01

    We review the current understanding of intrinsic electron and hole trapping in insulating amorphous oxide films on semiconductor and metal substrates. The experimental and theoretical evidences are provided for the existence of intrinsic deep electron and hole trap states stemming from the disorder of amorphous metal oxide networks. We start from presenting the results for amorphous (a) HfO2, chosen due to the availability of highest purity amorphous films, which is vital for studying their intrinsic electronic properties. Exhaustive photo-depopulation spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations using density functional theory shed light on the atomic nature of electronic gap states responsible for deep electron trapping observed in a-HfO2. We review theoretical methods used for creating models of amorphous structures and electronic structure calculations of amorphous oxides and outline some of the challenges in modeling defects in amorphous materials. We then discuss theoretical models of electron polarons and bi-polarons in a-HfO2 and demonstrate that these intrinsic states originate from low-coordinated ions and elongated metal-oxygen bonds in the amorphous oxide network. Similarly, holes can be captured at under-coordinated O sites. We then discuss electron and hole trapping in other amorphous oxides, such as a-SiO2, a-Al2O3, a-TiO2. We propose that the presence of low-coordinated ions in amorphous oxides with electron states of significant p and d character near the conduction band minimum can lead to electron trapping and that deep hole trapping should be common to all amorphous oxides. Finally, we demonstrate that bi-electron trapping in a-HfO2 and a-SiO2 weakens Hf(Si)–O bonds and significantly reduces barriers for forming Frenkel defects, neutral O vacancies and O2‑ ions in these materials. These results should be useful for better understanding of electronic properties and structural evolution of thin amorphous films under carrier injection

  9. Holographic bulk reconstruction with α' corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shubho R.; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2017-10-01

    We outline a holographic recipe to reconstruct α' corrections to anti-de Sitter (AdS) (quantum) gravity from an underlying CFT in the strictly planar limit (N →∞ ). Assuming that the boundary CFT can be solved in principle to all orders of the 't Hooft coupling λ , for scalar primary operators, the λ-1 expansion of the conformal dimensions can be mapped to higher curvature corrections of the dual bulk scalar field action. Furthermore, for the metric perturbations in the bulk, the AdS /CFT operator-field isomorphism forces these corrections to be of the Lovelock type. We demonstrate this by reconstructing the coefficient of the leading Lovelock correction, also known as the Gauss-Bonnet term in a bulk AdS gravity action using the expression of stress-tensor two-point function up to subleading order in λ-1.

  10. Orchestrating Bulk Data Movement in Grid Environments

    SciT

    Vazhkudai, SS

    2005-01-25

    Data Grids provide a convenient environment for researchers to manage and access massively distributed bulk data by addressing several system and transfer challenges inherent to these environments. This work addresses issues involved in the efficient selection and access of replicated data in Grid environments in the context of the Globus Toolkit{trademark}, building middleware that (1) selects datasets in highly replicated environments, enabling efficient scheduling of data transfer requests; (2) predicts transfer times of bulk wide-area data transfers using extensive statistical analysis; and (3) co-allocates bulk data transfer requests, enabling parallel downloads from mirrored sites. These efforts have demonstrated a decentralizedmore » data scheduling architecture, a set of forecasting tools that predict bandwidth availability within 15% error and co-allocation architecture, and heuristics that expedites data downloads by up to 2 times.« less

  11. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Pocha, Michael D.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Deri, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  12. Meteoroid Bulk Density and Ceplecha Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaauw, R. C.; Moser, D. E.; Moorhead, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The determination of asteroid bulk density is an important aspect of Near Earth Object (NEO) characterization. A fraction of meteoroids originate from asteroids (including some NEOs), thus in lieu of mutual perturbations, satellites, or expensive spacecraft missions, a study of meteoroid bulk densities can potentially provide useful insights into the densities of NEOs and PHOs (Potentially Hazardous Objects). Meteoroid bulk density is still inherently difficult to measure, and is most often determined by modeling the ablation of the meteoroid. One approach towards determining a meteoroid density distribution entails using a more easily measured proxy for the densities, then calibrating the proxy with known densities from meteorite falls, ablation modelling, and other sources. An obvious proxy choice is the Ceplecha type, KB (Ceplecha, 1958), which is thought to indicate the strength of a meteoroid and often correlated to different bulk densities in literature. KB is calculated using the air density at the beginning height of the meteor, the initial velocity, and the zenith angle of the radiant; quantities more readily determined than meteoroid bulk density itself. Numerical values of K(sub B) are sorted into groups (A, B, C, etc.), which have been matched to meteorite falls or meteor showers with known composition such as the porous Draconids. An extensive survey was conducted to establish the strength of the relationship between bulk density and K(sub B), specifically looking at those that additionally determined K(sub B) for the meteors. In examining the modeling of high-resolution meteor data from Kikwaya et al. (2011), the correlation between K(sub B) and bulk density was not as strong as hoped. However, a distinct split by dynamical type was seen with Jovian Tisserand parameter (T(sub J)), with meteoroids from Halley Type comets (T(sub J) < 2) exhibiting much lower bulk densities than those originating from Jupiter Family comets and asteroids (T(sub J) > 2

  13. Efficient bulk-loading of gridfiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Scott T.; Nicol, David M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of bulk-loading large data sets for the gridfile multiattribute indexing technique. We propose a rectilinear partitioning algorithm that heuristically seeks to minimize the size of the gridfile needed to ensure no bucket overflows. Empirical studies on both synthetic data sets and on data sets drawn from computational fluid dynamics applications demonstrate that our algorithm is very efficient, and is able to handle large data sets. In addition, we present an algorithm for bulk-loading data sets too large to fit in main memory. Utilizing a sort of the entire data set it creates a gridfile without incurring any overflows.

  14. The bulk composition of Titan's atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of the physical constraints for Titan's atmosphere leads to a model which describes the bulk composition of the atmosphere in terms of observable parameters. Intermediate-resolution photometric scans of both Saturn and Titan, including scans of the Q branch of Titan's methane band, constrain these parameters in such a way that the model indicates the presence of another important atmospheric gas, namely, another bulk constituent or a significant thermal opacity. Further progress in determining the composition and state of Titan's atmosphere requires additional observations to eliminate present ambiguities. For this purpose, particular observational targets are suggested.

  15. Method of inducing differential etch rates in glow discharge produced amorphous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, David L.; Zanzucchi, Peter J.

    1980-01-01

    A method of inducing differential etch rates in glow discharge produced amorphous silicon by heating a portion of the glow discharge produced amorphous silicon to a temperature of about 365.degree. C. higher than the deposition temperature prior to etching. The etch rate of the exposed amorphous silicon is less than the unheated amorphous silicon.

  16. Amorphous layer formation in Al86.0Co7.6Ce6.4 glass-forming alloy by large-area electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. L.; Murray, J. W.; Voisey, K. T.; Clare, A. T.; McCartney, D. G.

    2013-09-01

    Amorphous Al-Co-Ce alloys are of interest because of their resistance to corrosion, but high cooling rates are generally required to suppress the formation of crystalline phases. In this study, the surface of a bulk crystalline Al-Co-Ce alloy of a glass-forming composition was treated using large area electron beam (LAEB) irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that, compared to the microstructure of the original crystalline material, the treated surface exhibits greatly improved microstructural and compositional uniformity. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction conducted on the surface of treated samples indicates the formation of the amorphous phase following 25 and 50 pulses at 35 kV cathode voltage. However, when the samples are treated with 100 and 150 pulses at 35 kV cathode voltage of electron beam irradiation, the treated layer comprises localised crystalline regions in an amorphous matrix. In addition, the formation of cracks in the treated layer is found to be localised around the Al8Co2Ce phase in the bulk material. Overall, crack length per unit area had no clear change with an increase in the number of pulses.

  17. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A.; ...

    2016-10-12

    Solid-state shock-wave propagation is strongly nonequilibrium in nature and hence rate dependent. When using high-power pulsed-laser-driven shock compression, an unprecedented high strain rates can be achieved; we report the directional amorphization in boron carbide polycrystals. At a shock pressure of 45~50 GPa, multiple planar faults, slightly deviated from maximum shear direction, occur a few hundred nanometers below the shock surface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these planar faults are precursors of directional amorphization. We also propose that the shear stresses cause the amorphization and that pressure assists the process by ensuring the integrity of the specimen. Thermal energy conversionmore » calculations including heat transfer suggest that amorphization is a solid-state process. Such a phenomenon has significant effect on the ballistic performance of B 4C.« less

  18. First principles prediction of amorphous phases using evolutionary algorithms

    SciT

    Nahas, Suhas, E-mail: shsnhs@iitk.ac.in; Gaur, Anshu, E-mail: agaur@iitk.ac.in; Bhowmick, Somnath, E-mail: bsomnath@iitk.ac.in

    2016-07-07

    We discuss the efficacy of evolutionary method for the purpose of structural analysis of amorphous solids. At present, ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) based melt-quench technique is used and this deterministic approach has proven to be successful to study amorphous materials. We show that a stochastic approach motivated by Darwinian evolution can also be used to simulate amorphous structures. Applying this method, in conjunction with density functional theory based electronic, ionic and cell relaxation, we re-investigate two well known amorphous semiconductors, namely silicon and indium gallium zinc oxide. We find that characteristic structural parameters like average bond length and bondmore » angle are within ∼2% of those reported by ab initio MD calculations and experimental studies.« less

  19. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A.; LaSalvia, Jerry C.; Wehrenberg, Christopher E.; Behler, Kristopher D.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state shock-wave propagation is strongly nonequilibrium in nature and hence rate dependent. Using high-power pulsed-laser-driven shock compression, unprecedented high strain rates can be achieved; here we report the directional amorphization in boron carbide polycrystals. At a shock pressure of 45∼50 GPa, multiple planar faults, slightly deviated from maximum shear direction, occur a few hundred nanometers below the shock surface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these planar faults are precursors of directional amorphization. It is proposed that the shear stresses cause the amorphization and that pressure assists the process by ensuring the integrity of the specimen. Thermal energy conversion calculations including heat transfer suggest that amorphization is a solid-state process. Such a phenomenon has significant effect on the ballistic performance of B4C. PMID:27733513

  20. Solid state amorphization kinetic of alpha lactose upon mechanical milling.

    PubMed

    Caron, Vincent; Willart, Jean-François; Lefort, Ronan; Derollez, Patrick; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc

    2011-11-29

    It has been previously reported that α-lactose could be totally amorphized by ball milling. In this paper we report a detailed investigation of the structural and microstructural changes by which this solid state amorphization takes place. The investigations have been performed by Powder X-ray Diffraction, Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C CP-MAS) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The results reveal the structural complexity of the material in the course of its amorphization so that it cannot be considered as a simple mixture made of a decreasing crystalline fraction and an increasing amorphous fraction. Heating this complexity can give rise to a fully nano-crystalline material. The results also show that chemical degradations upon heating are strongly connected to the melting process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A; LaSalvia, Jerry C; Wehrenberg, Christopher E; Behler, Kristopher D; Meyers, Marc A

    2016-10-25

    Solid-state shock-wave propagation is strongly nonequilibrium in nature and hence rate dependent. Using high-power pulsed-laser-driven shock compression, unprecedented high strain rates can be achieved; here we report the directional amorphization in boron carbide polycrystals. At a shock pressure of 45∼50 GPa, multiple planar faults, slightly deviated from maximum shear direction, occur a few hundred nanometers below the shock surface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these planar faults are precursors of directional amorphization. It is proposed that the shear stresses cause the amorphization and that pressure assists the process by ensuring the integrity of the specimen. Thermal energy conversion calculations including heat transfer suggest that amorphization is a solid-state process. Such a phenomenon has significant effect on the ballistic performance of B 4 C.

  2. Predicting Crystallization of Amorphous Drugs with Terahertz Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sibik, Juraj; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas; Zeitler, J Axel

    2015-08-03

    There is a controversy about the extent to which the primary and secondary dielectric relaxations influence the crystallization of amorphous organic compounds below the glass transition temperature. Recent studies also point to the importance of fast molecular dynamics on picosecond-to-nanosecond time scales with respect to the glass stability. In the present study we provide terahertz spectroscopy evidence on the crystallization of amorphous naproxen well below its glass transition temperature and confirm the direct role of Johari-Goldstein (JG) secondary relaxation as a facilitator of the crystallization. We determine the onset temperature Tβ above which the JG relaxation contributes to the fast molecular dynamics and analytically quantify the level of this contribution. We then show there is a strong correlation between the increase in the fast molecular dynamics and onset of crystallization in several chosen amorphous drugs. We believe that this technique has immediate applications to quantify the stability of amorphous drug materials.

  3. Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia

    SciT

    Stone, Kevin H.; Schelhas, Laura T.; Garten, Lauren M.

    Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphsmore » of VO 2. Ultimately this suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.« less

  4. Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia

    DOE PAGES

    Stone, Kevin H.; Schelhas, Laura T.; Garten, Lauren M.; ...

    2016-07-13

    Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphsmore » of VO 2. Ultimately this suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.« less

  5. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  6. NMR signature of evolution of ductile-to-brittle transition in bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C C; Xiang, J F; Xi, X K; Wang, W H

    2011-12-02

    The mechanical properties of monolithic metallic glasses depend on the structures at atomic or subnanometer scales, while a clear correlation between mechanical behavior and structures has not been well established in such amorphous materials. In this work, we find a clear correlation of (27)Al NMR isotropic shifts with a microalloying induced ductile-to-brittle transition at ambient temperature in bulk metallic glasses, which indicates that the (27)Al NMR isotropic shift can be regarded as a structural signature to characterize plasticity for this metallic glass system. The study provides a compelling approach for investigating and understanding the mechanical properties of metallic glasses from the point of view of electronic structure. © 2011 American Physical Society

  7. On the origin of bulk glass forming ability in Cu-Hf, Zr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristić, Ramir; Zadro, Krešo; Pajić, Damir; Figueroa, Ignacio A.; Babić, Emil

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the formation of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) in metallic systems and finding a reliable criterion for selection of BMG compositions are among the most important issues in condensed-matter physics and material science. Using the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements performed on both amorphous and crystallized Cu-Hf alloys (30-70 at% Cu) we find a correlation between the difference in magnetic susceptibilities of corresponding glassy and crystalline alloys and the variation in the glass forming ability (GFA) in these alloys. Since the same correlation can be inferred from data for the properties associated with the electronic structure of Cu-Zr alloys, it seems quite general and may apply to other glassy alloys based on early and late transition metals. This correlation is plausible from the free-energy considerations and provides a simple way to select the compositions with high GFA.

  8. Atomic-Level Sculpting of Crystalline Oxides: Toward Bulk Nanofabrication with Single Atomic Plane Precision.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Stephen; He, Qian; Lupini, Andrew R; Leonard, Donovan N; Oxley, Mark P; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Unocic, Raymond R; Tselev, Alexander; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Sumpter, Bobby G; Pennycook, Stephen J; Kalinin, Sergei V; Borisevich, Albina Y

    2015-11-25

    The atomic-level sculpting of 3D crystalline oxide nanostructures from metastable amorphous films in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is demonstrated. Strontium titanate nanostructures grow epitaxially from the crystalline substrate following the beam path. This method can be used for fabricating crystalline structures as small as 1-2 nm and the process can be observed in situ with atomic resolution. The fabrication of arbitrary shape structures via control of the position and scan speed of the electron beam is further demonstrated. Combined with broad availability of the atomic resolved electron microscopy platforms, these observations suggest the feasibility of large scale implementation of bulk atomic-level fabrication as a new enabling tool of nanoscience and technology, providing a bottom-up, atomic-level complement to 3D printing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Visualization of Hierarchical Nanodomains in Polymer/Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean J.; Chen, Wei; ...

    2014-06-20

    Here, traditional electron microscopy techniques such as bright-field imaging provide poor contrast for organic films and identification of structures in amorphous material can be problematic, particularly in high-performance organic solar cells. By combining energy-filtered corrected transmission electron microscopy, together with electron energy loss and X-ray energy-dispersive hyperspectral imaging, we have imaged PTB7/ PC 61BM blended polymer optical photovoltaic films, and were able to identify domains ranging in size from several hundred nanometers to several nanometers in extent. This work verifies that microstructural domains exist in bulk heterojunctions in PTB7/PC 61BM polymeric solar cells at multiple length scales and expands ourmore » understanding of optimal device performance providing insight for the design of even higher performance cells.« less

  10. Low Young's modulus Ti-based porous bulk glassy alloy without cytotoxic elements.

    PubMed

    Nicoara, M; Raduta, A; Parthiban, R; Locovei, C; Eckert, J; Stoica, M

    2016-05-01

    A new a biocompatible Ti42Zr40Ta3Si15 (atomic %) porous bulk glassy alloy was produced by combination of rapid solidification and powder metallurgy techniques. Amorphous alloy ribbons were fabricated by melt spinning, i.e. extremely fast quenching the molten alloy with 10(6)K/s from T=1973K down to room temperature. The ribbons were then cryo-milled at liquid nitrogen temperature in order to produce powder, which was subsequently hot pressed. The resulting thick pellets have a porosity of about 14vol%, a high compression strength of 337MPa and a Young's modulus of about E=52GPa, values very close to those characteristic of cortical bone. Moreover, the morphology of the samples is very similar to that of cortical bone. The biocompatibility, which is due to the absence of any toxic element in the chemical composition, together with the suitable mechanical behavior, make these samples promising for orthopedic and dentistry applications. Ti-based alloys are nowadays the standard solution for biomedical implants. However, both the conventional crystalline and amorphous alloys have higher rigidity as the human bone, leading to the damage of the bone at the interface, and contains harmful elements like vanadium, aluminum, nickel or beryllium. The hierarchical porous structures based on glassy alloys with biocompatible elements is a much better alternative. This work presents for the first time the manufacturing of such porous bodies starting from Ti-based amorphous alloy ribbons, which contains only non-harmful elements. The morphology and the compressive mechanical properties of these new products are analyzed in regard with those characteristic to the cortical bone. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Amorphous Alloy Surpasses Steel and Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the same way that the inventions of steel in the 1800s and plastic in the 1900s sparked revolutions for industry, a new class of amorphous alloys is poised to redefine materials science as we know it in the 21st century. Welcome to the 3rd Revolution, otherwise known as the era of Liquidmetal(R) alloys, where metals behave similar to plastics but possess more than twice the strength of high performance titanium. Liquidmetal alloys were conceived in 1992, as a result of a project funded by the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), NASA, and the U.S. Department of Energy, to study the fundamentals of metallic alloys in an undercooled liquid state, for the development of new aerospace materials. Furthermore, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center contributed to the development of the alloys by subjecting the materials to testing in its Electrostatic Levitator, a special instrument that is capable of suspending an object in midair so that researchers can heat and cool it in a containerless environment free from contaminants that could otherwise spoil the experiment.

  12. Synthesis of Antimony Doped Amorphous Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, H.; Takashima, M.; Akasaka, H.; Ohtake, N.

    2013-06-01

    We report the effects of antimony (Sb) doping on the electrical and optical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films grown on silicon and copper substrates by magnetron sputtering deposition. For film deposition, the mixture targets fabricated from carbon and antimony powders was used. The atomic concentration of carbon, hydrogen, and antimony, in the film deposited from the 1.0 mol% Sb containing target were 81, 17, 2 at.%, respectively. These elements were homogeneously distributed in the film. On the structural effect, the average continuous sp2 carbon bonding networks decreased with Sb concentration increasing, and defects in the films were increased with the Sb incorporation because atomic radius of Sb atoms is twice larger size than that of carbon. The optical gap and the electrical resistivity were carried out before and after the Sb doping. The results show that optical gap dropped from 3.15 to 3.04 eV corresponding to non-doping to Sb-doping conditions, respectively. The electrical resistivity reduced from 10.5 to 1.0 MΩm by the Sb doping. These results suggest the doping level was newly formed in the forbidden band.

  13. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    DOE PAGES

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; ...

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value inmore » iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.« less

  14. High-harmonic generation in amorphous solids

    SciT

    You, Yong Sing; Yin, Yanchun; Wu, Yi

    High-harmonic generation in isolated atoms and molecules has been widely utilized in extreme ultraviolet photonics and attosecond pulse metrology. Recently, high-harmonic generation has been observed in solids, which could lead to important applications such as all-optical methods to image valance charge density and reconstruct electronic band structures, as well as compact extreme ultraviolet light sources. So far these studies are confined to crystalline solids; therefore, decoupling the respective roles of long-range periodicity and high density has been challenging. Here we report the observation of high-harmonic generation from amorphous fused silica. We also decouple the role of long-range periodicity by comparingmore » harmonics generated from fused silica and crystalline quartz, which contain the same atomic constituents but differ in long-range periodicity. These results advance current understanding of the strong-field processes leading to high-harmonic generation in solids with implications for the development of robust and compact extreme ultraviolet light sources.« less

  15. Amorphous Silicon: Flexible Backplane and Display Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.

    Advances in the science and technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H, also referred to as a-Si) and the associated devices including thin-film transistors (TFT) during the past three decades have had a profound impact on the development and commercialization of major applications such as thin-film solar cells, digital image scanners and X-ray imagers and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Particularly, during approximately the past 15 years, a-Si TFT-based flat panel AMLCDs have been a huge commercial success. a-Si TFT-LCD has enabled the note book PCs, and is now rapidly replacing the venerable CRT in the desktop monitor and home TV applications. a-Si TFT-LCD is now the dominant technology in use for applications ranging from small displays such as in mobile phones to large displays such as in home TV, as well-specialized applications such as industrial and avionics displays.

  16. Nanomechanics of slip avalanches in amorphous plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Penghui; Dahmen, Karin A.; Kushima, Akihiro; Wright, Wendelin J.; Park, Harold S.; Short, Michael P.; Yip, Sidney

    2018-05-01

    Discrete stress relaxations (slip avalanches) in a model metallic glass under uniaxial compression are studied using a metadynamics algorithm for molecular simulation at experimental strain rates. The onset of yielding is observed at the first major stress drop, accompanied, upon analysis, by the formation of a single localized shear band region spanning the entire system. During the elastic response prior to yielding, low concentrations of shear transformation deformation events appear intermittently and spatially uncorrelated. During serrated flow following yielding, small stress drops occur interspersed between large drops. The simulation results point to a threshold value of stress dissipation as a characteristic feature separating major and minor avalanches consistent with mean-field modeling analysis and mechanical testing experiments. We further interpret this behavior to be a consequence of a nonlinear interplay of two prevailing mechanisms of amorphous plasticity, thermally activated atomic diffusion and stress-induced shear transformations, originally proposed by Spaepen and Argon, respectively. Probing the atomistic processes at widely separate strain rates gives insight to different modes of shear band formation: percolation of shear transformations versus crack-like propagation. Additionally a focus on crossover avalanche size has implications for nanomechanical modeling of spatially and temporally heterogeneous dynamics.

  17. High-harmonic generation in amorphous solids

    DOE PAGES

    You, Yong Sing; Yin, Yanchun; Wu, Yi; ...

    2017-09-28

    High-harmonic generation in isolated atoms and molecules has been widely utilized in extreme ultraviolet photonics and attosecond pulse metrology. Recently, high-harmonic generation has been observed in solids, which could lead to important applications such as all-optical methods to image valance charge density and reconstruct electronic band structures, as well as compact extreme ultraviolet light sources. So far these studies are confined to crystalline solids; therefore, decoupling the respective roles of long-range periodicity and high density has been challenging. Here we report the observation of high-harmonic generation from amorphous fused silica. We also decouple the role of long-range periodicity by comparingmore » harmonics generated from fused silica and crystalline quartz, which contain the same atomic constituents but differ in long-range periodicity. These results advance current understanding of the strong-field processes leading to high-harmonic generation in solids with implications for the development of robust and compact extreme ultraviolet light sources.« less

  18. Amorphous Iron Borides: Preparation, Structure and Magnetic Properties.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-28

    temperature. External magnetic field experiments were performed in a superconducting solenoid with both source and absor- ber at 4.2 K. The observed...D-Ai20 919 AMORPHOUS IRON BORIDES: PREPARATION STRUCTURE AND i/i MAGNETIC PROPERTIES(U) JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV LAUREL NO APPLIED PHYSICS LRB K MOORJRNI...NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANOANOS-93-A 10 AMORPHOUS IRON BORIDES: PREPARATION, STRUCTURE ~AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES FINAL REPORT Kishin Moorjani September 1982 U

  19. Structure and Properties of Amorphous Transparent Conducting Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Julia

    Driven by technological appeal, the research area of amorphous oxide semiconductors has grown tremendously since the first demonstration of the unique properties of amorphous indium oxide more than a decade ago. Today, amorphous oxides, such as a-ITO, a-IZO, a-IGZO, or a-ZITO, exhibit the optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties that are comparable or even superior to those possessed by their crystalline counterparts, pushing the latter out of the market. Large-area uniformity, low-cost low-temperature deposition, high carrier mobility, optical transparency, and mechanical flexibility make these materials appealing for next-generation thin-film electronics. Yet, the structural variations associated with crystalline-to-amorphous transition as well as their role in carrier generation and transport properties of these oxides are far from being understood. Although amorphous oxides lack grain boundaries, factors like (i) size and distribution of nanocrystalline inclusions; (ii) spatial distribution and clustering of incorporated cations in multicomponent oxides; (iii) formation of trap defects; and (iv) piezoelectric effects associated with internal strains, will contribute to electron scattering. In this work, ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) and accurate density-functional approaches are employed to understand how the properties of amorphous ternary and quaternary oxides depend on quench rates, cation compositions, and oxygen stoichiometries. The MD results, combined with thorough experimental characterization, reveal that interplay between the local and long-range structural preferences of the constituent oxides gives rise to a complex composition-dependent structural behavior in the amorphous oxides. The proposed network models of metal-oxygen polyhedra help explain the observed intriguing electrical and optical properties in In-based oxides and suggest ways to broaden the phase space of amorphous oxide semiconductors with tunable properties. The

  20. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciT

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenonmore » ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.« less