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Sample records for zur astronomiegeschichte band

  1. Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5 (Acta Historica Astronomiae Vol. 18)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Dick, W. R.; Hamel, J.

    2003-01-01

    The 18th volume of the Acta Historica Astronomiae is at the same time the sixth collection of essays on the history of astronomy ("Beitræge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 6"), edited by the historians of astronomy W.R. Dick (Potsdam) and J. Hamel (Berlin). Besides a few short notices and book reviews, the book contains eight major articles, which deal with astronomical topics covering the time from the 16th to the 19th centuries. The first article by Michael Weichenhan (Berlin) deals with "the invention of the disk-shaped earth: a chapter of Copernican apologetics". The author shows that the concept of a "disc-shaped Earth" was by no means widespread in the middle ages, but restricted to the father of the church Lactantius and some adherents. Nevertheless, it was used by adherents of Copernicus to show the absurd consequences of a strictly literal biblical interpretation -- here concerning the Earth's shape, disc versus sphere, there the geocentric versus the heliocentric system. This thorough philosophical study is followed by two very short articles. "The measuring accuracy of Tycho's large sextant" by Johann Wünsch investigates O-C values of planet-star distances, as based on Tycho's observations as published in the Historia Coelestis (a compilation, which is also based on Tycho's manuscripts, and published in Regensburg in 1672). The result is that standard deviations are 80 arcseconds for Saturn and 89 arcseconds for Jupiter and Mars, an unexpectedly poor result in view of the general opinion that Tycho was famous for his precision work. "The astronomer Christoph Grienberger and the Galilei trial" by Franz Daxecker deals with a Jesuit astronomer who was both the disciple and successor of the mathematician-astronomer Christopher Clavius at the Collegium Romanum. While he was inclined to Galilei early on, he was forced to propagate Aristotelian doctrine. The brief article is very concise, but extremely tiresome to read (3 pages of pure text are embellished by

  2. Book Review: Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5 (Acta Historica Astronomiae Vol. 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, H. W.; Dick, W. R.; Hamel, J.

    2002-12-01

    The 15th volume of the Acta Historica Astronomiae is at the same time the fifth collection of essays on the history of astronomy (Beitraege zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5), edited by the historians of astronomy W.R. Dick (Potsdam) and J. Hamel (Berlin). Besides a few short notices and book reviews, the book contains 11 major articles, which deal with astronomical topics covering the time from the 16th to the 20th centuries. The first article, on the analysis and interpretation of historical horoscopes as a source of the history of science, is based on the inaugural lecture of its author, Guenther Oestmann. After a general introduction, which deals with the principles of horoscope making, the author discusses the horoscope of Count Heinrich Ranzau (1526-1598), the Danish governor of Schleswig-Holstein, who was a friend of Tycho Brahe. Oestmann shows that the astronomical-mathematical basis of such a horoscope can be reconstructed and interpreted. However, it is hardly possible to gain an insight in the process how the interpretation of a horoscope was done in detail. The second and third articles, by Franz Daxecker, deal with Athanasius Kircher and Christoph Scheiner, two catholic astronomers of the 17th century. Kircher's Organum Mathematicum is a calculating device that can be used in the fields of arithmetic, geometry, chronology, astronomy, astrology and others. The author provides extracts of the description of the Organum taken from a book by Caspar Schott, which deal with chronology and astronomy. A photograph of the Organum indicates that this tool consists of a set of tables glued on wooden or cardboard, but details of its contents and applications remain pretty obscure for the reader - a few elaborated examples would have been helpful. The second paper deals with the life of Christoph Scheiner SJ, the co-discoverer of sunspots (next to Galileo), after leaving Rome in 1633 - the year of the Galileo trial. Scheiner spent his later years in the Austrian and

  3. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 11. (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Duerbeck, H. W.; Hamel, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    The contributions deal with astronomical concepts, historical observatories and biographical studies. Newly found copies of Copernicus' principal work are described, the development of the concepts "sphaera" and "orbis coelestis" from ancient times via Copernicus to Kepler is investigated. The concept of harmonical cosmology of Kepler and A. Kircher is analyzed in a major paper. A rediscovered letter by Kepler is interpreted. Other papers deal with the university observatory of Bützow (Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania), the observatories installed in Strasbourg in the 17th and early 19th centuries, and the Jesuit observatory which existed in Graz (Styria) in the 18th century, as well as the unrealized plans for an observing station of Vienna University Observatory in the 1940s. Einstein's thoughts about Friedmann's cosmological papers are presented. Biographical sketches on Philipp Feselius (1565-1610), Ferdinand Adolph Freiherr von Ende (1760-1816), Wilhelm Ebert (1871-1916) and Karl Julius Lohnert (1885-1944) are supplemented by an analysis of the social background of the important Astronomers of the 20th century. The claim that Jupiter's moons were described already 105 years before Galilei is contradicted in a discussion. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  4. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 3. (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Hamel, Jürgen

    The main papers of this issue deal with previously unknown details of the foundation of the astronomical observatories in Gotha and in Königsberg (with numerous original documents by F.W. Bessel), with the Mecklenburg ordnance survey (1853-1873, with previously unknown letters by C.F. Gauss), with the merits of the Leipzig astronomer G.A. Jahn, with the internationality of the Astronomische Gesellschaft, and with early, previously little noted works on the expansion of the Universe. The issue contains a description of the important collection of sundials in the Kassel museum, discussions about the Medieval ``Phantom Period'', about Goethe's description of the zodiacal light, as well as obituaries and book reviews. Most papers in German, one in English.

  5. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 5 (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Hamel, Jürgen

    This book contains articles on 16th century horoscopes, on Athanasius Kircher's ``Organum Mathematicum'', on Gottfried Kirch's idea of an astronomical society, on a stellar photometer dating from 1786, on Bessel's review of Gauss' ``Theoria Motus'', on letters by F.X. von Zach, on the discovery of the minor planet Eros, as well as on the astronomers Christoph Scheiner, Johann Philipp von Wurzelbau, Georg Koch and Felix Linke. Short contributions and book reviews conclude this volume. Most papers are written in German. Main papers have English abstracts.

  6. Contributions to the History of Astronomy, Vol. 8 (German Title: Beiträge zur Astronomiegeschichte, Band 8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Wolfgang R.; Hamel, Jürgen

    The contributions span a time interval of more than 450 years. There are biographical investigations on Georg Joachim Rheticus, C.W.A. von Wahl and K.F. Heym, investigation on a reprint of a chapter of the principal work of Nicolaus Copernicus, on Christoph Scheiner and the "camera obscura", and, with respect to the history of timekeeping, on the "big Nuremberg clock". 19th century topics are: a contribution on the honorary doctorate of Joseph Fraunhofer, and on the construction of a lunar globe by Wilhelmine Witte, while the report on Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel and the cholera pandemia in Königsberg in the year 1831 gives a view into everyday life of scientists. 20th century topics are: the contributions on Bruno Thüring in Vienna and his relations with national socialism, as well as on Arthur Beer, Albert Einstein and the Warburg library. The book concludes by short communications, obituaries and book reviews.

  7. The Zur regulon of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zinc is considered as an essential element for all living organisms, but it can be toxic at large concentrations. Bacteria therefore tightly regulate zinc metabolism. The Cg2502 protein of Corynebacterium glutamicum was a candidate to control zinc metabolism in this species, since it was classified as metalloregulator of the zinc uptake regulator (Zur) subgroup of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family of DNA-binding transcription regulators. Results The cg2502 (zur) gene was deleted in the chromosome of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 by an allelic exchange procedure to generate the zur-deficient mutant C. glutamicum JS2502. Whole-genome DNA microarray hybridizations and real-time RT-PCR assays comparing the gene expression in C. glutamicum JS2502 with that of the wild-type strain detected 18 genes with enhanced expression in the zur mutant. The expression data were combined with results from cross-genome comparisons of shared regulatory sites, revealing the presence of candidate Zur-binding sites in the mapped promoter regions of five transcription units encoding components of potential zinc ABC-type transporters (cg0041-cg0042/cg0043; cg2911-cg2912-cg2913), a putative secreted protein (cg0040), a putative oxidoreductase (cg0795), and a putative P-loop GTPase of the COG0523 protein family (cg0794). Enhanced transcript levels of the respective genes in C. glutamicum JS2502 were verified by real-time RT-PCR, and complementation of the mutant with a wild-type zur gene reversed the effect of differential gene expression. The zinc-dependent expression of the putative cg0042 and cg2911 operons was detected in vivo with a gfp reporter system. Moreover, the zinc-dependent binding of purified Zur protein to double-stranded 40-mer oligonucleotides containing candidate Zur-binding sites was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. Conclusion Whole-genome expression profiling and DNA band shift assays demonstrated that Zur directly represses in a zinc

  8. Structural and Mechanistic Basis of Zinc Regulation Across the E. coli Zur Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Gilston, Benjamin A.; Wang, Suning; Marcus, Mason D.; Canalizo-Hernández, Mónica A.; Swindell, Elden P.; Xue, Yi; Mondragón, Alfonso; O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microbes, whether they are beneficial or pathogenic, are sensitive to host processes that starve or swamp the prokaryote with large fluctuations in local zinc concentration. To understand how microorganisms coordinate a dynamic response to changes in zinc availability at the molecular level, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of the zinc-sensing zinc uptake regulator (Zur) protein at each of the known Zur-regulated genes in Escherichia coli. We solved the structure of zinc-loaded Zur bound to the PznuABC promoter and show that this metalloregulatory protein represses gene expression by a highly cooperative binding of two adjacent dimers to essentially encircle the core element of each of the Zur-regulated promoters. Cooperativity in these protein-DNA interactions requires a pair of asymmetric salt bridges between Arg52 and Asp49′ that connect otherwise independent dimers. Analysis of the protein-DNA interface led to the discovery of a new member of the Zur-regulon: pliG. We demonstrate this gene is directly regulated by Zur in a zinc responsive manner. The pliG promoter forms stable complexes with either one or two Zur dimers with significantly less protein-DNA cooperativity than observed at other Zur regulon promoters. Comparison of the in vitro Zur-DNA binding affinity at each of four Zur-regulon promoters reveals ca. 10,000-fold variation Zur-DNA binding constants. The degree of Zur repression observed in vivo by comparison of transcript copy number in wild-type and Δzur strains parallels this trend spanning a 100-fold difference. We conclude that the number of ferric uptake regulator (Fur)-family dimers that bind within any given promoter varies significantly and that the thermodynamic profile of the Zur-DNA interactions directly correlates with the physiological response at different promoters. PMID:25369000

  9. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  10. Digitale Transformation, aber wie? - Von der Spielwiese zur Umsetzungsplanung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Thomas

    Es besteht wohl kaum Anlass zur Annahme, dass die seit Jahrzehnten etablierten Markt- und Technologiestrukturen der Energiewirtschaft sich nicht in einem radikalen Ablöseprozess mit Gewinnern und Verlierern befinden. Aber Vorsicht - vordergründig bereits verloren erscheinende Geschäftsmodelle erfahren im Zuge der Digitalisierung einerseits noch intensiveren Wettbewerbsdruck, können aber andererseits von diesem "technologischen Jungbrunnen" profitieren, um verlorenes Terrain zurückzugewinnen. Im folgenden Kapitel wird ein Managementzyklus aufgezeigt, der in Anlehnung an die bereits erfolgreiche Implementierung digitaler R/Evolutionen anderer Branchen aufzeigt, wie die Geschäftsleitung systematisch kostenbewusst und zielorientiert die Digitalisierung umsetzen kann.

  11. Lifelong Learning: One Focus, Different Systems. Studien zur Erwachsenenbildung, Band 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harney, Klaus, Ed.; Heikkinen, Anja, Ed.; Rahn, Sylvia, Ed.; Schemmann, Michael, Ed.

    These 17 articles on different subjects of the broader theme "lifelong learning" represent the latest results of the discussions of the Vocational Education and Culture Research Network. An introduction (Klaus Harney et al.) provides summaries of the contents. The articles are "The Global and International Discourse of Lifelong…

  12. A Simple Band for Gastric Banding.

    PubMed

    Broadbent

    1993-08-01

    The author has noted that flexible gastric bands have occasionally stenosed the gastric stoma or allowed it to dilate. A band was developed using a soft outer silicone rubber tube over a holding mechanism made out of a nylon cable tie passed within the silicone tube. This simple, easily applied band is rigid, resisting scar contracture and dilatation.

  13. Come Join the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of students in Blue Springs, Missouri, are joining the band, drawn by a band director who emphasizes caring and inclusiveness. In the four years since Melissia Goff arrived at Blue Springs High School, the school's extensive band program has swelled. The marching band alone has gone from 100 to 185 participants. Also under Goff's…

  14. Liquid Biopsy zur Überwachung von Melanompatienten.

    PubMed

    Gaiser, Maria Rita; von Bubnoff, Nikolas; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Utikal, Jochen Sven

    2018-04-01

    In den letzten sechs Jahren wurden verschiedene innovative systemische Therapien zur Behandlung des metastasierten malignen Melanoms (MM) entwickelt. Die konventionelle Chemotherapie wurde durch neuartige Primärtherapien abgelöst, darunter systemische Immuntherapien (Anti-CTLA4- und Anti-PD1-Antikörper; Zulassung von Anti-PDL1-Antikörpern erwartet) und Therapien, die gegen bestimmte Mutationen gerichtet sind (BRAF, NRAS und c-KIT). Daher stehen die behandelnden Ärzte neuen Herausforderungen gegenüber, beispielsweise der Stratifizierung von Patienten für geeignete Behandlungen und der Überwachung von Langzeit-Respondern auf Progression. Folglich werden zuverlässige Methoden zur Überwachung von Krankheitsprogression oder Behandlungsresistenz benötigt. Lokalisierte und fortgeschrittene Krebserkrankungen können zur Bildung zirkulierender Tumorzellen und Tumor-DNA (ctDNA) führen, die sich in Proben von peripherem Blut nachweisen und quantifizieren lassen (Liquid Biopsy). Im Fall von Melanompatienten können die Ergebnisse von Liquid Biopsy als neuartige prädiktive Biomarker bei therapeutischen Entscheidungen hilfreich sein, insbesondere im Zusammenhang mit mutationsbasierten zielgerichteten Therapien. Die Herausforderungen bei der Anwendung der Liquid Biopsy beinhalten strikte Kriterien für den Phänotyp der zirkulierenden MM-Zellen oder ihrer Fragmente und die Instabilität von ctDNA im Blut. In diesem Übersichtsartikel diskutieren wir die Beschränkungen der Liquid Biopsy hinsichtlich ihrer Anwendung in der Routinediagnostik. © 2018 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Components of the Unique Zur Regulon of Cupriavidus metallidurans Mediate Cytoplasmic Zinc Handling

    PubMed Central

    Bütof, Lucy; Schmidt-Vogler, Christopher; Herzberg, Martin; Große, Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zinc is an essential trace element, yet it is toxic at high concentrations. In the betaproteobacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans, the highly efficient removal of surplus zinc from the periplasm is responsible for the outstanding metal resistance of the organism. Rather than having a typical Zur-dependent, high-affinity ATP-binding cassette transporter of the ABC protein superfamily for zinc uptake at low concentrations, C. metallidurans has the secondary zinc importer ZupT of the zinc-regulated transporter, iron-regulated transporter (ZRT/IRT)-like protein (ZIP) family. It is important to understand, therefore, how this zinc-resistant bacterium copes with exposure to low zinc concentrations. Members of the Zur regulon in C. metallidurans were identified by comparing the transcriptomes of a Δzur mutant and its parent strain. The consensus sequence of the Zur-binding box was derived for the zupTp promoter-regulatory region by use of a truncation assay. The motif was used to predict possible Zur boxes upstream of Zur regulon members. The binding of Zur to these boxes was confirmed. Two Zur boxes upstream of the cobW1 gene, encoding a putative zinc chaperone, proved to be required for complete repression of cobW1 and its downstream genes in cells cultivated in mineral salts medium. A Zur box upstream of each of zur-cobW2, cobW3, and zupT permitted both low expression levels of these genes and their upregulation under conditions of zinc starvation. This demonstrates a compartmentalization of zinc homeostasis in C. metallidurans, where the periplasm is responsible for the removal of surplus zinc, cytoplasmic components are responsible for the management of zinc as an essential cofactor, and the two compartments are connected by ZupT. IMPORTANCE Elucidating zinc homeostasis is necessary for understanding both host-pathogen interactions and the performance of free-living bacteria in their natural environments. Escherichia coli acquires zinc under conditions of

  16. The components of the unique Zur regulon of Cupriavidus metallidurans mediate cytoplasmic zinc handling.

    PubMed

    Bütof, Lucy; Schmidt-Vogler, Christopher; Herzberg, Martin; Große, Cornelia; Nies, Dietrich H

    2017-08-14

    Zinc is an essential trace element and at the same time it is toxic at high concentrations. In the beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans the highly efficient removal of surplus zinc from the periplasm is responsible for its outstanding metal resistance. Rather than having a typical Zur-dependent, high-affinity ATP-binding cassette transporter of the ABC protein superfamily for zinc uptake at low concentrations, C. metallidurans instead has the secondary zinc importer ZupT of the ZRT/IRT (ZIP) family. It is important to understand, therefore, how this zinc-resistant bacterium copes when it is exposed to low zinc concentrations. Members of the Zur regulon in C. metallidurans were identified by comparing the transcriptomes of a Δ zur mutant and its parent strain. The consensus sequence of the Zur-binding box was derived for the zupTp promoter-regulatory region using a truncation assay. The motif was used to predict possible Zur-boxes upstream of Zur regulon members. Binding of Zur to these boxes was confirmed. Two Zur-boxes upstream of the cobW 1 gene, encoding a putative zinc chaperone, proved to be required for complete repression of cobW 1 and its downstream genes in cells cultivated in mineral salts medium. A Zur box upstream of each of zur-cobW 2 , cobW 3 and zupT permitted low-expression level of these genes plus their up-regulation under zinc starvation conditions. This demonstrates a compartmentalization of zinc homeostasis in C. metallidurans with the periplasm being responsible for removal of surplus zinc and cytoplasmic components for management of zinc as an essential co-factor, with both compartments connected by ZupT. Importance Elucidating zinc homeostasis is necessary to understand both host-pathogen interactions and performance of free-living bacteria in their natural environment. Escherichia coli acquires zinc under low zinc concentrations by the Zur-controlled ZnuABC importer of the ABC superfamily, and this was also the paradigm for other

  17. Foliar spray banding characteristics

    Treesearch

    A.R. Womac; C.W. Smith; Joseph E. Mulrooney

    2004-01-01

    Foliar spray banding was explored as a means of reducing peticide use compared to broadcast applications. Barious geometric spray patterns and delivery angles of foliar spray bands were investigated to increase spray deposits in a crop row at a constant spray rate of 94 L/ha. Wind-free laboratory results indicated that a banded application using three 65° hollow-cone...

  18. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  19. Singing with the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Timothy Meyer; Wright, Gary K.

    2012-01-01

    Usually band, orchestra, and choir directors work independently. However, the authors--one a choral director, the other a band director--have learned that making music together makes friends. Not only can ensemble directors get along, but joint concerts may be just the way to help students see how music can reach the heart. Combined instrumental…

  20. Amniotic constriction bands

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Amniotic band sequence URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... birth. The baby should be delivered in a medical center that has specialists experienced in caring for babies ... or partial loss of function of a body part. Congenital bands affecting large parts of the body cause the ...

  1. Progressive Band Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Kevin; Chang, Chein-I

    2009-01-01

    Progressive band selection (PBS) reduces spectral redundancy without significant loss of information, thereby reducing hyperspectral image data volume and processing time. Used onboard a spacecraft, it can also reduce image downlink time. PBS prioritizes an image's spectral bands according to priority scores that measure their significance to a specific application. Then it uses one of three methods to select an appropriate number of the most useful bands. Key challenges for PBS include selecting an appropriate criterion to generate band priority scores, and determining how many bands should be retained in the reduced image. The image's Virtual Dimensionality (VD), once computed, is a reasonable estimate of the latter. We describe the major design details of PBS and test PBS in a land classification experiment.

  2. Iliotibial band friction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy. PMID:21063495

  3. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  4. CSF oligoclonal banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... oligoclonal bands may point to a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. How the Test is Performed A sample of ... Performed This test helps support the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, it does not confirm the diagnosis. ...

  5. Banded Ridges in Hellas

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-09

    Low lying areas in the Hellas region, which is the largest impact basin on Mars, often show complex groups of banded ridges, furrows, and pits as seen in this observation from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  6. Adjustable gastric banding (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pouch and causes a feeling of fullness. The band can be tightened or loosened over time to change the size of the passage. Initially, the pouch holds about 1 ounce of food and later expands to 2-3 ounces.

  7. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 5 out of 5 Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous ...

  8. Verbesserte Visualisierung der Koronararterien in MSCT-Daten mit direkter Vergleichbarkeit zur Angiographie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacalli, Christina; Jähne, Marion; Wesarg, Stefan

    In diesem Beitrag stellen wir neue, automatisierte Verfahren zur Visualisierung der Koronararterien einerseits und für eine direkte Vergleichbarkeit mit konventionellen Angiogrammen andererseits vor. Unser Ansatz umfasst Methoden für die automatische Extraktion des Herzens aus kontrastverstärkten CT-Daten, sowie für die Maskierung grosser kontrastmittelgefüllter Kavitäten des Herzens, um die Sichtbarkeit der Koronararterien bei der Darstellung mittels Volumenrendering zu verbessern. Zum direkten Vergleich mit konventionellen Angiographien wurde ein Verfahren zur automatischen Generierung von Projektionsansichten aus den CT-Daten entwickelt.

  9. Zur (FurB) is a key factor in the control of the oxidative stress response in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Sein-Echaluce, Violeta C; González, Andrés; Napolitano, Mauro; Luque, Ignacio; Barja, Francisco; Peleato, M Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2015-06-01

    Iron and zinc are necessary nutrients whose homeostasis is tightly controlled by members of the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) superfamily in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Although the link between iron metabolism and oxidative stress management is well documented, little is known about the connection between zinc homeostasis and the oxidative stress response in cyanobacteria. Zinc homeostasis in Anabaena is controlled by Zur, also named FurB. When overexpressed in Escherichia coli, Zur (FurB) improved cell survival during oxidative stress. In order to investigate the possible correlation between Zur and the oxidative stress response in Anabaena, zur deletion and zur-overexpressing strains have been constructed, and the consequences of Zur imbalance evaluated. The lack of Zur increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), whereas an excess of Zur enhanced oxidative stress resistance. Both mutants displayed pleiotropic phenotypes, including alterations on the filament surfaces observable by scanning electron microscopy, reduced content of endogenous H2 O2 and altered expression of sodA, catalases and several peroxiredoxins. Transcriptional and biochemical analyses unveiled that the appropriate level of Zur is required for proper control of the oxidative stress response and allowed us to identify major antioxidant enzymes as novel members of the Zur regulon. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Jupiter's Bands of Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-22

    This enhanced-color image of Jupiter's bands of light and dark clouds was created by citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft. Three of the white oval storms known as the "String of Pearls" are visible near the top of the image. Each of the alternating light and dark atmospheric bands in this image is wider than Earth, and each rages around Jupiter at hundreds of miles (kilometers) per hour. The lighter areas are regions where gas is rising, and the darker bands are regions where gas is sinking. Juno acquired the image on May 19, 2017, at 11:30 a.m. PST (2:30 p.m. EST) from an altitude of about 20,800 miles (33,400 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21393

  11. Synthesizing folded band chaos.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Hayes, Scott T; Pethel, Shawn D; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2007-04-01

    A randomly driven linear filter that synthesizes Lorenz-like, reverse-time chaos is shown also to produce Rössler-like folded band wave forms when driven using a different encoding of the random source. The relationship between the topological entropy of the random source, dissipation in the linear filter, and the positive Lyapunov exponent for the reverse-time wave form is exposed. The two drive encodings are viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing both the Lorenz butterfly and Rössler folded band paradigms of nonlinear dynamics.

  12. Eine selbstkonsistente Carleman Linearisierung zur Analyse von Oszillatoren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Harry; Mathis, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    Die Analyse nichtlinearer dynamischer Schaltungen ist bis heute eine herausfordernde Aufgabe, da nur selten analytische Lösungen angegeben werden können. Daher wurden eine Vielzahl von Methoden entwickelt, um eine qualitative oder quantitative Näherung für die Lösungen der Netzwerkgleichung zu erhalten. Oftmals wird beispielsweise eine Kleinsignalanalyse mit Hilfe einer Taylorreihe in einem Arbeitspunkt durchgeführt, die nach den Gliedern erster Ordnung abgebrochen wird. Allerdings ist diese Linearisierung nur in der Nähe des stabilen Arbeitspunktes für hyperbolische Systeme gültig. Besonders für die Analyse des dynamischen Verhaltens von Oszillatoren treten jedoch nicht-hyperbolische Systeme auf, sodass diese Methode nicht angewendet werden kann Mathis (2000). Carleman hat gezeigt, dass nichtlineare Differentialgleichungen mit polynomiellen Nichtlinearitäten in ein unendliches System von linearen Differentialgleichungen transformiert werden können Carleman (1932). Wird das unendlichdimensionale Gleichungssystem für numerische Zwecke abgebrochen, kann bei Oszillatoren der Übergang in eine stationäre Schwingung (Grenzzyklus) nicht wiedergegeben werden. In diesem Beitrag wird eine selbstkonsistente Carleman Linearisierung zur Untersuchung von Oszillatoren vorgestellt, die auch dann anwendbar ist, wenn die Nichtlinearitäten keinen Polynomen entsprechen. Anstelle einer linearen Näherung um einen Arbeitspunkt, erfolgt mit Hilfe der Carleman Linearisierung eine Approximation auf einem vorgegebenen Gebiet. Da es jedoch mit der selbstkonsistenten Technik nicht möglich ist, das stationäre Verhalten von Oszillatoren zu beschreiben, wird die Berechnung einer Poincaré-Abbildung durchgeführt. Mit dieser ist eine anschließende Analyse des Oszillators möglich.

  13. Diet after gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... completely. Some of these are pasta, rice, bread, raw vegetables, and meats. Adding a low-fat sauce, broth gravy can make them easier to ... egg whites Beans Dairy products, which includes low-fat or nonfat ... foods with texture together with protein helps people who have a gastric band stay ...

  14. Banded Sunflower Moth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes Walsingham, is an important insect pest of cultivated sunflower. Eggs are deposited on the bracts of sunflower heads. Larvae develop through five instars within the heads and are present in fields from mid-July to mid-September. Larvae feed initially on the...

  15. Accuracy of band dendrometers

    Treesearch

    L. R. Auchmoody

    1976-01-01

    A study to determine the reliability of first-year growth measurements obtained from aluminum band dendrometers showed that growth was underestimated for black cherry trees growing less than 0.5 inch in diameter or accumulating less than 0.080 square foot of basal area. Prediction equations to correct for these errors are given.

  16. Band-notched spiral antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jae; Chang, John

    A band-notched spiral antenna having one or more spiral arms extending from a radially inner end to a radially outer end for transmitting or receiving electromagnetic radiation over a frequency range, and one or more resonance structures positioned adjacent one or more segments of the spiral arm associated with a notch frequency band or bands of the frequency range so as to resonate and suppress the transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation over said notch frequency band or bands.

  17. Robuste Verzweigungserkennung von Gefäßen in CTA-Datensätzen zur modellbasierten Extraktion der Centerline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Thomas; Fritz, Dominik; Biermann, Christina; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    Bei der Befundung und Visualisierung von Blutgefäßen ist deren Centerline von zentraler Bedeutung. Die Unterscheidung zwischen unverzweigten Abschnitten des Gefäßes und Verzweigungsbereichen ermöglicht den Einsatz spezialisierter und sehr effizienter Algorithmen zur modellbasierten Extraktion der Centerline. In diesem Artikel wird ein robustes Verfahren zur Verzweigungserkennung vorgestellt. Das Verfahren beruht auf einem Front-Propagation-Ansatz mit dynamisch angepassten Schwellwerten und einer anschließenden Clusteranalyse. Die vorgestellte Methode zur Verzweigungserkennung wurde als Komponente einer Architektur zur Extraktion der Centerline auf handannotierten Datensätzen getestet. Erste Ergebnisse sind sehr vielversprechend und ermöglichen auch bei pathologischen Gefäßen eine robuste Detektion von Gefäßverzweigungen.

  18. Bacillus licheniformis Contains Two More PerR-Like Proteins in Addition to PerR, Fur, and Zur Orthologues

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Shin-Yeong; Yang, Yoon-Mo; Ryu, Su-Hyun; Kwon, Yumi; Won, Young-Bin; Lee, Yeh-Eun; Youn, Hwan; Lee, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family proteins include sensors of Fe (Fur), Zn (Zur), and peroxide (PerR). Among Fur family proteins, Fur and Zur are ubiquitous in most prokaryotic organisms, whereas PerR exists mainly in Gram positive bacteria as a functional homologue of OxyR. Gram positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus encode three Fur family proteins: Fur, Zur, and PerR. In this study, we identified five Fur family proteins from B. licheniformis: two novel PerR-like proteins (BL00690 and BL00950) in addition to Fur (BL05249), Zur (BL03703), and PerR (BL00075) homologues. Our data indicate that all of the five B. licheniformis Fur homologues contain a structural Zn2+ site composed of four cysteine residues like many other Fur family proteins. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the PerR-like proteins (BL00690 and BL00950) as well as PerRBL (BL00075), but not FurBL (BL05249) and ZurBL (BL03703), can sense H2O2 by histidine oxidation with different sensitivity. We also show that PerR2 (BL00690) has a PerR-like repressor activity for PerR-regulated genes in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that B. licheniformis contains three PerR subfamily proteins which can sense H2O2 by histidine oxidation not by cysteine oxidation, in addition to Fur and Zur. PMID:27176811

  19. The hierarchically organized splitting of chromosome bands into sub-bands analyzed by multicolor banding (MCB).

    PubMed

    Lehrer, H; Weise, A; Michel, S; Starke, H; Mrasek, K; Heller, A; Kuechler, A; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the nature of chromosome sub-bands in more detail, the multicolor banding (MCB) probe-set for chromosome 5 was hybridized to normal metaphase spreads of GTG band levels at approximately 850, approximately 550, approximately 400 and approximately 300. It could be observed that as the chromosomes became shorter, more of the initial 39 MCB pseudo-colors disappeared, ending with 18 MCB pseudo-colored bands at the approximately 300-band level. The hierarchically organized splitting of bands into sub-bands was analyzed by comparing the disappearance or appearance of pseudo-color bands of the four different band levels. The regions to split first are telomere-near, centromere-near and in 5q23-->q31, followed by 5p15, 5p14, and all GTG dark bands in 5q apart from 5q12 and 5q32 and finalized by sub-band building in 5p15.2, 5q21.2-->q21.3, 5q23.1 and 5q34. The direction of band splitting towards the centromere or the telomere could be assigned to each band separately. Pseudo-colors assigned to GTG-light bands were resistant to band splitting. These observations are in concordance with the recently proposed concept of chromosome region-specific protein swelling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  1. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  2. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  3. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  4. Noise exposure in marching bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  5. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  6. Experimentelles FMCW-Radar zur hochfrequenten Charakterisierung von Windenergieanlagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Karsten; Werner, Jens; Schwartau, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    During the increasing dissemination of renewable energy sources the potential and actual interference effects of wind turbine plants became obvious. Turbines reflect the signals of weather radar and other radar systems. In addition to the static radar echoes, in particular the Doppler echoes are to be mentioned as an undesirable impairment Keränen (2014). As a result, building permit is refused for numerous new wind turbines, as the potential interference can not be reliably predicted. As a contribution to the improvement of this predictability, measurements are planned which aim at the high-frequency characterisation of wind energy installations. In this paper, a cost-effective FMCW radar is presented, which is operated in the same frequency band (C-band) as the weather radars of the German weather service. Here, the focus is on the description of the hardware design including the considerations used for its dimensioning.

  7. Degenerate band edge laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veysi, Mehdi; Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2018-05-01

    We propose a class of lasers based on a fourth-order exceptional point of degeneracy (EPD) referred to as the degenerate band edge (DBE). EPDs have been found in parity-time-symmetric photonic structures that require loss and/or gain; here we show that the DBE is a different kind of EPD since it occurs in periodic structures that are lossless and gainless. Because of this property, a small level of gain is sufficient to induce single-frequency lasing based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate Floquet-Bloch eigenwaves. This lasing scheme constitutes a light-matter interaction mechanism that leads also to a unique scaling law of the laser threshold with the inverse of the fifth power of the laser-cavity length. The DBE laser has the lowest lasing threshold in comparison to a regular band edge laser and to a conventional laser in cavities with the same loaded quality (Q ) factor and length. In particular, even without mirror reflectors the DBE laser exhibits a lasing threshold which is an order of magnitude lower than that of a uniform cavity laser of the same length and with very high mirror reflectivity. Importantly, this novel DBE lasing regime enforces mode selectivity and coherent single-frequency operation even for pumping rates well beyond the lasing threshold, in contrast to the multifrequency nature of conventional uniform cavity lasers.

  8. The demodulated band transform

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, Christopher K.; Gander, Phillip E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Windowed Fourier decompositions (WFD) are widely used in measuring stationary and non-stationary spectral phenomena and in describing pairwise relationships among multiple signals. Although a variety of WFDs see frequent application in electrophysiological research, including the short-time Fourier transform, continuous wavelets, band-pass filtering and multitaper-based approaches, each carries certain drawbacks related to computational efficiency and spectral leakage. This work surveys the advantages of a WFD not previously applied in electrophysiological settings. New Methods A computationally efficient form of complex demodulation, the demodulated band transform (DBT), is described. Results DBT is shown to provide an efficient approach to spectral estimation with minimal susceptibility to spectral leakage. In addition, it lends itself well to adaptive filtering of non-stationary narrowband noise. Comparison with existing methods A detailed comparison with alternative WFDs is offered, with an emphasis on the relationship between DBT and Thomson's multitaper. DBT is shown to perform favorably in combining computational efficiency with minimal introduction of spectral leakage. Conclusion DBT is ideally suited to efficient estimation of both stationary and non-stationary spectral and cross-spectral statistics with minimal susceptibility to spectral leakage. These qualities are broadly desirable in many settings. PMID:26711370

  9. Morphologies of omega band auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Natsuo; Yukimatu, Akira Sessai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Hori, Tomoaki

    2017-08-01

    We examined the morphological signatures of 315 omega band aurora events observed using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm ground-based all-sky imager network over a period of 8 years. We find that omega bands can be classified into the following three subtypes: (1) classical (O-type) omega bands, (2) torch or tongue (T-type) omega bands, and (3) combinations of classical and torch or tongue (O/T-type) omega bands. The statistical results show that T-type bands occur the most frequently (45%), followed by O/T-type bands (35%) and O-type bands (18%). We also examined the morphologies of the omega bands during their formation, from the growth period to the declining period through the maximum period. Interestingly, the omega bands are not stable, but rather exhibit dynamic changes in shape, intensity, and motion. They grow from small-scale bumps (seeds) at the poleward boundary of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, rather than via the rotation or shear motion of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, and do not exhibit any shear motion during the periods of auroral activity growth. Furthermore, the auroral luminosity is observed to increase during the declining period, and the total time from the start of the growth period to the end of the declining period is found to be about 20 min. Such dynamical signatures may be important in determining the mechanism responsible for omega band formation.

  10. Dark Bands on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dark crisscrossing bands on Jupiter's moon Europa represent widespread disruption from fracturing and the possible eruption of gases and rocky material from the moon's interior in this four-frame mosaic of images from NASA's Galileo spacecraft. These and other features suggest that soft ice or liquid water was present below the ice crust at the time of disruption. The data do not rule out the possibility that such conditions exist on Europa today. The pictures were taken from a distance of 156,000 kilometers (about 96,300 miles) on June 27, 1996. Many of the dark bands are more than 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) long, exceeding the length of the San Andreas fault of California. Some of the features seen on the mosaic resulted from meteoritic impact, including a 30- kilometer (18.5 mile) diameter crater visible as a bright scar in the lower third of the picture. In addition, dozens of shallow craters seen in some terrains along the sunset terminator zone (upper right shadowed area of the image) are probably impact craters. Other areas along the terminator lack craters, indicating relatively youthful surfaces, suggestive of recent eruptions of icy slush from the interior. The lower quarter of the mosaic includes highly fractured terrain where the icy crust has been broken into slabs as large as 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) across. The mosaic covers a large part of the northern hemisphere and includes the north pole at the top of the image. The sun illuminates the surface from the left. The area shown is centered on 20 degrees north latitude and 220 degrees west longitude and is about as wide as the United States west of the Mississippi River. The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  11. False Color Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    In a gray scale image, the suble variations seen in this false color image are almost impossible to identify. Note the orange band in the center of the frame, and the bluer bands to either side of it.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 87, Longitude 65.5 East (294.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Garage Band or GarageBand[R]? Remixing Musical Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vakeva, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I suggest that it is perhaps time to consider the pedagogy of popular music in more extensive terms than conventional rock band practices have to offer. One direction in which this might lead is the expansion of the informal pedagogy based on a "garage band" model to encompass various modes of digital artistry wherever this artistry…

  13. S2k-Leitlinie zum Gebrauch von Präparationen zur lokalen Anwendung auf der Haut (Topika).

    PubMed

    Wohlrab, Johannes; Staubach, Petra; Augustin, Matthias; Eisert, Lisa; Hünerbein, Andreas; Nast, Alexander; Reimann, Holger; Strömer, Klaus; Mahler, Vera

    2018-03-01

    Diese Leitlinie richtet sich an Assistenz- und Fachärzte der Dermatologie sowie an Kostenträger und politische Entscheidungsgremien. Die Leitlinie wurde im formellen Konsensusverfahren (S2k) von Dermatologen unter Einbindung von Apothekern erstellt. Die Leitlinie stellt allgemeine Aspekte der Pharmakokinetik sowie der regulatorischen Begrifflichkeiten dar. Es werden Empfehlungen zur Indikation von Magistralrezepturen sowie deren Qualitätssicherung gegeben. Die Bedeutung der galenischen Grundlagen und die Problematik bei einer Substitution gegeneinander verschiedener Grundlagen werden dargestellt. Die Leitlinie umfasst Kriterien zur Auswahl einer adäquaten Grundlage sowie spezifische Aspekte zur Therapieplanung. Die Leitlinie gibt Empfehlungen zum Management bei Unverträglichkeiten gegenüber Bestandteilen der Grundlagen oder Hilfsstoffe. © 2018 The Authors | Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  14. Improved Band-to-Band Registration Characterization for VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands Based on Lunar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhipeng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Li, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    Spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrumentaboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite are spatially co-registered.The accuracy of the band-to-band registration (BBR) is one of the key spatial parameters that must becharacterized. Unlike its predecessor, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), VIIRS has no on-board calibrator specifically designed to perform on-orbit BBR characterization.To circumvent this problem, a BBR characterization method for VIIRS reflective solar bands (RSB) based on regularly-acquired lunar images has been developed. While its results can satisfactorily demonstrate that the long-term stability of the BBR is well within +/- 0.1 moderate resolution bandpixels, undesired seasonal oscillations have been observed in the trending. The oscillations are most obvious between the visiblenear-infrared bands and short-middle wave infrared bands. This paper investigates the oscillations and identifies their cause as the band spectral dependence of the centroid position and the seasonal rotation of the lunar images over calibration events. Accordingly, an improved algorithm is proposed to quantify the rotation and compensate for its impact. After the correction, the seasonal oscillation in the resulting BBR is reduced from up to 0.05 moderate resolution band pixels to around 0.01 moderate resolution band pixels. After removing this spurious seasonal oscillation, the BBR, as well as its long-term drift are well determined.

  15. Band of Rubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist's animation illustrates a massive asteroid belt in orbit around a star the same age and size as our Sun. Evidence for this possible belt was discovered by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope when it spotted warm dust around the star, presumably from asteroids smashing together.

    The view starts from outside the belt, where planets like the one shown here might possibly reside, then moves into to the dusty belt itself. A collision between two asteroids is depicted near the end of the movie. Collisions like this replenish the dust in the asteroid belt, making it detectable to Spitzer.

    The alien belt circles a faint, nearby star called HD 69830 located 41 light-years away in the constellation Puppis. Compared to our own solar system's asteroid belt, this one is larger and closer to its star - it is 25 times as massive, and lies just inside an orbit equivalent to that of Venus. Our asteroid belt circles between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

    Because Jupiter acts as an outer wall to our asteroid belt, shepherding its debris into a series of bands, it is possible that an unseen planet is likewise marshalling this belt's rubble. Previous observations using the radial velocity technique did not locate any large gas giant planets, indicating that any planets present in this system would have to be the size of Saturn or smaller.

    Asteroids are chunks of rock from 'failed' planets, which never managed to coalesce into full-sized planets. Asteroid belts can be thought of as construction sites that accompany the building of rocky planets.

  16. Report from the banding lab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  17. Return rates of banded granivores in relation to band color and number of bands worn

    Treesearch

    Jared Verner; Dawn Breese; Kathryn L. Purcell

    1998-01-01

    We tested the null hypotheses of (1) no effect of band color and (2) no effect of number of bands worn on annual recapture rates of birds on their winter range. Results are reported from four species of granivores-Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus), Goldencrowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla) , White-crowned Sparrow (2. leucophrys) , and Darkeyed Junco (Junco...

  18. The Zinc-Responsive Regulator Zur Controls a Zinc Uptake System and Some Ribosomal Proteins in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)▿

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Oh, So-Young; Kim, Soon-Jong; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2007-01-01

    In various bacteria, Zur, a zinc-specific regulator of the Fur family, regulates genes for zinc transport systems to maintain zinc homeostasis. It has also been suggested that Zur controls zinc mobilization by regulating some ribosomal proteins. The antibiotic-producing soil bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor contains four genes for Fur family regulators, and one (named zur) is located downstream of the znuACB operon encoding a putative zinc uptake transporter. We found that zinc specifically repressed the level of znuA transcripts and that this level was derepressed in a Δzur mutant. Purified Zur existing as homodimers bound to the znuA promoter region in the presence of zinc, confirming the role of Zur as a zinc-responsive repressor. We analyzed transcripts for paralogous forms of ribosomal proteins L31 (RpmE1 and RpmE2) and L33 (RpmG2 and RpmG3) for their dependence on Zur and found that RpmE2 and RpmG2 with no zinc-binding motif of conserved cysteines (C's) were negatively regulated by Zur. C-negative RpmG3 and C-positive RpmE1 were not regulated by Zur. Instead, they were regulated by the sigma factor σR as predicted from their promoter sequences. The rpmE1 and rpmG3 genes were partially induced by EDTA in a manner dependent on σR, suggesting that zinc depletion may stimulate the σR regulatory system. This finding reflects a link between thiol-oxidizing stress and zinc depletion. We determined the Zur-binding sites within znuA and rpmG2 promoter regions by footprinting analyses and identified a consensus inverted repeat sequence (TGaaAatgatTttCA, where uppercase letters represent the nucleotides common to all sites analyzed). This sequence closely matches that for mycobacterial Zur and allows the prediction of more genes in the Zur regulon. PMID:17416659

  19. Von neuen Geschäftsideen zur gelebten Digitalisierung in Utility 4.0 - das Integrierte Geschäftsmodell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doleski, Oliver D.

    Die Energiewirtschaft benötigt neue, digitale Geschäftsmodelle. Gegenwärtig folgt auf Liberalisierung und Energiewende die nächste Stufe einer weitreichenden Bereinigung des Versorgungsmarktes. Digitalisierung und Dezentralisierung sind heute in aller Munde und verlangen nach neuen Produkten und Dienstleistungen. Dabei wirken die immensen Herausforderungen einer digitalen Energiewelt wie Beschleuniger für die Transformation im Versorgungssektor und tragen damit zur breiten Etablierung von Utilities 4.0 bei. Dieser Entwicklungsprozess vollzieht sich mithilfe unterschiedlicher Methoden zur Realisierung neuer Geschäftsideen. Allerdings greifen die gängigen Konzepte zur Entwicklung von Geschäftsmodellen gerade im Hinblick auf die Berücksichtigung komplexer, unbeständiger Rahmenbedingungen und spezifischer Anforderungen der digitalen Energiewelt mitunter zu kurz. Vor diesem Hintergrund wird das auf dem ganzheitlichen St. Galler Management-Konzept beruhende Integrierte Geschäftsmodell iOcTen als geeignetes Instrumentarium zur Geschäftsmodellentwicklung vorgestellt. Neben der Modellbeschreibung unterstützt ein intuitiv verständlicher Leitfaden den Praktiker bei der Transformation vom klassischen Versorgungsunternehmen zum digitalen Energiedienstleistungsunternehmen.

  20. Integrated amateur band and ultra-wide band monopole antenna with multiple band-notched

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Kunal; Kumar, Ashwani; Kanaujia, B. K.; Dwari, Santanu

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents the integrated amateur band and ultra-wide band (UWB) monopole antenna with integrated multiple band-notched characteristics. It is designed for avoiding the potential interference of frequencies 3.99 GHz (3.83 GHz-4.34 GHz), 4.86 GHz (4.48 GHz-5.63 GHz), 7.20 GHz (6.10 GHz-7.55 GHz) and 8.0 GHz (7.62 GHz-8.47 GHz) with VSWR 4.9, 11.5, 6.4 and 5.3, respectively. Equivalent parallel resonant circuits have been presented for each band-notched frequencies of the antenna. Antenna operates in amateur band 1.2 GHz (1.05 GHz-1.3 GHz) and UWB band from 3.2 GHz-13.9 GHz. Different substrates are used to verify the working of the proposed antenna. Integrated GSM band from 0.6 GHz to 1.8 GHz can also be achieved by changing the radius of the radiating patch. Antenna gain varied from 1.4 dBi to 9.8 dBi. Measured results are presented to validate the antenna performances.

  1. The United States Navy Band

    Science.gov Websites

    Navy Band Mission Ensembles National Tour Connect Auditions History Alumni Fanfare Newsletter Career Plus Instagram Fanfare Newsletter Concert Alerts! Alumni LINKS Links Links Career Information

  2. Polygonal deformation bands in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Nella Mollema, Pauline

    2017-04-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are dm-wide zones of shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions in the lower portion of the Jurassic Entrada Fm (Utah, USA). The edges of the polygons are 1 to 5 meters long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain < 0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. Density inversion, that takes place where under-compacted and over-pressurized layers (Carmel Fm) lay below normally compacted sediments (Entrada Sandstone), may be an important process for polygonal deformation bands formation. The gravitational sliding and soft sediment structures typically observed within the Carmel Fm support this hypothesis. Soft sediment deformation may induce polygonal faulting in the section of the Entrada Sandstone just above the Carmel Fm. The permeability of the polygonal deformation bands is approximately 10-14 to 10-13 m2, which is less than the permeability of the host, Entrada Sandstone (range 10-12 to 10-11 m2). The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  3. Intensity formulas for triplet bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budo, A.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work in this area is surveyed and the mathematics involved in determining the quantitative intensity measurements in triplet bands is presented. Explicit expressions for the intensity distribution in the branches of the 3 Sigma-3 Pi and 1 Sigma-3Pi bands valid for all values of the coupling constant Y of the 3 Pi terms are given. The intensity distribution calculated according to the formulas given is compared with measurements of PH, 3 Pi-3 Sigma. Good quantitative agreement is obtained.

  4. Dilatational band formation in bone

    PubMed Central

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Diab, Tamim; Sroga, Grazyna E.; Ural, Ani; Boskey, Adele L.; Gundberg, Caren M.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Toughening in hierarchically structured materials like bone arises from the arrangement of constituent material elements and their interactions. Unlike microcracking, which entails micrometer-level separation, there is no known evidence of fracture at the level of bone’s nanostructure. Here, we show that the initiation of fracture occurs in bone at the nanometer scale by dilatational bands. Through fatigue and indentation tests and laser confocal, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies on human and bovine bone specimens, we established that dilatational bands of the order of 100 nm form as ellipsoidal voids in between fused mineral aggregates and two adjacent proteins, osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OPN). Laser microdissection and ELISA of bone microdamage support our claim that OC and OPN colocalize with dilatational bands. Fracture tests on bones from OC and/or OPN knockout mice (OC−/−, OPN−/−, OC-OPN−/−;−/−) confirm that these two proteins regulate dilatational band formation and bone matrix toughness. On the basis of these observations, we propose molecular deformation and fracture mechanics models, illustrating the role of OC and OPN in dilatational band formation, and predict that the nanometer scale of tissue organization, associated with dilatational bands, affects fracture at higher scales and determines fracture toughness of bone. PMID:23129653

  5. Identifikationsverfahren zur Analyse von EEG-Signalen bei Epilepsie mit Reaktions-Diffusions Netzwerken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollas, F.; Tetzlaff, R.

    2007-06-01

    Partielle Differentialgleichungen des Reaktions-Diffusions-Typs beschreiben Phänomene wie Musterbildung, nichtlineare Wellenausbreitung und deterministisches Chaos und werden oft zur Untersuchung komplexer Vorgänge auf den Gebieten der Biologie, Chemie und Physik herangezogen. Zellulare Nichtlineare Netzwerke (CNN) sind eine räumliche Anordnung vergleichsweise einfacher dynamischer Systeme, die eine lokale Kopplung untereinander aufweisen. Durch eine Diskretisierung der Ortsvariablen können Reaktions-Diffusions-Gleichungen häufig auf CNN mit nichtlinearen Gewichtsfunktionen abgebildet werden. Die resultierenden Reaktions-Diffusions-CNN (RD-CNN) weisen dann in ihrer Dynamik näherungsweise gleiches Verhalten wie die zugrunde gelegten Reaktions-Diffusions-Systeme auf. Werden RD-CNN zur Identifikation neuronaler Strukturen anhand von EEG-Signalen herangezogen, so besteht die Möglichkeit festzustellen, ob das gefundene Netzwerk lokale Aktivität aufweist. Die von Chua eingeführte Theorie der lokalen Aktivität Chua (1998); Dogaru und Chua (1998) liefert eine notwendige Bedingung für das Auftreten von emergentem Verhalten in zellularen Netzwerken. Änderungen in den Parametern bestimmter RD-CNN könnten auf bevorstehende epileptische Anfälle hinweisen. In diesem Beitrag steht die Identifikation neuronaler Strukturen anhand von EEG-Signalen durch Reaktions-Diffusions-Netzwerke im Vordergrund der dargestellten Untersuchungen. In der Ergebnisdiskussion wird insbesondere auch die Frage nach einer geeigneten Netzwerkstruktur mit minimaler Komplexität behandelt.

  6. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  7. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  8. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    PubMed

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  9. William Band at Yenching University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  10. Ka-band study: 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Horttor, R. L.; Clauss, R. C.; Wilcher, J. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Mudgway, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Ka-band study team was chartered in late 1987 to bring together all the planning elements for establishing 32 GHz (Ka-band) as the primary downlink frequency for deep-space operation, and to provide a stable baseline from which to pursue that development. This article summarizes the results of that study at its conclusion in mid-1988, and corresponds to material presented to NASA's Office of Space Operations on July 14, 1988. For a variety of reasons, Ka-band is the right next major step in deep-space communications. It offers improved radio metric accuracy through reduced plasma sensitivity and increased bandwidth. Because of these improvements, it offers the opportunity to reduce costs in the flight radio system or in the DSN by allocating part of the overall benefits of Ka-band to this cost reduction. A mission scenario is being planned that can drive at least two and possibly all three of the DSN subnets to provide a Ka-band downlink capability by the turn of the century. The implementation scenario devised by the study team is believed to be feasible within reasonable resource expectations, and capable of providing the needed upgrade as a natural follow-on to the technology development which is already underway.

  11. Photoionization bands of rubidium molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakić, M.; Pichler, G.

    2018-03-01

    We studied the absorption spectrum of dense rubidium vapor generated in a T-type sapphire cell with a special emphasis on the structured photoionization continuum observed in the 200-300 nm spectral region. The photoionization spectrum has a continuous atomic contribution with a pronounced Seaton-Cooper minimum at about 250 nm and a molecular photoionization contribution with many broad bands. We discuss the possible origin of the photoionization bands as stemming from the absorption from the ground state of the Rb2 molecule to excited states of Rb2+* and to doubly excited autoionizing states of Rb2** molecule. All these photoionization bands are located above the Rb+ and Rb2+ ionization limits.

  12. Control banding approaches for nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Derk H

    2012-07-01

    Control banding (CB) has been developed as a pragmatic tool to manage the risk resulting from exposure to a wide variety of potentially hazardous substances in the absence of firm toxicological and exposure information. Currently, the CB approach is applied for emerging risks such as nanoparticles, by the development of various CB-based tools. Six of these are compared. Despite their similarity, i.e. combining hazard and exposure into control or risk bands, the structure, the applicability domains, and the assignment of the hazard and exposure bands, show differences that may affect the consistency of the resulting outcome amongst the various CB tools. The value of the currently available CB tools for nanomaterials can be enhanced by transparently elucidating these differences for user consideration during the selection of a tool for a specific scenario of application.

  13. C-band PARC manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groot, J. S.

    1992-05-01

    Measurement results of radar cross section, crosstalk level, etc., of a C band Polarimetric Active Radar Calibrator (PARC), which is used to calibrate air and spaceborne radars commonly used in remote sensing, are reported. The results are used to infer guidelines for the use of this PARC. The PARC consists of a high gain amplifier connected between two linearly polarized horn antennas.

  14. Dual-Band Band-Pass Filter with Fixed Low Band and Fluidically-Tunable High Band

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eiyong; Lim, Daecheon

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a dual-band band-pass filter with fixed low-band resonant frequency and tunable high-band resonant frequency. The proposed filter consists of two split-ring resonators (SRRs) with a stub and microfluidic channels. The lower resonant frequency is determined by the length of the SRR alone, whereas the higher resonant frequency is determined by the lengths of the SRR and the stub. Using this characteristic, we fix the lower resonant frequency by fixing the SRR length and tune the higher resonant frequency by controlling the stub length by injecting liquid metal in the microfluidic channel. We fabricated the filter on a Duroid substrate. The microfluidic channel was made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and eutectic gallium–indium (EGaIn) was used as the liquid metal. This filter operates in two states—with, and without, the liquid metal. In the state without the liquid metal, the filter has resonant frequencies at 1.85 GHz and 3.06 GHz, with fractional bandwidths of 4.34% and 2.94%, respectively; and in the state with the liquid metal, it has resonant frequencies at 1.86 GHz and 2.98 GHz, with fractional bandwidths of 4.3% and 2.95%, respectively. PMID:28813001

  15. X-band preamplifier filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manshadi, F.

    1986-01-01

    A low-loss bandstop filter designed and developed for the Deep Space Network's 34-meter high-efficiency antennas is described. The filter is used for protection of the X-band traveling wave masers from the 20-kW transmitter signal. A combination of empirical and theoretical techniques was employed as well as computer simulation to verify the design before fabrication.

  16. K-Band Latching Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  17. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, David A.; Flood, William S.; Arthur, Allan A.; Voelker, Ferdinand

    1986-01-01

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  18. Versuche zur Gewinnung von katalytischen Antikörpern zur Hydrolyse von Arylcarbamaten und Arylharnstoffen. (English Title: Attempts to produce catalytic antibodies for hydrolysis of arylcarbamates and arylureas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Deljana

    2002-05-01

    Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit gelang es, katalytische Antikörper zur Hydrolyse von Benzylphenylcarbamaten sowie zahlreiche monoklonale Antikörper gegen Haptene herzustellen. Es wurden verschiedene Hapten-Protein-Konjugate unter Verwendung unterschiedlicher Kopplungsmethoden hergestellt und charakterisiert. Zur Generierung der hydrolytisch aktiven Antikörper wurden Inzuchtmäuse mit KLH-Konjugaten von 4 Übergangszustandsanaloga (ÜZA) immunisiert. Mit Hilfe der Hybridomtechnik wurden verschiedene monoklonale Antikörper gegen diese ÜZA gewonnen. Dabei wurden sowohl verschiedene Immunisierungsschemata als auch verschiedene Inzuchtmausstämme und Fusionstechniken verwendet. Insgesamt wurden 32 monoklonale Antikörper gegen die verwendeten ÜZA selektiert. Diese Antikörper wurden in groen Mengen hergestellt und gereinigt. Zum Nachweis der Antikörper-vermittelten Katalyse wurden verschiedene Methoden entwickelt und eingesetzt, darunter immunologische Nachweismethoden mit Anti-Substrat- und Anti-Produkt-Antikörpern und eine photometrische Methode mit Dimethylaminozimtaldehyd. Der Nachweis der hydrolytischen Aktivität gelang mit Hilfe eines Enzymsensors, basierend auf immobilisierter Tyrosinase. Die Antikörper N1-BC1-D11, N1-FA7-C4, N1-FA7-D12 und R3-LG2-F9 hydrolysierten die Benzylphenylcarbamate POCc18, POCc19 und Substanz 27. Der Nachweis der hydrolytischen Aktivität dieser Antikörper gelang auch mit Hilfe der HPLC. Der katalytische Antikörper N1-BC1-D11 wurde kinetisch und thermodynamisch untersucht. Es wurde eine Michaelis-Menten-Kinetik mit Km von 210 µM, vmax von 3 mM/min und kcat von 222 min-1 beobachtet. Diese Werte korrelieren mit den Werten der wenigen bekannten Diphenylcarbamat-spaltenden Abzyme. Die Beschleunigungsrate des Antikörpers N1-BC1-D11 betrug 10. Das ÜZA Hei3 hemmte die hydrolytische Aktivität. Dies beweist, dass die Hydrolyse in der Antigenbindungsstelle stattfindet. Weiter wurde zwischen der Antikörperkonzentration und der

  19. Paediatric Virology as a new educational initiative: An interview with Nobelist Professor of Virology Harald zur Hausen.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    Born in Gelsenkirchen-Buer in Germany on March 11th, 1936, Professor Harald zur Hausen, Emeritus Professor of Virology at the University of Freiburg and 2008 Nobel Prize Laureate in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV), which causes cervical cancer, believes that good knowledge of virological methods and diagnostic possibilities are an asset for all young paediatricians. Professor zur Hausen considers that the creation of an educational platform on Paediatric Virology is definitely very beneficial for young paediatricians, as this will greatly enhance their knowledge in the field of Virology. He very actively advocates the vaccination of boys for the eradication of HPV infection and emphasises that male HPV vaccination should be included into the current vaccination programmes. He would have certainly considered Dr George N. Papanicolaou (Kyme, Island of Euboea, Greece, 1883 - Miami, Florida, USA, 1962) as an excellent candidate for the Nobel Prize, stating that the contribution of Dr Papanicolaou did not find sufficient recognition in the past. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens, Greece, on October 7th, 2017, Professor zur Hausen will give his plenary lecture on 'Paediatric Virology and Oncology: Virus persistence and the important first years of life'.

  20. Paediatric Virology as a new educational initiative: An interview with Nobelist Professor of Virology Harald zur Hausen

    PubMed Central

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2017-01-01

    Born in Gelsenkirchen-Buer in Germany on March 11th, 1936, Professor Harald zur Hausen, Emeritus Professor of Virology at the University of Freiburg and 2008 Nobel Prize Laureate in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV), which causes cervical cancer, believes that good knowledge of virological methods and diagnostic possibilities are an asset for all young paediatricians. Professor zur Hausen considers that the creation of an educational platform on Paediatric Virology is definitely very beneficial for young paediatricians, as this will greatly enhance their knowledge in the field of Virology. He very actively advocates the vaccination of boys for the eradication of HPV infection and emphasises that male HPV vaccination should be included into the current vaccination programmes. He would have certainly considered Dr George N. Papanicolaou (Kyme, Island of Euboea, Greece, 1883 - Miami, Florida, USA, 1962) as an excellent candidate for the Nobel Prize, stating that the contribution of Dr Papanicolaou did not find sufficient recognition in the past. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens, Greece, on October 7th, 2017, Professor zur Hausen will give his plenary lecture on ‘Paediatric Virology and Oncology: Virus persistence and the important first years of life’. PMID:29042913

  1. [Gastric band erosion: Alternative management].

    PubMed

    Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis José; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Cabrera-Jardines, Ricardo; Mondragón-Pinzón, Erwin Eduardo; Castillo-González, Federico Armando

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem, for which the prevalence has increased worldwide at an alarming rate, affecting 1.7 billion people in the world. To describe the technique employed in incomplete penetration of gastric band where endoscopic management and/or primary closure is not feasible. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band was performed in five patients with incomplete penetrance using Foley catheterization in the perforation site that could lead to the development of a gastro-cutaneous fistula. The cases presented include a leak that required surgical lavage with satisfactory outcome, and one patient developed stenosis 3 years after surgical management, which was resolved endoscopically. In all cases, the penetration site closed spontaneously. Gastric band erosion has been reported in 3.4% of cases. The reason for inserting a catheter is to create a controlled gastro-cutaneous fistula, allowing spontaneous closure. Various techniques have been described: the totally endoscopic, hybrid techniques (endoscopic/laparoscopic) and completely laparoscopic. A technique is described here that is useful and successful in cases where the above-described treatments are not viable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  2. S-Band propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  3. C (G)-Band & X (I) - Band Noncoherent Radar Transponder Performance Specification Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    TRAINING RANGE NEVADA TEST SITE STANDARD 262-02 ELECTRONIC TRAJECTORY MEASUREMENTS GROUP C (G) – BAND & X (I) – BAND NONCOHERENT RADAR...Date 00 Apr 2002 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle C (G)-Band & X (I) - Band Noncoherent Radar Transponder...Number of Pages 157 i STANDARD 262-02 C (G) – BAND & X (I) – BAND NONCOHERENT RADAR TRANSPONDER PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATION STANDARD APRIL 2002 Prepared by

  4. Vergleich von rekombinanten Vaccinia- und DNA-Vektoren zur Tumorimmuntherapie im C57BL/6-Mausmodell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnen, Heiko

    2002-10-01

    In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden Tumorimpfstoffe auf der Basis des Plasmid-Vektors pCI, modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) und MVA-infizierten dendritischen Zellen entwickelt und durch Sequenzierung, Western blotting und durchflußzytometrische Analyse überprüft. Die in vivo Wirksamkeit der Vakzinen wurde in verschiedenen Tumormodellen in C57BL/6 Mäusen verglichen. Die auf dem eukaryotischen Expressionsvektor pCI basierende DNA-Vakzinierung induzierte einen sehr wirksamen, antigenspezifischen und langfristigen Schutz vor Muzin, CEA oder beta-Galactosidase exprimierenden Tumoren. Eine MVA-Vakzinierung bietet in den in dieser Arbeit durchgeführten Tumormodellen keinen signifikanten Schutz vor Muzin oder beta-Galactosidase exprimierenden Tumoren. Sowohl humane, als auch murine in vitro generierte dendritische Zellen lassen sich mit MVA – im Vergleich zu anderen viralen Vektoren – sehr gut infizieren. Die Expressionsrate der eingefügten Gene ist aber gering im Vergleich zur Expression in permissiven Wirtszellen des Virus (embryonale Hühnerfibroblasten). Es konnte gezeigt werden, daß eine MVA-Infektion dendritischer Zellen ähnliche Auswirkungen auf den Reifezustand humaner und muriner dendritischer Zellen hat, wie eine Infektion mit replikationskompetenten Vakzinia-Stämmen, und außerdem die Hochregulation von CD40 während der terminalen Reifung von murinen dendritischen Zellen inhibiert wird. Die während der langfristigen in vitro Kultur auf CEF-Zellen entstandenen Deletionen im MVA Genom führten zu einer starken Attenuierung und dem Verlust einiger Gene, die immunmodulatorische Proteine kodieren, jedoch nicht zu einer Verminderung des zytopathischen Effekts in dendritischen Zellen. Die geringe Expressionsrate und die beobachtete Inhibition der Expression kostimulatorischer Moleküle auf dendritischen Zellen kann für eine wenig effektive Induktion einer Immunantwort in MVA vakzinierten Tieren durch cross priming oder die direkte Infektion

  5. X-band Uplink Ground Systems Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the X-band exciter and Doppler extractor equipment for the X-band uplink was completed. Stability measurements were made on the exciter and Doppler reference signals and the results are presented.

  6. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  7. Bands of Clouds and Lace

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-05-13

    As Cassini nears its rendezvous with Saturn, new detail in the banded clouds of the planet's atmosphere are becoming visible. Cassini began the journey to the ringed world of Saturn nearly seven years ago and is now less than two months away from orbit insertion on June 30. Cassini’s narrow-angle camera took this image on April 16, 2004, when the spacecraft was 38.5 million kilometers (23.9 million miles) from Saturn. Dark regions are generally areas free of high clouds, and bright areas are places with high, thick clouds which shield the view of the darker areas below. A dark spot is visible at the south pole, which is remarkable to scientists because it is so small and centered. The spot could be affected by Saturn's magnetic field, which is nearly aligned with the planet's rotation axis, unlike the magnetic fields of Jupiter and Earth. From south to north, other notable features are the two white spots just above the dark spot toward the right, and the large dark oblong-shaped feature that extends across the middle. The darker band beneath the oblong-shaped feature has begun to show a lacy pattern of lighter-colored, high altitude clouds, indicative of turbulent atmospheric conditions. The cloud bands move at different speeds, and their irregularities may be due to either the different motions between them or to disturbances below the visible cloud layer. Such disturbances might be powered by the planet's internal heat; Saturn radiates more energy than it receives from the Sun. The moon Mimas (396 kilometers, 245 miles across) is visible to the left of the south pole. Saturn currently has 31 known moons. Since launch, 13 new moons have been discovered by ground-based telescopes. Cassini will get a closer look and may discover new moons, perhaps embedded within the planet’s magnificent rings. This image was taken using a filter sensitive to light near 727 nanometers, one of the near-infrared absorption bands of methane gas, which is one of the ingredients in

  8. Senior Adult Bands: Music's New Horizon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Don D.; Levy, Katherine M.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the success of Iowa City's (Iowa) New Horizons Band that consists of 55 senior adult beginners and former instrumentalists. Describes the organization of the band program, the senior's performance skills and commitment, and the ongoing challenges. Gives a selected listing of the music the band plays at concerts and other events. (CMK)

  9. On sampling band-pass signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, R.; Shahshahani, M.

    1989-01-01

    Four techniques for uniform sampling of band-bass signals are examined. The in-phase and quadrature components of the band-pass signal are computed in terms of the samples of the original band-pass signal. The relative implementation merits of these techniques are discussed with reference to the Deep Space Network (DSN).

  10. Tap Teens' Curiosity with Lab Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Lab Band project used with 12th grade students at the Westgate Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada). Explains that each band student taught a peer how to play their instrument which created versatility in the band. States that all students kept a reflective journal. (CMK)

  11. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  12. Dust bands in the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Greenberg, Richard; Dermott, Stanley F.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the original IRAS observations leading to the discovery of the three dust bands in the asteroid belt and the analysis of data. Special attention is given to an analytical model of the dust band torus and to theories concerning the origin of the dust bands, with special attention given to the collisional equilibrium (asteroid family), the nonequilibrium (random collision), and the comet hypotheses of dust-band origin. It is noted that neither the equilibrium nor nonequilibrium models, as currently formulated, present a complete picture of the IRAS dust-band observations.

  13. WIDE BAND REGENERATIVE FREQUENCY DIVIDER AND MULTIPLIER

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1959-11-17

    A regenerative frequency divider and multiplier having wide band input characteristics is presented. The circuit produces output oscillations having frequencies related by a fixed ratio to input oscillations over a wide band of frequencies. In accomplishing this end, the divider-multiplier includes a wide band input circuit coupled by mixer means to a wide band output circuit having a pass band related by a fixed ratio to that of the input circuit. A regenerative feedback circuit derives a fixed frequency ratio feedback signal from the output circuit and applies same to the mixer means in proper phase relation to sustain fixed frequency ratio oscillations in the output circuit.

  14. Relative properties of smooth terminating bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Ragnarsson, I.

    1998-01-01

    The relative properties of smooth terminating bands observed in the A ∼ 110 mass region are studied within the effective alignment approach. Theoretical values of ietf are calculated using the configuration-dependent shell-correction model with the cranked Nilsson potential. Reasonable agreement with experiment shows that previous interpretations of these bands are consistent with the present study. Contrary to the case of superdeformed bands, the effective alignments of these bands deviate significantly from the pure single-particle alignments of the corresponding orbitals. This indicates that in the case of smooth terminating bands, the effects associated with changes in equilibrium deformations contribute significantly to the effective alignment.

  15. Thematic mapper studies band correlation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, S. G.; Kiang, R.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral data representative of thematic mapper candidate bands 1 and 3 to 7 were obtained by selecting appropriate combinations of bands from the JSC 24 channel multispectral scanner. Of all the bands assigned, only candidate bands 4 (.74 mu to .80 mu) and 5 (.80 mu to .91 mu) showed consistently high intercorrelation from region to region and time to time. This extremely high correlation persisted when looking at the composite data set in a multitemporal, multilocation domain. The GISS investigations lend positive confirmation to the hypothesis, that TM bands 4 and 5 are redundant.

  16. The Effects of Band Director Leadership Style and Student Leadership Ability on Band Festival Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, P. Dru

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between band director leadership styles and the strength of student leadership within the bands. This study also examined the differences between leadership styles, student leadership strength, and band festival ratings (marching and concert). Subjects (N = 42) were band directors from Texas and Arkansas who…

  17. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  18. Dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation and stable performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hang; Qu, Shao-Bo; Peng, Wei-Dong; Lin, Bao-Qin; Wang, Jia-Fu; Ma, Hua; Zhang, Jie-Qiu; Bai, Peng; Wang, Xu-Hua; Xu, Zhuo

    2012-05-01

    A new technique of designing a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is presented. This technique is based on a delicately designed topology of L- and Ku-band microwave filters. The two band-pass responses are generated by a capacitively-loaded square-loop frequency selective surface and an aperture-coupled frequency selective surface, respectively. A Faraday cage is located between the two frequency selective surface structures to eliminate undesired couplings. Based on this technique, a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is designed, which possesses large band separation, high selectivity, and stable performance under various incident angles and different polarizations.

  19. Ganzheitliche Digitalisierungsansätze im Stadtwerk: Von der Strategie bis zur Umsetzung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudenhausen, Roman; Hahn, Heike

    Digitalisierung muss im Stadtwerk dazu führen, Kundenerwartungen, die heutzutage schon vielfach durch digitales Know-how und Erfahrungen geprägt sind, in einzigartiger Weise zu entsprechen - in Form digitaler Kundenkontaktpunkte, automatisierter Prozesse oder plattformbasierter Geschäftsmodelle. Eine große Rolle spielen dabei unternehmensweit nutzbare Informationen, die eine 360-Grad-Sicht auf den Kunden ermöglichen. Nur in dieser Kombination werden sich nachhaltig Wettbewerbsvorteile generieren lassen. Manch ein Kunde wird die Lust, einen Prozess zu Ende zu gehen, schon vor dem Abschluss verlieren, wenn er nicht unmittelbar und ohne die digitale Welt zu verlassen zum Ziel kommt. Eine nur "halb digitale Kundenerfahrung" wird weder zu Neugeschäft noch zur positiven emotionalen Bindung zwischen Kunden und Stadtwerk führen. Nicht zu unterschätzen sind zudem Erwartungen hinsichtlich zukünftiger Geschäftsmodelle, aus denen sich disruptive Bedrohungen für die herkömmlichen Strom- und Gasangebote ergeben werden. Erste innovative Ansätze finden sich bereits im Markt, die erahnen lassen, dass zurzeit viel diskutierte Technologien wie die Blockchain nicht mehr nur hypothetischer Natur sind. Die Auseinandersetzung mit der Digitalisierung erfolgt dabei sinnvollerweise in einem unternehmensweit abgestimmten Rahmen, der eine zielgerichtete und ganzheitliche Vorgehensweise ermöglicht.

  20. [COPD und Klangtherapie: Pilotstudie zur Wirksamkeit einer Behandlung mit Körpertambura bei COPD-Patienten].

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Bernhard; Schmidt, Stefan; Hartwig, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Hintergrund: Erkrankungen der Atemorgane treten mit steigendem Alter öfter auf, nehmen weltweit zu und sind häufige Ursachen für Morbidität und Mortalität. In dieser Pilotstudie wurde der Frage nachgegangen, ob eine einmalige 10-minütige Behandlung mit einer Körpertambura eine signifikante und effektive Verbesserung der Lungenfunktion von Patienten mit chronisch-obstruktiver Lungenerkrankung (COPD; GOLD-Stadium A oder B) erbringen kann. Patienten und Methoden: 54 Probanden konnten je zur Hälfte in eine Behandlungsgruppe (Körpertambura) und eine aktive Kontrollgruppe (Atemtherapie) randomisiert werden. Eine Bestimmung der Lungenfunktionsmessparameter «Einsekundenkapazität» (FEV1) und «inspiratorische Vitalkapazität» (IVC) zu den Zeitpunkten T1 (Baseline), T2 (direkt nach Behandlung) und als Follow-up etwa 3 Wochen nach T1 (T3). Ergebnisse: Die Behandlungsgruppe zeigte sich der Kontrollgruppe in beiden Werten signifikant überlegen. Die Zeit-×-Gruppe-Interaktion (Varianzanalyse) ergab p = 0,001 (FEV1) bzw. p = 0,04 (IVC). Die Behandlungsgruppe zeigte bei beiden Werten eine Verbesserung von klinischer Relevanz. Schlussfolgerung: Diese Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die Klangbehandlung mittels einer Körpertambura - neben den schulmedizinischen, leitliniengerechten Therapien - eine zusätzliche, nebenwirkungsarme, aber durchaus klinisch wirksame Option für die Behandlung von COPD-Patienten darstellen kann, um deren Lebensqualität zu stabilisieren und zu verbessern. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  1. Einstellung und Wissen von Lehramtsstudierenden zur Evolution - ein Vergleich zwischen Deutschland und der Türkei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Dittmar; Soran, Haluk

    Es wird eine Untersuchung vorgestellt, in der Wissen und Überzeugungen von Lehramtsstudierenden aller Fächer zum Thema Evolution an zwei Universitäten in Deutschland und der Türkei erhoben worden sind. Die Befragung wurde in Dortmund und in Ankara durchgeführt. Es stellte sich heraus, dass ausgeprägte Defizite im Verständnis der Evolutionsmechanismen herrschen. Viele Studierende, insbesondere aus der Türkei, sind nicht von der Faktizität der Evolution überzeugt. Dies gilt sowohl für Studierende mit Fach Biologie als auch für Studierende mit anderen Fächern. Näher untersucht worden sind die Faktoren, die die Überzeugungen zur Evolution beeinflussen können, was ja in Anbetracht der hohen Ablehnungsrate der Evolution von besonderem Interesse ist. Das Vertrauen in die Wissenschaft spielt hierbei eine besondere Rolle: Wer der Wissenschaft vertraut, ist auch eher von der Evolution überzeugt, als diejenigen, die skeptisch gegenüber der Wissenschaft sind.

  2. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  3. Band 3 in aging and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Kay, M M

    1991-01-01

    Senescent cell antigen appears on old cells and marks them for death by initiating the binding of IgG autoantibody and subsequent removal by phagocytes in mammals and other vertebrates. We have created a synthetic aging antigen that blocks binding of IgG to senescent cells in vitro. Synthetic senescent cell antigen might be effective in preventing cellular destruction in vivo in certain diseases, and can be used to manipulate cellular life span in situ. Senescent cell antigen is generated by the modification of an important structural and transport membrane molecule, protein band 3. Band 3 is present in cellular, nuclear, Golgi, and mitochondrial membranes as well as in cell membranes. Band 3 proteins in nucleated cells participate in cell surface patching and capping. Band 3 maintains acid-base balance by mediating the exchange of anions (e.g., chloride, bicarbonate), and is the binding site for glycolytic enzymes. It is responsible for CO2 exchange in all tissues and organs. Thus, it is the most heavily used anion transport system in the body. Band 3 is a major transmembrane structural protein which attaches the plasma membrane to the internal cell cytoskeleton by binding to band 2.1 (ankyrin). Oxidation generates senescent cell antigen in situ. Band 3 is present in the central nervous system, and differences have been described in band 3 between young and aging brain tissue. One autosomal recessive neurological disease, choreoacanthocytosis, is associated with band 3 abnormalities. The 150 residues of the carboxyl terminus segment of band 3 appear to be altered. In brains from Alzheimer's disease patients, antibodies to aged band 3 label the amyloid core of classical plaques and the microglial cells located in the middle of the plaque in tissue sections, and an abnormal band 3 in immunoblots. Band 3 protein(s) in mammalian brain performs the same functions as that of erythroid band 3. These functions is anion transport, ankyrin binding, and generation of

  4. The dynamics of a shear band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarola, Diana; Capuani, Domenico; Bigoni, Davide

    2018-03-01

    A shear band of finite length, formed inside a ductile material at a certain stage of a continued homogeneous strain, provides a dynamic perturbation to an incident wave field, which strongly influences the dynamics of the material and affects its path to failure. The investigation of this perturbation is presented for a ductile metal, with reference to the incremental mechanics of a material obeying the J2-deformation theory of plasticity (a special form of prestressed, elastic, anisotropic, and incompressible solid). The treatment originates from the derivation of integral representations relating the incremental mechanical fields at every point of the medium to the incremental displacement jump across the shear band faces, generated by an impinging wave. The boundary integral equations (under the plane strain assumption) are numerically approached through a collocation technique, which keeps into account the singularity at the shear band tips and permits the analysis of an incident wave impinging a shear band. It is shown that the presence of the shear band induces a resonance, visible in the incremental displacement field and in the stress intensity factor at the shear band tips, which promotes shear band growth. Moreover, the waves scattered by the shear band are shown to generate a fine texture of vibrations, parallel to the shear band line and propagating at a long distance from it, but leaving a sort of conical shadow zone, which emanates from the tips of the shear band.

  5. Hardware-Abbildung eines videobasierten Verfahrens zur echtzeitfähigen Auswertung von Winkelhistogrammen auf eine modulare Coprozessor-Architektur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatt, H.; Tarnowsky, A.; Blume, H.; Pirsch, P.

    2010-10-01

    Dieser Beitrag behandelt die Abbildung eines videobasierten Verfahrens zur echtzeitfähigen Auswertung von Winkelhistogrammen auf eine modulare Coprozessor-Architektur. Die Architektur besteht aus mehreren dedizierten Recheneinheiten zur parallelen Verarbeitung rechenintensiver Bildverarbeitungsverfahren und ist mit einem RISC-Prozessor verbunden. Eine konfigurierbare Architekturerweiterung um eine Recheneinheit zur Auswertung von Winkelhistogrammen von Objekten ermöglicht in Verbindung mit dem RISC eine echtzeitfähige Klassifikation. Je nach Konfiguration sind für die Architekturerweiterung auf einem Xilinx Virtex-5-FPGA zwischen 3300 und 12 000 Lookup-Tables erforderlich. Bei einer Taktfrequenz von 100 MHz können unabhängig von der Bildauflösung pro Einzelbild in einem 25-Hz-Videodatenstrom bis zu 100 Objekte der Größe 256×256 Pixel analysiert werden. This paper presents the mapping of a video-based approach for real-time evaluation of angular histograms on a modular coprocessor architecture. The architecture comprises several dedicated processing elements for parallel processing of computation-intensive image processing tasks and is coupled with a RISC processor. A configurable architecture extension, especially a processing element for evaluating angular histograms of objects in conjunction with a RISC processor, provides a real-time classification. Depending on the configuration of the architecture extension, 3 300 to 12 000 look-up tables are required for a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA implementation. Running at a clock frequency of 100 MHz and independently of the image resolution per frame, 100 objects of size 256×256 pixels are analyzed in a 25 Hz video stream by the architecture.

  6. Shuttle Ku-band and S-band communications implementations study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.; Nessibou, T.; Nilsen, P. W.; Simon, M. K.; Weber, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    The interfaces between the Ku-band system and the TDRSS, between the S-band system and the TDRSS, GSTDN and SGLS networks, and between the S-band payload communication equipment and the other Orbiter avionic equipment were investigated. The principal activities reported are: (1) performance analysis of the payload narrowband bent-pipe through the Ku-band communication system; (2) performance evaluation of the TDRSS user constraints placed on the S-band and Ku-band communication systems; (3) assessment of the shuttle-unique S-band TDRSS ground station false lock susceptibility; (4) development of procedure to make S-band antenna measurements during orbital flight; (5) development of procedure to make RFI measurements during orbital flight to assess the performance degradation to the TDRSS S-band communication link; and (6) analysis of the payload interface integration problem areas.

  7. Assessment of Thematic Mapper Band-to-band Registration by the Block Correlation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, D. H.; Wrigley, R. C.; Mertz, F. C.; Hall, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Rectangular blocks of pixels from one band image were statistically correlated against blocks centered on identical pixels from a second band image. The block pairs were shifted in pixel increments both vertically and horizontally with respect to each other and the correlation coefficient to the maximum correlation was taken as the best estimate of registration error for each block pair. For the band combinations of the Arkansas scene studied, the misregistration of TM spectral bands within the noncooled focal plane lie well within the 0.2 pixel target specification. Misregistration between the middle IR bands is well within this specification also. The thermal IR band has an apparent misregistration with TM band 7 of approximately 3 pixels in each direction. The TM band 3 has a misregistration of approximately 0.2 pixel in the across-scan direction and 0.5 pixel in the along-scan direction, with both TM bands 5 and 7.

  8. Assessment of Thematic Mapper band-to-band registration by the block correlation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, D. H.; Wrigley, R. C.; Mertz, F. C.; Hall, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Rectangular blocks of pixels from one band image were statistically correlated against blocks centered on identical pixels from a second band image. The block pairs were shifted in pixel increments both vertically and horizontally with respect to each other and the correlation coefficient to the maximum correlation was taken as the best estimate of registration error for each block pair. For the band combinations of the Arkansas scene studied, the misregistration of TM spectral bands within the noncooled focal plane lie well within the 0.2 pixel target specification. Misregistration between the middle IR bands is well within this specification also. The thermal IR band has an apparent misregistration with TM band 7 of approximately 3 pixels in each direction. The TM band 3 has a misregistration of approximately 0.2 pixel in the across-scan direction and 0.5 pixel in the along-scan direction, with both TM bands 5 and 7.

  9. Rotational band properties of 173W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. X.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.; Liu, M. L.; Ding, B.; Li, G. S.; Hua, W.; Zhou, H. B.; Guo, S.; Qiang, Y. H.; Oshima, M.; Koizumi, M.; Toh, Y.; Kimura, A.; Harada, H.; Furutaka, K.; Kitatani, F.; Nakamura, S.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Ohta, M.; Hara, K.; Kin, T.; Meng, J.

    2012-10-01

    High-spin states in 173W have been studied using the 150Nd(28Si,5n)173W reaction at beam energies of 135 and 140 MeV. The previously known bands associated with the 7/2+[633], 5/2-[512], and 1/2-[521] configurations are extended significantly, and the unfavored signature branch of the 1/2-[521] band is established for the first time. The band properties, such as level spacings, band-crossing frequencies, alignment gains, and signature splittings, are discussed with an emphasis on the low-spin signature inversion observed in the 5/2-[512] band. By comparing the experimental B(M1)/B(E2) ratios with the theoretical values, we conclude that the configuration of the 5/2-[512] band is quite pure at low spins without appreciable admixture of the 5/2-[523] orbit, in conflict with the particle rotor model calculated results.

  10. Fade Mitigation Techniques at Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissanayake, Asoka (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Rain fading is the dominant propagation impairment affecting Ka-band satellite links and rain fade mitigation is a key element in the design of Ka-band satellite networks. Some of the common fade mitigation techniques include: power control, diversity, adaptive coding, and resource sharing. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides an excellent opportunity to develop and test Ka-band rain impairment amelioration techniques. Up-link power control and diversity are discussed in this paper.

  11. Metal band drives in spacecraft mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, Daryl

    1993-01-01

    Transmitting and changing the characteristics of force and stroke is a requirement in nearly all mechanisms. Examples include changing linear to rotary motion, providing a 90 deg change in direction, and amplifying stroke or force. Requirements for size, weight, efficiency and reliability create unique problems in spacecraft mechanisms. Flexible metal band and cam drive systems provide powerful solutions to these problems. Band drives, rack and pinion gears, and bell cranks are compared for effectiveness. Band drive issues are discussed including materials, bend radius, fabrication, attachment and reliability. Numerous mechanisms are shown which illustrate practical applications of band drives.

  12. Flat bands in fractal-like geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Biplab; Saha, Kush

    2018-05-01

    We report the presence of multiple flat bands in a class of two-dimensional lattices formed by Sierpinski gasket (SPG) fractal geometries as the basic unit cells. Solving the tight-binding Hamiltonian for such lattices with different generations of a SPG network, we find multiple degenerate and nondegenerate completely flat bands, depending on the configuration of parameters of the Hamiltonian. Moreover, we establish a generic formula to determine the number of such bands as a function of the generation index ℓ of the fractal geometry. We show that the flat bands and their neighboring dispersive bands have remarkable features, the most interesting one being the spin-1 conical-type spectrum at the band center without any staggered magnetic flux, in contrast to the kagome lattice. We furthermore investigate the effect of magnetic flux in these lattice settings and show that different combinations of fluxes through such fractal unit cells lead to a richer spectrum with a single isolated flat band or gapless electron- or holelike flat bands. Finally, we discuss a possible experimental setup to engineer such a fractal flat-band network using single-mode laser-induced photonic waveguides.

  13. Diffuse interstellar bands in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, O.; Henning, Thomas; Pfau, Werner; Stognienko, R.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code for radiation transport calculations is used to compare the profiles of the lambda lambda 5780 and 6613 Angstrom diffuse interstellar bands in the transmitted and the reflected light of a star embedded within an optically thin dust cloud. In addition, the behavior of polarization across the bands were calculated. The wavelength dependent complex indices of refraction across the bands were derived from the embedded cavity model. In view of the existence of different families of diffuse interstellar bands the question of other parameters of influence is addressed in short.

  14. Proportion of recovered waterfowl bands reported

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geis, A.D.; Atwood, E.L.

    1961-01-01

    Data from the annual mail survey of waterfowl hunters in the United States were used to estimate the total numbers of banded waterfowl that were shot. These estimates were compared with Banding Office records to estimate the proportion of recovered bands that was reported. On the average, about two banded birds were recovered for each one reported. The proportion reported was higher for some areas and for some species than for others. The proportion reported was higher when more of the reports came through employees of conservation agencies.

  15. Simultaneous dual-band radar development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskow, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    Efforts to design and construct an airborne imaging radar operating simultaneously at L band and X band with an all-inertial navigation system in order to form a dual-band radar system are described. The areas of development include duplex transmitters, receivers, and recorders, a control module, motion compensation for both bands, and adaptation of a commercial inertial navigation system. Installation of the system in the aircraft and flight tests are described. Circuit diagrams, performance figures, and some radar images are presented.

  16. Computational Design of Flat-Band Material.

    PubMed

    Hase, I; Yanagisawa, T; Kawashima, K

    2018-02-26

    Quantum mechanics states that hopping integral between local orbitals makes the energy band dispersive. However, in some special cases, there are bands with no dispersion due to quantum interference. These bands are called as flat band. Many models having flat band have been proposed, and many interesting physical properties are predicted. However, no real compound having flat band has been found yet despite the 25 years of vigorous researches. We have found that some pyrochlore oxides have quasi-flat band just below the Fermi level by first principles calculation. Moreover, their valence bands are well described by a tight-binding model of pyrochlore lattice with isotropic nearest neighbor hopping integral. This model belongs to a class of Mielke model, whose ground state is known to be ferromagnetic with appropriate carrier doping and on-site repulsive Coulomb interaction. We have also performed a spin-polarized band calculation for the hole-doped system from first principles and found that the ground state is ferromagnetic for some doping region. Interestingly, these compounds do not include magnetic element, such as transition metal and rare-earth elements.

  17. Computational Design of Flat-Band Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, I.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kawashima, K.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum mechanics states that hopping integral between local orbitals makes the energy band dispersive. However, in some special cases, there are bands with no dispersion due to quantum interference. These bands are called as flat band. Many models having flat band have been proposed, and many interesting physical properties are predicted. However, no real compound having flat band has been found yet despite the 25 years of vigorous researches. We have found that some pyrochlore oxides have quasi-flat band just below the Fermi level by first principles calculation. Moreover, their valence bands are well described by a tight-binding model of pyrochlore lattice with isotropic nearest neighbor hopping integral. This model belongs to a class of Mielke model, whose ground state is known to be ferromagnetic with appropriate carrier doping and on-site repulsive Coulomb interaction. We have also performed a spin-polarized band calculation for the hole-doped system from first principles and found that the ground state is ferromagnetic for some doping region. Interestingly, these compounds do not include magnetic element, such as transition metal and rare-earth elements.

  18. Reward banding to determine reporting rate of recovered mourning dove bands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomlinson, R.E.

    1968-01-01

    Reward bands placed on the other leg of certain regularly banded immature mourning doves (Zenaidura macroura) were used to develop information on reporting rates of recovered dove bands. Reports from 15 widely separated sections of the United States showed considerable variation in recovery rate of doves both with and without reward bands. The overall percentages of banded doves that were reported as recovered were 9.69% for those with reward bands and 3.83% for controls. The bandreporting rate for states influenced by publicity was 66%; that for states not influenced was 32%.

  19. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, D.A.; Flood, W.S.; Arthur, A.A.; Voelker, F.

    1984-03-20

    A broad-band beam bunther is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-

  20. Re-Imagining "Bildung Zur Humanität": How I Developed the Dialogos Approach to Practical Philosophy through Action Inquiry Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helskog, Guro Hansen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an account of how I developed the Dialogos approach to practical philosophy through action inquiry research. The process of development is understood as a contribution to the reconstruction of the notion "Bildung zur Humanität" as an ideal in education. Core perspectives, traditions and purposes involved in the action…

  1. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Søren; Stokbro, Kurt; Solomon, Gemma C.; Reuter, Matthew G.

    2017-12-01

    It is natural to characterize materials in transport junctions by their conductance length dependence, β. Theoretical estimations of β are made employing two primary theories: complex band structure and density functional theory (DFT) Landauer transport. It has previously been shown that the β value derived from total Landauer transmission can be related to the β value from the smallest |ki| complex band; however, it is an open question whether there is a deeper relationship between the two. Here we probe the details of the relationship between transmission and complex band structure, in this case individual eigenchannel transmissions and different complex bands. We present calculations of decay constants for the two most conductive states as determined by complex band structure and standard DFT Landauer transport calculations for one semi-conductor and two molecular junctions. The molecular junctions show that both the length dependence of the total transmission and the individual transmission eigenvalues can be, almost always, found through the complex band structure. The complex band structure of the semi-conducting material, however, does not predict the length dependence of the total transmission but only of the individual channels, at some k-points, due to multiple channels contributing to transmission. We also observe instances of vertical bands, some of which are the smallest |ki| complex bands, that do not contribute to transport. By understanding the deeper relationship between complex bands and individual transmission eigenchannels, we can make a general statement about when the previously accepted wisdom linking transmission and complex band structure will fail, namely, when multiple channels contribute significantly to the transmission.

  2. Zinc-Responsive Regulation of Alternative Ribosomal Protein Genes in Streptomyces coelicolor Involves Zur and σR▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Gillian A.; Pascoe, Ben; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Paget, Mark S. B.

    2007-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor contains paralogous versions of seven ribosomal proteins (S14, S18, L28, L31, L32, L33, and L36), which differ in their potential to bind structural zinc. The paralogues are termed C+ or C− on the basis of the presence or absence of putative cysteine ligands. Here, mutational studies suggest that the C− version of L31 can functionally replace its C+ paralogue only when expressed at an artificially elevated level. We show that the level of expression of four transcriptional units encoding C− proteins is elevated under conditions of zinc deprivation. Zur controls the expression of three transcriptional units (including rpmG2, rpmE2, rpmB2, rpsN2, rpmF2, and possibly rpsR2). Zur also controls the expression of the znuACB operon, which is predicted to encode a high-affinity zinc transport system. Surprisingly, the zinc-responsive control of the rpmG3-rpmJ2 operon is dictated by σR, a sigma factor that was previously shown to control the response to disulfide stress in S. coelicolor. The induction of σR activity during zinc limitation establishes an important link between thiol-disulfide metabolism and zinc homeostasis. PMID:17400736

  3. Zinc-responsive regulation of alternative ribosomal protein genes in Streptomyces coelicolor involves zur and sigmaR.

    PubMed

    Owen, Gillian A; Pascoe, Ben; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Paget, Mark S B

    2007-06-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor contains paralogous versions of seven ribosomal proteins (S14, S18, L28, L31, L32, L33, and L36), which differ in their potential to bind structural zinc. The paralogues are termed C(+) or C(-) on the basis of the presence or absence of putative cysteine ligands. Here, mutational studies suggest that the C(-) version of L31 can functionally replace its C(+) paralogue only when expressed at an artificially elevated level. We show that the level of expression of four transcriptional units encoding C(-) proteins is elevated under conditions of zinc deprivation. Zur controls the expression of three transcriptional units (including rpmG2, rpmE2, rpmB2, rpsN2, rpmF2, and possibly rpsR2). Zur also controls the expression of the znuACB operon, which is predicted to encode a high-affinity zinc transport system. Surprisingly, the zinc-responsive control of the rpmG3-rpmJ2 operon is dictated by sigma(R), a sigma factor that was previously shown to control the response to disulfide stress in S. coelicolor. The induction of sigma(R) activity during zinc limitation establishes an important link between thiol-disulfide metabolism and zinc homeostasis.

  4. Assessment of Thematic Mapper Band-to-band Registration by the Block Correlation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, D. H.; Wrigley, R. C.; Mertz, F. C.; Hall, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The design of the Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral radiometer makes it susceptible to band-to-band misregistration. To estimate band-to-band misregistration a block correlation method is employed. This method is chosen over other possible techniques (band differencing and flickering) because quantitative results are produced. The method correlates rectangular blocks of pixels from one band against blocks centered on identical pixels from a second band. The block pairs are shifted in pixel increments both vertically and horizontally with respect to each other and the correlation coefficient for each shift position is computed. The displacement corresponding to the maximum correlation is taken as the best estimate of registration error for each block pair. Subpixel shifts are estimated by a bi-quadratic interpolation of the correlation values surrounding the maximum correlation. To obtain statistical summaries for each band combination post processing of the block correlation results performed. The method results in estimates of registration error that are consistent with expectations.

  5. Nucleation of shear bands in amorphous alloys

    PubMed Central

    Perepezko, John H.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Chen, Ming-Wei; Wang, Jun-Qiang; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of shear bands is an important mode of localized inhomogeneous deformation that occurs in a wide range of materials. In metallic glasses, shear band development is considered to center on a structural heterogeneity, a shear transformation zone that evolves into a rapidly propagating shear band under a shear stress above a threshold. Deformation by shear bands is a nucleation-controlled process, but the initiation process is unclear. Here we use nanoindentation to probe shear band nucleation during loading by measuring the first pop-in event in the load–depth curve which is demonstrated to be associated with shear band formation. We analyze a large number of independent measurements on four different bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) alloys and reveal the operation of a bimodal distribution of the first pop-in loads that are associated with different shear band nucleation sites that operate at different stress levels below the glass transition temperature, Tg. The nucleation kinetics, the nucleation barriers, and the density for each site type have been determined. The discovery of multiple shear band nucleation sites challenges the current view of nucleation at a single type of site and offers opportunities for controlling the ductility of BMG alloys. PMID:24594599

  6. Low-Noise Band-Pass Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit uses standard components to overcome common limitation of JFET amplifiers. Low-noise band-pass amplifier employs JFET and operational amplifier. High gain and band-pass characteristics are achieved with suitable choice of resistances and capacitances. Circuit should find use as low-noise amplifier, for example as first stage instrumentation systems.

  7. Does the chromatic Mach bands effect exist?

    PubMed

    Tsofe, Avital; Spitzer, Hedva; Einav, Shmuel

    2009-06-30

    The achromatic Mach bands effect is a well-known visual illusion, discovered over a hundred years ago. This effect has been investigated thoroughly, mainly for its brightness aspect. The existence of Chromatic Mach bands, however, has been disputed. In recent years it has been reported that Chromatic Mach bands are not perceived under controlled iso-luminance conditions. However, here we show that a variety of Chromatic Mach bands, consisting of chromatic and achromatic regions, separated by a saturation ramp, can be clearly perceived under iso-luminance and iso-brightness conditions. In this study, observers' eye movements were recorded under iso-brightness conditions. Several observers were tested for their ability to perceive the Chromatic Mach bands effect and its magnitude, across different cardinal and non-cardinal Chromatic Mach bands stimuli. A computational model of color adaptation, which predicted color induction and color constancy, successfully predicts this variation of Chromatic Mach bands. This has been tested by measuring the distance of the data points from the "achromatic point" and by calculating the shift of the data points from predicted complementary lines. The results suggest that the Chromatic Mach bands effect is a specific chromatic induction effect.

  8. Convex Banding of the Covariance Matrix.

    PubMed

    Bien, Jacob; Bunea, Florentina; Xiao, Luo

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new sparse estimator of the covariance matrix for high-dimensional models in which the variables have a known ordering. Our estimator, which is the solution to a convex optimization problem, is equivalently expressed as an estimator which tapers the sample covariance matrix by a Toeplitz, sparsely-banded, data-adaptive matrix. As a result of this adaptivity, the convex banding estimator enjoys theoretical optimality properties not attained by previous banding or tapered estimators. In particular, our convex banding estimator is minimax rate adaptive in Frobenius and operator norms, up to log factors, over commonly-studied classes of covariance matrices, and over more general classes. Furthermore, it correctly recovers the bandwidth when the true covariance is exactly banded. Our convex formulation admits a simple and efficient algorithm. Empirical studies demonstrate its practical effectiveness and illustrate that our exactly-banded estimator works well even when the true covariance matrix is only close to a banded matrix, confirming our theoretical results. Our method compares favorably with all existing methods, in terms of accuracy and speed. We illustrate the practical merits of the convex banding estimator by showing that it can be used to improve the performance of discriminant analysis for classifying sound recordings.

  9. 47 CFR 90.1213 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Band plan. 90.1213 Section 90.1213 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... § 90.1213 Band plan. The following channel center frequencies are permitted to be aggregated for...

  10. Apparatus for loading a band saw blade

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Steven R.

    1990-01-01

    A band saw blade is loaded between pairs of guide wheels upon tensioning the blade by guiding the blade between pairs of spaced guide plates which define converging slots that converge toward the guide wheels. The approach is particularly useful in loading blades on underwater band saw machines used to cut radioactive materials.

  11. Convex Banding of the Covariance Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Jacob; Bunea, Florentina; Xiao, Luo

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new sparse estimator of the covariance matrix for high-dimensional models in which the variables have a known ordering. Our estimator, which is the solution to a convex optimization problem, is equivalently expressed as an estimator which tapers the sample covariance matrix by a Toeplitz, sparsely-banded, data-adaptive matrix. As a result of this adaptivity, the convex banding estimator enjoys theoretical optimality properties not attained by previous banding or tapered estimators. In particular, our convex banding estimator is minimax rate adaptive in Frobenius and operator norms, up to log factors, over commonly-studied classes of covariance matrices, and over more general classes. Furthermore, it correctly recovers the bandwidth when the true covariance is exactly banded. Our convex formulation admits a simple and efficient algorithm. Empirical studies demonstrate its practical effectiveness and illustrate that our exactly-banded estimator works well even when the true covariance matrix is only close to a banded matrix, confirming our theoretical results. Our method compares favorably with all existing methods, in terms of accuracy and speed. We illustrate the practical merits of the convex banding estimator by showing that it can be used to improve the performance of discriminant analysis for classifying sound recordings. PMID:28042189

  12. Shuttle S-band communications technical concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seyl, J. W.; Seibert, W. W.; Porter, J. A.; Eggers, D. S.; Novosad, S. W.; Vang, H. A.; Lenett, S. D.; Lewton, W. A.; Pawlowski, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Using the S-band communications system, shuttle orbiter can communicate directly with the Earth via the Ground Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (GSTDN) or via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The S-band frequencies provide the primary links for direct Earth and TDRSS communications during all launch and entry/landing phases of shuttle missions. On orbit, S-band links are used when TDRSS Ku-band is not available, when conditions require orbiter attitudes unfavorable to Ku-band communications, or when the payload bay doors are closed. the S-band communications functional requirements, the orbiter hardware configuration, and the NASA S-band communications network are described. The requirements and implementation concepts which resulted in techniques for shuttle S-band hardware development discussed include: (1) digital voice delta modulation; (2) convolutional coding/Viterbi decoding; (3) critical modulation index for phase modulation using a Costas loop (phase-shift keying) receiver; (4) optimum digital data modulation parameters for continuous-wave frequency modulation; (5) intermodulation effects of subcarrier ranging and time-division multiplexing data channels; (6) radiofrequency coverage; and (7) despreading techniques under poor signal-to-noise conditions. Channel performance is reviewed.

  13. Fluctuation diamagnetism in two-band superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kyosuke; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2016-04-01

    Anomalously large fluctuation diamagnetism around the superconducting critical temperature has been recently observed in iron selenide (FeSe) [Kasahara et al. (unpublished)]. This indicates that superconducting fluctuations (SCFs) play a more significant role in FeSe, which supposedly has a two-band structure, than in the familiar single-band superconductors. Motivated by the data on FeSe, SCF-induced diamagnetism is examined in a two-band system, on the basis of a phenomenological approach with a Ginzburg-Landau functional. The obtained results indicate that the SCF-induced diamagnetism may be more enhanced than that in a single-band system due to the existence of two distinct fluctuation modes. Such enhancement of diamagnetism unique to a two-band system seems consistent with the large diamagnetism observed in FeSe, though still far from a quantitative agreement.

  14. Direct Band Gap Wurtzite Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The main challenge for light-emitting diodes is to increase the efficiency in the green part of the spectrum. Gallium phosphide (GaP) with the normal cubic crystal structure has an indirect band gap, which severely limits the green emission efficiency. Band structure calculations have predicted a direct band gap for wurtzite GaP. Here, we report the fabrication of GaP nanowires with pure hexagonal crystal structure and demonstrate the direct nature of the band gap. We observe strong photoluminescence at a wavelength of 594 nm with short lifetime, typical for a direct band gap. Furthermore, by incorporation of aluminum or arsenic in the GaP nanowires, the emitted wavelength is tuned across an important range of the visible light spectrum (555–690 nm). This approach of crystal structure engineering enables new pathways to tailor materials properties enhancing the functionality. PMID:23464761

  15. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  16. LANDSAT 4 band 6 data evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A series of images of a portion of a TM frame of Lake Ontario are presented. The top left frame is the TM Band 6 image, the top right image is a conventional contrast stretched image. The bottom left image is a Band 5 to Band 3 ratio image. This image is used to generate a primitive land cover classificaton. Each land cover (Water, Urban, Forest, Agriculture) is assigned a Band 6 emissivity value. The ratio image is then combined with the Band 6 image and atmospheric propagation data to generate the bottom right image. This image represents a display of data whose digital count can be directly related to estimated surface temperature. The resolution appears higher because the process cell is the size of the TM shortwave pixels.

  17. Selecting band combinations with thematic mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A problem arises in making color composite images because there are 210 different possible color presentations of TM three-band images. A method is given for reducing that 210 to a single choice, decided by the statistics of a scene or subscene, and taking into full account any correlations that exist between different bands. Instead of using total variance as the measure for information content of the band triplets, the ellipsoid of maximum volume is selected which discourages selection of bands with high correlation. The band triplet is obtained by computing and ranking in order the determinants of each 3 x 3 principal submatrix of the original matrix M. After selection of the best triplet, the assignment of colors is made by using the actual variances (the diagonal elements of M): green (maximum variance), red (second largest variance), blue (smallest variance).

  18. Generation of Multi-band Chorus by Lower Band Cascade in the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Lu, Q.; Chen, L.; Bortnik, J.; Li, W.; Wang, S.

    2016-12-01

    Chorus waves are intense electromagnetic whistler-mode emissions in the magnetosphere, typically falling into two distinct frequency bands: a lower band (0.1-0.5fce) and an upper band (0.5-0.8fce) with a power gap at about 0.5fce. In this letter, with the THEMIS satellite, we observed two special chorus events, which are called as multi-band chorus because upper band chorus is located at harmonics of lower band chorus. We propose a new potential generation mechanism for multi-band chorus, which is called as lower band cascade. In this scenario, a density mode with a frequency equal to that of lower band chorus is caused by the ponderomotive effect (inhomogeneity of the electric amplitude) along the wave vector, and then upper band chorus with the frequency twice that of lower band chorus is generated through wave-wave couplings between lower band chorus and the density mode. The mechanism provides a new insight into the evolution of whistler-mode chorus in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  19. Narrow Band Gap Conjugated Polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qiuhong; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2018-01-16

    Two essential structural elements define a class of materials called conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The first is a polymer framework with an electronically delocalized, π-conjugated structure. This component allows one to adjust desirable optical and electronic properties, for example the range of wavelengths absorbed, emission quantum yields, electron affinity, and ionization potential. The second defining feature is the presence of ionic functionalities, which are usually linked via tethers that can modulate the distance of the charged groups relative to the backbone. These ionic groups render CPEs distinct relative to their neutral conjugated polymer counterparts. Solubility in polar solvents, including aqueous media, is an immediately obvious difference. This feature has enabled the development of optically amplified biosensor protocols and the fabrication of multilayer organic semiconductor devices through deposition techniques using solvents with orthogonal properties. Important but less obvious potential advantages must also be considered. For example, CPE layers have been used to introduce interfacial dipoles and thus modify the effective work function of adjacent electrodes. One can thereby modulate the barriers for charge injection into semiconductor layers and improve the device efficiencies of organic light-emitting diodes and solar cells. With a hydrophobic backbone and hydrophilic ionic sites, CPEs can also be used as dispersants for insoluble materials. Narrow band gap CPEs (NBGCPEs) have been studied only recently. They contain backbones that comprise electron-rich and electron-poor fragments, a combination that leads to intramolecular charge transfer excited states and enables facile oxidation and reduction. One particularly interesting combination is NBGCPEs with anionic sulfonate side groups, for which spontaneous self-doping in aqueous media is observed. That no such doping is observed with cationic NBGCPEs indicates that the interplay

  20. Vibronic Origin for the Diffuse Band Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duley, W. W.

    1983-09-01

    The two arguments outlined by Nuth and Donn (1983) against an interpretation of the diffuse band spectrum between 677 and 536 nm as vibronic systems associated with forbidden origins at 14321, 15153, and 15343 cm-1 (Duley, 1982) are controverted. It is concluded that the vibronic analysis presented by Duley, 1983 for the diffuse band spectrum is in keeping with current spectroscopic practice. The identification of a forbidden origin for 19 of these bands at 14321 cm-1 strongly suggests the involvement of Cr3+ ions in MgO solids in the production of these features.

  1. LANDSAT 4 band 6 data evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Previously experienced data collection problems were successfully resolved. A limited effort, directed at improved methods of display of TM Band 6 data, has concentrated on implementation of intensity hue and saturation displays using the Band 6 data to control hue. These displays tend to give the appearance of high resolution thermal data and make whole scene thermal interpretation easier by color coding thermal data in a manner that aids visual interpretation. More quantitative efforts were directed at utilizing the reflected bands to define land cover classes and then modifying the thermal displays using long wave optical properties associated with cover type.

  2. Satellite Communications for Unmanned Aircraft C2 Links: C-Band, Ku-Band and Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Bishop, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Unmanned aircraft (UA) that require access to controlled (or non-segregated) airspace require a highly reliable and robust command and control (C2) link, operating over protected aviation spectrum. While operating within radio line-of-sight (LOS) UA can make use of air-to-ground C2 links to terrestrial stations. When operating beyond LOS (BLOS) where a group of networked terrestrial stations does not exist to provide effective BLOS coverage, a satellite communications link is required. Protected aviation spectrum for satellite C2 links has only recently been allocated in bands where operational satellites exist. A previously existing C-Band allocation covers a bands where there are currently no operational satellites. The new allocations, within the Fixed Satellite Service bands at Ku and Ka-Bands will not be finalized until 2023 due to the need for the development of standards and technical decisions on the operation of UA satellite C2 links within these bands. This paper provides an overview of BLOS satellite C2 links, some of the conditions which will need to be met for the operation of such links, and a look at some aspects of spectrum sharing which may constrain these operations.

  3. 5 CFR 9701.212 - Bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Classification Structure § 9701.212 Bands. (a) For purposes of identifying...

  4. Banded whistlers observed on OGO-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paymar, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Inspection of broadband VLF records from OGO-4 shows that some whistlers exhibit a banded structure in which one or more bands of frequencies are missing from the whistler's spectrum. The phenomenon is commonly observed by satellites on midlatitude field lines at all local times and at various longitudes around the world. The dispersion of banded whistlers (BW) is of several tens of sec to the 1/2 power, indicating that they originated in the opposite hemisphere and are propagating downward at the satellite. BW are generally spread in time (tenths of seconds) rather than sharply defined and tend to occur at random. The frequency spacing of the bands may be either uniform or irregular, and may vary radically between successive events. Several possible explanations for BW are considered. In particular, an analysis of the interaction of plane electromagnetic waves traveling in an anisotropic plasma with a field aligned slab of enhanced ionization is presented with promising results.

  5. Sizable band gap in organometallic topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on first principle calculation when Ceperley-Alder and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerh type exchange-correlation energy functional were adopted to LSDA and GGA calculation, electronic properties of organometallic honeycomb lattice as a two-dimensional topological insulator was calculated. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction bulk band gap of organometallic lattice with heavy metals such as Au, Hg, Pt and Tl atoms were investigated. Our results show that the organometallic topological insulator which is made of Mercury atom shows the wide bulk band gap of about ∼120 meV. Moreover, by fitting the conduction and valence bands to the band-structure which are produced by Density Functional Theory, spin-orbit interaction parameters were extracted. Based on calculated parameters, gapless edge states within bulk insulating gap are indeed found for finite width strip of two-dimensional organometallic topological insulators.

  6. Silicone rubber band for laparoscopic tubal sterilization.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A H; Sealey, R M; Gay, J W; Kang, I

    1977-12-01

    In 1974, Yoon and associates (Am J Obstet Gynecol 120:132, 1974) described a new approach in which laparoscopic tubal occlusion was accomplished by utilizing the silicone rubber band technique. Recognizing the great advantages of the new technique in eliminating potential thermal injury associated with electrocoagulation, the authors have utilized the Yoon silicone rubber band technique in these institutions over the past 20 months. Thus far the procedure has been performed in 304 patients without any major complications. In the hope of eliminating and/or reducing possible pregnancy-failure rates, in 110 cases. In addition to application of the silicone band, the tube within the band was transected with non-electrical Seigler biopsy forceps. This, we believe, should provide an interesting long-term comparative study.

  7. Sodium in weak G-band giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Lambert, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium abundances have been determined for eight weak G-band giants whose atmospheres are greatly enriched with products of the CN-cycling H-burning reactions. Systematic errors are minimized by comparing the weak G-band giants to a sample of similar but normal giants. If, further, Ca is selected as a reference element, model atmosphere-related errors should largely be removed. For the weak-G-band stars (Na/Ca) = 0.16 +/- 0.01, which is just possibly greater than the result (Na/Ca) = 0.10 /- 0.03 from the normal giants. This result demonstrates that the atmospheres of the weak G-band giants are not seriously contaminated with products of ON cycling.

  8. An 'X-banded' Tidbinbilla interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batty, Michael J.; Gardyne, R. G.; Gay, G. J.; Jauncy, David L.; Gulkis, S.; Kirk, A.

    1986-01-01

    The recent upgrading of the Tidbinbilla two-element interferometer to simultaneous S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) operation has provided a powerful new astronomical facility for weak radio source measurement in the Southern Hemisphere. The new X-band system has a minimum fringe spacing of 38 arcsec, and about the same positional measurement capability (approximately 2 arcsec) and sensitivity (1 s rms noise of 10 mJy) as the previous S-band system. However, the far lower confusion limit will allow detection and accurate positional measurements for sources as weak as a few millijanskys. This capability will be invaluable for observations of radio stars, X-ray sources and other weak, compact radio sources.

  9. Modification of the band offset in boronitrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obodo, K. O.; Andrew, R. C.; Chetty, N.

    2011-10-01

    Using density functional methods within the generalized gradient approximation implemented in the Quantum Espresso codes, we modify the band offset in a single layer of boronitrene by substituting a double line of carbon atoms. This effectively introduces a line of dipoles at the interface. We considered various junctions of this system within the zigzag and armchair orientations. Our results show that the “zigzag-short” structure is energetically most stable, with a formation energy of 0.502 eV and with a band offset of 1.51 eV. The “zigzag-long” structure has a band offset of 1.99 eV. The armchair structures are nonpolar, while the zigzag-single structures show a charge accumulation for the C-substituted B and charge depletion for the C-substituted N at the junction. Consequently there is no shifting of the bands.

  10. The ν 3 band of DCOOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, K. L.; Ong, P. P.; Tan, T. L.

    1999-11-01

    The high resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of the ν 3 band of DCOOH has been measured with a resolution of 0.004 cm -1 in the spectral range 1670-1810 cm -1. Using the Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation, 713 infrared transitions have been assigned and fitted to provide rovibrational constants for the ν 3=1 state with a standard deviation of 0.000439 cm -1. The ν 3 band centre was found at 1725.87497±0.00003 cm -1. The band is perturbed by the 2ν 8 band, situated at 1762.9 cm -1, through Fermi resonance and possibly a Coriolis term. Perturbations of ν 3 by ν 5+ν 7 and ν 5+ν 9 are also expected. About 280 perturbed ν 3 lines were identified and excluded in the final fit.

  11. Quadratic band touching points and flat bands in two-dimensional topological Floquet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Liang; Zhou, Xiaoting; Fiete, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we theoretically study, using Floquet-Bloch theory, the influence of circularly and linearly polarized light on two-dimensional band structures with Dirac and quadratic band touching points, and flat bands, taking the nearest neighbor hopping model on the kagome lattice as an example. We find circularly polarized light can invert the ordering of this three-band model, while leaving the flat band dispersionless. We find a small gap is also opened at the quadratic band touching point by two-photon and higher order processes. By contrast, linearly polarized light splits the quadratic band touching point (into two Dirac points) by an amount that depends only on the amplitude and polarization direction of the light, independent of the frequency, and generally renders dispersion to the flat band. The splitting is perpendicular to the direction of the polarization of the light. We derive an effective low-energy theory that captures these key results. Finally, we compute the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity for this three-band model and analyze the various interband contributions of the Floquet modes. Our results suggest strategies for optically controlling band structure and interaction strength in real systems.

  12. Quadratic band touching points and flat bands in two-dimensional topological Floquet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Liang; Zhou, Xiaoting; Fiete, Gregory; The CenterComplex Quantum Systems Team

    In this work we theoretically study, using Floquet-Bloch theory, the influence of circularly and linearly polarized light on two-dimensional band structures with Dirac and quadratic band touching points, and flat bands, taking the nearest neighbor hopping model on the kagome lattice as an example. We find circularly polarized light can invert the ordering of this three band model, while leaving the flat-band dispersionless. We find a small gap is also opened at the quadratic band touching point by 2-photon and higher order processes. By contrast, linearly polarized light splits the quadratic band touching point (into two Dirac points) by an amount that depends only on the amplitude and polarization direction of the light, independent of the frequency, and generally renders dispersion to the flat band. The splitting is perpendicular to the direction of the polarization of the light. We derive an effective low-energy theory that captures these key results. Finally, we compute the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity for this 3-band model and analyze the various interband contributions of the Floquet modes. Our results suggest strategies for optically controlling band structure and interaction strength in real systems. We gratefully acknowledge funding from ARO Grant W911NF-14-1-0579 and NSF DMR-1507621.

  13. Control Banding and Nanotechnology Synergist

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D; Paik, S

    The average Industrial Hygienist (IH) loves a challenge, right? Okay, well here is one with more than a few twists. We start by going through the basics of a risk assessment. You have some chemical agents, a few workers, and the makings of your basic exposure characterization. However, you have no occupational exposure limit (OEL), essentially no toxicological basis, and no epidemiology. Now the real handicap is that you cannot use sampling pumps, cassettes, tubes, or any of the media in your toolbox, and the whole concept of mass-to-dose is out the window, even at high exposure levels. Of course,more » by the title, you knew we were talking about nanomaterials (NM). However, we wonder how many IHs know that this topic takes everything you know about your profession and turns it upside down. It takes the very foundations that you worked so hard in college and in the field to master and pulls it out from underneath you. It even takes the gold standard of our profession, the quantitative science of exposure assessment, and makes it look pretty darn rusty. Now with NM there is the potential to get some aspect of quantitative measurements, but the instruments are generally very expensive and getting an appropriate workplace personal exposure measurement can be very difficult if not impossible. The potential for workers getting exposures, however, is very real, as evidenced by a recent publication reporting worker exposures to polyacrylate nanoparticles in a Chinese factory (Song et al. 2009). With something this complex and challenging, how does a concept as simple as Control Banding (CB) save the day? Although many IHs have heard of CB, most of their knowledge comes from its application in the COSHH Essentials toolkit. While there is conflicting published research on COSHH Essentials and its value for risk assessments, almost all of the experts agree that it can be useful when no OELs are available (Zalk and Nelson 2008). It is this aspect of CB, its utility with

  14. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Mayank, E-mail: mayank30134@gmail.com; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S.

    2016-05-06

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  15. Home-use cancer detecting band aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Sheinman, Victor; Tzoy, Andrey; Toktosunov, Aitmamat; Adashov, Arkady

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel concept in which special band aid is developed for early detection of cancer. The band aid contains an array of micro needles with small detection array connected to each needle which inspects the color of the surface of the skin versus time after being pinched with the needles. We were able to show in pre-clinical trials that the color varies differently if the skin is close to tumor tissue.

  16. Design evaluation: S-band exciters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A design evaluation study was conducted to produce S-band exciter (SBE) system to provide a highly stable phase or modulated carrier for transmission to spacecraft. The exciter is part of an S-band receiver/exciter/ranging system at Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) ground stations. The major features of the system are defined. Circuit diagrams of the electronic components are provided.

  17. Theoretical Prediction of the Forming Limit Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banabic, D.; Vos, M.; Paraianu, L.; Jurco, P.

    2007-04-01

    Forming Limit Band (FLB) is a very useful tool to improve the sheet metal forming simulation robustness. Until now, the study of the FLB was only experimental. This paper presents the first attempt to model the FLB. The authors have established an original method for predicting the two margins of the limit band. The method was illustrated on the AA6111-T43 aluminum alloy. A good agreement with the experiments has been obtained.

  18. Pringle's Maneuver With a Releasable Insulok Band.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chung

    2015-10-01

    Currently, there are many conventional instruments being applied to perform hepatic inflow control, the Pringle's maneuver, distal to the hepatic hilum during hepatic resections. We wondered if a commonly used Insulok band can be added. Insulok band is a plastic tying device molded in one piece with an excellent cam-lock mechanism. We have applied releasable Insulok band to the Pringle's maneuver in 10 partial hepatectomy cases, which are not suitable for application of Chang's needle. After opening the lesser omentum, the band was passed through the Winslow foramen to the lesser sac, and the portal triad was occluded by locking the band. During the intermittent reperfusion period, this Insulok band allowed easy and fast control of hepatic inflow with its simple releasable locking device. Single inflow block was used on 6 cases while repeated block on 4 cases for partial hepatectomy. The average ischemic time was 15.2 ± 8.2 minutes with an interval of 5 minutes. There was neither procedure-related morbidity nor mortality. No patient had developed postoperative hepatic failure or prolonged liver dysfunction. The efficacy of bleeding control was excellent and the average blood loss during Pringle's maneuver was 6 ± 12.6 mL. Furthermore, locking and unlocking of the Insulok band each took only 5 seconds. Releasable Insulok band is a simpler, faster, cheaper, and safe alternative to the conventional methods for blocking hepatic inflow in Pringle's maneuver, especially in those cases not suitable for using the Chang's needle. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Band structures in near spherical 138Ce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, T.; Chanda, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Basu, S. K.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Das, J. J.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Ghugre, S. S.; Madhavan, N.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2009-06-01

    The high spin states of N=80138Ce have been populated in the fusion evaporation reaction 130Te( 12C, 4n) 138Ce at E=65 MeV. The γ transitions belonging to various band structures were detected and characterized using an array of five Clover Germanium detectors. The level scheme has been established up to a maximum spin and excitation energy of 23 ℏ and 9511.3 keV, respectively, by including 53 new transitions. The negative parity ΔI=1 band, developed on the 6536.3 keV 15 level, has been conjectured to be a magnetic rotation band following a semiclassical analysis and comparing the systematics of similar bands in the neighboring nuclei. The said band is proposed to have a four quasiparticle configuration of [πgh]⊗[. Other band structures are interpreted in terms of multi-quasiparticle configurations, based on Total Routhian Surface (TRS) calculations. For the low and medium spin states, a shell model calculation using a realistic two body interaction has been performed using the code OXBASH.

  20. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    DOEpatents

    Stepp, Jeffrey David [Grandview, MO; Hensley, Dale [Grandview, MO

    2006-04-04

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz-6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  1. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    DOEpatents

    Stepp, Jeffrey David [Grandview, MO; Hensley, Dale [Grandview, MO

    2006-09-12

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz 6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  2. Atomic-Monolayer MoS2 Band-to-Band Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Torres, Carlos M; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Zhu, Xiaodan; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Kang L

    2016-11-01

    The experimental observation of band-to-band tunneling in novel tunneling field-effect transistors utilizing a monolayer of MoS 2 as the conducting channel is demonstrated. Our results indicate that the strong gate-coupling efficiency enabled by two-dimensional materials, such as monolayer MoS 2 , results in the direct manifestation of a band-to-band tunneling current and an ambipolar transport. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Shear-band thickness and shear-band cavities in a Zr-based metallic glass

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, C.; Roddatis, V.; Kenesei, P.; ...

    2017-08-14

    Strain localization into shear bands in metallic glasses is typically described as a mechanism that occurs at the nano-scale, leaving behind a shear defect with a thickness of 10–20 nm. Here we sample the structure of a single system-spanning shear band that has carried all plastic flow with high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) and high-energy x-ray tomography (XRT). It is found that the shear-band thickness and the density change relative to the matrix sensitively depend on position along the shear band. A wide distribution of shear-band thickness (10 nm–210 nm) and density change (–1% to –12%)more » is revealed. There is no obvious correlation between shear-band thickness and density change, but larger thicknesses correspond typically to higher density changes. More than 100 micron-size shear-band cavities were identified on the shear-band plane, and their three-dimensional arrangement suggests a strongly fluctuating local curvature of the shear plane. As a result, these findings urge for a more complex view of a shear band than a simple nano-scale planar defect.« less

  4. Shear-band thickness and shear-band cavities in a Zr-based metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Roddatis, V.; Kenesei, P.

    Strain localization into shear bands in metallic glasses is typically described as a mechanism that occurs at the nano-scale, leaving behind a shear defect with a thickness of 10–20 nm. Here we sample the structure of a single system-spanning shear band that has carried all plastic flow with high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) and high-energy x-ray tomography (XRT). It is found that the shear-band thickness and the density change relative to the matrix sensitively depend on position along the shear band. A wide distribution of shear-band thickness (10 nm–210 nm) and density change (–1% to –12%)more » is revealed. There is no obvious correlation between shear-band thickness and density change, but larger thicknesses correspond typically to higher density changes. More than 100 micron-size shear-band cavities were identified on the shear-band plane, and their three-dimensional arrangement suggests a strongly fluctuating local curvature of the shear plane. As a result, these findings urge for a more complex view of a shear band than a simple nano-scale planar defect.« less

  5. Broadening of effective photonic band gaps in biological chiral structures: From intrinsic narrow band gaps to broad band reflection spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, W. E.; Hernández-Jiménez, M.; Libby, E.; Azofeifa, D. E.; Solis, Á.; Barboza-Aguilar, C.

    2015-09-01

    Under normal illumination with non-polarized light, reflection spectra of the cuticle of golden-like and red Chrysina aurigans scarabs show a structured broad band of left-handed circularly polarized light. The polarization of the reflected light is attributed to a Bouligand-type left-handed chiral structure found through the scarab's cuticle. By considering these twisted structures as one-dimensional photonic crystals, a novel approach is developed from the dispersion relation of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves traveling through chiral media, to show how the broad band characterizing these spectra arises from an intrinsic narrow photonic band gap whose spectral position moves through visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  6. Proportion of recovered goose and brant bands that are reported

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinson, R.K.; McCann, J.A.

    1966-01-01

    A few more than one-third of the goose and brant bands recovered by hunters were reported to the Bird Banding Laboratory (a rate of 0.361) during the 1962-64 hunting seasons. We calculated this band-reporting rate by comparing the estimated number of goose and brant bands recovered by hunters, based on a mail questionnaire survey, with the number of bands actually reported to the Bird Banding Laboratory. This band-reporting rate is probably representative only of the 1962-65 period. It is likely that, in earlier years, a greater proportion (perhaps about 0.60) of recovered goose and brant bands were reported.

  7. Automated coregistration of MTI spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, James P.; Galbraith, Amy E.; Pope, Paul A.; Ramsey, Keri A.; Szymanski, John J.

    2002-08-01

    In the focal plane of a pushbroom imager, a linear array of pixels is scanned across the scene, building up the image one row at a time. For the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), each of fifteen different spectral bands has its own linear array. These arrays are pushed across the scene together, but since each band's array is at a different position on the focal plane, a separate image is produced for each band. The standard MTI data products (LEVEL1B_R_COREG and LEVEL1B_R_GEO) resample these separate images to a common grid and produce coregistered multispectral image cubes. The coregistration software employs a direct ``dead reckoning' approach. Every pixel in the calibrated image is mapped to an absolute position on the surface of the earth, and these are resampled to produce an undistorted coregistered image of the scene. To do this requires extensive information regarding the satellite position and pointing as a function of time, the precise configuration of the focal plane, and the distortion due to the optics. These must be combined with knowledge about the position and altitude of the target on the rotating ellipsoidal earth. We will discuss the direct approach to MTI coregistration, as well as more recent attempts to tweak the precision of the band-to-band registration using correlations in the imagery itself.

  8. Chiral geometry in multiple chiral doublet bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Chen, Qibo

    2016-02-01

    The chiral geometry of multiple chiral doublet bands with identical configuration is discussed for different triaxial deformation parameters γ in the particle rotor model with . The energy spectra, electromagnetic transition probabilities B(M1) and B(E2), angular momenta, and K-distributions are studied. It is demonstrated that the chirality still remains not only in the yrast and yrare bands, but also in the two higher excited bands when γ deviates from 30°. The chiral geometry relies significantly on γ, and the chiral geometry of the two higher excited partner bands is not as good as that of the yrast and yrare doublet bands. Supported by Plan Project of Beijing College Students’ Scientific Research and Entrepreneurial Action, Major State 973 Program of China (2013CB834400), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175002, 11335002, 11375015, 11461141002), National Fund for Fostering Talents of Basic Science (NFFTBS) (J1103206), Research Fund for Doctoral Program of Higher Education (20110001110087) and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2015M580007)

  9. Band warping, band non-parabolicity, and Dirac points in electronic and lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resca, Lorenzo; Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-10-01

    We illustrate at a fundamental level the physical and mathematical origins of band warping and band non-parabolicity in electronic and vibrational structures. We point out a robust presence of pairs of topologically induced Dirac points in a primitive-rectangular lattice using a p-type tight-binding approximation. We analyze two-dimensional primitive-rectangular and square Bravais lattices with implications that are expected to generalize to more complex structures. Band warping is shown to arise at the onset of a singular transition to a crystal lattice with a larger symmetry group, which allows the possibility of irreducible representations of higher dimensions, hence band degeneracy, at special symmetry points in reciprocal space. Band warping is incompatible with a multi-dimensional Taylor series expansion, whereas band non-parabolicities are associated with multi-dimensional Taylor series expansions to all orders. Still band non-parabolicities may merge into band warping at the onset of a larger symmetry group. Remarkably, while still maintaining a clear connection with that merging, band non-parabolicities may produce pairs of conical intersections at relatively low-symmetry points. Apparently, such conical intersections are robustly maintained by global topology requirements, rather than any local symmetry protection. For two p-type tight-binding bands, we find such pairs of conical intersections drifting along the edges of restricted Brillouin zones of primitive-rectangular Bravais lattices as lattice constants vary relatively to each other, until these conical intersections merge into degenerate warped bands at high-symmetry points at the onset of a square lattice. The conical intersections that we found appear to have similar topological characteristics as Dirac points extensively studied in graphene and other topological insulators, even though our conical intersections have none of the symmetry complexity and protection afforded by the latter more

  10. Longwave Band-by-band Cloud Radiative Effect and its Application in GCM Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xianglei; Cole, Jason N. S.; He, Fei; Potter, Gerald L.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin; Suarez, Max; Loeb, Norman G.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud radiative effect (CRE) of each longwave (LW) absorption band of a GCM fs radiation code is uniquely valuable for GCM evaluation because (1) comparing band-by-band CRE avoids the compensating biases in the broadband CRE comparison and (2) the fractional contribution of each band to the LW broadband CRE (f(sub CRE)) is sensitive to cloud top height but largely insensitive to cloud fraction, presenting thus a diagnostic metric to separate the two macroscopic properties of clouds. Recent studies led by the first author have established methods to derive such band ]by ]band quantities from collocated AIRS and CERES observations. We present here a study that compares the observed band-by-band CRE over the tropical oceans with those simulated by three different atmospheric GCMs (GFDL AM2, NASA GEOS-5, and CCCma CanAM4) forced by observed SST. The models agree with observation on the annual ]mean LW broadband CRE over the tropical oceans within +/-1W/sq m. However, the differences among these three GCMs in some bands can be as large as or even larger than +/-1W/sq m. Observed seasonal cycles of f(sub CRE) in major bands are shown to be consistent with the seasonal cycle of cloud top pressure for both the amplitude and the phase. However, while the three simulated seasonal cycles of f(sub CRE) agree with observations on the phase, the amplitudes are underestimated. Simulated interannual anomalies from GFDL AM2 and CCCma CanAM4 are in phase with observed anomalies. The spatial distribution of f(sub CRE) highlights the discrepancies between models and observation over the low-cloud regions and the compensating biases from different bands.

  11. Band-Gap and Band-Edge Engineering of Multicomponent Garnet Scintillators from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Satyesh K.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Nikl, Martin; Jiang, Chao; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    Complex doping schemes in R3 Al5 O12 (where R is the rare-earth element) garnet compounds have recently led to pronounced improvements in scintillator performance. Specifically, by admixing lutetium and yttrium aluminate garnets with gallium and gadolinium, the band gap is altered in a manner that facilitates the removal of deleterious electron trapping associated with cation antisite defects. Here, we expand upon this initial work to systematically investigate the effect of substitutional admixing on the energy levels of band edges. Density-functional theory and hybrid density-functional theory (HDFT) are used to survey potential admixing candidates that modify either the conduction-band minimum (CBM) or valence-band maximum (VBM). We consider two sets of compositions based on Lu3 B5O12 where B is Al, Ga, In, As, and Sb, and R3Al5 O12 , where R is Lu, Gd, Dy, and Er. We find that admixing with various R cations does not appreciably affect the band gap or band edges. In contrast, substituting Al with cations of dissimilar ionic radii has a profound impact on the band structure. We further show that certain dopants can be used to selectively modify only the CBM or the VBM. Specifically, Ga and In decrease the band gap by lowering the CBM, while As and Sb decrease the band gap by raising the VBM, the relative change in band gap is quantitatively validated by HDFT. These results demonstrate a powerful approach to quickly screen the impact of dopants on the electronic structure of scintillator compounds, identifying those dopants which alter the band edges in very specific ways to eliminate both electron and hole traps responsible for performance limitations. This approach should be broadly applicable for the optimization of electronic and optical performance for a wide range of compounds by tuning the VBM and CBM.

  12. Band-gap and band-edge engineering of multicomponent garnet scintillators from first principles

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, Satyesh K.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Nikl, Martin; ...

    2015-11-24

    Complex doping schemes in R 3Al 5O 12 (where R is the rare-earth element) garnet compounds have recently led to pronounced improvements in scintillator performance. Specifically, by admixing lutetium and yttrium aluminate garnets with gallium and gadolinium, the band gap is altered in a manner that facilitates the removal of deleterious electron trapping associated with cation antisite defects. Here, we expand upon this initial work to systematically investigate the effect of substitutional admixing on the energy levels of band edges. Density-functional theory and hybrid density-functional theory (HDFT) are used to survey potential admixing candidates that modify either the conduction-band minimummore » (CBM) or valence-band maximum (VBM). We consider two sets of compositions based on Lu 3B 5O 12 where B is Al, Ga, In, As, and Sb, and R 3Al 5O 12, where R is Lu, Gd, Dy, and Er. We find that admixing with various R cations does not appreciably affect the band gap or band edges. In contrast, substituting Al with cations of dissimilar ionic radii has a profound impact on the band structure. We further show that certain dopants can be used to selectively modify only the CBM or the VBM. Specifically, Ga and In decrease the band gap by lowering the CBM, while As and Sb decrease the band gap by raising the VBM, the relative change in band gap is quantitatively validated by HDFT. These results demonstrate a powerful approach to quickly screen the impact of dopants on the electronic structure of scintillator compounds, identifying those dopants which alter the band edges in very specific ways to eliminate both electron and hole traps responsible for performance limitations. Furthermore, this approach should be broadly applicable for the optimization of electronic and optical performance for a wide range of compounds by tuning the VBM and CBM.« less

  13. System and method for progressive band selection for hyperspectral images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Kevin (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems, methods, and non-transitory computer-readable storage media for progressive band selection for hyperspectral images. A system having module configured to control a processor to practice the method calculates a virtual dimensionality of a hyperspectral image having multiple bands to determine a quantity Q of how many bands are needed for a threshold level of information, ranks each band based on a statistical measure, selects Q bands from the multiple bands to generate a subset of bands based on the virtual dimensionality, and generates a reduced image based on the subset of bands. This approach can create reduced datasets of full hyperspectral images tailored for individual applications. The system uses a metric specific to a target application to rank the image bands, and then selects the most useful bands. The number of bands selected can be specified manually or calculated from the hyperspectral image's virtual dimensionality.

  14. Unipolar Barrier Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Dual-band barrier infrared detectors having structures configured to reduce spectral crosstalk between spectral bands and/or enhance quantum efficiency, and methods of their manufacture are provided. In particular, dual-band device structures are provided for constructing high-performance barrier infrared detectors having reduced crosstalk and/or enhance quantum efficiency using novel multi-segmented absorber regions. The novel absorber regions may comprise both p-type and n-type absorber sections. Utilizing such multi-segmented absorbers it is possible to construct any suitable barrier infrared detector having reduced crosstalk, including npBPN, nBPN, pBPN, npBN, npBP, pBN and nBP structures. The pBPN and pBN detector structures have high quantum efficiency and suppresses dark current, but has a smaller etch depth than conventional detectors and does not require a thick bottom contact layer.

  15. An empirical basis for Mach bands

    PubMed Central

    Lotto, R. Beau; Williams, S. Mark; Purves, Dale

    1999-01-01

    Mach bands, the illusory brightness maxima and minima perceived at the initiation and termination of luminance gradients, respectively, are generally considered a direct perceptual manifestation of lateral inhibitory interactions among retinal or other lower order visual neurons. Here we examine an alternative explanation, namely that Mach bands arise as a consequence of real-world luminance gradients. In this first of two companion papers, we analyze the natural sources of luminance gradients, demonstrating that real-world gradients arising from curved surfaces are ordinarily adorned by photometric highlights and lowlights in the position of the illusory bands. The prevalence of such gradients provides an empirical basis for the generation of this perceptual phenomenon. PMID:10220450

  16. Exact folded-band chaotic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2012-06-01

    An exactly solvable chaotic oscillator with folded-band dynamics is shown. The oscillator is a hybrid dynamical system containing a linear ordinary differential equation and a nonlinear switching condition. Bounded oscillations are provably chaotic, and successive waveform maxima yield a one-dimensional piecewise-linear return map with segments of both positive and negative slopes. Continuous-time dynamics exhibit a folded-band topology similar to Rössler's oscillator. An exact solution is written as a linear convolution of a fixed basis pulse and a discrete binary sequence, from which an equivalent symbolic dynamics is obtained. The folded-band topology is shown to be dependent on the symbol grammar.

  17. Graphite, graphene and the flat band superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, G. E.

    2018-04-01

    Superconductivity has been observed in bilayer graphene [1,2]. The main factor, which determines the mechanism of the formation of this superconductivity is the "magic angle" of twist of two graphene layers, at which the electronic band structure becomes nearly flat. The specific role played by twist and by the band flattening, has been earlier suggested for explanations of the signatures of room-temperature superconductivity observed in the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), when the quasi two-dimensional interfaces between the twisted domains are present. The interface contains the periodic array of misfit dislocations (analogs of the boundaries of the unit cell of the Moire superlattice in bilayer graphene), which provide the possible source of the flat band. This demonstrates that it is high time for combination of the theoretical and experimental efforts in order to reach the reproducible room-temperature superconductivity in graphite or in similar real or artificial materials.

  18. New rotational bands in sup 166 Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K.; Sood, P.C.; Baluba Mutshil

    1989-08-01

    The {ital K}{sup {pi}}=1{sup {minus}} and 0{sup {minus}} bands from the (1/2{sup +}(411){plus minus}(1/2{sup {minus}}(521))) configuration, and the {ital K}{sup {pi}}=1{sup {minus}} and 2{sup {minus}} bands from the (3/2{sup +}(411){plus minus}(1/2{sup {minus}}(521))) configuration have been identified for the first time largely using known but previously unused gamma transitions from the {sup 165}Ho({ital n},{gamma}) reaction. A remarkable similarity is shown to exist between the level structures of the {ital K}{sup {pi}}=1{sup {minus}} and 0{sup {minus}} bands from the (1/2{sup +}(411){plus minus}(1/2{sup {minus}}(521))) configurations in {sup 170}Tm and {sup 166}Ho.

  19. What band rocks the MTB? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, J.; García-Rubio, I.; Gehring, A. U.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a polyphyletic group of bacteria that have been found in marine and lacustrine environments and soils [e.g. 1]. The hallmark of MTB is their intracellular formation of magnetosomes, single-domain ferrimagnetic particles that are aligned in chains. The chain configuration generates a strong magnetic dipole, which is used as magnetic compass to move the MTB into their favorable habit. The term band corresponds to a frequency window of microwaves in the gigahertz (GHz) range. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy uses the microwave absorption in a magnetic field to analyze the anisotropy properties and the domain state of magnetic materials. Specific microwave frequency causes absorption in a characteristic magnetic field range. For the investigation of MTB we use S-band (4.02 GHz), X-band (9.47 GHz), and Q-band (34.16 GHz). Experiments on cultured MTB and on sediment samples of Holocene age showed that absorption in X- and Q-band occurs when the sample is in a saturated or nearly saturated state [2, 3]. By contrast, absorption in the S-band appears in lower magnetic fields, where the sample is far from saturation. All FMR spectra show two distinct low-field features that can be assigned to magnetite particles in chains, aligned parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field. The detailed separation of the parallel and perpendicular components in the bulk samples is hampered, because of the random orientation of the chains in the sample. The comparison of S-, X-, and Q-band shows that the lower the frequency the better the separation of the components. In the S-band FMR spectroscopy, the separation of chains parallel to the external magnetic field is supported by the internal field of the sample. This field is caused by the remanence that contributes to the external magnetic field to fulfill the resonance condition [3,4]. Considering the different FMR responses, it can be postulated that a lower microwave frequency

  20. Targeting myofascial taut bands by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kisha; Shankar, Hariharan

    2013-07-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a frequent diagnosis in chronic pain and is characterized by tender, taut bands known as trigger points. The trigger points are painful areas in skeletal muscle that are associated with a palpable nodule within a taut band of muscle fibers. Despite the prevalence of myofascial pain syndrome, diagnosis is based on clinical criteria alone. A growing body of evidence that suggests that taut bands are readily visualized under ultrasound-guided exam, especially when results are correlated with elastography, multidimensional imaging, and physical exam findings such as local twitch response. The actual image characteristic in B mode appears to be controversial. Ultrasonography provides an objective modality to assist with diagnosis and treatment of trigger points in the future.

  1. Dutch X-band SLAR calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groot, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    In August 1989 the NASA/JPL airborne P/L/C-band DC-8 SAR participated in several remote sensing campaigns in Europe. Amongst other test sites, data were obtained of the Flevopolder test site in the Netherlands on August the 16th. The Dutch X-band SLAR was flown on the same date and imaged parts of the same area as the SAR. To calibrate the two imaging radars a set of 33 calibration devices was deployed. 16 trihedrals were used to calibrate a part of the SLAR data. This short paper outlines the X-band SLAR characteristics, the experimental set-up and the calibration method used to calibrate the SLAR data. Finally some preliminary results are given.

  2. Obituary: David L. Band (1957-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    David L. Band, of Potomac Maryland, died on March 16, 2009 succumbing to a long battle with spinal cord cancer. His death at the age of 52 came as a shock to his many friends and colleagues in the physics and astronomy community. Band showed an early interest and exceptional aptitude for physics, leading to his acceptance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an undergraduate student in 1975. After graduating from MIT with an undergraduate degree in Physics, Band continued as a graduate student in Physics at Harvard University. His emerging interest in Astrophysics led him to the Astronomy Department at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), where he did his dissertation work with Jonathan Grindlay. His dissertation (1985) entitled "Non-thermal Radiation Mechanisms and Processes in SS433 and Active Galactic Nuclei" was "pioneering work on the physics of jets arising from black holes and models for their emission, including self-absorption, which previewed much to come, and even David's own later work on Gamma-ray Bursts," according to Grindlay who remained a personal friend and colleague of Band's. Following graduate school, Band held postdoctoral positions at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley and the Center for Astronomy and Space Sciences at the University of California San Diego where he worked on the BATSE experiment that was part of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), launched in 1991. BATSE had as its main objective the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and made significant advances in this area of research. Band became a world-renowned figure in the emerging field of GRB studies. He is best known for his widely-used analytic form of gamma-ray burst spectra known as the "Band Function." After the CGRO mission ended, Band moved to the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he worked mainly on classified research but continued to work on GRB energetics and spectra. When NASA planned

  3. Band to Band Tunneling (BBT) Induced Leakage Current Enhancement in Irradiated Fully Depleted SOI Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adell, Phillipe C.; Barnaby, H. J.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Vermeire, B.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a model, validated with simulations, describing how band-to-band tunneling (BBT) affects the leakage current degradation in some irradiated fully-depleted SOI devices. The dependence of drain current on gate voltage, including the apparent transition to a high current regime is explained.

  4. Precipitation estimation using L-Band and C-Band soil moisture retrievals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An established methodology for estimating precipitation amounts from satellite-based soil moisture retrievals is applied to L-band products from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite missions and to a C-band product from the Advanced Scatterome...

  5. Elastic band prediction equations for combined free-weight and elastic band bench presses and squats.

    PubMed

    Shoepe, Todd C; Ramirez, David A; Almstedt, Hawley C

    2010-01-01

    Elastic bands added to traditional free-weight techniques have become a part of suggested training routines in recent years. Because of the variable loading patterns of elastic bands (i.e., greater stretch produces greater resistance), it is necessary to quantify the exact loading patterns of bands to identify the volume and intensity of training. The purpose of this study was to determine the length vs. tension properties of multiple sizes of a set of commonly used elastic bands to quantify the resistance that would be applied to free-weight plus elastic bench presses (BP) and squats (SQ). Five elastic bands of varying thickness were affixed to an overhead support beam. Dumbbells of varying weights were progressively added to the free end while the linear deformation was recorded with each subsequent weight increment. The resistance was plotted as a factor of linear deformation, and best-fit nonlinear logarithmic regression equations were then matched to the data. For both the BP and SQ loading conditions and all band thicknesses tested, R values were greater than 0.9623. These data suggest that differences in load exist as a result of the thickness of the elastic band, attachment technique, and type of exercise being performed. Facilities should adopt their own form of loading quantification to match their unique set of circumstances when acquiring, researching, and implementing elastic band and free-weight exercises into the training programs.

  6. Band Edge Dynamics and Multiexciton Generation in Narrow Band Gap HgTe Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Livache, Clément; Goubet, Nicolas; Martinez, Bertille; Jagtap, Amardeep; Qu, Junling; Ithurria, Sandrine; Silly, Mathieu G; Dubertret, Benoit; Lhuillier, Emmanuel

    2018-04-11

    Mercury chalcogenide nanocrystals and especially HgTe appear as an interesting platform for the design of low cost mid-infrared (mid-IR) detectors. Nevertheless, their electronic structure and transport properties remain poorly understood, and some critical aspects such as the carrier relaxation dynamics at the band edge have been pushed under the rug. Some of the previous reports on dynamics are setup-limited, and all of them have been obtained using photon energy far above the band edge. These observations raise two main questions: (i) what are the carrier dynamics at the band edge and (ii) should we expect some additional effect (multiexciton generation (MEG)) as such narrow band gap materials are excited far above the band edge? To answer these questions, we developed a high-bandwidth setup that allows us to understand and compare the carrier dynamics resonantly pumped at the band edge in the mid-IR and far above the band edge. We demonstrate that fast (>50 MHz) photoresponse can be obtained even in the mid-IR and that MEG is occurring in HgTe nanocrystal arrays with a threshold around 3 times the band edge energy. Furthermore, the photoresponse can be effectively tuned in magnitude and sign using a phototransistor configuration.

  7. Energy-banded ions in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Badman, S. V.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kivelson, M. G.; Kurth, W. S.

    2017-05-01

    Using data from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer ion mass spectrometer, we report the first observation of energy-banded ions at Saturn. Observed near midnight at relatively high magnetic latitudes, the banded ions are dominantly H+, and they occupy the range of energies typically associated with the thermal pickup distribution in the inner magnetosphere (L < 10), but their energies decline monotonically with increasing radial distance (or time or decreasing latitude). Their pitch angle distribution suggests a source at low (or slightly southern) latitudes. The band energies, including their pitch angle dependence, are consistent with a bounce-resonant interaction between thermal H+ ions and the standing wave structure of a field line resonance. There is additional evidence in the pitch angle dependence of the band energies that the particles in each band may have a common time of flight from their most recent interaction with the wave, which may have been at slightly southern latitudes. Thus, while the particles are basically bounce resonant, their energization may be dominated by their most recent encounter with the standing wave.Plain Language SummaryDuring an outbound passage by the Cassini spacecraft through Saturn's inner magnetosphere, ion energy distributions were observed that featured discrete flux peaks at regularly spaced energies. The peaks persisted over several hours and several Saturn radii of distance away from the planet. We show that these "<span class="hlt">bands</span>" of ions are plausibly the result of an interaction between the Saturnian plasma and standing waves that form along the magnetospheric magnetic field lines. These observations are the first reported evidence that such standing waves may be present in the inner magnetosphere, where they could contribute to the radial transport of Saturn's radiation belt particles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080005154','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080005154"><span>Silicon micromachined broad <span class="hlt">band</span> light source</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric (Inventor); Tuma, Margaret L. (Inventor); Eastwood, Michael (Inventor); Hansler, Richard (Inventor)</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>A micro electromechanical system (MEMS) broad <span class="hlt">band</span> incandescent light source includes three layers: a top transmission window layer; a middle filament mount layer; and a bottom reflector layer. A tungsten filament with a spiral geometry is positioned over a hole in the middle layer. A portion of the broad <span class="hlt">band</span> light from the heated filament is reflective off the bottom layer. Light from the filament and the reflected light of the filament are transmitted through the transmission window. The light source may operate at temperatures of 2500 K or above. The light source may be incorporated into an on board calibrator (OBC) for a spectrometer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22140248-unidentified-infrared-emission-bands-pahs-maons','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22140248-unidentified-infrared-emission-bands-pahs-maons"><span>UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED EMISSION <span class="hlt">BANDS</span>: PAHs or MAONs?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sun Kwok; Yong Zhang, E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>We suggest that the carrier of the unidentified infrared emission (UIE) <span class="hlt">bands</span> is an amorphous carbonaceous solid with mixed aromatic/aliphatic structures, rather than free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. Through spectral fittings of the astronomical spectra of the UIE <span class="hlt">bands</span>, we show that a significant amount of the energy is emitted by the aliphatic component, implying that aliphatic groups are an essential part of the chemical structure. Arguments in favor of an amorphous, solid-state structure rather than a gas-phase molecule as a carrier of the UIE are also presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApPhL.100z3902Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApPhL.100z3902Y"><span>Photon ratchet intermediate <span class="hlt">band</span> solar cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yoshida, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Farrell, D. J.; Phillips, C. C.</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>In this paper, we propose an innovative concept for solar power conversion—the "photon ratchet" intermediate <span class="hlt">band</span> solar cell (IBSC)—which may increase the photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency of IBSCs by increasing the lifetime of charge carriers in the intermediate state. The limiting efficiency calculation for this concept shows that the efficiency can be increased by introducing a fast thermal transition of carriers into a non-emissive state. At 1 sun, the introduction of a "ratchet <span class="hlt">band</span>" results in an increase of efficiency from 46.8% to 48.5%, due to suppression of entropy generation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMDI33B2237A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMDI33B2237A"><span>Shear <span class="hlt">Banding</span> in a Partially Molten Mantle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alisic, L.; Rudge, J. F.; Wells, G.; Katz, R. F.; Rhebergen, S.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>We investigate the nonlinear behaviour of partially molten mantle material under shear. Numerical models of compaction and advection-diffusion of a porous matrix with a spherical inclusion are built using the automated code generation package FEniCS. The time evolution of melt distribution with increasing shear in these models is compared to laboratory experiments that show high-porosity shear <span class="hlt">banding</span> in the medium and pressure shadows around the inclusion. We focus on understanding the interaction between these shear <span class="hlt">bands</span> and pressure shadows as a function of rheological parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23998709','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23998709"><span>Calcific <span class="hlt">band</span> keratopathy in an alpaca.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pucket, Jonathan D; Boileau, Melanie J; Sula, Mee Ja M</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>A 4-year-old female Suri alpaca was presented for evaluation of acute onset weakness, lethargy, and recent development of opacities in both eyes. On ophthalmic examination, bilaterally symmetrical corneal opacities were noted along the interpalpebral fissures with a few corneal blood vessels intermingled. A presumed diagnosis of calcific <span class="hlt">band</span> keratopathy was made based on location and appearance. The patient was euthanized a short while after diagnosis due to reasons unrelated to the eyes and histologic examination of the corneas revealed subepithelial calcium and vascularization, consistent with calcific <span class="hlt">band</span> keratopathy. This case report is the first to document this ocular condition in an alpaca. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750050946&hterms=nike&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dnike','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750050946&hterms=nike&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dnike"><span>Electron currents associated with an auroral <span class="hlt">band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Spiger, R. J.; Anderson, H. R.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Measurements of electron pitch angle distributions and energy spectra over a broad auroral <span class="hlt">band</span> were used to calculate net electric current carried by auroral electrons in the vicinity of the <span class="hlt">band</span>. The particle energy spectrometers were carried by a Nike-Tomahawk rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, at 0722 UT on February 25, 1972. Data are presented which indicate the existence of upward field-aligned currents of electrons in the energy range 0.5-20 keV. The spatial relationship of these currents to visual structure of the auroral arc and the characteristics of the electrons carrying the currents are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ApPhL..87c2102K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ApPhL..87c2102K"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> gap and <span class="hlt">band</span> offset of (GaIn)(PSb) lattice matched to InP</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Köhler, F.; Böhm, G.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.</p> <p>2005-07-01</p> <p>Metastable (GaxIn1-x)(PySb1-y) layers were grown on (001) InP substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy was applied to these heterostructures and revealed spatially indirect <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> recombination of electrons localized in the InP with holes in the (GaxIn1-x)(PySb1-y). In addition, samples with layer thicknesses larger than 100nm showed direct PL across the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap of (GaxIn1-x)(PySb1-y). <span class="hlt">Band</span>-gap energies and <span class="hlt">band</span> offset energies of (GaxIn1-x)(PySb1-y) relative to InP were derived from these PL data. A strong bowing parameter was observed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptCo.367..192Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptCo.367..192Z"><span>Accurate <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> registration of AOTF imaging spectrometer using motion detection technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, Pengwei; Zhao, Huijie; Jin, Shangzhong; Li, Ningchuan</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>This paper concerns the problem of platform vibration induced <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> misregistration with acousto-optic imaging spectrometer in spaceborne application. Registrating images of different <span class="hlt">bands</span> formed at different time or different position is difficult, especially for hyperspectral images form acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer. In this study, a motion detection method is presented using the polychromatic undiffracted beam of AOTF. The factors affecting motion detect accuracy are analyzed theoretically, and calculations show that optical distortion is an easily overlooked factor to achieve accurate <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> registration. Hence, a reflective dual-path optical system has been proposed for the first time, with reduction of distortion and chromatic aberration, indicating the potential of higher registration accuracy. Consequently, a spectra restoration experiment using additional motion detect channel is presented for the first time, which shows the accurate spectral image registration capability of this technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170003161','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170003161"><span>Measurement of the <span class="hlt">Band-to-Band</span> Registration of the SNPP VIIRS Imaging System from On-Orbit Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tilton, James C.; Lin, Guoqing; Tan, Bin</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was launched 28 October 2011 onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. The VIIRS instrument is a whiskbroom system with 22 spectral and thermal <span class="hlt">bands</span> split between 16 moderate resolution <span class="hlt">bands</span> (M-<span class="hlt">bands</span>), five imagery resolution <span class="hlt">bands</span> (I-<span class="hlt">bands</span>) and a day-night <span class="hlt">band</span>. In this study we measure the along-scan and along-track <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> registration between the I-<span class="hlt">bands</span> and M-<span class="hlt">bands</span> from on-orbit data. This measurement is performed by computing the Normalized Mutual Information (NMI) between shifted image <span class="hlt">band</span> pairs and finding the amount of shift required (if any) to produce the peak in NMI value. Subpixel accuracy is obtained by utilizing bicubic interpolation. Registration shifts are found to be similar to pre-launch measurements and stable (within measurement error) over the instruments first four years in orbit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24340411','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24340411"><span>Decreasing patient identification <span class="hlt">band</span> errors by standardizing processes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Walley, Susan Chu; Berger, Stephanie; Harris, Yolanda; Gallizzi, Gina; Hayes, Leslie</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Patient identification (ID) <span class="hlt">bands</span> are an essential component in patient ID. Quality improvement methodology has been applied as a model to reduce ID <span class="hlt">band</span> errors although previous studies have not addressed standardization of ID <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Our specific aim was to decrease ID <span class="hlt">band</span> errors by 50% in a 12-month period. The Six Sigma DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) quality improvement model was the framework for this study. ID <span class="hlt">bands</span> at a tertiary care pediatric hospital were audited from January 2011 to January 2012 with continued audits to June 2012 to confirm the new process was in control. After analysis, the major improvement strategy implemented was standardization of styles of ID <span class="hlt">bands</span> and labels. Additional interventions included educational initiatives regarding the new ID <span class="hlt">band</span> processes and disseminating institutional and nursing unit data. A total of 4556 ID <span class="hlt">bands</span> were audited with a preimprovement ID <span class="hlt">band</span> error average rate of 9.2%. Significant variation in the ID <span class="hlt">band</span> process was observed, including styles of ID <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Interventions were focused on standardization of the ID <span class="hlt">band</span> and labels. The ID <span class="hlt">band</span> error rate improved to 5.2% in 9 months (95% confidence interval: 2.5-5.5; P < .001) and was maintained for 8 months. Standardization of ID <span class="hlt">bands</span> and labels in conjunction with other interventions resulted in a statistical decrease in ID <span class="hlt">band</span> error rates. This decrease in ID <span class="hlt">band</span> error rates was maintained over the subsequent 8 months.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.715 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. 15.715 Section... <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.715 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. The Commission will designate one or more entities to administer the TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database(s). The Commission may, at its discretion, permit the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.714 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. 15.714 Section 15.714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Television <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.714 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. (a) A TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.714 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. 15.714 Section 15.714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Television <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.714 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. (a) A TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.715 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. 15.715 Section... <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.715 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. The Commission will designate one or more entities to administer the TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database(s). The Commission may, at its discretion, permit the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.714 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. 15.714 Section 15.714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Television <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.714 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. (a) A TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.714 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. 15.714 Section 15.714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Television <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.714 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. (a) A TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.713 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. 15.713 Section 15.713... TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. (a) Purpose. The TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database serves the following functions: (1) To... databases. (b) Information in the TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. (1) Facilities already recorded in Commission databases...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol1-sec15-714.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.714 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. 15.714 Section 15.714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Television <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.714 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administration fees. (a) A TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.715 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. 15.715 Section... <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.715 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. The Commission will designate one or more entities to administer the TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database(s). The Commission may, at its discretion, permit the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.715 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. 15.715 Section... <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.715 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. The Commission will designate one or more entities to administer the TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database(s). The Commission may, at its discretion, permit the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol1-sec15-715.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.715 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. 15.715 Section... <span class="hlt">Band</span> Devices § 15.715 TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database administrator. The Commission will designate one or more entities to administer a TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. Each database administrator shall: (a) Maintain a database that...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=kronig&id=EJ817706','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=kronig&id=EJ817706"><span>New Kronig-Penney Equation Emphasizing the <span class="hlt">Band</span> Edge Conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Szmulowicz, Frank</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The Kronig-Penney problem is a textbook example for discussing <span class="hlt">band</span> dispersions and <span class="hlt">band</span> gap formation in periodic layered media. For example, in photonic crystals, the behaviour of <span class="hlt">bands</span> next to the <span class="hlt">band</span> edges is important for further discussions of such effects as inhibited light emission, slow light and negative index of refraction. However,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730023383','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730023383"><span>Solid state, S-<span class="hlt">band</span>, power amplifier</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Digrindakis, M.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The final design and specifications for a solid state, S-<span class="hlt">band</span>, power amplifier is reported. Modifications from a previously proposed design were incorporated to improve efficiency and meet input overdrive and noise floor requirements. Reports on the system design, driver amplifier, power amplifier, and voltage and current limiter are included along with a discussion of the testing program.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED071972.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED071972.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> II, Music: 5623.50.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Silkebakken, Dennis L.</p> <p></p> <p>This quinmester course of easy-to-medium difficulty is recommended for pupils who have had <span class="hlt">band</span> or have demonstrated satisfactory proficiency on an instrument. Emphasis for both musicianship and performance is placed on intonation, phrasing, sight-reading, and instrumental technical facility, as well as responsibility of the individual to the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol5-sec90-531.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol5-sec90-531.pdf"><span>47 CFR 90.531 - <span class="hlt">Band</span> plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false <span class="hlt">Band</span> plan. 90.531 Section 90.531 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND..., 860, 883, 884, 923, 924, 939, 940, 997, 998, 1021, 1022, 1037, 1038, 1077, 1078, 1101, 1102, 1117...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=power+AND+cables&pg=6&id=ED134230','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=power+AND+cables&pg=6&id=ED134230"><span>Narrow-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Applications of Communications Satellites.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cowlan, Bert; Horowitz, Andrew</p> <p></p> <p>This paper attempts to describe the advantages of "narrow-<span class="hlt">band</span>" applications of communications satellites for education. It begins by discussing the general controversy surrounding the use of satellites in education, by placing the concern within the larger context of the general debate over the uses of new technologies in education, and by…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999lmac.workE..24F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999lmac.workE..24F"><span>Fireball Observations in Visible and Sodium <span class="hlt">Bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fletcher, Sandra</p> <p></p> <p>On November 17th at 1:32am MST, a large Leonid fireball was simultaneously imaged by two experiments, a visible <span class="hlt">band</span> CCD camera and a 590nm filtered <span class="hlt">band</span> equi-angle fisheye and telecentric lens assembly. The visible <span class="hlt">band</span> camera, ROTSE (Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment) is a two by two f/1.9 telephoto lens array with 2k x2k Thompson CCD and is located at 35.87 N, 106.25 W at an altitude of 2115m. One-minute exposures along the radiant were taken of the event for 30 minutes after the initial explosion. The sodium <span class="hlt">band</span> experiment was located at 35.29 N,106.46 W at an altitude of 1860m. It took ninety second exposures and captured several events throughout the night. Triangulation from two New Mexico sites resulted in an altitude of 83km over Wagon Mound, NM. Two observers present at the ROTSE site saw a green flash and a persistent glow up to seven minutes after the explosion. Cataloging of all sodium trails for comparison with lidar and infrasonic measurements is in progress. The raw data from both experiments and the atmospheric chemistry interpretation of them will be presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=women%27s+AND+gender+AND+role+AND+today&pg=4&id=EJ809017','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=women%27s+AND+gender+AND+role+AND+today&pg=4&id=EJ809017"><span>A Century of Women's <span class="hlt">Bands</span> in America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sullivan, Jill M.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Today, concert, jazz, and marching <span class="hlt">bands</span> thrive in most communities as part of the schools in the United States, and many teachers and students of these groups are women. According to data collected by the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics, girls outnumbered boys in instrumental ensembles in the years 1990,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..GECGT1091P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..GECGT1091P"><span>Numerical <span class="hlt">band</span> structure calculations of plasma metamaterials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pederson, Dylan; Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Raja, Laxminarayan</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Metamaterials (MM) are materials engineered to display negative macroscopic permittivity and permeability. These materials allow for designed control over electromagnetic energy flow, especially at frequencies where natural materials do not interact. Plasmas have recently found application in MM as a negative permittivity component. The permittivity of a plasma depends on its electron density, which can be controlled by an applied field. This means that plasmas can be used in MM to actively control the transmission or reflection of incident waves. This work focuses on a plasma MM geometry in which microplasmas are generated in perforations in a metal plate. We characterizethis material by its <span class="hlt">band</span> structure, which describes its interaction with incident waves. The plasma-EM interactions are obtained by coupling Maxwell's equations to a simplified plasma momentum equation. A plasma density profile is prescribed, and its effect on the <span class="hlt">band</span> structure is investigated. The <span class="hlt">band</span> structure calculations are typically done for static structures, whereas our current density responds to the incident waves. The resulting <span class="hlt">band</span> structures are compared with experimental results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ894759.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ894759.pdf"><span>Assessing Individual Performance in the College <span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reimer, Mark U.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Semester assessment of college wind <span class="hlt">band</span> members is an issue that conductors would probably agree falls within their academic freedom. Institutions may award as little as no credit or even a percentage of a credit for ensemble participation, although the time and effort required of the students and their conductor is undoubtedly equivalent to, or…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780059240&hterms=n-hexane&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dn-hexane','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780059240&hterms=n-hexane&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dn-hexane"><span>Infrared <span class="hlt">band</span> intensities of saturated hydrocarbons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pinkley, L. W.; Sethna, P. P.; Williams, D.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Kramers-Kronig analysis is applied to measured values of spectral reflectance at near-normal incidence to determine the real and the imaginary parts of the complex index of refraction for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-decane in the liquid state. The results indicate that the strengths of the characteristic <span class="hlt">bands</span> as measured by the integral of the imaginary part are roughly constant for all the liquid alkanes except for methane. The intensity of the CH valence vibration <span class="hlt">bands</span> in the spectra of the alkanes except methane is directly proportional to the number of CH groups per unit volume. The relations for the intensity of the <span class="hlt">bands</span> due to CH2 and CH3 deformations are examined. Characteristic <span class="hlt">band</span> intensities of the type established for NH4(+) and SO4(2-) groups in solutions and crystals cannot be extended to the more closely coupled CH2 and CH3 groups in alkane molecules.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1344110-superconducting-transitions-flat-band-systems','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1344110-superconducting-transitions-flat-band-systems"><span>Superconducting transitions in flat-<span class="hlt">band</span> systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Iglovikov, V. I.; Hébert, F.; Grémaud, B.; ...</p> <p>2014-09-11</p> <p>The physics of strongly correlated quantum particles within a flat <span class="hlt">band</span> was originally explored as a route to itinerant ferromagnetism and, indeed, a celebrated theorem by Lieb rigorously establishes that the ground state of the repulsive Hubbard model on a bipartite lattice with unequal number of sites in each sublattice must have nonzero spin S at half-filling. Recently, there has been interest in Lieb geometries due to the possibility of novel topological insulator, nematic, and Bose-Einstein condensed (BEC) phases. In this paper, we extend the understanding of the attractive Hubbard model on the Lieb lattice by using Determinant Quantum Montemore » Carlo to study real space charge and pair correlation functions not addressed by the Lieb theorems. Specifically, our results show unusual charge and charge transfer signatures within the flat <span class="hlt">band</span>, and a reduction in pairing order at ρ = 2/3 and ρ = 4/3, the points at which the flat <span class="hlt">band</span> is first occupied and then completely filled. Lastly, we compare our results to the case of flat <span class="hlt">bands</span> in the Kagome lattice and demonstrate that the behavior observed in the two cases is rather different.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=time+AND+needed+AND+make+AND+music&id=EJ710191','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=time+AND+needed+AND+make+AND+music&id=EJ710191"><span>Introduce Score Study to Your <span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Burrack, Frederick</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>In this article, the author asks music educators to imagine their <span class="hlt">band</span> students being able to identify the melody of a piece as it jumps among sections after playing it just a few times. How about recognizing harmonic modulation, or applying dynamic contrast through understanding of compositional form? While these elements may seem obvious to…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090040044','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090040044"><span>Small X-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Oscillator Antennas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix A.; Clark, Eric B.; Wilt, David M.; Mueller, Carl H.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A small, segmented microstrip patch antenna integrated with an X-<span class="hlt">band</span> feedback oscillator on a high-permittivity substrate has been built and tested. This oscillator antenna is a prototype for demonstrating the feasibility of such devices as compact, low-power-consumption building blocks of advanced, lightweight, phased antenna arrays that would generate steerable beams for communication and remotesensing applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/5211287','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/5211287"><span>Development of a bird <span class="hlt">banding</span> recapture database</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Tautin, J.; Doherty, P.F.; Metras, L.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Recaptures (and resightings) constitute the vast majority of post-release data from <span class="hlt">banded</span> or otherwise marked nongame birds. A powerful suite of contemporary analytical models is available for using recapture data to estimate population size, survival rates and other parameters, and many banders collect recapture data for their project specific needs. However, despite widely recognized, broader programmatic needs for more and better data, banders' recapture data are not centrally reposited and made available for use by others. To address this need, the US Bird <span class="hlt">Banding</span> Laboratory, the Canadian Bird <span class="hlt">Banding</span> Office and the Georgia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit are developing a bird <span class="hlt">banding</span> recapture database. In this poster we discuss the critical steps in developing the database, including: determining exactly which recapture data should be included; developing a standard record format and structure for the database; developing electronic means for collecting, vetting and disseminating the data; and most importantly, developing metadata descriptions and individual data set profiles to facilitate the user's selection of appropriate analytical models. We provide examples of individual data sets to be included in the database, and we assess the feasibility of developing a prescribed program for obtaining recapture data from banders who do not presently collect them. It is expected that the recapture database eventually will contain millions of records made available publicly for a variety of avian research and management purposes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16521770','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16521770"><span>Measuring the critical <span class="hlt">band</span> for speech.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Healy, Eric W; Bacon, Sid P</p> <p>2006-02-01</p> <p>The current experiments were designed to measure the frequency resolution employed by listeners during the perception of everyday sentences. Speech <span class="hlt">bands</span> having nearly vertical filter slopes and narrow bandwidths were sharply partitioned into various numbers of equal log- or ERBN-width subbands. The temporal envelope from each partition was used to amplitude modulate a corresponding <span class="hlt">band</span> of low-noise noise, and the modulated carriers were combined and presented to normal-hearing listeners. Intelligibility increased and reached asymptote as the number of partitions increased. In the mid- and high-frequency regions of the speech spectrum, the partition bandwidth corresponding to asymptotic performance matched current estimates of psychophysical tuning across a number of conditions. These results indicate that, in these regions, the critical <span class="hlt">band</span> for speech matches the critical <span class="hlt">band</span> measured using traditional psychoacoustic methods and nonspeech stimuli. However, in the low-frequency region, partition bandwidths at asymptote were somewhat narrower than would be predicted based upon psychophysical tuning. It is concluded that, overall, current estimates of psychophysical tuning represent reasonably well the ability of listeners to extract spectral detail from running speech.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title5-vol3-sec9701-212.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title5-vol3-sec9701-212.pdf"><span>5 CFR 9701.212 - <span class="hlt">Bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... performance, recognizing and rewarding employees, and other associated duties. (c) DHS must document in... Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF... MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Classification Structure § 9701.212 <span class="hlt">Bands</span>. (a) For purposes of identifying...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title5-vol3-sec9701-212.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title5-vol3-sec9701-212.pdf"><span>5 CFR 9701.212 - <span class="hlt">Bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... performance, recognizing and rewarding employees, and other associated duties. (c) DHS must document in... Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF... MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Classification Structure § 9701.212 <span class="hlt">Bands</span>. (a) For purposes of identifying...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title5-vol3-sec9701-212.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title5-vol3-sec9701-212.pdf"><span>5 CFR 9701.212 - <span class="hlt">Bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... performance, recognizing and rewarding employees, and other associated duties. (c) DHS must document in... Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF... MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Classification Structure § 9701.212 <span class="hlt">Bands</span>. (a) For purposes of identifying...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=tourism+AND+system&pg=7&id=EJ449067','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=tourism+AND+system&pg=7&id=EJ449067"><span>Termination and the Eastern <span class="hlt">Band</span> of Cherokees.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Finger, John R.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>During the 1940s and 1950s, local factors helped the Eastern Cherokees to resist termination of tribal status and federal responsibilities in Indian affairs. Factors include the belief that area tourism depended on Cherokee tribal identity, reluctance of local public schools to accept Indian students, and the <span class="hlt">band</span>'s complex legal status and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=environment+AND+behavior&pg=4&id=EJ1022166','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=environment+AND+behavior&pg=4&id=EJ1022166"><span>Rehearsal Characteristics of "Superior" <span class="hlt">Band</span> Directors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Juchniewicz, Jay; Kelly, Steven N.; Acklin, Amy I.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to investigate the rehearsal characteristics of "superior" middle and high school <span class="hlt">band</span> directors. A total of 131 respondents from Florida, Kentucky, and North Carolina who received a "superior" rating for 4 out of the past 5 years, completed an open-ended essay question online asking them to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150014246','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150014246"><span>Antarctic Analog for Dilational <span class="hlt">Bands</span> on Europa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hurford, T. A.; Brunt, K. M.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Europa's surface shows signs of extension, which is revealed as lithospheric dilation expressed along ridges, dilational <span class="hlt">bands</span> and ridged <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Ridges, the most common tectonic feature on Europa, comprise a central crack flanked by two raised banks a few hundred meters high on each side. Together these three classes may represent a continuum of formation. In Tufts' Dilational Model ridge formation is dominated by daily tidal cycling of a crack, which can be superimposed with regional secular dilation. The two sources of dilation can combine to form the various <span class="hlt">band</span> morphologies observed. New GPS data along a rift on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica is a suitable Earth analog to test the framework of Tufts' Dilational Model. As predicted by Tufts' Dilational Model, tensile failures in the Ross Ice Shelf exhibit secular dilation, upon which a tidal signal can be seen. From this analog we conclude that Tufts' Dilational Model for Europan ridges and <span class="hlt">bands</span> may be credible and that the secular dilation is most likely from a regional source and not tidally driven.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=planes&pg=7&id=EJ959218','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=planes&pg=7&id=EJ959218"><span>The <span class="hlt">Band</span> around a Convex Body</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Swanson, David</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>We give elementary proofs of formulas for the area and perimeter of a planar convex body surrounded by a <span class="hlt">band</span> of uniform thickness. The primary tool is a integral formula for the perimeter of a convex body which describes the perimeter in terms of the projections of the body onto lines in the plane.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AnGeo..35.1069P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AnGeo..35.1069P"><span>Statistical study of auroral omega <span class="hlt">bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Partamies, Noora; Weygand, James M.; Juusola, Liisa</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>The presence of very few statistical studies on auroral omega <span class="hlt">bands</span> motivated us to test-use a semi-automatic method for identifying large-scale undulations of the diffuse aurora boundary and to investigate their occurrence. Five identical all-sky cameras with overlapping fields of view provided data for 438 auroral omega-like structures over Fennoscandian Lapland from 1996 to 2007. The results from this set of omega <span class="hlt">band</span> events agree remarkably well with previous observations of omega <span class="hlt">band</span> occurrence in magnetic local time (MLT), lifetime, location between the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, as well as current density estimates. The average peak emission height of omega forms corresponds to the estimated precipitation energies of a few keV, which experienced no significant change during the events. Analysis of both local and global magnetic indices demonstrates that omega <span class="hlt">bands</span> are observed during substorm expansion and recovery phases that are more intense than average substorm expansion and recovery phases in the same region. The omega occurrence with respect to the substorm expansion and recovery phases is in a very good agreement with an earlier observed distribution of fast earthward flows in the plasma sheet during expansion and recovery phases. These findings support the theory that omegas are produced by fast earthward flows and auroral streamers, despite the rarity of good conjugate observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title5-vol3-sec9701-212.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title5-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title5-vol3-sec9701-212.pdf"><span>5 CFR 9701.212 - <span class="hlt">Bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Bands</span>. 9701.212 Section 9701.212 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013mss..confERI08B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013mss..confERI08B"><span>SF_6: the Forbidden <span class="hlt">Band</span> Unveiled</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boudon, V.; Manceron, L.; Kwabia-Tchana, F.; Roy, P.</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Sulfur hexafluoride (SF_6) is a greenhouse gas of anthropogenic origin, whose strong infrared absorption in the ν_3 S-F stretching region near 948 cm^{-1} induces a global warming potential 23900 times bigger than CO_2. This heavy species features many hot <span class="hlt">bands</span> at room temperature (at which the ground state population is only 30 %), especially those originating from the v_6=1 state. Unfortunately, the ν_6 <span class="hlt">band</span> itself (near 347 cm^{-1}) being, in first approximation, both infrared and Raman inactive, no reliable information could be obtained about it up to now. A long time ago, some authors suggested that this <span class="hlt">band</span> may be slightly activated through Coriolis interaction and may appear as a very faint <span class="hlt">band</span>, with an integrated intensity about 2 millionths of that of ν_3. Using a new cryogenic multipass cell with 93 m optical path length and regulated at 165± 2 K temperature, we recorded a spectrum of the ν_6 far-infrared region thanks to the performances of the AILES Beamline at the SOLEIL french synchrotron facility. Low temperature was used to avoid the presence of the 2ν_6-ν_6 hot <span class="hlt">band</span> and to reduce the neighboring, stronger ν_4-ν_2 difference <span class="hlt">band</span>. We are thus able to confirm that the small feature in this region, previously viewed at low-resolution is indeed ν_6. We present its fully resolved spectrum. It appears to be activated thanks to unidentified faint interactions resulting in the presence of a first-order dipole moment term that induces unusual selection rules. This spectrum was analyzed thanks to the XTDS software package, leading to accurate molecular spectroscopic parameters that should be useful to model the hot <span class="hlt">bands</span> of SF_6. W. B. Person, B. J. Krohn, J. Mol. Spectrosc. {98}, 229-257 (1983), C. Chappados, G. Birnbaum, J. Mol. Spectrosc. {105}, 206-214 (1984). Ch. Wenger, V. Boudon, M. Rotger, M. Sanzharov and J.-P. Champion, J. Mol. Spectrosc., {251} 102-113 (2008).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27042621','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27042621"><span>ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE <span class="hlt">BAND</span> OR SINGLE <span class="hlt">BAND</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>To evaluate the double-<span class="hlt">band</span> and single-<span class="hlt">band</span> techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-<span class="hlt">band</span> technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-<span class="hlt">band</span> anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-<span class="hlt">band</span> anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-<span class="hlt">band</span> group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-<span class="hlt">band</span> anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4799383','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4799383"><span>ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE <span class="hlt">BAND</span> OR SINGLE <span class="hlt">BAND</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To evaluate the double-<span class="hlt">band</span> and single-<span class="hlt">band</span> techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-<span class="hlt">band</span> technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. Methods: We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-<span class="hlt">band</span> anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-<span class="hlt">band</span> anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-<span class="hlt">band</span> group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-<span class="hlt">band</span> anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations. PMID:27042621</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120010450','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120010450"><span>Dichroic Filter for Separating W-<span class="hlt">Band</span> and Ka-<span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Epp, Larry W.; Durden, Stephen L.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Long, Ezra M.; Sosnowski, John B.; Higuera, Raymond J.; Chen, Jacqueline C.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The proposed Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems (ACEs) mission development would advance cloud profiling radar from that used in CloudSat by adding a 35-GHz (Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span>) channel to the 94-GHz (W-<span class="hlt">band</span>) channel used in CloudSat. In order to illuminate a single antenna, and use CloudSat-like quasi-optical transmission lines, a spatial diplexer is needed to add the Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> channel. A dichroic filter separates Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> from W-<span class="hlt">band</span> by employing advances in electrical discharge machining (EDM) and mode-matching analysis techniques developed and validated for designing dichroics for the Deep Space Network (DSN), to develop a preliminary design that both met the requirements of frequency separation and mechanical strength. First, a mechanical prototype was built using an approximately 102-micron-diameter EDM process, and tolerances of the hole dimensions, wall thickness, radius, and dichroic filter thickness measured. The prototype validated the manufacturing needed to design a dichroic filter for a higher-frequency usage than previously used in the DSN. The initial design was based on a Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> design, but thicker walls are required for mechanical rigidity than one obtains by simply scaling the Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> dichroic filter. The resulting trade of hole dimensions for mechanical rigidity (wall thickness) required electrical redesign of the hole dimensions. Updates to existing codes in the linear solver decreased the analysis time using mode-matching, enabling the electrical design to be realized quickly. This work is applicable to missions and instruments that seek to extend W-<span class="hlt">band</span> cloud profiling measurements to other frequencies. By demonstrating a dichroic filter that passes W-<span class="hlt">band</span>, but reflects a lower frequency, this opens up the development of instruments that both compare to and enhance CloudSat.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyS...92l4004R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyS...92l4004R"><span>How deformed are the TSD <span class="hlt">bands</span> in odd Lu isotopes?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ragnarsson, I.</p> <p>2017-12-01</p> <p>The experimental fingerprints for large deformation in the triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) <span class="hlt">bands</span> of 163,165,167Lu are discussed. It is argued that these fingerprints are not very convincing. On the contrary, especially the fact that there exist strong interactions between the TSD <span class="hlt">bands</span> and normal-deformed (ND) <span class="hlt">bands</span> indicates that the deformation of the TSD <span class="hlt">bands</span> cannot be very different from that of the ND <span class="hlt">bands</span>. The need for detailed new experimental data is underlined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Freq...72...73W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Freq...72...73W"><span>UWB Filtering Power Divider with Two Narrow Notch-<span class="hlt">bands</span> and Wide Stop-<span class="hlt">band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wei, Feng; Wang, Xin-Yi; Zou, Xin Tong; Shi, Xiao Wei</p> <p>2017-12-01</p> <p>A compact filtering ultra-wideband (UWB) microstrip power divider (PD) with two sharply rejected notch-<span class="hlt">bands</span> and wide stopband is analyzed and designed in this paper. The proposed UWB PD is based on a conventional Wilkinson power divider, while two stub loaded resonators (SLRs) are coupled into two symmetrical output ports to achieve a bandpass filtering response. The simplified composite right/left-handed (SCRLH) resonators are employed to generate the dual notched <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Defected ground structure (DGS) is introduced to improve the passband performance. Good insertion/return losses, isolation and notch-<span class="hlt">band</span> rejection are achieved as demonstrated in both simulation and experiment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25660695','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25660695"><span>The marginal <span class="hlt">band</span> system in nymphalid butterfly wings.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Taira, Wataru; Kinjo, Seira; Otaki, Joji M</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Butterfly wing color patterns are highly complex and diverse, but they are believed to be derived from the nymphalid groundplan, which is composed of several color pattern systems. Among these pattern systems, the marginal <span class="hlt">band</span> system, including marginal and submarginal <span class="hlt">bands</span>, has rarely been studied. Here, we examined the color pattern diversity of the marginal <span class="hlt">band</span> system among nymphalid butterflies. Marginal and submarginal <span class="hlt">bands</span> are usually expressed as a pair of linear <span class="hlt">bands</span> aligned with the wing margin. However, a submarginal <span class="hlt">band</span> can be expressed as a broken <span class="hlt">band</span>, an elongated oval, or a single dot. The marginal focus, usually a white dot at the middle of a wing compartment along the wing edge, corresponds to the pupal edge spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots that signify the locations of color pattern organizing centers. A marginal <span class="hlt">band</span> can be expressed as a semicircle, an elongated oval, or a pair of eyespot-like structures, which suggest the organizing activity of the marginal focus. Physical damage at the pupal edge spot leads to distal dislocation of the submarginal <span class="hlt">band</span> in Junonia almana and in Vanessa indica, suggesting that the marginal focus functions as an organizing center for the marginal <span class="hlt">band</span> system. Taken together, we conclude that the marginal <span class="hlt">band</span> system is developmentally equivalent to other symmetry systems. Additionally, the marginal <span class="hlt">band</span> is likely a core element and the submarginal <span class="hlt">band</span> a paracore element of the marginal <span class="hlt">band</span> system, and both <span class="hlt">bands</span> are primarily specified by the marginal focus organizing center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040068216','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040068216"><span>Large Format Narrow-<span class="hlt">Band</span>, Multi-<span class="hlt">Band</span>, and Broad-<span class="hlt">Band</span> LWIR QWIP Focal Planes for Space and Earth Science Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>A 640x512 pixel, long-wavelength cutoff, narrow-<span class="hlt">band</span> (delta(lambda)/approx. 10%) quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal plane array (FPA), a four-<span class="hlt">band</span> QWIP FPA in the 4-16 m spectral region, and a broad-<span class="hlt">band</span> (delta(lambda)/approx. 42%) QWIP FPA having 15.4 m cutoff have been demonstrated.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MPLA...3350048S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MPLA...3350048S"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> head spin assignment of superdeformed <span class="hlt">bands</span> in 133Pr using two-parameter formulae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sharma, Honey; Mittal, H. M.</p> <p>2018-03-01</p> <p>The two-parameter formulae viz. the power index formula, the nuclear softness formula and the VMI model are adopted to accredit the <span class="hlt">band</span> head spin (I0) of four superdeformed rotational <span class="hlt">bands</span> in 133Pr. The technique of least square fitting is used to accredit the <span class="hlt">band</span> head spin for four superdeformed rotational <span class="hlt">bands</span> in 133Pr. The root mean deviation among the computed transition energies and well-known experimental transition energies are attained by extracting the model parameters from the two-parameter formulae. The determined transition energies are in excellent agreement with the experimental transition energies, whenever exact spins are accredited. The power index formula coincides well with the experimental data and provides minimum root mean deviation. So, the power index formula is more efficient tool than the nuclear softness formula and the VMI model. The deviation of dynamic moment of inertia J(2) against the rotational frequency is also examined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018Prama..91....8D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018Prama..91....8D"><span>Geometry of magnetic rotational (MR) <span class="hlt">band</span>-crossing phenomenon in MR <span class="hlt">bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Devi, K. Rojeeta; Kumar, Suresh; Palit, R.</p> <p>2018-07-01</p> <p>A semiclassical (SC) approach is proposed to calculate the B( M1) transition rates in the <span class="hlt">band</span>-crossing region of two magnetic rotational (MR) <span class="hlt">bands</span>. In the present work, a geometry is suggested for the shear blades to govern its behaviour during the <span class="hlt">band</span>-crossing. In the crossing region, gradual alignment of two nucleons is responsible for the crossing behaviour and it must give a quantised resultant angular momentum. As an example, it is successfully implemented for the MR <span class="hlt">bands</span> in the mass A=110 and A=200 regions. A good agreement of the present semiclassical calculations with the experimental values is presented and furthermore, it is seen that the present proposal is also helpful to see the core contribution in the MR phenomenon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPCM...28j5603E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPCM...28j5603E"><span>Differences between the insulating limit quasiparticles of one-<span class="hlt">band</span> and three-<span class="hlt">band</span> cuprate models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ebrahimnejad, H.; Sawatzky, G. A.; Berciu, M.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We study the charge dynamics of the quasiparticle that forms when a single hole is doped in a two-dimensional antiferromagnet as described by the one-<span class="hlt">band</span> t-{{t}\\prime} -{{t}\\prime \\prime} -J model, using a variational approximation that includes spin fluctuations in the vicinity of the hole. We explain why the spin fluctuations and the longer range hopping have complementary contributions to the quasiparticle dynamics, and thus why both are essential to obtain a dispersion in agreement with that measured experimentally. This is very different from the three-<span class="hlt">band</span> Emery model in the strongly-correlated limit, where the same variational approximation shows that spin fluctuations have a minor effect on the quasiparticle dynamics. This difference proves that these one-<span class="hlt">band</span> and three-<span class="hlt">band</span> models describe qualitatively different quasiparticles in the insulating limit, and therefore that they cannot both be suitable to describe the physics of very underdoped cuprates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97c5138B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97c5138B"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> connectivity for topological quantum chemistry: <span class="hlt">Band</span> structures as a graph theory problem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bradlyn, Barry; Elcoro, L.; Vergniory, M. G.; Cano, Jennifer; Wang, Zhijun; Felser, C.; Aroyo, M. I.; Bernevig, B. Andrei</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>The conventional theory of solids is well suited to describing <span class="hlt">band</span> structures locally near isolated points in momentum space, but struggles to capture the full, global picture necessary for understanding topological phenomena. In part of a recent paper [B. Bradlyn et al., Nature (London) 547, 298 (2017), 10.1038/nature23268], we have introduced the way to overcome this difficulty by formulating the problem of sewing together many disconnected local k .p <span class="hlt">band</span> structures across the Brillouin zone in terms of graph theory. In this paper, we give the details of our full theoretical construction. We show that crystal symmetries strongly constrain the allowed connectivities of energy <span class="hlt">bands</span>, and we employ graph theoretic techniques such as graph connectivity to enumerate all the solutions to these constraints. The tools of graph theory allow us to identify disconnected groups of <span class="hlt">bands</span> in these solutions, and so identify topologically distinct insulating phases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA615115','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA615115"><span>First Principles Study of <span class="hlt">Band</span> Structure and <span class="hlt">Band</span> Gap Engineering in Graphene for Device Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-03-20</p> <p>In the bandstructure of graphene which is dominated by Dirac description, valence and conduction <span class="hlt">bands</span> cross the Fermi level at a single point (K...of energy <span class="hlt">bands</span> and appearance of Dirac cones near the ‘K’ point and Fermi level the electrons behave like massless Dirac fermions. For applications...results. Introduction Graphene, the super carbon , is now accepted as wonder material with new physics and it has caused major</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8891E..0BM','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8891E..0BM"><span>Decorrelation of L-<span class="hlt">band</span> and C-<span class="hlt">band</span> interferometry to volcanic risk prevention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Malinverni, E. S.; Sandwell, D.; Tassetti, A. N.; Cappelletti, L.</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>SAR has several strong key features: fine spatial resolution/precision and high temporal pass frequency. Moreover, the InSAR technique allows the accurate detection of ground deformations. This high potential technology can be invaluable to study volcanoes: it provides important information on pre-eruption surface deformation, improving the understanding of volcanic processes and the ability to predict eruptions. As a downside, SAR measurements are influenced by artifacts such as atmospheric effects or bad topographic data. Correlation gives a measure of these interferences, quantifying the similarity of the phase of two SAR images. Different approaches exists to reduce these errors but the main concern remain the possibility to correlate images with different acquisition times: snow-covered or heavily-vegetated areas produce seasonal changes on the surface. Minimizing the time between passes partly limits decorrelation. Though, images with a short temporal baseline aren't always available and some artifacts affecting correlation are timeindependent. This work studies correlation of pairs of SAR images focusing on the influence of surface and climate conditions, especially snow coverage and temperature. Furthermore, the effects of the acquisition <span class="hlt">band</span> on correlation are taken into account, comparing L-<span class="hlt">band</span> and C-<span class="hlt">band</span> images. All the chosen images cover most of the Yellowstone caldera (USA) over a span of 4 years, sampling all the seasons. Interferograms and correlation maps are generated. To isolate temporal decorrelation, pairs of images with the shortest baseline are chosen. Correlation maps are analyzed in relation to snow depth and temperature. Results obtained with ENVISAT and ERS satellites (C-<span class="hlt">band</span>) are compared with the ones from ALOS (L-<span class="hlt">band</span>). Results show a good performance during winter and a bad attitude towards wet snow (spring and fall). During summer both L-<span class="hlt">band</span> and C-<span class="hlt">band</span> maintain a good coherence with L-<span class="hlt">band</span> performing better over vegetation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/5211425','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/5211425"><span>Enhancing bird <span class="hlt">banding</span> information sharing across the western hemishpere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Rojo, A.; Berlanga, H.; Howes, L.; Tomosy, M.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Bird <span class="hlt">banding</span> and marking provide indispensable tools for ornithological research, management, and conservation of migratory birds and their habitats along migratory routes, breeding and non-breeding grounds. With the growing interest in international coordination of tracking bird movements, coordination amongst developing and existing programs is essential for effective data management. The North American Bird <span class="hlt">Banding</span> Program (Canadian Bird <span class="hlt">Banding</span> Office and U.S. Bird <span class="hlt">Banding</span> Laboratory and the Mexican government) has been working to enhance collaboration with other Western Hemisphere countries to establish a voluntary bird <span class="hlt">banding</span> communication network. This network addresses challenges, such as: demonstrating how sharing <span class="hlt">banding</span> expertise and information management can support the stewardship of Western Hemisphere migratory birds, ensuring that valuable <span class="hlt">banding</span> and encounter data are captured and shared. With increasing numbers of international scientific and conservation initiatives, bird <span class="hlt">banding</span> and marking programs must provide essential international coordination functions as well as support local activities by facilitating access to <span class="hlt">bands</span>, training, data management and encounter reporting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70027749','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70027749"><span>A technique to produce aluminum color <span class="hlt">bands</span> for avian research</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Koronkiewicz, T.J.; Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We developed a technique to produce metal (aluminum) color <span class="hlt">bands</span>, in response to concerns about leg injuries caused by celluloid-plastic color <span class="hlt">bands</span> applied to Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii). The technique involves color-anodized aluminum <span class="hlt">bands</span> (unnumbered blanks and federal numbered <span class="hlt">bands</span>), with auto pin-striping tape and flexible epoxy sealant, to create a variety of solid, half- and triple-split colors. This allows for hundreds of unique, high-contrast color combinations. During six consecutive years of application, these colored metal <span class="hlt">bands</span> have resisted color fade compared to conventional celluloid-plastic <span class="hlt">bands</span>, and have reduced leg injuries in the flycatcher. Although not necessarily warranted for all color-<span class="hlt">banding</span> studies, these metal <span class="hlt">bands</span> may provide a lower-impact option for studies of species known to be impacted by plastic color <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150015999','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150015999"><span>Structural Evolution of a Warm Frontal Precipitation <span class="hlt">Band</span> During GCPEx</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Colle, Brian A.; Naeger, Aaron; Molthan, Andrew; Nesbitt, Stephen</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>A warm frontal precipitation <span class="hlt">band</span> developed over a few hours 50-100 km to the north of a surface warm front. The 3-km WRF was able to realistically simulate <span class="hlt">band</span> development, although the model is somewhat too weak. <span class="hlt">Band</span> genesis was associated with weak frontogenesis (deformation) in the presence of weak potential and conditional instability feeding into the <span class="hlt">band</span> region, while it was closer to moist neutral within the <span class="hlt">band</span>. As the <span class="hlt">band</span> matured, frontogenesis increased, while the stability gradually increased in the <span class="hlt">banding</span> region. Cloud top generating cells were prevalent, but not in WRF (too stable). The <span class="hlt">band</span> decayed as the stability increased upstream and the frontogenesis (deformation) with the warm front weakened. The WRF may have been too weak and short-lived with the <span class="hlt">band</span> because too stable and forcing too weak (some micro issues as well).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6808E..0AM','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6808E..0AM"><span>Development of softcopy environment for primary color <span class="hlt">banding</span> visibility assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Min, Byungseok; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Allebach, Jan P.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Fine-pitch <span class="hlt">banding</span> is one of the most unwanted artifacts in laser electrophotographic (EP) printers. It is perceived as a quasiperiodic fluctuation in the process direction. Therefore, it is essential for printer vendors to know how <span class="hlt">banding</span> is perceived by humans in order to improve print quality. Monochrome <span class="hlt">banding</span> has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers; but there is no literature that deals with the <span class="hlt">banding</span> of color laser printers as measured from actual prints. The study of color <span class="hlt">banding</span> is complicated by the fact that the color <span class="hlt">banding</span> signal is physically defined in a three-dimensional color space, while <span class="hlt">banding</span> perception is described in a one-dimensional sense such as more <span class="hlt">banding</span> or less <span class="hlt">banding</span>. In addition, the color <span class="hlt">banding</span> signal arises from the independent contributions of the four primary colorant <span class="hlt">banding</span> signals. It is not known how these four distinct signals combine to give rise to the perception of color <span class="hlt">banding</span>. In this paper, we develop a methodology to assess the <span class="hlt">banding</span> visibility of the primary colorant cyan based on human visual perception. This is our first step toward studying the more general problem of color <span class="hlt">banding</span> in combinations of two or more colorants. According to our method, we print and scan the cyan test patch, and extract the <span class="hlt">banding</span> profile as a one dimensional signal so that we can freely adjust the intensity of <span class="hlt">banding</span>. Thereafter, by exploiting the pulse width modulation capability of the laser printer, the extracted <span class="hlt">banding</span> profile is used to modulate a pattern consisting of periodic lines oriented in the process direction, to generate extrinsic <span class="hlt">banding</span>. This avoids the effect of the halftoning algorithm on the <span class="hlt">banding</span>. Furthermore, to conduct various <span class="hlt">banding</span> assessments more efficiently, we also develop a softcopy environment that emulates a hardcopy image on a calibrated monitor, which requires highly accurate device calibration throughout the whole system. To achieve the same color appearance as the hardcopy</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19800017026','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19800017026"><span>Shuttle Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> and S-<span class="hlt">band</span> communications implementation study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dodds, J. G.; Huth, G. K.; Nilsen, P. W.; Polydoros, A.; Simon, M. K.; Weber, C. L.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Various aspects of the shuttle orbiter S-<span class="hlt">band</span> network communication system, the S-<span class="hlt">band</span> payload communication system, and the Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> communication system are considered. A method is proposed for obtaining more accurate S-<span class="hlt">band</span> antenna patterns of the actual shuttle orbiter vehicle during flight because the preliminary antenna patterns using mock-ups are not realistic that they do not include the effects of additional appendages such as wings and tail structures. The Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> communication system is discussed especially the TDRS antenna pointing accuracy with respect to the orbiter and the modifications required and resulting performance characteristics of the convolutionally encoded high data rate return link to maintain bit synchronizer lock on the ground. The TDRS user constraints on data bit clock jitter and data asymmetry on unbalanced QPSK with noisy phase references are included. The S-<span class="hlt">band</span> payload communication system study is outlined including the advantages and experimental results of a peak regulator design built and evaluated by Axiomatrix for the bent-pipe link versus the existing RMS-type regulator. The nominal sweep rate for the deep-space transponder of 250 Hz/s, and effects of phase noise on the performance of a communication system are analyzed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840022329&hterms=weeds&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dweeds','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840022329&hterms=weeds&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dweeds"><span>Investigation of TM <span class="hlt">Band-to-band</span> Registration Using the JSC Registration Processor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Yao, S. S.; Amis, M. L.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The JSC registration processor performs scene-to-scene (or <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span>) correlation based on edge images. The edge images are derived from a percentage of the edge pixels calculated from the raw scene data, excluding clouds and other extraneous data in the scene. Correlations are performed on patches (blocks) of the edge images, and the correlation peak location in each patch is estimated iteratively to fractional pixel location accuracy. Peak offset locations from all patches over the scene are then considered together, and a variety of tests are made to weed out outliers and other inconsistencies before a distortion model is assumed. Thus, the correlation peak offset locations in each patch indicate quantitatively how well the two TM <span class="hlt">bands</span> register to each other over that patch of scene data. The average of these offsets indicate the overall accuracies of the <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> registration. The registration processor was also used to register one acquisition to another acquisition of multitemporal TM data acquired over the same ground track. <span class="hlt">Band</span> 4 images from both acquisitions were correlated and an rms error of a fraction of a pixel was routinely obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760015329','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760015329"><span>Ku <span class="hlt">band</span> low noise parametric amplifier</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>A low noise, K sub u-<span class="hlt">band</span>, parametric amplifier (paramp) was developed. The unit is a spacecraft-qualifiable, prototype, parametric amplifier for eventual application in the shuttle orbiter. The amplifier was required to have a noise temperature of less than 150 K. A noise temperature of less than 120 K at a gain level of 17 db was achieved. A 3-db bandwidth in excess of 350 MHz was attained, while deviation from phase linearity of about + or - 1 degree over 50 MHz was achieved. The paramp operates within specification over an ambient temperature range of -5 C to +50 C. The performance requirements and the operation of the K sub u-<span class="hlt">band</span> parametric amplifier system are described. The final test results are also given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170003109','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170003109"><span>L-<span class="hlt">Band</span> RFI in Japan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Soldo, Yan; de Matthaeis, Paolo; Le Vine, David M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In recent years, three instruments have been launched into orbit with the aim of producing global maps of sea surface salinity and soil moisture using the 1400-1427 MHz <span class="hlt">band</span>: SMOS, Aquarius and SMAP. Although this frequency <span class="hlt">band</span> is allocated to passive measurements only, RFI (Radio-Frequency Interference) is present in the data of all three missions. On a global scale, the three sensors have observed approximately the same distribution of RFI. Japan is an important exception that has implications for the design of RFI detection algorithms. RFI in Japan is caused by a large number of emitters belonging to the same system (TV receivers) and for this reason some traditional RFI detection strategies detect little to no RFI over Japan. The study of this case has led to an improvement of the approach to detect RFI in Aquarius data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21369062','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21369062"><span>Paintable <span class="hlt">band</span>-edge liquid crystal lasers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gardiner, Damian J; Morris, Stephen M; Hands, Philip J W; Mowatt, Carrie; Rutledge, Rupert; Wilkinson, Timothy D; Coles, Harry J</p> <p>2011-01-31</p> <p>In this paper we demonstrate photonic <span class="hlt">band</span>-edge laser emission from emulsion-based polymer dispersed liquid crystals. The lasing medium consists of dye-doped chiral nematic droplets dispersed within a polymer matrix that spontaneously align as the film dries. Such lasers can be easily formed on single substrates with no alignment layers. The system combines the self-organizing periodic structure of chiral nematic liquid crystals with the simplicity of the emulsion procedure so as to produce a material that retains the emission characteristics of <span class="hlt">band</span>-edge lasers yet can be readily coated. Sequential and stacked layers demonstrate the possibility of achieving simultaneous multi-wavelength laser output from glass, metallic, and flexible substrates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27137544','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27137544"><span>Perfect narrow <span class="hlt">band</span> absorber for sensing applications.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Luo, Shiwen; Zhao, Jun; Zuo, Duluo; Wang, Xinbing</p> <p>2016-05-02</p> <p>We design and numerically investigate a perfect narrow <span class="hlt">band</span> absorber based on a metal-metal-dielectric-metal structure which consists of periodic metallic nanoribbon arrays. The absorber presents an ultra narrow absorption <span class="hlt">band</span> of 1.11 nm with a nearly perfect absorption of over 99.9% in the infrared region. For oblique incidence, the absorber shows an absorption more than 95% for a wide range of incident angles from 0 to 50°. Structure parameters to the influence of the performance are investigated. The structure shows high sensing performance with a high sensitivity of 1170 nm/RIU and a large figure of merit of 1054. The proposed structure has great potential as a biosensor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..254g2002A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..254g2002A"><span>Design of an Electronic Chest-<span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Atakan, R.; Acikgoz Tufan, H.; Baskan, H.; Eryuruk, S. H.; Akalin, N.; Kose, H.; Li, Y.; Kursun Bahadir, S.; Kalaoglu, F.</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>In this study, an electronic chest strap prototype was designed for measuring fitness level, performance optimization, mobility and fall detection. Knitting technology is used for production by using highly elastic nylon yarn. In order to evaluate comfort performance of the garment, yarn strength and elongation, air permeability, moisture management and FAST tests (Fabric Assurance Fabric Testing) were carried out, respectively. After testing of textile part of the chest <span class="hlt">band</span>, IMU sensors were integrated onto the garment by means of conductive yarns. Electrical conductivity of the circuit was also assessed at the end. Results indicated that the weight and the thickness of the product are relatively high for sports uses and it has a negative impact on comfort properties. However, it is highly stretchable and moisture management properties are still in acceptable values. From the perspective of possible application areas, developed smart chest <span class="hlt">band</span> in this research could be used in sports facilities as well as health care applications for elderly and disabled people.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1340998-band-excitation-scanning-probe-microscopy','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1340998-band-excitation-scanning-probe-microscopy"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> Excitation for Scanning Probe Microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jesse, Stephen</p> <p>2017-01-02</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Band</span> Excitation (BE) technique for scanning probe microscopy uses a precisely determined waveform that contains specific frequencies to excite the cantilever or sample in an atomic force microscope to extract more information, and more reliable information from a sample. There are a myriad of details and complexities associated with implementing the BE technique. There is therefore a need to have a user friendly interface that allows typical microscopists access to this methodology. This software enables users of atomic force microscopes to easily: build complex <span class="hlt">band</span>-excitation waveforms, set-up the microscope scanning conditions, configure the input and output electronics for generatemore » the waveform as a voltage signal and capture the response of the system, perform analysis on the captured response, and display the results of the measurement.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26398972','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26398972"><span>[Optimization of resistance training using elastic <span class="hlt">bands</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guex, K</p> <p>2015-07-15</p> <p>Resistance training using elastic <span class="hlt">bands</span> allows to perform a large variety of exercises for upper and lower body. It can be considered as a real alternative to the use of fitness equipment or free weight. After having determined the goal of the resistance training (i.e., maximal strength, hypertrophy, power or local muscular endurance), the acute program variables (i.e., muscle action, loading, volume, exercise selection and order, rest periods and repetition velocity) must be selected regarding the recommendations for strength training. The load is the most important variable in resistance program design. To determine it in an accurate way, when using elastic <span class="hlt">bands</span>, it is recommended to use the Multiple RM test.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910053646&hterms=Corn&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DCorn','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910053646&hterms=Corn&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DCorn"><span>C-<span class="hlt">band</span> backscattering from corn canopies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>A frequency-modulatad continuous-wave C-<span class="hlt">band</span> (4.8 GHz) scatterometer was mounted on an aerial lift truck, and backscatter coefficients of corn (Zea mays L.) were acquired as functions of polarizations, view angles, and row directions. As phytomass and green-leaf area index increased, the backscatter also increased. Near anthesis, when the canopies were fully developed, the major scattering elements were located in the upper 1 m of the 2.8 m tall canopy and little backscatter was measured below that level for view angles of 30 deg or greater. C-<span class="hlt">band</span> backscatter data could provide information to monitor tillage operations at small view zenith angles and vegetation at large view zenith angles.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810024204','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810024204"><span>Absorption <span class="hlt">band</span> Q model for the Earth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Anderson, D. L.; Given, J. W.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Attenuation in solids and liquids, as measured by the quality factor Q, is typically frequency dependent. In seismology, however, Q is usually assumed to be independent of frequency. Body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data are used to place constraints on the frequency dependence of Q in the mantle. Specific features of the absorption <span class="hlt">band</span> model are: low-Q in the seismic <span class="hlt">band</span> at both the top and the base of the mantle, low-Q for long-period body waves in the outer core, an inner core Q sub s that increases with period, and low Q sub p/Q sub s at short periods in the middle mantle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvB..94o5202G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvB..94o5202G"><span>Diluted magnetic semiconductors with narrow <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gu, Bo; Maekawa, Sadamichi</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>We propose a method to realize diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) with p - and n -type carriers by choosing host semiconductors with a narrow <span class="hlt">band</span> gap. By employing a combination of the density function theory and quantum Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate such semiconductors using Mn-doped BaZn2As2 , which has a <span class="hlt">band</span> gap of 0.2 eV. In addition, we found a nontoxic DMS Mn-doped BaZn2Sb2 , of which the Curie temperature Tc is predicted to be higher than that of Mn-doped BaZn2As2 , the Tc of which was up to 230 K in a recent experiment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPhD...51r5101Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPhD...51r5101Z"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> engineering in twisted molybdenum disulfide bilayers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhao, Yipeng; Liao, Chengwei; Ouyang, Gang</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>In order to explore the theoretical relationship between interlayer spacing, interaction and <span class="hlt">band</span> offset at the atomic level in vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) structures, we propose an analytical model to address the evolution of interlayer vdW coupling with random stacking configurations in MoS2 bilayers based on the atomic-bond-relaxation correlation mechanism. We found that interlayer spacing changes substantially with respect to the orientations, and the bandgap increases from 1.53 eV (AB stacking) to 1.68 eV (AA stacking). Our results reveal that the evolution of interlayer vdW coupling originates from the interlayer interaction, leading to interlayer separations and electronic properties changing with stacking configurations. Our predictions constitute a demonstration of twist engineering the <span class="hlt">band</span> shift in the emergent class of 2D crystals, transition-metal dichalcogenides.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA194269','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA194269"><span>Wide <span class="hlt">Band</span> Gyrotron Traveling Wave Amplifier Analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1987-12-01</p> <p>phase versus frequency characteristics. It is in these aspects that the gyrotron amplifier effort has been less than successful. A C-<span class="hlt">band</span> gyro- TWT ...proposals were made several years ago, no experimental results have yet been reported. Another concept for increasing the bandwidth of the gyro- TWT is to...including dielectric loading of the waveguide [24], helix loaded waveguide (25]-[26], and disc-loaded waveguide [26]-(27). No experimental results on</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/874202','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/874202"><span>Fabrication of photonic <span class="hlt">band</span> gap materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Constant, Kristen; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Biswas, Rana; Ho, Kai-Ming</p> <p>2002-01-15</p> <p>A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic <span class="hlt">band</span> gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microspheres, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microspheres therefrom. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microspheres may be polystyrene microspheres.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880009078&hterms=K2&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DK2','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880009078&hterms=K2&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DK2"><span>The <span class="hlt">band</span> systems of alkali vapors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Weizel, W.; Kulp, M.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>A number of <span class="hlt">band</span> edges of the molecules, Na2, K2, NaK, NaCs, LiK, LiRb, LiCs, and NaRb are arranged in edge schemes. The vibrational quanta of the base terms and the upper terms can be approximately determined. Viewpoints are produced for interpreting electron terms. The terms Na2 are interpreted as terms of a photo-electron.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850050094&hterms=microstrip+antenna&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmicrostrip%2Bantenna','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850050094&hterms=microstrip+antenna&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmicrostrip%2Bantenna"><span>Dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> reactively loaded microstrip antenna</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Richards, W. F.; Long, S. A.; Davidson, S. E.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A previously derived theory is applied to a microstrip antenna with a reactive load to produce a dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> radiator. A model consisting of a rectangular patch radiator loaded with a variable length short-circuited coaxial stub was investigated experimentally. Comparisons of theoretical predictions and experimental data are made for the impedance and resonant frequencies as a function of the position of the load, the length of the stub, and the characteristic impedance of the stub.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADB020119','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADB020119"><span>Improved 20mm Plastic Rotating <span class="hlt">Bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1976-12-01</p> <p>Taper, and 13- Degree Aft Taper, In-Flight at 3, 786 Feet per Second Muzzle Velocity at Ambient Conditions ....... ... 46 I LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS...at 3, 770 Feet per Second Muzzle Velocity at Ambient Conditions ......... ... 46 14 EG-D69-B-813/15 Series Projectile with 0.813-inch <span class="hlt">Band</span> Diameter...15-Degree Fore and Aft Tapers, In- Flight at 3, 763 Feet per Second Muzzle Velocity at Ambient Conditions ..... ............... .... 47 15 EG-D69-B-813</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7002011','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7002011"><span>Silicone rubber <span class="hlt">band</span> treatment of rectal prolapse.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jackaman, F R; Francis, J N; Hopkinson, B R</p> <p>1980-09-01</p> <p>Fifty-two patients with rectal prolapse have been treated by the silicone rubber <span class="hlt">band</span> perianal suture technique and satisfactory results have been obtained in 46 (89%). Eleven patients required reoperation to achieve this result. The procedure is a minor one, with little morbidity and no mortality. Provided that faecal impaction can be avoided in patients having this operation a successful outcome, can be expected. It is recommended especially for the frail and elderly with rectal prolapse.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020051087','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020051087"><span>Ultrafast Narrow <span class="hlt">Band</span> Modulation of VCSELs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Multimode beating was greatly enhanced by taking output from part (e.g., half) of the output facet. Simpler sources of microwaves and millimeter waves of various frequencies were generated by varying the VCSEL diameter in a single multimode VCSEL our coupling of a few VCSELs. Breathing frequency in multi-mode operations affects modulation response and bandwidth. Optimizing RO frequency and mode beating frequency could potentially expand bandwidths suitable for wide <span class="hlt">band</span> digital communications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950009412','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950009412"><span>The Diffuse Interstellar <span class="hlt">Bands</span>: Contributed papers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (Editor)</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Drawing a coherent picture of the observational characteristics of the Diffuse Interstellar <span class="hlt">Bands</span> (DIB's) and the physical and chemical properties of its proposed carriers was the focus of this NASA sponsored conference. Information relating to absoption spectra, diffuse radiation carriers, carbon compounds, stellar composition, and interstellar extinction involving T-Tauri stars, Reflection Nebulae, Red Giants, and accretion discs are discussed from those papers presented at the conference, which are included in this analytic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26594079','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26594079"><span>Comparison of eigensolvers for symmetric <span class="hlt">band</span> matrices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moldaschl, Michael; Gansterer, Wilfried N</p> <p>2014-09-15</p> <p>We compare different algorithms for computing eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a symmetric <span class="hlt">band</span> matrix across a wide range of synthetic test problems. Of particular interest is a comparison of state-of-the-art tridiagonalization-based methods as implemented in Lapack or Plasma on the one hand, and the block divide-and-conquer (BD&C) algorithm as well as the block twisted factorization (BTF) method on the other hand. The BD&C algorithm does not require tridiagonalization of the original <span class="hlt">band</span> matrix at all, and the current version of the BTF method tridiagonalizes the original <span class="hlt">band</span> matrix only for computing the eigenvalues. Avoiding the tridiagonalization process sidesteps the cost of backtransformation of the eigenvectors. Beyond that, we discovered another disadvantage of the backtransformation process for <span class="hlt">band</span> matrices: In several scenarios, a lot of gradual underflow is observed in the (optional) accumulation of the transformation matrix and in the (obligatory) backtransformation step. According to the IEEE 754 standard for floating-point arithmetic, this implies many operations with subnormal (denormalized) numbers, which causes severe slowdowns compared to the other algorithms without backtransformation of the eigenvectors. We illustrate that in these cases the performance of existing methods from Lapack and Plasma reaches a competitive level only if subnormal numbers are disabled (and thus the IEEE standard is violated). Overall, our performance studies illustrate that if the problem size is large enough relative to the bandwidth, BD&C tends to achieve the highest performance of all methods if the spectrum to be computed is clustered. For test problems with well separated eigenvalues, the BTF method tends to become the fastest algorithm with growing problem size.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/874723','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/874723"><span>Permanent magnet focused X-<span class="hlt">band</span> photoinjector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Yu, David U. L.; Rosenzweig, James</p> <p>2002-09-10</p> <p>A compact high energy photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injection and the linac. High electron beam brightness is achieved by accelerating a tightly focused electron beam in an integrated, multi-cell, X-<span class="hlt">band</span> rf linear accelerator (linac). The photoelectron linac employs a Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, easing manufacturing tolerances and costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840009412','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840009412"><span>V-<span class="hlt">band</span> integrated quadriphase modulator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Grote, A.; Chang, K.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>A V-<span class="hlt">band</span> integrated circuit quadriphase shift keyed modulator/exciter for space communications systems was developed. Intersatellite communications systems require direct modulation at 60 GHz to enhance signal processing capability. For most systems, particularly space applications, small and lightweight components are essential to alleviate severe system design constraints. Thus to achieve wideband, high data rate systems, direct modulation techniques at millimeter waves using solid state integrated circuit technology are an integral part of the overall technology developments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2493732','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2493732"><span>Silicone rubber <span class="hlt">band</span> treatment of rectal prolapse.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jackaman, F. R.; Francis, J. N.; Hopkinson, B. R.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Fifty-two patients with rectal prolapse have been treated by the silicone rubber <span class="hlt">band</span> perianal suture technique and satisfactory results have been obtained in 46 (89%). Eleven patients required reoperation to achieve this result. The procedure is a minor one, with little morbidity and no mortality. Provided that faecal impaction can be avoided in patients having this operation a successful outcome, can be expected. It is recommended especially for the frail and elderly with rectal prolapse. PMID:7002011</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860022472','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860022472"><span>LANDSAT 4 <span class="hlt">band</span> 6 data evaluation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The objectives of this investigation are to evaluate and monitor the radiometric integrity of the LANDSAT-D Thematic Mapper (TM) thermal infrared channel (<span class="hlt">Band</span> 6) data to develop improved radiometric preprocessing calibration techniques for removal of atmospheric effects. Efforts this period have concentrated on underflight data collection. Two successful flights were made on September 18 and October 6. The radiosonde data for these flights have been obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850013445','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850013445"><span>LANDSAT 4 <span class="hlt">band</span> 6 data evaluation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Comparison of underflight data with satellite estimates of temperature revealed significant gain calibration errors. The source of the LANDSAT 5 <span class="hlt">band</span> 6 error and its reproducibility is not yet adequately defined. The error can be accounted for using underflight or ground truth data. When underflight data are used to correct the satellite data, the residual error for the scene studied was 1.3K when the predicted temperatures were compared to measured surface temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850010912','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850010912"><span>Broad-<span class="hlt">band</span> UHF dipole array</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bailey, M. C.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A 6X6 array of fan-dipoles was designed to operate in the 510 to 660 MHz frequency range for aircraft flight test and evaluation of a UHF radiometer system. A broad-<span class="hlt">band</span> dipole design operating near the first resonance is detailed. Measured VSWR and radiation patterns for the dipole array demonstrate achievable bandwidths in the 35 percent to 40 percent range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28287400','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28287400"><span>Topological magnon <span class="hlt">bands</span> in ferromagnetic star lattice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Owerre, S A</p> <p>2017-05-10</p> <p>The experimental observation of topological magnon <span class="hlt">bands</span> and thermal Hall effect in a kagomé lattice ferromagnet Cu(1-3, bdc) has inspired the search for topological magnon effects in various insulating ferromagnets that lack an inversion center allowing a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin-orbit interaction. The star lattice (also known as the decorated honeycomb lattice) ferromagnet is an ideal candidate for this purpose because it is a variant of the kagomé lattice with additional links that connect the up-pointing and down-pointing triangles. This gives rise to twice the unit cell of the kagomé lattice, and hence more interesting topological magnon effects. In particular, the triangular bridges on the star lattice can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically which is not possible on the kagomé lattice ferromagnets. Here, we study DM-induced topological magnon <span class="hlt">bands</span>, chiral edge modes, and thermal magnon Hall effect on the star lattice ferromagnet in different parameter regimes. The star lattice can also be visualized as the parent material from which topological magnon <span class="hlt">bands</span> can be realized for the kagomé and honeycomb lattices in some limiting cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1338137-topological-nonsymmorphic-metals-from-band-inversion','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1338137-topological-nonsymmorphic-metals-from-band-inversion"><span>Topological nonsymmorphic metals from <span class="hlt">band</span> inversion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Muechler, Lukas; Alexandradinata, A.; Neupert, Titus; ...</p> <p>2016-12-29</p> <p>Here, we expand the phase diagram of two-dimensional, nonsymmorphic crystals at integer fillings that do not guarantee gaplessness. In addition to the trivial, gapped phase that is expected, we find that <span class="hlt">band</span> inversion leads to a class of topological, gapless phases. These topological phases are exemplified by the monolayers of MTe 2 (M ¼ W; Mo) if spin-orbit coupling is neglected. We characterize the Dirac <span class="hlt">band</span> touching of these topological metals by theWilson loop of the non-Abelian Berry gauge field. Furthermore, we develop a criterion for the proximity of these topological metals to 2D and 3D Z 2 topological insulatorsmore » when spinorbit coupling is included; our criterion is based on nonsymmorphic symmetry eigenvalues, and may be used to identify topological materials without inversion symmetry. An additional feature of the Dirac cone in monolayer MTe 2 is that it tilts over in a Lifshitz transition to produce electron and hole pockets—a type-II Dirac cone. These pockets, together with the pseudospin structure of the Dirac electrons, suggest a unified, topological explanation for the recently reported, nonsaturating magnetoresistance in WTe 2, as well as its circular dichroism in photoemission. We complement our analysis and first-principles <span class="hlt">band</span> structure calculations with an ab-initio-derived tight-binding model for the WTe 2 monolayer.« less</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015LatJP..52a..52A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015LatJP..52a..52A"><span>Frequency Arrangement For 700 MHz <span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ancans, G.; Bobrovs, V.; Ivanovs, G.</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>The 694-790 MHz (700 MHz) <span class="hlt">band</span> was allocated by the 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12) in ITU Region 1 (Europe included), to the mobile service on a co-primary basis with other services to which this <span class="hlt">band</span> was allocated on the primary basis and identified for the International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT). At the same time, the countries of Region 1 will be able also to continue using these frequencies for their broadcasting services if necessary. This allocation will be effective immediately after 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15). In order to make the best possible use of this frequency <span class="hlt">band</span> for mobile service, a worldwide harmonized frequency arrangement is to be prepared to allow for large economies of scale and international roaming as well as utilizing the available spectrum in the best possible way, minimizing possible interference between services, facilitating deployment and cross-border coordination. The authors analyze different possible frequency arrangements and conclude on the frequency arrangement most suitable for Europe.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017heut.book..199G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017heut.book..199G"><span>Modulare und durchgängige Produktmodelle als Erfolgsfaktor <span class="hlt">zur</span> Bedienung einer Omni-Channel-Architektur - PLM 4.0</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Golovatchev, Julius; Felsmann, Marcus</p> <p></p> <p>Mit der Transformation der Wertschöpfungsstrukturen von Utility 1.0 zu Utility 4.0 erfolgt offensichtlich auch eine Veränderung des Produkts. Vor dem Hintergrund disruptiver Technologien (IoT, Big Data, Cloud, Robotics etc.) und auch gesellschaftlicher Veränderungen entstehen ständig neue Geschäftsmodelle und Produkte, die über die reine Versorgungsdienstleistung (z. B. Strom) hinausgehen. Dabei muss der wertvolle Rohstoff Produktdaten für smarte Produkte durchgängiger und schneller nutzbar gemacht werden. Die modularen und durchgängigen Produktstrukturen leisten einen Beitrag <span class="hlt">zur</span> Beherrschung von Komplexität und stellen somit einen wesentlichen Hebel für erfolgreiche Produktentwicklung und -management dar. In diesem Beitrag werden Ansätze beschrieben, wie es den vor der Herausforderung Utility 4.0 stehenden Unternehmen gelingen kann, Smart-Energy-Produkte so zu modellieren, dass sie die Interoperabilität der einzelnen Produktionsmodule sicherstellt und ein Ende-zu-Ende-Management ermöglicht.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018ISPAr42.3.1085L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018ISPAr42.3.1085L"><span>Sharpending of the Vnir and SWIR <span class="hlt">Bands</span> of the Wide <span class="hlt">Band</span> Spectral Imager Onboard Tiangong-II Imagery Using the Selected <span class="hlt">Bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Q.; Li, X.; Liu, G.; Huang, C.; Li, H.; Guan, X.</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p>The Tiangong-II space lab was launched at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center of China on September 15, 2016. The Wide <span class="hlt">Band</span> Spectral Imager (WBSI) onboard the Tiangong-II has 14 visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral <span class="hlt">bands</span> covering the range from 403-990 nm and two shortwave infrared (SWIR) <span class="hlt">bands</span> covering the range from 1230-1250 nm and 1628-1652 nm respectively. In this paper the selected <span class="hlt">bands</span> are proposed which aims at considering the closest spectral similarities between the VNIR with 100 m spatial resolution and SWIR <span class="hlt">bands</span> with 200 m spatial resolution. The evaluation of Gram-Schmidt transform (GS) sharpening techniques embedded in ENVI software is presented based on four types of the different low resolution pan <span class="hlt">band</span>. The experimental results indicated that the VNIR <span class="hlt">band</span> with higher CC value with the raw SWIR <span class="hlt">Band</span> was selected, more texture information was injected the corresponding sharpened SWIR <span class="hlt">band</span> image, and at that time another sharpened SWIR <span class="hlt">band</span> image preserve the similar spectral and texture characteristics to the raw SWIR <span class="hlt">band</span> image.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27406699','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27406699"><span>Dual <span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric "molecules".</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen; Li, Bo; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji</p> <p>2016-07-13</p> <p>Dual <span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial perfect absorbers with two absorption <span class="hlt">bands</span> are highly desirable because of their potential application areas such as detectors, transceiver system, and spectroscopic imagers. However, most of these dual <span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial absorbers proposed were based on resonances of metal patterns. Here, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate a dual <span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial perfect absorber composed of artificial dielectric "molecules" with high symmetry. The artificial dielectric "molecule" consists of four "atoms" of two different sizes corresponding to two absorption <span class="hlt">bands</span> with near unity absorptivity. Numerical and experimental absorptivity verify that the dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial absorber is polarization insensitive and can operate in wide-angle incidence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900062032&hterms=organic+soil&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dorganic%2Bsoil','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900062032&hterms=organic+soil&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dorganic%2Bsoil"><span>Spectral <span class="hlt">band</span> selection for classification of soil organic matter content</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Henderson, Tracey L.; Szilagyi, Andrea; Baumgardner, Marion F.; Chen, Chih-Chien Thomas; Landgrebe, David A.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes the spectral-<span class="hlt">band</span>-selection (SBS) algorithm of Chen and Landgrebe (1987, 1988, and 1989) and uses the algorithm to classify the organic matter content in the earth's surface soil. The effectiveness of the algorithm was evaluated comparing the results of classification of the soil organic matter using SBS <span class="hlt">bands</span> with those obtained using Landsat MSS <span class="hlt">bands</span> and TM <span class="hlt">bands</span>, showing that the algorithm was successful in finding important spectral <span class="hlt">bands</span> for classification of organic matter content. Using the calculated <span class="hlt">bands</span>, the probabilities of correct classification for climate-stratified data were found to range from 0.910 to 0.980.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARB44008S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARB44008S"><span>Relating the defect <span class="hlt">band</span> gap and the density functional <span class="hlt">band</span> gap</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schultz, Peter; Edwards, Arthur</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Density functional theory (DFT) is an important tool to probe the physics of materials. The Kohn-Sham (KS) gap in DFT is typically (much) smaller than the observed <span class="hlt">band</span> gap for materials in nature, the infamous ``<span class="hlt">band</span> gap problem.'' Accurate prediction of defect energy levels is often claimed to be a casualty--the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap defines the energy scale for defect levels. By applying rigorous control of boundary conditions in size-converged supercell calculations, however, we compute defect levels in Si and GaAs with accuracies of ~0.1 eV, across the full gap, unhampered by a <span class="hlt">band</span> gap problem. Using GaAs as a theoretical laboratory, we show that the defect <span class="hlt">band</span> gap--the span of computed defect levels--is insensitive to variations in the KS gap (with functional and pseudopotential), these KS gaps ranging from 0.1 to 1.1 eV. The defect gap matches the experimental 1.52 eV gap. The computed defect gaps for several other III-V, II-VI, I-VII, and other compounds also agree with the experimental gap, and show no correlation with the KS gap. Where, then, is the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap problem? This talk presents these results, discusses why the defect gap and the KS gap are distinct, implying that current understanding of what the ``<span class="hlt">band</span> gap problem'' means--and how to ``fix'' it--need to be rethought. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28256467','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28256467"><span>Antibacterial nanosilver coated orthodontic <span class="hlt">bands</span> with potential implications in dentistry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Prabha, Rahul Damodaran; Kandasamy, Rajasigamani; Sivaraman, U Sajeev; Nandkumar, Maya A; Nair, Prabha D</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Fixed orthodontic treatment, an indispensable procedure in orthodontics, necessitates insertion of dental <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Insertion of <span class="hlt">band</span> material could also introduce a site of plaque retention. It was hypothesized that <span class="hlt">band</span> materials with slow-release antimicrobial properties could help in sustained infection control, prevention of dental plaque formation and further associated health risks. Considering the known antimicrobial proprieties of silver, a coating of silver nanoparticle (SNP) onto the stainless steel <span class="hlt">bands</span> was done and characterized for its beneficial properties in the prevention of plaque accumulation. Coatings of SNPs on conventional stainless steel dental <span class="hlt">bands</span> were prepared using thermal evaporation technology. The coated dental <span class="hlt">bands</span> were characterized for their physicochemical properties and evaluated for antimicrobial activity and biocompatibility. The physiochemical characterization of <span class="hlt">band</span> material both coated and uncoated was carried out using scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopyand contact angle test. Biocompatibility tests for coated <span class="hlt">band</span> material were carried using L929 mouse fibroblast cell culture and MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay. Antimicrobial activity of coated <span class="hlt">band</span> material against Gram-positive bacteria was tested. A stable and uniform coating of SNPs was obtained. The coated <span class="hlt">band</span> materials were biocompatible as well as possessed distinct antimicrobial activity. The SNP coated dental <span class="hlt">bands</span> could be potential antimicrobial dental <span class="hlt">bands</span> for future clinical use. Further studies need to be done to validate the efficiency of coated <span class="hlt">band</span> materials in oral environments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.jstor.org/stable/3808868','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://www.jstor.org/stable/3808868"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> reporting rates of mallards in the Mississippi alluvial valley</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Reinecke, K.J.; Shaiffer, C.W.; Delnicki, D.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>We captured 2,182 mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in eastcentral Arkansas and marked 730 with standard <span class="hlt">bands</span>, 728 with 10 reward <span class="hlt">bands</span>, and 724 with 'dummy' radio transmitters during November 1986-89 to estimate <span class="hlt">band</span> reporting rates in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV). Assuming all transmitters were reported, reporting rates were 0.16 (SE=0.049) for standard <span class="hlt">bands</span> and 0.34 (SE=0.081) for 10 reward <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Interviews with hunters indicated that flock size distributions differed (P=0.03) between mallards wearing transmitters and those wearing <span class="hlt">bands</span> (standard or reward). Mallards wearing transmitters were more likely to be alone and less likely to be in large flocks when recovered than were mallards wearing <span class="hlt">bands</span>. These results suggest that either <span class="hlt">band</span> reporting rates of mallards in the MAV are substantially less than those of midcontinent mallards (P=0.03), or marking mallards with external transmitters increases susceptibility to hunting mortality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/News/Pages/DNREC-Falcon-Cam-chicks-banded-for-future-flight.aspx','SCIGOVWS'); return false;" href="http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/News/Pages/DNREC-Falcon-Cam-chicks-banded-for-future-flight.aspx"><span>DNREC Falcon Cam chicks <span class="hlt">banded</span> for future flight</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.science.gov/aboutsearch.html">Science.gov Websites</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>own ornithological future this week. They were <span class="hlt">banded</span> <em>Tuesday</em> by the US Fish & Wildlife Service so into adulthood. USFWS raptor biologist Craig Koppie gave the chicks colorful leg-<span class="hlt">bands</span> <em>Tuesday</em> that</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/wv0151.photos.172120p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/wv0151.photos.172120p/"><span>3. Photocopied August 1975 from The Evolution of Modern <span class="hlt">Band</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>3. Photocopied August 1975 from The Evolution of Modern <span class="hlt">Band</span> Saw Mills for Sawing Logs, Dewitt Clinton Prescott, 1910. VIEW OF <span class="hlt">BAND</span> SAW. *NOTE* 4'x 5' NEGATIVE - Meadow River Lumber Company, Highway 60, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=torque&pg=6&id=EJ195075','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=torque&pg=6&id=EJ195075"><span>On Optimizing an Archibald Rubber-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Heat Engine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mullen, J. G.; And Others</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the criteria and procedure for optimizing the performance of Archibald rubber-<span class="hlt">band</span> heat engines by using the appropriate choice of dimensions, minimizing frictional torque, maximizing torque and balancing the rubber <span class="hlt">band</span> system. (GA)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1429661-efficient-band-trap-tunneling-model-including-heterojunction-band-offset','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1429661-efficient-band-trap-tunneling-model-including-heterojunction-band-offset"><span>Efficient <span class="hlt">Band</span>-to-Trap Tunneling Model Including Heterojunction <span class="hlt">Band</span> Offset</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gao, Xujiao; Huang, Andy; Kerr, Bert</p> <p></p> <p>In this paper, we present an efficient <span class="hlt">band</span>-to-trap tunneling model based on the Schenk approach, in which an analytic density-of-states (DOS) model is developed based on the open boundary scattering method. The new model explicitly includes the effect of heterojunction <span class="hlt">band</span> offset, in addition to the well-known field effect. Its analytic form enables straightforward implementation into TCAD device simulators. It is applicable to all one-dimensional potentials, which can be approximated to a good degree such that the approximated potentials lead to piecewise analytic wave functions with open boundary conditions. The model allows for simulating both the electric-field-enhanced and <span class="hlt">band</span>-offset-enhanced carriermore » recombination due to the <span class="hlt">band</span>-to-trap tunneling near the heterojunction in a heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). Simulation results of an InGaP/GaAs/GaAs NPN HBT show that the proposed model predicts significantly increased base currents, due to the hole-to-trap tunneling enhanced by the emitter-base junction <span class="hlt">band</span> offset. Finally, the results compare favorably with experimental observation.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1429661-efficient-band-trap-tunneling-model-including-heterojunction-band-offset','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1429661-efficient-band-trap-tunneling-model-including-heterojunction-band-offset"><span>Efficient <span class="hlt">Band</span>-to-Trap Tunneling Model Including Heterojunction <span class="hlt">Band</span> Offset</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Gao, Xujiao; Huang, Andy; Kerr, Bert</p> <p>2017-10-25</p> <p>In this paper, we present an efficient <span class="hlt">band</span>-to-trap tunneling model based on the Schenk approach, in which an analytic density-of-states (DOS) model is developed based on the open boundary scattering method. The new model explicitly includes the effect of heterojunction <span class="hlt">band</span> offset, in addition to the well-known field effect. Its analytic form enables straightforward implementation into TCAD device simulators. It is applicable to all one-dimensional potentials, which can be approximated to a good degree such that the approximated potentials lead to piecewise analytic wave functions with open boundary conditions. The model allows for simulating both the electric-field-enhanced and <span class="hlt">band</span>-offset-enhanced carriermore » recombination due to the <span class="hlt">band</span>-to-trap tunneling near the heterojunction in a heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). Simulation results of an InGaP/GaAs/GaAs NPN HBT show that the proposed model predicts significantly increased base currents, due to the hole-to-trap tunneling enhanced by the emitter-base junction <span class="hlt">band</span> offset. Finally, the results compare favorably with experimental observation.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAP...117w4501C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAP...117w4501C"><span>Modeling direct <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>A rigorous framework to study direct <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence <span class="hlt">bands</span> (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the "CVBs interaction" that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-<span class="hlt">band</span> envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-<span class="hlt">band</span>, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170002445','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20170002445"><span>Precipitation Estimation Using L-<span class="hlt">Band</span> and C-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Soil Moisture Retrievals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Koster, Randal D.; Brocca, Luca; Crow, Wade T.; Burgin, Mariko S.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>An established methodology for estimating precipitation amounts from satellite-based soil moisture retrievals is applied to L-<span class="hlt">band</span> products from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite missions and to a C-<span class="hlt">band</span> product from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) mission. The precipitation estimates so obtained are evaluated against in situ (gauge-based) precipitation observations from across the globe. The precipitation estimation skill achieved using the L-<span class="hlt">band</span> SMAP and SMOS data sets is higher than that obtained with the C-<span class="hlt">band</span> product, as might be expected given that L-<span class="hlt">band</span> is sensitive to a thicker layer of soil and thereby provides more information on the response of soil moisture to precipitation. The square of the correlation coefficient between the SMAP-based precipitation estimates and the observations (for aggregations to approximately100 km and 5 days) is on average about 0.6 in areas of high rain gauge density. Satellite missions specifically designed to monitor soil moisture thus do provide significant information on precipitation variability, information that could contribute to efforts in global precipitation estimation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018AIPC.1935f0001A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018AIPC.1935f0001A"><span>Design of a dual <span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial absorber for Wi-Fi <span class="hlt">bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alkurt, Fatih Özkan; Baǧmancı, Mehmet; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Bakır, Mehmet; Altıntaş, Olcay; Karadaǧ, Faruk; Akgöl, Oǧuzhan; Ünal, Emin</p> <p>2018-02-01</p> <p>The goal of this work is to design and fabrication of a dual <span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial based absorber for Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Wi-Fi has two different operating frequencies such as 2.45 GHz and 5 GHz. A dual <span class="hlt">band</span> absorber is proposed and the proposed structure consists of two layered unit cells, and different sized square split ring (SSR) resonators located on each layers. Copper is used for metal layer and resonator structure, FR-4 is used as substrate layer in the proposed structure. This designed dual <span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial absorber is used in the wireless frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span> which has two center frequencies such as 2.45 GHz and 5 GHz. Finite Integration Technique (FIT) based simulation software used and according to FIT based simulation results, the absorption peak in the 2.45 GHz is about 90% and the another frequency 5 GHz has absorption peak near 99%. In addition, this proposed structure has a potential for energy harvesting applications in future works.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JAP...115n3107D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JAP...115n3107D"><span>Inter-<span class="hlt">band</span> optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low <span class="hlt">band</span> gap III-V semiconductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda Sarkar, Debasree</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>A generalized theory is developed to study inter-<span class="hlt">band</span> optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k→) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The <span class="hlt">band</span> structures of these low <span class="hlt">band</span> gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance <span class="hlt">band</span> are frequently described by the three energy <span class="hlt">band</span> model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg1-xCdxTe, and In1-xGaxAsyP1-y lattice matched to InP, as example of III-V compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy <span class="hlt">band</span> compared to their bulk <span class="hlt">band</span> gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three <span class="hlt">band</span> model of Kane than those with parabolic energy <span class="hlt">band</span> approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy <span class="hlt">band</span> parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having <span class="hlt">band</span> nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic <span class="hlt">band</span> model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence <span class="hlt">band</span> split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70022708','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70022708"><span>Effects of neck <span class="hlt">bands</span> on survival of greater snow geese</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Menu, S.; Hestbeck, J.B.; Gauthier, G.; Reed, A.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Neck <span class="hlt">bands</span> are a widely used marker in goose research. However, few studies have investigated a possible negative effect of this marker on survival. We tested the effect of neck <span class="hlt">bands</span> on the survival of adult female greater snow geese (Chen caerulescens atlantica) by marking birds with either a neck <span class="hlt">band</span> and a metal leg <span class="hlt">band</span> or a leg <span class="hlt">band</span> only on Bylot Island (Nunavut, formerly included in the Northwest Territories, Canada) from 1990 to 1996. Annual survival was estimated using leg-<span class="hlt">band</span> recoveries in fall and winter and using neck-<span class="hlt">band</span> sightings in spring and fall. Recapture rates were estimated using summer recaptures. Using recovery data, the selected model yielded a survival similar for the neck-<span class="hlt">banded</span> and leg-<span class="hlt">banded</span> only birds (S = 0.845 ?? 0.070 vs. S = 0.811 ?? 0.107). The hypothesis of equality of survival between the 2 groups was easily accepted under most constraints imposed on survival or recovery rates. However, failure to account for a different direct recovery rate for neck-<span class="hlt">banded</span> birds would lead us to incorrectly conclude a possible negative effect of neck <span class="hlt">bands</span> on survival. Using sighting data, mean annual survival of neck-<span class="hlt">banded</span> birds was independently estimated at 0.833 ?? 0.057, a value very similar to that estimated with <span class="hlt">band</span>-recovery analysis. Raw recapture rates during summer were significantly lower for neck-<span class="hlt">banded</span> birds compared to those marked with leg <span class="hlt">bands</span> only (4.6% vs. 12.1%), but in this analysis, survival, site fidelity, reproductive status, and recapture rates were confounded. We conclude that neck <span class="hlt">bands</span> did not affect survival of greater snow geese, but could possibly affect other demographic traits such as breeding propensity and emigration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27225485','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27225485"><span>Interrupted commissural <span class="hlt">band</span> annuloplasty prevents mitral stenosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sawazaki, Masaru; Tomari, Shiro; Zaikokuji, Kenta; Imaeda, Yusuke</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Mitral annuloplasty is an important component of the treatment of degenerative mitral valve disease. However, postoperative echocardiography reveals elevated mitral gradients in some patients. We developed a technique that we termed interrupted commissural <span class="hlt">band</span> annuloplasty (iCBA), which does not shorten either the anterior or posterior annulus and is not associated with the development of a mitral gradient. We compared the echocardiographic characteristics of patients treated using this method versus Cosgrove ring (COS) placement, both at rest and during exercise. ICBA features placement of three sutures in the commissures using two <span class="hlt">bands</span> and shortens the commissural annular length by 60 %. We used this method to treat 63 patients and placed Cosgrove <span class="hlt">bands</span> in 58. Of all patients, 48 who underwent iCBA and 34 with COSs passed the exercise echocardiographic test. The maximal transmitral pressures at rest in the iCBA and Cosgrove groups were 8.04 ± 0.74 and 11.30 ± 0.88 mmHg (P = 0.0029), respectively, and the mean transmitral pressures at rest were 2.46 ± 0.74 and 3.61 ± 0.32 mmHg (P = 0.0037), respectively. The maximal transmitral pressures during exercise were 11.79 ± 0.97 and 18.37 ± 1.16 mmHg (P < 0.0001), and the mean transmitral pressures during exercise were 4.95 ± 0.45 and 7.76 ± 0.53 mmHg (P < 0.0001). ICBA prevents postoperative mitral stenosis both at rest and importantly during exercise.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15943298','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15943298"><span>Raman <span class="hlt">band</span> intensities of tellurite glasses.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Plotnichenko, V G; Sokolov, V O; Koltashev, V V; Dianov, E M; Grishin, I A; Churbanov, M F</p> <p>2005-05-15</p> <p>Raman spectra of TeO2-based glasses doped with WO3, ZnO, GeO2, TiO2, MoO3, and Sb2O3 are measured. The intensity of <span class="hlt">bands</span> in the Raman spectra of MoO3-TeO2 and MoO3-WO3-TeO2 glasses is shown to be 80-95 times higher than that for silica glass. It is shown that these glasses can be considered as one of the most promising materials for Raman fiber amplifiers.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JChPh.148r4701P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JChPh.148r4701P"><span>Peristalticity-driven <span class="hlt">banded</span> chemical garden</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pópity-Tóth, É.; Schuszter, G.; Horváth, D.; Tóth, Á.</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>Complex structures in nature are often formed by self-assembly. In order to mimic the formation, to enhance the production, or to modify the structures, easy-to-use methods are sought to couple engineering and self-assembly. Chemical-garden-like precipitation reactions are frequently used to study such couplings because of the intrinsic chemical and hydrodynamic interplays. In this work, we present a simple method of applying periodic pressure fluctuations given by a peristaltic pump which can be used to achieve regularly <span class="hlt">banded</span> precipitate membranes in the copper-phosphate system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28932288','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28932288"><span>Tension <span class="hlt">band</span> suture fixation for olecranon fractures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Phadnis, Joideep; Watts, Adam C</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>Olecranon fractures are common and often require surgical treatment when displaced. Traditional methods of stabilization using tension <span class="hlt">band</span> wire fixation and plate fixation achieve adequate union and function but are associated with a high rate of re-operation and wound problems because of prominent metalwork. The purpose of the present article is to describe an all suture technique for fixation of simple olecranon fractures that maintains inter-fragmentary compression, provides bony union and reduces the rate of re-operation caused by prominent metalwork.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900012005','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900012005"><span>Germanium Blocked Impurity <span class="hlt">Band</span> (BIB) detectors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Haller, E. E.; Baumann, H.; Beeman, J. W.; Hansen, W. L.; Luke, P. N.; Lutz, M.; Rossington, C. S.; Wu, I. C.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Information is given in viewgraph form. The advantages of the Si blocked impurity <span class="hlt">band</span> (BIB) detector invented by M. D. Petroff and M. G. Stabelbroek are noted: smaller detection volume leading to a reduction of cosmic ray interference, extended wavelength response because of dopant wavefunction overlap, and photoconductive gain of unity. It is argued that the stated advantages of Si BIB detectors should be realizable for Ge BIB detectors. Information is given on detector development, subtrate choice and preparation, wafer polising, epitaxy, characterization of epi layers, and preliminary Ge BIB detector test results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780019219','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780019219"><span>Shuttle Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> signal design study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lindsey, W. C.; Braun, W. R.; Mckenzie, T. M.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Carrier synchronization and data demodulation of Unbalanced Quadriphase Shift Keyed (UQPSK) Shuttle communications' signals by optimum and suboptimum methods are discussed. The problem of analyzing carrier reconstruction techniques for unbalanced QPSK signal formats is addressed. An evaluation of the demodulation approach of the Ku-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Shuttle return link for UQPSK when the I-Q channel power ratio is large is carried out. The effects that Shuttle rocket motor plumes have on the RF communications are determined also. The effect of data asymmetry on bit error probability is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24429766','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24429766"><span>Suicidal ligature strangulation using gymnastics <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tzimas, Iliana; Bajanowski, Thomas; Pollak, Stefan; Trübner, Kurt; Thierauf, Annette</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Suicidal ligature strangulation is a rare event. The most important issue to solve in the investigation is whether it is a case of homicide or suicide. The characteristics of suicidal ligature strangulation are summarized by Koops and Brinkmann with the emphasis on the nature of the ligature instrument(s). In this article, we present two cases of self-strangulation with an almost identical modus operandi using gymnastics <span class="hlt">bands</span>. The autopsy findings and the nature of the ligature in these cases are depicted and in good accordance with the described typical observations in suicidal cases. The importance of a broad medico-legal investigation is demonstrated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26633526','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26633526"><span>Pedunculopontine Gamma <span class="hlt">Band</span> Activity and Development.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; Mahaffey, Susan; MacNicol, Melanie; Hyde, James R; D'Onofrio, Stasia M; Phillips, Cristy</p> <p>2015-12-03</p> <p>This review highlights the most important discovery in the reticular activating system in the last 10 years, the manifestation of gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity in cells of the reticular activating system (RAS), especially in the pedunculopontine nucleus, which is in charge of waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The identification of different cell groups manifesting P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels that control waking vs. those that manifest N-type channels that control REM sleep provides novel avenues for the differential control of waking vs. REM sleep. Recent discoveries on the development of this system can help explain the developmental decrease in REM sleep and the basic rest-activity cycle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830015378','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830015378"><span>LANDSAT-4 <span class="hlt">band</span> 6 data evaluation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>The radiometric integrity of the LANDSAT-D thematic mapper (TM) thermal infrared channel (<span class="hlt">band</span> 6) data was evaluated to develop improved radiometric preprocessing calibration techniques for removal of atmospheric effects. Primary data analysis was spent in evaluating the line to line and detector to detector variation in the thermal infrared data. The data studied was in the core area of Lake Ontario where very stable temperatures were expected. The detectors and the scan direction were taken as separate parameters and an analysis of variance was conducted. The data indicate that significant variability exists both between detectors and between scan directions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA604196','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA604196"><span>Deep Impurity <span class="hlt">Band</span> Silicon for Subbandgap Photodetection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-05-02</p> <p>Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 W911NF-12-1-0196 617-495-9884 Final Report 62016- EL -II.1 a. REPORT 14. ABSTRACT 16...durations were then compared with simulated durations produced by a numerical solution of the 1- Fig. 1: Ab initio calculations of <span class="hlt">band</span> struc- ture of...using a 1-D finite el - ement model of solute diffusion during pulsed-laser melting to determine the diffusive velocity, vdiff, characterizing the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1174995','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1174995"><span>Universal EUV in-<span class="hlt">band</span> intensity detector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Berger, Kurt W.</p> <p>2004-08-24</p> <p>Extreme ultraviolet light is detected using a universal in-<span class="hlt">band</span> detector for detecting extreme ultraviolet radiation that includes: (a) an EUV sensitive photodiode having a diode active area that generates a current responsive to EUV radiation; (b) one or more mirrors that reflects EUV radiation having a defined wavelength(s) to the diode active area; and (c) a mask defining a pinhole that is positioned above the diode active area, wherein EUV radiation passing through the pinhole is restricted substantially to illuminating the diode active area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000457&hterms=Fire+alarm&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DFire%2Balarm','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000457&hterms=Fire+alarm&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DFire%2Balarm"><span>Two-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Pyrometers Detect Hydrogen Fires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Collins, J. David; Youngquist, Robert C.; Simmons, Stephen M.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Two-<span class="hlt">band</span> infrared pyrometers detect small hydrogen fires at greater distances in full daylight being developed. Detectors utilize part of infrared spectrum in which signals from hydrogen flames 10 to the 3rd power to 10 to the 4th power times as intense as ultraviolet region of current detectors. Utilize low-loss infrared lenses for focusing and for limiting fields of view to screen out spurious signals from nearby sources. Working distances of as much as 100 meters possible. Portable, battery-powered unit gives audible alarm, in form of increase in frequency of tone, when aimed at hydrogen fire.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840006506','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840006506"><span>LANDSAT 4 <span class="hlt">band</span> 6 data evaluation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Satellite data collected over Lake Ontario were processed to observed surface temperature values. This involved computing apparent radiance values for each point where surface temperatures were known from averaged digital count values. These radiance values were then converted by using the LOWTRAN 5A atmospheric propagation model. This model was modified by incorporating a spectral response function for the LANDSAT <span class="hlt">band</span> 6 sensors. A downwelled radiance term derived from LOWTRAN was included to account for reflected sky radiance. A blackbody equivalent source radiance was computed. Measured temperatures were plotted against the predicted temperature. The RMS error between the data sets is 0.51K.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018EPJWC.17605028G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018EPJWC.17605028G"><span>Clear-air lidar dark <span class="hlt">band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Girolamo, Paolo Di; Scoccione, Andrea; Cacciani, Marco; Summa, Donato; Schween, Jan H.</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p>This paper illustrates measurements carried out by the Raman lidar BASIL in the frame of HOPE, revealing the presence of a clear-air dark <span class="hlt">band</span> phenomenon (i.e. the appearance of a minimum in lidar backscatter echoes) in the upper portion of the convective boundary layer. The phenomenon is clearly distinguishable in the lidar backscatter echoes at 1064 nm. This phenomenon is attributed to the presence of lignite aerosol particles advected from the surrounding open pit mines in the vicinity of the measuring site.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006sf2a.conf..471H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006sf2a.conf..471H"><span>Interferometric study of Betelgeuse in H <span class="hlt">band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Haubois, X.; Perrin, G.; Lacour, S.; Schuller, P. A.; Monnier, J. D.; Berger, J.-P.; Ridgway, S. T.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Pedretti, E.; Traub, W. A.</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>We present 3 telescope interferometric observations of the super giant star Betelgeuse (Alpha Ori, M2Iab) using the IOTA/IONIC interferometer (Whipple Observatory, Arizona) in early October 2005. Since IOTA is a 3 telescope interferometer, we were able to make closure phase measurements which allow us to image the star with several pixels across the disk. We discuss the fondamental parameters of Betelgeuse such as diameter, limb darkening and effective temperature. For the first time at this spatial resolution in the H <span class="hlt">band</span>, closure phases provide interesting insights on the features of the object since we detect a spot corresponding to 0.5% of the total received flux.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1352892-topological-exciton-bands-moire-heterojunctions','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1352892-topological-exciton-bands-moire-heterojunctions"><span>Topological Exciton <span class="hlt">Bands</span> in Moire Heterojunctions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Wu, Fengcheng; Lovorn, Timothy; MacDonald, A. H.</p> <p>2017-04-05</p> <p>Moire patterns are common in Van der Waals heterostructures and can be used to apply periodic potentials to elementary excitations. Here, we show that the optical absorption spectrum of transition metal dichalcogenide bilayers is profoundly altered by long period moire patterns that introduce twist-angle dependent satellite excitonic peaks. Topological exciton <span class="hlt">bands</span> with non-zero Chern numbers that support chiral excitonic edge states can be engineered by combining three ingredients: i) the valley Berry phase induced by electron-hole exchange interactions, ii) the moire potential, and iii) the valley Zeeman field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.713 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... authorized services operating in the TV <span class="hlt">bands</span>. In addition, a TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database must also verify that the FCC identifier (FCC ID) of a device seeking access to its services is valid; under this requirement the TV <span class="hlt">bands</span>... information will come from the official Commission database. These services include: (i) Digital television...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title32-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title32-vol3-sec508-1.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title32-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title32-vol3-sec508-1.pdf"><span>32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN <span class="hlt">BANDS</span> § 508.1 Utilization of Army <span class="hlt">bands</span>. (a) General... Secretary of Defense. The authority to determine whether the use of an Army <span class="hlt">band</span> at a public gathering is... Forces, veterans, and patriotic organizations. (3) At public rallies and parades intended to stimulate...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-01/pdf/2012-18575.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-01/pdf/2012-18575.pdf"><span>77 FR 45503 - 4.9 GHz <span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>... Docket No. 06-150; FCC 12-61] 4.9 GHz <span class="hlt">Band</span> AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule... that exempted 4940-4990 MHz (4.9 GHz) <span class="hlt">band</span> applicants from certified frequency coordination. Next, the Commission corrects the bandwidth of Channel 14 in the 4.9 GHz <span class="hlt">band</span> plan from five megahertz to one megahertz...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.713 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. 15.713 Section 15.713... TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. (a) Purpose. The TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database serves the following functions: (1) To... channels are determined based on the interference protection requirements in § 15.712. A database must...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.713 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. 15.713 Section 15.713... TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. (a) Purpose. The TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database serves the following functions: (1) To... channels are determined based on the interference protection requirements in § 15.712. A database must...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol1-sec15-713.pdf"><span>47 CFR 15.713 - TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. 15.713 Section 15.713... TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 48536, August 15, 2014. (a) Purpose. The TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> database serves the following functions: (1) To determine and provide to a TVBD, upon...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/12474','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/12474"><span>Microbial control of Asian longhorned beetles - what are fungal <span class="hlt">bands</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>Ann E. Hajek; Thomas Dubois; Jennifer Lund; Ryan Shanley; Leah Bauer; Michael Smith; Peng Fan; Huang Bo; Hu Jiafu; Zengzhi Li</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>In Japan, the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria brongniartii is grown in nonwoven fiber <span class="hlt">bands</span> that are placed around trunks of orchard trees for control of numerous cerambycid pests, including Anoplophora chinensis (= A. malasiaca). The Japanese company producing <span class="hlt">bands</span>, Nitto Denko in Osaka, markets <span class="hlt">bands</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/34708','DOTNTL'); return false;" href="https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/34708"><span>L <span class="hlt">Band</span> Service Compatibility Part I: Optimum OOBE Compatibility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntlsearch.bts.gov/tris/index.do">DOT National Transportation Integrated Search</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-12-04</p> <p>Discussion: -- Two Parts - Today we focus on optimum L <span class="hlt">Band</span> ABC Out of <span class="hlt">Band</span> Emission into GPS L1, OOBE. - Next ABC meeting will examine GPS-side mitigation of Adjacent <span class="hlt">Band</span> Interference, ABI. -- Greater Compatibility: OOBE and ABI are distinct but pa...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=performance&id=EJ1069194','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=performance&id=EJ1069194"><span>A Theoretical Structure of High School Concert <span class="hlt">Band</span> Performance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bergee, Martin J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study used exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to verify a theoretical structure for high school concert <span class="hlt">band</span> performance and to test that structure for viability, generality, and invariance. A total of 101 university students enrolled in two different <span class="hlt">bands</span> rated two high school <span class="hlt">band</span> performances (a "first"…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1207241','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1207241"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.</p> <p>2015-08-04</p> <p>Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency <span class="hlt">band</span> based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency <span class="hlt">band</span> and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338057','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338057"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.</p> <p>2017-01-03</p> <p>Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency <span class="hlt">band</span> based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency <span class="hlt">band</span> and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28932668','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28932668"><span>Local Bonding Influence on the <span class="hlt">Band</span> Edge and <span class="hlt">Band</span> Gap Formation in Quaternary Chalcopyrites.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miglio, Anna; Heinrich, Christophe P; Tremel, Wolfgang; Hautier, Geoffroy; Zeier, Wolfgang G</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Quaternary chalcopyrites have shown to exhibit tunable <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps with changing anion composition. Inspired by these observations, the underlying structural and electronic considerations are investigated using a combination of experimentally obtained structural data, molecular orbital considerations, and density functional theory. Within the solid solution Cu 2 ZnGeS 4- x Se x , the anion bond alteration parameter changes, showing larger bond lengths for metal-selenium than for metal-sulfur bonds. The changing bonding interaction directly influences the valence and conduction <span class="hlt">band</span> edges, which result from antibonding Cu-anion and Ge-anion interactions, respectively. The knowledge of the underlying bonding interactions at the <span class="hlt">band</span> edges can help design properties of these quaternary chalcopyrites for photovoltaic and thermoelectric applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26538662','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26538662"><span>Hypothesis testing for <span class="hlt">band</span> size detection of high-dimensional <span class="hlt">banded</span> precision matrices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>An, Baiguo; Guo, Jianhua; Liu, Yufeng</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Many statistical analysis procedures require a good estimator for a high-dimensional covariance matrix or its inverse, the precision matrix. When the precision matrix is <span class="hlt">banded</span>, the Cholesky-based method often yields a good estimator of the precision matrix. One important aspect of this method is determination of the <span class="hlt">band</span> size of the precision matrix. In practice, crossvalidation is commonly used; however, we show that crossvalidation not only is computationally intensive but can be very unstable. In this paper, we propose a new hypothesis testing procedure to determine the <span class="hlt">band</span> size in high dimensions. Our proposed test statistic is shown to be asymptotically normal under the null hypothesis, and its theoretical power is studied. Numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of our testing procedure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018ChPhC..42e4104S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018ChPhC..42e4104S"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> head spin assignment of superdeformed <span class="hlt">bands</span> in Hg isotopes through power index formula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sharma, Honey; Mittal, H. M.</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>The power index formula has been used to obtain the <span class="hlt">band</span> head spin (I 0) of all the superdeformed (SD) <span class="hlt">bands</span> in Hg isotopes. A least squares fitting approach is used. The root mean square deviations between the determined and the observed transition energies are calculated by extracting the model parameters using the power index formula. Whenever definite spins are available, the determined and the observed transition energies are in accordance with each other. The computed values of dynamic moment of inertia J (2) obtained by using the power index formula and its deviation with the rotational frequency is also studied. Excellent agreement is shown between the calculated and the experimental results for J (2) versus the rotational frequency. Hence, the power index formula works very well for all the SD <span class="hlt">bands</span> in Hg isotopes expect for 195Hg(2, 3, 4).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS059%28S%29074&hterms=Hawaii+Kilauea+volcano&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DHawaii%2BKilauea%2Bvolcano','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS059%28S%29074&hterms=Hawaii+Kilauea+volcano&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DHawaii%2BKilauea%2Bvolcano"><span>Color composite C-<span class="hlt">band</span> and L-<span class="hlt">band</span> image of Kilauea volcanoe on Hawaii</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>This color composite C-<span class="hlt">band</span> and L-<span class="hlt">band</span> image of the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii was acuired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-<span class="hlt">band</span> Synthetic Aperature Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The city of Hilo can be seen at the top. The image shows the different types of lava flows around the crater Pu'u O'o. Ash deposits which erupted in 1790 from the summit of Kilauea volcano show up as dark in this image, and fine details associated with lava flows which erupted in 1919 and 1974 can be seen to the south of the summit in an area called the Ka'u Desert. Other historic lava flows can also be seen. Highway 11 is the linear feature running from Hilo to the Kilauea volcano. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43918.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1817906G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1817906G"><span>Simulation of radar backscattering from snowpack at X-<span class="hlt">band</span> and Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gay, Michel; Phan, Xuan-Vu; Ferro-Famil, Laurent</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>This paper presents a multilayer snowpack electromagnetic backscattering model, based on Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT). This model is capable of simulating the interaction of electromagnetic wave (EMW) at X-<span class="hlt">band</span> and Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> frequencies with multilayer snowpack. The air-snow interface and snow-ground backscattering components are calculated using the Integral Equation Model (IEM) by [1], whereas the volume backscattering component is calculated based on the solution of Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) equation at order 1. Case study has been carried out using measurement data from NoSREx project [2], which include SnowScat data in X-<span class="hlt">band</span> and Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span>, TerraSAR-X acquisitions and snowpack stratigraphic in-situ measurements. The results of model simulations show good agreement with the radar observations, and therefore allow the DMRT model to be used in various applications, such as data assimilation [3]. [1] A.K. Fung and K.S. Chen, "An update on the iem surface backscattering model," Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, IEEE, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 75 - 77, april 2004. [2] J. Lemmetyinen, A. Kontu, J. Pulliainen, A. Wiesmann, C. Werner, T. Nagler, H. Rott, and M. Heidinger, "Technical assistance for the deployment of an x- to ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> scatterometer during the nosrex ii experiment," Final Report, ESA ESTEC Contract No. 22671/09/NL/JA., 2011. [3] X. V. Phan, L. Ferro-Famil, M. Gay, Y. Durand, M. Dumont, S. Morin, S. Allain, G. D'Urso, and A. Girard, "3d-var multilayer assimilation of x-<span class="hlt">band</span> sar data into a detailed snowpack model," The Cryosphere Discussions, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 4881-4912, 2013.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999JMoSp.197..188W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999JMoSp.197..188W"><span>Identification of New Hot <span class="hlt">Bands</span> in the Blue and Green <span class="hlt">Band</span> Systems of FeH</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wilson, Catherine; Brown, John M.</p> <p>1999-10-01</p> <p>A particularly rich region of the electronic spectrum of FeH from 525 to 545 nm was investigated using the techniques of dispersed and undispersed laser-induced fluorescence. Analysis has led to the discovery that several different electronic transitions are embedded in this region; the (0, 0) and (1, 1) <span class="hlt">bands</span> of the e6Π-a6Δ (green) system, the (0, 2) <span class="hlt">band</span> of the g6Φ-X4Δ (intercombination) system, the (0, 1) <span class="hlt">band</span> of the g6Φ-a6Δ (blue) system, and the (0, 0) <span class="hlt">band</span> of the g6Φ-b6Π system. Seventy-five lines were assigned in the (0, 1) <span class="hlt">band</span> of the g6Φ-a6Δ transition. These, with the assignment of an additional 14 lines in the 583 nm region to the (0, 1) <span class="hlt">band</span> of the e6Π-a6Δ transition, led to the extension of the known term values to higher J values for the Ω = 9/2, 7/2, and 5/2 spin components of the v = 1 level of the a6Δ state and the novel characterization of the a6Δ3/2 (v = 1) and g6Φ5/2 (v = 0) components. A further 73 lines were assigned to the first four subbands of the (1, 1) <span class="hlt">band</span> of the e6Π-a6Δ transition and term values for the lowest four spin components of the v = 1 level of the e6Π state were determined. This provides the first experimental measurement of a vibrational interval in one of the higher lying electronic states of FeH. The interval does not appear to vary strongly between the spin components (ΔG1/2 = 1717, 1713, 1710 cm-1 for Ω = 7/2, 5/2, 3/2, respectively). Remarkably few of the hot-<span class="hlt">band</span> transitions assigned in this work could be identified in the complex, high-temperature spectrum of FeH recorded by P. McCormack and S. O'Connor [Astron. Astrophys. Suppl. 26, 373-380 (1976)].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1339166-rotational-band-structure-mg32','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1339166-rotational-band-structure-mg32"><span>Rotational <span class="hlt">band</span> structure in Mg 32</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Crawford, H. L.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>There is significant evidence supporting the existence of deformed ground states within the neutron-rich N ≈ 20 neon, sodium, and magnesium isotopes that make up what is commonly called the “island of inversion.” However, the rotational <span class="hlt">band</span> structures, which are a characteristic fingerprint of a rigid nonspherical shape, have yet to be observed. In this work, we report on a measurement and analysis of the yrast (lowest lying) rotational <span class="hlt">band</span> in 32 Mg up to spin I = 6 + produced in a two-step projectile fragmentation reaction and observed using the state-of-the-art γ -ray tracking detector array, GRETINA ( γmore » -ray energy tracking in-beam nuclear array). Large-scale shell-model calculations using the SDPF-U-MIX effective interaction show excellent agreement with the new data. Moreover, a theoretical analysis of the spectrum of rotational states as a function of the pairing gap, together with cranked-shell-model calculations, provides intriguing evidence for a reduction in pairing correlations with increased angular momentum, also in line with the shell-model results.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAP...121p4902R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAP...121p4902R"><span>V-<span class="hlt">band</span> electronically reconfigurable metamaterial</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Radisic, Vesna; Hester, Jimmy G.; Nguyen, Vinh N.; Caira, Nicholas W.; DiMarzio, Donald; Hilgeman, Theodore; Larouche, Stéphane; Kaneshiro, Eric; Gutierrez-Aitken, Augusto</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>In this work, we report on a reconfigurable V-<span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial fabricated using an InP heterojunction bipolar transistor production process. As designed and fabricated, the implementation uses complementary split ring resonators (cSRRs) and Schottky diodes in both single unit cell and three unit cell monolithic microwave integrated circuits. Each unit cell has two diodes embedded within the gaps of the cSRRs. Reconfigurability is achieved by applying an external bias that turns the diodes on and off, which effectively controls the resonant property of the structure. In order to measure the metamaterial properties, the unit cells are fed and followed by transmission lines. Measured data show good agreement with simulations and demonstrate that the metamaterial structure exhibits resonance at around 65 GHz that can be switched on and off. The three-unit cell transmission line metamaterial shows a deeper resonance and a larger phase change than a single cell, as expected. These are the first reported reconfigurable metamaterials operating at the V-<span class="hlt">band</span> using the InP high speed device fabrication process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SSCom.222...32L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SSCom.222...32L"><span>Tunable metamaterial dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> terahertz absorber</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Luo, C. Y.; Li, Z. Z.; Guo, Z. H.; Yue, J.; Luo, Q.; Yao, G.; Ji, J.; Rao, Y. K.; Li, R. K.; Li, D.; Wang, H. X.; Yao, J. Q.; Ling, F. R.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>We report a design of a temperature controlled tunable dual <span class="hlt">band</span> terahertz absorber. The compact single unit cell consists of two nested closed square ring resonators and a layer metallic separated by a substrate strontium titanate (STO) dielectric layer. It is found that the absorber has two distinctive absorption peaks at frequencies 0.096 THz and 0.137 THz, whose peaks are attained 97% and 75%. Cooling the absorber from 400 K to 250 K causes about 25% and 27% shift compared to the resonance frequency of room temperature, when we cooling the temperature to 150 K, we could attained both the two tunabilities exceeding 53%. The frequency tunability is owing to the variation of the dielectric constant of the low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate. The mechanism of the dual <span class="hlt">band</span> absorber is attributed to the overlapping of dual resonance frequencies, and could be demonstrated by the distributions of the electric field. The method opens up avenues for designing tunable terahertz devices in detection, imaging, and stealth technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1043838','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1043838"><span>X-<span class="hlt">Band</span> RF Gun Development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami</p> <p></p> <p>In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-<span class="hlt">band</span> multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-<span class="hlt">band</span> high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into themore » structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA10006&hterms=duck+hazard&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dduck%2Bhazard','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA10006&hterms=duck+hazard&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dduck%2Bhazard"><span>At Bright <span class="hlt">Band</span> Inside Victoria Crater</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p><p/> A layer of light-toned rock exposed inside Victoria Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars appears to mark where the surface was at the time, many millions of years ago, when an impact excavated the crater. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove to this bright <span class="hlt">band</span> as the science team's first destination for the rover during investigations inside the crater. <p/> Opportunity's left front hazard-identification camera took this image just after the rover finished a drive of 2.25 meters (7 feet, 5 inches) during the rover's 1,305th Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 25, 2007). The rocks beneath the rover and its extended robotic arm are part of the bright <span class="hlt">band</span>. <p/> Victoria Crater has a scalloped shape of alternating alcoves and promontories around the crater's circumference. Opportunity descended into the crater two weeks earlier, within an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' Counterclockwise around the rim, just to the right of the arm in this image, is a promontory called 'Cabo Frio.'</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810006665','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810006665"><span>Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> multiple beam antenna</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chen, C. C.; Franklin, C. F.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The frequency reuse capability is demonstrated for a Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> multiple beam antenna which provides contiguous low sidelobe spot beams for point-to-point communications between any two points within the continental United States (CONUS), or regional coverage beams for direct broadcast systems. A spot beam antenna in the 14/21 GHz <span class="hlt">band</span> which provides contiguous overlapping beams covering CONUS and two discrete beams covering Hawaii and Alaska were designed, developed, and tested. Two reflector antennas are required for providing contiguous coverage of CONUS. Each is comprised of one offset parabolic reflector, one flat polarization diplexer, and two separate planar array feeds. This antenna system provides contiguous spot beam coverage of CONUS, utilizing 15 beams. Also designed, developed and demonstrated was a shaped contoured beam antenna system which provides contiguous four time zone coverage of CONUS from a single offset parabolic reflector incorporating one flat polarization diplexer and two separate planar array feeds. The beams which illuminate the eastern time zone and the mountain time zone are horizontally polarized, while the beams which illuminate the central time zone and the pacific time zone are vertically polarized. Frequency reuse is achieved by amplitude and polarization isolation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvC..97b4308H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvC..97b4308H"><span>Multiple <span class="hlt">band</span> structures in 70Ge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Morrow, S. I.; Döring, J.; Tabor, S. L.; Le, K. Q.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Bender, P. C.; Elder, R. M.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Tripathi, Vandana</p> <p>2018-02-01</p> <p>High-spin states in 70Ge were studied using the 55Mn(18O,p 2 n ) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. Prompt γ -γ coincidences were measured using the Florida State University Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. An investigation of these coincidences resulted in the addition of 31 new transitions and the rearrangement of four others in the 70Ge level scheme, providing a more complete picture of the high-spin decay pattern involving both positive- and negative-parity states with multiple <span class="hlt">band</span> structures. Spins were assigned based on directional correlation of oriented nuclei ratios, which many times also led to unambiguous parity determinations based on the firm assignments for low-lying states made in previous work. Total Routhian surface calculations, along with the observed trends in the experimental kinematic moment of inertia with rotational frequency, support the multiquasiparticle configurations of the various crossing <span class="hlt">bands</span> proposed in recent studies. The high-spin excitation spectra predicted by previous shell-model calculations compare favorably with the experimental one determined from this study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptMa..58...51C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptMa..58...51C"><span>Optical <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps of organic semiconductor materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Costa, José C. S.; Taveira, Ricardo J. S.; Lima, Carlos F. R. A. C.; Mendes, Adélio; Santos, Luís M. N. B. F.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>UV-Vis can be used as an easy and forthright technique to accurately estimate the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap energy of organic π-conjugated materials, widely used as thin films/composites in organic and hybrid electronic devices such as OLEDs, OPVs and OFETs. The electronic and optical properties, including HOMO-LUMO energy gaps of π-conjugated systems were evaluated by UV-Vis spectroscopy in CHCl3 solution for a large number of relevant π-conjugated systems: tris-8-hydroxyquinolinatos (Alq3, Gaq3, Inq3, Al(qNO2)3, Al(qCl)3, Al(qBr)3, In(qNO2)3, In(qCl)3 and In(qBr)3); triphenylamine derivatives (DDP, p-TTP, TPB, TPD, TDAB, m-MTDAB, NPB, α-NPD); oligoacenes (naphthalene, anthracene, tetracene and rubrene); oligothiophenes (α-2T, β-2T, α-3T, β-3T, α-4T and α-5T). Additionally, some electronic properties were also explored by quantum chemical calculations. The experimental UV-Vis data are in accordance with the DFT predictions and indicate that the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap energies of the OSCs dissolved in CHCl3 solution are consistent with the values presented for thin films.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NJPh...19k5002A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NJPh...19k5002A"><span>Changing optical <span class="hlt">band</span> structure with single photons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Albrecht, Andreas; Caneva, Tommaso; Chang, Darrick E.</p> <p>2017-11-01</p> <p>Achieving strong interactions between individual photons enables a wide variety of exciting possibilities in quantum information science and many-body physics. Cold atoms interfaced with nanophotonic structures have emerged as a platform to realize novel forms of nonlinear interactions. In particular, when atoms are coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide, long-range atomic interactions can arise that are mediated by localized atom-photon bound states. We theoretically show that in such a system, the absorption of a single photon can change the <span class="hlt">band</span> structure for a subsequent photon. This occurs because the first photon affects the atoms in the chain in an alternating fashion, thus leading to an effective period doubling of the system and a new optical <span class="hlt">band</span> structure for the composite atom-nanophotonic system. We demonstrate how this mechanism can be engineered to realize a single-photon switch, where the first incoming photon switches the system from being highly transmissive to highly reflective, and analyze how signatures can be observed via non-classical correlations of the outgoing photon field.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994dsrc.reptS....D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994dsrc.reptS....D"><span>Multi-<span class="hlt">band</span> infrared camera systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Davis, Tim; Lang, Frank; Sinneger, Joe; Stabile, Paul; Tower, John</p> <p>1994-12-01</p> <p>The program resulted in an IR camera system that utilizes a unique MOS addressable focal plane array (FPA) with full TV resolution, electronic control capability, and windowing capability. Two systems were delivered, each with two different camera heads: a Stirling-cooled 3-5 micron <span class="hlt">band</span> head and a liquid nitrogen-cooled, filter-wheel-based, 1.5-5 micron <span class="hlt">band</span> head. Signal processing features include averaging up to 16 frames, flexible compensation modes, gain and offset control, and real-time dither. The primary digital interface is a Hewlett-Packard standard GPID (IEEE-488) port that is used to upload and download data. The FPA employs an X-Y addressed PtSi photodiode array, CMOS horizontal and vertical scan registers, horizontal signal line (HSL) buffers followed by a high-gain preamplifier and a depletion NMOS output amplifier. The 640 x 480 MOS X-Y addressed FPA has a high degree of flexibility in operational modes. By changing the digital data pattern applied to the vertical scan register, the FPA can be operated in either an interlaced or noninterlaced format. The thermal sensitivity performance of the second system's Stirling-cooled head was the best of the systems produced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..MARF33005Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..MARF33005Z"><span>Symmetries and <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps in nanoribbons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Zhiwei; Tian, Yiteng; Fernando, Gayanath; Kocharian, Armen</p> <p></p> <p>In ideal graphene-like systems, time reversal and sublattice symmetries preserve the degeneracies at the Dirac point(s). We have examined such degeneracies in the <span class="hlt">band</span> structure as well as the transport properties in various arm-twisted (graphene-related) nanoribbons. A twist angle is defined such that at 0 degrees the ribbon is a rectangular ribbon and at 60 degrees the ribbon is cut from a honeycomb lattice. Using model Hamiltonians and first principles calculations in these nanoribbons with Z2 topology, we have monitored the <span class="hlt">band</span> structure as a function of the twist angle θ. In twisted ribbons, it turns out that the introduction of an extra hopping term leads to a gap opening. We have also calculated the size and temperature broadening effects in similar ribbons in addition to Rashba-induced transport properties. The authors acknowledge the computing facilities provided by the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No.DE-AC02- 98CH10886.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29308925','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29308925"><span>Treatment of Patellar Lower Pole Fracture with Modified Titanium Cable Tension <span class="hlt">Band</span> Plus Patellar Tibial Tunnel Steel "8" Reduction <span class="hlt">Band</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Jiaming; Wang, Decheng; He, Zhiliang; Shi, Hao</p> <p>2018-01-08</p> <p>To determine the efficacy of modified titanium tension <span class="hlt">band</span> plus patellar tendon tunnel steel 8 "reduction <span class="hlt">band</span>" versus titanium cable tension <span class="hlt">band</span> fixation for the treatment of patellar lower pole fracture. 58 patients with lower patella fracture were enrolled in this study, including 30 patients treated with modified titanium cable tension <span class="hlt">band</span> plus patellar tibial tunnel wire "8" tension <span class="hlt">band</span> internal fixation (modified group), and 28 patients with titanium cable tension <span class="hlt">band</span> fixation. All patients were followed up for 9∼15 months with an average of 11.6 months. Knee flexion was significantly improved in the modified group than in the titanium cable tension <span class="hlt">band</span> group (111.33 ± 13 degrees versus 98.21 ± 21.70 degrees, P = 0.004). The fracture healing time showed no significant difference. At the end of the follow-up, the improvement excellent rate was 93.33% in the modified group, and 82.14% in the titanium cable tension <span class="hlt">band</span> group. Titanium cable tension <span class="hlt">band</span> internal fixation loosening was found in 2 cases, including 1 case of treatment by two surgeries without loose internal fixation. The modified titanium cable tension <span class="hlt">band</span> with "8" tension <span class="hlt">band</span> fixation showed better efficacy for lower patella fractures than titanium cable tension <span class="hlt">band</span> fixation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=festival&pg=7&id=EJ1087349','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=festival&pg=7&id=EJ1087349"><span>Warm-Up Activities of Middle and High School <span class="hlt">Band</span> Directors Participating in State-Level Concert <span class="hlt">Band</span> Assessments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ward, Justin P.; Hancock, Carl B.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to examine the warm-ups chosen by concert <span class="hlt">band</span> directors participating in state-level performance assessments. We observed 29 middle and high school <span class="hlt">bands</span> and coded the frequency and duration of warm-up activities and behaviors. Results indicated that most <span class="hlt">bands</span> rehearsed music and played scales, long tones, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-01/pdf/2012-18566.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-01/pdf/2012-18566.pdf"><span>77 FR 45558 - 4.9 GHz <span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>...The Commission allocated the 4940-4990 MHz (4.9 GHz) <span class="hlt">band</span> in 2002 for fixed and mobile use and dedicated the <span class="hlt">band</span> for public safety broadband communications. In the ten years since, the <span class="hlt">band</span> has gone underutilized. The purpose of these proposed rules is to invigorate and maximize use of the 4.9 GHz <span class="hlt">band</span> and attract more users while improving spectrum efficiency. The Commission seeks comment on formal coordination requirements, expanded eligibility, how the <span class="hlt">band</span> can complement the 700 MHz public safety broadband network, technical rule changes, aeronautical mobile operations, interoperability standards, and deployment reporting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPCS..116..367W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPCS..116..367W"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> structures in fractal grading porous phononic crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying; Liang, Tianshu; Wang, Bin</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>In this paper, a new grading porous structure is introduced based on a Sierpinski triangle routine, and wave propagation in this fractal grading porous phononic crystal is investigated. The influences of fractal hierarchy and porosity on the <span class="hlt">band</span> structures in fractal graidng porous phononic crystals are clarified. Vibration modes of unit cell at absolute <span class="hlt">band</span> gap edges are given to manifest formation mechanism of absolute <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps. The results show that absolute <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps are easy to form in fractal structures comparatively to the normal ones with the same porosity. Structures with higher fractal hierarchies benefit multiple wider absolute <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps. This work provides useful guidance in design of fractal porous phononic crystals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22566421','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22566421"><span>Reduction in pediatric identification <span class="hlt">band</span> errors: a quality collaborative.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Phillips, Shannon Connor; Saysana, Michele; Worley, Sarah; Hain, Paul D</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>Accurate and consistent placement of a patient identification (ID) <span class="hlt">band</span> is used in health care to reduce errors associated with patient misidentification. Multiple safety organizations have devoted time and energy to improving patient ID, but no multicenter improvement collaboratives have shown scalability of previously successful interventions. We hoped to reduce by half the pediatric patient ID <span class="hlt">band</span> error rate, defined as absent, illegible, or inaccurate ID <span class="hlt">band</span>, across a quality improvement learning collaborative of hospitals in 1 year. On the basis of a previously successful single-site intervention, we conducted a self-selected 6-site collaborative to reduce ID <span class="hlt">band</span> errors in heterogeneous pediatric hospital settings. The collaborative had 3 phases: preparatory work and employee survey of current practice and barriers, data collection (ID <span class="hlt">band</span> failure rate), and intervention driven by data and collaborative learning to accelerate change. The collaborative audited 11377 patients for ID <span class="hlt">band</span> errors between September 2009 and September 2010. The ID <span class="hlt">band</span> failure rate decreased from 17% to 4.1% (77% relative reduction). Interventions including education of frontline staff regarding correct ID <span class="hlt">bands</span> as a safety strategy; a change to softer ID <span class="hlt">bands</span>, including "luggage tag" type ID <span class="hlt">bands</span> for some patients; and partnering with families and patients through education were applied at all institutions. Over 13 months, a collaborative of pediatric institutions significantly reduced the ID <span class="hlt">band</span> failure rate. This quality improvement learning collaborative demonstrates that safety improvements tested in a single institution can be disseminated to improve quality of care across large populations of children.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24992898','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24992898"><span>Neurofeedback training of gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> oscillations improves perceptual processing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Salari, Neda; Büchel, Christian; Rose, Michael</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>In this study, a noninvasive electroencephalography-based neurofeedback method is applied to train volunteers to deliberately increase gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> oscillations (40 Hz) in the visual cortex. Gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> oscillations in the visual cortex play a functional role in perceptual processing. In a previous study, we were able to demonstrate that gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> oscillations prior to stimulus presentation have a significant influence on perceptual processing of visual stimuli. In the present study, we aimed to investigate longer lasting effects of gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> neurofeedback training on perceptual processing. For this purpose, a feedback group was trained to modulate oscillations in the gamma <span class="hlt">band</span>, while a control group participated in a task with an identical design setting but without gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> feedback. Before and after training, both groups participated in a perceptual object detection task and a spatial attention task. Our results clearly revealed that only the feedback group but not the control group exhibited a visual processing advantage and an increase in oscillatory gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity in the pre-stimulus period of the processing of the visual object stimuli after the neurofeedback training. Results of the spatial attention task showed no difference between the groups, which underlines the specific role of gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> oscillations for perceptual processing. In summary, our results show that modulation of gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity selectively affects perceptual processing and therefore supports the relevant role of gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity for this specific process. Furthermore, our results demonstrate the eligibility of gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> oscillations as a valuable tool for neurofeedback applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5448966','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5448966"><span>Formation of Degenerate <span class="hlt">Band</span> Gaps in Layered Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ignatov, Anton I.; Merzlikin, Alexander M.; Levy, Miguel; Vinogradov, Alexey P.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In the review, peculiarities of spectra of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of anisotropic and/or magnetooptic materials are considered. The attention is focused on <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps of a special type—the so called degenerate <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps which are degenerate with respect to polarization. Mechanisms of formation and properties of these <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps are analyzed. Peculiarities of spectra of photonic crystals that arise due to the linkage between <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps are discussed. Particularly, it is shown that formation of a frozen mode is caused by linkage between Brillouin and degenerate <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps. Also, existence of the optical Borrmann effect at the boundaries of degenerate <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps and optical Tamm states at the frequencies of degenerate <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps are analyzed. PMID:28817024</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAP...122q5102W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAP...122q5102W"><span>Thermoelectric <span class="hlt">band</span> engineering: The role of carrier scattering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Witkoske, Evan; Wang, Xufeng; Lundstrom, Mark; Askarpour, Vahid; Maassen, Jesse</p> <p>2017-11-01</p> <p>Complex electronic <span class="hlt">band</span> structures, with multiple valleys or <span class="hlt">bands</span> at the same or similar energies, can be beneficial for thermoelectric performance, but the advantages can be offset by inter-valley and inter-<span class="hlt">band</span> scattering. In this paper, we demonstrate how first-principles <span class="hlt">band</span> structures coupled with recently developed techniques for rigorous simulation of electron-phonon scattering provide the capabilities to realistically assess the benefits and trade-offs associated with these materials. We illustrate the approach using n-type silicon as a model material and show that intervalley scattering is strong. This example shows that the convergence of valleys and <span class="hlt">bands</span> can improve thermoelectric performance, but the magnitude of the improvement depends sensitively on the relative strengths of intra- and inter-valley electron scattering. Because anisotropy of the <span class="hlt">band</span> structure also plays an important role, a measure of the benefit of <span class="hlt">band</span> anisotropy in the presence of strong intervalley scattering is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://elibrary.unm.edu/sora/JFO/v066n04/p0582-p0589.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://elibrary.unm.edu/sora/JFO/v066n04/p0582-p0589.pdf"><span>A colored leg <span class="hlt">banding</span> technique for Amazona parrots</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Meyers, J.M.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>A technique for individual identification of Amazona was developed using plastic leg <span class="hlt">bands</span>. <span class="hlt">Bands</span> were made from 5- and 7-mm-wide strips of laminated PVC coiled 2.5 times with an inside diameter 4-5 mm gt the maximum diameter of the parrot's leg. Seventeen parrots were captured in Puerto Rico, marked with individual plastic leg <span class="hlt">bands</span>, and observed for 204-658 d with only one lost or damaged plastic <span class="hlt">band</span>. Plastic leg <span class="hlt">bands</span> did not cause injury to or calluses on parrots' legs. The plastic material used for making leg <span class="hlt">bands</span> was available in 18 colors in 1994, which would allow unique marking of 306 individuals using one plastic leg <span class="hlt">band</span> on each leg.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22570199-bi-directional-evolutionary-optimization-photonic-band-gap-structures','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22570199-bi-directional-evolutionary-optimization-photonic-band-gap-structures"><span>Bi-directional evolutionary optimization for photonic <span class="hlt">band</span> gap structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Meng, Fei; School of Civil Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410075; Huang, Xiaodong, E-mail: huang.xiaodong@rmit.edu.au</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Toward an efficient and easy-implement optimization for photonic <span class="hlt">band</span> gap structures, this paper extends the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) method for maximizing photonic <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps. Photonic crystals are assumed to be periodically composed of two dielectric materials with the different permittivity. Based on the finite element analysis and sensitivity analysis, BESO starts from a simple initial design without any <span class="hlt">band</span> gap and gradually re-distributes dielectric materials within the unit cell so that the resulting photonic crystal possesses a maximum <span class="hlt">band</span> gap between two specified adjacent <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Numerical examples demonstrated the proposed optimization algorithm can successfully obtain the <span class="hlt">band</span> gapsmore » from the first to the tenth <span class="hlt">band</span> for both transverse magnetic and electric polarizations. Some optimized photonic crystals exhibit novel patterns markedly different from traditional designs of photonic crystals.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPhD...51u5102B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPhD...51u5102B"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span>-edges and <span class="hlt">band</span>-gap in few-layered transition metal dichalcogenides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bhunia, Hrishikesh; Pal, Amlan J.</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>We have considered liquid-exfoliated transition metal dichalcogenides (WS2, WSe2, MoS2, and MoSe2) and studied their <span class="hlt">band</span>-edges and <span class="hlt">band</span>-gap through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and density of states. A monolayer, bilayer (2L), and trilayer (3L) of each of the layered materials were characterized to derive the energies. Upon an increase in the number of layers, both the <span class="hlt">band</span>-edges were found to shift towards the Fermi energy. The results from the exfoliated nanosheets have been compared with reported STS studies of MoS2 and WSe2 formed through chemical vapor deposition or molecular beam epitaxy methods; an uncontrolled lattice strain existed in such 2L and 3L nanoflakes due to mismatch in stacking-patterns between the monolayers affecting their energies. In the present work, the layers formed through the liquid-exfoliation process retained their interlayer coupling or stacking-sequence prevalent to the bulk and hence allowed determination of <span class="hlt">band</span>-energies in these strain-free two-dimensional materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17308532','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17308532"><span>An investigation of the decontamination of Siqveland matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Whitworth, C L; Davies, K; Palmer, N O A; Martin, M V</p> <p>2007-02-24</p> <p>This study investigated blood contamination of artificially and clinically contaminated Siqveland matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> and retainers. A modified version of the recognised Kastle-Meyer test for blood was used to compare the efficacy of enzymatic agents, a washer-disinfector and an instrument washer for pre-sterilisation cleaning of Siqveland matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> and retainers. Assembled Siqveland matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> were contaminated either artificially with horse blood or clinically during dental treatment. Contaminated assembled matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> and retainers were subjected to immersion in an enzymatic agent, automated processing in a washer-disinfector or instrument washer, or a combination of pre-soaking and automatic cleaning. Residual blood contamination from each <span class="hlt">band</span> and retainer was measured and compared to the volume of blood recovered from an unprocessed control group of contaminated assembled matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> or retainers. Residual blood was recovered from every clinically contaminated assembled Siqveland matrix <span class="hlt">band</span> and retainer. The volume of blood recovered from assembled Siqveland matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> ranged from 0.13-7.1 microl and from retainers, following removal of the matrix <span class="hlt">band</span>, from 0.001-1.523 microl. The most effective method of pre-sterilisation cleaning for artificially contaminated assembled matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> was processing in the washer-disinfector. Conversely, the most effective method for cleaning clinically contaminated assembled matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> and retainers was pre-soaking in an enzymatic agent followed by a heavy-duty cycle in an instrument washer. It is not possible to clean assembled Siqveland matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> using any method currently available to dental practitioners. Matrix <span class="hlt">bands</span> should be discarded after use on one patient. Once the <span class="hlt">band</span> is removed, all detectable blood can be removed from the retainer by pre-soaking in an enzymatic detergent followed by processing in an instrument washer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19800011044','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19800011044"><span>Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> radar threshold analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Weber, C. L.; Polydoros, A.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>The statistics of the CFAR threshold for the Ku-<span class="hlt">band</span> radar was determined. Exact analytical results were developed for both the mean and standard deviations in the designated search mode. The mean value is compared to the results of a previously reported simulation. The analytical results are more optimistic than the simulation results, for which no explanation is offered. The normalized standard deviation is shown to be very sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio and very insensitive to the noise correlation present in the range gates of the designated search mode. The substantial variation in the CFAR threshold is dominant at large values of SNR where the normalized standard deviation is greater than 0.3. Whether or not this significantly affects the resulting probability of detection is a matter which deserves additional attention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014dlr..book...36J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014dlr..book...36J"><span>Satellitenbewegung, <span class="hlt">band</span> III: Natiirliche und gesteuerte bewegung.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jochim, E. F.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Im dritten <span class="hlt">Band</span> der Satellitenbewegung werden in fortlaufender Nummerierung einige für Untersuchungen der Bewegung der künstlichen Satelliten wichtige Grundlagen der Astrodynamik mit ausführlichen mathematischen Formelsystemen behandelt. Dazu zählen die unterschiedlichen Aspekte der Bewegung der natürlichen Himmelskörper, die Steuerung und Kontrolle von künstlichen Objekten, und insbesondere die für eine Satellitenbahnanalyse wichtigen physikalischen Beeinflussungen einer Satellitenbewegung. Mathematisch entscheidend ist die Wahl geeigneter Bahnparameter, die ein bestimmtes Bewegungsproblem widerspruchsfrei und singularitätenfrei zu behandeln gestatten. Für die Behandlung routinemäßiger Aufgabenstellungen der Satellitenbewegung, in erster Linie einer präzisen Bahnbestimmung und Bahnverbesserung, kann auf eine Fülle von lehrbuchartigen Monographien verwiesen werden, so dass diese Problematik in der vorliegenden Arbeit nur angedeutet werden soll.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-SSC-20170608-Journey+Band+Member+Tours+Stennis.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-SSC-20170608-Journey+Band+Member+Tours+Stennis.html"><span>SSC-20170608-Journey <span class="hlt">Band</span> Member Tours Stennis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2017-06-08</p> <p>Ross Valory, bass guitar player with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame <span class="hlt">band</span> Journey, visited NASA’s Stennis Space Center on June 8. Valory, along with several members of their crew, toured various facilities at Stennis including the B-2 Test Stand which will be used to test the core stage for NASA’s Space Launch System or SLS. The SLS is a powerful, advanced launch vehicle for a new era of human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit. With its unprecedented power and capabilities, SLS will launch crews of up to four astronauts in the agency’s Orion spacecraft on missions to explore multiple, deep-space destinations eventually including Mars. During the tour, Valory made this short video about America’s journey to Mars.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ChPhC..40l4103J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ChPhC..40l4103J"><span>Electromagnetic transitions in multiple chiral doublet <span class="hlt">bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jia, Hui; Qi, Bin; Wang, Shou-Yu; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Chen</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Multiple chiral doublet <span class="hlt">bands</span> (MχD) in the 80, 130 and 190 mass regions are studied by the model of γ = 90° triaxial rotor coupled with identical symmetric proton-neutron configurations. By selecting a suitable basis, the calculated wave functions are explicitly exhibited to be symmetric under the operator Â, which is defined as rotation by 90° about the 3-axis with the exchange of valance proton and neutron. We found that both M1 and E2 transitions are allowed between levels with different values of A, while they are forbidden between levels with same values of A. Such a selection rule holds true for MχD in different mass regions. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11675094, 11622540, 11545011, 11405096, 11461141001, U1432119), Shandong Natural Science Foundation (ZR2014AQ012), and Young Scholars Program of Shandong University, Weihai (2015WHWLJH01)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3514197','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3514197"><span>Segmental structure in <span class="hlt">banded</span> mongoose calls</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In complex animal vocalizations, such as bird or whale song, a great variety of songs can be produced via rearrangements of a smaller set of 'syllables', known as 'phonological syntax' or 'phonocoding' However, food or alarm calls, which function as referential signals, were previously thought to lack such combinatorial structure. A new study of calls in the <span class="hlt">banded</span> mongoose Mungos mungo provides the first evidence of phonocoding at the level of single calls. The first portion of the call provides cues to the identity of the caller, and the second part encodes its current activity. This provides the first example known in animals of something akin to the consonants and vowels of human speech. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/97 PMID:23206277</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23206277','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23206277"><span>Segmental structure in <span class="hlt">banded</span> mongoose calls.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fitch, W Tecumseh</p> <p>2012-12-03</p> <p>In complex animal vocalizations, such as bird or whale song, a great variety of songs can be produced via rearrangements of a smaller set of 'syllables', known as 'phonological syntax' or 'phonocoding' However, food or alarm calls, which function as referential signals, were previously thought to lack such combinatorial structure. A new study of calls in the <span class="hlt">banded</span> mongoose Mungos mungo provides the first evidence of phonocoding at the level of single calls. The first portion of the call provides cues to the identity of the caller, and the second part encodes its current activity. This provides the first example known in animals of something akin to the consonants and vowels of human speech.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983coex....1..191T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983coex....1..191T"><span>The cyanogen <span class="hlt">band</span> of Comet Halley</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tatum, J. B.; Campbell, E. C.</p> <p></p> <p>The results of improved whole disk solar irradiance spectrum calculations performed for projected Halley's Comet heliocentric radial velocity and distance are provided. The computations were carried out to account for Doppler effects in the Fraunhofer lines of rotational excitation <span class="hlt">bands</span> of violet CN emissions from the comet in its encounters with solar radiation. The calculations spanned every half-day for 200 days before and after perihelion. The 801 computer images of the expected intensities were photographed in sequence to form an animated film paced by background music from Liszt's Second Hungarian Rhapsody. The results are intended for accounting for spectral changes observed due to Doppler effects induced by changing velocity and distance, rather than physical mechanisms of the emitting processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850008641','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850008641"><span>Shuttle payload S-<span class="hlt">band</span> communications system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Batson, B. H.; Teasdale, W. E.; Pawlowski, J. F.; Schmidt, O. L.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The Shuttle payload S-<span class="hlt">band</span> communications system design, operational capabilities, and performance are described in detail. System design requirements, overall system and configuration and operation, and laboratory/flight test results are presented. Payload communications requirements development is discussed in terms of evolvement of requirements as well as the resulting technical challenges encountered in meeting the initial requirements. Initial design approaches are described along with cost-saving initiatives that subsequently had to be made. The resulting system implementation that was finally adopted is presented along with a functional description of the system operation. A description of system test results, problems encountered, how the problems were solved, and the system flight experience to date is presented. Finally, a summary of the advancements made and the lessons learned is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97t1401C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97t1401C"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> structure dynamics in indium wires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Krause, R.; Aeschlimann, S.; Gierz, I.</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>One-dimensional indium wires grown on Si(111) substrates, which are metallic at high temperatures, become insulating below ˜100 K due to the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). The physics of this transition is not conventional and involves a multiband Peierls instability with strong interband coupling. This CDW ground state is readily destroyed with femtosecond laser pulses resulting in a light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition. The current understanding of this transition remains incomplete, requiring measurements of the transient electronic structure to complement previous investigations of the lattice dynamics. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with extreme ultraviolet radiation is applied to this end. We find that the transition from the insulating to the metallic <span class="hlt">band</span> structure occurs within ˜660 fs, which is a fraction of the amplitude mode period. The long lifetime of the transient state (>100 ps) is attributed to trapping in a metastable state in accordance with previous work.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820022098','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820022098"><span>Measurement accuracies in <span class="hlt">band</span>-limited extrapolation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kritikos, H. N.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The problem of numerical instability associated with extrapolation algorithms is addressed. An attempt is made to estimate the bounds for the acceptable errors and to place a ceiling on the measurement accuracy and computational accuracy needed for the extrapolation. It is shown that in <span class="hlt">band</span> limited (or visible angle limited) extrapolation the larger effective aperture L' that can be realized from a finite aperture L by over sampling is a function of the accuracy of measurements. It is shown that for sampling in the interval L/b absolute value of xL, b1 the signal must be known within an error e sub N given by e sub N squared approximately = 1/4(2kL') cubed (e/8b L/L')(2kL') where L is the physical aperture, L' is the extrapolated aperture, and k = 2pi lambda.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985PAZh...11..866H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985PAZh...11..866H"><span>On the red giant titanium oxide <span class="hlt">bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hanni, L.; Sitska, J.</p> <p>1985-12-01</p> <p>The dependence of TiO absorption in cool oxygen-sequence giant stars on the Teff and log g of their atmospheres is investigated theoretically on the basis of spectra simulated using the computer program described by Hanni (1983) and the giant model atmospheres of Johnson et al. (1980). The temperature dependence of the intensity jumps at the head of the alpha(1.0) <span class="hlt">band</span> is determined from simulated spectra, and the jumps are related to spectral types using the calibration of Ridgway et al. (1980). The results are presented in tables and graphs and shown to be in good agreement with the empirical Teff/intensity-jump correlation of Boyarchuk (1969).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830008538','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830008538"><span>LANDSAT-D <span class="hlt">band</span> 6 data evaluation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>A filter, fabricated to match the spectral response of the LANDSAT <span class="hlt">band</span> 6 sensors, was received and the combined system response function computed. The half power points for the aircraft system are 10.5 micrometer and 11.55 micrometer compared to the 10.4 and 11.6 micrometer values for the satellite. These discrepancies are considered acceptable; their effect on the apparent temperature observed at the satellite is being evaluated. The filter was installed in the infrared line scanner and the line scanner was installed in the aircraft and field checked. A daytime underflight of the satellite is scheduled for the next clear overpass and the feasibility of a nightime overpass is being discussed with NASA. The LOWTRAN 5 computer code was obtained from the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory and is being implemented for use on this effort.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/870338','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/870338"><span>Wide <span class="hlt">band</span> stepped frequency ground penetrating radar</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Bashforth, Michael B.; Gardner, Duane; Patrick, Douglas; Lewallen, Tricia A.; Nammath, Sharyn R.; Painter, Kelly D.; Vadnais, Kenneth G.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>A wide <span class="hlt">band</span> ground penetrating radar system (10) embodying a method wherein a series of radio frequency signals (60) is produced by a single radio frequency source (16) and provided to a transmit antenna (26) for transmission to a target (54) and reflection therefrom to a receive antenna (28). A phase modulator (18) modulates those portion of the radio frequency signals (62) to be transmitted and the reflected modulated signal (62) is combined in a mixer (34) with the original radio frequency signal (60) to produce a resultant signal (53) which is demodulated to produce a series of direct current voltage signals (66) the envelope of which forms a cosine wave shaped plot (68) which is processed by a Fast Fourier Transform unit 44 into frequency domain data (70) wherein the position of a preponderant frequency is indicative of distance to the target (54) and magnitude is indicative of the signature of the target (54).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/biblio/203878','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/biblio/203878"><span>Wide <span class="hlt">band</span> stepped frequency ground penetrating radar</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Bashforth, M.B.; Gardner, D.; Patrick, D.; Lewallen, T.A.; Nammath, S.R.; Painter, K.D.; Vadnais, K.G.</p> <p>1996-03-12</p> <p>A wide <span class="hlt">band</span> ground penetrating radar system is described embodying a method wherein a series of radio frequency signals is produced by a single radio frequency source and provided to a transmit antenna for transmission to a target and reflection therefrom to a receive antenna. A phase modulator modulates those portions of the radio frequency signals to be transmitted and the reflected modulated signal is combined in a mixer with the original radio frequency signal to produce a resultant signal which is demodulated to produce a series of direct current voltage signals, the envelope of which forms a cosine wave shaped plot which is processed by a Fast Fourier Transform Unit 44 into frequency domain data wherein the position of a preponderant frequency is indicative of distance to the target and magnitude is indicative of the signature of the target. 6 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JLTP..191...14K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JLTP..191...14K"><span>Theory of Fermi Liquid with Flat <span class="hlt">Bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Khodel, V. A.</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p>A self-consistent theory of Fermi systems hosting flat <span class="hlt">bands</span> is developed. Compared with an original model of fermion condensation, its key point consists in proper accounting for mixing between condensate and non-condensate degrees of freedom that leads to formation of a non-BCS gap Υ (p) in the single-particle spectrum. The results obtained explain: (1) the two-gap structure of spectra of single-particle excitations of electron systems of copper oxides, revealed in ARPES studies, (2) the role of violation of the topological stability of the Landau state in the arrangement of the T-x phase diagram of this family of high-T_c superconductors, (3) the topological nature of a metal-insulator transition, discovered in homogeneous two-dimensional low-density electron liquid of MOSFETs more than 20 years ago.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009APS..MARZ33011L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009APS..MARZ33011L"><span>Two <span class="hlt">band</span> model for the cuprates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Shiu; White, Steven</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>We use a numerical canonical transformation approach to derive an effective two-<span class="hlt">band</span> model for the hole-doped cuprates, which keeps both oxygen and copper orbitals but removes double occupancy from each. A similar model was considered previously by Frenkel, Gooding, Shraiman, and Siggia (PRB 41, number 1, page 350). We compare the numerically derived model with previously obtained analytical results. In addition to the usual hopping terms between oxygens tpp and Cu-Cu exchange terms Jdd, the model also includes a strong copper-oxygen exchange interaction Jpd and a Kondo-like spin-flip oxygen-oxygen hopping term Kpdp. We use the density matrix renormalization group to study the charge, spin, and pairing properties of the derived model on ladder systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986MiJo...29..133T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986MiJo...29..133T"><span>W-<span class="hlt">band</span> integrated circuit PIN switches</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tahim, R. S.; Pham, T.; Chang, K.</p> <p>1986-12-01</p> <p>Both single-pole single-throw (SPST) and single-pole double-throw (SPDT) PIN switches have been developed at W <span class="hlt">band</span> using microstrip integrated circuits. In SPST configurations, these switches have less than 1 dB of insertion loss under forward-voltage conditions from 90 to 108 GHz. Isolation greater than 20 dB over 3 GHz and greater than 10 dB over 7 GHz has been achieved. In SPDT configurations, insertion loss of less than 2 dB and isolation of more than 15 dB over 10 GHz (90 to 110 GHz) have been achieved. Beam-lead PIN diodes were used. Major features included mechanical ruggedness, light weight, small size and low-cost manufacturing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018ACP....18.4885D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018ACP....18.4885D"><span>Clear-air lidar dark <span class="hlt">band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Di Girolamo, Paolo; Scoccione, Andrea; Cacciani, Marco; Summa, Donato; De Rosa, Benedetto; Schween, Jan H.</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p>This paper illustrates measurements carried out by the Raman lidar BASIL in the frame of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), revealing the presence of a clear-air dark <span class="hlt">band</span> phenomenon (i.e. a minimum in lidar backscatter echoes) in the upper portion of the convective boundary layer. The phenomenon is clearly distinguishable in the lidar backscatter echoes at 532 and 1064 nm, as well as in the particle depolarisation data. This phenomenon is attributed to the presence of lignite aerosol particles advected from the surrounding open pit mines in the vicinity of the measuring site. The paper provides evidence of the phenomenon and illustrates possible interpretations for its occurrence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26206396','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26206396"><span>Hazard <span class="hlt">banding</span> in compliance with the new Globally Harmonised System (GHS) for use in control <span class="hlt">banding</span> tools.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arnone, Mario; Koppisch, Dorothea; Smola, Thomas; Gabriel, Stefan; Verbist, Koen; Visser, Remco</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Many control <span class="hlt">banding</span> tools use hazard <span class="hlt">banding</span> in risk assessments for the occupational handling of hazardous substances. The outcome of these assessments can be combined with advice for the required risk management measures (RMMs). The Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has resulted in a change in the hazard communication elements, i.e. Hazard (H) statements instead of Risk-phrases. Hazard <span class="hlt">banding</span> schemes that depend on the old form of safety information have to be adapted to the new rules. The purpose of this publication is to outline the rationales for the assignment of hazard <span class="hlt">bands</span> to H statements under the GHS. Based on this, this publication proposes a hazard <span class="hlt">banding</span> scheme that uses the information from the safety data sheets as the basis for assignment. The assignment of hazard <span class="hlt">bands</span> tiered according to the severity of the underlying hazards supports the important principle of substitution. Additionally, the set of assignment rules permits an exposure-route-specific assignment of hazard <span class="hlt">bands</span>, which is necessary for the proposed route-specific RMMs. Ideally, all control <span class="hlt">banding</span> tools should apply the same assignment rules. This GHS-compliant hazard <span class="hlt">banding</span> scheme can hopefully help to establish a unified hazard <span class="hlt">banding</span> strategy in the various control <span class="hlt">banding</span> tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015isms.confERF02D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015isms.confERF02D"><span>High Pressure Oxygen A-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Spectra</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Drouin, Brian; Sung, Keeyoon; Yu, Shanshan; Lunny, Elizabeth M.; Bui, Thinh Quoc; Okumura, Mitchio; Rupasinghe, Priyanka; Bray, Caitlin; Long, David A.; Hodges, Joseph; Robichaud, David; Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Hoo, Jiajun</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Composition measurements from remote sensing platforms require knowledge of air mass to better than the desired precision of the composition. Oxygen spectra allow determination of air mass since the mixing ratio of oxygen is fixed. The OCO-2 mission is currently retrieving carbon dioxide concentration using the oxygen A-<span class="hlt">band</span> for air mass normalization. The 0.25% accuracy desired for the carbon dioxide concentration has pushed the state-of-the-art for oxygen spectroscopy. To produce atmospheric pressure A-<span class="hlt">band</span> cross-sections with this accuracy requires a sophisticated line-shape model (Galatry or Speed-Dependent) with line mixing (LM) and collision induced absorption (CIA). Models of each of these phenomena exist, but an integrated self-consistent model must be developed to ensure accuracy. This presentation will describe the ongoing effort to parameterize these phenomena on a representative data set created from complementary experimental techniques. The techniques include Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS), photo-acoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). CRDS data allow long-pathlength measurements with absolute intensities, providing lineshape information as well as LM and CIA, however the subtleties of the lineshape are diminished in the saturated line-centers. Conversely, the short paths and large dynamic range of the PAS data allow the full lineshape to be discerned, but with an arbitrary intensity axis. Finally, the FTS data provides intermediate paths and consistency across a broad pressure range. These spectra are all modeled with the Labfit software using first the spectral line database HITRAN, and then model values are adjusted and fitted for better agreement with the data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010CP....369..122K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010CP....369..122K"><span>Change in optimum genetic algorithm solution with changing <span class="hlt">band</span> discontinuities and <span class="hlt">band</span> widths of electrically conducting copolymers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kaur, Avneet; Bakhshi, A. K.</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>The interest in copolymers stems from the fact that they present interesting electronic and optical properties leading to a variety of technological applications. In order to get a suitable copolymer for a specific application, genetic algorithm (GA) along with negative factor counting (NFC) method has recently been used. In this paper, we study the effect of change in the ratio of conduction <span class="hlt">band</span> discontinuity to valence <span class="hlt">band</span> discontinuity (Δ Ec/Δ Ev) on the optimum solution obtained from GA for model binary copolymers. The effect of varying bandwidths on the optimum GA solution is also investigated. The obtained results show that the optimum solution changes with varying parameters like <span class="hlt">band</span> discontinuity and <span class="hlt">band</span> width of constituent homopolymers. As the ratio Δ Ec/Δ Ev increases, <span class="hlt">band</span> gap of optimum solution decreases. With increasing <span class="hlt">band</span> widths of constituent homopolymers, the optimum solution tends to be dependent on the component with higher <span class="hlt">band</span> gap.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70019599','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70019599"><span>Injury due to leg <span class="hlt">bands</span> in willow flycatchers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Sedgwick, J.A.; Klus, R.J.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>We report an apparently unusually high incidence of leg injury in Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) as a result of <span class="hlt">banding</span> and color <span class="hlt">banding</span>. Color <span class="hlt">bands</span> and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) <span class="hlt">bands</span> applied to Willow Flycatchers from 1988-1995 resulted in an overall leg injury rate of 9.6% to birds returning to our study areas in subsequent years. Most injuries occurred on legs with only color <span class="hlt">band(s</span>) (58.3%) or on legs with both a USFWS <span class="hlt">band</span> and a color <span class="hlt">band</span> (35%); only 6.7% of injuries (4/60) were due to USFWS <span class="hlt">bands</span> alone, yielding an overall USFWS <span class="hlt">band</span> injury rate of only 0.6%. Injuries ranged from severe (swollen, bleeding legs; a missing foot) to relatively minor (irritations on the tarsus). Amputation of the foot occurred in 33.9% of the cases. Return rates of adult injured birds in the year(s) following injury were significantly lower than for the population at large.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26828673','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26828673"><span>Interdigitation Zone <span class="hlt">Band</span> Restoration After Treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Serizawa, Satoshi; Ohkoshi, Kishiko; Minowa, Yuko; Soejima, Kumiko</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>To investigate whether the integrity of the interdigitation zone <span class="hlt">band</span>, the ellipsoid zone <span class="hlt">band</span>, and the external limiting membrane are reliable markers of treatment outcome in diabetic macular edema (DME). In this retrospective study, we examined 41 treatment-naïve eyes (38 patients) with DME that were treated with laser therapy, pharmacotherapy, and/or vitrectomy. Best-corrected visual acuity and the integrity of the interdigitation zone <span class="hlt">band</span>, the ellipsoid zone <span class="hlt">band</span>, and the external limiting membrane were assessed before treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months after DME treatment. One year after treatment, the external limiting membrane, ellipsoid zone <span class="hlt">band</span>, and interdigitation zone <span class="hlt">band</span> were completely visible in 30 (73.2%), 24 (58.5%), and 2 (4.9%) eyes, respectively. Interdigitation zone <span class="hlt">band</span> status improved significantly (P = 0.005) 1 year after treatment. The interdigitation zone did not improve in the absence of the ellipsoid zone <span class="hlt">band</span>. Likewise, ellipsoid zone status did not improve in the absence of the external limiting membrane at any time after treatment. The results of this study show that restoration of the interdigitation zone <span class="hlt">band</span> constitutes a very sensitive marker of DME treatment outcome when the ellipsoid zone <span class="hlt">band</span> is visible before treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70173751','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70173751"><span>Retention of riveted aluminum leg <span class="hlt">bands</span> by wild turkeys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Diefenbach, Duane R.; Vreeland, Wendy C.; Casalena, Mary Jo; Schiavone, Michael V.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In order for mark–recapture models to provide unbiased estimates of population parameters, it is critical that uniquely identifying tags or marks are not lost. We double-<span class="hlt">banded</span> male and female wild turkeys with aluminum rivet <span class="hlt">bands</span> and estimated the probability that a bird would be recovered with both <span class="hlt">bands</span> <1–225 wk since <span class="hlt">banding</span> (mean = 51.2 wk, SD = 44.0). We found that 100% of females (n = 37) were recovered with both <span class="hlt">bands</span>. For males, we recovered 6 of 188 turkeys missing a rivet <span class="hlt">band</span> for a retention probability of 0.984 (95% CI = 0.96–0.99). If male turkeys are double-<span class="hlt">banded</span> with rivet <span class="hlt">bands</span> the probability of recovering a turkey without any marks is <0.001. We failed to detect a change in <span class="hlt">band</span> retention over time or differences between adults and juveniles. Given the low cost and high retention rates of rivet aluminum <span class="hlt">bands</span>, we believe they are an effective marking technique for wild turkeys and, for most studies, will minimize any concern about the assumption that marks are not lost.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApPhL.106a3505V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApPhL.106a3505V"><span>Deformation potentials for <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> tunneling in silicon and germanium from first principles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vandenberghe, William G.; Fischetti, Massimo V.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The deformation potentials for phonon-assisted <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> tunneling (BTBT) in silicon and germanium are calculated using a plane-wave density functional theory code. Using hybrid functionals, we obtain: DTA = 4.1 × 108 eV/cm, DTO = 1.2 × 109 eV/cm, and DLO = 2.2 × 109 eV/cm for BTBT in silicon and DTA = 7.8 × 108 eV/cm and DLO = 1.3 × 109 eV/cm for BTBT in germanium. These values agree with experimentally measured values and we explain why in diodes, the TA/TO phonon-assisted BTBT dominates over LO phonon-assisted BTBT despite the larger deformation potential for the latter. We also explain why LO phonon-assisted BTBT can nevertheless dominate in many practical applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JPhCS.864a2062F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JPhCS.864a2062F"><span>Thin SOI lateral IGBT with <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> tunneling mechanism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fu, Qiang; Tang, Zhaohuan; Tan, Kaizhou; Wang, Zhikuan; Mei, Yong</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>In this paper, a novel 200V lateral IGBT on thin SOI layer with a <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> tunneling junction near the anode is proposed. The structure and the operating mechanism of the proposed IGBT are described and discussed. Its main feature is that the novel IGBT structure has a unique abrupt doped p++/n++ tunneling junction in the side of the anode. By utilizing the reverse bias characteristics of the tunneling junction, the proposed IGBT can achieve excellent reverse conducting performance. Numerical simulations suggest that a low reverse conduction voltage drop VR=-1.6V at a current density of 100A/cm2 and a soft factor S=0.63 of the build-in diode are achieved.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27183026','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27183026"><span>Split-face comparison between single-<span class="hlt">band</span> and dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> pulsed light technology for treatment of photodamage.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Varughese, Neal; Keller, Lauren; Goldberg, David J</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Intense pulsed light (IPL) has a well-recognized role in the treatment of photodamaged skin. To assess the safety and efficacy of a novel single-<span class="hlt">band</span> IPL handpiece versus dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> IPL handpiece in the treatment of photodamage. This was a prospective, single-center split-face study with 20 enrolled participants. Three treatments, 21 days apart, were administered to the subjects and follow-up was performed for 20 weeks. The left side of the face was treated with the single-<span class="hlt">band</span> handpiece. The right side of the face was treated with the dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> handpiece. Blinded investigators assessed the subjects' skin texture, pigmented components of photodamage, and presence of telangiectasia both before and after treatment, utilizing a five-point scale. Pigmented components of photodamage, skin texture, and presence of telangiectasias on the left and right side of the face were improved at the end of treatment. At 20-week follow-up, the side treated with single-<span class="hlt">band</span> handpiece showed improvement in telangiectasia and pigmentation that was statistically superior to the contralateral side treated with the dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> handpiece. Both devices equally improved textural changes. No adverse effects were noted with either device. Both single-<span class="hlt">band</span> and dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> IPL technology are safe and effective in the treatment of photodamaged facial skin. IPL treatment with a single-<span class="hlt">band</span> handpiece yielded results comparable or superior to dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ZNatA..71..493Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ZNatA..71..493Y"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic <span class="hlt">band</span> gap. In order to research <span class="hlt">band</span> structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the <span class="hlt">band</span> structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, <span class="hlt">band</span> structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of <span class="hlt">band</span> structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first <span class="hlt">band</span> gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvC..97d1304P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvC..97d1304P"><span>Evidence of chiral <span class="hlt">bands</span> in even-even nuclei</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Petrache, C. M.; Lv, B. F.; Astier, A.; Dupont, E.; Wang, Y. K.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhao, P. W.; Ren, Z. X.; Meng, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Badran, H.; Cox, D. M.; Grahn, T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Konki, J.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Uusitalo, J.; Cederwall, B.; Aktas, Ö.; Ertoprak, A.; Liu, H.; Matta, S.; Subramaniam, P.; Guo, S.; Liu, M. L.; Zhou, X. H.; Wang, K. L.; Kuti, I.; Timár, J.; Tucholski, A.; Srebrny, J.; Andreoiu, C.</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p>Evidence for chiral doublet <span class="hlt">bands</span> has been observed for the first time in the even-even nucleus 136Nd. One chiral <span class="hlt">band</span> was firmly established. Four other candidates for chiral <span class="hlt">bands</span> were also identified, which can contribute to the realization of the multiple pairs of chiral doublet <span class="hlt">bands</span> (M χ D ) phenomenon. The observed <span class="hlt">bands</span> are investigated by the constrained and tilted axis cranking covariant density functional theory (TAC-CDFT). Possible configurations have been explored. The experimental energy spectra, angular momenta, and B (M 1 )/B (E 2 ) values for the assigned configurations are globally reproduced by TAC-CDFT. Calculated results support the chiral interpretation of the observed <span class="hlt">bands</span>, which correspond to shapes with maximum triaxiality induced by different multiquasiparticle configurations in 136Nd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018IJMPE..2750044G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018IJMPE..2750044G"><span>Novel solution of power law for γ-<span class="hlt">bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gupta, J. B.</p> <p></p> <p>The power law expression E = aIb offers a single-term formula with just two parameters for expressing the level energies in the spectra of even-Z even-N nuclei. Its application to ground <span class="hlt">band</span> spectra for a wide range of nuclei has been demonstrated in our earlier works. Here, we extend its application to the rotational <span class="hlt">bands</span> built on an excited state of K = 2 γ-vibration <span class="hlt">band</span> and Kπ = 0 2+ beta <span class="hlt">band</span>. A novel assumption of a virtual level with spin zero for γ-<span class="hlt">bands</span> is made and its validity and use is illustrated. Here, the constancy of the parameters “b” and “a” with spin, offers a more realistic view of the dependence of the nuclear core deformation on spin, in the excited <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Also, it enables a spinwise view, not available in the other energy fit expressions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25933339','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25933339"><span>Intermediate <span class="hlt">band</span> solar cell with extreme broadband spectrum quantum efficiency.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Datas, A; López, E; Ramiro, I; Antolín, E; Martí, A; Luque, A; Tamaki, R; Shoji, Y; Sogabe, T; Okada, Y</p> <p>2015-04-17</p> <p>We report, for the first time, about an intermediate <span class="hlt">band</span> solar cell implemented with InAs/AlGaAs quantum dots whose photoresponse expands from 250 to ∼6000  nm. To our knowledge, this is the broadest quantum efficiency reported to date for a solar cell and demonstrates that the intermediate <span class="hlt">band</span> solar cell is capable of producing photocurrent when illuminated with photons whose energy equals the energy of the lowest <span class="hlt">band</span> gap. We show experimental evidence indicating that this result is in agreement with the theory of the intermediate <span class="hlt">band</span> solar cell, according to which the generation recombination between the intermediate <span class="hlt">band</span> and the valence <span class="hlt">band</span> makes this photocurrent detectable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/2000110','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/2000110"><span>Analysis and machine mapping of the distribution of <span class="hlt">band</span> recoveries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Cowardin, L.M.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>A method of calculating distance and bearing from <span class="hlt">banding</span> site to recovery location based on the solution of a spherical triangle is presented. X and Y distances on an ordinate grid were applied to computer plotting of recoveries on a map. The advantages and disadvantages of tables of recoveries by State or degree block, axial lines, and distance of recovery from <span class="hlt">banding</span> site for presentation and comparison of the spatial distribution of <span class="hlt">band</span> recoveries are discussed. A special web-shaped partition formed by concentric circles about the point of <span class="hlt">banding</span> and great circles at 30-degree intervals through the point of <span class="hlt">banding</span> has certain advantages over other methods. Comparison of distributions by means of a X? contingency test is illustrated. The statistic V = X?/N can be used as a measure of difference between two distributions of <span class="hlt">band</span> recoveries and its possible use is illustrated as a measure of the degree of migrational homing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100010901','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100010901"><span>Miniature L-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Radar Transceiver</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>McWatters, Dalia; Price, Douglas; Edelstein, Wendy</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>A miniature L-<span class="hlt">band</span> transceiver that operates at a carrier frequency of 1.25 GHz has been developed as part of a generic radar electronics module (REM) that would constitute one unit in an array of many identical units in a very-large-aperture phased-array antenna. NASA and the Department of Defense are considering the deployment of such antennas in outer space; the underlying principles of operation, and some of those of design, also are applicable on Earth. The large dimensions of the antennas make it advantageous to distribute radio-frequency electronic circuitry into elements of the arrays. The design of the REM is intended to implement the distribution. The design also reflects a requirement to minimize the size and weight of the circuitry in order to minimize the weight of any such antenna. Other requirements include making the transceiver robust and radiation-hard and minimizing power demand. Figure 1 depicts the functional blocks of the REM, including the L-<span class="hlt">band</span> transceiver. The key functions of the REM include signal generation, frequency translation, amplification, detection, handling of data, and radar control and timing. An arbitrary-waveform generator that includes logic circuitry and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) generates a linear-frequency-modulation chirp waveform. A frequency synthesizer produces local-oscillator signals used for frequency conversion and clock signals for the arbitrary-waveform generator, for a digitizer [that is, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC)], and for a control and timing unit. Digital functions include command, timing, telemetry, filtering, and high-rate framing and serialization of data for a high-speed scientific-data interface. The aforementioned digital implementation of filtering is a key feature of the REM architecture. Digital filters, in contradistinction to analog ones, provide consistent and temperature-independent performance, which is particularly important when REMs are distributed throughout a large</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA620163','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA620163"><span>C(G)-<span class="hlt">Band</span> and X(I)-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Noncoherent Radar Transponder Performance Specification Standard</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>transmitter with an integral power supply. The transponder must accept interrogation signals from single or multiple radar sets and provide a...the transponder receives a coded pulse interrogation from the ground radar and transmits a single pulse reply in the same frequency <span class="hlt">band</span>. The...obtained by using either a single tracking station or several tracking stations along the flight path of the target vehicle. The accuracy gained by use</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAP...120d4307H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAP...120d4307H"><span>Modeling of multi-<span class="hlt">band</span> drift in nanowires using a full <span class="hlt">band</span> Monte Carlo simulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hathwar, Raghuraj; Saraniti, Marco; Goodnick, Stephen M.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We report on a new numerical approach for multi-<span class="hlt">band</span> drift within the context of full <span class="hlt">band</span> Monte Carlo (FBMC) simulation and apply this to Si and InAs nanowires. The approach is based on the solution of the Krieger and Iafrate (KI) equations [J. B. Krieger and G. J. Iafrate, Phys. Rev. B 33, 5494 (1986)], which gives the probability of carriers undergoing interband transitions subject to an applied electric field. The KI equations are based on the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and previous solutions of these equations have used Runge-Kutta (RK) methods to numerically solve the KI equations. This approach made the solution of the KI equations numerically expensive and was therefore only applied to a small part of the Brillouin zone (BZ). Here we discuss an alternate approach to the solution of the KI equations using the Magnus expansion (also known as "exponential perturbation theory"). This method is more accurate than the RK method as the solution lies on the exponential map and shares important qualitative properties with the exact solution such as the preservation of the unitary character of the time evolution operator. The solution of the KI equations is then incorporated through a modified FBMC free-flight drift routine and applied throughout the nanowire BZ. The importance of the multi-<span class="hlt">band</span> drift model is then demonstrated for the case of Si and InAs nanowires by simulating a uniform field FBMC and analyzing the average carrier energies and carrier populations under high electric fields. Numerical simulations show that the average energy of the carriers under high electric field is significantly higher when multi-<span class="hlt">band</span> drift is taken into consideration, due to the interband transitions allowing carriers to achieve higher energies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/15486','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/15486"><span><span class="hlt">Banding</span> of Asio Owls in south-central Saskatchewan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>C. Stuart Houston</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>During a long-term Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) <span class="hlt">banding</span> program, 1946-1996, there were opportunities to <span class="hlt">band</span> 507 Long-eared Owls (Asio otus) and 246 Short-eared Owls (Asio flammeus). No less than 35.1 percent of the Long-eared Owls and 63.5 percent of the Short-eared Owls were <span class="hlt">banded</span> in two unusual years,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JGRC..109.8012C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JGRC..109.8012C"><span>Observations of <span class="hlt">banding</span> in first-year Arctic sea ice</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cole, David M.; Eicken, Hajo; Frey, Karoline; Shapiro, Lewis H.</p> <p>2004-08-01</p> <p>Horizontal <span class="hlt">banding</span> features, alternating dark and bright horizontal <span class="hlt">bands</span> apparent in ice cores and stratigraphic cross sections have long been observed in first-year sea ice and are frequently associated with <span class="hlt">bands</span> of high and low brine or gas porosity. Observations on the land-fast ice near Barrow, Alaska, in recent years have revealed particularly striking <span class="hlt">banding</span> patterns and prompted a study of their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. The <span class="hlt">banding</span> patterns are quantified from photographs of full-depth sections of the ice, and examples are presented from the Chukchi Sea and Elson Lagoon. Statistics on <span class="hlt">band</span> spacing are presented, and the growth records for three seasons are employed to estimate their time of formation. These data provide insight into the periodicity of the underlying phenomena. Micrographs are used to examine the microstructural variations associated with various <span class="hlt">banding</span> features and to quantify the geometry of the constituent brine inclusions associated with high- and low-porosity <span class="hlt">bands</span>. The micrography revealed that the area fraction of brine inclusions varied by a factor of nearly 3 through the more pronounced high- and low-porosity <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Vertical micrographs obtained shortly after the materials' removal from the ice sheet showed that significantly larger inclusions form abruptly at the start of the high-porosity <span class="hlt">bands</span> and frequently terminate abruptly at the end of the <span class="hlt">band</span>. Crystallographic observations indicated that the high-porosity <span class="hlt">bands</span> supported the nucleation and growth of crystals having substantially different orientations from the very well aligned columnar structure that characterized the bulk of the sheet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950009431','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950009431"><span>A bibliography of papers on the diffuse interstellar <span class="hlt">bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Snow, Theodore P.; Barnes, Susan; Heitzmann, Maribeth</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Presented is a compilation of publications on the diffuse interstellar <span class="hlt">bands</span>, found in the literature dating back to the first known mention of the <span class="hlt">bands</span>. It has been attempted to make this list complete, but it must be recognized that some papers may be missing. Judgement was required in some cases where the diffuse <span class="hlt">bands</span> are mentioned, but are not a central theme of a paper; in most instances we kept such papers in a list, rather than omitting them.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADP022454','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADP022454"><span>Using Large Signal Code TESLA for Wide <span class="hlt">Band</span> Klystron Simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-04-01</p> <p>tuning procedure TESLA simulates of high power klystron [3]. accurately actual eigenmodes of the structure as a solution Wide <span class="hlt">band</span> klystrons very often...on <span class="hlt">band</span> klystrons with two-gap two-mode resonators. The decomposition of simulation region into an external results of TESLA simulations for NRL S ...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP022454 TITLE: Using Large Signal Code TESLA for Wide <span class="hlt">Band</span> Klystron</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840017711','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840017711"><span>Analysis of carbon dioxide <span class="hlt">bands</span> near 2.2 micrometers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Abubaker, M. S.; Shaw, J. H.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Carbon dioxide is one of the more important atmospheric infrared-absorbing gases due to its relatively high, and increasing, concentration. The spectral parameters of its <span class="hlt">bands</span> are required for understanding radiative heat transfer in the atmosphere. The line intensities, positions, line half-widths, rotational constants, and <span class="hlt">band</span> centers of three overlapping <span class="hlt">bands</span> of CO2 near 2.2 microns are presented. Non-linear least squares (NLLS) regression procedures were employed to determine these parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27129802','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27129802"><span>Management of Gastric Obstruction Caused by Adjustable Gastric <span class="hlt">Band</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Czeiger, David; Abu-Swis, Shadi; Shaked, Gad; Ovnat, Amnon; Sebbag, Gilbert</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Optimal adjustment of the filling volume of laparoscopic adjustable gastric <span class="hlt">banding</span> is challenging and commonly performed empirically. Patients with <span class="hlt">band</span> over-inflation and gastric obstruction arrive at the emergency department complaining of recurrent vomiting. In cases of gastric obstruction, intra-<span class="hlt">band</span> pressure measurement may assist in determining the amount of fluid that should be removed from the <span class="hlt">band</span>; however, our investigations have determined that intra-<span class="hlt">band</span> pressure assessment need not play a role in the treatment of gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> obstruction. In patients coming to the emergency department with gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> obstruction, we measured intra-<span class="hlt">band</span> pressure at arrival and following stepped removal of fluid, comparing the initial pressure with post-deflation pressure and measuring the volume of fluid removed. Forty-eight patients participated in the study. Forty-five patients had a low-pressure/high-volume <span class="hlt">band</span>. Their mean baseline pressure was 54.6 ± 22.3 mmHg. The mean volume of fluid removed from the <span class="hlt">band</span> was 1.3 ± 0.8 ml. The mean post-deflation pressure was 22.5 ± 16.3 mmHg. Nearly 30 % of patients required as little as 0.5 ml of fluid removal, and 60 % of them were free of symptoms with removal of 1 ml. Our results indicate that intra-<span class="hlt">band</span> pressure measurement is of little value for determining the amount of fluid that should be removed for treatment of <span class="hlt">band</span> obstruction. We suggest the removal of fluid in volumes of 0.5 ml until symptoms are relieved. Only in complicated cases, such as in patients having recurrent obstructions, should additional modalities be employed for further management guidance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880003321','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880003321"><span>X-<span class="hlt">band</span> uplink ground systems development: Part 2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Johns, C. E.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The prototype X-<span class="hlt">band</span> exciter testing has been completed. Stability and single-sideband phase noise measurements have been made on the X-<span class="hlt">band</span> exciter signal (7.145-7.235 GHz) and on the coherent X- and S-<span class="hlt">band</span> receiver test signals (8.4-8.5 GHz and 2.29-2.3 GHz) generated within the exciter equipment. Outputs are well within error budgets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29218217','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29218217"><span>Gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> tubing-related complication during pregnancy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ongso, Yuni F; Beh, Han N</p> <p>2017-11-01</p> <p>In the past few decades, laparoscopic adjustable gastric <span class="hlt">banding</span> is one of the most common bariatric procedures performed to treat morbid obesity. Device-related complication such as connection-tubing problem is rare. Here we present a case of gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> tubing complication during pregnancy. This case illustrates the need to maintain high index of suspicion of gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> device-related complication during pregnancy and early referral for bariatric surgical assessment is recommended.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5710516','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5710516"><span>Gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> tubing-related complication during pregnancy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Beh, Han N</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Abstract In the past few decades, laparoscopic adjustable gastric <span class="hlt">banding</span> is one of the most common bariatric procedures performed to treat morbid obesity. Device-related complication such as connection-tubing problem is rare. Here we present a case of gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> tubing complication during pregnancy. This case illustrates the need to maintain high index of suspicion of gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> device-related complication during pregnancy and early referral for bariatric surgical assessment is recommended. PMID:29218217</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017IPNPR.211B...1M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017IPNPR.211B...1M"><span>Deep-Space Ka-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Flight Experience</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Morabito, D. D.</p> <p>2017-11-01</p> <p>Lower frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span> have become more congested in allocated bandwidth as there is increased competition between flight projects and other entities. Going to higher frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span> offers significantly more bandwidth, allowing for the use of much higher data rates. However, Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> is more susceptible to weather effects than lower frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span> currently used for most standard downlink telemetry operations. Future or prospective flight projects considering deep-space Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> (32-GHz) telemetry data links have expressed an interest in understanding past flight experience with received Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> downlink performance. Especially important to these flight projects is gaining a better understanding of weather effects from the experience of current or past missions that operated Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> radio systems. We will discuss the historical flight experience of several Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> missions starting from Mars Observer in 1993 up to present-day deep-space missions such as Kepler. The study of historical Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> flight experience allows one to recommend margin policy for future missions. Of particular interest, we will review previously reported-on flight experience with the Cassini spacecraft Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> radio system that has been used for radio science investigations as well as engineering studies from 2004 to 2015, when Cassini was in orbit around the planet Saturn. In this article, we will focus primarily on the Kepler spacecraft Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> link, which has been used for operational telemetry downlink from an Earth trailing orbit where the spacecraft resides. We analyzed the received Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> signal level data in order to characterize link performance over a wide range of weather conditions and as a function of elevation angle. Based on this analysis of Kepler and Cassini flight data, we found that a 4-dB margin with respect to adverse conditions ensures that we achieve at least a 95 percent data return.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADP015050','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADP015050"><span>The Marvels of Electromagnetic <span class="hlt">Band</span> Gap (EBG) Structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-11-01</p> <p>terminology of "Electromagnetic conference papers and journal articles dealing with <span class="hlt">Band</span>- gaps (EBG)". Recently, many researchers the characterizations...<span class="hlt">Band</span> Gap (EBG) Structures 9 utilized to reduce the mutual coupling between Structures: An FDTD/Prony Technique elements of antenna arrays. based on the...<span class="hlt">Band</span>- Gap of several patents. He has had pioneering research contributions in diverse areas of electromagnetics,Snteructure", Dymposiget o l 21 IE 48</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA490649','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA490649"><span>’Marine’ Character of the United States Marine <span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>Classical Music Hall ofFame on May 24, 1998.14 In celebration of 200 years of service to our country and the Corps, the Marine <span class="hlt">Band</span> was received as the guest...Saxophones LJ Cellos iH Guitar i Y Bassoons H Harp y Vocalists 1 31 AppendixE Current U.S. Marine <span class="hlt">Band</span> Fitness Report « z o t3 ill en U.S. Marine <span class="hlt">Band</span> FITNESS</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol5-sec97-301.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol5-sec97-301.pdf"><span>47 CFR 97.301 - Authorized frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>...: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements see § 97.303... Advanced Class: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements... General Class: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol5-sec97-301.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol5-sec97-301.pdf"><span>47 CFR 97.301 - Authorized frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>...: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements see § 97.303... Advanced Class: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements... General Class: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol5-sec97-301.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol5-sec97-301.pdf"><span>47 CFR 97.301 - Authorized frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>...: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements see § 97.303... Advanced Class: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements... General Class: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol5-sec97-301.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol5-sec97-301.pdf"><span>47 CFR 97.301 - Authorized frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>...: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements see § 97.303... Advanced Class: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements... General Class: Wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> MF ITU region 1 kHz ITU region 2 kHz ITU region 3 kHz Sharing requirements...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MS%26E..322b2029X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MS%26E..322b2029X"><span>A Wide <span class="hlt">Band</span> Absorbing Material Design Using <span class="hlt">Band</span>-Pass Frequency Selective Surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xu, Yonggang; Xu, Qiang; Liu, Ting; Zheng, Dianliang; Zhou, Li</p> <p>2018-03-01</p> <p>Based on the high frequency advantage characteristics of the Fe based absorbing coating, a method for designing the structure of broadband absorbing structure by using frequency selective surface (FSS) is proposed. According to the transmission and reflection characteristic of the different size FSS structure, the frequency variation characteristic was simulated. Secondly, the genetic algorithm was used to optimize the high frequency broadband absorbing materials, including the single and double magnetic layer material. Finally, the absorbing characteristics in iron layer were analyzed as the <span class="hlt">band</span> pass FSS structure was embedded, the results showed that the <span class="hlt">band</span>-pass FSS had the influence on widening the absorbing frequency. As the FSS was set as the bottom layer, it was effective to achieve the good absorbing property in low frequency and the high frequency absorbing performance was not weakened, because the <span class="hlt">band</span>-pass FSS led the low frequency absorption and the high frequency shielding effect. The results of this paper are of guiding significance for designing and manufacturing the broadband absorbing materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyE...94..126G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyE...94..126G"><span>Analysis of single <span class="hlt">band</span> and dual <span class="hlt">band</span> graphene based patch antenna for terahertz region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>George, Jemima Nissiyah; Madhan, M. Ganesh</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>A microstrip patch antenna is designed using a very thin layer of graphene as the radiating patch, which is fed by a microstrip transmission line. The graphene based patch is designed on a silicon substrate having a dielectric constant of 11.9, to radiate at a single frequency of 2.6 THz. Further, this antenna is made to resonate at dual frequencies of 2.48 THz and 3.35 THz, by changing the substrate height, which is reported for the first time. Various antenna parameters such as return loss, VSWR, gain, efficiency and bandwidth are also determined for the single and dual <span class="hlt">band</span> operation. For the single <span class="hlt">band</span> operation, a bandwidth of 145.4 GHz and an efficiency of 92% was achieved. For dual <span class="hlt">band</span> operation, a maximum bandwidth of 140.5 GHz was obtained at 3.35 THz and an efficiency of 87.3% was obtained at the first resonant frequency of 2.48 THz. The absorption cross section of the antenna is also analysed for various substrate heights and has maximum peaks at the corresponding resonating frequencies. The simulation has been carried out by using a full wave electromagnetic simulator based on FDTD method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SPIE10605E..1FG','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SPIE10605E..1FG"><span>Design of an S <span class="hlt">band</span> narrow-<span class="hlt">band</span> bandpass BAW filter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gao, Yang; Zhao, Kun-li; Han, Chao</p> <p>2017-11-01</p> <p>An S <span class="hlt">band</span> narrowband bandpass filter BAW with center frequency 2.460 GHz, bandwidth 41MHz, <span class="hlt">band</span> insertion loss - 1.154 dB, the passband ripple 0.9 dB, the out of <span class="hlt">band</span> rejection about -42.5dB@2.385 GHz; -45.5dB@2.506 GHz was designed for potential UAV measurement and control applications. According to the design specifications, the design is as follows: each FBAR's stack was designed in BAW filter by using Mason model. Each FBAR's shape was designed with the method of apodization electrode. The layout of BAW filter was designed. The acoustic-electromagnetic cosimulation model was built to validate the performance of the designed BAW filter. The presented design procedure is a common one, and there are two characteristics: 1) an A and EM co-simulation method is used for the final BAW filter performance validation in the design stage, thus ensures over-optimistic designs by the bare 1D Mason model are found and rejected in time; 2) An in-house developed auto-layout method is used to get compact BAW filter layout, which simplifies iterative error-and-try work here and output necessary in-plane geometry information to the A and EM cosimulation model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.377a2092G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.377a2092G"><span>Pressure effects on <span class="hlt">band</span> structures in dense lithium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Goto, Naoyuki; Nagara, Hitose</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>We studied the change of the <span class="hlt">band</span> structures in some structures of Li predicted at high pressures, using GGA and GW calculations. The width of the 1s <span class="hlt">band</span> coming from the 1s electron of Li shows broadening by the pressurization, which is the normal behavior of <span class="hlt">bands</span> at high pressure. The width of the <span class="hlt">band</span> just below the Fermi level decreases by the pressurization, which is an opposite behavior to the normal <span class="hlt">bands</span>. The character of this narrowing <span class="hlt">band</span> is mostly p-like with a little s-like portion. The <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps in some structures are really observed even by the GGA calculations. The gaps by the GW calculations increase to about 1.5 times the GGA values. Generally the one-shot GW calculation (diagonal only calculations) gives more reliable values than the GGA, but it may fail to predict <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps for the case where <span class="hlt">band</span> dispersion shows complex crossing near the Fermi level. There remains some structures for which GW calculations with off-diagonal elements taken into account are needed to identify the phase to be metallic or semiconducting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080044050','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080044050"><span>Dual <span class="hlt">Band</span> Deep Ultraviolet AlGaN Photodetectors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Aslam, S.; Miko, L.; Stahle, C.; Franz, D.; Pugel, D.; Guan, B.; Zhang, J. P.; Gaska, R.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of a back-illuminated voltage bias selectable dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> AlGaN UV photodetector. The photodetector can separate UVA and W-B <span class="hlt">band</span> radiation by bias switching a two terminal n-p-n homojunction structure that is fabricated in the same pixel. When a forward bias is applied between the top and bottom electrodes, the detector can sense UV-A and reject W-B <span class="hlt">band</span> radiation. Alternatively, under reverse bias, the photodetector can sense UV-B and reject UV-A <span class="hlt">band</span> radiation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990NTTRv...2...44H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990NTTRv...2...44H"><span>14/12-GHz-<span class="hlt">band</span> satellite communication services</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hayashi, Kunihiro; Nagaki, Kiyoaki; Mori, Yasuo</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Three new systems for integrated TV-relay services have been developed: Satellite Video Comunication Service (SVCS) and Satellite Digital Communication Service (SDCS), with Japan's 14/12-GHz-<span class="hlt">band</span> commercial communication satellites. These systems have been in commercial use since May 1989. Usually SVCS and SDCS have been provided using Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> (30/20 GHz-<span class="hlt">band</span>) of CS-2 and Cs-3. This paper provides an overview of the design, the performance, and the systems of the new 14/12-GHz-<span class="hlt">band</span> satellite communication services.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11477765','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11477765"><span>A programmable ultra-low noise X-<span class="hlt">band</span> exciter.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>MacMullen, A; Hoover, L R; Justice, R D; Callahan, B S</p> <p>2001-07-01</p> <p>A programmable ultra-low noise X-<span class="hlt">band</span> exciter has been developed using commercial off-the-shelf components. Its phase noise is more than 10 dB below the best available microwave synthesizers. It covers a 7% frequency <span class="hlt">band</span> with 0.1-Hz resolution. The X-<span class="hlt">band</span> output at +23 dBm is a combination of signals from an X-<span class="hlt">band</span> sapphire-loaded cavity oscillator (SLCO), a low noise UHF frequency synthesizer, and special-purpose frequency translation and up-conversion circuitry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870014404','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870014404"><span>Block 3 X-<span class="hlt">band</span> receiver-exciter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Johns, C. E.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The development of an X-<span class="hlt">band</span> exciter, for use in the X-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Uplink Subsystem, was completed. The exciter generates the drive signal for the X-<span class="hlt">band</span> transmitter and also generates coherent test signals for the S- and X-<span class="hlt">band</span> Block 3 translator and a Doppler reference signal for the Doppler extractor system. In addition to the above, the exciter generates other reference signals that are described. Also presented is an overview of the exciter design and some test data taken on the prototype. A brief discussion of the Block 3 Doppler extractor is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/5211424','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/5211424"><span>Workshop: Western hemisphere network of bird <span class="hlt">banding</span> programs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Celis-Murillo, A.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: To promote collaboration among <span class="hlt">banding</span> programs in the Americas. Introduction: Bird <span class="hlt">banding</span> and marking provide indispensable tools for ornithological research, management, and conservation of migratory birds on migratory routes, breeding and non-breeding grounds. Many countries and organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean are in the process of developing or have expressed interest in developing national <span class="hlt">banding</span> schemes and databases to support their research and management programs. Coordination of developing and existing <span class="hlt">banding</span> programs is essential for effective data management, reporting, archiving and security, and most importantly, for gaining a fuller understanding of migratory bird conservation issues and how the <span class="hlt">banding</span> data can help. Currently, there is a well established bird-<span class="hlt">banding</span> program in the U.S.A. and Canada, and programs in other countries are being developed as well. Ornithologists in many Latin American countries and the Caribbean are interested in using <span class="hlt">banding</span> and marking in their research programs. Many in the ornithological community are interested in establishing <span class="hlt">banding</span> schemes and some countries have recently initiated independent <span class="hlt">banding</span> programs. With the number of long term collaborative and international initiatives increasing, the time is ripe to discuss and explore opportunities for international collaboration, coordination, and administration of bird <span class="hlt">banding</span> programs in the Western Hemisphere. We propose the second ?Western Hemisphere Network of Bird <span class="hlt">Banding</span> Programs? workshop, in association with the SCSCB, to be an essential step in the progress to strengthen international partnerships and support migratory bird conservation in the Americas and beyond. This will be the second multi-national meeting to promote collaboration among <span class="hlt">banding</span> programs in the Americas (the first meeting was held in October 8-9, 2006 in La Mancha, Veracruz, Mexico). The Second ?Western Hemisphere Network of Bird <span class="hlt">Banding</span> Programs</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24627895','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24627895"><span>Surface correlation effects in two-<span class="hlt">band</span> strongly correlated slabs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Esfahani, D Nasr; Covaci, L; Peeters, F M</p> <p>2014-02-19</p> <p>Using an extension of the Gutzwiller approximation for an inhomogeneous system, we study the two-<span class="hlt">band</span> Hubbard model with unequal <span class="hlt">band</span> widths for a slab geometry. The aim is to investigate the mutual effect of individual <span class="hlt">bands</span> on the spatial distribution of quasi-particle weight and charge density, especially near the surface of the slab. The main effect of the difference in <span class="hlt">band</span> width is the presence of two different length scales corresponding to the quasi-particle profile of each <span class="hlt">band</span>. This is enhanced in the vicinity of the critical interaction of the narrow <span class="hlt">band</span> where an orbitally selective Mott transition occurs and a surface dead layer forms for the narrow <span class="hlt">band</span>. For the doped case, two different regimes of charge transfer between the surface and the bulk of the slab are revealed. The charge transfer from surface/center to center/surface depends on both the doping level and the average relative charge accumulated in each <span class="hlt">band</span>. Such effects could also be of importance when describing the accumulation of charges at the interface between structures made of multi-<span class="hlt">band</span> strongly correlated materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29241194','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29241194"><span>[Kombinierte Anwendung von Strahlentherapie und adjuvanter Therapie mit einem Mistelextrakt (Viscum album L.) <span class="hlt">zur</span> Behandlung des oralen malignen Melanoms beim Hund: Eine retrospektive Studie].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>von Bodungen, Uta; Ruess, Katja; Reif, Marcus; Biegel, Ulrike</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Hintergrund: Orale maligne Melanome (OMM) des Hundes zeichnen sich durch schnelles Wachstum, lokale Invasion und hohe Metastasierungsraten aus. Extrakte auf Basis von Viscum album L. (VAE) werden zunehmend in der Krebstherapie sowohl in der Human- als auch in der Veterinärmedizin eingesetzt. Ziel unserer Studie war es zu untersuchen, inwieweit die adjuvante Therapie mit VAE eine therapeutische Option <span class="hlt">zur</span> Behandlung von OMM ist. Besonderes Augenmerk galt dabei der Überlebenszeit und möglichen Nebenwirkungen. Tiere und Methoden: 26 Hunde mit OMM, die in einem der größten veterinäronkologischen Zentren der Schweiz allesamt eine Strahlentherapie erhielten (teilweise nach operativer Tumorresektion) wurden in die retrospektive Studie eingeschlossen: 18 Hunde wurden mit VAE behandelt (1 ml VAE (Iscador®) in ansteigenden Konzentrationen von 0,1 bis 20 mg/ml subkutan 3-mal pro Woche (VAE-Gruppe), 8 erhielten keine adjuvante Behandlung (Vergleichsgruppe). Wir verglichen die Größenentwicklung der OMM sowie die Überlebenszeit. Ergebnisse: Patienten mit Bestrahlung und adjuvanter VAE-Therapie zeigten mit 236 Tagen eine signifikant längere mediane Überlebenszeit im Vergleich zu Patienten mit Bestrahlung, aber ohne adjuvante VAE-Therapie (49 Tage; Log-Rank-Test: p = 0,0047). Die VAE-Therapie verlängerte die Überlebenszeit um mehr als zwei Drittel (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0,30, 95%-Konfidenzintervall (KI) 0,11-0,86; p = 0,024), während ein höheres Tumorstadium gemäß UICC (Union internationale contre le cancer) einen statistischen Trend <span class="hlt">zur</span> Verdopplung des Sterberisikos zeigte (UICC-Stadium III/IV vs. I/II: HR = 2,12, 95%-KI 0,88-5,12; p = 0,095). Zwei Patienten zeigten milde Nebenwirkungen während der VAE-Behandlung. Einer der beiden zeigte 1 Tag lang ein selbstlimitiertes Fieber, bei dem anderen Patienten reduzierten wir die Dosis von einem konzentrierteren zu einem weniger konzentrierten VAE (Serie 0) aufgrund von Müdigkeit, die daraufhin verschwand</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110016823','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110016823"><span>Ka-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Autonomous Formation Flying Sensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tien, Jeffrey; Purcell, George, Jr.; Srinivasan, Jeffrey; Ciminera, Michael; Srinivasan, Meera; Meehan, Thomas; Young, Lawrence; Aung, MiMi; Amaro, Luis; Chong, Yong; <a style="text-decoration: none; " href="javascript:void(0); " onClick="displayelement('author_20110016823'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20110016823_show'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20110016823_hide'); "> <img style="display:inline; width:12px; height:12px; " src="images/arrow-up.gif" width="12" height="12" border="0" alt="hide" id="author_20110016823_show"> <img style="width:12px; height:12px; display:none; " src="images/arrow-down.gif" width="12" height="12" border="0" alt="hide" id="author_20110016823_hide"></p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> integrated range and bearing-angle formation sensor called the Autonomous Formation Flying (AFF) Sensor has been developed to enable deep-space formation flying of multiple spacecraft. The AFF Sensor concept is similar to that of the Global Positioning System (GPS), but the AFF Sensor would not use the GPS. The AFF Sensor would reside in radio transceivers and signal-processing subsystems aboard the formation-flying spacecraft. A version of the AFF Sensor has been developed for initial application to the two-spacecraft StarLight optical-interferometry mission, and several design investigations have been performed. From the prototype development, it has been concluded that the AFF Sensor can be expected to measure distances and directions with standard deviations of 2 cm and 1 arc minute, respectively, for spacecraft separations ranging up to about 1 km. It has also been concluded that it is necessary to optimize performance of the overall mission through design trade-offs among the performance of the AFF Sensor, the field of view of the AFF Sensor, the designs of the spacecraft and the scientific instruments that they will carry, the spacecraft maneuvers required for formation flying, and the design of a formation-control system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17412587','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17412587"><span>Cooperative begging in <span class="hlt">banded</span> mongoose pups.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bell, Matthew B V</p> <p>2007-04-17</p> <p>Vivid begging displays are common in species with parental care [1, 2]. They are usually seen as the way that rival offspring selfishly compete over parental investment [3], and individuals are expected to respond to the begging of rivals by increasing their own begging intensity [4, 5]. Here I show the opposite - that potential rivals gain direct benefits from begging by littermates, so that begging behavior becomes a collective enterprise, similar to other cooperative activities. I investigate begging in communally breeding <span class="hlt">banded</span> mongooses (Mungos mungo), where each pup forms an exclusive relationship with a single helper (its "escort"), minimizing competition over food allocation. Escorts were influenced by the total signal emanating from a litter, so that pups who begged at low rates received more food as litter size increased. Focal pups increased their begging when litters were experimentally reduced or littermates were induced to beg at low rates, but they received food at similar rates and showed reduced weight gain - indicating that they were paying a higher cost for a similar reward. These results suggest that offspring can benefit from companions despite conflicts over the allocation of parental investment [6, 7]. Such benefits provide an explanation for observed variation in the expression of parent-offspring conflict.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4297038','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4297038"><span>Vestibular Findings in Military <span class="hlt">Band</span> Musicians</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Gueber, Crislaine; Silva, Thanara Pruner da; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military <span class="hlt">band</span> musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years). They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%), hearing difficulties (47.3%), dizziness (36.8%), headache (26.3%), intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%), and earache (15.7%). Seven musicians (37.0%) showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%). There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations. PMID:25992076</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28902516','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28902516"><span>Electronic <span class="hlt">Band</span> Structure of Helical Polyisocyanides.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Champagne, Benoît; Liégeois, Vincent; Fripiat, Joseph G; Harris, Frank E</p> <p>2017-10-19</p> <p>Restricted Hartree-Fock computations are reported for a methyl isocyanide polymer (repeating unit -C═N-CH 3 ), whose most stable conformation is expected to be a helical chain. The computations used a standard contracted Gaussian orbital set at the computational levels STO-3G, 3-21G, 6-31G, and 6-31G**, and studies were made for two line-group configurations motivated by earlier work and by studies of space-filling molecular models: (1) A structure of line-group symmetry L9 5 , containing a 9-fold screw axis with atoms displaced in the axial direction by 5/9 times the lattice constant, and (2) a structure of symmetry L4 1 that had been proposed, containing a 4-fold screw axis with translation by 1/4 of the lattice constant. Full use of the line-group symmetry was employed to cause most of the computational complexity to depend only on the size of the asymmetric repeating unit. Data reported include computed bond properties, atomic charge distribution, longitudinal polarizability, <span class="hlt">band</span> structure, and the convoluted density of states. Most features of the description were found to be insensitive to the level of computational approximation. The work also illustrates the importance of exploiting line-group symmetry to extend the range of polymer structural problems that can be treated computationally.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97o5422E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97o5422E"><span>Topological nanophononic states by <span class="hlt">band</span> inversion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Esmann, Martin; Lamberti, Fabrice Roland; Senellart, Pascale; Favero, Ivan; Krebs, Olivier; Lanco, Loïc; Gomez Carbonell, Carmen; Lemaître, Aristide; Lanzillotti-Kimura, Norberto Daniel</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p>Nanophononics is essential for the engineering of thermal transport in nanostructured electronic devices, it greatly facilitates the manipulation of mechanical resonators in the quantum regime, and it could unveil a new route in quantum communications using phonons as carriers of information. Acoustic phonons also constitute a versatile platform for the study of fundamental wave dynamics, including Bloch oscillations, Wannier-Stark ladders, and other localization phenomena. Many of the phenomena studied in nanophononics were inspired by their counterparts in optics and electronics. In these fields, the consideration of topological invariants to control wave dynamics has already had a great impact for the generation of robust confined states. Interestingly, the use of topological phases to engineer nanophononic devices remains an unexplored and promising field. Conversely, the use of acoustic phonons could constitute a rich platform to study topological states. Here, we introduce the concept of topological invariants to nanophononics and experimentally implement a nanophononic system supporting a robust topological interface state at 350 GHz. The state is constructed through <span class="hlt">band</span> inversion, i.e., by concatenating two semiconductor superlattices with inverted spatial mode symmetries. The existence of this state is purely determined by the Zak phases of the constituent superlattices, i.e., the one-dimensional Berry phase. We experimentally evidenced the mode through Raman spectroscopy. The reported robust topological interface states could become part of nanophononic devices requiring resonant structures such as sensors or phonon lasers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17203058','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17203058"><span>Dilatant shear <span class="hlt">bands</span> in solidifying metals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gourlay, C M; Dahle, A K</p> <p>2007-01-04</p> <p>Compacted granular materials expand in response to shear, and can exhibit different behaviour from that of the solids, liquids and gases of which they are composed. Application of the physics of granular materials has increased the understanding of avalanches, geological faults, flow in hoppers and silos, and soil mechanics. During the equiaxed solidification of metallic alloys, there exists a range of solid fractions where the microstructure consists of a geometrically crowded disordered assembly of crystals saturated with liquid. It is therefore natural to ask if such a microstructure deforms as a granular material and what relevance this might have to solidification processing. Here we show that partially solidified alloys can exhibit the characteristics of a cohesionless granular material, including Reynolds' dilatancy and strain localization in dilatant shear <span class="hlt">bands</span> 7-18 mean crystals wide. We show that this behaviour is important in defect formation during high pressure die casting of Al and Mg alloys, a global industry that contributes over $7.3 billion to the USA's economy alone and is used in the manufacture of products that include mobile-phone covers and steering wheels. More broadly, these findings highlight the potential to apply the principles and modelling approaches developed in granular mechanics to the field of solidification processing, and also indicate the possible benefits that might be gained from exploring and exploiting further synergies between these fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000073297&hterms=forest+trees&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dforest%2Btrees','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000073297&hterms=forest+trees&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dforest%2Btrees"><span>Passive Microwave Measurements Over Conifer Forests at L-<span class="hlt">Band</span> and C-<span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Chauhan, N.; Kim, E.; Bidwell, S.; Goodberlet, M.; Haken, M.; deMatthaeis, P.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Measurements have been made at L-<span class="hlt">band</span> and C-<span class="hlt">band</span> over conifer forests in Virginia to study the response of passive microwave instruments to biomass and soil moisture. A series of aircraft measurements were made in July, August and November, 1999 over relatively homogenous conifer forests of varying biomass. Three radiometers participated in these measurements. These were: 1) the L-<span class="hlt">band</span> radiometer ESTAR, a horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer which has been used extensively in past measurements of soil moisture; 2) the L-<span class="hlt">band</span> radiometer SLFMR, a vertically polarized cross-track scanner which has been used successfully in the past for mapping sea surface salinity; and 3) The ACMR, a new C-<span class="hlt">band</span> radiometer which operates at V- and H-polarization and in the configuration for these experiments did not scan. All three radiometers were flown on the NASA P-3 aircraft based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The ESTAR and SLFMR were mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and imaged across track whereas the ACMR was mounted to look aft at 54 degrees up from nadir. Data was collected at altitudes of 915 meters and 457 meters. The forests consisted of relatively homogeneous "managed" stands of conifer located near Waverly, Virginia. This is a relatively flat area about 30 miles southeast of Richmond, VA with numerous stands of trees being grown for the forestry industry. The stands selected for study consisted of areas of regrowth and mature stands of pine. In addition, a small stand of very large trees was observed. Soil moisture sampling was done in each stand during the aircraft over flights. Data was collected on July 7, August 27, November 15 and November 30, 1999. Measurements were made with ESTAR on all days. The ACMR flew on the summer missions and the SLFMR was present only on the August 27 flight. Soil moisture varied from quite dry on July 7 to quite moist on November 30 (which was shortly after a period of rain). The microwave</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10000E..1QC','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10000E..1QC"><span>Model development for MODIS thermal <span class="hlt">band</span> electronic cross-talk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Tiejun; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu; Li, Yonghong; Brinkmann, Jake; Keller, Graziela; Xiong, Xiaoxiong (Jack)</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Among them, 16 thermal emissive <span class="hlt">bands</span> covering a wavelength range from 3.8 to 14.4 μm. After 16 years on-orbit operation, the electronic crosstalk of a few Terra MODIS thermal emissive <span class="hlt">bands</span> develop substantial issues which cause biases in the EV brightness temperature measurements and surface feature contamination. The crosstalk effects on <span class="hlt">band</span> 27 with center wavelength at 6.7 μm and <span class="hlt">band</span> 29 at 8.5 μm increased significantly in recent years, affecting downstream products such as water vapor and cloud mask. The crosstalk issue can be observed from nearly monthly scheduled lunar measurements, from which the crosstalk coefficients can be derived. Most of MODIS thermal <span class="hlt">bands</span> are saturated at moon surface temperatures and the development of an alternative approach is very helpful for verification. In this work, a physical model was developed to assess the crosstalk impact on calibration as well as in Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. This model was applied to Terra MODIS <span class="hlt">band</span> 29 empirically for correction of Earth brightness temperature measurements. In the model development, the detector nonlinear response is considered. The impacts of the electronic crosstalk are assessed in two steps. The first step consists of determining the impact on calibration using the on-board blackbody (BB). Due to the detector nonlinear response and large background signal, both linear and nonlinear coefficients are affected by the crosstalk from sending <span class="hlt">bands</span>. The crosstalk impact on calibration coefficients was calculated. The second step is to calculate the effects on the Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. The effects include those from affected calibration coefficients and the contamination of Earth view measurements. This model links the measurement bias with crosstalk coefficients, detector nonlinearity, and the ratio of Earth measurements between the sending and receiving <span class="hlt">bands</span>. The correction</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.T31C4625L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.T31C4625L"><span>Study of Deformation <span class="hlt">Bands</span> in Ignimbrites in Shihtiping, Eastern Taiwan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, S. T.; Huang, W. J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Shihtiping is located at the coast of eastern Taiwan, where rocks are the products of subaerial eruption by Chimei Volcano in late Miocene. The major lithology is ignimbrite along with pyroclasts in various sizes. Deformation <span class="hlt">bands</span> ubiquitously appear in such loose, high-porosity, rocks. This study aims at documenting the occurrence of the deformation <span class="hlt">bands</span>, understanding their formation mechanism and discussing their tectonic implications. There are two sets of deformation <span class="hlt">bands</span> with orientations of N60°~80°E and N50°~70°W, respectively, in Shihtiping. The dip angles of both range from 70° to 90°. Commonly, the deformation <span class="hlt">bands</span> are exposed as single trace or braided trace composed of several individuals. They can be traced easily because they are protruding owning to more weathering-resistant than the host rock. Thickness and separation of single deformation <span class="hlt">band</span> are in the order of millimeter and millimeter to centimeter, respectively. Thickness of zone of deformation <span class="hlt">band</span> ranges from few mm to tens of cm and total separation is commonly tens of cm. Based on microscopic examination, mineral assemblages in deformation <span class="hlt">bands</span> usually include plagioclase, hornblende and augite. Although mineral assemblages are the same as host rock, clasts in deformation <span class="hlt">bands</span> are rounder and smaller. Thus, it results in closed packing and porosity reduction within deformation <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Summed up the observations, the deformation <span class="hlt">bands</span> in Shihtiping were formed by cataclasis and can be classified as cataclastic <span class="hlt">band</span>. They may reflect the regional paelostress state but not accompanied with any tectonic fault.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22907924','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22907924"><span>Clock is not a component of Z-<span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Jushuo; Dube, Dipak K; White, Jennifer; Fan, Yingli; Sanger, Jean M; Sanger, Joseph W</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The process of Z-<span class="hlt">band</span> assembly begins with the formation of small Z-bodies composed of a complex of proteins rich in alpha-actinin. As additional proteins are added to nascent myofibrils, Z-bodies are transformed into continuous <span class="hlt">bands</span> that form coherent discs of interacting proteins at the boundaries of sarcomeres. The steps controlling the transition of Z-bodies to Z-<span class="hlt">bands</span> are not known. The report that a circadian protein, Clock, was localized in the Z-<span class="hlt">bands</span> of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes raised the question whether this transcription factor could be involved in Z-<span class="hlt">band</span> assembly. We found that the anti-Clock antibody used in the reported study also stained the Z-<span class="hlt">bands</span> and Z-bodies of mouse and avian cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. YFP constructs of Clock that were assembled, however, did not localize to the Z-<span class="hlt">bands</span> of muscle cells. Controls of Clock's activity showed that cotransfection of muscle cells with pYFP-Clock and pCeFP-BMAL1 led to the expected nuclear localization of YFP-Clock with its binding partner CeFP-BMAL1. Neither CeFP-BMAL1 nor antibodies directed against BMAL1 localized to Z-<span class="hlt">bands</span>. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay (VC-BMAL1 and VN-Clock) confirmed the absence of Clock and BMAL1 from Z-<span class="hlt">bands</span>, and their nuclear colocalization. A second anti-Clock antibody stained nuclei, but not Z-<span class="hlt">bands</span>, of cells cotransfected with Clock and BMAL1 plasmids. Western blots of reactions of muscle extracts and purified alpha-actinins with the two anti-Clock antibodies showed that the original antibody cross-reacted with alpha-actinin and the second did not. These results cannot confirm Clock as an active component of Z-<span class="hlt">bands</span>. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27384682','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27384682"><span>Laparoscopic <span class="hlt">Band</span>-Separated One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ospanov, Oral B</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>This video demonstrates laparoscopic <span class="hlt">band</span>-separated one anastomosis gastric bypass-combining the advantages of <span class="hlt">banding</span> and gastric bypass without stapler and cutter use. This is basically a gastrojejunal loop bypass above an obstructive <span class="hlt">band</span> in the upper stomach. An adjustable low pressure "Medsil" gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> was introduced in the abdomen and retracted through the retrogastric tunnel. The front wall of the stomach below the <span class="hlt">band</span> was displaced in the upward direction through the ring <span class="hlt">band</span>, increasing the size of the anterior portion of the stomach pouch so that a gastroenteroanastomosis could be created at this point. Gastro-gastric sutures were placed to create a gastro-gastric plication around the <span class="hlt">band</span> and hold it in position. The <span class="hlt">band</span> tubing was exteriorized and connected to a special port, which was secured to the abdominal wall fascia. A jejunal loop was created about 200 cm from the ligament of Treitz and anastomosed to the gastric pouch by hand using Vicryl 2/0 sutures. Between November 2015 and February 2016, the study was performed on 10 patients. The average operating time for all cases was 75 min (range 63-87). There was no morbidity or mortality. No complications were observed, including <span class="hlt">band</span> erosion and <span class="hlt">band</span> infection. Operation costs were about $2000 lower with this method than with standard gastric bypass surgery. Postop the patients lost weight by 3-4 kg per month. Preliminary results show that laparoscopic <span class="hlt">band</span>-separated one anastomosis gastric bypass have feasibility, safety, efficacy, and reduced operating costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120013672','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120013672"><span>Terra MODIS <span class="hlt">Band</span> 27 Electronic Crosstalk Effect and Its Removal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Wenny, Brian</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the primary instruments in the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). The first MODIS instrument was launched in December, 1999 on-board the Terra spacecraft. MODIS has 36 <span class="hlt">bands</span>, covering a wavelength range from 0.4 micron to 14.4 micron. MODIS <span class="hlt">band</span> 27 (6.72 micron) is a water vapor <span class="hlt">band</span>, which is designed to be insensitive to Earth surface features. In recent Earth View (EV) images of Terra <span class="hlt">band</span> 27, surface feature contamination is clearly seen and striping has become very pronounced. In this paper, it is shown that <span class="hlt">band</span> 27 is impacted by electronic crosstalk from <span class="hlt">bands</span> 28-30. An algorithm using a linear approximation is developed to correct the crosstalk effect. The crosstalk coefficients are derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations. They show that the crosstalk is strongly detector dependent and the crosstalk pattern has changed dramatically since launch. The crosstalk contributions are positive to the instrument response of <span class="hlt">band</span> 27 early in the mission but became negative and much larger in magnitude at later stages of the mission for most detectors of the <span class="hlt">band</span>. The algorithm is applied to both Black Body (BB) calibration and MODIS L1B products. With the crosstalk effect removed, the calibration coefficients of Terra MODIS <span class="hlt">band</span> 27 derived from the BB show that the detector differences become smaller. With the algorithm applied to MODIS L1B products, the Earth surface features are significantly removed and the striping is substantially reduced in the images of the <span class="hlt">band</span>. The approach developed in this report for removal of the electronic crosstalk effect can be applied to other MODIS <span class="hlt">bands</span> if similar crosstalk behaviors occur.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018TDM.....5a5008K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018TDM.....5a5008K"><span>Towards <span class="hlt">band</span> structure and <span class="hlt">band</span> offset engineering of monolayer Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 via Strain</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Joon-Seok; Ahmad, Rafia; Pandey, Tribhuwan; Rai, Amritesh; Feng, Simin; Yang, Jing; Lin, Zhong; Terrones, Mauricio; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Singh, Abhishek K.; Akinwande, Deji; Lin, Jung-Fu</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) demonstrate a wide range of optoelectronic properties due to their diverse elemental compositions, and are promising candidates for next-generation optoelectronics and energy harvesting devices. However, effective <span class="hlt">band</span> offset engineering is required to implement practical structures with desirable functionalities. Here, we explore the pressure-induced <span class="hlt">band</span> structure evolution of monolayer WS2 and Mo0.5W0.5S2 using hydrostatic compressive strain applied in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) apparatus and theoretical calculations, in order to study the modulation of <span class="hlt">band</span> structure and explore the possibility of <span class="hlt">band</span> alignment engineering through different compositions. Higher W composition in Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 contributes to a greater pressure-sensitivity of direct <span class="hlt">band</span> gap opening, with a maximum value of 54 meV GPa-1 in WS2. Interestingly, while the conduction <span class="hlt">band</span> minima (CBMs) remains largely unchanged after the rapid gap increase, valence <span class="hlt">band</span> maxima (VBMs) significantly rise above the initial values. It is suggested that the pressure- and composition-engineering could introduce a wide variety of <span class="hlt">band</span> alignments including type I, type II, and type III heterojunctions, and allow to construct precise structures with desirable functionalities. No structural transition is observed during the pressure experiments, implying the pressure could provide selective modulation of <span class="hlt">band</span> offset.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..96x5205M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..96x5205M"><span><span class="hlt">Band-to-band</span> transitions, selection rules, effective mass, and excitonic contributions in monoclinic β -Ga2O3</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mock, Alyssa; Korlacki, Rafał; Briley, Chad; Darakchieva, Vanya; Monemar, Bo; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Goto, Ken; Higashiwaki, Masataka; Schubert, Mathias</p> <p>2017-12-01</p> <p>We employ an eigenpolarization model including the description of direction dependent excitonic effects for rendering critical point structures within the dielectric function tensor of monoclinic β -Ga2O3 yielding a comprehensive analysis of generalized ellipsometry data obtained from 0.75-9 eV. The eigenpolarization model permits complete description of the dielectric response. We obtain, for single-electron and excitonic <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> transitions, anisotropic critical point model parameters including their polarization vectors within the monoclinic lattice. We compare our experimental analysis with results from density functional theory calculations performed using the Gaussian-attenuation-Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof hybrid density functional. We present and discuss the order of the fundamental direct <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> transitions and their polarization selection rules, the electron and hole effective mass parameters for the three lowest <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> transitions, and their excitonic contributions. We find that the effective masses for holes are highly anisotropic and correlate with the selection rules for the fundamental <span class="hlt">band-to-band</span> transitions. The observed transitions are polarized close to the direction of the lowest hole effective mass for the valence <span class="hlt">band</span> participating in the transition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ApPhL..98w4103G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ApPhL..98w4103G"><span>Observation of <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps in the gigahertz range and deaf <span class="hlt">bands</span> in a hypersonic aluminum nitride phononic crystal slab</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gorisse, M.; Benchabane, S.; Teissier, G.; Billard, C.; Reinhardt, A.; Laude, V.; Defaÿ, E.; Aïd, M.</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>We report on the observation of elastic waves propagating in a two-dimensional phononic crystal composed of air holes drilled in an aluminum nitride membrane. The theoretical <span class="hlt">band</span> structure indicates the existence of an acoustic <span class="hlt">band</span> gap centered around 800 MHz with a relative bandwidth of 6.5% that is confirmed by gigahertz optical images of the surface displacement. Further electrical measurements and computation of the transmission reveal a much wider attenuation <span class="hlt">band</span> that is explained by the deaf character of certain <span class="hlt">bands</span> resulting from the orthogonality of their polarization with that of the source.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAP...121f3103A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAP...121f3103A"><span>Ultra-thin narrow-<span class="hlt">band</span>, complementary narrow-<span class="hlt">band</span>, and dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial absorbers for applications in the THz regime</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Astorino, Maria Denise; Frezza, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Nicola</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>In this paper, ultra-thin narrow-<span class="hlt">band</span>, complementary narrow-<span class="hlt">band</span>, and dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> metamaterial absorbers (MMAs), exploiting the same electric ring resonator configuration, are investigated at normal and oblique incidence for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations, and with different physical properties in the THz regime. In the analysis of the ultra-thin narrow-<span class="hlt">band</span> MMA, the limit of applicability of the transmission line model has been overcome with the introduction of a capacitance which considers the z component of the electric field. These absorbing structures have shown a wide angular response and a polarization-insensitive behavior due to the introduction of a conducting ground plane and to the four-fold rotational symmetry of the resonant elements around the propagation axis. We have adopted a retrieval procedure to extract the effective electromagnetic parameters of the proposed MMAs and we have compared the simulated and analytical results through the interference theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016A%26A...590A..52O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016A%26A...590A..52O"><span>Interstellar fullerene compounds and diffuse interstellar <span class="hlt">bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Omont, Alain</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Recently, the presence of fullerenes in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been confirmed and new findings suggest that these fullerenes may possibly form from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the ISM. Moreover, the first confirmed identification of two strong diffuse interstellar <span class="hlt">bands</span> (DIBs) with the fullerene, C60+, connects the long standing suggestion that various fullerenes could be DIB carriers. These new discoveries justify reassessing the overall importance of interstellar fullerene compounds, including fullerenes of various sizes with endohedral or exohedral inclusions and heterofullerenes (EEHFs). The phenomenology of fullerene compounds is complex. In addition to fullerene formation in grain shattering, fullerene formation from fully dehydrogenated PAHs in diffuse interstellar clouds could perhaps transform a significant percentage of the tail of low-mass PAH distribution into fullerenes including EEHFs. But many uncertain processes make it extremely difficult to assess their expected abundance, composition and size distribution, except for the substantial abundance measured for C60+. EEHFs share many properties with pure fullerenes, such as C60, as regards stability, formation/destruction and chemical processes, as well as many basic spectral features. Because DIBs are ubiquitous in all lines of sight in the ISM, we address several questions about the interstellar importance of various EEHFs, especially as possible carriers of diffuse interstellar <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Specifically, we discuss basic interstellar properties and the likely contributions of fullerenes of various sizes and their charged counterparts such as C60+, and then in turn: 1) metallofullerenes; 2) heterofullerenes; 3) fulleranes; 4) fullerene-PAH compounds; 5) H2@C60. From this reassessment of the literature and from combining it with known DIB line identifications, we conclude that the general landscape of interstellar fullerene compounds is probably much richer than heretofore realized</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110012224','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110012224"><span>X-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Acquisition Aid Software</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Britcliffe, Michael J.; Strain, Martha M.; Wert, Michael</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The X-<span class="hlt">band</span> Acquisition Aid (AAP) software is a low-cost acquisition aid for the Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas, and is used while acquiring a spacecraft shortly after it has launched. When enabled, the acquisition aid provides corrections to the antenna-predicted trajectory of the spacecraft to compensate for the variations that occur during the actual launch. The AAP software also provides the corrections to the antenna-predicted trajectory to the navigation team that uses the corrections to refine their model of the spacecraft in order to produce improved antenna-predicted trajectories for each spacecraft that passes over each complex. The software provides an automated Acquisition Aid receiver calibration, and provides graphical displays to the operator and remote viewers via an Ethernet connection. It has a Web server, and the remote workstations use the Firefox browser to view the displays. At any given time, only one operator can control any particular display in order to avoid conflicting commands from more than one control point. The configuration and control is accomplished solely via the graphical displays. The operator does not have to remember any commands. Only a few configuration parameters need to be changed, and can be saved to the appropriate spacecraft-dependent configuration file on the AAP s hard disk. AAP automates the calibration sequence by first commanding the antenna to the correct position, starting the receiver calibration sequence, and then providing the operator with the option of accepting or rejecting the new calibration parameters. If accepted, the new parameters are stored in the appropriate spacecraft-dependent configuration file. The calibration can be performed on the Sun, greatly expanding the window of opportunity for calibration. The spacecraft traditionally used for calibration is in view typically twice per day, and only for about ten minutes each pass.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2885579','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2885579"><span>W-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Frequency-Swept EPR</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hyde, James S.; Strangeway, Robert A.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Froncisz, Wojciech</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes a novel experiment on nitroxide radical spin labels using a multiarm EPR W-<span class="hlt">band</span> bridge with a loop-gap resonator (LGR). We demonstrate EPR spectroscopy of spin labels by linear sweep of the microwave frequency across the spectrum. The high bandwidth of the LGR, about 1 GHz between 3 dB points of the microwave resonance, makes this new experiment possible. A frequency-tunable yttrium iron garnet (YIG) oscillator provides sweep rates as high as 1.8 × 105 GHz/s, which corresponds to 6.3 kT/s in magnetic field-sweep units over a 44 MHz range. Two experimental domains were identified. In the first, linear frequency sweep rates were relatively slow, and pure absorption and pure dispersion spectra were obtained. This appears to be a practical mode of operation at the present level of technological development. The main advantage is the elimination of sinusoidal magnetic field modulation. In the second mode, the frequency is swept rapidly across a portion of the spectrum, and then the frequency sweep is stopped for a readout period; FID signals from a swept line oscillate at a frequency that is the difference between the spectral position of the line in frequency units and the readout position. If there is more than one line, oscillations are superimposed. The sweep rates using the YIG oscillator were too slow, and the portion of the spectrum too narrow to achieve the full EPR equivalent of Fourier transform (FT) NMR. The paper discusses technical advances required to reach this goal. The hypothesis that trapezoidal frequency sweep is an enabling technology for FT EPR is supported by this study. PMID:20462775</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.470.2835L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.470.2835L"><span>TRES survey of variable diffuse interstellar <span class="hlt">bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Law, Charles J.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Johansen, Sommer L.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Margutti, Raffaella; Parrent, Jerod T.; Drout, Maria R.; Sanders, Nathan E.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Latham, David W.</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Diffuse interstellar <span class="hlt">bands</span> (DIBs) are absorption features commonly observed in optical/near-infrared spectra of stars and thought to be associated with polyatomic molecules that comprise a significant reservoir of organic material in the Universe. However, the central wavelengths of almost all DIBs do not correspond with electronic transitions of known atomic or molecular species and the specific physical nature of their carriers remains inconclusive despite decades of observational, theoretical and experimental research. It is well established that DIB carriers are located in the interstellar medium, but the recent discovery of time-varying DIBs in the spectra of the extragalactic supernova SN 2012ap suggests that some may be created in massive star environments. Here, we report evidence of short time-scale (∼10-60 d) changes in DIB absorption line substructure towards 3 of 17 massive stars observed as part of a pathfinder survey of variable DIBs conducted with the 1.5-m Tillinghast telescope and Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) at Fred L. Whipple Observatory. The detections are made in high-resolution optical spectra (R ∼ 44 000) having signal-to-noise ratios of 5-15 around the 5797 and 6614 Å features, and are considered significant but requiring further investigation. We find that these changes are potentially consistent with interactions between stellar winds and DIB carriers in close proximity. Our findings motivate a larger survey to further characterize these variations and may establish a powerful new method for probing the poorly understood physical characteristics of DIB carriers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AAS...22915115L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AAS...22915115L"><span>TRES Survey of Variable Diffuse Interstellar <span class="hlt">Bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Law, Charles; Milisavljevic, Dan; Crabtree, Kyle; Johansen, Sommer; Patnaude, Daniel</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Diffuse interstellar <span class="hlt">bands</span> (DIBs) are absorption features commonly observed in optical/near-infrared spectra of stars and thought to be associated with polyatomic molecules that comprise a significant reservoir of organic material in the universe. However, because the central wavelengths of DIBs do not correspond with electronic transitions of known atomic or molecular species, the specific physical nature of their carriers remains inconclusive despite decades of observational, theoretical, and experimental research. It is well established that DIB carriers must be located in the interstellar medium, but the recent discovery of time-varying DIBs in the spectra of the extragalactic supernova SN 2012ap suggests that some may be created in massive star environments. We report evidence of short time-scale (˜1-60 days) variations in DIB absorption line substructure toward 3 of 17 massive stars observed as part of a pathfinder survey of variable DIBs. The detections are made in high-resolution optical spectra (R ˜ 44000) from the Tillinghast Reflection Echelle Spectrograph on the 1.5m Tillinghast telescope at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Fred L. Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins in Arizona. Our detections have signal-to-noise ratios of 5-15 around the features of interest, and are thus considered significant but requiring further investigation. We find that these changes are potentially consistent with interactions between stellar winds and DIB carriers in close proximity. Our findings motivate a larger survey to further characterize these variations and may establish a powerful new method for probing the poorly understood physical characteristics of DIB carriers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25562642','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25562642"><span>A conversation with Susan <span class="hlt">Band</span> Horwitz.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Horwitz, Susan Band; Goldman, I David</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Susan <span class="hlt">Band</span> Horwitz is a Distinguished Professor and holds the Falkenstein Chair in Cancer Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. She is co-chair of the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and associate director for therapeutics at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center. After graduating from Bryn Mawr College, Dr. Horwitz received her PhD in biochemistry from Brandeis University. She has had a continuing interest in natural products as a source of new drugs for the treatment of cancer. Her most seminal research contribution has been in the development of Taxol(®). Dr. Horwitz and her colleagues made the discovery that Taxol had a unique mechanism of action and suggested that it was a prototype for a new class of antitumor drugs. Although Taxol was an antimitotic agent blocking cells in the metaphase stage of the cell cycle, Dr. Horwitz recognized that Taxol was blocking mitosis in a way different from that of other known agents. Her group demonstrated that the binding site for Taxol was on the β-tubulin subunit. The interaction of Taxol with the β-tubulin subunit resulted in stabilized microtubules, essentially paralyzing the cytoskeleton, thereby preventing cell division. Dr. Horwitz served as president (2002-2003) of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. She has received numerous honors and awards, including the C. Chester Stock Award from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Warren Alpert Foundation Prize from Harvard Medical School, the Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cancer Research, the American Cancer Society's Medal of Honor, and the AACR Award for Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research. The following interview was conducted on January 23, 2014.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017E%26PSL.476..165K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017E%26PSL.476..165K"><span>The melting of subducted <span class="hlt">banded</span> iron formations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kang, Nathan; Schmidt, Max W.</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Banded</span> iron formations (BIF) were common shelf and ocean basin sediments 3.5-1.8 Ga ago. To understand the fate of these dense rocks upon subduction, the melting relations of carbonated BIF were determined in Fe-Ca-(Mg)-Si-C-O2 at 950-1400 °C, 6 and 10 GPa, oxidizing (fO2 = hematite-magnetite, HM) and moderately reducing (fO2 ∼CO2-graphite/diamond, CCO) conditions. Solidus temperatures under oxidizing conditions are 950-1025 °C with H2O, and 1050-1150 °C anhydrous, but 250-175 °C higher at graphite saturation (values at 6-10 GPa). The combination of Fe3+ and carbonate leads to a strong melting depression. Solidus curves are steep with 17-20 °C/GPa. Near-solidus melts are ferro-carbonatites with ∼22 wt.% FeOtot, ∼48 wt% CO2 and 1-5 wt.% SiO2 at fO2 ∼ HM and ∼49 wt.% FeOtot, ∼20 wt% CO2 and 19-25 wt.% SiO2 at fO2 ∼ CCO . At elevated subduction geotherms, as likely for the Archean, C-bearing BIF could melt out all carbonate around 6 GPa. Fe-rich carbonatites would rise but stagnate gravitationally near the slab/mantle interface until they react with the mantle through Fe-Mg exchange and partial reduction. The latter would precipitate diamond and yield Fe- and C-rich mantle domains, yet, Fe-Mg is expected to diffusively re-equilibrate over Ga time scales. We propose that the oldest subduction derived diamonds stem from BIF derived melts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25005899','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25005899"><span>[Assessment of parental stress using the "Eltern-Belastungs-Screening <span class="hlt">zur</span> Kindeswohlgefährdung" (EBSK) - association with emotional and behavioral problems in children].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Eichler, Anna K; Glaubitz, Katharina A; Hartmann, Luisa C; Spangler, Gottfried</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Parental stress is increased in clinical contexts (e.g., child psychiatry) and correlates with behavioral and emotional problems of children. In addition, parental stress can result in a biased parental perception of child's behavior and emotions. These interrelations were examined in a normal (N = 320) and a clinical (N = 75) sample. The "Eltern-Belastungs-Screening <span class="hlt">zur</span> Kindeswohlgefährdung" (EBSK; Deegener, Spangler, Körner & Becker, 2009) was used for the assessment of parental stress. As expected, increased EBSK scores were overrepresented in the clinical sample. In both samples stressed parents reported having children with more behavioral and emotional problems. Children of stressed parents in turn reported significantly less problems than their parents did. The rating of independent third persons, e.g. teachers, was not available and should be added in future research. Restrictions in methodology and conclusions for practice are discussed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010inho.book..437H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010inho.book..437H"><span>Auf dem Weg <span class="hlt">zur</span> digitalen Fakultät - moderne IT Infrastruktur am Beispiel des Physik-Departments der TU München</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Homolka, Josef</p> <p></p> <p>Der Geschäftsbetrieb einer Universität ist durch zunehmende Digitalisierung und Nutzung elektronischer Medien gekennzeichnet. Die Einführung immer leistungsfähigerer zentraler IT-Systeme führt zu einer komplexen Vielfalt heterogener Benutzer- und Administrationsschnittstellen. <span class="hlt">Zur</span> Schaffung einer umfassenden benutzerfreundlichen und nahtlosen IT-Infrastruktur ist die Beteiligung aller organisatorischen Einheiten und Ebenen erforderlich. Am Physik-Departement der Technischen Universität München wurden unter Integration eigener Ressourcen mit zentralen Ressourcen, die im Rahmen des IntegraTUM Projektes entwickelt und bereitgestellt wurden, existierende Dienste weiterentwickelt und neue Angebote aufgebaut. Das System, bestehend aus den Komponenten Netzwerk, Arbeitsplatzrechner, Serverinfrastruktur, E-Mail-Service, WWWDienst, Datenhaltung und Software wurde für die Nutzerkreise Studenten und Mitarbeiter im Hinblick auf Anwenderfreundlichkeit und nahtlosen Zugriff optimiert.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016cosp...41E.614F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016cosp...41E.614F"><span>Fullerenes, Organics and the Diffuse Interstellar <span class="hlt">Bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Foing, Bernard H.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>The status of DIB research has strongly advanced since 20 years [1], as well as the quest for fullerenes, PAHs and large organics in space. In 1994 we reported the discovery of two near IR diffuse <span class="hlt">bands</span> coincident with C60+, confirmed in subsequent years [2-6] and now by latest laboratory experiments. A number of DIB observational studies have been published, dealing with: DIB surveys [1,7-10]; measurements of DIB families, correlations and environment dependences [11-14]; extragalactic DIBs [15, 16]. Resolved substructures were detected [17,18] and compared to predicted rotational contours by large molecules [19]. Polarisation studies provided upper limits constraints [20, 21]. DIBs carriers have been linked with organic molecules observed in the interstellar medium [22-25] such as IR <span class="hlt">bands</span> (assigned to PAHs), Extended Red Emission or recently detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME, assigned to spinning dust) and with spectroscopic IR emission <span class="hlt">bands</span> measured with ISO or Spitzer. Fullerenes and PAHs have been proposed to explain some DIBs and specific molecules were searched in DIB spectra [eg 2-6, 26-31]. These could be present in various dehydrogenation and ionisation conditions [32,33]. Experiments in the laboratory and in space [eg 34-36] allow to measure the survival and by-products of these molecules. We review DIB observational results and their interpretation, and discuss the presence of large organics, fullerenes, PAHs, graphenes in space. References [1] Herbig, G. 1995 ARA&A33, 19; [2] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1994 Natur 369, 296; [3] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1997 A&A317, L59; [4] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1995 ASSL202, 65; [5] Ehrenfreund, P., Foing, B. H. 1997 AdSpR19, 1033; [6] Galazutdinov, G. A. et al. 2000 MNRAS317, 750; [7] Jenniskens, P., Desert, F.-X. 1994 A&AS106, 39; [8] Ehrenfreund, P. et al. 1997 A&A318, L28; [9] Tuairisg, S. Ó. et al. 2000 A&AS142, 225; [10] Cox, N. et al. 2005 A&A438, 187; [11] Cami, J. et al. 1997A&A.326, 822</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B44C..05T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B44C..05T"><span>Polarimetric and Structural Properties of a Boreal Forest at P-<span class="hlt">Band</span> and L-<span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tebaldini, S.; Rocca, F.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>With this paper we investigate the structural and polarimetric of the boreal forest within the Krycklan river catchment, Northern Sweden, basing on multi-polarimetric and multi-baseline SAR surveys at P-<span class="hlt">Band</span> and L-<span class="hlt">Band</span> collected in the framework of the ESA campaign BioSAR 2008. The analysis has been carried out by applying the Algebraic Synthesis (AS) technique, recently introduced in literature, which provides a theoretical framework for the decomposition of the backscattered signal into ground-only and volume-only contributions, basing on both baseline and polarization diversity. The availability of multiple baselines allows the formation of a synthetic aperture not only along the azimuth direction but also in elevation. Accordingly, the backscattered echoes can be focused not only in the slant range, azimuth plane, but in the whole 3D space. This is the rationale of the SAR Tomography (T-SAR) concept, which has been widely considered in the literature of the last years. It follows that, as long as the penetration in the scattering volume is guaranteed, the vertical profile of the vegetation layer is retrieved by separating backscatter contributions along the vertical direction, which is the main reason for the exploitation of Tomographic techniques at longer wavelengths. Still, the capabilities of T-SAR are limited to imaging the global vertical structure of the electromagnetic scattering in a certain polarization. It then becomes important to develop methodologies for the investigation of the vertical structure of different Scattering Mechanisms (SMs), such as ground and volume scattering, in such a way as to derive information that can be delivered also outside the field of Radar processing. This is an issue that may become relevant at longer wavelengths, such as P-<span class="hlt">Band</span>, where the presence of multiple scattering arising from the interaction with terrain could hinder the correct reconstruction of the forest structure. The availability of multiple polarizations</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-sts059-s-074.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-sts059-s-074.html"><span>Color composite C-<span class="hlt">band</span> and L-<span class="hlt">band</span> image of Kilauea volcanoe on Hawaii</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-04-15</p> <p>STS059-S-074 (15 April 1994) --- This color composite C-<span class="hlt">Band</span> and L-<span class="hlt">Band</span> image of the Kilauea volcano on the big island of Hawaii was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The city of Hilo can be seen at the top. The image shows the different types of lava flows around the crater Pu'u O'o. Ash deposits which erupted in 1790 from the summit of Kilauea volcano show up as dark in this image, and fine details associated with lava flows which erupted in 1919 and 1974 can be seen to the south of the summit in an area called the Ka'u Desert. In addition, the other historic lava flows created in 1881 and 1984 from Mauna Loa volcano (out of view to the left of this image) can easily be seen despite the fact that the surrounding area is covered by forest. Such information will be used to map the extent of such flows, which can pose a hazard to the subdivisions of Hilo. Highway 11 is the linear feature running from Hilo to the Kilauea volcano. The Kilauea volcano has been almost continuously active for more than the last 11 years. Field teams that were on the ground specifically to support these radar observations report that there was vigorous surface activity about 400 meters (one-quarter mile) inland from the coast. A moving lava flow about 200 meters (660 feet) in length was observed at the time of the Shuttle over flight, raising the possibility that subsequent images taken during this mission will show changes in the landscape. SIR-C/X-SAR is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE). SIR-C/X-SAR radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-<span class="hlt">Band</span> (24 cm), C-<span class="hlt">Band</span> (6 cm), and X-<span class="hlt">Band</span> (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830007058','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830007058"><span>The evolution of a Ku-<span class="hlt">Band</span> satellite network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bransford, L. A.; Diebler, M.; Dutka, S. C.; Gorton, D. W.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to undertake the management and development of CTS terminals and time on appropriate Ku-<span class="hlt">Band</span> satellites was procured. A community of public service users who have readily addressable needs and resources to pay for services on an ad hoc Ku-<span class="hlt">Band</span> network was developed and a test network for selected users was managed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26895900','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26895900"><span>A novel endoscopic fluorescent <span class="hlt">band</span> ligation method for tumor localization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hyun, Jong Hee; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Kwang Gi; Kim, Hong Rae; Lee, Hyun Min; Park, Sunup; Kim, Sung Chun; Choi, Yongdoo; Sohn, Dae Kyung</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Accurate tumor localization is essential for minimally invasive surgery. This study describes the development of a novel endoscopic fluorescent <span class="hlt">band</span> ligation method for the rapid and accurate identification of tumor sites during surgery. The method utilized a fluorescent rubber <span class="hlt">band</span>, made of indocyanine green (ICG) and a liquid rubber solution mixture, as well as a near-infrared fluorescence laparoscopic system with a dual light source using a high-powered light-emitting diode (LED) and a 785-nm laser diode. The fluorescent rubber <span class="hlt">bands</span> were endoscopically placed on the mucosae of porcine stomachs and colons. During subsequent conventional laparoscopic stomach and colon surgery, the fluorescent <span class="hlt">bands</span> were assayed using the near-infrared fluorescence laparoscopy system. The locations of the fluorescent clips were clearly identified on the fluorescence images in real time. The system was able to distinguish the two or three <span class="hlt">bands</span> marked on the mucosal surfaces of the stomach and colon. Resection margins around the fluorescent <span class="hlt">bands</span> were sufficient in the resected specimens obtained during stomach and colon surgery. These novel endoscopic fluorescent <span class="hlt">bands</span> could be rapidly and accurately localized during stomach and colon surgery. Use of these <span class="hlt">bands</span> may make possible the excision of exact target sites during minimally invasive gastrointestinal surgery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100012820','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100012820"><span>K-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Force, Dale A.; Simons, Rainee N.; Peterson, Todd T.; Spitsen, Paul C.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A new space-qualified, high-power, high-efficiency, K-<span class="hlt">band</span> traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) will provide high-rate, high-capacity, direct-to-Earth communications for science data and video gathered by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) during its mission. Several technological advances were responsible for the successful demonstration of the K-<span class="hlt">band</span> TWTA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760009076','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760009076"><span>TDRSS multimode transponder program S-<span class="hlt">band</span> modification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mackey, J. E.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>The S-<span class="hlt">Band</span> TDRS multimode transponder and its associated ground support equipment is described. The transponder demonstrates candidate modulation techniques to provide the required information for the design of an eventual S-<span class="hlt">band</span> transponder suitable for installation in a user satellite, capable of operating as part of a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title50-vol6/pdf/CFR-2010-title50-vol6-sec21-22.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title50-vol6/pdf/CFR-2010-title50-vol6-sec21-22.pdf"><span>50 CFR 21.22 - <span class="hlt">Banding</span> or marking permits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... address of the public, scientific, or educational institution to which any specimens will be donated that... official numbered leg <span class="hlt">bands</span> issued by the Service. The use of any other <span class="hlt">band</span>, clip, dye, or other method of... public scientific or educational institution, birds killed or found dead as a result of the permittee's...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=five+AND+people&pg=6&id=EJ793425','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=five+AND+people&pg=6&id=EJ793425"><span>Musical Collaboration outside School: Processes of Negotiation in <span class="hlt">Band</span> Rehearsals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Miell, Dorothy; Littleton, Karen</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents a study of a series of <span class="hlt">band</span> rehearsals run by five young people as they practised for a gig together: preparing new songs as well as developing their existing sets. The analysis specifically explores the ways in which the <span class="hlt">band</span> members collectively develop and evaluate their musical "works in progress." Their interactions were…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+trends&pg=7&id=EJ898253','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+trends&pg=7&id=EJ898253"><span>Steel <span class="hlt">Band</span> Repertoire: The Case for Original Music</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tanner, Chris</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>In the past few decades, the steel <span class="hlt">band</span> art form has experienced consistent growth and development in several key respects. For example, in the United States, the sheer number of steel <span class="hlt">band</span> programs has steadily increased, and it appears that this trend will continue in the future. Additionally, pan builders and tuners have made great strides in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5882142','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5882142"><span>Constriction of the Stomach by an Unusual Peritoneal <span class="hlt">Band</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kassem, Mohammad W; Iwanaga, Joe; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R. Shane</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Compression of intraabdominal contents can occur due to anomalous congenital <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Herein, we describe, to our knowledge, the first case of compression of the stomach by an anomalous <span class="hlt">band</span> extending from the lesser omentum to the greater omentum. Relevant literature is reviewed and the clinical implications of such a case are described. PMID:29632757</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29632757','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29632757"><span>Constriction of the Stomach by an Unusual Peritoneal <span class="hlt">Band</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kassem, Mohammad W; Patel, Mayank; Iwanaga, Joe; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane</p> <p>2018-02-03</p> <p>Compression of intraabdominal contents can occur due to anomalous congenital <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Herein, we describe, to our knowledge, the first case of compression of the stomach by an anomalous <span class="hlt">band</span> extending from the lesser omentum to the greater omentum. Relevant literature is reviewed and the clinical implications of such a case are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7481E..0BA','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7481E..0BA"><span>Improved target detection by IR dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> image fusion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Adomeit, U.; Ebert, R.</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>Dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> thermal imagers acquire information simultaneously in both the 8-12 μm (long-wave infrared, LWIR) and the 3-5 μm (mid-wave infrared, MWIR) spectral range. Compared to single-<span class="hlt">band</span> thermal imagers they are expected to have several advantages in military applications. These advantages include the opportunity to use the best <span class="hlt">band</span> for given atmospheric conditions (e. g. cold climate: LWIR, hot and humid climate: MWIR), the potential to better detect camouflaged targets and an improved discrimination between targets and decoys. Most of these advantages have not yet been verified and/or quantified. It is expected that image fusion allows better exploitation of the information content available with dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> imagers especially with respect to detection of targets. We have developed a method for dual-<span class="hlt">band</span> image fusion based on the apparent temperature differences in the two <span class="hlt">bands</span>. This method showed promising results in laboratory tests. In order to evaluate its performance under operational conditions we conducted a field trial in an area with high thermal clutter. In such areas, targets are hardly to detect in single-<span class="hlt">band</span> images because they vanish in the clutter structure. The image data collected in this field trial was used for a perception experiment. This perception experiment showed an enhanced target detection range and reduced false alarm rate for the fused images compared to the single-<span class="hlt">band</span> images.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvC..96c4321G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvC..96c4321G"><span>Outstanding problems in the <span class="hlt">band</span> structures of 152Sm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gupta, J. B.; Hamilton, J. H.</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>The recent data on B (E 2 ) values, deduced from the multi-Coulex excitation of the low spin states in the decay of 152Sm, and other experimental findings in the last two decades are compared with the predictions from the microscopic dynamic pairing plus quadrupole model of Kumar and Baranger. The 1292.8 keV 2+ state is assigned to the 03 + <span class="hlt">band</span>, and the K =2 assignment of the 1769 keV 2+ state is confirmed. The anomaly of the shape coexistence of the assumed spherical β <span class="hlt">band</span> versus the deformed ground <span class="hlt">band</span> is resolved. The values from the critical point symmetry X(5) support the collective character of the β <span class="hlt">band</span>. The problem with the two-term interacting boson model Hamiltonian in predicting β and γ <span class="hlt">bands</span> in 152Sm leads to interesting consequences. The collective features of the second excited Kπ=03 + <span class="hlt">band</span> are preferred over the "pairing isomer" view. Also the multiphonon nature of the higher lying Kπ=22 +β γ <span class="hlt">band</span> and Kπ=4+ <span class="hlt">band</span> are illustrated vis-à-vis the new data and the nuclear structure theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=rock&pg=4&id=EJ1035886','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=rock&pg=4&id=EJ1035886"><span>Popular Music Pedagogy: <span class="hlt">Band</span> Rehearsals at British Universities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pulman, Mark</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>There has been little published pedagogical research on popular music group rehearsing. This study explores the perceptions of tutors and student pop/rock <span class="hlt">bands</span> about the rehearsals in which they were involved as a part of their university music course. The participants were 10 tutors and 16 <span class="hlt">bands</span> from eight British tertiary institutions. Analysis…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title50-vol9/pdf/CFR-2014-title50-vol9-sec21-22.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title50-vol9/pdf/CFR-2014-title50-vol9-sec21-22.pdf"><span>50 CFR 21.22 - <span class="hlt">Banding</span> or marking permits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... address of the public, scientific, or educational institution to which any specimens will be donated that... official numbered leg <span class="hlt">bands</span> issued by the Service. The use of any other <span class="hlt">band</span>, clip, dye, or other method of... public scientific or educational institution, birds killed or found dead as a result of the permittee's...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title50-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title50-vol8-sec21-22.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title50-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title50-vol8-sec21-22.pdf"><span>50 CFR 21.22 - <span class="hlt">Banding</span> or marking permits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... address of the public, scientific, or educational institution to which any specimens will be donated that... official numbered leg <span class="hlt">bands</span> issued by the Service. The use of any other <span class="hlt">band</span>, clip, dye, or other method of... public scientific or educational institution, birds killed or found dead as a result of the permittee's...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title50-vol9/pdf/CFR-2012-title50-vol9-sec21-22.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title50-vol9/pdf/CFR-2012-title50-vol9-sec21-22.pdf"><span>50 CFR 21.22 - <span class="hlt">Banding</span> or marking permits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... address of the public, scientific, or educational institution to which any specimens will be donated that... official numbered leg <span class="hlt">bands</span> issued by the Service. The use of any other <span class="hlt">band</span>, clip, dye, or other method of... public scientific or educational institution, birds killed or found dead as a result of the permittee's...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740057513&hterms=twilight&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dtwilight','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740057513&hterms=twilight&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dtwilight"><span>Nitric oxide gamma and delta <span class="hlt">band</span> emission at twilight</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Feldman, P. D.; Takacs, P. Z.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Nitric oxide twilight emission above 140 km in the gamma- and delta-<span class="hlt">bands</span> was observed with a rocket-borne spectrophotometer. The relative intensity of the two <span class="hlt">band</span> systems indicates that the emission is produced predominantly by the chemiluminescent preassociation of oxygen and nitrogen atoms.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvB..86s5315L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvB..86s5315L"><span>Temperature-dependent internal photoemission probe for <span class="hlt">band</span> parameters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lao, Yan-Feng; Perera, A. G. Unil</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>The temperature-dependent characteristic of <span class="hlt">band</span> offsets at the heterojunction interface was studied by an internal photoemission (IPE) method. In contrast to the traditional Fowler method independent of the temperature (T), this method takes into account carrier thermalization and carrier/dopant-induced <span class="hlt">band</span>-renormalization and <span class="hlt">band</span>-tailing effects, and thus measures the <span class="hlt">band</span>-offset parameter at different temperatures. Despite intensive studies in the past few decades, the T dependence of this key <span class="hlt">band</span> parameter is still not well understood. Re-examining a p-type doped GaAs emitter/undoped AlxGa1-xAs barrier heterojunction system disclosed its previously ignored T dependency in the valence-<span class="hlt">band</span> offset, with a variation up to ˜-10-4 eV/K in order to accommodate the difference in the T-dependent <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps between GaAs and AlGaAs. Through determining the Fermi energy level (Ef), IPE is able to distinguish the impurity (IB) and valence <span class="hlt">bands</span> (VB) of extrinsic semiconductors. One important example is to determine Ef of dilute magnetic semiconductors such as GaMnAs, and to understand whether it is in the IB or VB.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4013218','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4013218"><span>Gamma <span class="hlt">Band</span> Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Studies&id=EJ1102831','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Studies&id=EJ1102831"><span>Research on Community <span class="hlt">Bands</span>: Past, Present, and Future</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rohwer, Debbie</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this review of literature was to synthesize findings of studies investigating community <span class="hlt">bands</span>. This review of literature centers on research that has been conducted on community <span class="hlt">bands</span> in status studies, historical/cultural studies, pedagogical studies, health and wellness studies, and intergenerational studies. The last section of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title32-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title32-vol3-sec508-1.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title32-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title32-vol3-sec508-1.pdf"><span>32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Utilization of Army <span class="hlt">bands</span>. 508.1 Section 508.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND... Secretary of Defense. The authority to determine whether the use of an Army <span class="hlt">band</span> at a public gathering is...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24135149','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24135149"><span>Cellular mechanics of germ <span class="hlt">band</span> retraction in Drosophila.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lynch, Holley E; Crews, Sarah M; Rosenthal, Brett; Kim, Elliott; Gish, Robert; Echiverri, Karl; Hutson, M Shane</p> <p>2013-12-15</p> <p>Germ <span class="hlt">band</span> retraction involves a dramatic rearrangement of the tissues on the surface of the Drosophila embryo. As germ <span class="hlt">band</span> retraction commences, one tissue, the germ <span class="hlt">band</span>, wraps around another, the amnioserosa. Through retraction the two tissues move cohesively as the highly elongated cells of the amnioserosa contract and the germ <span class="hlt">band</span> moves so it is only on one side of the embryo. To understand the mechanical drivers of this process, we designed a series of laser ablations that suggest a mechanical role for the amnioserosa. First, we find that during mid retraction, segments in the curve of the germ <span class="hlt">band</span> are under anisotropic tension. The largest tensions are in the direction in which the amnioserosa contracts. Second, ablating one lateral flank of the amnioserosa reduces the observed force anisotropy and leads to retraction failures. The other intact flank of amnioserosa is insufficient to drive retraction, but can support some germ <span class="hlt">band</span> cell elongation and is thus not a full phenocopy of ush mutants. Another ablation-induced failure in retraction can phenocopy mys mutants, and does so by targeting amnioserosa cells in the same region where the mutant fails to adhere to the germ <span class="hlt">band</span>. We conclude that the amnioserosa must play a key, but assistive, mechanical role that aids uncurling of the germ <span class="hlt">band</span>. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3856716','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3856716"><span>Cellular Mechanics of Germ <span class="hlt">Band</span> Retraction in Drosophila</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lynch, Holley E.; Crews, Sarah M.; Rosenthal, Brett; Kim, Elliott; Gish, Robert; Echiverri, Karl; Hutson, M. Shane</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Germ <span class="hlt">band</span> retraction involves a dramatic rearrangement of the tissues on the surface of the Drosophila embryo. As germ <span class="hlt">band</span> retraction commences, one tissue, the germ <span class="hlt">band</span>, wraps around another, the amnioserosa. Through retraction the two tissues move cohesively as the highly elongated cells of the amnioserosa contract and the germ <span class="hlt">band</span> moves so it is only on one side of the embryo. To understand the mechanical drivers of this process, we designed a series of laser ablations that suggest a mechanical role for the amnioserosa. First, we find that during mid retraction, segments in the curve of the germ <span class="hlt">band</span> are under anisotropic tension. The largest tensions are in the direction in which the amnioserosa contracts. Second, ablating one lateral flank of the amnioserosa reduces the observed force anisotropy and leads to retraction failures. The other intact flank of amnioserosa is insufficient to drive retraction, but can support some germ <span class="hlt">band</span> cell elongation and is thus not a full phenocopy of ush mutants. Another ablation-induced failure in retraction can phenocopy mys mutants, and does so by targeting amnioserosa cells in the same region where the mutant fails to adhere to the germ <span class="hlt">band</span>. We conclude that the amnioserosa must play a key, but assistive, mechanical role that aids uncurling of the germ <span class="hlt">band</span>. PMID:24135149</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf"><span>47 CFR 18.303 - Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>. 18.303 Section 18.303 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL... following safety, search and rescue frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span> is prohibited: 490-510 kHz, 2170-2194 kHz, 8354-8374 kHz...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf"><span>47 CFR 18.303 - Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>. 18.303 Section 18.303 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL... following safety, search and rescue frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span> is prohibited: 490-510 kHz, 2170-2194 kHz, 8354-8374 kHz...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf"><span>47 CFR 18.303 - Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>. 18.303 Section 18.303 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL... following safety, search and rescue frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span> is prohibited: 490-510 kHz, 2170-2194 kHz, 8354-8374 kHz...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf"><span>47 CFR 18.303 - Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>. 18.303 Section 18.303 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL... following safety, search and rescue frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span> is prohibited: 490-510 kHz, 2170-2194 kHz, 8354-8374 kHz...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol1-sec18-303.pdf"><span>47 CFR 18.303 - Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>. 18.303 Section 18.303 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.303 Prohibited frequency <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Operation of ISM equipment within the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1102332.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1102332.pdf"><span>Health Risks Faced by Public School <span class="hlt">Band</span> Directors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Woolery, Danielle N.; Woolery, Jesse A.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Public school <span class="hlt">band</span> directors face many work-related hazards in their grueling, yet rewarding job. As a school year progresses, directors are expected to work long hours, while trying to balance professional and personal responsibilities. A <span class="hlt">band</span> director whose career spans multiple decades can potentially face a number of serious medical problems.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24309750','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24309750"><span>Gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Garcia-Rill, E; Kezunovic, N; D'Onofrio, S; Luster, B; Hyde, J; Bisagno, V; Urbano, F J</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus, intralaminar parafascicular nucleus, and pontine SubCoeruleus nucleus dorsalis all fire in the gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels, or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries: an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity during waking versus during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma <span class="hlt">band</span> processing differ during waking versus REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation?</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-02-08/pdf/2011-2767.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-02-08/pdf/2011-2767.pdf"><span>76 FR 6789 - Unlicensed Operation in the TV Broadcast <span class="hlt">Bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-02-08</p> <p>...., Spectrum Bridge Inc., Telcordia Technologies, and WSdb LLC--as TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> device database administrators. The TV <span class="hlt">bands</span> databases will be used by fixed and personal portable unlicensed devices to identify unused... administrators to develop the databases that are necessary to enable the introduction of this new class of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27376841','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27376841"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> gap in tubular pillar phononic crystal plate.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shu, Fengfeng; Liu, Yongshun; Wu, Junfeng; Wu, Yihui</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>In this paper, a phononic crystal (PC) plate with tubular pillars is presented and investigated. The <span class="hlt">band</span> structures and mode displacement profiles are calculated by using finite element method. The result shows that a complete <span class="hlt">band</span> gap opens when the ratio of the pillar height to the plate thickness is about 1.6. However, for classic cylinder pillar structures, a <span class="hlt">band</span> gap opens when the ratio is equal or greater than 3. A tubular pillar design with a void room in it enhances acoustic multiple scattering and gives rise to the opening of the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap. In order to verify it, a PC structure with double tubular pillars different in size (one within the other) is introduced and a more than 2times <span class="hlt">band</span> gap enlargement is observed. Furthermore, the coupling between the resonant mode and the plate mode around the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap is characterized, as well as the effect of the geometrical parameters on the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap. The behavior of such structure could be utilized to design a pillar PC with stronger structural stability and to enlarge <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1013826','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1013826"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V [Knoxville, TN</p> <p>2010-08-17</p> <p>Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency <span class="hlt">band</span>; exciting a probe using the <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency <span class="hlt">band</span>; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation). An apparatus includes a <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1083943','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1083943"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V</p> <p>2013-05-28</p> <p>Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency <span class="hlt">band</span>; exciting a probe using the <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency <span class="hlt">band</span>; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation). An apparatus includes a <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the <span class="hlt">band</span> excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=education+AND+music+AND+linked+AND+data&id=EJ705508','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=education+AND+music+AND+linked+AND+data&id=EJ705508"><span>Effect of Sex Identification on Instrument Assignment by <span class="hlt">Band</span> Directors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnson, Christopher M.; Stewart, Erin E.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sex identification on the assignment of instruments to beginning <span class="hlt">band</span> students. Participants were <span class="hlt">band</span> directors solicited at music conferences and music education students solicited from major universities across the United States. Participants completed an online survey about instrument…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14560267','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14560267"><span>Mechanical and biological comparison of latex and silicone rubber <span class="hlt">bands</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hwang, Chung-Ju; Cha, Jung-Yul</p> <p>2003-10-01</p> <p>Latex rubber <span class="hlt">bands</span> are routinely used to supply orthodontic force. However, because the incidence of allergic reactions to latex is rising, the use of nonlatex alternatives is increasing, and assessing the mechanical properties of the replacement products is becoming more important. The purposes of this study were to compare the mechanical properties of latex and silicone orthodontic rubber <span class="hlt">bands</span> through static testing under dry and wet conditions, and to compare their biologic (cytotoxic) properties. Three brands of latex and 1 brand of silicone rubber <span class="hlt">bands</span> were tested. When extended to 300% of the lumen diameter, the silicone group had an initial force equal to 83% of the product specifications; this was the lowest of the 4 groups. All 4 brands showed notable amounts of force degradation at the 300% extension when subjected to saliva immersion; this approximated a 30% force decay over 2 days. The latex <span class="hlt">bands</span> all followed a similar pattern of force degradation, whereas the silicone <span class="hlt">bands</span> showed a greater increase in force decay as the extension length increased. The silicone <span class="hlt">bands</span> were less cytotoxic than 2 of the 3 types of latex. Although the silicone <span class="hlt">bands</span> showed the least discrepancy of force degradation between air and saliva conditions, the amount of the force decay was the greatest. Therefore, great improvements in the physical properties of the silicone <span class="hlt">band</span> are required before they can be considered an acceptable replacement for latex.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=modern+AND+education+AND+traditional+AND+education&pg=4&id=EJ1179695','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=modern+AND+education+AND+traditional+AND+education&pg=4&id=EJ1179695"><span>"Modern <span class="hlt">Band</span>" as School Music: A Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Byo, James L.</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>This purpose of this study was to uncover the nature and value associated with involvement in "Modern <span class="hlt">Band</span>" (rock <span class="hlt">band</span>), the primary, not supplemental, means to music education in one US school. The values that emerged--music, community, identity, teacher, and classroom management--overlap considerably with the benefits and values…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=322491','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=322491"><span>Subsurface <span class="hlt">banding</span> poultry litter impacts greenhouse gas emissions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/find-a-publication/">USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The impact subsurface <span class="hlt">banding</span> poultry litter (PL) has on greenhouse gas emissions is limited. Thus, a study was conducted in established bermudagrass pastures located in Coastal Plain and Piedmont regions to determine the effects subsurface applying PL has on soil flux using two different <span class="hlt">band</span> spaci...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-14/pdf/2011-23426.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-14/pdf/2011-23426.pdf"><span>76 FR 56657 - Unlicensed Operation in the TV Broadcast <span class="hlt">Bands</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-09-14</p> <p>... Second Report and Order the Commission decided to designate one or more database administrator from the private sector to create and operate TV <span class="hlt">band</span> databases. The TV <span class="hlt">band</span> database administrators will act on behalf of the FCC, but will offer a privately owned and operated service. Each database administrator...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..96i4103T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..96i4103T"><span>Strain gradient drives shear <span class="hlt">banding</span> in metallic glasses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tian, Zhi-Li; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Chen, Yan; Dai, Lan-Hong</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Shear <span class="hlt">banding</span> is a nucleation-controlled process in metallic glasses (MGs) involving multiple temporal-spatial scales, which hinders a concrete understanding of its structural origin down to the atomic scale. Here, inspired by the morphology of composite materials, we propose a different perspective of MGs as a hard particle-reinforced material based on atomic-scale structural heterogeneity. The local stable structures indicated by a high level of local fivefold symmetry (L5FS) act as hard "particles" which are embedded in the relatively soft matrix. We demonstrate this concept by performing atomistic simulations of shear <span class="hlt">banding</span> in CuZr MG. A shear <span class="hlt">band</span> is prone to form in a sample with a high degree of L5FS which is slowly quenched from the liquid. An atomic-scale analysis on strain and the structural evolution reveals that it is the strain gradient effect that has originated from structural heterogeneity that facilitates shear transformation zones (STZs) to mature shear <span class="hlt">bands</span>. An artificial composite model with a high degree of strain gradient, generated by inserting hard MG strips into a soft MG matrix, demonstrates a great propensity for shear <span class="hlt">banding</span>. It therefore confirms the critical role strain gradient plays in shear <span class="hlt">banding</span>. The strain gradient effect on shear <span class="hlt">banding</span> is further quantified with a continuum model and a mechanical instability analysis. These physical insights might highlight the strain gradient as the hidden driving force in transforming STZs into shear <span class="hlt">bands</span> in MGs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MsT.........13T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MsT.........13T"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span> Gap Engineering of Titania Systems Purposed for Photocatalytic Activity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thurston, Cameron</p> <p></p> <p>Ab initio computer aided design drastically increases candidate population for highly specified material discovery and selection. These simulations, carried out through a first-principles computational approach, accurately extrapolate material properties and behavior. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2 ) is one such material that stands to gain a great deal from the use of these simulations. In its anatase form, titania (TiO2 ) has been found to exhibit a <span class="hlt">band</span> gap nearing 3.2 eV. If titania is to become a viable alternative to other contemporary photoactive materials exhibiting <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps better suited for the solar spectrum, then the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap must be subsequently reduced. To lower the energy needed for electronic excitation, both transition metals and non-metals have been extensively researched and are currently viable candidates for the continued reduction of titania's <span class="hlt">band</span> gap. The introduction of multicomponent atomic doping introduces new energy <span class="hlt">bands</span> which tend to both reduce the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap and recombination loss. Ta-N, Nb-N, V-N, Cr-N, Mo-N, and W-N substitutions were studied in titania and subsequent energy and <span class="hlt">band</span> gap calculations show a favorable <span class="hlt">band</span> gap reduction in the case of passivated systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20170008487&hterms=electronics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Delectronics','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20170008487&hterms=electronics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Delectronics"><span>Model Development for MODIS Thermal <span class="hlt">Band</span> Electronic Crosstalk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Tiejun; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu; Li, Yonghonh; Brinkman, Jake; Keller, Graziela; Xiong, Xiaoxiong</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 <span class="hlt">bands</span>. Among them, 16 thermal emissive <span class="hlt">bands</span> covering a wavelength range from 3.8 to 14.4 m. After 16 years on-orbit operation, the electronic crosstalk of a few Terra MODIS thermal emissive <span class="hlt">bands</span> developed substantial issues that cause biases in the EV brightness temperature measurements and surface feature contamination. The crosstalk effects on <span class="hlt">band</span> 27 with center wavelength at 6.7 m and <span class="hlt">band</span> 29 at 8.5 m increased significantly in recent years, affecting downstream products such as water vapor and cloud mask. The crosstalk effect is evident in the near-monthly scheduled lunar measurements, from which the crosstalk coefficients can be derived. The development of an alternative approach is very helpful for independent verification.In this work, a physical model was developed to assess the crosstalk impact on calibration as well as in Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. This model was applied to Terra MODIS <span class="hlt">band</span> 29 empirically to correct the Earth brightness temperature measurements. In the model development, the detectors nonlinear response is considered. The impact of the electronic crosstalk is assessed in two steps. The first step consists of determining the impact on calibration using the on-board blackbody (BB). Due to the detectors nonlinear response and large background signal, both linear and nonlinear coefficients are affected by the crosstalk from sending <span class="hlt">bands</span>. The second step is to calculate the effects on the Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. The effects include those from affected calibration coefficients and the contamination of Earth view measurements. This model links the measurement bias with crosstalk coefficients, detector non-linearity, and the ratio of Earth measurements between the sending and receiving <span class="hlt">bands</span>. The correction of the electronic cross talk can be implemented empirically from the processed bias at different brightness temperature. The implementation</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011LTP....37...69K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011LTP....37...69K"><span>Anomalous resistivity and superconductivity in the two-<span class="hlt">band</span> Hubbard model with one narrow <span class="hlt">band</span> (Review)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kagan, M. Yu.; Valkov, V. V.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>We search for marginal Fermi-liquid behavior in the two-<span class="hlt">band</span> Hubbard model with one narrow <span class="hlt">band</span>. We consider the limit of low electron densities in the <span class="hlt">bands</span> and strong intraband and interband Hubbard interactions. We analyze the influence of electron-polaron effects and other mechanisms for mass-enhancement (related to the momentum dependence of the self-energies) on the effective mass and scattering times of light and heavy components in the clean case (electron-electron scattering and no impurities). We find a tendency towards phase separation (towards negative partial compressibility of heavy particles) in the 3D case with a large mismatch between the densities of heavy and light <span class="hlt">bands</span> in the strong coupling limit. We also find that for low temperatures and equal densities, the resistivity in a homogeneous state R(T )∝T2 behaves as a Fermi-liquid in both 3D and 2D. For temperatures greater than the effective bandwidth for heavy electrons T >Wh*, the coherence of the heavy component breaks down completely. The heavy particles move diffusively in the surrounding light particles. At the same time, light particles scatter on heavy particles as if on immobile (static) impurities. Under these conditions, the heavy component is marginal, while the light component is not. The resistivity approaches saturation for T >Wh* in the 3D case. In 2D the resistivity has a maximum and a localization tail owing to weak-localization corrections of the Altshuler-Aronov type. This behavior of resistivity in 3D could be relevant for some uranium-based heavy-fermion compounds such as UNi2Al3 and in 2D, for some other mixed-valence compounds, possibly including layered manganites. We also consider briefly the superconductive (SC) instability in this model. The leading instability tends to p-wave pairing and is governed by an enhanced Kohn-Luttinger mechanism for SC at low electron densities. The critical temperature corresponds to the pairing of heavy electrons via polarization of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97u4508A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97u4508A"><span>Green's-function theory of dirty two-<span class="hlt">band</span> superconductivity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Asano, Yasuhiro; Golubov, Alexander A.</p> <p>2018-06-01</p> <p>We study the effects of random nonmagnetic impurities on the superconducting transition temperature Tc in a two-<span class="hlt">band</span> superconductor, where we assume an equal-time spin-singlet s -wave pair potential in each conduction <span class="hlt">band</span> and the hybridization between the two <span class="hlt">bands</span> as well as the <span class="hlt">band</span> asymmetry. In the clean limit, the phase of hybridization determines the stability of two states, called s++ and s+-. The interband impurity scatterings decrease Tc of the two states exactly in the same manner when time-reversal symmetry is preserved in the Hamiltonian. We find that a superconductor with larger hybridization shows more moderate suppression of Tc. This effect can be explained by the presence of odd-frequency Cooper pairs, which are generated by the <span class="hlt">band</span> hybridization in the clean limit and are broken by impurities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhLA..382..679L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhLA..382..679L"><span>Designing broad phononic <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps for in-plane modes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Yang Fan; Meng, Fei; Li, Shuo; Jia, Baohua; Zhou, Shiwei; Huang, Xiaodong</p> <p>2018-03-01</p> <p>Phononic crystals are known as artificial materials that can manipulate the propagation of elastic waves, and one essential feature of phononic crystals is the existence of forbidden frequency range of traveling waves called <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps. In this paper, we have proposed an easy way to design phononic crystals with large in-plane <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps. We demonstrated that the gap between two arbitrarily appointed <span class="hlt">bands</span> of in-plane mode can be formed by employing a certain number of solid or hollow circular rods embedded in a matrix material. Topology optimization has been applied to find the best material distributions within the primitive unit cell with maximal <span class="hlt">band</span> gap width. Our results reveal that the centroids of optimized rods coincide with the point positions generated by Lloyd's algorithm, which deepens our understandings on the formation mechanism of phononic in-plane <span class="hlt">band</span> gaps.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750008242','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750008242"><span>The Noisiness of Low Frequency <span class="hlt">Bands</span> of Noise</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lawton, B. W.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>The relative noisiness of low frequency 1/3-octave <span class="hlt">bands</span> of noise was examined. The frequency range investigated was bounded by the <span class="hlt">bands</span> centered at 25 and 200 Hz, with intensities ranging from 50 to 95 db (SPL). Thirty-two subjects used a method of adjustment technique, producing comparison <span class="hlt">band</span> intensities as noisy as 100 and 200 Hz standard <span class="hlt">bands</span> at 60 and 72 db. The work resulted in contours of equal noisiness for 1/3-octave <span class="hlt">bands</span>, ranging in intensity from approximately 58 to 86 db (SPL). These contours were compared with the standard equal noisiness contours; in the region of overlap, between 50 and 200 Hz, the agreement was good.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvL.120n6402S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvL.120n6402S"><span>Topological <span class="hlt">Band</span> Theory for Non-Hermitian Hamiltonians</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shen, Huitao; Zhen, Bo; Fu, Liang</p> <p>2018-04-01</p> <p>We develop the topological <span class="hlt">band</span> theory for systems described by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians, whose energy spectra are generally complex. After generalizing the notion of gapped <span class="hlt">band</span> structures to the non-Hermitian case, we classify "gapped" <span class="hlt">bands</span> in one and two dimensions by explicitly finding their topological invariants. We find nontrivial generalizations of the Chern number in two dimensions, and a new classification in one dimension, whose topology is determined by the energy dispersion rather than the energy eigenstates. We then study the bulk-edge correspondence and the topological phase transition in two dimensions. Different from the Hermitian case, the transition generically involves an extended intermediate phase with complex-energy <span class="hlt">band</span> degeneracies at isolated "exceptional points" in momentum space. We also systematically classify all types of <span class="hlt">band</span> degeneracies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JPhD...42h5110O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JPhD...42h5110O"><span>Electronic transport properties of Ti-impurity <span class="hlt">band</span> in Si</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Olea, J.; González-Díaz, G.; Pastor, D.; Mártil, I.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>In this paper we show that pulsed laser melted high dose implantation of Ti in Si, above the Mott transition, produces an impurity <span class="hlt">band</span> (IB) in this semiconductor. Using the van der Pauw method and Hall effect measurements we find strong laminated conductivity at the implanted layer and a temperature dependent decoupling between the Ti implanted layer (TIL) and the substrate. The conduction mechanism from the TIL to the substrate shows blocking characteristics that could be well explained through IB theory. Using the ATLAS code we can estimate the energetic position of the IB at 0.36 eV from the conduction <span class="hlt">band</span>, the density of holes in this <span class="hlt">band</span> which is closely related to the Ti atomic density and the hole mobility in this <span class="hlt">band</span>. <span class="hlt">Band</span> diagrams of the structure at low and high temperatures are also simulated in the ATLAS framework. The simulation obtained is fully coherent with experimental results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3497012','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3497012"><span>Tunable and sizable <span class="hlt">band</span> gap in silicene by surface adsorption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Quhe, Ruge; Fei, Ruixiang; Liu, Qihang; Zheng, Jiaxin; Li, Hong; Xu, Chengyong; Ni, Zeyuan; Wang, Yangyang; Yu, Dapeng; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lu, Jing</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Opening a sizable <span class="hlt">band</span> gap without degrading its high carrier mobility is as vital for silicene as for graphene to its application as a high-performance field effect transistor (FET). Our density functional theory calculations predict that a <span class="hlt">band</span> gap is opened in silicene by single-side adsorption of alkali atom as a result of sublattice or bond symmetry breaking. The <span class="hlt">band</span> gap size is controllable by changing the adsorption coverage, with an impressive maximum <span class="hlt">band</span> gap up to 0.50 eV. The ab initio quantum transport simulation of a bottom-gated FET based on a sodium-covered silicene reveals a transport gap, which is consistent with the <span class="hlt">band</span> gap, and the resulting on/off current ratio is up to 108. Therefore, a way is paved for silicene as the channel of a high-performance FET. PMID:23152944</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28013027','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28013027"><span>Forces directing germ-<span class="hlt">band</span> extension in Drosophila embryos.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kong, Deqing; Wolf, Fred; Großhans, Jörg</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Body axis elongation by convergent extension is a conserved developmental process found in all metazoans. Drosophila embryonic germ-<span class="hlt">band</span> extension is an important morphogenetic process during embryogenesis, by which the length of the germ-<span class="hlt">band</span> is more than doubled along the anterior-posterior axis. This lengthening is achieved by typical convergent extension, i.e. narrowing the lateral epidermis along the dorsal-ventral axis and simultaneous extension along the anterior-posterior axis. Germ-<span class="hlt">band</span> extension is largely driven by cell intercalation, whose directionality is determined by the planar polarity of the tissue and ultimately by the anterior-posterior patterning system. In addition, extrinsic tensile forces originating from the invaginating endoderm induce cell shape changes, which transiently contribute to germ-<span class="hlt">band</span> extension. Here, we review recent progress in understanding of the role of mechanical forces in germ-<span class="hlt">band</span> extension. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22772098','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22772098"><span>Optimal wavelength <span class="hlt">band</span> clustering for multispectral iris recognition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gong, Yazhuo; Zhang, David; Shi, Pengfei; Yan, Jingqi</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>This work explores the possibility of clustering spectral wavelengths based on the maximum dissimilarity of iris textures. The eventual goal is to determine how many <span class="hlt">bands</span> of spectral wavelengths will be enough for iris multispectral fusion and to find these <span class="hlt">bands</span> that will provide higher performance of iris multispectral recognition. A multispectral acquisition system was first designed for imaging the iris at narrow spectral <span class="hlt">bands</span> in the range of 420 to 940 nm. Next, a set of 60 human iris images that correspond to the right and left eyes of 30 different subjects were acquired for an analysis. Finally, we determined that 3 clusters were enough to represent the 10 feature <span class="hlt">bands</span> of spectral wavelengths using the agglomerative clustering based on two-dimensional principal component analysis. The experimental results suggest (1) the number, center, and composition of clusters of spectral wavelengths and (2) the higher performance of iris multispectral recognition based on a three wavelengths-<span class="hlt">bands</span> fusion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19257619','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19257619"><span><span class="hlt">Band</span>-selective filter in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nakabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kurihara, Susumu</p> <p>2009-02-13</p> <p>Electric transport of a zigzag graphene nanoribbon through a steplike potential and a barrier potential is investigated by using the recursive Green's function method. In the case of the steplike potential, we demonstrate numerically that scattering processes obey a selection rule for the <span class="hlt">band</span> indices when the number of zigzag chains is even; the electrons belonging to the "even" ("odd") <span class="hlt">bands</span> are scattered only into the even (odd) <span class="hlt">bands</span> so that the parity of the wave functions is preserved. In the case of the barrier potential, by tuning the barrier height to be an appropriate value, we show that it can work as the "<span class="hlt">band</span>-selective filter", which transmits electrons selectively with respect to the indices of the <span class="hlt">bands</span> to which the incident electrons belong. Finally, we suggest that this selection rule can be observed in the conductance by applying two barrier potentials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940031056','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940031056"><span>The Mars Observer Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> link experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rebold, T. A.; Kwok, A.; Wood, G. E.; Butman, S.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The Ka-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Link Experiment was the first demonstration of a deep-space communications link in the 32- to 35-GHz <span class="hlt">band</span> (Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span>). It was carried out using the Mars Observer spacecraft while the spacecraft was in the cruise phase of its mission and using a 34-meter beam-waveguide research and development antenna at the Goldstone complex of the DSN. The DSN has been investigating the performance benefits of a shift from X-<span class="hlt">band</span> (8.4 GHz) to Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> (32 GHz) for deep-space communications. The fourfold increase in frequency is expected to offer a factor of 3 to 10 improvement (5 to 10 dB) in signal strength for a given spacecraft transmitter power and antenna size. Until recently, the expected benefits were based on performance studies, with an eye to implementing such a link, but theory was transformed to reality when a 33.7-GHz Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> signal was received from the spacecraft by DSS 13. This article describes the design and implementation of the Ka-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Link Experiment from the spacecraft to the DSS-13 system, as well as results from the Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> telemetry demonstration, ranging demonstration, and long-term tracking experiment. Finally, a preliminary analysis of comparative X- and Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> tracking results is included. These results show a 4- to 7-dB advantage for Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> using the system at DSS 13, assuming such obstacles as antenna pointing loss and power conversion loss are overcome.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97c5139C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PhRvB..97c5139C"><span>Building blocks of topological quantum chemistry: Elementary <span class="hlt">band</span> representations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cano, Jennifer; Bradlyn, Barry; Wang, Zhijun; Elcoro, L.; Vergniory, M. G.; Felser, C.; Aroyo, M. I.; Bernevig, B. Andrei</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>The link between chemical orbitals described by local degrees of freedom and <span class="hlt">band</span> theory, which is defined in momentum space, was proposed by Zak several decades ago for spinless systems with and without time reversal in his theory of "elementary" <span class="hlt">band</span> representations. In a recent paper [Bradlyn et al., Nature (London) 547, 298 (2017), 10.1038/nature23268] we introduced the generalization of this theory to the experimentally relevant situation of spin-orbit coupled systems with time-reversal symmetry and proved that all <span class="hlt">bands</span> that do not transform as <span class="hlt">band</span> representations are topological. Here we give the full details of this construction. We prove that elementary <span class="hlt">band</span> representations are either connected as <span class="hlt">bands</span> in the Brillouin zone and are described by localized Wannier orbitals respecting the symmetries of the lattice (including time reversal when applicable), or, if disconnected, describe topological insulators. We then show how to generate a <span class="hlt">band</span> representation from a particular Wyckoff position and determine which Wyckoff positions generate elementary <span class="hlt">band</span> representations for all space groups. This theory applies to spinful and spinless systems, in all dimensions, with and without time reversal. We introduce a homotopic notion of equivalence and show that it results in a finer classification of topological phases than approaches based only on the symmetry of wave functions at special points in the Brillouin zone. Utilizing a mapping of the <span class="hlt">band</span> connectivity into a graph theory problem, we show in companion papers which Wyckoff positions can generate disconnected elementary <span class="hlt">band</span> representations, furnishing a natural avenue for a systematic materials search.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28141557','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28141557"><span>Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric <span class="hlt">Band</span> (LAGB) Migration - Endoscopic Treatment Modalities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klimczak, Tomasz; Szewczyk, Tomasz; Janczak, Przemysław; Jurałowicz, Piotr</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Laparoscopic adjustible gastric binding (LAGB) is one of most common surgical methods of treating obesity. Gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> migration (erosion) is a typical LAGB complication, with a frequency of about 1-4%. The aim of the study was to present the possibilities of endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of this complication. The study was carried out in the Department of Gastroenterological, Oncological and General Surgery in Łódź. Between 2008 and 2015, 450 gastric <span class="hlt">bands</span> were implanted using the laparoscopic technique in 318 (71%) women and 132 (29%) men. In this period 7 cases of <span class="hlt">band</span> migration were diagnosed - 3 cases in men (2.3%) and 4 cases in women (1.3%), what presents 1.56% of general number of complications. Five out of 7 eroded <span class="hlt">bands</span> were qualified for endoscopic removal. Four out of 5 qualified eroded <span class="hlt">bands</span> were removed using the gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> cutting technique. In one case we used the musculo-mucosal incision technique. In order to diagnose early perforations all patients underwent control passage examinations with oral contrast (gastrografin) 3-6 hours after the procedure. All 5 out of 5 qualified eroded gastric <span class="hlt">bands</span> were successfully removed with the endoscopic method, which gives 100% success rate in own material. Two endoscopic methods were used: 1) endoscopic gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> cutting, 2) endoscopic musculo-mucosal incision. Endoscopy gives a possibility of instant diagnosis of gastric <span class="hlt">band</span> migration and early minimally invasive treatment. One of our endoscopic methods of removing the <span class="hlt">bands</span> by making several incisions of the musculo-mucosal plicae has not yet been described in professional medical literature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000STIN...0171553M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000STIN...0171553M"><span>Mars Global Surveyor Ka-<span class="hlt">Band</span> Frequency Data Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> (32 GHz) along with the primary X-<span class="hlt">band</span> (8.4 GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-in diameter parabolic high gain antenna (HGA) on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) R&D 34-meter antenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. The projected 5-dB link advantage of Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> relative to X-<span class="hlt">band</span> was confirmed in previous reports using measurements of MGS signal strength data acquired during the first two years of the link experiment from December 1996 to December 1998. Analysis of X-<span class="hlt">band</span> and Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> frequency data and difference frequency (fx-fka)/3.8 data will be presented here. On board the spacecraft, a low-power sample of the X-<span class="hlt">band</span> downlink from the transponder is upconverted to 32 GHz, the Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> frequency, amplified to I-W using a Solid State Power Amplifier, and radiated from the dual X/Ka HGA. The X-<span class="hlt">band</span> signal is amplified by one of two 25 W TWTAs. An upconverter first downconverts the 8.42 GHz X-<span class="hlt">band</span> signal to 8 GHz and then multiplies using a X4 multiplier producing the 32 GHz Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> frequency. The frequency source selection is performed by an RF switch which can be commanded to select a VCO (Voltage Controlled Oscillator) or USO (Ultra-Stable Oscillator) reference. The Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> frequency can be either coherent with the X-<span class="hlt">band</span> downlink reference or a hybrid combination of the USO and VCO derived frequencies. The data in this study were chosen such that the Ka-<span class="hlt">band</span> signal is purely coherent with the X-<span class="hlt">band</span> signal, that is the downconverter is driven by the same frequency source as the X-<span class="hlt">band</span> downlink). The ground station used to acquire the data is DSS-13, a 34-meter BWG antenna which incorporates a series of mirrors inside beam waveguide tubes which guide the energy to a subterranean pedestal room, providing a stable environment</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770012173&hterms=mcd&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmcd','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770012173&hterms=mcd&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmcd"><span>Phase and group delay of S-<span class="hlt">band</span> megawatt Cassegrain diplexer and S-<span class="hlt">band</span> megawatt transmit filter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lay, R.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>The phase characteristics and group delay of the S-<span class="hlt">band</span> Megawatt Cassegrain Diplexer (MCD) and S-<span class="hlt">band</span> Megawatt Transmit Filter (MTF) are reported. These phase measurements on the MCD and MTF were done in response to the need to obtain the total DSS hardware ground delay required for very long baseline interferometry and ranging radio metric measurements.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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