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Sample records for zurich neuromotor assessment

  1. Comparison between the Movement ABC-2 and the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment in Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Knaier, Elisa; Köchli, Sabrina; Chaouch, Aziz; Rousson, Valentin; Kriemler, Susi; Jenni, Oskar G

    2016-12-01

    An established test instrument for the assessment of motor performance in children between 3 and 16 years is the Movement Assessment Battery for Children - Second Edition (M-ABC-2). The Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (ZNA) is also widely used for the evaluation of children's motor performance but has not been compared with the M-ABC-2 for children below five years for the purpose of convergent validity. Forty-seven children (26 boys, 21 girls) between three and five years of age were assessed using the M-ABC-2 and the ZNA3-5. Rank correlations between scores of different test components were calculated. Only low-to-moderate correlations were observed when separate components of these tests were compared (.31 to .68, p < .05), especially when involving the associated movements from the ZNA3-5 (-.05 to -.13, p > .05). However, the correlation between summary scores of the two tests was .77 (p < .001), and it increased to .84 when associated movements were excluded, which was comparable in magnitude to the test-retest reliability of the M-ABC-2, supporting convergent validity between the two tests. Although the ZNA3-5 and M-ABC-2 measure different aspects of motor behavior, the two instruments may thus measure essentially the same construct. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. The Validity of Two Neuromotor Assessments for Predicting Motor Performance at 12 Months in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Song, You Hong; Chang, Hyun Jung; Shin, Yong Beom; Park, Young Sook; Park, Yun Hee; Cho, Eun Sol

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the validity of the Test of Infant Motor Performance (TIMP) and general movements (GMs) assessment for predicting Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) score at 12 months in preterm infants. A total of 44 preterm infants who underwent the GMs and TIMP at 1 month and 3 months of corrected age (CA) and whose motor performance was evaluated using AIMS at 12 months CA were included. GMs were judged as abnormal on basis of poor repertoire or cramped-synchronized movements at 1 month CA and abnormal or absent fidgety movement at 3 months CA. TIMP and AIMS scores were categorized as normal (average and low average and >5th percentile, respectively) or abnormal (below average and far below average or <5th percentile, respectively). Correlations between GMs and TIMP scores at 1 month and 3 months CA and the AIMS classification at 12 months CA were examined. The TIMP score at 3 months CA and GMs at 1 month and 3 months CA were significantly correlated with the motor performance at 12 months CA. However, the TIMP score at 1 month CA did not correlate with the AIMS classification at 12 months CA. For infants with normal GMs at 3 months CA, the TIMP score at 3 months CA correlated significantly with the AIMS classification at 12 months CA. Our findings suggest that neuromotor assessment using GMs and TIMP could be useful to identify preterm infants who are likely to benefit from intervention.

  3. Ophthalmological, Cognitive, Electrophysiological and MRI Assessment of Visual Processing in Preterm Children without Major Neuromotor Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Michelle; Vollmer, Brigitte; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Neville, Brian; Connelly, Alan; Wyatt, John; Timms, Chris; De Haan, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Many studies report chronic deficits in visual processing in children born preterm. We investigated whether functional abnormalities in visual processing exist in children born preterm but without major neuromotor impairment (i.e. cerebral palsy). Twelve such children (less than 33 weeks gestation or birthweight less than 1000 g) without major…

  4. The KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment methodology for flood risk: the case of Sihl river in Zurich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, Paolo; Bullo, Martina; Gallina, Valentina; Torresan, Silvia; Critto, Andrea; Zabeo, Alex; Semenzin, Elena; Buchecker, Matthias; Marcomini, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    -spot areas and targets at risk (i.e. people, buildings, infrastructures, agriculture, natural and semi-natural systems, cultural heritages) in the considered region by comparing the baseline scenario with alternative scenarios, where different structural and/or non-structural mitigation measures are planned. Risk maps, along with related statistics, provide crucial information about flood risk pattern, and allow the development of relevant and strategic mitigation and prevention measures to minimizing flood risk in urban areas. The present study applied and validated the KULTURisk RRA methodology to the Sihl river case study in Zurich (Switzerland). Through a tuning process of the methodology to the site-specific context and features, flood related risks have been assessed for different receptors lying on the Sihl river valley, which represents a typical case of river flooding in urban area. The total risk maps obtained under a 300 years return period scenario (selected as the reference one) have highlighted that the area is associated with the lower class of risk. Moreover, the relative risk is higher in Zurich city centre, in the few residential areas around the city centre and within the districts that rely just beside to the Sihl river course.

  5. [Neuromotor assessment of patients with spastic cerebral palsy treated with orthopedic surgery at the National Rehabilitation Institute].

    PubMed

    Piana, A R; Viñals, C L; Del Valle, M C; Arellano, M S; Redón, A T; Peralta, S C; León, S L

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a static neurologic condition resulting from a brain lesion occurring before the completion of brain development. The goal of management is not cure, but increasing patients' functionality and improving their capabilities and maintaining their locomotion, cognitive development, social interaction and independence. The best results are obtained with an early and intensive management that includes physical and occupational therapy, medical and surgical treatments, mechanical aids and the management of concomitant conditions. To assess the neuromotor improvement in patients with spastic CP after surgical treatment at the National Rehabilitation Institute. Patients with a diagnosis of spastic CP who presented at the Pediatric Rehabilitation outpatient service were referred to the Joint CP Clinic from January 2007 to January 2008, and underwent surgical treatment of the pelvic limbs. They were assessed 3 times and underwent neuromotor tests with gross motor function measure (GMFM), which was rated with the gross motor function classification system (GMFCS). Most of the patients had improvement in the muscle tone and contracture assessments as well as in the GMFM, and their self-mobility increased one level. Significant improvements were seen in the muscle tone and contractures after surgery; the GMFM and the self-mobility levels in the GMFCS also improved. Multiple level surgery together with a postoperative physical therapy program results in considerable improvements in the gross motor function measure of patients with spastic CP.

  6. The KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment methodology for water-related natural hazards - Part 2: Application to the Zurich case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, P.; Bullo, M.; Torresan, S.; Critto, A.; Olschewski, R.; Zappa, M.; Marcomini, A.

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of the paper is the application of the KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment (KR-RRA) methodology, presented in the companion paper (Part 1, Ronco et al., 2014), to the Sihl River valley, in Switzerland. Through a tuning process of the methodology to the site-specific context and features, flood related risks have been assessed for different receptors lying on the Sihl River valley including the city of Zurich, which represents a typical case of river flooding in urban area. After characterizing the peculiarities of the specific case study, risk maps have been developed under a 300 years return period scenario (selected as baseline) for six identified relevant targets, exposed to flood risk in the Sihl valley, namely: people, economic activities (including buildings, infrastructures and agriculture), natural and semi-natural systems and cultural heritage. Finally, the total risk index map, which allows to identify and rank areas and hotspots at risk by means of Multi Criteria Decision Analysis tools, has been produced to visualize the spatial pattern of flood risk within the area of study. By means of a tailored participative approach, the total risk maps supplement the consideration of technical experts with the (essential) point of view of the relevant stakeholders for the appraisal of the specific scores and weights related to the receptor-relative risks. The total risk maps obtained for the Sihl River case study are associated with the lower classes of risk. In general, higher relative risks are concentrated in the deeply urbanized area within and around the Zurich city centre and areas that rely just behind to the Sihl River course. Here, forecasted injuries and potential fatalities are mainly due to high population density and high presence of old (vulnerable) people; inundated buildings are mainly classified as continuous and discontinuous urban fabric; flooded roads, pathways and railways, the majority of them referring to the Zurich main

  7. KULTURisk regional risk assessment methodology for water-related natural hazards - Part 2: Application to the Zurich case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, P.; Bullo, M.; Torresan, S.; Critto, A.; Olschewski, R.; Zappa, M.; Marcomini, A.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is the application of the KULTURisk regional risk assessment (KR-RRA) methodology, presented in the companion paper (Part 1, Ronco et al., 2014), to the Sihl River basin, in northern Switzerland. Flood-related risks have been assessed for different receptors lying on the Sihl River valley including Zurich, which represents a typical case of river flooding in an urban area, by calibrating the methodology to the site-specific context and features. Risk maps and statistics have been developed using a 300-year return period scenario for six relevant targets exposed to flood risk: people; economic activities: buildings, infrastructure and agriculture; natural and semi-natural systems; and cultural heritage. Finally, the total risk index map has been produced to visualize the spatial pattern of flood risk within the target area and, therefore, to identify and rank areas and hotspots at risk by means of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) tools. Through a tailored participatory approach, risk maps supplement the consideration of technical experts with the (essential) point of view of relevant stakeholders for the appraisal of the specific scores weighting for the different receptor-relative risks. The total risk maps obtained for the Sihl River case study are associated with the lower classes of risk. In general, higher (relative) risk scores are spatially concentrated in the deeply urbanized city centre and areas that lie just above to river course. Here, predicted injuries and potential fatalities are mainly due to high population density and to the presence of vulnerable people; flooded buildings are mainly classified as continuous and discontinuous urban fabric; flooded roads, pathways and railways, most of them in regards to the Zurich central station (Hauptbahnhof) are at high risk of inundation, causing severe indirect damage. Moreover, the risk pattern for agriculture, natural and semi-natural systems and cultural heritage is relatively

  8. Neuromotor outcomes in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Tsakalidis, Christos; Kyriakidou, Maria; Mitsiakos, Georgios; Chatziioanidis, Helias; Porpodi, Maria; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Nikolaides, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    We examine the neuromotor outcomes of preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Two hundred and nineteen infants (gestational age, ≤ 32 weeks; birth weight, ≤ 1500 g) were studied. Neuromotor development was assessed using the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination. All potential risk factors associated with neuromotor scores (P < 0.015) were included in the generalized linear model (multiple linear regression) to determine if bronchopulmonary dysplasia had an independent relationship with neuromotor scores. Infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia had lower global scores at ages 6 and 12 months. After adjustment for confounding factors, scores of infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia were reduced by 13.2 units, whereas scores for those with periventricular leukomalacia were reduced by 11.1 units, at age 6 months. At age 12 months, scores for those with periventricular leukomalacia were reduced by 11.9 units. Duration of hospital stay reduced scores by 0.1 for each additional day increase in hospital. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia constitutes a major cause of poor neuromotor outcomes at age 6 months, but improvements in motor outcomes occur over time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing neuro-motor recovery in a stroke survivor with high-resolution EEG, robotics and Virtual Reality.

    PubMed

    Comani, Silvia; Schinaia, Lorenzo; Tamburro, Gabriella; Velluto, Lucia; Sorbi, Sandro; Conforto, Silvia; Guarnieri, Biancamaria

    2015-01-01

    One post-stroke patient underwent neuro-motor rehabilitation of one upper limb with a novel system combining a passive robotic device, Virtual Reality training applications and high resolution electroencephalography (HR-EEG). The outcome of the clinical tests and the evaluation of the kinematic parameters recorded with the robotic device concurred to highlight an improved motor recovery of the impaired limb despite the age of the patient, his compromised motor function, and the start of rehabilitation at the 3rd week post stroke. The time frequency and functional source analysis of the HR-EEG signals permitted to quantify the functional changes occurring in the brain in association with the rehabilitation motor tasks, and to highlight the recovery of the neuro-motor function.

  10. An operational hydrological ensemble prediction system for the city of Zurich (Switzerland): assessing the added value of probabilistic forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addor, N.; Jaun, S.; Fundel, F.; Zappa, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Sihl River flows through Zurich, Switzerland's most populated city, for which it represents the largest flood threat. To anticipate extreme discharge events and provide decision support in case of flood risk, a hydrometeorological ensemble prediction system (HEPS) was launched operationally in 2008. This model chain relies on deterministic (COSMO-7) and probabilistic (COSMO-LEPS) atmospheric forecasts, which are used to force a semi-distributed hydrological model (PREVAH) coupled to a hydraulic model (FLORIS). The resulting hydrological forecasts are eventually communicated to the stakeholders involved in the Sihl discharge management. This fully operational setting provides a real framework with which we assessed the potential of deterministic and probabilistic discharge forecasts for flood mitigation. To study the suitability of HEPS for small-scale basins and to quantify the added value conveyed by the probability information, a 31-month reforecast was produced for the Sihl catchment (336 km2). Several metrics support the conclusion that the performance gain is of up to 2 days lead time for the catchment considered. Brier skill scores show that probabilistic hydrological forecasts outperform their deterministic counterparts for all the lead times and event intensities considered. The small size of the Sihl catchment does not prevent skillful discharge forecasts, but makes them particularly dependent on correct precipitation forecasts. Our evaluation stresses that the capacity of the model to provide confident and reliable mid-term probability forecasts for high discharges is limited. We finally highlight challenges for making decisions on the basis of hydrological predictions, and discuss the need for a tool to be used in addition to forecasts to compare the different mitigation actions possible in the Sihl catchment.

  11. Fetal programming of infant neuromotor development: the generation R study.

    PubMed

    van Batenburg-Eddes, Tamara; de Groot, Laila; Steegers, Eric A P; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine whether infant neuromotor development is determined by fetal size and body symmetry in the general population. This study was embedded within the Generation R Study, a population-based cohort in Rotterdam. In 2965 fetuses, growth parameters were measured in mid-pregnancy and late pregnancy. After birth, at age 9 to 15 wks, neuromotor development was assessed with an adapted version of Touwen's Neurodevelopmental Examination. Less optimal neuromotor development was defined as a score in the highest tertile. We found that higher fetal weight was beneficial to infant neurodevelopment. A fetus with a 1-SD score higher weight in mid-pregnancy had an 11% lower risk of less optimal neuromotor development (OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.82-0.97). Similarly, a fetus with a 1-SD score larger abdominal-to-head circumference (AC/HC) ratio had a 13% lower risk of less optimal neuromotor development (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.79-0.96). These associations were also present in late pregnancy. Our findings show that fetal size and body symmetry in pregnancy are associated with infant neuromotor development. These results suggest that differences in infant neuromotor development, a marker of behavioral and cognitive problems, are at least partly caused by processes occurring early in fetal life.

  12. Changing incidence of psychotic disorders among the young in Zurich.

    PubMed

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Lauber, Christoph; Warnke, Inge; Haker, Helene; Murray, Robin M; Rössler, Wulf

    2007-09-01

    There is controversy over whether the incidence rates of schizophrenia and psychotic disorders have changed in recent decades. To detect deviations from trends in incidence, we analysed admission data of patients with an ICD-8/9/10 diagnosis of psychotic disorders in the Canton Zurich / Switzerland, for the period 1977-2005. The data was derived from the central psychiatric register of the Canton Zurich. Ex-post forecasting with ARIMA (Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average) models was used to assess departures from existing trends. In addition, age-period-cohort analysis was applied to determine hidden birth cohort effects. First admission rates of patients with psychotic disorders were constant in men and showed a downward trend in women. However, the rates in the youngest age groups showed a strong increase in the second half of the 1990's. The trend reversal among the youngest age groups coincides with the increased use of cannabis among young Swiss in the 1990's.

  13. Neuromotor control of gluteal muscles in runners with achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Franettovich Smith, Melinda M; Honeywill, Conor; Wyndow, Narelle; Crossley, Kay M; Creaby, Mark W

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromotor control of the gluteus medius (GMED) and gluteus maximus (GMAX) muscles in runners with Achilles tendinopathy to that of healthy controls. Fourteen male runners with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 healthy male runners (control) ran overground while EMG of GMED and GMAX was recorded. Three temporal variables were identified via visual inspection of EMG data: (i) onset of muscle activity (onset), (ii) offset of muscle activity (offset), and (iii) duration of muscle activity (duration). A multivariate analysis of covariance with between-subject factor of group (Achilles tendinopathy, control) and variables of onset, offset, and duration was performed for each muscle. Age, weight, and height were included as covariates, and α level was set at 0.05. The Achilles tendinopathy group demonstrated a delay in the activation of the GMED relative to heel strike (P < 0.001) and a shorter duration of activation (P < 0.001) compared to that of the control group. GMED offset time relative to heel strike was not different between the groups (P = 0.063). For GMAX, the Achilles tendinopathy group demonstrated a delay in its onset (P = 0.008), a shorter duration of activation (P = 0.002), and earlier offset (P < 0.001) compared to the control group. This study provides preliminary evidence of altered neuromotor control of the GMED and GMAX muscles in male runners with Achilles tendinopathy. Although further prospective studies are required to discern the causal nature of this relationship, this study highlights the importance of considering neuromotor control of the gluteal muscles in the assessment and management of patients with Achilles tendinopathy.

  14. The Neuromotor Examination of the Preschool Child and Its Prognostic Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2005-01-01

    The present paper reviews the methods available for neurological or neuromotor evaluation at preschool age. General textbooks on pediatric neurology describe the neurological examination at preschool age in terms of the assessment of the evaluation of cranial nerves, muscle tone, muscle power, reflexes, and the presence of abnormal movements. They…

  15. Does gender influence neuromotor control of the knee and hip?

    PubMed

    Cowan, Sallie M; Crossley, Kay M

    2009-04-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is a common condition that occurs more frequently in females. Anatomical, hormonal and neuromuscular factors have been proposed to contribute to the increased incidence of PFP in females, with neuromuscular factors considered to be of particular importance. This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate differences in the neuromotor control of the knee and hip muscles between genders and to investigate whether clinical measures of hip rotation range and strength were associated with EMG measures of hip and thigh motor control. Twenty-nine (16 female and 13 male) asymptomatic participants completed a visual choice reaction-time stair stepping task. EMG activity was recorded from vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, anterior and posterior gluteus medius muscles. In addition hip rotation range of motion and hip external rotation, abduction and trunk strength were assessed. There were no differences in the timing or peak of EMG activation of the vasti or gluteus medius muscle between genders during the stepping task. There were however significant associations between EMG measures of motor control of the vasti and hip strength in both females and males. These findings are suggestive of a link between hip muscle control and vasti neuromotor control.

  16. A Novel Tool for Evaluation of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Patients in the Emergency Department: Does Robotic Assessment of Neuromotor Performance Following Injury Predict the Presence of Postconcussion Symptoms at Follow-up?

    PubMed

    Subbian, Vignesh; Ratcliff, Jonathan J; Korfhagen, Joseph J; Hart, Kimberly W; Meunier, Jason M; Shaw, George J; Lindsell, Christopher J; Beyette, Fred R

    2016-04-01

    Postconcussion symptoms (PCS) are a common complication of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Currently, there is no validated clinically available method to reliably predict at the time of injury who will subsequently develop PCS. The purpose of this study was to determine if PCS following mild TBI can be predicted during the initial presentation to an emergency department (ED) using a novel robotic-assisted assessment of neurologic function. All patients presenting to an urban ED with a chief complaint of head injury within the preceding 24 hours were screened for inclusion from March 2013 to April 2014. The enrollment criteria were as follows: 1) age of 18 years or greater, 2) ability and willingness to provide written informed consent, 3) blunt head trauma and clinical diagnosis of isolated mild TBI by the treating physician, and 4) blood alcohol level of <100 mg/dL. Eligible mild TBI patients were enrolled and their neuromotor function was assessed in the ED using a battery of five tests that cover a range of proprioceptive, visuomotor, visuospatial, and executive function performance metrics. At 3 weeks postinjury, participants were contacted via telephone to complete the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire to assess the presence of significant PCS. A total of 66 mild TBI patients were enrolled in the study with 42 of them completing both the ED assessment and the follow-up; 40 patients were included in the analyses. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the entire test battery was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.54 to 0.90). The AUC for tests that primarily measure visuomotor and proprioceptive performance were 0.80 (95% CI = 0.65 to 0.95) and 0.71 (95% CI = 0.53 to 0.89), respectively. The robotic-assisted test battery has the ability to discriminate between subjects who developed PCS and those who did not. Additionally, poor visuomotor and proprioceptive performance were most strongly associated with

  17. The neuromotor effects of transverse friction massage.

    PubMed

    Begovic, Haris; Zhou, Guang-Quan; Schuster, Snježana; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2016-12-01

    Transverse friction massage (TFM), as an often used technique by therapists, is known for its effect in reducing the pain and loosing the scar tissues. Nevertheless, its effects on neuromotor driving mechanism including the electromechanical delay (EMD), force transmission and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling which could be used as markers of stiffness changes, has not been computed using ultrafast ultrasound (US) when combined with external sensors. Hence, the aim of this study was to find out produced neuromotor changes associated to stiffness when TFM was applied over Quadriceps femoris (QF) tendon in healthy subjcets. Fourteen healthy males and fifteen age-gender matched controls were recruited. Surface EMG (sEMG), ultrafast US and Force sensors were synchronized and signals were analyzed to depict the time delays corresponding to EC coupling, force transmission, EMD, torque and rate of force development (RFD). TFM has been found to increase the time corresponding to EC coupling and EMD, whilst, reducing the time belonging to force transmission during the voluntary muscle contractions. A detection of the increased time of EC coupling from muscle itself would suggest that TFM applied over the tendon shows an influence on changing the neuro-motor driving mechanism possibly via afferent pathways and therefore decreasing the active muscle stiffness. On the other hand, detection of decreased time belonging to force transmission during voluntary contraction would suggest that TFM increases the stiffness of tendon, caused by faster force transmission along non-contractile elements. Torque and RFD have not been influenced by TFM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuromotor control in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2013-05-01

    Neuromotor control of skeletal muscles, including respiratory muscles, is ultimately dependent on the structure and function of the motor units (motoneurons and the muscle fibers they innervate) comprising the muscle. In most muscles, considerable diversity of contractile and fatigue properties exists across motor units, allowing a range of motor behaviors. In diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there may be disproportional primary (disease related) or secondary effects (related to treatment or other concomitant factors) on the size and contractility of specific muscle fiber types that would influence the relative contribution of different motor units. For example, with COPD there is a disproportionate atrophy of type IIx and/or IIb fibers that comprise more fatigable motor units. Thus fatigue resistance may appear to improve, while overall motor performance (e.g., 6-min walk test) and endurance (e.g., reduced aerobic exercise capacity) are diminished. There are many coexisting factors that might also influence motor performance. For example, in COPD patients, there may be concomitant hypoxia and/or hypercapnia, physical inactivity and unloading of muscles, and corticosteroid treatment, all of which may disproportionately affect specific muscle fiber types, thereby influencing neuromotor control. Future studies should address how plasticity in motor units can be harnessed to mitigate the functional impact of COPD-induced changes.

  19. Analysis of Human Body Bipedal Stability for Neuromotor Disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baritz, Mihaela; Cristea, Luciana; Rogozea, Liliana; Cotoros, Diana; Repanovici, Angela

    2009-04-01

    The analysis of different biomechanical aspects of balance and equilibrium is presented in the first part of the paper. We analyzed the posture, balance and stability of human body for a normal person and for a person with loco-motor or neuro-motor disabilities (in the second part). In the third part of the paper we presented the methodology and the experimental setup used to record the human body behavior in postural stability for persons with neuro-motors disabilities. The results and the conclusions are presented in the final part of the paper and also in the future work meant to establish the computer analysis for rehabilitation neuromotor disabilities.

  20. Recent developments in biofeedback for neuromotor rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Wolf, Steven L; He, Jiping

    2006-01-01

    The original use of biofeedback to train single muscle activity in static positions or movement unrelated to function did not correlate well to motor function improvements in patients with central nervous system injuries. The concept of task-oriented repetitive training suggests that biofeedback therapy should be delivered during functionally related dynamic movement to optimize motor function improvement. Current, advanced technologies facilitate the design of novel biofeedback systems that possess diverse parameters, advanced cue display, and sophisticated control systems for use in task-oriented biofeedback. In light of these advancements, this article: (1) reviews early biofeedback studies and their conclusions; (2) presents recent developments in biofeedback technologies and their applications to task-oriented biofeedback interventions; and (3) discusses considerations regarding the therapeutic system design and the clinical application of task-oriented biofeedback therapy. This review should provide a framework to further broaden the application of task-oriented biofeedback therapy in neuromotor rehabilitation. PMID:16790060

  1. Invited review: gravitational biology of the neuromotor systems: a perspective to the next era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.

    2000-01-01

    Earth's gravity has had a significant impact on the designs of the neuromotor systems that have evolved. Early indications are that gravity also plays a key role in the ontogenesis of some of these design features. The purpose of the present review is not to assess and interpret a body of knowledge in the usual sense of a review but to look ahead, given some of the general concepts that have evolved and observations made to date, which can guide our future approach to gravitational biology. We are now approaching an era in gravitational biology during which well-controlled experiments can be conducted for sustained periods in a microgravity environment. Thus it is now possible to study in greater detail the role of gravity in phylogenesis and ontogenesis. Experiments can range from those conducted on the simplest levels of organization of the components that comprise the neuromotor system to those conducted on the whole organism. Generally, the impact of Earth's gravitational environment on living systems becomes more complex as the level of integration of the biological phenomenon of interest increases. Studies of the effects of gravitational vectors on neuromotor systems have and should continue to provide unique insight into these mechanisms that control and maintain neural control systems designed to function in Earth's gravitational environment. A number of examples are given of how a gravitational biology perspective can lead to a clearer understanding of neuromotor disorders. Furthermore, the technologies developed for spaceflight studies have contributed and should continue to contribute to studies of motor dysfunctions, such as spinal cord injury and stroke. Disorders associated with energy support and delivery systems and how these functions are altered by sedentary life styles at 1 G and by space travel in a microgravity environment are also discussed.

  2. Neuromotor Noise Is Malleable by Amplifying Perceived Errors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoran; Abe, Masaki O.; Sternad, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Variability in motor performance results from the interplay of error correction and neuromotor noise. This study examined whether visual amplification of error, previously shown to improve performance, affects not only error correction, but also neuromotor noise, typically regarded as inaccessible to intervention. Seven groups of healthy individuals, with six participants in each group, practiced a virtual throwing task for three days until reaching a performance plateau. Over three more days of practice, six of the groups received different magnitudes of visual error amplification; three of these groups also had noise added. An additional control group was not subjected to any manipulations for all six practice days. The results showed that the control group did not improve further after the first three practice days, but the error amplification groups continued to decrease their error under the manipulations. Analysis of the temporal structure of participants’ corrective actions based on stochastic learning models revealed that these performance gains were attained by reducing neuromotor noise and, to a considerably lesser degree, by increasing the size of corrective actions. Based on these results, error amplification presents a promising intervention to improve motor function by decreasing neuromotor noise after performance has reached an asymptote. These results are relevant for patients with neurological disorders and the elderly. More fundamentally, these results suggest that neuromotor noise may be accessible to practice interventions. PMID:27490197

  3. Neuromotor development in relation to birth weight in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Harel, S; Shapira, Y; Hartzler, J; Teng, E L; Quiligan, E; Van Der Meulen, J P

    1978-01-01

    The development of neuromotor patterns in relation to birth weight was studied in the rabbit, a perinatal brain developer. In order to induce intrauterine growth retardation and to increase the number of low birth weight rabbits, experimental ischemia to half the fetuses in each doe was achieved by total ligation of approximately 30% of spiral vessels to the placenta, during the last trimester of gestation. Following natural delivery, the rabbit pups were periodically observed for the appearance of eye-opening and righting reflex, and for the cessations of falling, circling and dragging of hind limbs. An index of neuromotor development was assigned to each rabbit by summing up the age (in days) of appearance of each of the neuromotor milestones. An association was found between low birth weight and delayed neuromotor development at 2 weeks of age. The most significant correlation was found between low birth weight and delayed disappearance of falling. The latter may represent incoordination as an expression of cerebellar dysfunction.

  4. Neuromotor Issues in the Learning and Control of Golf Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Christopher A.

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical and practical issues related to the neuromotor control of a golf swing are presented in this paper. The typical strategy for golf training consists of high volume repetition with an emphasis on a large variety of isolated swing characteristics. The student is frequently instructed to maintain consistent performance in each swing with…

  5. Concurrent validity of the Harris Infant Neuromotor Test and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale.

    PubMed

    Tse, Lillian; Mayson, Tanja A; Leo, Sara; Lee, Leanna L S; Harris, Susan R; Hayes, Virginia E; Backman, Catherine L; Cameron, Dianne; Tardif, Megan

    2008-02-01

    We examined concurrent validity of scores for two infant motor screening tools, the Harris Infant Neuromotor Test (HINT) and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale, in 121 Canadian infants. Relationships between the two tests for the overall sample were as follows: r = -.83 at 4 to 6.5 months (n = 121; p < .01) and r = -.85 at 10 to 12.5 months (n = 109; p < .01), suggesting that the HINT, the newer of the two measures, is valid in determining motor delays. Each test has advantages and disadvantages, and practitioners should determine which one best meets their infant assessment needs.

  6. Neuromotor outcomes at school age after extremely low birth weight: early detection of subtle signs.

    PubMed

    Gidley Larson, Jennifer C; Baron, Ida Sue; Erickson, Kristine; Ahronovich, Margot D; Baker, Robin; Litman, Fern R

    2011-01-01

    Motor impairments are prevalent in children born at extremely low birth weight (ELBW; <1,000 g). Rarely studied are subtle motor deficits that indicate dysfunction or delay in neural systems critical for optimal cognitive, academic, and behavioral function. We aimed to examine quantifiable signs of subtle neuromotor dysfunction in an early school-aged ELBW cohort that coincidentally had age-appropriate cognition and design copying. We studied 97 participants born between 1998 and 2001; 74 ELBW (6.7 years ± 0.75) compared with 23 term-born (6.6 years ± 0.29). Neuromotor outcomes were assessed using the Physical and Neurological Examination of Subtle Signs-Revised, and measures of dexterity/coordination and visual-motor integration. ELBW participants performed worse than term-born on design-copying and dexterity, were age-appropriate compared to normative data, and had slower timed movements and more subtle overflow movements. Those ELBW born <26 weeks performed most poorly compared with those born 26-34 weeks and term-born. Subtle motor dysfunctions are detectable and quantifiable in ELBW children by school age, even in the presence of average cognition. Early age assessment of incoordination, motor speed, and overflow movements should aid initiation of timely therapies to prepare at-risk ELBW children for subsequent school entry and facilitate design of optimal early treatment strategies. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Rehabilitation of Neuromotor Disabilities in Aquatic Microgravity Environment.

    PubMed

    Barassi, Giovanni; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia; Porreca, Annamaria; Giannuzzo, Giuseppe; Irace, Giuseppe; Trivisano, Leonardo; Saggini, Raoul

    2018-02-28

    The aquatic environment has a high potential in rehabilitation treatment of acute lesions and in chronic diseases. The Safe Bearing Back method is proposed to stimulate the reorganization of deteriorated sensory neuromotor skills. The aim of the present study was to verify the effectiveness and the long-term maintenance of the benefits of a specific thermal rehabilitation training in neuromotor and neurological disabilities. Seventy four patients were evaluated using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Tinetti Gait-Balance Scale (TIN), and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain. In addition, a general health index was developed, conceived as a linear combination, with unit weights, of the normalized FIM, TIN, and VAS indicators. Measurements were made at T1 (baseline before treatment), T2 (after a five-month treatment, which was the end of treatment), and T3 (6 months after the end of treatment). Self-sufficiency, walking ability, and subjective pain perception were improved after the treatment. The improvement tapered off during the six-month-long follow-up, but the patients' condition remained well compared with the baseline level before the implementation of the treatment program. We conclude that hydrokinesitherapy with the Safe Bearing Back method demonstrates is clearly effective in the immediate and medium-term rehabilitation of neuromotor diseases.

  8. High resolution power spectra of daily Zurich sunspot numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Euler, H. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    High resolution power spectra of 77 years of Zurich daily sunspot numbers were computed using various lags and data point intervals. Major harmonic peaks of the approximately 124-month period showed up strongly as well as the 27-day solar rotational period.

  9. Mental correlates of neuromotoric deviation in 6-year-olds at heightened risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Thomas F; Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth; Blennow, Gösta

    2003-04-01

    The meaning and relevance of the increased rates of neuromotoric deviation (ND) observed in patients with schizophrenia and their biological relatives remain unclear. ND could represent free-floating, independent characteristics of individuals in these families vs. signs of an increased risk for current or future mental disorder. The co-temporaneous relationship between ND and mental disorder at 6 years of age was investigated among 31 children with an increased risk for schizophrenia and similar psychoses, defined as having a mother with a history of schizophrenia or unspecified functional psychosis. As compared with high-risk cases with a low level of ND, the subgroup of 10 high-risk offspring showing notably increased rates of ND had significantly more frequent psychiatric diagnoses (typically language disorders and enuresis), poor functioning on global assessment, poor interpersonal competency and high anxiety proneness. Neuromotoric items representing "overflow" (e.g., choreatic movements, tremor) were significantly positively related to each of these mental characteristics. Among high-risk offspring, an increased rate of ND is very clearly associated with increased rates of current mental disorder, and might potentially identify a subgroup with an especially high risk for serious mental disorder in the future.

  10. Stories of Change: The University of Zurich, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiedt, Eva Seiler

    The University of Zurich (UZH) is the largest university with the broadest range of courses in Switzerland. The number of students in the Autumn Semester 2008 was 24,788, out of which, 56% students were women. They were studying at the Faculty of Theology (246), the Faculty of Law (3,519), the Faculty of Economy (3,055), the Faculty of Medicine (2,397), the Vetsuisse-Faculty (veterinary medicine, 650), the Faculty of Arts (12,015), and the Faculty of Science (2,906). The staff consists of 463 professors, 2,559 assistants and senior scientists, and 1,696 administrative and technical staff. They work in 160 institutes, seminars, and clinics in and around the city of Zurich, most of them concentrated on three main campuses.

  11. Neuromotor function in ship welders after cessation of manganese exposure.

    PubMed

    Wastensson, Gunilla; Sallsten, Gerd; Bast-Pettersen, Rita; Barregard, Lars

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether previous long-term exposure to manganese (Mn) via inhalation of welding fumes can cause persistent impairment in neuromotor function even long after cessation of exposure. Quantitative tests of tremor, motor speed, manual dexterity, diadochokinesis, eye-hand coordination and postural stability were administered to 17 retired ship welders (mean age 69 years), with mean exposure time 28 years. The welders' exposure had ceased on average 18 years before the study. A cumulative exposure index (CEI) was calculated for each of the former welders. The welders were compared with 21 referents from the same shipyards (mean age was 66 years). Former welders performed less well than referents in the grooved pegboard test, and poorer performance was associated with CEI. The performance in most of the other neurobehavioral tests was similar between groups, but the welders tended to perform slightly better than the referents in tests demanding hand steadiness. The latter finding may be due to a training effect from their former working tasks or selection bias into or out of this occupation. In the present study of welders with previous welding fume exposure, former welders and referents performed similarly in most of the neurobehavioral tests. Previous adverse effects on the neuromotor system might have ceased, and decreased neuromotor function due to normal aging processes in both groups might have disguised any slight effect of previous Mn exposure. The poorer performance in the grooved pegboard test among welders may indicate an adverse effect on motor function of long-term exposure to Mn, but this finding has to be confirmed by other studies.

  12. Neuromotor tolerability and behavioural characterisation of cannabidiolic acid, a phytocannabinoid with therapeutic potential for anticipatory nausea.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Daniel I; Samuels, James; Duncan, Marnie; Whalley, Benjamin J; Williams, Claire M

    2016-01-01

    Anticipatory nausea (AN) is a poorly controlled side effect experienced by chemotherapy patients. Currently, pharmacotherapy is restricted to benzodiazepine anxiolytics, which have limited efficacy, have significant sedative effects and induce dependency. The non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), has shown considerable efficacy in pre-clinical AN models, however determination of its neuromotor tolerability profile is crucial to justify clinical investigation. Provisional evidence for appetite-stimulating properties also requires detailed investigation. This study aims to assess the tolerability of CBDA in locomotor activity, motor coordination and muscular strength tests, and additionally for ability to modulate feeding behaviours. Male Lister Hooded rats administered CBDA (0.05-5 mg/kg; p.o.) were assessed in habituated open field (for locomotor activity), static beam and grip strength tests. A further study investigated whether these CBDA doses modulated normal feeding behaviour. Finally, evidence of anxiolytic-like effects in the habituated open field prompted testing of 5 mg/kg CBDA for anxiolytic-like activity in unhabituated open field, light/dark box and novelty-suppressed feeding (NSF) tests. CBDA had no adverse effects upon performance in any neuromotor tolerability test, however anxiolytic-like behaviour was observed in the habituated open field. Normal feeding behaviours were unaffected by any dose. CBDA (5 mg/kg) abolished the increased feeding latency in the NSF test induced by the 5-HT1AR antagonist, WAY-100,635, indicative of anxiolytic-like effects, but had no effect on anxiety-like behaviour in the novel open field or light/dark box. CBDA is very well tolerated and devoid of the sedative side effect profile of benzodiazepines, justifying its clinical investigation as a novel AN treatment.

  13. Relationship of neuromotor disturbances to psychosis symptoms in first-episode neuroleptic-naive schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Leonardo; Caligiuri, Michael P; Malla, Ashok K; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-06-01

    From the very inception of the modern diagnostic scheme for psychotic disorders, abnormalities in motor function have been observed in these conditions. Despite convergence from multiple areas of research supporting the notion that multiple frontal-subcortical circuits regulate motor and limbic behavior, the precise relationship between motor abnormalities and psychopathology has not been elucidated. The goals of this study were to examine the prevalence of extrapyramidal signs (EPS) in first-episode schizophrenia patients and their relationships to three psychopathological dimensions (positive psychosis syndrome, negative syndrome, and disorganization). We assessed EPS using traditional observer-based as well as quantitative instrumental measures in 39 neuroleptic-naive first-episode schizophrenia subjects. Subjects were followed for 6 months after initiating antipsychotic treatment to examine the stability of motor-limbic relationships. Four main findings emerged from this study. First, depending on the measure used the prevalence of dyskinesia prior to treatment ranged from 13% to 20%. The prevalence of parkinsonism ranged from 18% to 28%. Second, severity of dyskinesia was associated with the positive psychotic syndrome; whereas parkinsonism was associated with the positive psychosis, negative syndrome and disorganization. Third, psychopathology improved significantly across all symptom dimensions following antipsychotic treatment, while EPS remained stable. This suggests that some motor abnormalities in schizophrenia may reflect trait characteristics. Fourth, abnormalities on the pre-treatment instrumental measure of parkinsonism predicted greater improvement on positive psychosis symptoms following treatment (p=0.008). Our findings support the notion that neuromotor disturbances may be a core feature of schizophrenia in a substantial proportion of patients and implicate multiple fronto-striatal circuits regulating limbic and neuromotor behavior in

  14. Neuromotor Development of Children Aged 6 and 7 Years Born before the 30th Week Gestation.

    PubMed

    Majewska, Joanna; Zajkiewicz, Katarzyna; Wacław-Abdul, Kamila; Baran, Joanna; Szymczyk, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the level of neuromotor function and somatic development in 6- and 7-year-old children born before the 30th week gestation with that in full-term children at the same age, as well as the correlation between prematurity and motor development. The study group consisted of prematurely born 40 children. Their mean gestational age at birth was 27.8 ± 1.6 weeks (range 24-30 weeks). The control group consisted of 40 healthy children born with normal birth weight (>2500 g). The neuromotor function was assessed using Touwen neurological examination criteria. During the examination, the attention was focused on the hand preference, laterality, synkinesis, and asymmetry. In addition, children's weight, height, and BMI index were measured. Premature children showed much worse results than full-term ones in hand function ( p < 0,001). They obtained the best results in paper tearing while crossing the body midline turned out to be the most difficult. Considering the quality of walking, the biggest difficulty for the premature children was to walk backwards along the straight line while during normal walking they showed the best results. The results for the muscle tone subcategory in the study group were also significantly worse than those in control group ( p < 0,001), as well as the total outcome for the movement coordination and diadochokinesis subcategories ( p < 0,001). The nondisabled, prematurely born children have significantly lower average outcomes regarding hand function, quality of walking, muscle tone, coordination, and diadochokinesis at age of six to seven, compared to the full-term peers.

  15. Negative or positive? The iron lung and poliomyelitis-Zurich, 1951.

    PubMed

    Eichel, T; Dreux, M L

    2017-03-01

    During the poliomyelitis epidemics of the last century hospitals were inundated with patients in acute respiratory failure. Between 1946 and 1949, Nandor (Ferdinand) Eichel documented the use of the iron lung in children with acute poliomyelitis at the University Children's Hospital, Zurich. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of the Iron lung and negative pressure respiratory support for this indication and to establish its role in the context of other existing therapies at the time. Eichel produced his review and data as the Inaugural Dissertation towards his medical degree from the the University of Zurich, published in 1951. The dissertation was written in German and first translated into English in 2014. The current paper explores the findings of the dissertation and explains why there has been the transition to techniques of respiratory support today. It includes a biography of Dr F. N. Eichel and an update on the current status of poliomyelitis. The original dissertation was found in the home of Nandor's son and was of great interest to the current authors, Nandor's granddaughter and her colleague.

  16. Choice of rock excavation method for tramway tunnel in Zurich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andráskay, E.; Ramer, E.; Berger, E.

    1983-02-01

    Within the city of Zurich a new tramway line is under construction. One section consists of a tunnel, 350 m long, which is to be built undergound. Different rock excavation methods were evaluated for this tunnel in the light of the many constraints given by the urban environment, such as disturbance of residents in nearby residential houses and closeness of other structures (bridges, road tunnel, university laboratory with vibration-sensitive equipment, etc.). The excavation methods considered were blasting, hydraulic hammer, bulldozer with ripper tooth and mechanical boring with roadheader. The evaluation was made on the basis of vibrations and noise caused by the different excavation methods and on the basis of their respective construction time and cost. Finally the decisions which led to the choice of the excavation method and to the instructions in the tender, documents are presented, and first experiences from the site are discussed.

  17. [Anthrax in the canton of Zurich between 1878 and 2005].

    PubMed

    Brandes Ammann, A; Brandl, H

    2007-07-01

    Historical records reporting cases of animal anthrax in the canton of Zurich between 1878 and 2005 were analysed on the level of political communities regarding occurrence and number of cases, animals affected, and number of communities affected. Data were correlated with industrial activities (tanning, wool and horse hair processing) in a community and to the prevailing meteorological conditions. A total of 830 cases of animal anthrax has been recorded in 140 of 171 communities. Occurrence correlated with industrial activities in a community such as companies handling potentially contaminated materials (hides, fur, wool, hair, meat, or bone meal). The influence of wool processing companies (P = 0. 004) and tanneries (P = 0. 032) was significant whereas horse hair processing had no effect. However, a statistical relationship between the number of cases reported and meteorological data (rainfall, mean temperature) was not found.

  18. Evaluation of child development: beyond the neuromotor aspect.

    PubMed

    Eickmann, Sophie Helena; Emond, Alan Martin; Lima, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    To review the epidemiology and update the scientific knowledge on the problems of development and behavior in childhood, and the recommendations for the role of the pediatrician in identifying and managing delays and disturbances in child development and mental health. A search for relevant literature was performed in the PubMed and Scopus databases and publications of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. With the decline in the incidence of communicable diseases in children, problems with development, behavior, and emotional regulation are increasingly becoming a part of the work of pediatricians, yet many are not trained and feel uncomfortable about this extension of their role. The available screening tools for child development and behavior are reviewed, and a 'school readiness' checklist is presented, together with recommendations on how the pediatrician can incorporate developmental surveillance into routine practice, aware of the need for children to acquire social, emotional, and cognitive skills so that they can develop their full potential. The pediatrician's role in the future will include both physical and mental health, recognizing that social development, resilience, and emotional maturity are as important as physical growth and neuromotor skills in a child's life course. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Cortical correlates of neuromotor development in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Garvey, M A; Ziemann, U; Bartko, J J; Denckla, M B; Barker, C A; Wassermann, E M

    2003-09-01

    To examine the relationship between acquisition of fine motor skills in childhood and development of the motor cortex. We measured finger tapping speed and mirror movements in 43 healthy right-handed subjects (6-26 years of age). While recording surface electromyographic activity from right and left first dorsal interosseus, we delivered focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the hand areas of each motor cortex. We measured motor evoked potential (MEP) threshold, and ipsilateral (iSP) and contralateral (CSP) silent periods. As children got older, finger speeds got faster, MEP threshold decreased, iSP duration increased and latency decreased. Finger tapping speed got faster as motor thresholds and iSP latency decreased, but was unrelated to CSP duration. In all subjects right hemisphere MEP thresholds were higher than those on the left and duration of right hemisphere CSP was longer than that on the left. Children under 10 years of age had higher left hand mirror movement scores, and fewer left hemisphere iSPs which were of longer duration. Maturation of finger tapping skills is closely related to developmental changes in the motor threshold and iSP latency. Studies are warranted to explore the relationship between these measures and other neuromotor skills in children with motor disorders. TMS can provide important insights into certain functional aspects of neurodevelopment in children.

  20. On the paleoenvironmental potential of 253 newly discovered pine stumps from Zurich, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinig, Frederick; Nievergelt, Daniel; Esper, Jan; Friedrich, Michael; Helle, Gerhard; Hellmann, Lena; Kromer, Bernd; Morganti, Sandro; Pauly, Maren; Sookdeo, Adam; Tegel, Willy; Treydte, Kerstin; Wacker, Lukas; Büntgen, Ulf

    2017-04-01

    The transition from the last Ice Age to the early Holocene 15'000-10'000 BP represents a close natural analog to the ongoing and predicted rates of anthropogenic climate change. A reduced quality and quantity of high-resolution proxy archives during this period, however, limits our understanding of the magnitude and pace of Late Glacial (LG) environmental variability. Here, we present the world's best preserved, most replicated and oldest forest remains: A total of 253 subfossil pine stumps were recently discovered in Zurich. The combined approach of tree-ring and radiocarbon (14C) measurements results in an absolutely dated Preboreal Swiss tree-ring width chronology and eight floating chronologies. With tree ages ranging between 41 and 506 years, often including pith and bark, and a mean segment length of 163 years, this exceptional find is distributed over nearly 2'000 years between the Allerød and the Preboreal. Together with 200 previously collected LG pines from the greater Zurich region, this study sets a benchmark in terms of sample replication and dating precision for stable more dynamic climatic periods such as the Laacher See eruption, the Older and Younger Dryas. The paleoenvironmental significance would even increase when annually resolved 14C-measurements help fixing a major, Northern Hemispheric gap in the absolutely dated dendro time series during the Younger Dryas. While overcoming this interlude, our results further emphasize the importance of interdisciplinary research on these striking LG climatic shifts to better understand and assess their ecological and environmental impact.

  1. Simulating the dispersion of NOx and CO2 in the city of Zurich at building resolving scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Dominik; Berchet, Antoine; Emmenegger, Lukas; Henne, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Cities are emission hotspots for both greenhouse gases and air pollutants. They contribute about 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions and are home to a growing number of people potentially suffering from poor air quality in the urban environment. High-resolution atmospheric transport modelling of greenhouse gases and air pollutants at the city scale has, therefore, several important applications such as air pollutant exposure assessment, air quality forecasting, or urban planning and management. When combined with observations, it also has the potential to quantify emissions and monitor their long-term trends, which is the main motivation for the deployment of urban greenhouse gas monitoring networks. We have developed a comprehensive atmospheric modeling model system for the city of Zurich, Switzerland ( 600,000 inhabitants including suburbs), which is composed of the mesoscale model GRAMM simulating the flow in a larger domain around Zurich at 100 m resolution, and the nested high-resolution model GRAL simulating the flow and air pollutant dispersion in the city at building resolving (5-10 m) scale. Based on an extremely detailed emission inventory provided by the municipality of Zurich, we have simulated two years of hourly NOx and CO2 concentration fields across the entire city. Here, we present a detailed evaluation of the simulations against a comprehensive network of continuous monitoring sites and passive samplers for NOx and analyze the sensitivity of the results to the temporal variability of the emissions. Furthermore, we present first simulations of CO2 and investigate the challenges associated with CO2 sources not covered by the inventory such as human respiration and exchange fluxes with urban vegetation.

  2. Mercury and neuromotor function among children in a rural town in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stella Maria; Schomaker, Michael; Heumann, Christian; Schierl, Rudolf; Michalke, Bernhard; Jenni, Oskar G.; Caflisch, Jon; Muñoz, Daniel Moraga; von Ehrenstein, Ondine S.; Radon, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background Mercury (Hg) exposure from artisanal gold mining has adverse effects on the neuromotor function in adults. However, few studies have examined this relationship in children. Objectives To investigate the impact of Hg exposure on children’s neuromotor function. Methods Cross-sectional data on Hg risk factors and demographics were collected from n = 288 children (response = 68.9%). Based on complete cases (CCs) (n = 130) and multiple imputations (n = 288), associations between fingernail Hg and four different neuromotor function components were calculated using multiple logistic regression adjusted for confounders. Results Of the children, 11.1, 14.9, 63.9, and 10.4% had pathologic pure motor skills, adaptive fine motor skills, adaptive gross motor skills, and static balance, respectively. No significant association between fingernail Hg and any neuromotor component was found. However, Hg burning in the household was significantly associated with children’s pathologic pure motor skills (OR 3.07 95% CI 1.03–9.18). Conclusion Elemental Hg exposure in the household might have adverse long-term effects on children’s pure motor skills. PMID:27078174

  3. Neuromotor Task Training for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemeijer, A. S.; Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Schoemaker, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate neuromotor task training (NTT), a recently developed child-centred and task-oriented treatment programme for children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). A treatment and a non-treatment control group of children with DCD were included. Children were selected if they scored below the 15th centile on…

  4. Neuromotor Deficits in Developmental Coordination Disorder: Evidence from a Reach-to-Grasp Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biancotto, Marina; Skabar, Aldo; Bulgheroni, Maria; Carrozzi, Marco; Zoia, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) has been classified as a specific learning disability, nonetheless the underlying cognitive mechanisms are still a matter of discussion. After a summary of the main hypotheses on the principal neuromotor causes of DCD, this study applies a causal model framework to describe the possible coexistence of more…

  5. Neuromotor Activity, Anxiety and Cognitive Function in the In Vivo Model of Alimentary Hyperlipidemia and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Apryatin, S A; Sidorova, Yu S; Shipelin, V A; Balakina, A; Trusov, N V; Mazo, V K

    2017-05-01

    Behavioral indicators characterizing specific features of the pathological process of alimentary-dependent diseases were studied using in vivo model of alimentary hyperlipidemia in rats and mice. Rats and mice of the control groups received balanced semisynthetic diet for 63 days; animals of the experimental groups received a diet with high fat content (30% dry weight), balanced or high-fat diet with fructose solution instead of water, balanced cholesterol-enriched diet (0.5% dry weight), or balanced cholesterol-enriched diet with fructose solution. During the experiment, the mass of food, consumed by the animals, was monitored daily. Muscle tone was assessed by the front paw grip strength on days 33 and 54 of the experiment. Anxiety was tested in the elevated plus maze on days 36 and 57. Behavior and memory were assessed by conditioned passive avoidance reflex on days 39, 40, and 61. A significant increase in muscle tone was revealed on day 54 in rats fed with a balanced diet with fructose, and in mice, that received a similar diet, supplemented with fructose and cholesterol. Anxiety in the second test (day 57) was significantly decreased in rats fed high-fat diet and increased in mice fed high fat diet and high fat diet with fructose. In the second test, additional amount of cholesterol in the diet was the factor that significantly improved both short-term and long-term memory in both species. In mice, in contrast to rats, addition of fructose, including combination with high-fat diet, significantly worsened short-term and long-term memory. Thus, dietary factors, contributing to alimentary dyslipidemia development in rats and mice, can significantly affect the indices of neuromotor activity, anxiety level and cognitive functions, and the nature and direction of these changes are largely species-specific.

  6. The Impact of Subcortical Band Heterotopia and Associated Complications on the Neuropsychological Functioning of a 13-Year-Old Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudoin, Beata S.; Hill, James M.; Ming, Sue X.

    2007-01-01

    Motor impairment in children with Asperger syndrome (AS) or high functioning autism (HFA) has been reported previously. This study presents results of a quantitative assessment of neuromotor skills in 14-22 year old HFA/AS. Sixteen HFA/AS and 16 IQ-matched controls were assessed by the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (ZNA). The HFA/AS group showed…

  7. Approximate Entropy Values Demonstrate Impaired Neuromotor Control of Spontaneous Leg Activity in Infants with Myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Beth A.; Teulier, Caroline; Sansom, Jennifer; Stergiou, Nicholas; Ulrich, Beverly D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose One obstacle to providing early intervention to infants with myelomeningocele (MMC) is the challenge of quantifying impaired neuromotor control of movements early in life. Methods We used the nonlinear analysis tool Approximate Entropy (ApEn) to analyze periodicity and complexity of supine spontaneous lower extremity movements of infants with MMC and typical development (TD) at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months of age. Results Movements of infants with MMC were more regular and repeatable (lower ApEn values) than movements of infants with TD indicating less adaptive and flexible movement patterns. For both groups ApEn values decreased with age, and the movements of infants with MMC were less complex than movements of infants with TD. Further, for infants with MMC, lesion level and age of walking onset correlated negatively with ApEn values. Conclusions Our study begins to demonstrate the feasibility of ApEn to identify impaired neuromotor control in infants with MMC. PMID:21829116

  8. [The efficacy of music and music therapy in the neuromotor rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Raglio, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    This article review includes the controlled and randomized controlled trials about the use of music and music therapy techniques in the neuromotor rehabilitation. The paper defines the music therapy and delineates the neuroscientific bases and rehabilitative potential of music and music therapy interventions. Significant results are present in the stroke and Parkinson's disease rehabilitation. The Author's conclusions suggest the need of more rigorous studies based on clear procedures and strong methodological research criteria.

  9. Development of a Portable Tool for Screening Neuromotor Sequelae From Repetitive Low-Level Blast Exposure.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Ross, Scott E; Long, Benjamin; Jakiela, Jason T; Bailie, Jason M; Yanagi, Matthew A; Haran, F Jay; Wright, W Geoffrey; Robins, Rebecca K; Sargent, Paul D; Duckworth, Joshua L

    2017-03-01

    Blast exposure is a prevalent cause of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in military personnel in combat. However, it is more common for a service member to be exposed to a low-level blast (LLB) that does not result in a clinically diagnosable mTBI. Recent research suggests that repetitive LLB exposure can result in symptomology similar to symptoms observed after mTBI. This manuscript reports on the use of an Android-based smartphone application (AccWalker app) to capture changes in neuromotor functioning after blast exposure. Active duty U.S. Navy personnel (N = 59) performed a stepping-in-place task before repetitive LLB exposure (heavy weapons training), and again immediately after, 24 hours after, and 72 to 96 hours after the completion of the training. The AccWalker app revealed that there are changes in neuromotor functioning after LLB exposure (slower self-selected movement pace and increased stride time variability) in participants who experienced neurocognitive decline. These data suggest that neurocognitive and neuromotor decline can occur after repeated LLB exposure. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. Neuromotor effects of acute ethanol inhalation exposure in humans: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Véronique; Lamoureux, Daniel; Beuter, Anne; Charbonneau, Michel; Tardif, Robert

    2003-07-01

    Ethanol (ETOH) is added to unleaded gasoline to decrease environmental levels of carbon monoxide from automobiles emissions. Therefore, addition of ETOH in reformulated fuel will most likely increase and the involuntarily human exposure to this chemical will also increase. This preliminary study was undertaken to evaluate the possible neuromotor effects resulting from acute ETOH exposure by inhalation in humans. Five healthy non-smoking adult males, with no history of alcohol abuse, were exposed by inhalation, in a dynamic, controlled-environment exposure chamber, to various concentrations of ETOH (0, 250, 500 and 1,000 ppm in air) for six hours. Reaction time, body sway, hand tremor and rapid alternating movements were measured before and after each exposure session by using the CATSYS 7.0 system and a diadochokinesimeter. The concentrations of ETOH in blood and in alveolar air were also measured. ETOH was not detected in blood nor in alveolar air when volunteers were exposed to 250 and 500 ppm, but at the end of exposure to 1,000 ppm, blood and alveolar air concentrations were 0.443 mg/100ml and 253.1 ppm, respectively. The neuromotor tests did not show conclusively significant differences between the exposed and non-exposed conditions. In conclusion, this study suggests that acute exposure to ethanol at 1,000 ppm or lower or to concentrations that could be encountered upon refueling is not likely to cause any significant neuromotor alterations in healthy males.

  11. Concentrations in ambient air and emissions of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in Zurich, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Buser, Andreas M; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Bogdal, Christian; MacLeod, Matthew; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2013-07-02

    Tens of thousands of tonnes of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) are used each year globally, which leads to high and continuous cVMS emissions to air. However, field measurements of cVMS in air and empirical information about emission rates to air are still limited. Here we present measurements of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) in air for Zurich, Switzerland. The measurements were performed in January and February 2011 over a period of eight days and at two sites (city center and background) with a temporal resolution of 6-12 h. Concentrations of D5 and D6 are higher in the center of Zurich and range from 100 to 650 ng m(-3) and from 10 to 79 ng m(-3), respectively. These values are among the highest levels of D5 and D6 reported in the literature. In a second step, we used a multimedia environmental fate model parametrized for the region of Zurich to interpret the levels and time trends in the cVMS concentrations and to back-calculate the emission rates of D5 and D6 from the city of Zurich. The average emission rates obtained for D5 and D6 are 120 kg d(-1) and 14 kg d(-1), respectively, which corresponds to per-capita emissions of 310 mg capita(-1) d(-1) for D5 and 36 mg capita(-1) d(-1) for D6.

  12. Activity Report of the Language Laboratory of the University of Zurich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebneter, Theodor

    1975-01-01

    Reports on the lab's activities as a center for the development of university language lab courses and for research into contemporary oral colloquial French, a part of the applied linguistics research area, and a center for the development of a language lab grammar for Zurich German. (RM)

  13. Comparative predictive validity of the Harris Infant Neuromotor Test and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale.

    PubMed

    Harris, Susan R; Backman, Catherine L; Mayson, Tanja A

    2010-05-01

    We compared abilities of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) and the Harris Infant Neuromotor Test (HINT), during the infant's first year, in predicting scores on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) at age 2 and 3 years. This prospective study involved 144 infants (71 females, 73 males), assessed with the HINT and AIMS at 4 to 6.5 and 10 to 12.5 months and with the BSID at 2 and 3 years. Inclusion criteria for typical infants (n=58) were the following: 38 to 42 weeks' gestation, birthweight at least 2500g, and no congenital anomaly, postnatal health concern, nor major prenatal or perinatal maternal risk factor. For at-risk infants (n=86), inclusion criteria were any of the following: less than 38 weeks' gestation, birthweight less than 2500g, maternal age older than 35 years or younger than 19 years at infant birth, maternal psychiatric/mental health concerns, prenatal drug/alcohol exposure, multiple births, or use of reproductive technology. For the overall sample, the early (4-6.5mo) HINT had higher predictive correlations than the AIMS for 2-year BSID-II motor outcomes (r=-0.36 vs 0.26), and 3-year BSID-III gross motor outcomes (r=-0.45 vs 0.31), as did the 10- to 12.5-month HINT (r=-0.55 vs 0.47). Correlations were identical for 10- to 12.5-month HINT and AIMS scores and 3-year BSID-III gross motor (r=-0.58 and 0.58) and fine motor (r=-0.35 and 0.35) subscales. When the sample was divided into typical and at-risk groups, predictive correlations were consistently stronger for the at-risk infants. Categorical predictive analyses were reasonably similar across both tests. Results suggest that the HINT has comparable predictive validity to the AIMS and should be considered for use in clinical and research settings.

  14. The "Zurich E-Learning Certificate": A Role Model for the Acquirement of eCompetence for Academic Staff and an Example of a Practical Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Benno; Keller, Stefan Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Since 2002 the "Zurich E-Learning Certificate" offers lecturers and academic staff from the three main universities in Zurich the possibility to take part in a professional development program which supports the acquirement of eCompetence. The program is the result of a cooperation between the University of Zurich (UZH), the Swiss…

  15. Procedures for Preventing Juvenile Violence in Switzerland: The Zurich Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endrass, Jerome; Rossegger, Astrid; Urbaniok, Frank; Laubacher, Arja; Pierce, Christine Schnyder; Moskvitin, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    The Swiss legal system places strong emphasis on risk assessment and treatment of potentially violent offenders. Especially after the 2001 Zug massacre, there is close cooperation between the judicial and mental health systems to prevent violence through early detection and intervention. A case study of a risk management program for a dangerous…

  16. Procedures for preventing juvenile violence in Switzerland: the Zurich model.

    PubMed

    Endrass, Jérôme; Rossegger, Astrid; Urbaniok, Frank; Laubacher, Arja; Pierce, Christine Schnyder; Moskvitin, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    The Swiss legal system places strong emphasis on risk assessment and treatment of potentially violent offenders. Especially after the 2001 Zug massacre, there is close cooperation between the judicial and mental health systems to prevent violence through early detection and intervention. A case study of a risk management program for a dangerous seventeen-year-old delinquent youth illustrates this approach. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  17. Does psychomotor agitation in major depressive episodes indicate bipolarity? Evidence from the Zurich Study.

    PubMed

    Angst, Jules; Gamma, Alex; Benazzi, Franco; Ajdacic, Vladeta; Rössler, Wulf

    2009-02-01

    Kraepelin's partial interpretation of agitated depression as a mixed state of "manic-depressive insanity" (including the current concept of bipolar disorder) has recently been the focus of much research. This paper tested whether, how, and to what extent both psychomotor symptoms, agitation and retardation in depression are related to bipolarity and anxiety. The prospective Zurich Study assessed psychiatric and somatic syndromes in a community sample of young adults (N = 591) (aged 20 at first interview) by six interviews over 20 years (1979-1999). Psychomotor symptoms of agitation and retardation were assessed by professional interviewers from age 22 to 40 (five interviews) on the basis of the observed and reported behaviour within the interview section on depression. Psychiatric diagnoses were strictly operationalised and, in the case of bipolar-II disorder, were broader than proposed by DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10. As indicators of bipolarity, the association with bipolar disorder, a family history of mania/hypomania/cyclothymia, together with hypomanic and cyclothymic temperament as assessed by the general behavior inventory (GBI) [15], and mood lability (an element of cyclothymic temperament) were used. Agitated and retarded depressive states were equally associated with the indicators of bipolarity and with anxiety. Longitudinally, agitation and retardation were significantly associated with each other (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0-3.2), and this combined group of major depressives showed stronger associations with bipolarity, with both hypomanic/cyclothymic and depressive temperamental traits, and with anxiety. Among agitated, non-retarded depressives, unipolar mood disorder was even twice as common as bipolar mood disorder. Combined agitated and retarded major depressive states are more often bipolar than unipolar, but, in general, agitated depression (with or without retardation) is not more frequently bipolar than retarded depression (with or without agitation), and

  18. Can the Griffiths scales predict neuromotor and perceptual-motor impairment in term infants with neonatal encephalopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, A; Guzzetta, A; Mercuri, E; Henderson, S; Haataja, L; Cowan, F; Dubowitz, L

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To examine the predictive value of early developmental testing for identifying neuromotor and perceptual-motor impairment at school age in children with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). Methods: Eighty full term infants with NE were followed longitudinally. Where possible, children were tested on the Griffiths scales at 1 and 2 years and at 5–6 years, on the Touwen Examination, Movement ABC, and WPPSI. The relation between the Griffiths scores and later outcome measures was examined using correlation coefficients and sensitivity and specificity values. Results: By 2 years, 25 children with cerebral palsy were too severely impaired to be formally assessed and remained so at 5–6 years. Abnormal Griffiths scores were obtained by 12% and 7% of the children at 1 and 2 years respectively. At 5–6 years, 33% had poor Movement ABC scores and 15% poor WPPSI scores. The highest correlation between Griffiths scores and the outcome measures was for the Movement ABC (0.72), although this accounted for only 50% of the variance. Sensitivity scores for the Movement ABC were below 70% but specificity was 100%. Conclusions: A poor score on the Griffiths scales at 1 and/or 2 years is a good predictor of impairment at school age. However, a normal score in the early years cannot preclude later neurological, perceptual-motor, or cognitive abnormalities. PMID:15210495

  19. Weight-based nutritional diagnosis of Mexican children and adolescents with neuromotor disabilities.

    PubMed

    Vega-Sanchez, Rodrigo; de la Luz Gomez-Aguilar, Maria; Haua, Karime; Rozada, Guadalupe

    2012-07-04

    Nutrition related problems are increasing worldwide but they have scarcely been evaluated in people with neuromotor disabilities, particularly in developing countries. In this study our aim was to describe the weight-based nutritional diagnoses of children and adolescents with neuromotor disabilities who attended a private rehabilitation center in Mexico City. Data from the first visit's clinical records of 410 patients who attended the Nutrition department at the Teleton Center for Children Rehabilitation, between 1999 and 2008, were analyzed. Sex, age, weight and height, length or segmental length data were collected and used to obtain the nutritional diagnosis based on international growth charts, as well as disability-specific charts. Weight for height was considered the main indicator. Cerebral palsy was the most frequent diagnosis, followed by spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and Down's syndrome. Children with cerebral palsy showed a higher risk of presenting low weight/undernutrition (LW/UN) than children with other disabilities, which was three times higher in females. In contrast, children with spina bifida, particularly males, were more likely to be overweight/obese (OW/OB), especially after the age of 6 and even more after 11. Patients with muscular dystrophy showed a significantly lower risk of LW/UN than patients with other disabilities. In patients with Down's syndrome neither LW/UN nor OW/OB were different between age and sex. This is the first study that provides evidence of the nutritional situation of children and adolescents with neuromotor disabilities in Mexico, based on their weight status. Low weight and obesity affect a large number of these patients due to their disability, age and sex. Early nutritional diagnosis must be considered an essential component in the treatment of these patients to prevent obesity and malnutrition, and improve their quality of life.

  20. Sex differences in cerebral palsy on neuromotor outcome: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Domenico M; Sini, Francesca; Brogna, Claudia; Albamonte, Emilio; Ricci, Daniela; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2016-08-01

    Sex differences have been reported in children with cerebral palsy (CP), with males having a higher risk of developing CP, but it is not entirely clear whether sex may also affect the severity of motor impairment. The aim of the present study was to critically review the existing literature on sex influence on neuromotor outcome in children with CP. The published papers confirm that CP occurs more frequently in males than in females. Within different types of CP or individual level of impairment, however, there was limited evidence that sex also had an effect on their performance. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins in Zurich, Switzerland--Atmospheric Concentrations and Emissions.

    PubMed

    Diefenbacher, Pascal S; Bogdal, Christian; Gerecke, Andreas C; Glüge, Juliane; Schmid, Peter; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2015-08-18

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are of concern due to their potential for adverse health effects, bioaccumulation, persistence, and long-range transport. Data on concentrations of SCCPs in urban areas and underlying emissions are still scarce. In this study, we investigated the levels and spatial distribution of SCCPs in air, based on two separate, spatially resolved sampling campaigns in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. SCCP concentrations in air ranged from 1.8 to 17 ng·m(-3) (spring 2011) and 1.1 to 42 ng·m(-3) (spring 2013) with medians of 4.3 and 2.7 ng·m(-3), respectively. Both data sets show that atmospheric SCCP levels in Zurich can vary substantially and may be influenced by a number of localized sources within this urban area. Additionally, continuous measurements of atmospheric concentrations performed at one representative sampling site in the city center from 2011 to 2013 showed strong seasonal variations with high SCCP concentrations in summer and lower levels in winter. A long-term dynamic multimedia environmental fate model was parametrized to simulate the seasonal trends of SCCP concentrations in air and to back-calculate urban emissions. Resulting annual SCCP emissions in the city of Zurich accounted for 218-321 kg, which indicates that large SCCP stocks are present in urban areas of industrialized countries.

  2. The Effect of Part-simulation of Weightlessness on Human Control of Bilateral Teleoperation: Neuromotor Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, K.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of weightlessness on the human operator's performance in force reflecting position control of remote manipulators was investigated. A gravity compensation system was developed to simulate the effect of weightlessness on the operator's arm. A universal force reflecting hand controller (FRHC) and task simulation software were employed. Two experiments were performed because of anticipated disturbances in neuromotor control specification on the human operator in an orbital control environment to investigate: (1) the effect of controller stiffness on the attainment of a learned terminal position in the three dimensional controller space, and (2) the effect of controller stiffness and damping on force tracking of the contour of a simulated three dimensional cube using the part simulation of weightless conditions. The results support the extension of neuromotor control models, which postulate a stiffness balance encoding of terminal position, to three dimensional motion of a multilink system, confirm the existence of a disturbance in human manual control performance under gravity compensated conditions, and suggest techniques for compensation of weightlessness induced performance decrement through appropriate specification of hand controller response characteristics. These techniques are based on the human control model.

  3. The development and use of SPIO Lycra compression bracing in children with neuromotor deficits.

    PubMed

    Hylton, N; Allen, C

    1997-01-01

    The use of flexible compression bracing in persons with neuromotor deficits offers improved possibilities for stability and movement control without severely limiting joint movement options. At the Children's Therapy Center in Kent, Washington, this treatment modality has been explored with increasing application in children with moderate to severe cerebral palsy and other neuromotor deficits over the past 6 years, with good success. Significant functional improvements using Neoprene shoulder/trunk/hip Bracing led us to experiment with much lighter compression materials. The stabilizing pressure input orthosis or SPIO bracing system (developed by Cheryl Allen, parent and Chief Designer, and Nancy Hylton, PT) is custom-fitted to the stability, movement control and sensory deficit needs of a specific individual. SPIO bracing developed for a specific child has often become part of a rapidly increasing group of flexible bracing options which appear to provide an improved base of support for functional gains in balance, dynamic stability, general and specific movement control with improved postural and muscle readiness. Both deep sensory and subtle biomechanical factors may account for the functional changes observed. This article discusses the development and current use of flexible compression SPIO bracing in this area.

  4. Identification of potential neuromotor mechanisms of manual therapy in patients with musculoskeletal disablement: rationale and description of a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia; Wu, Allan D

    2009-05-21

    Many health care practitioners use a variety of hands-on treatments to improve symptoms and disablement in patients with musculoskeletal pathology.Research to date indirectly suggests a potentially broad effect of manual therapy on the neuromotor processing of functional behavior within the supraspinal central nervous system (CNS) in a manner that may be independent of modification at the level of local spinal circuits. However, the effect of treatment speed, as well as the specific mechanism and locus of CNS changes, remain unclear. We developed a placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the hypothesis that manual therapy procedures directed to the talocrural joint in individuals with post-acute ankle sprain induce a change in corticospinal excitability that is relevant to improve the performance of lower extremity functional behavior. This study is designed to identify potential neuromotor changes associated with manual therapy procedures directed to the appendicular skeleton, compare the relative effect of treatment speed on potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures, and determine the behavioral relevance of potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00847769.

  5. A Survey of the Use of Antiepileptic and Muscle Relaxant Medication in a Sample of Children with Neuromotor Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Bobby G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A longitudinal survey of 424 preschoolers and infants with neuromotor disorders served by a children's rehabilitation center was conducted to determine the number who were receiving muscle relaxant or anticonvulsant medication, as well as average daily dosages. An increase in the number of antiepileptic prescriptions was found from 1962 to 1986.…

  6. Identification of potential neuromotor mechanisms of manual therapy in patients with musculoskeletal disablement: rationale and description of a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Beth E; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia; Wu, Allan D

    2009-01-01

    Background Many health care practitioners use a variety of hands-on treatments to improve symptoms and disablement in patients with musculoskeletal pathology. Research to date indirectly suggests a potentially broad effect of manual therapy on the neuromotor processing of functional behavior within the supraspinal central nervous system (CNS) in a manner that may be independent of modification at the level of local spinal circuits. However, the effect of treatment speed, as well as the specific mechanism and locus of CNS changes, remain unclear. Methods/Design We developed a placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the hypothesis that manual therapy procedures directed to the talocrural joint in individuals with post-acute ankle sprain induce a change in corticospinal excitability that is relevant to improve the performance of lower extremity functional behavior. Discussion This study is designed to identify potential neuromotor changes associated with manual therapy procedures directed to the appendicular skeleton, compare the relative effect of treatment speed on potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures, and determine the behavioral relevance of potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures. Trial Registration identifier NCT00847769. PMID:19460169

  7. The relationship between burden and well-being among caregivers of Italian people diagnosed with severe neuromotor and cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Fianco, Andrea; Sartori, Raffaela D G; Negri, Luca; Lorini, Saverio; Valle, Giovanni; Delle Fave, Antonella

    2015-04-01

    In studies on caregiving, high levels of perceived burden are commonly considered as synonymous with poor well-being. This study aimed at better disentangling the relationship between burden and well-being dimensions through their joint investigation. To this purpose, perceived well-being and social resources were evaluated among caregivers reporting different levels of burden. Participants were 91 caregivers (mean age=50.4; SD=9.6), parents of people diagnosed with severe neuromotor and cognitive disorders. Participants completed a semi-structured interview and a set of scaled questionnaires: Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI), Satisfaction with Life Scale, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, Eudaimonic and Hedonic Happiness Investigation, Resilience Scale for Adults, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Participants were divided into two groups according to their perceived burden level, assessed through CBI. In both groups, the subjective components of burden accounted for the major fraction of the total burden level. Participants perceiving high burden reported higher levels of depression related emotions, lower life satisfaction and lower resilience than participants perceiving low burden. No group difference emerged in perceived meaningfulness and social support. A regression analysis showed that the best predictor of perceived burden was life satisfaction, followed to a lesser extent by resilience, while depression related emotions did not provide significant contribution. Findings suggest that the joint assessment of burden and well-being dimensions, that are co-existing in caregivers' experience, allow for the identification of personal and relational resources that can be usefully included in interventions addressed to caregivers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Understanding neuromotor strategy during functional upper extremity tasks using symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Dominic E; Guastello, Stephen J; Prost, Robert W; Jeutter, Dean C

    2012-01-01

    The ability to model and quantify brain activation patterns that pertain to natural neuromotor strategy of the upper extremities during functional task performance is critical to the development of therapeutic interventions such as neuroprosthetic devices. The mechanisms of information flow, activation sequence and patterns, and the interaction between anatomical regions of the brain that are specific to movement planning, intention and execution of voluntary upper extremity motor tasks were investigated here. This paper presents a novel method using symbolic dynamics (orbital decomposition) and nonlinear dynamic tools of entropy, self-organization and chaos to describe the underlying structure of activation shifts in regions of the brain that are involved with the cognitive aspects of functional upper extremity task performance. Several questions were addressed: (a) How is it possible to distinguish deterministic or causal patterns of activity in brain fMRI from those that are really random or non-contributory to the neuromotor control process? (b) Can the complexity of activation patterns over time be quantified? (c) What are the optimal ways of organizing fMRI data to preserve patterns of activation, activation levels, and extract meaningful temporal patterns as they evolve over time? Analysis was performed using data from a custom developed time resolved fMRI paradigm involving human subjects (N=18) who performed functional upper extremity motor tasks with varying time delays between the onset of intention and onset of actual movements. The results indicate that there is structure in the data that can be quantified through entropy and dimensional complexity metrics and statistical inference, and furthermore, orbital decomposition is sensitive in capturing the transition of states that correlate with the cognitive aspects of functional task performance.

  9. [Correlation between growth rate of corpus callosum and neuromotor development in preterm infants].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ke; Sun, Jie; Hu, Li-Yan; Liu, Fang

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the growth rate of corpus callosum by cranial ultrasound in very low birth weight preterm infants and to provide a reference for early evaluation and improvement of brain development. A total of 120 preterm infants under 33 weeks' gestation were recruited and divided into 26-29(+6) weeks group (n=64) and 30-32(+6) weeks group (n=56) according to the gestational age. The growth rate of corpus callosum was compared between the two groups. The correlation between the corpus callosum length and the cerebellar vermis length and the relationship of the growth rate of corpus callosum with clinical factors and the neuromotor development were analyzed. The growth rate of corpus callosum in preterm infants declined since 2 weeks after birth. Compared with the 30-32(+6) weeks group, the 26-29(+6) weeks group had a significantly lower growth rate of corpus callosum at 3-4 weeks after birth, at 5-6 weeks after birth, and from 7 weeks after birth to 40 weeks of corrected gestational age. There was a positive linear correlation between the corpus callosum length and the cerebellar vermis length. Small-for-gestational age infants had a low growth rate of corpus callosum at 2 weeks after birth. The 12 preterm infants with severe abnormal intellectual development had a lower growth rate of corpus callosum compared with the 108 preterm infants with non-severe abnormal intellectual development at 3-6 weeks after birth. The 5 preterm infants with severe abnormal motor development had a significantly lower growth rate of corpus callosum compared with the 115 preterm infants with non-severe abnormal motor development at 3-6 weeks after birth. The decline of growth rate of corpus callosum in preterm infants at 2-6 weeks after birth can increase the risk of severe abnormal neuromotor development.

  10. Walk Ratio (Step Length/Cadence) as a Summary Index of Neuromotor Control of Gait: Application to Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rota, Viviana; Perucca, Laura; Simone, Anna; Tesio, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    In healthy adults, the step length/cadence ratio [walk ratio (WR) in mm/(steps/min) and normalized for height] is known to be constant around 6.5 mm/(step/min). It is a speed-independent index of the overall neuromotor gait control, in as much as it reflects energy expenditure, balance, between-step variability, and attentional demand. The speed…

  11. Acrylamide in a fried potato dish (rösti) from restaurants in Zurich, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    McCombie, Gregor; Biedermann, Maurus; Biedermann-Brem, Sandra; Suter, Gaby; Eicher, Angela; Pfefferle, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Rösti, a fried potato product, is a large contributor to acrylamide exposure locally in Switzerland. A survey of 55 dishes prepared by 51 restaurants in the city of Zurich showed that the average rösti contained 702 µg/kg acrylamide. By analysing the content of reducing sugars in the potatoes used for frying, it is shown that with simple measures, the exposure to acrylamide could easily be reduced by factor 2 or more, while even improving the culinary experience. Though rösti is a typical dish in the German-speaking areas in Switzerland, the result may be of general interest for fried potato products which are popular in large areas of Central Europe.

  12. Evidence as Source of Power in School Reforms: The Quest for the Extension of Compulsory Education in Zurich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imlig, Flavian; Ruoss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the use of evidence in educational policy and politics, and how this use has changed over time. Using an analytical framework that combines research approaches from both political and educational science, evidence-related arguments in two major school reforms in the canton of Zurich, Switzerland are described. In…

  13. Early physiotherapy ad modum Vojta or Bobath in infants with suspected neuromotor disturbance.

    PubMed

    d'Avignon, M; Norén, L; Arman, T

    1981-08-01

    Thirty children with early signs of cerebral neuromotor disturbances according to "Vojta criteria" were followed until the age of thirty-three months to six years. Twelve children were treated with early physiotherapy according to Bobath, ten children were treated according to Vojta and eight constituted a control group. The infants tended for early physical therapy were divided by random into two different groups. The neonatal risk factors, however, proved to be unevenly distributed among the infants in the Vojta- and the Bobath-treated groups - the latter being more heavily burdened in this respect. Vojta has claimed that his method of early physiotherapy is able to prevent the development of cerebral palsy (cp) of "uncomplicated" (but not of "complicated") type. At follow-up we found one child out of nine with "uncomplicated" cp in the Vojta group against three out of six in the Bobath- and two out of six in the control group. These differences, however, are not statistically significant. Further detailed studies with greater groups of children seem necessary to help us to clarify these problems. The psychological aspects of early physiotherapy should be thoroughly considered and this is particularly important in connection with the Vojta method.

  14. Moyamoya angiopathy in Europe: the beginnings in Zurich, practical lessons learned, increasing awareness and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Khan, N; Yonekawa, Y

    2008-01-01

    The number of patients, especially children, diagnosed with Moyamoya angiopathy and being referred to us for treatment from all across Europe, has increased over the last few years. An increase in awareness of the occurrence of stroke in children in the general and medical population might be the main cause of this phenomenon. Increasing awareness does not happen "spontaneously" nor does it manifest overnight! It requires regular platforms of communication between the general population and amongst the different medical specialists mainly neurologists, paediatric neurologists, neuropsychologists, neuroradiologists, neurorehabilitation specialists, nursing staff and neurosurgeons. Presently we were lucky to conduct the first Moyamoya Symposium ever to be conducted at a European-Japanese level with participation of specialists of this particular field from across Europe and Japan. Ever since the first child with Moyamoya was managed at the University hospital in Zurich some 7 years ago the number of patients referred to us from all across Europe increased rapidly. The importance of interdisciplinary communication, trust and support amongst specialists and increasing the awareness of the disease among the patients, medical personnel was and remains to be just as important as making the correct diagnosis and treatment of choice in these patients. We present the lessons we learned during these previous years and look into the future perspectives that require our further and urgent attention.

  15. Forelimb muscle function in pig-nosed turtles, Carettochelys insculpta: testing neuromotor conservation between rowing and flapping in swimming turtles

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Angela R. V.; Blob, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in muscle activation patterns can lead to new locomotor modes; however, neuromotor conservation—the evolution of new forms of locomotion through changes in structure without concurrent changes to underlying motor patterns—has been documented across diverse styles of locomotion. Animals that swim using appendages do so via rowing (anteroposterior oscilations) or flapping (dorsoventral oscilations). Yet few studies have compared motor patterns between these swimming modes. In swimming turtles, propulsion is generated exclusively by limbs. Kinematically, turtles swim using multiple styles of rowing (freshwater species), flapping (sea turtles) and a unique hybrid style with superficial similarity to flapping by sea turtles and characterized by increased dorsoventral motions of synchronously oscillated forelimbs that have been modified into flippers (Carettochelys insculpta). We compared forelimb motor patterns in four species of turtle (two rowers, Apalone ferox and Trachemys scripta; one flapper, Caretta caretta; and Carettochelys) and found that, despite kinematic differences, motor patterns were generally similar among species with a few notable exceptions: specifically, presence of variable bursts for pectoralis and triceps in Trachemys (though timing of the non-variable pectoralis burst was similar), and the timing of deltoideus activity in Carettochelys and Caretta compared with other taxa. The similarities in motor patterns we find for several muscles provide partial support for neuromotor conservation among turtles using diverse locomotor styles, but the differences implicate deltoideus as a prime contributor to flapping limb motions. PMID:23966596

  16. Clinical effects of non-invasive cerebellar magnetic stimulation treatment combined with neuromotor rehabilitation in traumatic brain injury. A single case study.

    PubMed

    Martino Cinnera, Alex; Bonnì, S; Iosa, M; Ponzo, V; Fusco, A; Caltagirone, Carlo; Koch, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal treatments are emerging as effective approaches for motor recovery in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Various evidence has demonstrated that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may improve outcomes in people with motor disorders. Behavioral gains from rTMS protocols may be maximized when brain stimulation is coupled with carefully designed occupational/physical therapy. We present the case of a 25-year-old man with chronic TBI (a bilateral corticosubcortical parieto-occipital lesion) who underwent three weeks of cerebellar intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a form of rTMS, combined with neurorehabilitation treatment. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, and accelerometer gait analysis were administered before and after treatment. The results showed improvements in balance performance (BBS: T0=47; T1=53; +10.72%), motor recovery (FMA: T0=93/100; T1=96/100; +3.00%), step length (T0=50.4±7.2; T1=53.8±2.2 cm, p<0.001), and walking speed (T0=0.87±0.06; T1=0.91±0.04 m/sec,p<0.001). Combined cerebellar rTMS and neurore-Clinical effects of non-invasive cerebellar magnetic stimulation treatment combined with neuromotor rehabilitation in traumatic brain injury. A single case study. habilitation seems to be a promising treatment for motor and balance dysfunctions in TBI patients.

  17. Inter- and intra-observer variability of radiography and computed tomography for evaluation of Zurich cementless acetabular cup placement ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Leasure, Jessica O; Peck, Jeffrey N; Villamil, Armando; Fiore, Kara L; Tano, Cheryl A

    2016-11-23

    To evaluate the inter- and intra-observer variability in measurement of the angle of lateral opening (ALO) and version angle measurement using digital radiography and computed tomography (CT). Each hemipelvis was implanted with a cementless acetabular cup. Ventrodorsal and mediolateral radiographs were made of each pelvis, followed by CT imaging. After removal of the first cup, the pelves were implanted with an acetabular cup in the contralateral acetabulum and imaging was repeated. Three surgeons measured the ALO and version angles three times for each cup from the mediolateral radiographic projection. The same measurements were made using three-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions from CT images. Two anatomical axes were used to measure pelvic inclination in the sagittal plane, resulting in six measurements per cup. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance evaluated inter- and intra-observer repeatability for radiographic and CT-based measurements. Version angle based on radiographic measurement did not differ within surgeons (p = 0.433), but differed between surgeons (p <0.001). Radiographic measurement of ALO differed within surgeons (p = 0.006) but not between surgeons (p = 0.989). The ALO and version angle measured on CT images did not differ with or between surgeons. Assessment of inter- and intra-observer measurement of ALO and version angle was more reproducible using CT images than conventional mediolateral radiography for a Zurich cementless acetabular cup.

  18. Development of Motor Speed and Associated Movements from 5 to 18 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasser, Theo; Rousson, Valentin; Caflisch, Jon; Jenni, Oskar G.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To study the development of motor speed and associated movements in participants aged 5 to 18 years for age, sex, and laterality. Method: Ten motor tasks of the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (repetitive and alternating movements of hands and feet, repetitive and sequential finger movements, the pegboard, static and dynamic balance,…

  19. Does intrauterine crowding affect locomotor development? A comparative study of motor performance, neuromotor maturation and gait variability among piglets that differ in birth weight and vitality

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Peter; Prims, Sara; Ayuso, Miriam; Van Cruchten, Steven; Van Ginneken, Chris

    2018-01-01

    In polytocous species, such as pigs, the growth of an individual fetus is affected by competition from its littermates and the sow. This intrauterine competition greatly influences postnatal traits such as birth weight and vitality (physical strength). A lowered vitality is most often observed among low birth weight piglets. Since it has been argued that locomotion might be key to unraveling vitality-related differences, we compared gait development in piglets with a low birth weight and low vitality (L piglets) with piglets with a normal birth weight and normal vitality (N piglets) by means of spatio-temporal gait analysis during locomotion at self-selected speed. Video recordings of L and N piglets walking along a corridor at ten time points (between birth and 96 h after birth) were made and the footfalls were digitized. Hence, self-selected speed, spatio-temporal characteristics and gait symmetry were analyzed to compare motor performance, neuromotor maturation (motor task, interlimb and intralimb coordination) and gait variability for L and N piglets. The analysis included both absolute and normalized data (according to the dynamic similarity concept), to distinguish neuromotor maturation from effects caused by growth. Results indicate that intrauterine crowding affects locomotion, mainly by impairing growth in utero, with a lowered motor performance during the first 96 h of age as a consequence. A difference in neuromotor skills was also visible, though only for swing and stance duration, implying a difference in neuromotor development in utero. However, further maturation during the first days after birth does not seem to be affected by intrauterine crowding. We can therefore conclude that L piglets might be considered a smaller and fictitious younger version of N piglets. PMID:29689084

  20. An operational hydrological ensemble prediction system for the city of Zurich (Switzerland): skill, case studies and scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addor, N.; Jaun, S.; Fundel, F.; Zappa, M.

    2011-07-01

    The Sihl River flows through Zurich, Switzerland's most populated city, for which it represents the largest flood threat. To anticipate extreme discharge events and provide decision support in case of flood risk, a hydrometeorological ensemble prediction system (HEPS) was launched operationally in 2008. This model chain relies on limited-area atmospheric forecasts provided by the deterministic model COSMO-7 and the probabilistic model COSMO-LEPS. These atmospheric forecasts are used to force a semi-distributed hydrological model (PREVAH), coupled to a hydraulic model (FLORIS). The resulting hydrological forecasts are eventually communicated to the stakeholders involved in the Sihl discharge management. This fully operational setting provides a real framework with which to compare the potential of deterministic and probabilistic discharge forecasts for flood mitigation. To study the suitability of HEPS for small-scale basins and to quantify the added-value conveyed by the probability information, a reforecast was made for the period June 2007 to December 2009 for the Sihl catchment (336 km2). Several metrics support the conclusion that the performance gain can be of up to 2 days lead time for the catchment considered. Brier skill scores show that overall COSMO-LEPS-based hydrological forecasts outperforms their COSMO-7-based counterparts for all the lead times and event intensities considered. The small size of the Sihl catchment does not prevent skillful discharge forecasts, but makes them particularly dependent on correct precipitation forecasts, as shown by comparisons with a reference run driven by observed meteorological parameters. Our evaluation stresses that the capacity of the model to provide confident and reliable mid-term probability forecasts for high discharges is limited. The two most intense events of the study period are investigated utilising a novel graphical representation of probability forecasts, and are used to generate high discharge

  1. Versatile robotic interface to evaluate, enable and train locomotion and balance after neuromotor disorders.

    PubMed

    Dominici, Nadia; Keller, Urs; Vallery, Heike; Friedli, Lucia; van den Brand, Rubia; Starkey, Michelle L; Musienko, Pavel; Riener, Robert; Courtine, Grégoire

    2012-07-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) disorders distinctly impair locomotor pattern generation and balance, but technical limitations prevent independent assessment and rehabilitation of these subfunctions. Here we introduce a versatile robotic interface to evaluate, enable and train pattern generation and balance independently during natural walking behaviors in rats. In evaluation mode, the robotic interface affords detailed assessments of pattern generation and dynamic equilibrium after spinal cord injury (SCI) and stroke. In enabling mode,the robot acts as a propulsive or postural neuroprosthesis that instantly promotes unexpected locomotor capacities including overground walking after complete SCI, stair climbing following partial SCI and precise paw placement shortly after stroke. In training mode, robot-enabled rehabilitation, epidural electrical stimulation and monoamine agonists reestablish weight-supported locomotion, coordinated steering and balance in rats with a paralyzing SCI. This new robotic technology and associated concepts have broad implications for both assessing and restoring motor functions after CNS disorders, both in animals and in humans.

  2. Sitting Together And Reaching To Play (START-Play): Protocol for a Multisite Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial on Intervention for Infants With Neuromotor Disorders.

    PubMed

    Harbourne, Regina T; Dusing, Stacey C; Lobo, Michele A; Westcott-McCoy, Sarah; Bovaird, James; Sheridan, Susan; Galloway, James C; Chang, Hui-Ju; Hsu, Lin-Ya; Koziol, Natalie; Marcinowski, Emily C; Babik, Iryna

    2018-06-01

    There is limited research examining the efficacy of early physical therapy on infants with neuromotor dysfunction. In addition, most early motor interventions have not been directly linked to learning, despite the clear association between motor activity and cognition during infancy. The aim of this project is to evaluate the efficacy of Sitting Together And Reaching To Play (START-Play), an intervention designed to target sitting, reaching, and motor-based problem solving to advance global development in infants with motor delays or neuromotor dysfunction. This study is a longitudinal multisite randomized controlled trial. Infants in the START-Play group are compared to infants receiving usual care in early intervention (EI). The research takes place in homes in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Washington, and Virginia. There will be 140 infants with neuromotor dysfunction participating, beginning between 7 to 16 months of age. Infants will have motor delays and emerging sitting skill. START-Play provides individualized twice-weekly home intervention for 12 weeks with families to enhance cognition through sitting, reaching, and problem-solving activities for infants. Ten interventionists provide the intervention, with each child assigned 1 therapist. The primary outcome measure is the Bayley III Scales of Infant Development. Secondary measures include change in the Early Problem Solving Indicator, change in the Gross Motor Function Measure, and change in the type and duration of toy contacts during reaching. Additional measures include sitting posture control and parent-child interaction. Limitations include variability in usual EI care and the lack of blinding for interventionists and families. This study describes usual care in EI across 4 US regions and compares outcomes of the START-Play intervention to usual care.

  3. The Infant Motor Profile: A Standardized and Qualitative Method to Assess Motor Behaviour in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2008-01-01

    A reliable and valid instrument to assess neuromotor condition in infancy is a prerequisite for early detection of developmental motor disorders. We developed a video-based assessment of motor behaviour, the Infant Motor Profile (IMP), to evaluate motor abilities, movement variability, ability to select motor strategies, movement symmetry, and…

  4. True survival benefit of lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis patients: the Zurich experience.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Markus; Benden, Christian; Inci, Ilhan; Schmid, Christoph; Irani, Sarosh; Speich, Rudolf; Weder, Walter; Boehler, Annette

    2009-04-01

    Lung transplantation is the ultimate therapy for end-stage cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease; however, the debate continues as to whether lung transplantation improves survival. We report post-transplant outcome in CF at our institution by comparing 5-year post-transplant survival with a calculated 5-year survival without lung transplantation, using a predictive 5-year survivorship model, and describe pre-transplant parameters influencing transplant outcome. CF patients undergoing lung transplantation at our center were included (1992 to 2007). Survival rates were calculated and compared, and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used for statistical assessment. Eighty transplants were performed in CF patients, 11 (13.8%) of whom were children. Mean age at transplant was 26.2 years (95% confidence interval: 24.4 to 28.0). The Liou raw score at transplant was -20 (95% confidence interval: -16 to -24), resulting in an estimated 5-year survival without transplantation of 33 +/- 14%, compared with a 5-year post-transplant survival of 68.2 +/- 5.6%. Further improvement was noted in the recent transplant era (since 2000), with a 5-year survival of 72.7 +/- 7.3%. Univariate analysis revealed that later year of transplant and diagnosis of diabetes influenced survival positively. Pediatric age had no negative impact. In the multivariate analysis, only diabetes influenced survival, in a positive manner. Lung transplantation performed at centers having experience with the procedure can offer a true survival benefit to patients with end-stage CF lung disease.

  5. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. I. WHICH ENVIRONMENT AFFECTS GALAXY EVOLUTION?

    SciTech Connect

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Cibinel, Anna; Lilly, Simon J.

    2013-10-20

    The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) is based on a sample of ∼1500 galaxy members of 141 groups in the mass range ∼10{sup 12.5-14.5} M{sub ☉} within the narrow redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.0585. ZENS adopts novel approaches, described here, to quantify four different galactic environments, namely: (1) the mass of the host group halo; (2) the projected halo-centric distance; (3) the rank of galaxies as central or satellites within their group halos; and (4) the filamentary large-scale structure density. No self-consistent identification of a central galaxy is found in ∼40% of <10{sup 13.5} M{sub ☉} groups, from whichmore » we estimate that ∼15% of groups at these masses are dynamically unrelaxed systems. Central galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups generally have similar properties, suggesting that centrals are regulated by their mass and not by their environment. Centrals in relaxed groups have, however, ∼30% larger sizes than in unrelaxed groups, possibly due to accretion of small satellites in virialized group halos. At M > 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, satellite galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups have similar size, color, and (specific) star formation rate distributions; at lower galaxy masses, satellites are marginally redder in relaxed relative to unrelaxed groups, suggesting quenching of star formation in low-mass satellites by physical processes active in relaxed halos. Overall, relaxed and unrelaxed groups show similar stellar mass populations, likely indicating similar stellar mass conversion efficiencies. In the enclosed ZENS catalog, we publish all environmental diagnostics as well as the galaxy structural and photometric measurements described in companion ZENS papers II and III.« less

  6. An operational hydrological ensemble prediction system for the city of Zurich (Switzerland): skill, case studies and scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addor, N.; Jaun, S.; Zappa, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Sihl River flows through Zurich, Switzerland's most populated city, for which it represents the largest flood threat. To anticipate extreme discharge events and provide decision support in case of flood risk, a hydrometeorological ensemble prediction system (HEPS) was launched operationally in 2008. This models chain relies on limited-area atmospheric forecasts provided by the deterministic model COSMO-7 and the probabilistic model COSMO-LEPS. These atmospheric forecasts are used to force a semi-distributed hydrological model (PREVAH), coupled to a hydraulic model (FLORIS). The resulting hydrological forecasts are eventually communicated to the stakeholders involved in the Sihl discharge management. This fully operational setting provides a real framework to compare the potential of deterministic and probabilistic discharge forecasts for flood mitigation. To study the suitability of HEPS for small-scale basins and to quantify the added-value conveyed by the probability information, a reforecast was made for the period June 2007 to December 2009 for the Sihl catchment (336 km2). Several metrics support the conclusion that the performance gain can be of up to 2 days lead time for the catchment considered. Brier skill scores show that COSMO-LEPS-based hydrological forecasts overall outperform their COSMO-7 based counterparts for all the lead times and event intensities considered. The small size of the Sihl catchment does not prevent skillful discharge forecasts, but makes them particularly dependent on correct precipitation forecasts, as shown by comparisons with a reference run driven by observed meteorological parameters. Our evaluation stresses that the capacity of the model to provide confident and reliable mid-term probability forecasts for high discharges is limited. The two most intense events of the study period are investigated utilising a novel graphical representation of probability forecasts and used to generate high discharge scenarios. They

  7. From "uncertifiable" medical practice to Berlin Clinic of Women Doctors: the medical career of Franziska Tiburtius (M.D. Zurich, 1876).

    PubMed

    Meyer, P

    1999-01-01

    Problems in gender expectations and relationships complicated increasing professionalization of medical arts at an important point of transformation toward the modern industrial European state. Subordination of women's work in these processes altered possible outcomes for German society in general and for female medical careers in particular. Franziska Tiburtius was one of twenty German women who graduated from the coeducational medical school in Zurich, Switzerland, in the nineteenth century. She was a founder of the Clinic of Women Doctors despite prohibitions against certifying women as physicians. Imperial Germany was the last Western nation to admit women to full medical practice in 1899.

  8. Aging curve of neuromotor function by pronation and supination of forearms using three-dimensional wireless acceleration and angular velocity sensors.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, M; Okui, H; Hirakawa, G; Ishinishi, H; Katayama, Y; Iramina, K

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an evaluation system for pronation and supination of forearms. The motion of pronation and supination of the forearm is used as a diagnosis method of developmental disability, etc. However, this diagnosis method has a demerit in which diagnosis results between doctors are not consistent. It is hoped that a more quantitative and simple evaluation method is established. Moreover it is hoped a diagnostic criteria obtained from healthy subjects can be established to diagnose developmental disorder patients. We developed a simple and portable evaluation system for pronation and supination of forearms. Three-dimensional wireless acceleration and angular velocity sensors are used for this system. In this study, pronation and supination of forearms of 570 subjects (subjects aged 6-12, 21-100) were examined. We could obtain aging curves in the neuromotor function of pronation and supination. These aging curves obtained by our developed system, has the potential to become diagnostic criteria for a developmental disability, etc.

  9. A scaling theory for number-flux distributions generated during steady-state coagulation and settling and application to particles in Lake Zurich, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Alexandria B

    2002-10-15

    In this study, we extend the established scaling theory for cluster size distributions generated during unsteady coagulation to number-flux distributions that arise during steady-state coagulation and settling in an unmixed water mass. The scaling theory predicts self-similar number-flux distributions and power-law decay of total number flux with depth. The shape of the number-flux distributions and the power-law exponent describing the decay of the total number flux are shown to depend on the homogeneity and small i/j limit of the coagulation kernel and the exponent kappa, which describes the variation in settling velocity with cluster volume. Particle field measurements from Lake Zurich, collected by U. Weilenmann and co-workers (Limnol. Oceanogr.34, 1 (1989)), are used to illustrate how the scaling predictions can be applied to a natural system. This effort indicates that within the mid-depth region of Lake Zurich, clusters of the same size preferentially interact and large clusters react with one another more quickly than small ones, indicative of clusters coagulating in a reaction-limited regime.

  10. First insights into the social organisation of Goodman's mouse lemur (Microcebus lehilahytsara)--testing predictions from socio-ecological hypotheses in the Masoala hall of Zurich Zoo.

    PubMed

    Jürges, Vivian; Kitzler, Johanne; Zingg, Robert; Radespiel, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Following current socio-ecological hypotheses, the social organisation of a species is mainly determined by resource quality and distribution. In the case of Microcebus spp., a taxon-specific socio-ecological model was formulated earlier to explain their variable social organisation. The aim of this study was to test predictions from this model in Goodman's mouse lemur based on a data set from animals living in the semi-free colony of Zurich Zoo. During a 2-month study, we observed 5 females and 5 males using radiotelemetry. We collected data on space use and social behaviour, on sleeping sites and on sleeping group composition. Predictions were only partly confirmed. As expected, Goodman's mouse lemurs were solitary foragers with an increased level of sociality due to crowding effects at the feeding stations. In contrast to the prediction, females and males formed unisexual sleeping groups, which were stable in females and of a fission-fusion type in males. Whereas the formation of sleeping groups by both sexes may be triggered by thermoregulatory benefits, the formation of unisexual sleeping groups may result from divergent interests of the sexes. We conclude that the existing model for the evolution of mouse lemur social organisation needs to be refined. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Tinea capitis and tinea faciei in the Zurich area - an 8-year survey of trends in the epidemiology and treatment patterns.

    PubMed

    Kieliger, S; Glatz, M; Cozzio, A; Bosshard, P P

    2015-08-01

    Tinea capitis and tinea faciei are dermatophyte infections of the scalp and glabrous skin of the face affecting mainly prepubertal children. During the past 30 years, a significant increase and a change in the pattern of infectious agents has been noted for tinea capitis. The aim of this study was to determine trends in the current epidemiological situation of tinea capitis and tinea faciei in the Zurich area, Switzerland and adjacent Central and Eastern Switzerland. Consecutive cases diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 were studied retrospectively. A total of 90 tinea capitis and 40 tinea faciei cases were observed. Anthropophilic isolates (primarily Trichophyton violaceum and Microsporum audouinii) accounted for 76% of tinea capitis cases. In contrast, zoophilic isolates (primarily T. interdigitale) were responsible for 73% of tinea faciei cases. The peak incidence in both conditions was in 4-8 year-old children. While the annual number of tinea faciei cases remained stable over the past 8 years, a trend for an increase in T. violaceum-positive tinea capitis has been observed. This was mainly due to patients of African ethnicity. Anthropophilic isolates accounted for three quarters of tinea capitis and one quarter of tinea faciei cases. T. violaceum-positive tinea capitis was primarily linked to patients of African ethnicity. Tinea capitis caused by Microsporum spp. was more refractory to therapy and needed longer treatment than Trichophyton spp.-induced infection. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Is total hip arthroplasty safely performed in lung transplant patients? Current experience from a retrospective study of the Zurich lung transplant cohort.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jürgen W; Benden, Christian; Dora, Claudio; Werner, Clément M L

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the number of lung transplants has increased rapidly, with higher quality of life and improved survival rates in transplant recipients, including patients with advanced age. This, in turn, means that more transplant recipients will seek musculoskeletal care to treat degenerative joint disease and also trauma incidents. Safety concerns regarding elective and posttraumatic hip arthroplasty in transplant patients include an increased risk of infection, wound healing problems, periprosthetic fractures and loosening of the implants. Clinical outcomes and safety aspects were retrospectively reviewed for five primary total hip arthroplasties (THA) in lung transplant recipients with minimal follow-up of two years at average of 2.6 (2-11) years. Patients were recruited from the Zurich Lung Transplant Center comprising of a cohort of 253 patients between January 1st, 2004 and December 31st, 2013. All five patients subjectively reported excellent outcomes after THA with a final average Harris Hip Score of 97 (86-100). One 71-year-old patient died 26 months after THA unrelated to arthroplasty. One superficial wound healing disturbance was documented. No periprosthetic fractures, no dislocations, no periprosthetic infections, no further revision surgery, no implant loosening was observed. In conclusion, THA can be safely and successfully performed even in lung transplant patients under long-term immunosuppressive therapy and polymedication, provided a multidisciplinary approach can be granted.

  13. The 2015 Annual Meeting of SETAC German Language Branch in Zurich (7-10 September, 2015): Ecotoxicology and environmental chemistry-from research to application.

    PubMed

    Werner, Inge; Aldrich, Annette; Becker, Benjamin; Becker, Dennis; Brinkmann, Markus; Burkhardt, Michael; Caspers, Norbert; Campiche, Sophie; Chèvre, Nathalie; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Escher, Beate I; Fischer, Fabian; Giebner, Sabrina; Heye, Katharina; Hollert, Henner; Junghans, Marion; Kienle, Cornelia; Knauer, Katja; Korkaric, Muris; Märkl, Veronika; Muncke, Jane; Oehlmann, Jörg; Reifferscheid, Georg; Rensch, Daniel; Schäffer, Andreas; Schiwy, Sabrina; Schwarz, Simon; Segner, Helmut; Simon, Eszter; Triebskorn, Rita; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Wintgens, Thomas; Zennegg, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of the 20th annual meeting of the German Language Branch of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC GLB) held from September 7th to 10th 2015 at ETH (Swiss Technical University) in Zurich, Switzerland. The event was chaired by Inge Werner, Director of the Swiss Centre for Applied Ecotoxicology (Ecotox Centre) Eawag-EPFL, and organized by a team from Ecotox Centre, Eawag, Federal Office of the Environment, Federal Office of Agriculture, and Mesocosm GmbH (Germany). Over 200 delegates from academia, public agencies and private industry of Germany, Switzerland and Austria attended and discussed the current state of science and its application presented in 75 talks and 83 posters. In addition, three invited keynote speakers provided new insights into scientific knowledge 'brokering', and-as it was the International Year of Soil-the important role of healthy soil ecosystems. Awards were presented to young scientists for best oral and poster presentations, and for best 2014 master and doctoral theses. Program and abstracts of the meeting (mostly in German) are provided as Additional file 1.

  14. [Acceptance and feasibility of medical telemonitoring plus individual teleconsultation -A two years research and development project at the University Hospital Zurich].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Weitmann, Sabine; Buser, Jacqueline; Baumann, Doris; Schmidt, Christian; Brettenhofer, Marlene; Tarnutzer, Silvan; Meienberger, Beda; Otto, Ulrich; Brockes, Christiane

    2015-09-01

    The research and development project "Long Independent Living Assistant (LILA)'; which is financially supported by the Commission for Technology and lnnoyation (KTI}, is based on the results and experiences of many years of the Medical Online Consultation Service at the University Hospital Zurich.The focus is on development and provision of a comprehensive, telemedicine service. Citizens and patients should be provided more safety at home and the family doctor should be supported by the service. Core elements of the project include the telemonitoring of vital signs combined with an individual teleconsultation via telephone, email and video. Technically, the. service is supported by a web-based documentation and communication platform with an integrated patient record. In a one-year planning phase, individual interviews and group discussions were conducted with the participants of the study. The results are continuously incorporated into the concept. The subsequent pilot phase analyzed the developed tetemedical approach and leads to further improvements. The aim of the study is the evaluation of the needs, feasibility and acceptance of telemedicine services from the perspective of the user, taking into account their social environment~

  15. The color of complexes and UV-vis spectroscopy as an analytical tool of Alfred Werner's group at the University of Zurich.

    PubMed

    Fox, Thomas; Berke, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Two PhD theses (Alexander Gordienko, 1912; Johannes Angerstein, 1914) and a dissertation in partial fulfillment of a PhD thesis (H. S. French, Zurich, 1914) are reviewed that deal with hitherto unpublished UV-vis spectroscopy work of coordination compounds in the group of Alfred Werner. The method of measurement of UV-vis spectra at Alfred Werner's time is described in detail. Examples of spectra of complexes are given, which were partly interpreted in terms of structure (cis ↔ trans configuration, counting number of bands for structural relationships, and shift of general spectral features by consecutive replacement of ligands). A more complete interpretation of spectra was hampered at Alfred Werner's time by the lack of a light absorption theory and a correct theory of electron excitation, and the lack of a ligand field theory for coordination compounds. The experimentally difficult data acquisitions and the difficult spectral interpretations might have been reasons why this method did not experience a breakthrough in Alfred Werner's group to play a more prominent role as an important analytical method. Nevertheless the application of UV-vis spectroscopy on coordination compounds was unique and novel, and witnesses Alfred Werner's great aptitude and keenness to always try and go beyond conventional practice.

  16. Pure animal phobia is more specific than other specific phobias: epidemiological evidence from the Zurich Study, the ZInEP and the PsyCoLaus.

    PubMed

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Rodgers, Stephanie; Müller, Mario; Hengartner, Michael P; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra; Kawohl, Wolfram; Heekeren, Karsten; Rössler, Wulf; Angst, Jules; Castelao, Enrique; Vandeleur, Caroline; Preisig, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Interest in subtypes of mental disorders is growing in parallel with continuing research progress in psychiatry. The aim of this study was to examine pure animal phobia in contrast to other specific phobias and a mixed subtype. Data from three representative Swiss community samples were analysed: PsyCoLaus (n = 3720), the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey (n = 1500) and the Zurich Study (n = 591). Pure animal phobia and mixed animal/other specific phobias consistently displayed a low age at onset of first symptoms (8-12 years) and clear preponderance of females (OR > 3). Meanwhile, other specific phobias started up to 10 years later and displayed almost a balanced sex ratio. Pure animal phobia showed no associations with any included risk factors and comorbid disorders, in contrast to numerous associations found in the mixed subtype and in other specific phobias. Across the whole range of epidemiological parameters examined in three different samples, pure animal phobia seems to represent a different entity compared to other specific phobias. The etiopathogenetic mechanisms and risk factors associated with pure animal phobias appear less clear than ever.

  17. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY (ZENS) OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. V. PROPERTIES AND FREQUENCY OF MERGING SATELLITES AND CENTRALS IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pipino, A.; Cibinel, A.; Tacchella, S.

    2014-12-20

    We use the Zurich Environmental Study database to investigate the environmental dependence of the merger fraction Γ and merging galaxy properties in a sample of ∼1300 group galaxies with M > 10{sup 9.2} M {sub ☉} and 0.05 < z < 0.0585. In all galaxy mass bins investigated in our study, we find that Γ decreases by a factor of ∼2-3 in groups with halo masses M {sub HALO} > 10{sup 13.5} M {sub ☉} relative to less massive systems, indicating a suppression of merger activity in large potential wells. In the fiducial case of relaxed groups only, we measuremore » a variation of ΔΓ/Δlog (M {sub HALO}) ∼ –0.07 dex{sup –1}, which is almost independent of galaxy mass and merger stage. At galaxy masses >10{sup 10.2} M {sub ☉}, most mergers are dry accretions of quenched satellites onto quenched centrals, leading to a strong increase of Γ with decreasing group-centric distance at these mass scales. Both satellite and central galaxies in these high-mass mergers do not differ in color and structural properties from a control sample of nonmerging galaxies of equal mass and rank. At galaxy masses of <10{sup 10.2} M {sub ☉} where we mostly probe satellite-satellite pairs and mergers between star-forming systems close pairs (projected distance <10-20 kpc) show instead ∼2 × enhanced (specific) star formation rates and ∼1.5 × larger sizes than similar mass, nonmerging satellites. The increase in both size and star formation rate leads to similar surface star formation densities in the merging and control-sample satellite populations.« less

  18. Challenges to maternal wellbeing during pregnancy impact temperament, attention, and neuromotor responses in the infant rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Coe, Christopher L; Lubach, Gabriele R; Crispen, Heather R; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Schneider, Mary L

    2010-11-01

    The relative maturity, alertness, and reactivity of an infant at birth are sensitive indices of the neonate's health, the quality of the pregnancy, and the mother's wellbeing. Even when fetal growth and gestation length have been normal, the maturing fetus can still be adversely impacted by both physical events and psychological challenges to the mother during the prenatal period. The following research evaluated 413 rhesus monkeys from 7 different types of pregnancies to determine which conditions significantly influenced the behavioral responsiveness and state of the young infant. A standardized test battery modeled after the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale for human newborns was employed. The largest impairments in orientation and increases in infant emotional reactivity were seen when female monkeys drank alcohol, even though consumed at only moderate levels during part of the pregnancy. The infants' ability to focus and attend to visual and auditory cues was also affected when the gravid female's adrenal hormones were transiently elevated for 2 weeks by ACTH administration. In addition, responses to tactile and vestibular stimulation were altered by both this ACTH treatment and psychological disturbance during gestation. Conversely, a 2-day course of antenatal corticosteroids 1 month before term resulted in infants with lower motor activity and reactivity. These findings highlight several pregnancy conditions that can affect a young infant's neurobehavioral status, even when otherwise healthy, and demonstrate that alterations or deficits are specific to the type of insult experienced by the mother and fetus. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Neuromotor Adverse Effects in 342 Youth During 12 Weeks of Naturalistic Treatment With 5 Second-Generation Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Carbon, Maren; Kapoor, Sandeep; Sheridan, Eva; Al-Jadiri, Aseel; Azzo, Sally; Sarkaria, Tania; Kane, John M; Saito, Ema; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-09-01

    Second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) effects in youth were monitored to quantify extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) and to identify risk profiles for treatment-emergent EPS. Data were analyzed for the nonrandomized, prospective Second-generation Antipsychotic Treatment Indications, Effectiveness and Tolerability in Youth (SATIETY) inception cohort study. EPS were assessed at baseline and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after naturalistic SGA initiation for schizophrenia, mood, disruptive behavior, and autism spectrum disorders using the Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS), Barnes Akathisia Scale, Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS), and Treatment Emergent Side Effect Scale. Drug-induced parkinsonism was defined by incident mean SAS score >0.33, anticholinergic initiation, or increasing total SAS score ≥2 in patients with baseline EPS. In 342 youth aged 13.6 ± 3.5 years (male = 58.2%, antipsychotic-naive = 65.8%), 15.2% developed drug-induced parkinsonism. Raw SGA-grouped drug-induced parkinsonism rates were as follows: quetiapine = 1.5%, olanzapine = 13.8%, risperidone = 16.1%, ziprasidone = 20.0%, and aripiprazole = 27.3%. SGA type, dose, higher age, and lower baseline functioning were jointly associated with drug-induced parkinsonism (R(2) = 0.18; p < .0001). Controlling for these factors, drug-induced parkinsonism rates were significantly lower only for quetiapine and olanzapine. Subjectively reported EPS (5%), EPS-related treatment discontinuation (3.3%), and anticholinergic initiation (3%) were infrequent. Anticholinergic initiation was most frequent with risperidone (10.2%; p = .0004). Treatment-emergent dyskinesia ranged from 4.5% (aripiprazole) to 15.5% (olanzapine). SGA type, younger age, white race/ethnicity, and baseline AIMS were jointly associated with treatment-emergent dyskinesia (R(2) = 0.31; p < .0001). Controlling for these factors, treatment-emergent dyskinesia rates differed among SGA subgroups, with higher rates with olanzapine and ziprasidone. At baseline

  20. Biomechanics and Developmental Neuromotor Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zernicke, Ronald F.; Schneider, Klaus

    1993-01-01

    By applying the principles and methods of mechanics to the musculoskeletal system, new insights can be discovered about control of human limb dynamics in both adults and infants. Reviews previous research on how infants gain control of their limbs and learn to reach in the first year of life. (MDM)

  1. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults: guidance for prescribing exercise.

    PubMed

    Garber, Carol Ewing; Blissmer, Bryan; Deschenes, Michael R; Franklin, Barry A; Lamonte, Michael J; Lee, I-Min; Nieman, David C; Swain, David P

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this Position Stand is to provide guidance to professionals who counsel and prescribe individualized exercise to apparently healthy adults of all ages. These recommendations also may apply to adults with certain chronic diseases or disabilities, when appropriately evaluated and advised by a health professional. This document supersedes the 1998 American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Position Stand, "The Recommended Quantity and Quality of Exercise for Developing and Maintaining Cardiorespiratory and Muscular Fitness, and Flexibility in Healthy Adults." The scientific evidence demonstrating the beneficial effects of exercise is indisputable, and the benefits of exercise far outweigh the risks in most adults. A program of regular exercise that includes cardiorespiratory, resistance, flexibility, and neuromotor exercise training beyond activities of daily living to improve and maintain physical fitness and health is essential for most adults. The ACSM recommends that most adults engage in moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise training for ≥30 min·d on ≥5 d·wk for a total of ≥150 min·wk, vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise training for ≥20 min·d on ≥3 d·wk (≥75 min·wk), or a combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity exercise to achieve a total energy expenditure of ≥500-1000 MET·min·wk. On 2-3 d·wk, adults should also perform resistance exercises for each of the major muscle groups, and neuromotor exercise involving balance, agility, and coordination. Crucial to maintaining joint range of movement, completing a series of flexibility exercises for each the major muscle-tendon groups (a total of 60 s per exercise) on ≥2 d·wk is recommended. The exercise program should be modified according to an individual's habitual physical activity, physical function, health status, exercise responses, and stated goals. Adults who are unable or unwilling to meet the exercise targets outlined here still can benefit

  2. College-age twins: university admission policies / twin research: birth weight and neuromotor performance; transfusion syndrome markers; vanishing twins and fetal sex determination; mz twin discordance for wilson's disease / media: big at birth; planned separation of conjoined twins; x factor twins; Cinema: the identical.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2014-12-01

    There is a lack of research findings addressing the unique college admissions issues faced by twins and other multiples. The advantages and disadvantage twins face, as reported by college administrators, twins and families are reviewed. Next, recent research addressing twins' birth weight and neuromotor performance, transfusion syndrome markers, the vanishing twin syndrome and monozygotic (MZ) twin discordance for Wilson's disease is described. News items concerning the birth of unusually large twins, the planned separation of conjoined twins, twin participants in the X Factor games and a film, The Identical, are also summarized.

  3. Progress report (1953) on the revision of Washington's Chemical analyses of igneous rocks (U.S.G.S. Prof. Paper 99), presented at the First International Symposium on Geochemistry, under the auspices of the International Union of Chemistry, in Zurich, August 11-13, 1953

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooker, Marjorie

    1954-01-01

    In October of last year, vhen I was here in Zurich, it was my privilege to talk with Professor Niggli about the revision of Washington's "Chemical analysis of igneous rocks" which the United States Geological Survey is undertaking. It was then that he suggested the possibility of a progress report at this meeting in order that information about the revision would be available to those who are most interested. At the time that I talked with Professor Niggli the place or this meeting had not bean decided, but I think he hoped that it would be in Zurich,, Today, we must proceed without him, but I am sure that you must feel, as I do, that he is here sn spirit and that he expects us to continue the work as he would have, - with enthusiasm, with strength, and with happiness.

  4. Identification of neuromotor deficits common to autism spectrum disorder and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and imitation deficits specific to autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Biscaldi, Monica; Rauh, Reinhold; Müller, Cora; Irion, Lisa; Saville, Christopher W N; Schulz, Eberhard; Klein, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Deficits in motor and imitation abilities are a core finding in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but impaired motor functions are also found in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Given recent theorising about potential aetiological overlap between the two disorders, the present study aimed to assess difficulties in motor performance and imitation of facial movements and meaningless gestures in a sample of 24 ADHD patients, 22 patients with ASD, and 20 typically developing children, matched for age (6-13 years) and similar in IQ (>80). Furthermore, we explored the impact of comorbid ADHD symptoms on motor and imitation performance in the ASD sample and the interrelationships between the two groups of variables in the clinical groups separately. The results show motor dysfunction was common to both disorders, but imitation deficits were specific to ASD. Together with the pattern of interrelated motor and imitation abilities, which we found exclusively in the ASD group, our findings suggest complex phenotypic, and possibly aetiological, relationships between the two neurodevelopmental conditions.

  5. Examining sensory ability, feature matching and assessment-based adaptation for a brain-computer interface using the steady-state visually evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Brumberg, Jonathan S; Nguyen, Anh; Pitt, Kevin M; Lorenz, Sean D

    2018-01-31

    We investigated how overt visual attention and oculomotor control influence successful use of a visual feedback brain-computer interface (BCI) for accessing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices in a heterogeneous population of individuals with profound neuromotor impairments. BCIs are often tested within a single patient population limiting generalization of results. This study focuses on examining individual sensory abilities with an eye toward possible interface adaptations to improve device performance. Five individuals with a range of neuromotor disorders participated in four-choice BCI control task involving the steady state visually evoked potential. The BCI graphical interface was designed to simulate a commercial AAC device to examine whether an integrated device could be used successfully by individuals with neuromotor impairment. All participants were able to interact with the BCI and highest performance was found for participants able to employ an overt visual attention strategy. For participants with visual deficits to due to impaired oculomotor control, effective performance increased after accounting for mismatches between the graphical layout and participant visual capabilities. As BCIs are translated from research environments to clinical applications, the assessment of BCI-related skills will help facilitate proper device selection and provide individuals who use BCI the greatest likelihood of immediate and long term communicative success. Overall, our results indicate that adaptations can be an effective strategy to reduce barriers and increase access to BCI technology. These efforts should be directed by comprehensive assessments for matching individuals to the most appropriate device to support their complex communication needs. Implications for Rehabilitation Brain computer interfaces using the steady state visually evoked potential can be integrated with an augmentative and alternative communication device to provide access

  6. MotorBrain: A mobile app for the assessment of users' motor performance in neurology.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Andrea; Chittaro, Luca; Burigat, Stefano; Budai, Riccardo

    2017-05-01

    Human motor skills or impairments have been traditionally assessed by neurologists by means of paper-and-pencil tests or special hardware. More recently, technologies such as digitizing tablets and touchscreens have offered neurologists new assessment possibilities, but their use has been restricted to a specific medical condition, or to stylus-operated mobile devices. The objective of this paper is twofold. First, we propose a mobile app (MotorBrain) that offers six computerized versions of traditional motor tests, can be used directly by patients (with and without the supervision of a clinician), and aims at turning millions of smartphones and tablets available to the general public into data collection and assessment tools. Then, we carry out a study to determine whether the data collected by MotorBrain can be meaningful for describing aging in human motor performance. A sample of healthy participants (N= 133) carried out the motor tests using MotorBrain on a smartphone. Participants were split into two groups (Young, Old) based on their age (less than or equal to 30 years, greater than or equal to 50 years, respectively). The data collected by the app characterizes accuracy, reaction times, and speed of movement. It was analyzed to investigate differences between the two groups. The app does allow measuring differences in neuromotor performance. Data collected by the app allowed us to assess performance differences due to the aging of the neuromuscular system. Data collected through MotorBrain is suitable to make meaningful distinctions among different kinds of performance, and allowed us to highlight performance differences associated to aging. MotorBrain supports the building of a large database of neuromotor data, which can be used for normative purposes in clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Contralateral Associated Movements Correlate with Poorer Inhibitory Control, Attention and Visual Perception in Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Meyer, Andrea H; Zysset, Annina E; Stülb, Kerstin; Leeger-Aschmann, Claudia S; Schmutz, Einat A; Arhab, Amar; Puder, Jardena J; Kriemler, Susi; Munsch, Simone; Jenni, Oskar G

    2017-10-01

    Contralateral associated movements (CAMs) frequently occur in complex motor tasks. We investigated whether and to what extent CAMs are associated with inhibitory control among preschool children in the Swiss Preschoolers' Health Study. Participants were 476 healthy, typically developing children (mean age = 3.88 years; 251 boys) evaluated on two consecutive afternoons. The children performed the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment, the statue subtest of the Neuropsychological Assessment for Children (NEPSY), and cognitive tests of the Intelligence and Development Scales-Preschool (IDS-P). CAMs were associated with poor inhibitory control on the statue test and poor selective attention and visual perception on the IDS-P. We attributed these findings to preschoolers' general immaturity of the central nervous system.

  8. [Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Hunter R., Ed.; Kerstiens, Gene, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    These four serial issues examine the effectiveness and appropriateness of a variety of assessment tests as well as their relationship to developmental education. Included are reviews of the following tests: (1) the Comparative Guidance and Placement Program, a self-scoring test of English and mathematics; (2) the Stanford Achievement Test, an…

  9. Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Theodore E., Ed.

    "The Role of the State in Performance-Based Teacher Education-Certification" by Robert Roth creates a context for viewing how state agencies are approaching performance education. Peter Airasian then explores the value questions that are at the heart of evaluation issues. Fred McDonald looks at "The State of the Art in Performance Assessment," and…

  10. Deficits in motor abilities and developmental fractionation of imitation performance in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Biscaldi, Monica; Rauh, Reinhold; Irion, Lisa; Jung, Nikolai H; Mall, Volker; Fleischhaker, Christian; Klein, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    The co-occurrence of motor and imitation disabilities often characterises the spectrum of deficits seen in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Whether these seemingly separate deficits are inter-related and whether, in particular, motor deficits contribute to the expression of imitation deficits is the topic of the present study and was investigated by comparing these deficits' cross-sectional developmental trajectories. To that end, different components of motor performance assessed in the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment and imitation abilities for facial movements and non-meaningful gestures were tested in 70 subjects (aged 6-29 years), including 36 patients with high-functioning ASD and 34 age-matched typically developed (TD) participants. The results show robust deficits in probands with ASD in timed motor performance and in the quality of movement, which are all independent of age, with one exception. Only diadochokinesis improves moderately with increasing age in ASD probands. Imitation of facial movements and of non-meaningful hand, finger, hand finger gestures not related to social context or tool use is also impaired in ASD subjects, but in contrast to motor performance this deficit overall improves with age. A general imitation factor, extracted from the highly inter-correlated imitation tests, is differentially correlated with components of neuromotor performance in ASD and TD participants. By developmentally fractionating developmentally stable motor deficits from developmentally dynamic imitation deficits, we infer that imitation deficits are primarily cognitive in nature.

  11. Cross-cultural validity of standardized motor development screening and assessment tools: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Bianca; Sargent, Barbara; Fetters, Linda

    2016-12-01

    To investigate whether standardized motor development screening and assessment tools that are used to evaluate motor abilities of children aged 0 to 2 years are valid in cultures other than those in which the normative sample was established. This was a systematic review in which six databases were searched. Studies were selected based on inclusion/exclusion criteria and appraised for evidence level and quality. Study variables were extracted. Twenty-three studies representing six motor development screening and assessment tools in 16 cultural contexts met the inclusion criteria: Alberta Infant Motor Scale (n=7), Ages and Stages Questionnaire, 3rd edition (n=2), Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd edition (n=8), Denver Developmental Screening Test, 2nd edition (n=4), Harris Infant Neuromotor Test (n=1), and Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, 2nd edition (n=1). Thirteen studies found significant differences between the cultural context and normative sample. Two studies established reliability and/or validity of standardized motor development assessments in high-risk infants from different cultural contexts. Five studies established new population norms. Eight studies described the cross-cultural adaptation of a standardized motor development assessment. Standardized motor development assessments have limited validity in cultures other than that in which the normative sample was established. Their use can result in under- or over-referral for services. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  12. Static Signature Synthesis: A Neuromotor Inspired Approach for Biometrics.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Miguel A; Diaz-Cabrera, Moises; Morales, Aythami

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we propose a new method for generating synthetic handwritten signature images for biometric applications. The procedures we introduce imitate the mechanism of motor equivalence which divides human handwriting into two steps: the working out of an effector independent action plan and its execution via the corresponding neuromuscular path. The action plan is represented as a trajectory on a spatial grid. This contains both the signature text and its flourish, if there is one. The neuromuscular path is simulated by applying a kinematic Kaiser filter to the trajectory plan. The length of the filter depends on the pen speed which is generated using a scalar version of the sigma lognormal model. An ink deposition model, applied pixel by pixel to the pen trajectory, provides realistic static signature images. The lexical and morphological properties of the synthesized signatures as well as the range of the synthesis parameters have been estimated from real databases of real signatures such as the MCYT Off-line and the GPDS960GraySignature corpuses. The performance experiments show that by tuning only four parameters it is possible to generate synthetic identities with different stability and forgers with different skills. Therefore it is possible to create datasets of synthetic signatures with a performance similar to databases of real signatures. Moreover, we can customize the created dataset to produce skilled forgeries or simple forgeries which are easier to detect, depending on what the researcher needs. Perceptual evaluation gives an average confusion of 44.06 percent between real and synthetic signatures which shows the realism of the synthetic ones. The utility of the synthesized signatures is demonstrated by studying the influence of the pen type and number of users on an automatic signature verifier.

  13. Effect of Cholinergic Perturbations on Neuromotor-Cognitive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    the effects of 1.0 and 2.0 rrg of alprazolam (Xanax), a standard anxiolytic drug commonly used with clinical populations (Figures 1 to 3). The 1.0 mg...procedure and results of the study that generated the alprazolam data have been presented previously by Ellinwood et al. (26). As clearly shown in Figures 1...for either dose of alprazolam . Since the atropine and alprazolam studies were accomplished with different subjects and the sample size of the atropine

  14. Body machine interfaces for neuromotor rehabilitation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pierella, Camilla; Abdollahi, Farnaz; Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Pedersen, Jessica; Chen, David; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Casadio, Maura

    2014-01-01

    High-level spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors face every day two related problems: recovering motor skills and regaining functional independence. Body machine interfaces (BoMIs) empower people with sever motor disabilities with the ability to control an external device, but they also offer the opportunity to focus concurrently on achieving rehabilitative goals. In this study we developed a portable, and low-cost BoMI that addresses both problems. The BoMI remaps the user's residual upper body mobility to the two coordinates of a cursor on a computer monitor. By controlling the cursor, the user can perform functional tasks, such as entering text and playing games. This framework also allows the mapping between the body and the cursor space to be modified, gradually challenging the user to exercise more impaired movements. With this approach, we were able to change the behavior of our SCI subject, who initially used almost exclusively his less impaired degrees of freedom - on the left side - for controlling the BoMI. At the end of the few practice sessions he had restored symmetry between left and right side of the body, with an increase of mobility and strength of all the degrees of freedom involved in the control of the interface. This is the first proof of concept that our BoMI can be used to control assistive devices and reach specific rehabilitative goals simultaneously.

  15. Braccio di Ferro: a new haptic workstation for neuromotor rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Casadio, Maura; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Morasso, Pietro G; Arrichiello, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    This technical note describes a new robotic workstation for neurological rehabilitation, shortly named Braccio di Ferro. It has been designed by having in mind the range of forces and the frequency bandwidth that characterize the interaction between a patient and a physical therapist, as well as a number of requirements that we think are essential for allowing a natural haptic interaction: back-driveability, very low friction and inertia, mechanical robustness, the possibility to operate in different planes, and an open software environment, which allows the operator to add new functionalities and design personalized rehabilitation protocols. Braccio di Ferro is an open system and, in the spirit of open source design, is intended to foster the dissemination of robot therapy. Moreover, its combination of features is not present in commercially available systems.

  16. The Child Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 5th Edition (Child SCAT5): Background and rationale.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gavin A; Purcell, Laura; Schneider, Kathryn J; Yeates, Keith Owen; Gioia, Gerard A; Anderson, Vicki; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Echemendia, Ruben J; Makdissi, Michael; Sills, Allen; Iverson, Grant L; Dvořák, Jiří; McCrory, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem; Patricios, Jon; Giza, Christopher C; Kutcher, Jeffrey S

    2017-06-01

    This article presents the Child Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 5th Edition (Child SCAT5). The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool was introduced in 2004, following the 2nd International Conference on Concussion in Sport in Prague, Czech Republic. Following the 4th International Consensus Conference, held in Zurich, Switzerland, in 2012, the SCAT 3rd edition (Child SCAT3) was developed for children aged between 5 and12 years. Research to date was reviewed and synthesised for the 5th International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport in Berlin, Germany, leading to the current revision of the test, the Child SCAT5. This article describes the development of the Child SCAT5. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Utilization of a novel digital measurement tool for quantitative assessment of upper extremity motor dexterity: a controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Ruth; Lee, Sunghoon I; Kimball, Jon A; Yew, Andrew Y; Lu, Derek S; Li, Charles H; Garst, Jordan H; Ghalehsari, Nima; Paak, Brian H; Razaghy, Mehrdad; Espinal, Marie; Ostowari, Arsha; Ghavamrezaii, Amir A; Pourtaheri, Sahar; Wu, Irene; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Lu, Daniel C

    2014-08-13

    The current methods of assessing motor function rely primarily on the clinician's judgment of the patient's physical examination and the patient's self-administered surveys. Recently, computerized handgrip tools have been designed as an objective method to quantify upper-extremity motor function. This pilot study explores the use of the MediSens handgrip as a potential clinical tool for objectively assessing the motor function of the hand. Eleven patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) were followed for three months. Eighteen age-matched healthy participants were followed for two months. The neuromotor function and the patient-perceived motor function of these patients were assessed with the MediSens device and the Oswestry Disability Index respectively. The MediSens device utilized a target tracking test to investigate the neuromotor capacity of the participants. The mean absolute error (MAE) between the target curve and the curve tracing achieved by the participants was used as the assessment metric. The patients' adjusted MediSens MAE scores were then compared to the controls. The CSM patients were further classified as either "functional" or "nonfunctional" in order to validate the system's responsiveness. Finally, the correlation between the MediSens MAE score and the ODI score was investigated. The control participants had lower MediSens MAE scores of 8.09%±1.60%, while the cervical spinal disorder patients had greater MediSens MAE scores of 11.24%±6.29%. Following surgery, the functional CSM patients had an average MediSens MAE score of 7.13%±1.60%, while the nonfunctional CSM patients had an average score of 12.41%±6.32%. The MediSens MAE and the ODI scores showed a statistically significant correlation (r=-0.341, p<1.14×10⁻⁵). A Bland-Altman plot was then used to validate the agreement between the two scores. Furthermore, the percentage improvement of the the two scores after receiving the surgical intervention showed a significant

  18. The Infant Motor Profile: a standardized and qualitative method to assess motor behaviour in infancy.

    PubMed

    Heineman, Kirsten R; Bos, Arend F; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2008-04-01

    A reliable and valid instrument to assess neuromotor condition in infancy is a prerequisite for early detection of developmental motor disorders. We developed a video-based assessment of motor behaviour, the Infant Motor Profile (IMP), to evaluate motor abilities, movement variability, ability to select motor strategies, movement symmetry, and fluency. The IMP consists of 80 items and is applicable in children from 3 to 18 months. The present study aimed to test intra- and interobserver reliability and concurrent validity of the IMP with the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) and Touwen neurological examination. The study group consisted of 40 low-risk term (median gestational age [GA] 40 wks, range 38-42 wks) and 40 high-risk preterm infants (median GA 29.6 wks, range 26-33 wks) with corrected ages 4 to 18 months (31 females, 49 males). Intra- and interobserver agreement of the IMP were satisfactory (Spearman's rho=0.9). Concurrent validity of IMP and AIMS was good (Spearman's rho=0.8, p<0.005). The IMP was able to differentiate between infants with normal neurological condition, simple minor neurological dysfunction (MND), complex MND, and abnormal neurological condition (p<0.005). This means that the IMP may be a promising tool to evaluate neurological integrity during infancy, a suggestion that needs confirmation by means of assessment of larger groups of infants with heterogeneous neurological conditions.

  19. Translation, reliability, and clinical utility of the Melbourne Assessment 2.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Corinna N; Plebani, Anael; Labruyère, Rob

    2017-10-12

    The aims were to (i) provide a German translation of the Melbourne Assessment 2 (MA2), a quantitative test to measure unilateral upper limb function in children with neurological disabilities and (ii) to evaluate its reliability and aspects of clinical utility. After its translation into German and approval of the back translation by the original authors, the MA2 was performed and videotaped twice with 30 children with neuromotor disorders. For each participant, two raters scored the video of the first test for inter-rater reliability. To determine test-retest reliability, one rater additionally scored the video of the second test while the other rater repeated the scoring of the first video to evaluate intra-rater reliability. Time needed for rater training, test administration, and scoring was recorded. The four subscale scores showed excellent intra-, inter-rater, and test-retest reliability with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.90-1.00 (95%-confidence intervals 0.78-1.00). Score items revealed substantial to almost perfect intra-rater reliability (weighted kappa k w  = 0.66-1.00) for the more affected side. Score item inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the same extremity were, with one exception, moderate to almost perfect (k w  = 0.42-0.97; k w  = 0.40-0.89). Furthermore, the MA2 was feasible and acceptable for patients and clinicians. The MA2 showed excellent subscale and moderate to almost perfect score item reliability. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a lack of high-quality studies about psychometric properties of upper limb measurement tools in the neuropediatric population. The Melbourne Assessment 2 is a promising tool for reliable measurement of unilateral upper limb movement quality in the neuropediatric population. The Melbourne Assessment 2 is acceptable and practicable to therapists and patients for routine use in clinical care.

  20. Comparison of Psychomotor Development Screening Test and Clinical Assessment of Psychomotor Development

    PubMed

    Radmilović, Goranka; Matijević, Valentina; Zavoreo, Iris

    2016-12-01

    Numerous adverse factors are acting in the prenatal, perinatal and postnatal period of life and may be the cause of later mild or severe deviations from normal psychomotor development. Therefore, it is crucial to identify infants with neurological risk factors and infants that already have a delay from orderly development, in order to immediately initiate the rehabilitation process. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is difference in the assessment of psychomotor development in neurological risk children based on the psychomotor development test (Croatian, Razvoj psihomotorike, RPM test) and clinical evaluation of neuromotor development. RPM test is designed for rough estimate of psychomotor development in children in the first two years of life. The study included 15 full term children (8 male and 7 female) with clinical diagnosis of mild paraparesis and mild deviation from normal psychological and social development, and 15 full term children (8 male and 7 female) without neurological risk factors and deviations from normal psychomotor development, all at the age of 12-24 months. Of the 15 children diagnosed with mild paraparesis, none had delayed psychomotor development, 6.7% had suspect development and 93.3% had normal development on RPM test. All children in the control group had normal development on RPM test. According to the results, the RPM test is not sensitive enough to detect mild neurodevelopmental disorders.

  1. Association between Body Composition and Motor Performance in Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Lanzi, Stefano; Zysset, Annina E; Arhab, Amar; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Stuelb, Kerstin; Leeger-Aschmann, Claudia S; Schmutz, Einat A; Meyer, Andrea H; Kriemler, Susi; Munsch, Simone; Jenni, Oskar G; Puder, Jardena J

    2017-01-01

    Being overweight makes physical movement more difficult. Our aim was to investigate the association between body composition and motor performance in preschool children. A total of 476 predominantly normal-weight preschool children (age 3.9 ± 0.7 years; m/f: 251/225; BMI 16.0 ± 1.4 kg/m2) participated in the Swiss Preschoolers' Health Study (SPLASHY). Body composition assessments included skinfold thickness, waist circumference (WC), and BMI. The Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (ZNA) was used to assess gross and fine motor tasks. After adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, sociocultural characteristics, and physical activity (assessed with accelerometers), skinfold thickness and WC were both inversely correlated with jumping sideward (gross motor task β-coefficient -1.92, p = 0.027; and -3.34, p = 0.014, respectively), while BMI was positively correlated with running performance (gross motor task β-coefficient 9.12, p = 0.001). No significant associations were found between body composition measures and fine motor tasks. The inverse associations between skinfold thickness or WC and jumping sideward indicates that children with high fat mass may be less proficient in certain gross motor tasks. The positive association between BMI and running suggests that BMI might be an indicator of fat-free (i.e., muscle) mass in predominately normal-weight preschool children. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  2. Association between Body Composition and Motor Performance in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Kakebeeke, Tanja H.; Lanzi, Stefano; Zysset, Annina E.; Arhab, Amar; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Stuelb, Kerstin; Leeger-Aschmann, Claudia S.; Schmutz, Einat A.; Meyer, Andrea H.; Kriemler, Susi; Munsch, Simone; Jenni, Oskar G.; Puder, Jardena J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Being overweight makes physical movement more difficult. Our aim was to investigate the association between body composition and motor performance in preschool children. Methods A total of 476 predominantly normal-weight preschool children (age 3.9 ± 0.7 years; m/f: 251/225; BMI 16.0 ± 1.4 kg/m2) participated in the Swiss Preschoolers' Health Study (SPLASHY). Body composition assessments included skinfold thickness, waist circumference (WC), and BMI. The Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (ZNA) was used to assess gross and fine motor tasks. Results After adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, sociocultural characteristics, and physical activity (assessed with accelerometers), skinfold thickness and WC were both inversely correlated with jumping sideward (gross motor task β-coefficient −1.92, p = 0.027; and −3.34, p = 0.014, respectively), while BMI was positively correlated with running performance (gross motor task β-coefficient 9.12, p = 0.001). No significant associations were found between body composition measures and fine motor tasks. Conclusion The inverse associations between skinfold thickness or WC and jumping sideward indicates that children with high fat mass may be less proficient in certain gross motor tasks. The positive association between BMI and running suggests that BMI might be an indicator of fat-free (i.e., muscle) mass in predominately normal-weight preschool children. PMID:28934745

  3. Development of motor speed and associated movements from 5 to 18 years.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Theo; Rousson, Valentin; Caflisch, Jon; Jenni, Oskar G

    2010-03-01

    To study the development of motor speed and associated movements in participants aged 5 to 18 years for age, sex, and laterality. Ten motor tasks of the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (repetitive and alternating movements of hands and feet, repetitive and sequential finger movements, the pegboard, static and dynamic balance, diadochokinesis) were administered to 593 right-handed participants (286 males, 307 females). A strong improvement with age was observed in motor speed from age 5 to 10, followed by a levelling-off between 12 and 18 years. Simple tasks and the pegboard matured early and complex tasks later. Simple tasks showed no associated movements beyond early childhood; in complex tasks associated movements persisted until early adulthood. The two sexes differed only marginally in speed, but markedly in associated movements. A significant laterality (p<0.001) in speed was found for all tasks except for static balance; the pegboard was most lateralized, and sequential finger movements least. Associated movements were lateralized only for a few complex tasks. We also noted a substantial interindividual variability. Motor speed and associated movements improve strongly in childhood, weakly in adolescence, and are both of developmental relevance. Because they correlate weakly, they provide complementary information.

  4. Development of a new assessment tool for cervical myelopathy using hand-tracking sensor: Part 1: validity and reliability.

    PubMed

    Alagha, M Abdulhadi; Alagha, Mahmoud A; Dunstan, Eleanor; Sperwer, Olaf; Timmins, Kate A; Boszczyk, Bronek M

    2017-04-01

    To assess the reliability and validity of a hand motion sensor, Leap Motion Controller (LMC), in the 15-s hand grip-and-release test, as compared against human inspection of an external digital camera recording. Fifty healthy participants were asked to fully grip-and-release their dominant hand as rapidly as possible for two trials with a 10-min rest in-between, while wearing a non-metal wrist splint. Each test lasted for 15 s, and a digital camera was used to film the anterolateral side of the hand on the first test. Three assessors counted the frequency of grip-and-release (G-R) cycles independently and in a blinded fashion. The average mean of the three was compared with that measured by LMC using the Bland-Altman method. Test-retest reliability was examined by comparing the two 15-s tests. The mean number of G-R cycles recorded was: 47.8 ± 6.4 (test 1, video observer); 47.7 ± 6.5 (test 1, LMC); and 50.2 ± 6.5 (test 2, LMC). Bland-Altman indicated good agreement, with a low bias (0.15 cycles) and narrow limits of agreement. The ICC showed high inter-rater agreement and the coefficient of repeatability for the number of cycles was ±5.393, with a mean bias of 3.63. LMC appears to be valid and reliable in the 15-s grip-and-release test. This serves as a first step towards the development of an objective myelopathy assessment device and platform for the assessment of neuromotor hand function in general. Further assessment in a clinical setting and to gauge healthy benchmark values is warranted.

  5. Health impact assessment of cycling network expansions in European cities.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Natalie; Rojas-Rueda, David; Salmon, Maëlle; Martinez, David; Ambros, Albert; Brand, Christian; de Nazelle, Audrey; Dons, Evi; Gaupp-Berghausen, Mailin; Gerike, Regine; Götschi, Thomas; Iacorossi, Francesco; Int Panis, Luc; Kahlmeier, Sonja; Raser, Elisabeth; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2018-04-01

    We conducted a health impact assessment (HIA) of cycling network expansions in seven European cities. We modeled the association between cycling network length and cycling mode share and estimated health impacts of the expansion of cycling networks. First, we performed a non-linear least square regression to assess the relationship between cycling network length and cycling mode share for 167 European cities. Second, we conducted a quantitative HIA for the seven cities of different scenarios (S) assessing how an expansion of the cycling network [i.e. 10% (S1); 50% (S2); 100% (S3), and all-streets (S4)] would lead to an increase in cycling mode share and estimated mortality impacts thereof. We quantified mortality impacts for changes in physical activity, air pollution and traffic incidents. Third, we conducted a cost-benefit analysis. The cycling network length was associated with a cycling mode share of up to 24.7% in European cities. The all-streets scenario (S4) produced greatest benefits through increases in cycling for London with 1,210 premature deaths (95% CI: 447-1,972) avoidable annually, followed by Rome (433; 95% CI: 170-695), Barcelona (248; 95% CI: 86-410), Vienna (146; 95% CI: 40-252), Zurich (58; 95% CI: 16-100) and Antwerp (7; 95% CI: 3-11). The largest cost-benefit ratios were found for the 10% increase in cycling networks (S1). If all 167 European cities achieved a cycling mode share of 24.7% over 10,000 premature deaths could be avoided annually. In European cities, expansions of cycling networks were associated with increases in cycling and estimated to provide health and economic benefits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of a Tracing Task to Assess Visuomotor Performance: Effects of Age, Sex, and Handedness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background. Visuomotor abnormalities are common in aging and age-related disease, yet difficult to quantify. This study investigated the effects of healthy aging, sex, and handedness on the performance of a tracing task. Participants (n = 150, aged 21–95 years, 75 females) used a stylus to follow a moving target around a circle on a tablet computer with their dominant and nondominant hands. Participants also performed the Trail Making Test (a measure of executive function). Methods. Deviations from the circular path were computed to derive an “error” time series. For each time series, absolute mean, variance, and complexity index (a proposed measure of system functionality and adaptability) were calculated. Using the moving target and stylus coordinates, the percentage of task time within the target region and the cumulative micropause duration (a measure of motion continuity) were computed. Results. All measures showed significant effects of aging (p < .0005). Post hoc age group comparisons showed that with increasing age, the absolute mean and variance of the error increased, complexity index decreased, percentage of time within the target region decreased, and cumulative micropause duration increased. Only complexity index showed a significant difference between dominant versus nondominant hands within each age group (p < .0005). All measures showed relationships to the Trail Making Test (p < .05). Conclusions. Measures derived from a tracing task identified performance differences in healthy individuals as a function of age, sex, and handedness. Studies in populations with specific neuromotor syndromes are warranted to test the utility of measures based on the dynamics of tracking a target as a clinical assessment tool. PMID:23388876

  7. Affective state and voice: cross-cultural assessment of speaking behavior and voice sound characteristics--a normative multicenter study of 577 + 36 healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Braun, Silke; Botella, Cristina; Bridler, René; Chmetz, Florian; Delfino, Juan Pablo; Herzig, Daniela; Kluckner, Viktoria J; Mohr, Christine; Moragrega, Ines; Schrag, Yann; Seifritz, Erich; Soler, Carla; Stassen, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    Human speech is greatly influenced by the speakers' affective state, such as sadness, happiness, grief, guilt, fear, anger, aggression, faintheartedness, shame, sexual arousal, love, amongst others. Attentive listeners discover a lot about the affective state of their dialog partners with no great effort, and without having to talk about it explicitly during a conversation or on the phone. On the other hand, speech dysfunctions, such as slow, delayed or monotonous speech, are prominent features of affective disorders. This project was comprised of four studies with healthy volunteers from Bristol (English: n = 117), Lausanne (French: n = 128), Zurich (German: n = 208), and Valencia (Spanish: n = 124). All samples were stratified according to gender, age, and education. The specific study design with different types of spoken text along with repeated assessments at 14-day intervals allowed us to estimate the 'natural' variation of speech parameters over time, and to analyze the sensitivity of speech parameters with respect to form and content of spoken text. Additionally, our project included a longitudinal self-assessment study with university students from Zurich (n = 18) and unemployed adults from Valencia (n = 18) in order to test the feasibility of the speech analysis method in home environments. The normative data showed that speaking behavior and voice sound characteristics can be quantified in a reproducible and language-independent way. The high resolution of the method was verified by a computerized assignment of speech parameter patterns to languages at a success rate of 90%, while the correct assignment to texts was 70%. In the longitudinal self-assessment study we calculated individual 'baselines' for each test person along with deviations thereof. The significance of such deviations was assessed through the normative reference data. Our data provided gender-, age-, and language-specific thresholds that allow one to reliably distinguish between 'natural

  8. A spatial Bayesian network model to assess the benefits of early warning for urban flood risk to people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbi, Stefano; Villa, Ferdinando; Mojtahed, Vahid; Hegetschweiler, Karin Tessa; Giupponi, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a novel methodology to assess flood risk to people by integrating people's vulnerability and ability to cushion hazards through coping and adapting. The proposed approach extends traditional risk assessments beyond material damages; complements quantitative and semi-quantitative data with subjective and local knowledge, improving the use of commonly available information; and produces estimates of model uncertainty by providing probability distributions for all of its outputs. Flood risk to people is modeled using a spatially explicit Bayesian network model calibrated on expert opinion. Risk is assessed in terms of (1) likelihood of non-fatal physical injury, (2) likelihood of post-traumatic stress disorder and (3) likelihood of death. The study area covers the lower part of the Sihl valley (Switzerland) including the city of Zurich. The model is used to estimate the effect of improving an existing early warning system, taking into account the reliability, lead time and scope (i.e., coverage of people reached by the warning). Model results indicate that the potential benefits of an improved early warning in terms of avoided human impacts are particularly relevant in case of a major flood event.

  9. A spatial Bayesian network model to assess the benefits of early warning for urban flood risk to people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbi, S.; Villa, F.; Mojtahed, V.; Hegetschweiler, K. T.; Giupponi, C.

    2015-10-01

    This article presents a novel methodology to assess flood risk to people by integrating people's vulnerability and ability to cushion hazards through coping and adapting. The proposed approach extends traditional risk assessments beyond material damages; complements quantitative and semi-quantitative data with subjective and local knowledge, improving the use of commonly available information; produces estimates of model uncertainty by providing probability distributions for all of its outputs. Flood risk to people is modeled using a spatially explicit Bayesian network model calibrated on expert opinion. Risk is assessed in terms of: (1) likelihood of non-fatal physical injury; (2) likelihood of post-traumatic stress disorder; (3) likelihood of death. The study area covers the lower part of the Sihl valley (Switzerland) including the city of Zurich. The model is used to estimate the benefits of improving an existing Early Warning System, taking into account the reliability, lead-time and scope (i.e. coverage of people reached by the warning). Model results indicate that the potential benefits of an improved early warning in terms of avoided human impacts are particularly relevant in case of a major flood event: about 75 % of fatalities, 25 % of injuries and 18 % of post-traumatic stress disorders could be avoided.

  10. Assessing Classroom Assessment Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson-Beck, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are teaching strategies that provide formative assessments of student learning. It has been argued that the use of CATs enhances and improves student learning. Although the various types of CATs have been extensively documented and qualitatively studied, there appears to be little quantitative research…

  11. Aeronautical education and research at the Swiss Institute of Technology in Zurich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, L; Ackeret, J

    1931-01-01

    Progress in the scientific and practical fields of aviation has caused the Swiss Institute of Technology to organize lectures and practical training courses in all three branches of aeronautics and to found centers of scientific research, laboratories, etc., in order to supply the government and industries with scientifically and technically trained engineers.

  12. Motivation in medical education and patient communication. The EGPRN meeting in Zurich, Switzerland, October 2010.

    PubMed

    Rethans, Jan-Joost; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert

    2011-06-01

    The European General Practice Research Network held an international research meeting on 'Motivation in medical education and patient communication' in Zürich, Switzerland, in October 2010. The two authors were keynote speakers, who introduced the theme from different angles and summarized and reflected on individual papers presented at the conference. The theme of the conference underlined the importance of communication in general practice and of motivation in medical education in particular. There were a variety of papers each addressing in its own way the topic of this meeting. We conclude that it is still uncommon to use psychological theories on motivation in research on motivation and patient communication in general practice/family medicine. Motivation and readiness to change are essential concepts in experimental health services research. Research designs increasingly follow the Framework for the Evaluation of Complex Interventions in Health Care as suggested by the British Medical Research Council. However, there are also difficulties related to classical experimental designs that have to be critically discussed.

  13. Urban mining as a contribution to the resource strategy of the Canton of Zurich.

    PubMed

    Simoni, M; Kuhn, E P; Morf, L S; Kuendig, R; Adam, F

    2015-11-01

    Urban mining is increasingly being recognised as an important component of resource strategies of public authorities, not only because it contributes to environmental protection, but also because it is a source of valuable recyclable materials. We demonstrate that the sustainable livelihoods (SL) framework can be used for public policy making in waste management by presenting the approach and experiences of a review study termed 'urban mining potential analysis' and its application to antimony, copper, gypsum, gold and rare earth elements. This article uses the rare earth element (REE) group to illustrate and present an overview over information and knowledge gaps concerning urban mining. The analysis shows that rare earth element recycling can be more environmentally friendly than primary production, particularly if the latter comes from countries with weak enforcement of environmental legislation. On the other hand REE recycling often cannot compete with large scale primary production because market prices do not reflect the social and environmental impacts of production, and because the avoided impacts of waste decontamination and reduced waste production are not considered. The urban mining potential analysis can be used to support decision making and the setting of priorities for future research and public action. The findings of the study and expert opinions based thereon contribute to the selection of measures and the formulation of public waste management and resource strategies in general. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Age and gender as independent predictors of violence under the influence of alcohol in Zurich, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Mica, Ladislav; Oesterle, Linda; Werner, Clément M L; Simmen, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-08

    Violent behaviour associated with alcohol consumption is frequently reported by different media. Clinical data analysing the correlation between alcohol intoxication, age, gender and violence are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of age, gender and blood alcohol content on violent behaviour under the influence of alcohol under central European conditions. Three hundred patients admitted to the emergency department were included into this study in the time period from January 01. to December 31. 2009. The inclusion criteria were a blood alcohol content (BAC) of ≥10 mmol/l, any traumatic injury and an age ≥16 years. Violence was defined as an evitable act committed by others leading to patient's hospitalisation. The data were compared with Wilcoxon and χ2-test for proportions. The data were considered as significant if p<0,05. Predictive quality was evaluated by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Independent predictors were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. The average age was 36,9±16,9 years (range: 16-84 years), 259 (86%) males and 41 (24%) females. There was a significant difference in gender (odds ratio for gender male 2,88; CI 95%: 1,24-6,67; p<0,001) and age dependent (odds ratio for each year of age 0,94; CI 95%: 0,93-0,96; p<0,0001) violence with no correlation to blood alcohol content found. Logistic regression analysis revealed male gender and young age as an independent predictor for violence. These results clarify the relationship between alcohol, age, gender and violence and have important implications for municipal-level alcohol policies.

  15. Strong RFI observed in protected 21 cm band at Zurich observatory, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monstein, C.

    2014-03-01

    While testing a new antenna control software tool, the telescope was moved to the most western azimuth position pointing to our own building. While de-accelerating the telescope, the spectrometer showed strong broadband radio frequency interference (RFI) and two single-frequency carriers around 1412 and 1425 MHz, both of which are in the internationally protected band. After lengthy analysis it was found out, that the Webcam AXIS2000 was the source for both the broadband and single-frequency interference. Switching off the Webcam solved the problem immediately. So, for future observations of 21 cm radiation, all nearby electronics has to be switched off. Not only the Webcam but also all unused PCs, printers, networks, monitors etc.

  16. Effects of innovative virtual reality game and EMG biofeedback on neuromotor control in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Dong Ryul; Sim, Yon Ju; You, Joshua H; Kim, Cheol J

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor control dysfunction or dyskinesia is a hallmark of neuromuscular impairment in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and is often implicated in reaching and grasping deficiencies due to a neuromuscular imbalance between the triceps and biceps. To mitigate such muscle imbalances, an innovative electromyography (EMG)-virtual reality (VR) biofeedback system were designed to provide accurate information about muscle activation and motivation. However, the clinical efficacy of this approach has not yet been determined in children with CP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a combined EMG biofeedback and VR (EMG-VR biofeedback) intervention system to improve muscle imbalance between triceps and biceps during reaching movements in children with spastic CP. Raw EMG signals were recorded at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz, band-pass filtered between 20-450 Hz, and notch-filtered at 60 Hz during elbow flexion and extension movements. EMG data were then processed using MyoResearch Master Edition 1.08 XP software. All participants underwent both interventions consisting of the EMG-VR biofeedback combination and EMG biofeedback alone. EMG analysis resulted in improved muscle activation in the underactive triceps while decreasing overactive or hypertonic biceps in the EMG-VR biofeedback compared with EMG biofeedback. The muscle imbalance ratio between the triceps and biceps was consistently improved. The present study is the first clinical trial to provide evidence for the additive benefits of VR intervention for enhancing the upper limb function of children with spastic CP.

  17. Neuro-Motor Responses to Daily Centrifugation in Bed-Rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffery T.; Krnavek, Jody; Fisher, Elizibeth; Ford, George; Paloski, William H.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known from numerous space flight studies that exposure to micro-g produces both morphological and neural adaptations in the major postural muscles. However, the characteristics and mechanism of these changes, particularly when it may involve the central nervous system are not defined. Furthermore, it is not known what role unloading of the muscular system may have on central changes in sensorimotor function or if centrifugation along the +Gz direction (long body axis) can mitigate both the peripheral changes in muscle function and modification of the central changes in sensorimotor adaptation to the near weightless environment of space flight. The purpose of this specific effort was, therefore, to investigate the efficacy of artificial gravity (AG) as a method for maintaining sensorimotor function in micro-g. Eight male subjects were exposed to daily 1 hr centrifugation during a 21 day 6 degree head-down bed rest study. Seven controls were placed on the centrifuge without rotation. The radius and angular velocity of the centrifuge were adjusted such that each subject experienced a centripetal acceleration of 2.5g at the feet, and approximately 1.0g at the heart. Both the tendon (MSR) and functional stretch reflexes (FSR) were collected using an 80 lb. ft. servomotor controlled via position feedback to provide a dorsiflexion step input to elicit the MSR, and the same step input with a built in 3 sec hold to evoke the FSR. EMG data were obtained from the triceps surae. Supplementary torque, velocity and position data were collected with the EMG responses. All data were digitized and sampled at 4 kHz. Only the MSR data has been analyzed at this time, and preliminary results suggest that those subjects exposed to active centrifugation (treatment group) show only minor changes in MSR peak latency times, either as a function of time spent in bed rest or exposure to centrifugation, while the control subjects show delays in the MSR peak latencies that are typical of bed rested subjects. There also appears to be a trend in the treatment group where centrifugation results in peak latencies that are shorter than the control group. This trend is supported by the observation that peak reflex amplitudes are larger (up to 40% in magnitude)than those of the control subjects. Furthermore, centrifugation tends, by day 21 of bed rest, to normalize the peak amplitudes to the amplitudes observed prior to bed rest or centrifugation. From a preliminary point of view, centrifugation appears to have a positive effect on the sensorimotor system, and specifically on those muscles that provide anti-gravity and postural support.

  18. Differentiation of High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder Based on Neuromotor Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayate, Ashwini; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; McGinley, Jennifer L.; Iansek, Robert; Rinehart, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Autism and Asperger's disorder (AD) are characterised by impairments in social interaction, stereotypic behaviours or restricted interests. Although currently listed as distinct clinical disorders, the validity of their distinction remains controversial. This study examined gait in children with autism and AD. Eleven children with high-functioning…

  19. Use of active video gaming in children with neuromotor dysfunction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Robbin; Popescu, Lisa; Manzanares, Robert; Morris, Brendan; Lee, Szu-Ping; Dufek, Janet S

    2017-09-01

    To examine current evidence on use of active video gaming (AVG) to improve motor function in children with movement disorders including cerebral palsy, developmental coordination disorder, and Down syndrome. Scopus, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched. Included papers studied the use of AVG for improving movement-related outcomes in these populations. Parameters studied included health condition, strength of evidence, AVG delivery methods, capacity for individualizing play, outcomes addressed, effectiveness for achieving outcomes, and challenges/limitations. The 20 extracted articles varied in quality. Studies involved children with six different conditions using AVG in clinical, home, or school settings for 49 different motor outcomes. Dosage varied in frequency and duration. Choice of games played and difficulty level were therapist determined (n=6) or child controlled (n=14). The most common study limitations were small sample sizes and difficulty individualizing treatment. All articles showed improvement in outcomes with AVG, although differences were not consistently significant compared with conventional therapy. Heterogeneity of measurement tools and target outcomes prevented meta-analysis or development of formal recommendations. However, AVG is feasible and shows potential for improving outcomes in this population. Additional investigations of dosing variables, utility as a home supplement to clinical care, and outcomes with larger sample sizes are merited. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  20. ACUTE POSTNATAL EXPOSURE TO BROMINATED DIPHENYLETHER 47 DELAYS NEUROMOTOR ONTOGENY AND ALTERS MOTOR ACTIVITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used commercial flame retardants that are accumulating in the environment. 2,2’,4,4’-Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE 47) is a very stable congener of this group and has been shown to accumulate in humans. PBDEs may interfere with...

  1. Intellectual and motor performance, quality of life and psychosocial adjustment in children with cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Francis F; Landolt, Markus A; Vinh, Russia Ha; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Neuhaus, Thomas J; Latal, Bea; Laube, Guido F

    2009-07-01

    Cystinosis is a rare multisystemic progressive disorder mandating lifelong medical treatment. Knowledge on the intellectual and motor functioning, health-related quality of life and psychosocial adjustment in children with cystinosis is limited. We have investigated nine patients (four after renal transplantation) at a median age of 9.7 years (range 5.3-19.9 years). Intellectual performance (IP) was analysed with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (seven children) and the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (two children). Motor performance (MP) was evaluated using the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment Test, and quality of life (QOL) was studied by means of the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research Academical Medical Center Child Quality of Life Questionnaire. Psychosocial adjustment was assessed by the Child Behavior Checklist. The overall intelligence quotient (IQ) of our patient cohort (median 92, range 71-105) was significantly lower than that of the healthy controls (p = 0.04), with two patients having an IQ < 85. Verbal IQ (93, range 76-118) was significantly higher than performance IQ (90, range 68-97; p = 0.03). The MP was significantly below the norm for pure motor, pegboard and static balance, as well as for movement quality. The patients' QOL was normal for six of seven dimensions (exception being positive emotions), whereas parents reported significant impairment in positive emotions, autonomy, social and cognitive functions. Significant disturbance was noted in terms of psychosocial adjustment. Based on the results from our small patient cohort, we conclude that intellectual and motor performance, health-related QOL and psychosocial adjustment are significantly impaired in children and adolescents with cystinosis.

  2. Risk Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    How the EPA conducts risk assessment to protect human health and the environment. Several assessments are included with the guidelines, models, databases, state-based RSL Tables, local contacts and framework documents used to perform these assessments.

  3. Primarily Assessing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkinson, Anne

    1991-01-01

    The idea of assessment driving the curriculum and the importance of assessing students constantly instead of using only standardized tests are discussed. Informal observations used by teachers as a way of assessing student progress is emphasized. The United Kingdom's National Curriculum assessment program are described. (KR)

  4. Urban Earthquake Shaking and Loss Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancilar, U.; Tuzun, C.; Yenidogan, C.; Zulfikar, C.; Durukal, E.; Erdik, M.

    2009-04-01

    This study, conducted under the JRA-3 component of the EU NERIES Project, develops a methodology and software (ELER) for the rapid estimation of earthquake shaking and losses the Euro-Mediterranean region. This multi-level methodology developed together with researchers from Imperial College, NORSAR and ETH-Zurich is capable of incorporating regional variability and sources of uncertainty stemming from ground motion predictions, fault finiteness, site modifications, inventory of physical and social elements subjected to earthquake hazard and the associated vulnerability relationships. GRM Risk Management, Inc. of Istanbul serves as sub-contractor tor the coding of the ELER software. The methodology encompasses the following general steps: 1. Finding of the most likely location of the source of the earthquake using regional seismotectonic data base and basic source parameters, and if and when possible, by the estimation of fault rupture parameters from rapid inversion of data from on-line stations. 2. Estimation of the spatial distribution of selected ground motion parameters through region specific ground motion attenuation relationships and using shear wave velocity distributions.(Shake Mapping) 4. Incorporation of strong ground motion and other empirical macroseismic data for the improvement of Shake Map 5. Estimation of the losses (damage, casualty and economic) at different levels of sophistication (0, 1 and 2) that commensurate with the availability of inventory of human built environment (Loss Mapping) Level 2 analysis of the ELER Software (similar to HAZUS and SELENA) is essentially intended for earthquake risk assessment (building damage, consequential human casualties and macro economic loss quantifiers) in urban areas. The basic Shake Mapping is similar to the Level 0 and Level 1 analysis however, options are available for more sophisticated treatment of site response through externally entered data and improvement of the shake map through incorporation

  5. Caregiver Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Assessment is a critical step in determining appropriate support services. This article discusses "caregiver assessment," a systematic process of gathering information to describe a caregiving situation. Caregiver assessment identifies the particular problems, needs, resources, and strengths of the family caregiver and approaches issues from the…

  6. Managing Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Development Agency, London (England).

    This document, which is intended for curriculum managers at British further education colleges, presents guidelines for developing and implementing a college assessment policy based on the principle that the objectives of all assessment procedures and policies are as follows: enhance the assessment provision within colleges; ensure that assessment…

  7. Functional Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slomka, Gregory T.

    This report provides an overview of the use of functional assessment in the evaluation of individuals with psychiatric disabilities. It begins by discussing the difficulties with traditional forms of assessment and the development of functional assessment, particularly in the field of psychiatric rehabilitation. The need to not rely on any single…

  8. National Assessment's Consumer Skills Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) encountered problems when developing a comprehensive assessment of consumer skills of 17-year-olds in 1978. When NAEP conducted a nationwide assessment of basic life skills of 17-year-olds in 1977, there was considerable interest in the consumer skills portion. Therefore, it was decided to…

  9. Symposium: Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Chris M.; Perelman, Les; Poe, Mya; Sommers, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents four symposium papers on assessment. It includes: (1) "Closed Systems and Standardized Writing Tests" (Chris M. Anson); (2) "Information Illiteracy and Mass Market Writing Assessments" (Les Perelman); (3) "Genre, Testing, and the Constructed Realities of Student Achievement" (Mya Poe); and (4)…

  10. Portfolio Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagavarian, Debra A.

    The portfolio assessment process at Thomas A. Edison State College is described in this report. Through portfolio assessment, the school helps students identify and gain credit for college-level skills and knowledge acquired through work, volunteer activities, independent reading, military or corporate training, and life experiences that may be…

  11. Existential Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana, Richard H.; Leech, Shirley

    1974-01-01

    Present psychological assessment stems from a philosophy of science that values objectivity but fails to comprehend the existence of the person being evaluated. A humanistic-existential model shifts the focus from omnipotence to encounter and encourages client responsibility. Some pertinent assessment issues are formulated and specific instruments…

  12. Psychobiographical Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munter, Pamela Osborne

    1975-01-01

    Psychobiography, the analysis of public persons by competent clinicians, is discussed as a possible assessment technique. Its position in relation to traditional personality assessment is considered as well as major previous efforts. Psychobiography is a part of the curriculum at several leading universities and suggestions are made for future…

  13. Nonbiased Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland, Thomas, Ed.

    The Nonbiased Assessment module contains seven sections that provide information on various issues relevant to the construction of programs for assessing minority group children. Each section, in addition to the discussion of the topic, contains a list of objectives for the workshop participant or reader, a pretest, simulations, and an annotated…

  14. Process Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Green, Leslie M.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study of process assessment (assessing children by teaching them new material) of four children (mean age=6.6 years) with delayed reading skills are discussed in terms of the classroom use of measurement of children's retention. (CL)

  15. Dietary Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    EGRP's goals in Dietary Assessment are to increase the precision of dietary intake estimates by improving self-report of dietary intake and the analytic procedures for processing reported information.

  16. Respiratory assessment.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Heidi

    The ability to carry out and document a full respiratory assessment is an essential skill for all nurses. The elements included are: an initial assessment, history taking, inspection, palpation, percussion, auscultation and further investigations. A prompt initial assessment allows immediate evaluation of severity of illness and appropriate treatment measures may warrant instigation at this point. Following this, a comprehensive patient history will be elicited. Clinical examination of the patient follows and involves inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation. At this point, consideration must be given to preparation of a light, warm, quiet, private environment for examination and suitable patient positioning. Inspection is a comprehensive visual assessment, while palpation involves using touch to gather information. The next stages are percussion and auscultation. While percussion is striking the chest to determine the state of underlying tissues, auscultation entails listening to and interpreting sound transmission through the chest wall via a stethoscope. Finally, further investigations may be necessary to confirm or negate suspected diagnoses.

  17. Assessing habitat connectivity for ground-dwelling animals in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Braaker, S; Moretti, M; Boesch, R; Ghazoul, J; Obrist, M K; Bontadina, F

    To ensure viable species populations in fragmented landscapes, individuals must be able to move between suitable habitat patches. Despite the increased interest in biodiversity assessment in urban environments, the ecological relevance of habitat connectivity in highly fragmented landscapes remains largely unknown. The first step to understanding the role of habitat connectivity in urban ecology is the challenging task of assessing connectivity in the complex patchwork of contrasting habitats that is found in cities. We developed a data-based framework, minimizing the use of subjective assumptions, to assess habitat connectivity that consists of the following sequential steps: (1) identification of habitat preference based on empirical habitat-use data; (2) derivation of habitat resistance surfaces evaluating various transformation functions; (3) modeling of different connectivity maps with electrical circuit theory (Circuitscape), a method considering all possible pathways across the landscape simultaneously; and (4) identification of the best connectivity map with information-theoretic model selection. We applied this analytical framework to assess habitat connectivity for the European hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus, a model species for ground-dwelling animals, in the city of Zurich, Switzerland, using GPS track points from 40 individuals. The best model revealed spatially explicit connectivity “pinch points,” as well as multiple habitat connections. Cross-validation indicated the general validity of the selected connectivity model. The results show that both habitat connectivity and habitat quality affect the movement of urban hedgehogs (relative importance of the two variables was 19.2% and 80.8%, respectively), and are thus both relevant for predicting urban animal movements. Our study demonstrates that even in the complex habitat patchwork of cities, habitat connectivity plays a major role for ground-dwelling animal movement. Data-based habitat connectivity

  18. Assessing rangelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyke, David A.

    2002-01-01

    It is important for land managers and technical assistance specialists to be able to assess the health of rangelands in order to know where to focus management efforts. The complexity of ecological processes, and the inherent expense of directly measuring site integrity, suggests a need for an evaluation process that focuses instead on biological and physical attributes. In a collaborative effort, the USGS, ARS, BLM, and NRCS have jointly developed a system in which 17 indicators are used to gauge three attributes of rangeland health. A qualitative, observational procedure provides an assessment of the functional status of these indicators. This quick assessment technique, by providing an understanding about each attribute, helps interpret rangeland health.

  19. The ABCs of Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Ann W.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of assessment in the enhancement of learning. Explains different types of assessment such as performance assessment, portfolio assessment, time-series assessment, and the predict-and-explain assessment and discusses how to analyze assessment. (YDS)

  20. Ambulatory Assessment.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Ryan W; Wycoff, Andrea M; Trull, Timothy J

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, significant technological advances have changed our understanding of dynamic processes in clinical psychology. A particularly important agent of change has been ambulatory assessment (AA). AA is the assessment of individuals in their daily lives, combining the twin benefits of increased ecological validity and minimized retrospective biases. These benefits make AA particularly well-suited to the assessment of dynamic processes, and recent advancements in technology are providing exciting new opportunities to understand these processes in new ways. In the current article, we briefly detail the capabilities currently offered by smartphones and mobile physiological devices, as well as some of the practical and ethical challenges of incorporating these new technologies into AA research. We then provide several examples of recent innovative applications of AA methodology in clinical research, assessment, and intervention and provide a case example of AA data generated from a study utilizing multiple mobile devices. In this way, we aim to provide a sense of direction for researchers planning AA studies of their own.

  1. Reference Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bivens-Tatum, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    This article presents interesting articles that explore several different areas of reference assessment, including practical case studies and theoretical articles that address a range of issues such as librarian behavior, patron satisfaction, virtual reference, or evaluation design. They include: (1) "Evaluating the Quality of a Chat Service"…

  2. Abdominal Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; Weilitz, Pamela Becker

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints by patients, and assessment of abdominal pain and associated symptoms can be challenging for home healthcare providers. Reasons for abdominal pain are related to inflammation, organ distention, and ischemia. The history and physical examination are important to narrow the source of acute or chronic problems, identify immediate interventions, and when necessary, facilitate emergency department care.

  3. Extraneous carbon assessment in ultra-microscale radiocarbon analysis using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the natural abundance of radiocarbon (14C) concentrations in inorganic and organic carbon-containing materials can be used to investigate their date of origin. Particularly, the biogeochemical cycling of specific compounds in the environment may be investigated applying molecular marker analyses. However, the isolation of specific molecules from environmental matrices requires a complex processing procedure resulting in small sample sizes that often contain less than 30 μg C. Such small samples are sensitive to extraneous carbon (Cex) that is introduced during the purification of the compounds (Shah and Pearson, 2007). We present a thorough radiocarbon blank assessment for benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), a proxy for combustion products that are formed during the oxidative degradation of condensed polyaromatic structures (Wiedemeier et al, in press). The extraneous carbon assessment includes reference material for (1) chemical extraction, (2) preparative liquid chromatography (3) wet chemical oxidation which are subsequently measured with gas ion source AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometer, 5-100 μg C). We always use pairs of reference materials, radiocarbon depleted (14Cfossil) and modern (14Cmodern) to determine the fraction modern (F14C) of Cex.Our results include detailed information about the quantification of Cex in radiocarbon molecular marker analysis using BPCA. Error propagation calculations indicate that ultra-microscale samples (20-30 μg) are feasible with uncertainties of less than 10 %. Calculations of the constant contamination reveal important information about the source (F14C) and mass (μg) of Cex (Wacker and Christl, 2011) for each sub procedure. An external correction of compound specific radiocarbon data is essential for robust results that allow for a high degree of confidence in the 14C results. References Shah and Pearson, 2007. Ultra-microscale (5-25μg C) analysis of individual lipids by 14C AMS: Assessment and

  4. Ambulatory Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Trull, Timothy J.; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Ambulatory assessment (AA) covers a wide range of assessment methods to study people in their natural environment, including self-report, observational, and biological/physiological/behavioral. AA methods minimize retrospective biases while gathering ecologically valid data from patients’ everyday life in real time or near real time. Here, we report on the major characteristics of AA, and we provide examples of applications of AA in clinical psychology (a) to investigate mechanisms and dynamics of symptoms, (b) to predict the future recurrence or onset of symptoms, (c) to monitor treatment effects, (d) to predict treatment success, (e) to prevent relapse, and (f) as interventions. In addition, we present and discuss the most pressing and compelling future AA applications: technological developments (the smartphone), improved ecological validity of laboratory results by combined lab-field studies, and investigating gene-environment interactions. We conclude with a discussion of acceptability, compliance, privacy, and ethical issues. PMID:23157450

  5. Ménage-à-trois: the amoeba Nuclearia sp. from Lake Zurich with its ecto- and endosymbiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dirren, Sebastian; Salcher, Michaela M; Blom, Judith F; Schweikert, Michael; Posch, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    We present a fascinating triad relationship between a eukaryotic amoeba and its two bacterial symbionts. The morphological characteristics of the amoeba allowed for a confident assignment to the genus Nuclearia (Opisthokonta, Nucleariidae), but species identification resulted in an ambiguous result. Sequence analysis indicated an affiliation to the species N. thermophila, however, several morphological features contradict the original description. Amoebal isolates were cultured for several years with their preferred food source, the microcystin-producing harmful cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens. Symbioses of the amoeba with ecto- and endosymbiotic bacteria were maintained over this period. Several thousand cells of the ectosymbiont are regularly arranged inside a layer of extracellular polymeric substances produced by the amoeba. The ectosymbiont was identified as Paucibacter toxinivorans (Betaproteobacteria), which was originally isolated by enrichment with microcystins. We found indications that our isolated ectosymbiont indeed contributed to toxin-degradation. The endosymbiont (Gammaproteobacteria, 15-20 bacteria per amoeba) is enclosed in symbiosomes inside the host cytoplasm and represents probably an obligate symbiont. We propose the name "Candidatus Endonucleariobacter rarus" for this bacterium that was neither found free-living nor in a symbiotic association. Nucleariidae are uniquely suited model organisms to study the basic principles of symbioses between opisthokonts and prokaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. 78 FR 56740 - Grant of Individual Exemption Involving UBS AG (UBS or the Applicant); Located in Zurich...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... requirements: (1) An independent auditor, who has appropriate technical training and proficiency with Title I of ERISA, shall conduct an annual written audit; (2) The audit shall specifically require the auditor... and written policies and procedures requirements described in paragraph (f); (4) The auditor shall...

  7. Technical foundation and operational effectiveness of noise-related landing fees at the Zurich and Geneva airports

    SciTech Connect

    Schurter, E.

    1982-01-01

    The development of noise-related landing-fees at airports in various countries is discussed. Noise-related landing fees create an inducement for an accelerated pace of fleet renewal, while the monetary yield from fees collected by airports help to defray expenditures incurred by airports in providing noise protection and insulation for the receivers of the noise. (KRM)

  8. Socio-psychological airplane noise investigation in the districts of three Swiss airports: Zurich, Geneva and Basel

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, R.; Mueller, R.; Meier, H.P.

    1980-09-01

    The results of noise measurements and calculations are available in the form of noise maps for each of the three areas. To measure the stress due to airplane noise the Noise and Number Index (NNI) was applied. In the vicinities of the airports, 400 households were randomly selected in each of the three noise zones (of 10 NNI intervals each). A total of 3939 questionnaires could be evaluated, one quarter of which came from areas without airplane noise. Concurrently, traffic noise was measured in areas of Basel and expressed in sum total levels L sub 50 and the reaction ofmore » 944 persons was elicited by interrogation.« less

  9. Socio-psychological airplane noise investigation in the districts of three Swiss airports: Zurich, Geneva and Basel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, R.; Mueller, R.; Meier, H. P.

    1980-01-01

    The results of noise measurements and calculations are available in the form of noise maps for each of the three areas. To measure the stress due to airplane noise the Noise and Number Index (NNI) was applied. In the vicinities of the airports, 400 households were randomly selected in each of the three noise zones (of 10 NNI intervals each). A total of 3939 questionnaires could be evaluated, one quarter of which came from areas without airplane noise. Concurrently, traffic noise was measured in areas of Basel and expressed in sum total levels L sub 50 and the reaction of 944 persons was elicited by interrogation.

  10. Artist as Educator? Assessing the Pedagogic Role of Folly in the Early Work of the Anglo-Swiss Artist Henry Fuseli (1741-1825)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hester Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This article examines a group of five ink, pen and wash drawings produced by the Anglo-Swiss artist Henry Fuseli in the mid-eighteenth century in Zurich. The drawings were produced for a "Narrenbuch" (Book of Fools) uniting visual images of folly with humorous slogans. The drawings are significant in that they imitate sixteenth-century…

  11. Poor neuro-motor tuning of the human larynx: a comparison of sung and whistled pitch imitation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joseph F.; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2018-01-01

    Vocal imitation is a hallmark of human communication that underlies the capacity to learn to speak and sing. Even so, poor vocal imitation abilities are surprisingly common in the general population and even expert vocalists cannot match the precision of a musical instrument. Although humans have evolved a greater degree of control over the laryngeal muscles that govern voice production, this ability may be underdeveloped compared with control over the articulatory muscles, such as the tongue and lips, volitional control of which emerged earlier in primate evolution. Human participants imitated simple melodies by either singing (i.e. producing pitch with the larynx) or whistling (i.e. producing pitch with the lips and tongue). Sung notes were systematically biased towards each individual's habitual pitch, which we hypothesize may act to conserve muscular effort. Furthermore, while participants who sung more precisely also whistled more precisely, sung imitations were less precise than whistled imitations. The laryngeal muscles that control voice production are under less precise control than the oral muscles that are involved in whistling. This imprecision may be due to the relatively recent evolution of volitional laryngeal-motor control in humans, which may be tuned just well enough for the coarse modulation of vocal-pitch in speech. PMID:29765635

  12. Altered resting state neuromotor connectivity in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: A MAPP

    PubMed Central

    Kutch, Jason J.; Yani, Moheb S.; Asavasopon, Skulpan; Kirages, Daniel J.; Rana, Manku; Cosand, Louise; Labus, Jennifer S.; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Farmer, Melissa A.; Johnson, Kevin A.; Ness, Timothy J.; Deutsch, Georg; Harris, Richard E.; Apkarian, A. Vania; Clauw, Daniel J.; Mackey, Sean C.; Mullins, Chris; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Brain network activity associated with altered motor control in individuals with chronic pain is not well understood. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a debilitating condition in which previous studies have revealed altered resting pelvic floor muscle activity in men with CP/CPPS compared to healthy controls. We hypothesized that the brain networks controlling pelvic floor muscles would also show altered resting state function in men with CP/CPPS. Here we describe the results of the first test of this hypothesis focusing on the motor cortical regions, termed pelvic-motor, that can directly activate pelvic floor muscles. A group of men with CP/CPPS (N = 28), as well as group of age-matched healthy male controls (N = 27), had resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network study. Brain maps of the functional connectivity of pelvic-motor were compared between groups. A significant group difference was observed in the functional connectivity between pelvic-motor and the right posterior insula. The effect size of this group difference was among the largest effect sizes in functional connectivity between all pairs of 165 anatomically-defined subregions of the brain. Interestingly, many of the atlas region pairs with large effect sizes also involved other subregions of the insular cortices. We conclude that functional connectivity between motor cortex and the posterior insula may be among the most important markers of altered brain function in men with CP/CPPS, and may represent changes in the integration of viscerosensory and motor processing. PMID:26106574

  13. The validity of parental reports on motor skills performance level in preschool children: a comparison with a standardized motor test.

    PubMed

    Zysset, Annina E; Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Meyer, Andrea H; Stülb, Kerstin; Leeger-Aschmann, Claudia S; Schmutz, Einat A; Arhab, Amar; Ferrazzini, Valentina; Kriemler, Susi; Munsch, Simone; Puder, Jardena J; Jenni, Oskar G

    2018-05-01

    Motor skills are interrelated with essential domains of childhood such as cognitive and social development. Thus, the evaluation of motor skills and the identification of atypical or delayed motor development is crucial in pediatric practice (e.g., during well-child visits). Parental reports on motor skills may serve as possible indicators to decide whether further assessment of a child is necessary or not. We compared parental reports on fundamental motor skills performance level (e.g., hopping, throwing), based on questions frequently asked in pediatric practice, with a standardized motor test in 389 children (46.5% girls/53.5% boys, M age = 3.8 years, SD = 0.5, range 3.0-5.0 years) from the Swiss Preschoolers' Health Study (SPLASHY). Motor skills were examined using the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment 3-5 (ZNA3-5), and parents filled in an online questionnaire on fundamental motor skills performance level. The results showed that the answers from the parental report correlated only weakly with the objectively assessed motor skills (r = .225, p < .001). Although a parental screening instrument for motor skills would be desirable, the parent's report used in this study was not a valid indicator for children's fundamental motor skills. Thus, we may recommend to objectively examine motor skills in clinical practice and not to exclusively rely on parental report. What is Known: • Early assessment of motor skills in preschool children is important because motor skills are essential for the engagement in social activities and the development of cognitive abilities. Atypical or delayed motor development can be an indicator for different developmental needs or disorders. • Pediatricians frequently ask parents about the motor competences of their child during well-child visits. What is New: • The parental report on fundamental motor skills performance level used in this study was not a reliable indicator for describing motor development in the

  14. Assessing Assessment Texts: Where Is Planning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fives, Helenrose; Barnes, Nicole; Dacey, Charity; Gillis, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a content analysis of 27 assessment textbooks to determine how assessment planning was framed in texts for preservice teachers. We identified eight assessment planning themes: alignment, assessment purpose and types, reliability and validity, writing goals and objectives, planning specific assessments, unpacking, overall assessment…

  15. Better Assessments Require Better Assessment Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiggins, Rick

    2018-01-01

    Stiggins says that, to build better assessment systems, educators and education leaders need more opportunities to learn the basic principles of sound assessment practice. He lays out what he views as the fundamental elements of assessment literacy.

  16. Weight status and gender-related differences in motor skills and in child care - based physical activity in young children.

    PubMed

    Bonvin, Antoine; Barral, Jérôme; Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Kriemler, Susi; Longchamp, Anouk; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Puder, Jardena J

    2012-03-09

    Over the last decades, a decline in motor skills and in physical activity and an increase in obesity has been observed in children. However, there is a lack of data in young children. We tested if differences in motor skills and in physical activity according to weight or gender were already present in 2- to 4-year-old children. Fifty-eight child care centers in the French part of Switzerland were randomly selected for the Youp'là bouge study. Motor skills were assessed by an obstacle course including 5 motor skills, derived from the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment test. Physical activity was measured with accelerometers (GT1M, Actigraph, Florida, USA) using age-adapted cut-offs. Weight status was assessed using the International Obesity Task Force criteria (healthy weight vs overweight) for body mass index (BMI). Of the 529 children (49% girls, 3.4 ± 0.6 years, BMI 16.2 ± 1.2 kg/m2), 13% were overweight. There were no significant weight status-related differences in the single skills of the obstacle course, but there was a trend (p = 0.059) for a lower performance of overweight children in the overall motor skills score. No significant weight status-related differences in child care-based physical activity were observed. No gender-related differences were found in the overall motor skills score, but boys performed better than girls in 2 of the 5 motor skills (p ≤ 0.04). Total physical activity as well as time spent in moderate-vigorous and in vigorous activity during child care were 12-25% higher and sedentary activity 5% lower in boys compared to girls (all p < 0.01). At this early age, there were no significant weight status- or gender-related differences in global motor skills. However, in accordance to data in older children, child care-based physical activity was higher in boys compared to girls. These results are important to consider when establishing physical activity recommendations or targeting health promotion interventions in young children.

  17. Weight status and gender-related differences in motor skills and in child care - based physical activity in young children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last decades, a decline in motor skills and in physical activity and an increase in obesity has been observed in children. However, there is a lack of data in young children. We tested if differences in motor skills and in physical activity according to weight or gender were already present in 2- to 4-year-old children. Methods Fifty-eight child care centers in the French part of Switzerland were randomly selected for the Youp'là bouge study. Motor skills were assessed by an obstacle course including 5 motor skills, derived from the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment test. Physical activity was measured with accelerometers (GT1M, Actigraph, Florida, USA) using age-adapted cut-offs. Weight status was assessed using the International Obesity Task Force criteria (healthy weight vs overweight) for body mass index (BMI). Results Of the 529 children (49% girls, 3.4 ± 0.6 years, BMI 16.2 ± 1.2 kg/m2), 13% were overweight. There were no significant weight status-related differences in the single skills of the obstacle course, but there was a trend (p = 0.059) for a lower performance of overweight children in the overall motor skills score. No significant weight status-related differences in child care-based physical activity were observed. No gender-related differences were found in the overall motor skills score, but boys performed better than girls in 2 of the 5 motor skills (p ≤ 0.04). Total physical activity as well as time spent in moderate-vigorous and in vigorous activity during child care were 12-25% higher and sedentary activity 5% lower in boys compared to girls (all p < 0.01). Conclusions At this early age, there were no significant weight status- or gender-related differences in global motor skills. However, in accordance to data in older children, child care-based physical activity was higher in boys compared to girls. These results are important to consider when establishing physical activity recommendations or targeting health promotion

  18. [Phylo- and ontogenetic aspects of erect posture and walking in developmental neurology].

    PubMed

    Berényi, Marianne; Katona, Ferenc; Sanchez, Carmen; Mandujano, Mario

    2011-07-30

    patterns during human ontogenesis reflect phylogenetic develpoment of species specific human functions. During ontogenesis spontaneous motor development gradually arises from these early specific sensorimotor predecessors.. The regular use of the elementary neuromotor patterns for diagnostic puposes has several distinct advantages. The neuromotor patterns have a natural stereotypy in normal infants and, therefore, deflections from this regular pattern may be detected easily, thus, the activation of the elementary neuromotor pattern is a more suitable method for identifying defects in the motor activity of the neonate or young infant than the assessment of the primitive reflexes. The "stiumulus positions," which activate specific movements according to how the human neonate or young infant is positioned, do not activate such motor patterns in neonate or young primates including apes. The characteristic locomotor pattern in these adult primates, including the apes, is swinging and involves brachiation with an extreme prehensility. This species specific motor activity is reflected in the orangutan and gibbon neonates by an early extensive grasp. However, according to our investigations, no crawling, creeping, elementary walk, or sitting up can be activated in them. Neonates grasp the hair of the mother, a vital function for the survival of the young. In contemporary nonhuman primates including apes, the neonate brain is more mature. Thus, pronounced differences can be observed between early motor ontogenesis in the human and all other primates. The earliest human movements are complex performances rather than simple reflexes. The distinction between primitive reflexes and elementary neuromotor patterns is essential. Primitive reflexes are controlled by the brainstem. All can be activated in primates. These reflexes have short durations and contrary to elementary sensorimotor patterns occur only once in response to one stimulus, e.g., one head drop elicits one abduction

  19. Premorbid Anomalies and Risk of Schizophrenia and Depressive Disorders in a Birth Cohort Exposed to Prenatal Rubella

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penner, Justin D.; Brown, Alan S.

    2007-01-01

    In a birth cohort prenatally exposed to rubella, we assessed whether prospectively documented premorbid neuromotor dysfunction, mannerisms, deviant behaviors, and temperament during childhood and adolescence were impaired in cases who developed depressive disorder (DD) relative to rubella-exposed controls and cases who developed schizophrenia…

  20. Functional Impairment Severity Is Associated with Health Status among Older Persons with Intellectual Disability and Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, C. M.; Rosasco, M.; Robinson, L. M.; Meccarello, J.; Janicki, M. P.; Turk, M. A.; Davidson, P. W.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Studies have noted high rates of specific health disorders in adults with cerebral palsy (CP). However, it remains unclear how growing older with a lifelong neuromotor physical disability confers risk for health outcomes in adults who have both intellectual disability (ID) and CP. Aim: To assess the relationship between health status…

  1. Assessment, Change, and Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Describes three types of communication assessment: structural assessment; functional assessment; and process assessment. Contends that these traditional approaches are inappropriate for assessing organizational change. Proposes that complexity theory explicitly focuses on evolutionary processes and thus is a more appropriate foundation for…

  2. Conducting Source Water Assessments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents background information on the source water assessment steps, the four steps of a source wter assessment, and how to use the results of an assessment to protect drinking water sources.

  3. Reading Assessment: Looking Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afflerbach, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on three areas of reading assessment that I believe to be crucial for students' reading development: developing comprehensive formative assessments, assessing the wide array of factors that contribute to students' reading development, and fostering student independence by helping students learn to use reading assessment on…

  4. Assessment as Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    In this article Kavita Gupta describes how she used assessment "as" learning, where students learn, self-correct, and collaborate "during" the assessment (Rowe 2012) in her AP chemistry class. In her class, she used these assessments as learning for "performance-based assessments" (PBAs). They share attributes of both…

  5. Issues in Assessment: Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinowski, Patricia A., Ed.

    This collection of articles is the third in a series on assessment produced by Finger Lakes Community College (New York). It deals with classroom assessment as an ongoing process that can be of significant value to teachers as well as to students. Assessment at the college and assessment in the classroom in general are explored. Articles include:…

  6. Assessing Assessment: In Pursuit of Meaningful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rootman-le Grange, Ilse; Blackie, Margaret A. L.

    2018-01-01

    The challenge of supporting the development of meaningful learning is prevalent in chemistry education research. One of the core activities used in the learning process is assessments. The aim of this paper is to illustrate how the semantics dimension of Legitimation Code Theory can be a helpful tool to critique the quality of assessments and…

  7. Neurodevelopmental retardation, as assessed clinically and with magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography, associated with perinatal dioxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ten Tusscher, G W; Leijs, M M; de Boer, L C C; Legler, J; Olie, K; Spekreijse, H; van Dijk, B W; Vulsma, T; Briët, J; Ilsen, A; Koppe, J G

    2014-09-01

    In 1980s Western Europe, human perinatal exposure to background levels of dioxins was rather high. We therefore evaluated the neurodevelopment of our cohort during the prepubertal period and in adolescence. At prepubertal age (7-12 years) 41 children were tested. Both neuromotor functioning and psychological testing were performed (Dutch version of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-R) and the Dutch version of the Child Behavior Checklist for ages 4-18 years (CBCL 4-18) and the Teacher Report Form (TRF)). Neurophysiological tests were performed using magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography. In adolescence (14-18 years) the behavior of 33 children was studied again (CBCL and TRF). And the levels of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs (dl-PCBs) were measured in serum. At prepubertal age no association was found between perinatal dioxin exposure and verbal, performal and total IQ or with the Touwen's test for neuromotor development. There were behavioral problems associated with both prenatal and postnatal dioxin exposure. In adolescence there were problems associated with the current dioxin levels and dioxin-like-PCBs. Neurophysiological tests revealed clear negative dysfunction. An increase in latency time after a motion stimulus (N2b) of 13 ms (= a delay of 10%) is associated with the higher prenatal dioxin exposure. A similar delay was measured in testing cognitive ability by analyzing the odd ball measurements, N200 and P300, together with an amplitude decrease of 12 %. The delay is indicative of a defective myelinisation and the decrease in amplitude of a loss of neurons. We found effects on behavior in association with the perinatal dioxin exposure and in adolescence in association with the current dioxin levels. Neurophysiological testing is instrumental in the detection of effects of perinatal background levels of chemicals on brain development in normal, healthy children. The clinical, neurological and psychological tests commonly used are

  8. Distributed road assessment system

    DOEpatents

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  9. SUFFICIENT IODINE INTAKE IN SCHOOLCHILDREN FROM THE ZAGREB AREA: ASSESSMENT WITH DRIED BLOD SPOT THYROGLOBULIN AS A NEW FUNCTIONAL BIOMARKER FOR IODINE DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Jukić, Tomislav; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; Granić, Roko; Prpić, Marin; Krilić, Drazena; Juresa, Vesna; Katalenić, Marijan; Kusić, Zvonko

    2015-12-01

    Current methods for assessment of iodine intake in a population comprise measurements of urinary iodine concentration (UIC), thyroid volume by ultrasound (US-Tvol), and newborn TSH. Serum or dried blood spot thyroglobulin (DBS-Tg) is a new promising functional iodine status biomarker in children. In 1996, a new act on universal salt iodination was introduced in Croatia with 25 mg of potassium iodideper kg of salt. In 2002, Croatia finally reached iodine sufficiency. However, in 2009, median UIC in 101 schoolchildren from Zagreb, the capital of Croatia, was 288 µg/L, posing to be excessive. The aim of the study was to assess iodine intake in schoolchildren from the Zagreb area and to evaluate the value of DBS-Tg in schoolchildren as a new functional biomarker of iodine deficiency (and iodine excess). The study was part of a large international study in 6- to 12-year-old children supported by UNICEF, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) and the International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (ICCIDD). According to international study results, the median cut-off Tg < 13 µg/L and/or < 3% Tg values > 40 µg/L indicate iodine sufficiency. The study included 159 schoolchildren (median age 9.1 ± 1.4 years) from Zagreb and a nearby small town of Jastrebarsko with measurements of UIC, US-Tvol, DBS-Tg, T4, TSH and iodine content in salt from households of schoolchildren (KI/kg of salt). Overall median UIC was 205 µg/L (range 1-505 µg/L). Thyroid volumes in schoolchildren measured by US were within the normal range according to reference values. Median DBS-Tg in schoolchildren was 12.1 µg/L with 3% of Tg values > 40 µg/L. High Tg values were in the UIC range < 50 µg/L and > 300 µg/L (U-shaped curve of Tg plotted against UIC). All children were euthyroid with geometric mean TSH 0.7 ± 0.3 mU/L and arithmetic mean T4 62 ± 12.5 nmol/L. The mean KI content per kg of salt was 24.9 ± 3.1 mg/kg (range 19-36 mg/kg). Study results

  10. Assessing the assessments: Pharmaceuticals in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Enick, O.V.; Moore, M.M.

    2007-11-15

    The relatively new issue of pharmaceutical contamination of the environment offers the opportunity to explore the application of values to the construction, communication and management of risk. The still-developing regulatory policies regarding environmental contamination with pharmaceuticals provide fertile ground for the introduction of values into the definition and management of risk. In this report, we summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmaceutical contamination of the environment and discuss specific attributes of pharmaceuticals that require special consideration. We then present an analysis showing that if values are incorporated into assessing, characterizing and managing risk, the results of risk assessments will more accuratelymore » reflect the needs of various stakeholders. Originating from an acknowledgement of the inherent uncertainty and value-laden nature of risk assessment, the precautionary principle (and later, the multi-criteria, integrated risk assessment), provides a direction for further research and policy development.« less

  11. Deconstruction Rapid Assessment Tool

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Deconstruction Rapid Assessment Tool (EPA 905-F-15-001) instructions, form and spreadsheet for assessing and triaging structures being considered for deconstruction. Promote environmental stewardship and economic revitalization through deconstruction.

  12. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hepatitis Risk Assessment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Viral Hepatitis. Are you at risk? Take this 5 minute Hepatitis Risk Assessment developed ...

  13. National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Lakes Assessment is a collaborative, statistical survey of the nation's lakes. It is one of four national surveys that EPA and its partners conduct to assess the condition and health of the nation's water resources.

  14. Risk assessment and prioritization

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    The first step to take in order to prevent and minimize the dangers of disasters or attacks, is risk assessment, followed closely by prioritization. This article discusses key vulnerability and risk assessment that Volpe Center has conducted in suppo...

  15. GM Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Penny A. C.

    GM risk assessments play an important role in the decision-making process surrounding the regulation, notification and permission to handle Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Ultimately the role of a GM risk assessment will be to ensure the safe handling and containment of the GMO; and to assess any potential impacts on the environment and human health. A risk assessment should answer all ‘what if’ scenarios, based on scientific evidence.

  16. Expanding Student Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Vito, Ed.

    This book supports constructive discussion about assessment and provides concrete directions for change. The 10 chapters outline many of the difficulties associated with current standardized testing. While most educators refer to the new non-standardized test efforts as alternative assessments, this type of assessment is increasingly being called…

  17. Georgia's Teacher Performance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Anne Marie; Wetherington, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Like most states, Georgia until recently depended on an assessment of content knowledge to award teaching licenses, along with a licensure recommendation from candidates' educator preparation programs. While the content assessment reflected candidates' grasp of subject matter, licensure decisions did not hinge on direct, statewide assessment of…

  18. Evidence-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Leong, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Assessing student understanding is a critical part of a teacher's routine. Most assessments are reviewed with a quick eye, but the evidence-centered assessment strategy encourages us to slow down and look more carefully at student work samples. In this article, the author proposes guidelines for the close examination of student work. These…

  19. Assessment for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    There are many ways of assessing students and the work they do, and many ways of getting them ready for those assessments. Special needs students provide an extra challenge to educators because they have difficulty preparing for assessment and often more difficulty communicating what they know. It is not enough to be a thoughtful, lab-focused…

  20. Assessment That Informs Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, Annette, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Assessment is more than simply ascribing an 'A' or a 'B' to a particular student achievement. In an era of state-mandated proficiencies and alternative assessment strategies, educators need practical ideas they can use to meaningfully assess their students' learning and their own practice. This issue of "ENC Focus" centers on the topic of inquiry…

  1. Assessments for ecological stewardship

    Treesearch

    Russell T. Graham; Theresa Jain; Richard A. Haynes; Jim Sanders; David L. Cleaves

    1999-01-01

    Depending on the agency, discipline, or audience, assessments supply data and information to address relevant policy questions and to help make decisions (Streets 1989, Thorton et al. 1994). Data collected in assessments estimate, measure, appraise, rate, characterize, or describe various resource conditions. If properly executed, assessment processes can draw...

  2. Framework for the assessment

    Treesearch

    H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    This chapter of Outdoor recreation in American life: a national assessment of demand and supply trends details the components of the assessment framework. In this chapter the author recounts the establishment of the process for assessing the state of the forest and range resources in this country through passage of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning...

  3. Innovations in Computerized Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drasgow, Fritz, Ed.; Olson-Buchanan, Julie B., Ed.

    Chapters in this book present the challenges and dilemmas faced by researchers as they created new computerized assessments, focusing on issues addressed in developing, scoring, and administering the assessments. Chapters are: (1) "Beyond Bells and Whistles; An Introduction to Computerized Assessment" (Julie B. Olson-Buchanan and Fritz Drasgow);…

  4. Reflections on Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiRanna, Kathy; Osmundson, Ellen; Topps, Jo; Gearhart, Maryl

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an assessment-centered teaching (ACT) framework they developed to communicate the integration of assessment and instruction. The framework is a visual representation of the relationships among the fundamental elements of assessment knowledge: the characteristics of quality goals for student learning and…

  5. Is Psychodiagnostic Assessment Humanistic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugarman, Alan

    1978-01-01

    Humanistic psychologists tend to describe psychodiagnostic assessment as nonhumanistic. They argue that assessment is reductionistic and artificial, ignores the examiner-patient relationship, judges people, and is overly intellectual. These concerns are then addressed from a pro-assessment perspective. (EVH)

  6. GCSE Assessment Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Contains three articles designed to help practitioners with practical assessment for the GCSE. Articles include: "GCSE Biology Practical Assessment--Can the End Justify the Means?"; "Investigating the Effect of Catalase: GCSE Assessment Practical"; and "An Experimental Design for GCSE Physics." (CW)

  7. Classroom Assessment. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airasian, Peter W.

    "Classroom Assessment" is designed for students taking a first course in classroom assessment and measurement. It shows how assessment principles apply to the full range of teacher decision making, and not just the formal evaluation of student learning. For this reason, the book has been organized in a manner that follows the natural progression…

  8. Educational Diagnostic Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bejar, Isaac I.

    1984-01-01

    Approaches proposed for educational diagnostic assessment are reviewed and identified as deficit assessment and error analysis. The development of diagnostic instruments may require a reexamination of existing psychometric models and development of alternative ones. The psychometric and content demands of diagnostic assessment all but require test…

  9. Authentic Assessment: A Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Kay, Ed.

    The essays in this collection consider the meaning of authentic assessment and the implications of its use. "Section 1: Assessing Assessment" includes the following essays: (1) "The Nation's Report Card Goes Home: Good News and Bad about Trends in Achievement" (Robert L. Linn and Stephen B. Dunbar); (2) "Budgets, Politics, and Testing" (Chris…

  10. Schedule Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Greg

    2003-01-01

    Schedule risk assessments determine the likelihood of finishing on time. Each task in a schedule has a varying degree of probability of being finished on time. A schedule risk assessment quantifies these probabilities by assigning values to each task. This viewgraph presentation contains a flow chart for conducting a schedule risk assessment, and profiles applicable several methods of data analysis.

  11. Home Energy Assessments

    ScienceCinema

    Dispenza, Jason

    2017-12-27

    A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time. This video shows some of the ways that a contractor may test your home during an assessment, and helps you understand how an assessment can help you move toward energy savings. Find out more at: http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/energy_audits/index.cfm/mytopic=11160

  12. GCSE Assessment Notes: Six GCSE Assessment Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    Provided are copy masters, instructions for use, and grading criteria for six problems used as part of the practical assessment for a modular science course. Each problem gives a narrative and a list of materials necessary to complete the problem. (CW)

  13. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  14. Introduction to economic assessment.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Ann; Sin, Chih Hoong

    2013-11-01

    This is the first in a series of four continuing professional development articles that explain some of the principles of economic assessment and describe the most commonly cited approaches. The series aims to enable readers to critically examine economic assessments in the context of nurse-led service innovation. It introduces a tried-and-tested methodology, with associated tools and templates, used to conduct economic assessments in nursing. In this article, the principles of economic assessment are introduced and two case studies of nurse-led innovation are used to illustrate how they are applied in practice.

  15. How to assess vision.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Janet

    2016-09-21

    Rationale and key points An objective assessment of the patient's vision is important to assess variation from 'normal' vision in acute and community settings, to establish a baseline before examination and treatment in the emergency department, and to assess any changes during ophthalmic outpatient appointments. » Vision is one of the essential senses that permits people to make sense of the world. » Visual assessment does not only involve measuring central visual acuity, it also involves assessing the consequences of reduced vision. » Assessment of vision in children is crucial to identify issues that might affect vision and visual development, and to optimise lifelong vision. » Untreatable loss of vision is not an inevitable consequence of ageing. » Timely and repeated assessment of vision over life can reduce the incidence of falls, prevent injury and optimise independence. Reflective activity 'How to' articles can help update you practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article might change your practice when assessing people holistically. 2. How you could use this article to educate your colleagues in the assessment of vision.

  16. Resource Assessment and Tools

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Various resource assessment strategies and tools are needed to ensure bioenergy feedstock materials are produced, harvested, and transported in a sustainable manner. This presentation highlights research accomplishments by the USDA-ARS Renewable Energy Assessment Project (REAP) team along with our u...

  17. Developing "Assessment Capable" Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Nancy; Fisher, Douglas; Hattie, John

    2018-01-01

    For students, the authors argue, the ability to assess their own learning--that is, to actively understand their own progress and trajectory--can have a significant impact on achievement levels. The authors discuss factors associated with "assessment-capable learners" and offer examples of how to foster such characteristics in classrooms.

  18. Assessment and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    In most developed countries, the pursuit of reliable and valid means of assessing people's learning generates high volumes of published discourse and, not infrequently, dissent; the documentation on the various assessment policies, practices and theories could conceivably fill whole libraries. Some of the discourse and much of the dissent relate…

  19. Discourse and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Tim; Hill, Kathryn; May, Lynette

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the increase in discourse-based studies of oral proficiency assessment techniques. Discusses research carried out on a number of factors in the assessment setting, including the role of interlocutor, candidate, and rater, and the impact of tasks, task performance conditions, and rating criteria. (Author/VWL)

  20. Adventures in Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkey, Kate; Thorne, Sally; Arkinstall, Philip; Bryant, Matthew; Rawlings, David; Kennett, Richard; Fletcher, Adele

    2015-01-01

    In "Teaching History 157, Assessment Edition," a number of different teachers shared the ways in which their departments were approaching the assessment and reporting of students' progress in a "post-levels" world. This article adds to those examples, first by illustrating how teachers from different schools in the Bristol area…

  1. Review of Assessment Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jinrui; De Luca, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews 37 empirical studies, selected from 363 articles and 20 journals, on assessment feedback published between 2000 and 2011. The reviewed articles, many of which came out of studies in the UK and Australia, reflect the most current issues and developments in the area of assessing disciplinary writing. The article aims to outline…

  2. Assessment Hotspots, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahearn, Charles, Ed.; Nalley, Donna, Ed.; Marsh, Corinda, Ed.; Casbon, Christy, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    SouthEastern Regional Vision for Education (SERVE) is one of the federally funded regional educational laboratories. This annual publication captures and shares the experiences of SERVE school districts that have volunteered to share their efforts at assessment reform. This issue contains the following articles: (1) "Classroom Assessment: A…

  3. Assessing Knowledge Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacci, Michael

    This paper presents two general approaches to the assessment of knowledge structures, the first of which entails the building of empirical evidence to support cognitive theory. This type of assessment is concerned with attempting to prove the existence of various knowledge structures; that is, evidence that leads to the construct validity of these…

  4. Interest Assessment. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.

    The assessment of interests through the use of interest inventories is big business in the field of testing today. The assessment of interests originally developed as an outgrowth of efforts in education and in industry to supplement special and general abilities information about individuals. Interest inventories used today differ from early…

  5. Assessing Bilingual Dominance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flege, James Emil; Mackay, Ian R. A.; Piske, Thorsten

    2002-01-01

    Used two methods to assess bilingual dominance in four groups of Italian-English bilinguals. Ratios were derived from bilinguals' self-rating of ability to speak and understand Italian compared to English. Dominance in Italian was associated with a relatively high level of performance in Italian (assessed in a translation task) and relatively poor…

  6. Needs Assessment Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucks County Public Schools, Doylestown, PA.

    The general needs assessment instrument can provide the means for a school district to assess its needs relative to the Ten Goals of Quality Education. It is comprised of 63 area behavior statements taken from the category schemes. The student must check the appropriate number for each statement representing "always" through…

  7. Assessment in Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elman, Sandra E.; Lynton, Ernest A.

    The assessment of professional programs at the undergraduate level is discussed (i.e., engineering, business, education, nursing, and other career-oriented fields). Presently, assessment in professional education relies almost exclusively on written or oral testing of a predetermined set of cognitive and analytical skills. This is followed by…

  8. Calculus Courses' Assessment Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauna, Matti

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe computer-aided assessment methods used in online Calculus courses and the data they produce. The online learning environment collects a lot of time-stamped data about every action a student makes. Assessment data can be harnessed into use as a feedback, predictor, and recommendation facility for students and instructors.…

  9. Cancer Risk Assessment Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aidala, Jim

    1985-01-01

    Describes the scientific basis of cancer risk assessment, outlining the dominant controversies surrounding the use of different methods for identifying carcinogens (short-term tests, animal bioassays, and epidemiological studies). Points out that risk assessment is as much an art as it is a science. (DH)

  10. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  11. WATER CHEMISTRY ASSESSMENT METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This section summarizes and evaluates the surfce water column chemistry assessment methods for USEPA/EMAP-SW, USGS-NAQA, USEPA-RBP, Oho EPA, and MDNR-MBSS. The basic objective of surface water column chemistry assessment is to characterize surface water quality by measuring a sui...

  12. School Suicide Risk Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E.; Louvar Reeves, Melissa A.

    2018-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among youth ages 10 years and older. Further, recent federal surveillance data suggest the rates of suicidal ideation and behaviors to be increasing. With these facts in mind, in this paper, we examine the school psychologist's role in suicide risk assessment; which assesses the degree to which students, who…

  13. Research in Writing Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, William E.

    Five papers on the assessment of writing ability presented at the Division D meeting are critiqued. It is suggested that it is not possible to conclude--as has Larson in his study of grades 4, 6, and 8--that National Assessment of Educational Progress results do not give evidence of growth in writing ability. Dovell and Buhr, examining approaches…

  14. Functional Assessment Inventory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crewe, Nancy M.; Athelstan, Gary T.

    This manual, which provides extensive new instructions for administering the Functional Assessment Inventory (FAI), is intended to enable counselors to begin using the inventory without undergoing any special training. The first two sections deal with the need for functional assessment and issues in the development and use of the inventory. The…

  15. Better Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinchot, Michael; Ngai, Courtney; Huie, Robert; Talanquer, Vicente; Lambertz, Jennifer; Banks, Gregory; Weinrich, Melissa; Lewis, Rebecca; Pelletier, Pamela; Sevian, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Formative assessment has been defined as the process "to recognize and respond to student learning to enhance that learning during the learning." Formative assessment helps teachers identify strengths and weaknesses in their students' understanding, focuses students' attention on relevant information and ideas, and provides scaffolds…

  16. National Assessment Technical Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chelimsky, Eleanor

    In 1991 the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB) released a report interpreting the achievement of U.S. students in mathematics on the 1990 National Assessment of Educational Progress in terms of a set of performance standards. The NAGB had been designing and implementing an approach to defining basic, proficient, and advanced levels of…

  17. Formative Assessment as Mediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vos, Mark; Belluigi, Dina Zoe

    2011-01-01

    Whilst principles of validity, reliability and fairness should be central concerns for the assessment of student learning in higher education, simplistic notions of "transparency" and "explicitness" in terms of assessment criteria should be critiqued more rigorously. This article examines the inherent tensions resulting from CRA's links to both…

  18. TIMSS 2015 Assessment Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S., Ed.; Martin, Michael O., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Now entering into its 20th year of data collection, Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study, (TIMSS) is an international assessment of mathematics and science at the fourth and eighth grades. TIMSS 2015 is the most recent in the TIMSS series, which began with the first assessments in 1995 and has continued every four years--1999,…

  19. Chemical Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This course is aimed at providing an overview of the fundamental guiding principles and general methods used in chemical risk assessment. Chemical risk assessment is a complex and ever-evolving process. These principles and methods have been organized by the National Research Cou...

  20. Handbook of Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Heidi, Ed.; Cizek, Gregory J., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Formative assessment has recently become a focus of renewed research as state and federal policy-makers realize that summative assessments have reached a point of diminishing returns as a tool for increasing student achievement. Consequently, supporters of large-scale testing programs are now beginning to consider the potential of formative…

  1. Diagnosing Diagnostic Language Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic language assessment (DLA) is gaining a lot of attention from language teachers, testers, and applied linguists. With a recent surge of interest in DLA, there seems to be an urgent need to assess where the field of DLA stands at the moment and develop a general sense of where it should be moving in the future. The current article, as the…

  2. Language, Culture, and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Asa G., III

    Much of the language and many constructs used in testing and assessment must be redefined in order for testing instruments to be valid for use with children of African-American descent. These children are products of unique linguistic environments. Current educational assessment tools are insensitive to the cultural-linguistic diversity of the…

  3. Balance in Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The review by Black and Wiliam of national systems makes clear the complexity of assessment, and identifies important issues. One of these is "balance": balance between local and central responsibilities, balance between the weights given to various purposes of schooling, balance between weights for various functions of assessment, and balance…

  4. Assessing Second Language Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    While the viva voce (oral) examination has always been used in content-based educational assessment (Latham 1877: 132), the assessment of second language (L2) speaking in performance tests is relatively recent. The impetus for the growth in testing speaking during the 19th and 20th centuries is twofold. Firstly, in educational settings the…

  5. Assessing regeneration potential

    Treesearch

    Ivan L. Sander

    1989-01-01

    When a regeneration harvest cut is planned for even-aged stands or it is time to make another cut in uneven-aged stands, the first thing to do is assess the regeneration potential. Regeneration potential is the likelihood of being successful in reproducing desired species. You need an assessment to be reasonably sure that regeneration and management objectives can be...

  6. National Sample Assessment Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    These protocols represent a working guide for planning and implementing national sample assessments in connection with the national Key Performance Measures (KPMs). The protocols are intended for agencies involved in planning or conducting national sample assessments and personnel responsible for administering associated tenders or contracts,…

  7. Assessment with Pumpkins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikes, Erin; Sterling, Donna R.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a pumpkin activity that allows teachers to evaluate their students' understanding of standards-based science skills. This activity is a valuable tool for the teacher to assess all the concepts introduced in the beginning of the life science. It assesses the lab skills that have been taught in the first quarter: observation,…

  8. Information Literacy Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warmkessel, Marjorie M.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an annotated list of seven recent articles on the topic of information literacy assessment. They include: (1) "The Three Arenas of Information Literacy Assessment" (Bonnie Gratch Lindauer); (2) "Testing the Effectiveness of Interactive Multimedia for Library-User Education" (Karen Markey et al.); (3)…

  9. Critique of Research Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the issue of articles on research assessments and rankings. It focuses on the British Research Assessment Exercises (RAEs) and New Zealand's Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF). It contrasts these with systems that are not tied to funding formulas and emphasise quality enhancement rather than quality assurance. It…

  10. Risk Assessment: Evidence Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2007-01-01

    Human systems PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment: a) Provides quantitative measures of probability, consequence, and uncertainty; and b) Communicates risk and informs decision-making. Human health risks rated highest in ISS PRA are based on 1997 assessment of clinical events in analog operational settings. Much work remains to analyze remaining human health risks identified in Bioastronautics Roadmap.

  11. Assessment of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    The assessment and diagnosis of learning disabilities (LD) in the school is problematic. How do educators determine who is learning disabled? What practices are recommended? The main focus of the paper is on specific, relatively technical points that influence the validity of assessment. Since technical concerns are only one of the factors…

  12. New Assessments, New Rigor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joan Herman; Robert Linn

    2014-01-01

    Researching. Synthesizing. Reasoning with evidence. The PARCC and Smarter Balanced assessments are clearly setting their sights on complex thinking skills. Researchers Joan Herman and Robert Linn look at the new assessments to see how they stack up against Norman Webb's depth of knowledge framework as well as against current state tests. The…

  13. Music Objectives: Second Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    The document describes the development of objectives and presents objectives formulated by music educators, lay individuals, and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) staff in 1973. Objectives from the first music assessment were reappraised, reviewed, and revised to include greater breadth of application, greater emphasis on the…

  14. On Learning and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    2017-01-01

    The challenge of "educational" assessments--assessments that advance the purposes of learning and instruction--is to provide useful information regarding students' progress towards the goals of instruction in ways that are reliable and not idiosyncratic. In this commentary, the author indicates that the challenges are actually more…

  15. Cambridge Healthtech Institute's Third Annual Conference on Lab-on-a-Chip and Microarrays. 22-24 January 2001, Zurich, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Jain, K K

    2001-02-01

    Cambridge Healthtech Institute's Third Annual Conference on Lab-on-a-Chip and Microarray technology covered the latest advances in this technology and applications in life sciences. Highlights of the meetings are reported briefly with emphasis on applications in genomics, drug discovery and molecular diagnostics. There was an emphasis on microfluidics because of the wide applications in laboratory and drug discovery. The lab-on-a-chip provides the facilities of a complete laboratory in a hand-held miniature device. Several microarray systems have been used for hybridisation and detection techniques. Oligonucleotide scanning arrays provide a versatile tool for the analysis of nucleic acid interactions and provide a platform for improving the array-based methods for investigation of antisense therapeutics. A method for analysing combinatorial DNA arrays using oligonucleotide-modified gold nanoparticle probes and a conventional scanner has considerable potential in molecular diagnostics. Various applications of microarray technology for high-throughput screening in drug discovery and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) analysis were discussed. Protein chips have important applications in proteomics. With the considerable amount of data generated by the different technologies using microarrays, it is obvious that the reading of the information and its interpretation and management through the use of bioinformatics is essential. Various techniques for data analysis were presented. Biochip and microarray technology has an essential role to play in the evolving trends in healthcare, which integrate diagnosis with prevention/treatment and emphasise personalised medicines.

  16. The Radicalization of Diasporas and Terrorism: A Joint Conference by the RAND Corporation and the Center for Security Studies, ETH Zurich

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    the terrorist threat, and the government has not been successful at communicating a message to counter extremist ideologies . Many new immigrants are...However, unlike in other European countries, violence among these Diaspora communities is not necessarily ideological in nature. Gangs control...groups that enter the country to carry out a specific attack) cannot be dismissed. The influx of conservative ideologies , the marginalization of Muslims

  17. Recent Advanced in Rare Earth Chemistry: IREC (International Rare Earth Conference) 85 Held at Zurich (Switzerland) on 4-8 Mar 85.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-04

    compounds were employed since 1979. The polyfunc- studied using time-resolved spectro- tlonal ligands (L) included crown ethers scopy, and the...structure of rare earth * Aqueous complexes with cyclic poly - compounds (for example Cs3Ln2X9), was ethers crown ethers , Alstad, Univer- presented by A...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited U.S. Office of Naval Research, London ag - ’ 3 k) I 5.’ - ~1 I 9 ’<I. A -i I. 4. -A kA IS7 ASS

  18. The geriatric assessment.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Bassem; Higgins, Kim E

    2011-01-01

    The geriatric assessment is a multidimensional, multidisciplinary assessment designed to evaluate an older person's functional ability, physical health, cognition and mental health, and socioenvironmental circumstances. It is usually initiated when the physician identifies a potential problem. Specific elements of physical health that are evaluated include nutrition, vision, hearing, fecal and urinary continence, and balance. The geriatric assessment aids in the diagnosis of medical conditions; development of treatment and follow-up plans; coordination of management of care; and evaluation of long-term care needs and optimal placement. The geriatric assessment differs from a standard medical evaluation by including nonmedical domains; by emphasizing functional capacity and quality of life; and, often, by incorporating a multidisciplinary team. It usually yields a more complete and relevant list of medical problems, functional problems, and psychosocial issues. Well-validated tools and survey instruments for evaluating activities of daily living, hearing, fecal and urinary continence, balance, and cognition are an important part of the geriatric assessment. Because of the demands of a busy clinical practice, most geriatric assessments tend to be less comprehensive and more problem-directed. When multiple concerns are presented, the use of a "rolling" assessment over several visits should be considered. Academy of Family Physicians.

  19. Assessing Resource Assessment for MRE (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, H. P.; Bozec, A.; Duerr, A. S.; Rauchenstein, L. T.

    2010-12-01

    The Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center at Florida Atlantic University is concerned with marine renewable energy (MRE) recovery from the Florida Current using marine hydrokinetic technology and, in the future, from the thermocline in the Florida Straits via ocean thermal energy conversion. Although neither concept is new, technology improvements and the evolution of policy now warrant optimism for the future of these potentially rich resources. In moving toward commercial-scale deployments of energy-generating systems, an important first step is accurate and unembellished assessment of the resource itself. In short, we must ask: how much energy might be available? The answer to this deceptively simple question depends, of course, on the technology itself - system efficiencies, for example - but it also depends on a variety of other limiting factors such as deployment strategies, environmental considerations, and the overall economics of MRE in the context of competing energy resources. While it is universally agreed that MRE development must occur within a framework of environmental stewardship, it is nonetheless inevitable that there will be trade-offs between absolute environmental protection and realizing the benefits of MRE implementation. As with solar-energy and wind-power technologies, MRE technologies interact with the environment in which they are deployed. Ecological, societal, and even physical resource concerns all require investigation and, in some cases, mitigation. Moreover, the converse - how will the environment affect the equipment? - presents technical challenges that have confounded the seagoing community forever. Biofouling, for example, will affect system efficiency and create significant maintenance and operations issues. Because this will also affect the economics of MRE, nonlinear interactions among the limiting factors complicate the overall issue of resource assessment significantly. While MRE technology development is

  20. Environmental assessment overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentino, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    The assessment program has as its objectives: to identify the environmental issues associated with the SPS Reference System; to prepare a preliminary assessment based on existing data; to suggest mitigating strategies and provide environmental data and guidance to other components of the program as required; and to plan long-range research to reduce the uncertainty in the preliminary assessment. The key environmental issues associated with the satellite power system are discussed and include human health and safety, ecosystems, climate, and interaction with electromagnetic systems.

  1. [Assessment in Medical Education].

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Martha Delgado; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of medical education is fundamental for proper feedback and evaulation of students. The overall purpose of the evaluation is numerically and formatively revised. The suggested evaluation processes is described taking into account the Miller competence pyramid as a tool for designing evaluations and concepts of validity and reproducibility in assessments. The utility of student and the teacher is also raised. The issue of assessment should leave the knowledge parameters that are usually used. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Landslide risk assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lessing, P.; Messina, C.P.; Fonner, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    Landslide risk can be assessed by evaluating geological conditions associated with past events. A sample of 2,4 16 slides from urban areas in West Virginia, each with 12 associated geological factors, has been analyzed using SAS computer methods. In addition, selected data have been normalized to account for areal distribution of rock formations, soil series, and slope percents. Final calculations yield landslide risk assessments of 1.50=high risk. The simplicity of the method provides for a rapid, initial assessment prior to financial investment. However, it does not replace on-site investigations, nor excuse poor construction. ?? 1983 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  3. Wadeable Streams Assessment Data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Wadeable Streams Assessment (WSA) is a first-ever statistically-valid survey of the biological condition of small streams throughout the U.S. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) worked with the states to conduct the assessment in 2004-2005. Data for each parameter sampled in the Wadeable Streams Assessment (WSA) are available for downloading in a series of files as comma separated values (*.csv). Each *.csv data file has a companion text file (*.txt) that lists a dataset label and individual descriptions for each variable. Users should view the *.txt files first to help guide their understanding and use of the data.

  4. Assessment of Relevant Learning Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, JinGyu

    Criteria for relevant classroom assessments are discussed, and a biofunctional model of learning assessment is presented. In classroom assessment, the following criteria must be considered: (1) assessment approach (process-oriented and outcome-oriented); (2) assessment context (knowledge and higher-order thinking skills); (3) assessment method…

  5. Metrics for Habitability Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Fogel, M. L.; Glamoclija, M.; Kerr, L.; Mogensen, C.; Eigenbrode, J.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Steele, A.

    2009-03-01

    We report an approach to evaluation of habitability potential on another planet, with special relevance to Mars Science Laboratory. We are developing a tool for optimizing the most critical measurements for extraterrestrial environmental assessment.

  6. Assessment and Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Caroline

    2000-01-01

    Explores the term "applied linguistics" and discusses the role of language testing within this discipline, the relationship between testing and teaching, and the relationship between testing and assessment (Author/VWL)

  7. National Coastal Condition Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    It is important to monitor coastal waters for potentially harmful trends and to identify areas in good condition. That is the purpose of the National Coastal Condition Assessment, which EPA conducts every few years.

  8. National Coastal Condition Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NCCA is a collaborative, statistical survey of the nation's coastal waters and the Great Lakes. It is one of four national surveys that EPA and its partners conduct to assess the condition and health of the nation's water resources.

  9. Pollinator Risk Assessment Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Guidance is part of a long-term strategy to advance the science of assessing the risks posed by pesticides to honey bees, giving risk managers the means to further improve pollinator protection in our regulatory decisions.

  10. Adult nutrition assessment tutorial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This tutorial presents a systematic approach to nutrition assessment based on a modern appreciation for the contributions of inflammation that serve as the foundation for newly proposed consensus definitions for malnutrition syndromes. Practical indicators of malnutrition and inflammation have been ...

  11. TES radiometric assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, H.; Sarkissian, E.; Bowman, K.; Fisher, B.; Rider, D.; Aumann, H. H.; Apolinski, M.; Debaca, R. C.; Gluck, S.; Madatyan, M.; hide

    2005-01-01

    TES is an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer on board the EOS-Aura spacecraft launched July 15, 2004. Improvements to the radiometric calibration and consequent assessment of radiometric accuracy have been on-going since launch.

  12. Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, Joseph V.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring is the coordination of environmental (air, water, land, and crops) monitoring networks to collect systematically pollutant exposure data for a specific receptor, usually man. (Author/BB)

  13. Biosafety Risk Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, Susan Adele; Gaudioso, Jennifer M.; Salerno, Reynolds Mathewson

    2010-10-01

    Laboratories that work with biological agents need to manage their safety risks to persons working the laboratories and the human and animal community in the surrounding areas. Biosafety guidance defines a wide variety of biosafety risk mitigation measures, which include measures which fall under the following categories: engineering controls, procedural and administrative controls, and the use of personal protective equipment; the determination of which mitigation measures should be used to address the specific laboratory risks are dependent upon a risk assessment. Ideally, a risk assessment should be conducted in a manner which is standardized and systematic which allows it tomore » be repeatable and comparable. A risk assessment should clearly define the risk being assessed and avoid over complication.« less

  14. National Wetland Condition Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NWCA is a collaborative, statistical survey of the nation's wetlands. It is one of four national surveys that EPA and its partners conduct to assess the condition and health of the nation's water resources.

  15. NARSTO EMISSION INVENTORY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NARSTO Ozone and Particulate Matter Assessments emphasized that emission inventories are critical to the success of air quality management programs and that emissions inventories in Canada, Mexico, and the United States need improvement to meet expectations for quality, timel...

  16. BIOPHYSICAL ASSESSMENTS: WHO CARES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    An initial statement of this discussion topic was "are ecological economic studies without explicit biophysical assessments fraudulent?" -- implying that such studies were at least misleading, if not intentionally deceitful. To a person trained in the physical/biological sciences...

  17. EMS technology assessment template

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-01-01

    This technology assessment template is designed to evaluate information technology and EMS devices that provide data about patients, evaluation-oriented clinical patient information, or decision support tools. The template may also be used by consume...

  18. International ITS Program Assessment

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-08-01

    THIS PAPER ATTEMPTS TO MAKE AN UPDATED COMPARISON OF WORLDWIDE ACTIVITIES IN INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (ITS) AND TO RECOMMEND A STRATEGY FOR CONTINUING INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM ASSESSMENT FOR DISCUSSION AT THE BENEFITS, EVALUATION AND COSTS (BE...

  19. Alternative Assessment Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    Maintaining the precision necessary for administering norm referenced tests can be a problem for the special education teacher who is trained to assist the student. Criterion-referenced tests, observations, and interviews are presented as effective alternative assessment techniques. (JDD)

  20. Integrated Science Assessments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Integrated Science Assessments are reports that represent a concise evaluation and synthesis of the most policy-relevant science for reviewing the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for the six principal pollutants.

  1. The Uses of Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchese, Theodore J.

    1988-01-01

    The approaches taken by Alverno College, Clayton State College, DePaul University, James Madison University, Northeast Missouri State University, and Rhode Island College in using the results of student assessment productively are described. (MSE)

  2. RCTA capstone assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Craig; Bodt, Barry; Childers, Marshal; Dean, Robert; Oh, Jean; DiBerardino, Chip; Keegan, Terence

    2015-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory's Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) is a program intended to change robots from tools that soldiers use into teammates with which soldiers can work. This requires the integration of fundamental and applied research in perception, artificial intelligence, and human-robot interaction. In October of 2014, the RCTA assessed progress towards integrating this research. This assessment was designed to evaluate the robot's performance when it used new capabilities to perform selected aspects of a mission. The assessed capabilities included the ability of the robot to: navigate semantically outdoors with respect to structures and landmarks, identify doors in the facades of buildings, and identify and track persons emerging from those doors. We present details of the mission-based vignettes that constituted the assessment, and evaluations of the robot's performance in these vignettes.

  3. Superfund Site Assessment Process

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the site assessment process used by the federal Superfund program to evaluate releases of hazardous substances that may pose a threat to human health or the environment and select an appropriate program for sites needing cleanup.

  4. Assessing Motivation to Read.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrell, Linda B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Motivation to Read Profile (MRP), which assesses children's self-concepts as readers and the value they see in reading. Discusses its development and offers suggestions for its use with elementary students. Includes the MRP. (SR)

  5. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  6. Safety Auditing and Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodin, Ronnie

    2005-12-01

    Safety professionals typically do not engage in audits and independent assessments with the vigor as do our quality brethren. Taking advantage of industry and government experience conducting value added Independent Assessments or Audits benefits a safety program. Most other organizations simply call this process "internal audits." Sources of audit training are presented and compared. A relation of logic between audit techniques and mishap investigation is discussed. An example of an audit process is offered. Shortcomings and pitfalls of auditing are covered.

  7. Schedule Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Greg

    2003-01-01

    Schedule Risk Assessment needs to determine the probability of finishing on or before a given point in time. Task in a schedule should reflect the "most likely" duration for each task. IN reality, each task is different and has a varying degree of probability of finishing within or after the duration specified. Schedule risk assessment attempt to quantify these probabilities by assigning values to each task. Bridges the gap between CPM scheduling and the project's need to know the likelihood of "when".

  8. Safety Auditing and Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald (Ronnie)

    2005-01-01

    Safety professionals typically do not engage in audits and independent assessments with the vigor as do our quality brethren. Taking advantage of industry and government experience conducting value added Independent Assessments or Audits benefits a safety program. Most other organizations simply call this process "internal audits." Sources of audit training are presented and compared. A relation of logic between audit techniques and mishap investigation is discussed. An example of an audit process is offered. Shortcomings and pitfalls of auditing are covered.

  9. National Climate Assessment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-06

    NASA Earth Science Division Director Michael Freilich shows meteorologists a model of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory during a media event for the release of the Third U.S. National Climate Assessment, South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 6, 2014. NASA Earth-observing satellite observations and analysis by the NASA-supported research community underlie many of the findings in the new climate change assessment. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Risk Assessment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prassinos, Peter G.; Lyver, John W., IV; Bui, Chinh T.

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment is used in many industries to identify and manage risks. Initially developed for use on aeronautical and nuclear systems, risk assessment has been applied to transportation, chemical, computer, financial, and security systems among others. It is used to gain an understanding of the weaknesses or vulnerabilities in a system so modification can be made to increase operability, efficiency, and safety and to reduce failure and down-time. Risk assessment results are primary inputs to risk-informed decision making; where risk information including uncertainty is used along with other pertinent information to assist management in the decision-making process. Therefore, to be useful, a risk assessment must be directed at specific objectives. As the world embraces the globalization of trade and manufacturing, understanding the associated risk become important to decision making. Applying risk assessment techniques to a global system of development, manufacturing, and transportation can provide insight into how the system can fail, the likelihood of system failure and the consequences of system failure. The risk assessment can identify those elements that contribute most to risk and identify measures to prevent and mitigate failures, disruptions, and damaging outcomes. In addition, risk associated with public and environment impact can be identified. The risk insights gained can be applied to making decisions concerning suitable development and manufacturing locations, supply chains, and transportation strategies. While risk assessment has been mostly applied to mechanical and electrical systems, the concepts and techniques can be applied across other systems and activities. This paper provides a basic overview of the development of a risk assessment.

  11. Knowledge Management Assessment Trends

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Recommendations for strategies and approaches to close the gaps An action plan with practical and operational solutions, along with a pilot and evaluation...access to a continuity book or a formal program to orient them to the organization. The BCKS assessment team has helped organizations close these gaps ...managers, and employees in the organization. The Knowledge Assessment identifies: • Knowledge and performance gaps • The causes or factors

  12. Assessment in Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustaman, N. Y.

    2017-09-01

    An analyses study focusing on scientific reasoning literacy was conducted to strengthen the stressing on assessment in science by combining the important of the nature of science and assessment as references, higher order thinking and scientific skills in assessing science learning as well. Having background in developing science process skills test items, inquiry in its many form, scientific and STEM literacy, it is believed that inquiry based learning should first be implemented among science educators and science learners before STEM education can successfully be developed among science teachers, prospective teachers, and students at all levels. After studying thoroughly a number of science researchers through their works, a model of scientific reasoning was proposed, and also simple rubrics and some examples of the test items were introduced in this article. As it is only the beginning, further studies will still be needed in the future with the involvement of prospective science teachers who have interests in assessment, either on authentic assessment or in test items development. In balance usage of alternative assessment rubrics, as well as valid and reliable test items (standard) will be needed in accelerating STEM education in Indonesia.

  13. Assessments of adolescent language.

    PubMed

    Wiig, E H

    1995-02-01

    I have stressed that language and learning disabilities that are exhibited in the preschool or elementary school years often persist into adolescence but that the characteristics and implications of these disabilities change with the preadolescent and adolescent transitions to metalinguistic maturity. As the student with language disabilities matures and as educational demands increase in complexity and in level of abstractness, the interactions between language and cognition become more apparent. Language disabilities of adolescents are often described in relation to observed deficits in the acquisition of content (semantics), form (morphology and syntax), and use (pragmatics). I have broadened this perspective to consider identification of metalinguistic strengths and/or deficits, deficits in the integration and organization of communication, reasoning and problem solving, and in conceptualization and creativity. Several assessment options were discussed, among them, norm-and criterion- referenced testing, language sample analysis, portfolio assessments of integrated communication, observational checklists and interviews, classroom language probes, and self-assessments. The perspectives taken for assessment have been that no single assessment option can satisfy all assessment objectives and/or constraints. I have also stressed that all tests are subject to measurement error and how to account for this error. Last, but not least, I have shared some of the voices of adolescents which express their perspectives and priorities.

  14. Operational risk assessment.

    PubMed

    McKim, Vicky L

    2017-06-01

    In the world of risk management, which encompasses the business continuity disciplines, many types of risk require evaluation. Financial risk is most often the primary focus, followed by product and market risks. Another critical area, which typically lacks a thorough review or may be overlooked, is operational risk. This category encompasses many risk exposure types including those around building structures and systems, environmental issues, nature, neighbours, clients, regulatory compliance, network, data security and so on. At times, insurance carriers will assess internal hazards, but seldom do these assessments include more than a cursory look at other types of operational risk. In heavily regulated environments, risk assessments are required but may not always include thorough assessments of operational exposures. Vulnerabilities may linger or go unnoticed, only to become the catalyst for a business disruption at a later time, some of which are so severe that business recovery becomes nearly impossible. Businesses may suffer loss of clients as the result of a prolonged disruption of services. Comprehensive operational risk assessments can assist in identifying such vulnerabilities, exposures and threats so that the risk can be minimised or removed. This paper lays out how an assessment of this type can be successfully conducted.

  15. Effectiveness of γ-oryzanol in reducing neuromotor deficits, dopamine depletion and oxidative stress in a Drosophila melanogaster model of Parkinson's disease induced by rotenone.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Stífani Machado; de Paula, Mariane Trindade; Poetini, Marcia Rósula; Meichtry, Luana; Bortolotto, Vandreza Cardoso; Zarzecki, Micheli Stefani; Jesse, Cristiano Ricardo; Prigol, Marina

    2015-12-01

    The γ-orizanol present in rice bran oil contains a mix of steryl triterpenyl esters of ferulic acid, which is believed to be linked to its antioxidant potential. In this study we investigated the neuroprotective actions of γ-orizanol (ORY) against the toxicity induced by rotenone (ROT) in Drosophila melanogaster. The flies (both genders) aged between 1 and 5 days old were divided into four groups of 50 flies each: (1) control, (2) ORY 25 μM, (3) ROT 500 μM, (4) ORY 25 μM+ROT 500 μM. Flies were concomitantly exposed to a diet containing ROT and ORY for 7 days according to their respective groups. Survival and behavior analyses were carried out in vivo, and ex vivo analyses involved acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), determination of dopaminergic levels, cellular viability and mitochondrial viability, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), reactive species levels (RS), lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and contents of total thiols and non-proteic thiols (NPSH). Our results show for the first time that ORY not only acts as an endogenous activator of the cellular antioxidant defenses, but it also ameliorates rotenone induced mortality, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our salient findings regarded the restoration of cholinergic deficits, dopamine levels and improved motor function provided by ORY. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective potential of ORY and that this effect can be potentially due to its antioxidant action. In conclusion, the present results show that ORY is effective in reducing the ROT induced toxicity in D. melanogaster, which showed a neuroprotective action, possibly due to the presence of the antioxidant constituents such as the ferulic acid. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Correlation of brain ultrasonography scans to the neuromotor outcome of very-low-birth-weight infants during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Rallis, Dimitrios; Kyriakidou, Maria; Tsakalidis, Christos; Pratsiou, Paraskevi; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the consistency of the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination scores of very-low-birth-weight infants at 6 and 12 months of age and its correlation to cranial ultrasonography findings, we designed a prospective study between January 2005 and January 2008, in the tertiary Neonatal Unit of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. All infants enrolled had a cranial ultrasonography performed at term. Preterm infants born at <32 weeks gestation with a birth weight <1500 g were eligible for the study. One hundred seventy-four infants were finally enrolled; out of those, 46 (26%) had an optimal score at 6 and 76 (44%) at 12 months of age. Mean global scores were 61 and 69 at 6 and 12 months, respectively. The Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination score significantly increased between 6 and 12 months, equally in all ultrasonography groups. The presence of cystic periventricular leukomalacia was associated to lower scores and neurologic impairment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Targeting p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Restores Subventricular Zone Neural Stem Cells and Corrects Neuromotor Deficits in Atm Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeesun

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a progressive degenerative disorder that results in major neurological disability. In A-T patients, necropsy has revealed atrophy of cerebellar cortical layers along with Purkinje and granular cell loss. We have previously identified an oxidative stress-mediated increase in phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the resultant downregulation of Bmi-1 and upregulation of p21 as key components of the mechanism causing defective proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of Atm−/− mice. However, the in vivo aspect of alteration in SVZ tissue and the functional significance of p38MAPK activation in NSCs for neuropathogenesis of ATM deficiency remain unknown. Here we show that the NSC population was abnormally decreased in the SVZ of 3-month-old Atm−/− mice; this decrease was accompanied by p38MAPK activation. However, after a 2-month treatment with the p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580, starting at 1 month old, Atm−/− mice showed restoration of normal levels of Bmi-1 and p21 with the rescue of NSC population in the SVZ. In addition, treated Atm−/− mice exhibited more Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Most importantly, motor coordination of Atm−/− mice was significantly improved in the treatment group. Our results show for the first time in vivo evidence of depleted NSCs in the SVZ of Atm−/− mice and also demonstrate that pharmacologic inhibition of p38MAPK signaling has the potential to treat neurological defects of A-T. This study provides a promising approach targeting the oxidative stress-dependent p38 signaling pathway not only for A-T but also for other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23197859

  18. Radiation monitoring systems as a tool for assessment of accidental releases at the Chernobyl and Fukushima NPPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shershakov, Vjacheslav; Bulgakov, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    approach was used for assessing the consequences at the Fukushima NPP. These results are also provided in the presentation. References 1. Kelly G.N., Ehrhardt J., Shershakov V.M.. Decision Support for Off-Site Emergency Preparedness in Europe. Radiation Protection Dosimetry, Vol. 64 Nos. 1-2, 1996, pp. 129-142. 2. Ehrhardt J., Shershakov V.M. Real-time on-line decision support systems (RODOS) for off-site emergency management following a nuclear accident. EUR 16533, 1996 3. Kelly G.N., Shershakov V.M. (Editors). Environmental contamination, radiation doses and health consequences after the ?hernobyl accident. Radiation Protection Dosimetry. Special Commemorative Issue.Vol. 64, 1996 4. Shershakov V.M. Computer information technology for support of radiation monitoring problems. OECD Proceedings of an International Workshop «Nuclear Emergency Data Management», Zurich, Switzerland, 1998, pp. 377-388 5. Pitkevich V.A., Duba V.V., Ivanov V.K., Tsyb A.F., Shershakov V.M., Golubenkov A.V., Borodin R.V., V.A., Kosykh V.S. Reconstruction of External Dose to the Inhabitants Living in the Contaminated Territory of Russia by the Results of the Accident at the Chernobyl NPP. Health Phys., Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 54-68, 1995. 6. Shershakov V., Fesenko S., Kryshev I., Semioshkina T. Decision-Aiding Tools for Remediation Strategies. In: Radioactivity in the Environment, Volume 14, Remediation of Contaminated Environments, 2009, pp 41- 120, Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Assessment of Working Scientifically--The TAPS Focused Assessment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Kendra

    2018-01-01

    The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) Focused Assessment approach embeds assessment within normal classroom science activities. Essentially, a Focused Assessment is a lesson plan for a science inquiry, with an identified focus for assessment and guidance on how to interpret the children's responses in relation to expectations for that…

  20. Vulvodynia: Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Andrew T; Pukall, Caroline F; Brown, Candace; Bergeron, Sophie; Stein, Amy; Kellogg-Spadt, Susan

    2016-04-01

    Vulvodynia constitutes a highly prevalent form of sexual pain in women, and current information regarding its assessment and treatment is needed. To update the scientific evidence published in 2010, from the Third International Consultation on Sexual Medicine, pertaining to the assessment and treatment of women's sexual pain. An expert committee, as part of the Fourth International Consultation on Sexual Medicine, was comprised of researchers and clinicians from biological and social science disciplines for the review of the scientific evidence on the assessment and treatment of women's genital pain. A review of assessment and treatment strategies involved in vulvodynia. We recommend the following treatments for the management of vulvodynia: psychological interventions, pelvic floor physical therapy, and vestibulectomy (for provoked vestibulodynia). We also support the use of multidisciplinary treatment approaches for the management of vulvodynia; however, more studies are needed to determine which components are most important. We recommend waiting for more empirical evidence before recommending alternative treatment options, anti-inflammatory agents, hormonal agents, and anticonvulsant medications. Although we do not recommend lidocaine, topical corticosteroids, or antidepressant medication for the management of vulvodynia, we suggest that capsaicin, botulinum toxin, and interferon be considered second-line avenues and that their recommendation be revisited once further research is conducted. A comprehensive assessment is needed to understand the pain experience of women presenting with vulvodynia. In addition, treatment typically progresses from less invasive to more invasive, and several treatment options are worth pursuing. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ecosystem Services as Assessment Endpoints in Ecological Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of ecological risk assessment (ERA) is on assessment endpoints, explicit expressions of environmental values to be protected. Traditionally, the ecological entities identified in assessment endpoints have been components of ecosystems deemed by risk assessors to be impo...

  2. Assessing Uncertainty in Risk Assessment Models (BOSC CSS meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro assays are increasingly being used in risk assessments Uncertainty in assays leads to uncertainty in models used for risk assessments. This poster assesses uncertainty in the ER and AR models.

  3. Formative Assessment: Simply, No Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the types of assessment the closest to daily reading instruction is formative assessment. In contrast to summative assessment, which occurs after instruction, formative assessment involves forming judgments frequently in the flow of instruction. Key features of formative assessment include identifying gaps between where students are and…

  4. Portfolio Assessment and Quality Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Youb; Yazdian, Lisa Sensale

    2014-01-01

    Our article focuses on using portfolio assessment to craft quality teaching. Extant research literature on portfolio assessment suggests that the primary purpose of assessment is to serve learning, and portfolio assessments facilitate the process of making linkages among assessment, curriculum, and student learning (Asp, 2000; Bergeron, Wermuth,…

  5. Societal assessment overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The decision to proceed with SPS depends on a political determination that commitment of the economic, institutional, and social energies required for its implementation is a worthwhile investment. This determination is national (and international) in scope and is based on knowledge of the environmental and societal impacts of the SPS, its projected economics and technological risks, expressed through the influence of contending segments of society. To assist the decision makers, an assessment of societal issues associated with the SPS was undertaken as part of the Concept Development and Evaluation Program. Results of the assessment are reported. The primary societal assessment objectives are to determine if the societal ramifications of an SPS might significantly impede its development, and to establish an information base regarding these issues. Estimates regarding SPS impacts commensurate with its stage of development and the needs of the decision makers are provided.

  6. Assessment methods for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Biefang, S; Potthoff, P

    1995-09-01

    Diagnostics and evaluation in medical rehabilitation should be based on methods that are as objective as possible. In this context quantitative methods are an important precondition. We conducted for the German Pensions Insurance Institutions (which are in charge of the medical and vocational rehabilitation of workers and employees) a survey on assessment methods for rehabilitation which included an evaluation of American literature, with the aim to indicate procedures that can be considered for adaptation in Germany and to define further research requirements. The survey identified: (1) standardized procedures and instrumented tests for the assessment of musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary and neurophysiological function; (2) personality, intelligence, achievement, neuropsychological and alcoholism screening tests for the assessment of mental or cognitive function; (3) rating scales and self-administered questionnaires for the assessment of Activities of Daily Living and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL Scales); (4) generic profiles and indexes as well as disease-specific measures for the assessment of health-related quality of life and health status; and (5) rating scales for vocational assessment. German equivalents or German versions exist only for a part of the procedures identified. Translation and testing of Anglo-Saxon procedures should have priority over the development of new German methods. The following procedures will be taken into account: (a) instrumented tests for physical function, (b) IADL Scales, (c) generic indexes of health-related quality of life, (d) specific quality of life and health status measures for disorders of the circulatory system, metabolic system, digestive organs, respiratory tract and for cancer, and (e) vocational rating scales.

  7. Making a nutritional assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Pencharz, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    The assessment of nutritional deficiencies depends on both clinical and laboratory diagnosis. The standard physical examination should be supplemented by nutritional anthropometry, consisting of accurate growth and skinfold measurements. A careful dietary history, preferably taken by a dietitian, is necessary to construct a record of past nutrient intake. Since biochemical abnormalities often appear before clinical signs of nutritional deficiency a battery of biochemical tests is sometimes needed. In unusual cases newer techniques of assessing body composition or immunologic or physiologic function may be required. In all cases the patient's physical state, nutritional intake and biochemical status must be related to age and sex standards. PMID:7139499

  8. Assessing climate impacts

    PubMed Central

    Wohl, Ellen E.; Pulwarty, Roger S.; Zhang, Jian Yun

    2000-01-01

    Assessing climate impacts involves identifying sources and characteristics of climate variability, and mitigating potential negative impacts of that variability. Associated research focuses on climate driving mechanisms, biosphere–hydrosphere responses and mediation, and human responses. Examples of climate impacts come from 1998 flooding in the Yangtze River Basin and hurricanes in the Caribbean and Central America. Although we have limited understanding of the fundamental driving-response interactions associated with climate variability, increasingly powerful measurement and modeling techniques make assessing climate impacts a rapidly developing frontier of science. PMID:11027321

  9. National Climate Assessment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-06

    NASA Earth Science Division Director Michael Freilich shows meteorologists an AERONET sun photometer, right, and a model of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory during a media event for the release of the Third U.S. National Climate Assessment, South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 6, 2014. NASA Earth-observing satellite observations and analysis by the NASA-supported research community underlie many of the findings in the new climate change assessment. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Nutritional Status Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional Status Assessment (Nutrition) is the most comprehensive inflight study done by NASA to date of human physiologic changes during long-duration space flight; this includes measures of bone metabolism, oxidative damage, nutritional assessments, and hormonal changes. This study will impact both the definition of nutritional requirements and development of food systems for future space exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. This experiment will also help to understand the impact of countermeasures (exercise and pharmaceuticals) on nutritional status and nutrient requirements for astronauts.

  11. Howitzer Technology Assessment Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    AD-A091 782 VEDA INC SOUTHAMPTON PA p~1t HOWITZER TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT STUDY.CU) Fs1/ NOV 80 A J CURRAN , J M MAGINN N000OI8?gC-0925 UNCLASSIFIED...ADIO SCONTRACTOR REPORT ARLCD-CR-SO036 0 HOWITZER TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT STUDY ROGER I. CURRAN - JAMES M. MAGINN VEDA INCORPORATED 1360 INDUSTRIAL...C-0925," 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME ARC ADDRESS VI POGAMEUNTPRJCAS JPROe &. M HaSN. RJETTn Veda Incorporated 1360 Industrial Highway Southampton

  12. Assessing Students' Mathematical Problem Posing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Edward A.; Cai, Jinfa

    2005-01-01

    Specific examples are used to discuss assessment, an integral part of mathematics instruction, with problem posing and assessment of problem posing. General assessment criteria are suggested to evaluate student-generated problems in terms of their quantity, originality, and complexity.

  13. Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment provide EPA staff with guidance for developing and using risk assessments. They also provide basic information to the public about the Agency's risk assessment methods.

  14. Emerging trends in technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, V. T.

    1975-01-01

    Recent trends and problems in technology assessment are discussed briefly. The Congressional Office of Technology Assessment and its performance are reviewed along with technology assessment activity in the National Science Foundation.

  15. Assessment Hotspots, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahearn, Charles, Ed.; Nalley, Donna, Ed.; Casbon, Christy, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    SouthEastern Regional Vision for Education (SERVE) is one of the 10 federally funded regional educational laboratories. This annual publication captures and shares the experiences of SERVE school districts that have volunteered to share their efforts at assessment reform. This issue contains the following: (1) "We Never Get over the Fear of…

  16. Technical Writing Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In fall 1991, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College (OCC) to evaluate the need for a proposed Technical Writing program. General information was gathered from a literature review, Michigan Occupational Information System data, interviews with professionals in the field, and a 1987 needs assessment conducted by Washtenaw Community…

  17. Assessing Scientific Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, John M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A method for assessing scientific performance based on relationships displayed numerically in published documents is proposed and illustrated using published documents in pediatric oncology for the period 1979-1982. Contributions of a major clinical investigations group, the Childrens Cancer Study Group, are analyzed. Twenty-nine references are…

  18. Ultrasonic pipe assessment

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Graham H.; Morrow, Valerie L.; Levie, Harold; Kane, Ronald J.; Brown, Albert E.

    2003-12-23

    An ultrasonic pipe or other structure assessment system includes an ultrasonic transducer positioned proximate the pipe or other structure. A fluid connection between the ultrasonic transducer and the pipe or other structure is produced. The ultrasonic transducer is moved relative to the pipe or other structure.

  19. Threat Assessment Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2008-01-01

    With every new case of school violence, district leaders are urged to be proactive in hopes of averting potential violence. Experts say part of that proactive work comes from a threat assessment plan that every district should have. While every district that receives funds from the U.S. Department of Education for school safety is required to have…

  20. Community Impact Assessment Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Alberta Development Council, Peace River.

    This handbook is intended for communities that wish to undertake their own community impact assessment (CIA). The goal is to enable communities to plan for changes before they occur, so they can cope with changes when they do occur. CIA involves forecasting and evaluating the full range of unintended consequences for the community of development…

  1. Assessment as Evidential Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorin, Joanna S.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Principles of evidential reasoning have often been discussed in the context of educational and psychological measurement with respect to construct validity and validity arguments. More recently, Mislevy proposed the metaphor of assessment as an evidentiary argument about students' learning and abilities given their…

  2. Technologies for Language Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Jill; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews current and developing technology uses that are relevant to language assessment and discusses examples of recent linguistic applications from the laboratory at the Educational Testing Service. The processes of language test development are described and the functions they serve from the perspective of a large testing organization are…

  3. Assessing Numeracy and NAPLAN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perso, Thelma

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author clarifies the distinction between numeracy and mathematics and the implications of this distinction for teachers of mathematics. In doing so she has, of necessity, focused on one--albeit significant--high stakes assessment genre used on Australian students that purports to measure numeracy. It is essential that teachers…

  4. Quality of Life Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Peter H.

    Explaining the use of overlay methodology in the assessment of rural social service this paper describes a technique of visual juxtaposition wherein information is matched with geographic location. To ascertain whether senior citizen centers are located in areas of client concentration, for example, this model superimposes the location of senior…

  5. Assessing Training Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knitting, Lace, and Net Industry Training Board, Nottingham (England).

    This document discusses how a company may assess its need for a training program. Two tables, one listing occupational data such as number and age of employees and turnover rate and one making a manpower forecast for management and staff, are included. A list of training guides is given. (CK)

  6. High Technology Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeastern Louisiana Univ., Hammond.

    A project produced a high technology status report providing needs assessment data for educational planning. The purpose was to determine the impact and future of high technology in Louisiana. Information was obtained from 68 Louisiana manufacturing industries by mailed questionnaire. Data indicated that 45 industries were involved in high tech. A…

  7. The Comprehensive Health Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Iowa Community Coll. District, Davenport.

    This report contains information from a fall 1991 health occupations assessment of 1,021 health-related employers in Eastern Iowa and the Illinois Quad Cities area. Twelve chapters present comprehensive results of all surveys; results of 10 labor market survey instruments developed for chiropractic offices, dentists' offices, emergency medical…

  8. Assessment of General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of general education is often approached through broad surveys or standardized instruments that fail to capture the learning goals most faculty members desire for this portion of the curriculum. The challenge in remedying this situation lies, first, in defining general education in meaningful ways that can be both articulated and…

  9. Assessment under Resource Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Steve; Curtis, Mary G.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and the measurement of learning are receiving increasing emphasis in American higher education. This is a case study that demonstrates a simple, inexpensive method of measuring freshman to senior "gains" or learning using a cross-sectional methodology. Seniors and freshmen within a four-year business program were both given…

  10. Expanding Student Assessment Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartscher, Beth; Carter, Andrea; Lawlor, Anna; McKelvey, Barbara

    This paper describes an approach for expanding assessment opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding of content. The targeted population consisted of elementary and junior high school students in two schools in a growing middle-class community in north central Illinois. The elementary school enrolled 467 students and the junior…

  11. PIRLS 2016 Assessment Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S., Ed.; Martin, Michael O., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Because developing reading literacy ability is vital to every student's growth and maturation, the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, more widely known as IEA, has been conducting regular international assessments of reading literacy and the factors associated with its acquisition in countries around the world…

  12. WADEABLE STREAMS ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Wadeable Streams Assessment (WSA) provides the first statistically defensible summary of the condition of the nation’s streams and small rivers, which are so integrally tied to our history. This report brings the results of this ground-breaking study to the American public....

  13. Strategic Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derleth, Jason; Lobia, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation provides an overview of the attempt to develop and demonstrate a methodology for the comparative assessment of risks across the entire portfolio of NASA projects and assets. It includes information about strategic risk identification, normalizing strategic risks, calculation of relative risk score, and implementation options.

  14. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  15. Assessing Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, Patricia, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Students in traditional as well as online classrooms need more than grades from their instructors--they also need meaningful feedback to help bridge their academic knowledge and skills with their daily lives. With the increasing number of online learning classrooms, the question of how to consistently assess online learning has become increasingly…

  16. Duane Webster, Assessment Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Brinley

    2009-01-01

    Duane Webster oversaw the Association of Research Libraries' (ARL) Statistics and Measurement Program as it evolved into the Statistics and Assessment Program. During his 20-year tenure as ARL's executive director, Duane was instrumental in the creation of ARL's Web-based Interactive Statistics and played a leadership role in the development of a…

  17. HABITAT ASSESSMENT METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter summarizes and evaluated the habitat assessment protocols of five agencies, USEPA/EMAP/SW, USGS/NAWQA, USEPA/RBP, Ohio EPA, and MDNR/MBSS. It begins with a description of the origin of the habitat indices most widely used by these agencies. Then the habitat assessmen...

  18. Landscape assessment for tourism

    Treesearch

    Clare A. Gunn

    1979-01-01

    Increased development of landscapes for tourism now creates problems of integrating the many parts. Accomplishments at the site scale have not been matched with equal progress at the regional scale. This concept, and its example of application, shows promise of assisting regions in assessing their potential of landscapes before development. With such a concept, not...

  19. Two Concepts of Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    It is sometimes said that there has been a "paradigm shift" in the field of assessment over the last two or three decades: a new preoccupation with what learners can do, what they know or what they have achieved. It is suggested in this article that this change has precipitated a need to distinguish two conceptually and logically…

  20. Assessing Pupils' Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, Mike

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explores what Assessing Pupils' Progress (APP) is about. He contends that the predilection for testing is a catastrophe as far as the teaching and learning of mathematics is concerned; it is an outcome of the drive for collecting so-called "data" on pupils. What those people, who should know better, either choose to…

  1. A Patient Assessment Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Dorothy; Rosenaur, Janet Allan

    1974-01-01

    Use of a nursing assessment/patient history tool developed by project faculty at the school of nursing, University of California, San Francisco and used in a primary care clinic assisted nursing students in collecting patient information, making home visits, functioning as team members, recording data, and in defining their nursing role. (EA)

  2. Assessment: The Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This position statement presents a summative argument against current structures and practices of assessment in England's primary schools, and some key principles for its replacement. The text was agreed by More Than A Score, a broad coalition of professional, curriculum, research and campaigning organisations opposed to the current assessment…

  3. Neurobehavioral Assessment before Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.

    2005-01-01

    The complexities of neurobehavioral assessment of the fetus, which can be neither directly viewed nor manipulated, cannot be understated. Impetus to develop methods for measuring fetal neurobehavioral development has been provided by the recognition that individual differences in neurobehavioral functioning do not originate with birth and…

  4. Designing and Assessing Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quan, Hong; Liu, Dandan; Cun, Xiangqin; Lu, Yingchun

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the design, implementation and assessment of a level 2 module for non-English major students in higher vocational and professional education. 1132001 is a code of module that uses active methods to teach college English in China. It specifically reflects on the module's advantage and defect for developing and improving learning…

  5. The Strategic Assessment Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazner, Steve, Ed.

    This book presents six papers focusing on the application of the strategic assessment model (SAM) to the management of higher education facilities. The papers are part of an ongoing effort by the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers to provide comparative cost and staffing information and to develop a benchmarking process. The…

  6. Classroom Assessment of Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavenas, Rosemarie

    1985-01-01

    Argues that while the cognitive area in early childhood programs has been the focus of extensive research, socialization is still often assumed to be enhanced by the mere presence of other children. Assessment, evaluation, and planning by teachers is encouraged through testing and information gathered about the child, his/her peers and siblings,…

  7. Landscape Assessment (LA)

    Treesearch

    Carl H. Key; Nathan C. Benson

    2006-01-01

    Landscape Assessment primarily addresses the need to identify and quantify fire effects over large areas, at times involving many burns. In contrast to individual case studies, the ability to compare results is emphasized along with the capacity to aggregate information across broad regions and over time. Results show the spatial heterogeneity of burns and how fire...

  8. Assessing Minority Group Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Beeman N., Ed.

    Contents of this book include the following collection of articles: "Assessing Minority Group Children: Challenges for School Psychologists," Thomas Oakland; "The NEA Testing Moratorium," Boyd Bosma; "Cultural Myopia: The Need for a Corrective Lens," Martin H. Gerry; "Assumptions Underlying Psychological Testing," T. Ernest Newland;…

  9. Needs Assessment. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Since implementing NCLB (No Child Left Behind), raising of test scores and making AYP (Adequate Yearly Progress) have been paramount in the schools and the search has been on to find "THE" answer in the schools' quest to attain these goals. When hunting for appropriate methods to reach these objectives, needs assessments are often…

  10. Choosing Assessments that Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abilock, Debbie, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Professionally, school librarians are faced with an explosion of choices--search engines, online catalogs, media types, subscription databases, and Web tools--all requiring scrutiny, evaluation, and selection. In turn, this support "stuff" forms a basis for making additional choices about how and what they teach and what they assess. Whereas once…

  11. Research in Language Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoch, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Since its inception in 1990, the Language Testing Research Centre (LTRC) at the University of Melbourne has earned an international reputation for its work in the areas of language assessment and testing as well as program evaluation. The mission of the centre is: (1) to carry out and promote research and development in language testing; (2) to…

  12. Assessing Intercultural Training Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Training designs are critical to the success of intercultural training programmes. A common typology for classifying intercultural training designs distinguishes among the following dimensions: experiential discovery versus didactic expository and culture-specific versus culture-general training. The purpose of this paper is to assess different…

  13. Software process assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon E.; Tucker, George T.; Verducci, Anthony J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Software process assessments (SPA's) are part of an ongoing program of continuous quality improvements in AT&T. Their use was found to be very beneficial by software development organizations in identifying the issues facing the organization and the actions required to increase both quality and productivity in the organization.

  14. Climate change assessments

    Treesearch

    Linda A. Joyce

    2008-01-01

    The science associated with climate and its effects on ecosystems, economies, and social systems is developing rapidly. Climate change assessments can serve as an important synthesis of this science and provide the information and context for management and policy decisions on adaptation and mitigation. This topic paper describes the variety of climate change...

  15. Educational Assessment - Memphis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memphis Area Chamber of Commerce, TN. Education Committee.

    The result of a plan evolved in order to assess the educational potentials of Memphis with a view toward their exploitation to the fullest to meet the manpower demands of the industrial and commercial community today. An analysis was made of present and projected job vacancies and the character of these positions was determined with respect to…

  16. Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool is a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) interface jointly developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service, and the University of Arizona to a...

  17. Physical Fitness Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes, Alice

    This document presents baseline data on physical fitness that provides an outline for assessing the physical fitness of students. It consists of 4 tasks and a 13-item questionnaire on fitness-related behaviors. The fitness test evaluates cardiorespiratory endurance by a steady state jog; muscular strength and endurance with a two-minute bent-knee…

  18. TIMSS 2007 Assessment Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S.; Martin, Michael O.; Ruddock, Graham J.; O'Sullivan, Christine Y.; Arora, Alka; Erberber, Ebru

    2005-01-01

    Developing the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007 Assessment Frameworks represents an extensive collaborative effort involving individuals and expert groups from more than 60 countries around the world. The document contains three frameworks for implementing TIMSS 2007--the Mathematics Framework, the Science…

  19. Risk assessment [Chapter 9

    Treesearch

    Dennis S. Ojima; Louis R. Iverson; Brent L. Sohngen; James M. Vose; Christopher W. Woodall; Grant M. Domke; David L. Peterson; Jeremy S. Littell; Stephen N. Matthews; Anantha M. Prasad; Matthew P. Peters; Gary W. Yohe; Megan M. Friggens

    2014-01-01

    What is "risk" in the context of climate change? How can a "risk-based framework" help assess the effects of climate change and develop adaptation priorities? Risk can be described by the likelihood of an impact occurring and the magnitude of the consequences of the impact (Yohe 2010) (Fig. 9.1). High-magnitude impacts are always...

  20. Assessment Applications of Ontologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Gregory K. W. K.; Niemi, David; Bewley, William L.

    This paper discusses the use of ontologies and their applications to assessment. An ontology provides a shared and common understanding of a domain that can be communicated among people and computational systems. The ontology captures one or more experts' conceptual representation of a domain expressed in terms of concepts and the relationships…

  1. Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Thomas

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning for individuals with substance abuse problems. The intent is to provide information to professional counselors in school, rehabilitation, school psychology, social work, public mental health, and private treatment settings. Information to be…

  2. Nontraditional Forms of Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses the benefits of nontraditional assessments and shares how she has used them in her 5th-grade classroom in rural South Carolina. The examples include doing a Gallery Walk, writing poetry, integrating the arts into other subjects, having students reenact historical scenes, using social media, and rewriting popular songs with…

  3. Assessment in Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Chad; Usherwood, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Simulations are employed widely as teaching tools in political science, yet evidence of their pedagogical effectiveness, in comparison to other methods of instruction, is mixed. The assessment of learning outcomes is often a secondary concern in simulation design, and the qualitative and quantitative methods used to evaluate outcomes are…

  4. Designing Assessment for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depka, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Teaching mathematics in today's world requires practices and procedures integrated with performance tasks that actively involve students. In this second edition of Designing Rubrics for Mathematics, Eileen Depka clarifies the purpose of rubrics in math instruction and illustrates the relationship between assessment, rubrics, and the National…

  5. NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the National Coastal Assessment (NCA) is to estimate the status and trends of the condition of the nation's coastal resources on a state, regional and national basis. Based on NCA monitoring from 1999-2001, 100% of the nation's estuarine waters (at over 2500 locati...

  6. Assessment without Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earle, Sarah; Davies, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Assessment is primarily a matter of judgement rather than measurement, yet for too long the nation has been pretending that pupils' attainment and measurement can be measured in increasingly fine detail (one APS "point" being one sixth of an original National Curriculum level). The lack of validity and reliability of this approach…

  7. Assessment "Honest Alternatives".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Susan Glazer

    1995-01-01

    Addresses the challenge of finding or creating alternatives to tests and traditional grading systems. Reflects on and describes the experience of creating an assessment tool and cautions against choosing alternatives that merely camouflage the grades. Encourages educators to find authentic alternatives to describe children's growth. (BAC)

  8. Assessing the south's forests

    Treesearch

    David N. Wear; John G. Greis

    2003-01-01

    The Southern Forest Resource Assessment (SFRA) was initiated in the Spring of 1999 to address broad questions concerning the status, trends and potential future of southern forests. The southern offices of the USDA Forest Service, U.S. Environmental Protectional Agency, U.S. Fish and wildlife Service, and Tennessee Valley Authority charactered SFRA and it has been...

  9. Curriculum and Assessment Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andy

    Large-scale curriculum and assessment reform is neither a local peculiarity, nor a product of national political partisanship. It is a phenomenon of international dimensions. Divided into three sections and nine chapters, this book seeks to explain and interpret the nature, impact, and interrelatedness of recent important and far-reaching reforms.…

  10. Formaldehyde risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We would like to comment on the paper by Crump et al. (2008), ‘Sensitivity analysis of biologically motivated model for formaldehyde-induced respiratory cancer in humans’. We are authors of the formaldehyde cancer risk assessment described in Conolly et al. (2003, 2004) that is t...

  11. Methods & Strategies: Deep Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Alison; Hollimon, Shameka; Lee, Okhee

    2015-01-01

    The "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS") push students to have "a deeper understanding of content" (NGSS Lead States 2013, Appendix A, p. 4). However, with the reality of high-stakes assessments that rely primarily on multiple-choice questions, how can a science teacher analyze students' written responses…

  12. An Employer Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Aliza; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A Chicago vocational English language training program (VELT) conducted a needs assessment survey of employers of limited-English-proficient (LEP) workers in assembly, packing, shipping, janitorial and housekeeping, machine operation, and food preparation jobs. The purposes of the survey were to determine: (1) the employers' methods of obtaining…

  13. Simply Performance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Cheryl A.; McLaughlin, Felecia C.; Pringle, Rose M.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the experiences of Miss Felecia McLaughlin, a fourth-grade teacher from the island of Jamaica who used the model proposed by Bass et al. (2009) to assess conceptual understanding of four of the six types of simple machines while encouraging collaboration through the creation of learning teams. Students had an opportunity to…

  14. Assessing for Technological Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    Designing standards-based assessment is a key component of a quality technology education program. For students to become technologically literate, it is important that the teacher understands how to measure student understandings and abilities in the study of technology. This article is written to help teachers and teacher educators recognize the…

  15. LIFE-CYCLE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life Cycle Assessment, or LCA, is an environmental accounting and mangement approach that consider all the aspects of resource use and environmental releases associated with an industrial system from cradle-to-grave. Specifically, it is a holistic view of environmental interacti...

  16. Pre-Test Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Pre-tests are a non-graded assessment tool used to determine pre-existing subject knowledge. Typically pre-tests are administered prior to a course to determine knowledge baseline, but here they are used to test students prior to topical material coverage throughout the course. While counterintuitive, the pre-tests cover material the student is…

  17. Self Assessment for Socializing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Socializing is an integral part of human relations and auger well for the human development. Defined as "the involvement of students in identifying standards and/or criteria to apply to their work and making judgments about the extent to which they have met these criteria and standards", self assessment by its nature teaches students how to…

  18. Towards Fairer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klenowski, Val

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the largest Australian collection and analysis of empirical data on multiple facets of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education in state schools to date, this article critically analyses the systemic push for standardized testing and improved scores, and argues for a greater balance of assessment types by providing alternative,…

  19. Assessing Preschoolers' Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education, Urbana, IL.

    There are 11 behavioral dimensions which parents and preschool teachers can use in assessing the development of preschool children. These dimensions are: (1) sleeping; (2) eating; (3) toilet habits; (4) range of affect or emotion; (5) variations in play; (6) curiosity; (7) acceptance of authority; (8) initiative; (9) interest; (10) spontaneous…

  20. Comparative Judgement for Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Alastair

    2012-01-01

    Historically speaking, students were judged long before they were marked. The tradition of marking, or scoring, pieces of work students offer for assessment is little more than two centuries old, and was introduced mainly to cope with specific problems arising from the growth in the numbers graduating from universities as the industrial revolution…

  1. Community Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrismer, John M.

    This document reports a needs assessment study designed and conducted to provide South Seattle Community College (SSCC) with information about the present and future educational, occupational training, and cultural needs of the total community served. Results of the survey are divided into chapters covering a specific population of the community…

  2. Appreciative Assessment: Inquire!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Mary-Anne

    2012-01-01

    Appreciative Inquiry builds on positive experiences to spark positive change; appreciative assessment is all about helping students find and build on their unique abilities and aptitudes by providing positive, supportive feedback with a focus on capabilities and possibilities. Positive stories and anecdotes about best learning practices are the…

  3. The management of technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    The total problem concept of technology assessment, involving a comprehensive information management activity with an objective orientation to the assessment function is discussed. A brief overview of the technology assessment function and some past experiences are given. Fragmentation of assessment systems, optimum social subsystem for examination in particular assessments, and adequacy of assessments are studied. The magnitude of the technology assessment function and the level of support required for the effective performance of this function are also discussed. One type of institutional arrangement which might produce a close approximation to the total problem assessment approach is suggested.

  4. How EPA Assesses Chemical Safety

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  5. Classroom Assessment Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2003-12-01

    Provost David L. Potter of George Mason University chaired a joint task force and presented a report entitled ``Powerful Partnerships : A Shared Responsibility for Learnin'' in June 1998. The main goal is to make a difference in the quality of student learning. Further, it is important to assess this difference and document it. Clifford O. Young, Sr., & Laura Howzell Young of California State University, San Bernardino argue that a new paradigm for assessment, a learning paradigm, must be constructed to measure the success of new kinds of educational practices. Using two survey instruments, the Instruction Model Learning Model Questionnaire (IMLMQ) and the Student Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness (SETE), they compared students' responses to the course when taught with traditional methods and with interactive methods. The results suggest that neither instrument effectively measures the kinds of learning promoted under the new paradigm. Linn, Baker, & Dunbar recommend that these newer assessment practices should be more authentic, that is, to involve students in the actual or simulated performance of a task or the documentation of the desired competency in a portfolio. Cerbin says that one of the most unfortunate consequences of a summative emphasis is that it inhibits open and productive discussions about teaching; in essence, it marginalizes the types of activity that could lead to better teaching (Cerbin, 1992). William Cerbin, who is the Director of the Center for Effective Teaching and learning, University Assessment Coordinator, and Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse is a recognized expert in the areas of cognition, language, and development. Edgerton, Hutchings, & Quinlan indicate that Teaching Portfolios may contain evidence of students' learning, but such information is optional, and when included, it may be only one of many pieces of material. Seldin, also supports this and stresses that the interplay between the instructor

  6. A springs actuated finger exoskeleton: From mechanical design to spring variables evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bortoletto, Roberto; Mello, Ashley N; Piovesan, Davide

    2017-07-01

    In the context of post-stroke patients, suffering of hemiparesis of the hand, robot-aided neuro-motor rehabilitation allows for intensive rehabilitation treatments and quantitative evaluation of patients' progresses. This work presents the design and evaluation of a spring actuated finger exoskeleton. In particular, the spring variables and the interaction forces between the assembly and the hand were investigated, in order to assess the effectiveness of the proposed exoskeleton.

  7. Performance Assessment Examples from the Quality Performance Assessment Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuriacose, Christina

    2017-01-01

    In this brief article, Christina Kuriacose provides four sample performance assessments. Spanning grade levels, these assessments are strong examples of teacher-developed performance assessments from schools within the Center for Collaborative Education's Quality Performance Assessment network. These performance tasks demonstrate the pedagogical…

  8. Using Performance Assessments To Measure Teachers' Competence in Classroom Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Rita G.; Johnson, Robert L.

    The development and pilot testing of a set of performance assessments to determine classroom teachers' measurement competencies in areas covered by "Standards for Teacher Competence in Educational Assessment of Students" (1990) are described. How the use of performance assessments in a graduate-level classroom-assessment course can…

  9. Microbial Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Mena, K. D.; Nickerson, C.A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, microbiological spaceflight requirements have been established in a subjective manner based upon expert opinion of both environmental and clinical monitoring results and the incidence of disease. The limited amount of data, especially from long-duration missions, has created very conservative requirements based primarily on the concentration of microorganisms. Periodic reevaluations of new data from later missions have allowed some relaxation of these stringent requirements. However, the requirements remain very conservative and subjective in nature, and the risk of crew illness due to infectious microorganisms is not well defined. The use of modeling techniques for microbial risk has been applied in the food and potable water industries and has exceptional potential for spaceflight applications. From a productivity standpoint, this type of modeling can (1) decrease unnecessary costs and resource usage and (2) prevent inadequate or inappropriate data for health assessment. In addition, a quantitative model has several advantages for risk management and communication. By identifying the variable components of the model and the knowledge associated with each component, this type of modeling can: (1) Systematically identify and close knowledge gaps, (2) Systematically identify acceptable and unacceptable risks, (3) Improve communication with stakeholders as to the reasons for resource use, and (4) Facilitate external scientific approval of the NASA requirements. The modeling of microbial risk involves the evaluation of several key factors including hazard identification, crew exposure assessment, dose-response assessment, and risk characterization. Many of these factors are similar to conditions found on Earth; however, the spaceflight environment is very specialized as the inhabitants live in a small, semi-closed environment that is often dependent on regenerative life support systems. To further complicate modeling efforts, microbial dose

  10. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Diane Schaub

    2007-03-05

    Since its inception, the University of Florida Industrial Assessment Center has successfully completed close to 400 energy assessments of small to medium manufacturing facilities in Florida, southern Georgia and southern Alabama. Through these efforts, recommendations were made that would result in savings of about $5 million per year, with an implementation rate of 20-25%. Approximately 80 engineering students have worked for the UF-IAC, at least 10 of whom went on to work in energy related fields after graduation. Additionally, through the popular course in Industrial Energy Management, many students have graduated from the University of Florida with a strong understandingmore » and support of energy conservation methods.« less

  11. Assessing Writing Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2013-12-01

    This is an encore presentation of what was presented at the 2012 AGU International Conference. It was entitled: 'ASSESSING CORE COMPETENCIES.' The poster presentation, however, has been redesigned and reorganized with new, revised perspectives. The importance of ASSESSMENT principles has been emphasized. Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marchese in 1987. Assessment is the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology itself. He further argues that students must demonstrate that they have the have the ability to think critically before they make an attempt to use technology in a chosen application-specific environment. The author further

  12. Medical assessment in athletes.

    PubMed

    Pruna, Ricard; Lizarraga, Antonia; Domínguez, David

    2018-04-13

    Practicing sports at a professional level requires the body to be in good health. The fact of carrying out a continuous and high intensity physical activity in the presence of pathological conditions and/or a maladaptation of the body can be detrimental to the athletes' health and, therefore, to their performance. Many of the problems that arise in the sports field could be prevented with a periodic and well-structured medical assessment. In this review, we describe the protocol of the medical service of a high-level sports club for the assessment of its professional athletes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Management self assessment plan

    SciTech Connect

    Debban, B.L.

    Duke Engineering and Services Hanford Inc., Spent Nuclear Fuel Project is responsible for the operation of fuel storage facilities. The SNF project mission includes the safe removal, processing and transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel from 100 K Area fuel storage basins to a new Storage facility in the Hanford 200 East Area. Its mission is the modification of the 100 K area fuel storage facilities and the construction of two new facilities: the 100 K Area Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and the 200 East Area Canister Storage Building. The management self assessment plan described in this document is scheduled tomore » begin in April of 1999 and be complete in May of 1999. The management self assessment plan describes line management preparations for declaring that line management is ready to commence operations.« less

  14. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  15. Market assessment overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib-Agahi, H.

    1981-01-01

    Market assessment, refined with analysis disaggregated from a national level to the regional level and to specific market applications, resulted in more accurate and detailed market estimates. The development of an integrated set of computer simulations, coupled with refined market data, allowed progress in the ability to evaluate the worth of solar thermal parabolic dish systems. In-depth analyses of both electric and thermal market applications of these systems are described. The following market assessment studies were undertaken: (1) regional analysis of the near term market for parabolic dish systems; (2) potential early market estimate for electric applications; (3) potential early market estimate for industrial process heat/cogeneration applications; and (4) selection of thermal and electric application case studies for fiscal year 1981.

  16. Assessing Cardiac Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Young, Martin E.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Abel, E. Dale; Brunengraber, Henri; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Des Rosiers, Christine; Gerszten, Robert; Glatz, Jan F.; Griffin, Julian L.; Gropler, Robert J.; Holzhuetter, Hermann-Georg; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lewandowski, E. Douglas; Malloy, Craig R.; Neubauer, Stefan; Peterson, Linda R.; Portman, Michael A.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In a complex system of interrelated reactions, the heart converts chemical energy to mechanical energy. Energy transfer is achieved through coordinated activation of enzymes, ion channels, and contractile elements, as well as structural and membrane proteins. The heart’s needs for energy are difficult to overestimate. At a time when the cardiovascular research community is discovering a plethora of new molecular methods to assess cardiac metabolism, the methods remain scattered in the literature. The present statement on “Assessing Cardiac Metabolism” seeks to provide a collective and curated resource on methods and models used to investigate established and emerging aspects of cardiac metabolism. Some of those methods are refinements of classic biochemical tools, whereas most others are recent additions from the powerful tools of molecular biology. The aim of this statement is to be useful to many and to do justice to a dynamic field of great complexity. PMID:27012580

  17. Water Vulnerability Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    Air Force Base , Texas 78235-5000 B AApril 1991 MAY f2-D T Final ReportBo R ’V Approved for public release...dilstribution Is unlimited. 91-00493 91 524 020 IIlI 111III II AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND SBROOKS AIR FORCE BASE , TEXAS 78235-5000 NOTICES When Government...tornadoes. If the base is on a fault line, they should do an assessment for earthquakes. Air Force plans should include sabotage, biological,

  18. Flood Vulnerability Assessment Map

    EIA Publications

    Maps of energy infrastructure with real-time storm and emergency information by fuel type and by state. Flood hazard information from FEMA has been combined with EIA's energy infrastructure layers as a tool to help state, county, city, and private sector planners assess which key energy infrastructure assets are vulnerable to rising sea levels, storm surges, and flash flooding. Note that flood hazard layers must be zoomed-in to street level before they become visible.

  19. Self and Superior Assessment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    model of the self-evaluation process as it differs from the evaluation process used by superiors. Symbolic Interactionism One view of self assessment is...supplied by the symbolic interactionists (Cooley, 1902; Head, 1934), who state that self perceptions are generated largely from individuals...disagreements remained even immediately after an appraisal interview in which a great deal of feedback was given. Research on the symbolic interactionist

  20. Prior Knowledge Assessment Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    marksmanship, advanced rifle marksmanship, and even specialized shooting courses. A comparison of the means on the test for the two groups showed that the...hands- on evaluations of student knowledge and/or skills. Pretests however, determine how much knowledge a student currently possesses of the course...content; thus, questions on pretests assess knowledge about what is to be taught in the course. Also, most pretests will include test items

  1. Borehole geological assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuck, W. H., III (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus are discussed for performing geological assessments of a formation located along a borehole, and a boring tool that bores a pair of holes into the walls of the borehole and into the surrounding strata along with a pair of probes which are installed in the holes. One of the probes applies an input such as a current or pressured fluid, and the other probe senses a corresponding input which it receives from the strata.

  2. Northwest Regional Climate Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipschultz, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Objectives are to establish a continuing, inclusive National process that: 1) synthesizes relevant science and information 2) increases understanding of what is known & not known 3) identifies information needs related to preparing for climate variability and change, and reducing climate impacts and vulnerability 4) evaluates progress of adaptation & mitigation activities 5) informs science priorities 6) builds assessment capacity in regions and sectors 7) builds understanding & skilled use of findings

  3. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment

    Science.gov Websites

    Well-Being. Learn more Download the Statement About the MA Board of Directors A Framework for Assessment In late 2003, the MA and Island Press published Ecosystems and Human Well-being: A Framework for Board Panel Secretariat Authors By Country By Chapter Reviewers Round 1 Reviewers Round 2 Reviewers

  4. Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcot, Divya K.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to particular hazardous materials in a work environment is dangerous to the employees who work directly with or around the materials as well as those who come in contact with them indirectly. In order to maintain a national standard for safe working environments and protect worker health, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set forth numerous precautionary regulations. NASA has been proactive in adhering to these regulations by implementing standards which are often stricter than regulation limits and administering frequent health risk assessments. The primary objective of this project is to create the infrastructure for an Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database specific to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) which will compile all of the exposure assessment data into a well-organized, navigable format. The data includes Sample Types, Samples Durations, Crafts of those from whom samples were collected, Job Performance Requirements (JPR) numbers, Phased Contrast Microscopy (PCM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results and qualifiers, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and names of industrial hygienists who performed the monitoring. This database will allow NASA to provide OSHA with specific information demonstrating that JSC s work procedures are protective enough to minimize the risk of future disease from the exposures. The data has been collected by the NASA contractors Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) and Wyle Laboratories. The personal exposure samples were collected from devices worn by laborers working at JSC and by building occupants located in asbestos-containing buildings.

  5. Public Risk Assessment Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendeck, Gavin

    2010-01-01

    The Public Entry Risk Assessment (PERA) program addresses risk to the public from shuttle or other spacecraft re-entry trajectories. Managing public risk to acceptable levels is a major component of safe spacecraft operation. PERA is given scenario inputs of vehicle trajectory, probability of failure along that trajectory, the resulting debris characteristics, and field size and distribution, and returns risk metrics that quantify the individual and collective risk posed by that scenario. Due to the large volume of data required to perform such a risk analysis, PERA was designed to streamline the analysis process by using innovative mathematical analysis of the risk assessment equations. Real-time analysis in the event of a shuttle contingency operation, such as damage to the Orbiter, is possible because PERA allows for a change to the probability of failure models, therefore providing a much quicker estimation of public risk. PERA also provides the ability to generate movie files showing how the entry risk changes as the entry develops. PERA was designed to streamline the computation of the enormous amounts of data needed for this type of risk assessment by using an average distribution of debris on the ground, rather than pinpointing the impact point of every piece of debris. This has reduced the amount of computational time significantly without reducing the accuracy of the results. PERA was written in MATLAB; a compiled version can run from a DOS or UNIX prompt.

  6. AUTOMATED GEOSPATIAL WATERSHED ASSESSMENT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment tool (AGWA) is a GIS interface jointly developed by the USDA Agricultural Research Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Arizona, and the University of Wyoming to automate the parameterization and execution of the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and KINEmatic Runoff and EROSion (KINEROS2) hydrologic models. The application of these two models allows AGWA to conduct hydrologic modeling and watershed assessments at multiple temporal and spatial scales. AGWA’s current outputs are runoff (volumes and peaks) and sediment yield, plus nitrogen and phosphorus with the SWAT model. AGWA uses commonly available GIS data layers to fully parameterize, execute, and visualize results from both models. Through an intuitive interface the user selects an outlet from which AGWA delineates and discretizes the watershed using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) based on the individual model requirements. The watershed model elements are then intersected with soils and land cover data layers to derive the requisite model input parameters. The chosen model is then executed, and the results are imported back into AGWA for visualization. This allows managers to identify potential problem areas where additional monitoring can be undertaken or mitigation activities can be focused. AGWA also has tools to apply an array of best management practices. There are currently two versions of AGWA available; AGWA 1.5 for

  7. Health equity impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Povall, Susan L; Haigh, Fiona A; Abrahams, Debbie; Scott-Samuel, Alex

    2014-12-01

    The World Health Organization's Commission on Social Determinants of Health has called for 'health equity impact assessments' of all economic agreements, market regulation and public policies. We carried out an international study to clarify if existing health impact assessment (HIA) methods are adequate for the task of global health equity assessments. We triangulated data from a scoping review of the international literature, in-depth interviews with health equity and HIA experts and an international stakeholder workshop. We found that equity is not addressed adequately in HIAs for a variety of reasons, including inadequate guidance, absence of definitions, poor data and evidence, perceived lack of methods and tools and practitioner unwillingness or inability to address values like fairness and social justice. Current methods can address immediate, 'downstream' factors, but not the root causes of inequity. Extending HIAs to cover macro policy and global equity issues will require new tools to address macroeconomic policies, historical roots of inequities and upstream causes like power imbalances. More sensitive, participatory methods are also required. There is, however, no need for the development of a completely new methodology. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Northwest Climate Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, P.; Dalton, M. M.; Snover, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the US National Climate Assessment, the Northwest region undertook a process of climate risk assessment. This process included an expert evaluation of previously identified impacts, their likelihoods, and consequences, and engaged experts from both academia and natural resource management practice (federal, tribal, state, local, private, and non-profit) in a workshop setting. An important input was a list of 11 risks compiled by state agencies in Oregon and similar adaptation efforts in Washington. By considering jointly the likelihoods, consequences, and adaptive capacity, participants arrived at an approximately ranked list of risks which was further assessed and prioritized through a series of risk scoring exercises to arrive at the top three climate risks facing the Northwest: 1) changes in amount and timing of streamflow related to snowmelt, causing far-reaching ecological and socioeconomic consequences; 2) coastal erosion and inundation, and changing ocean acidity, combined with low adaptive capacity in the coastal zone to create large risks; and 3) the combined effects of wildfire, insect outbreaks, and diseases will cause large areas of forest mortality and long-term transformation of forest landscapes.

  9. GAR Global Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskrey, Andrew; Safaie, Sahar

    2015-04-01

    Disaster risk management strategies, policies and actions need to be based on evidence of current disaster loss and risk patterns, past trends and future projections, and underlying risk factors. Faced with competing demands for resources, at any level it is only possible to priorities a range of disaster risk management strategies and investments with adequate understanding of realised losses, current and future risk levels and impacts on economic growth and social wellbeing as well as cost and impact of the strategy. The mapping and understanding of the global risk landscape has been greatly enhanced by the latest iteration of the GAR Global Risk Assessment and the objective of this submission is to present the GAR global risk assessment which contributed to Global Assessment Report (GAR) 2015. This initiative which has been led by UNISDR, was conducted by a consortium of technical institutions from around the world and has covered earthquake, cyclone, riverine flood, and tsunami probabilistic risk for all countries of the world. In addition, the risks associated with volcanic ash in the Asia-Pacific region, drought in various countries in sub-Saharan Africa and climate change in a number of countries have been calculated. The presentation will share thee results as well as the experience including the challenges faced in technical elements as well as the process and recommendations for the future of such endeavour.

  10. Methods for assessing geodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwoliński, Zbigniew; Najwer, Alicja; Giardino, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The accepted systematics of geodiversity assessment methods will be presented in three categories: qualitative, quantitative and qualitative-quantitative. Qualitative methods are usually descriptive methods that are suited to nominal and ordinal data. Quantitative methods use a different set of parameters and indicators to determine the characteristics of geodiversity in the area being researched. Qualitative-quantitative methods are a good combination of the collection of quantitative data (i.e. digital) and cause-effect data (i.e. relational and explanatory). It seems that at the current stage of the development of geodiversity research methods, qualitative-quantitative methods are the most advanced and best assess the geodiversity of the study area. Their particular advantage is the integration of data from different sources and with different substantive content. Among the distinguishing features of the quantitative and qualitative-quantitative methods for assessing geodiversity are their wide use within geographic information systems, both at the stage of data collection and data integration, as well as numerical processing and their presentation. The unresolved problem for these methods, however, is the possibility of their validation. It seems that currently the best method of validation is direct filed confrontation. Looking to the next few years, the development of qualitative-quantitative methods connected with cognitive issues should be expected, oriented towards ontology and the Semantic Web.

  11. Isocyanides Derived from α,α-Disubstituted Amino Acids: Synthesis and Antifouling Activity Assessment.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuki; Takashima, Shuhei; Nogata, Yasuyuki; Yoshimura, Erina; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Kitano, Yoshikazu

    2018-03-01

    Herein, we contribute to the development of environmentally friendly antifoulants by synthesizing eighteen isocyanides derived from α,α-disubstituted amino acids and evaluating their antifouling activity/toxicity against the cypris larvae of the Balanus amphitrite barnacle. Almost all isocyanides showed good antifouling activity without significant toxicity and exhibited EC 50 values of 0.07 - 7.30 μg/mL after 120-h exposure. The lowest EC 50 values were observed for valine-, methionine-, and phenylalanine-derived isocyanides, which achieved > 95% cypris larvae settlement inhibition at concentrations of less than 30 μg/mL without exhibiting significant toxicity. Thus, the prepared isocyanides should be useful for further research focused on the development of environmentally friendly antifouling agents. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  12. Application of ''Earl's Assessment "as", Assessment "for", and Assessment "of" Learning Model'' with Orthopaedic Assessment Clinical Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafave, Mark R.; Katz, Larry; Vaughn, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Context: In order to study the efficacy of assessment methods, a theoretical framework of Earl's model of assessment was introduced. Objective: (1) Introduce the predictive learning assessment model (PLAM) as an application of Earl's model of learning; (2) test Earl's model of learning through the use of the Standardized Orthopedic Assessment Tool…

  13. Second and Foreign Language Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purpura, James E.

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes some of the main issues, concerns, and debates that have ensued over the years in the field of L2 assessment and shows how past concerns have shaped contemporary L2 assessment research and practice. The article first describes what L2 assessment is and what it entails, arguing that notions of L2 assessment have been…

  14. Information Technology and Literacy Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balajthy, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Compares technology predictions from around 1989 with the technology of 2002. Discusses the place of computer-based assessment today, computer-scored testing, computer-administered formal assessment, Internet-based formal assessment, computerized adaptive tests, placement tests, informal assessment, electronic portfolios, information management,…

  15. The Scope of Writing Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamp-Lyons, Liz

    2002-01-01

    Attempts to put the field of writing assessment into a historical, linguistic, and geographical/cultural context, in order to stimulate work in writing assessment from across as broad a set of perspectives as possible. Presents a history of writing assessment, looks at writing assessment in the modern period, and considers the future of writing…

  16. Multilevel Assessments of Science Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quellmalz, Edys S.; Timms, Michael J.; Silberglitt, Matt D.

    2011-01-01

    The Multilevel Assessment of Science Standards (MASS) project is creating a new generation of technology-enhanced formative assessments that bring the best formative assessment practices into classrooms to transform what, how, when, and where science learning is assessed. The project is investigating the feasibility, utility, technical quality,…

  17. The use of video clips in teleconsultation for preschool children with movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Hetty; Lucas, Cees; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Karin; Maathuis, Carel; van Wijlen-Hempel, Rietje; Elvers, Hans

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the reliability and validity of video clips in assessing movement disorders in preschool children. The study group included 27 children with neuromotor concerns. The explorative validity group included children with motor problems (n = 21) or with typical development (n = 9). Hempel screening was used for live observation of the child, full recording, and short video clips. The explorative study tested the validity of the clinical classifications "typical" or "suspect." Agreement between live observation and the full recording was almost perfect; Agreement for the clinical classification "typical" or "suspect" was substantial. Agreement between the full recording and short video clips was substantial to moderate. The explorative validity study, based on short video clips and the presence of a neuromotor developmental disorder, showed substantial agreement. Hempel screening enables reliable and valid observation of video clips, but further research is necessary to demonstrate the predictive value.

  18. Risk assessment in fractured porous media with particular reference to water catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzenhoefer, R.; Helmig, R.; Nowak, W.; Binning, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    About 75% of the drinking water in Germany is drawn from groundwater. Karstic features can enhance the migration of contaminants to well fields, thus causing an elevated risk of contamination. In order to delineate well-head protection zones, the karstic flow and transport processes have to be understood and areas of high vulnerability have to be known from the perspective of a water constructor or manager. The trend in European legislation is to require probabilistic risk analysis in water supply management (see Water Safety Plan [WHO]). This will require to assess the 50 day line, and other indicators for well vulnerability, within stochastic frameworks. Also, the economic principles of risk (expected damage) minimization or cost/benefit optimization require probabilistic assessment of well vulnerability and well down time after contamination. The aim of this study is to provide a quantitative probabilistic approach to assess well vulnerability in a karstic system, meeting the future needs of water managers and expected legal requirements. To this end, we use a risk concept based on the four intrinsic well-vulnerability measures by Frind [2006], and transfer them to a probabilistic framework. The four vulnerability criteria are: (1)The time between a spill event and peak concentration arrival at the well, (2)The level of peak concentration relative to the spill concentration, (3)The time to breach a threshold concentration (e.g. drinking-water standard) and (4)The time of exposure (i.e., the time during which the threshold concentration is exceeded). This information helps the water manager to prioritize quantitatively the most sensitive areas with the highest risk to the well. To these areas the most efficient protection measures can be applied. Also, contamination sites can be ranked in the relevance of their remediation necessity. In order to model flow and transport processes in a karstic system, the aquifer has to be represented by a stochastic model concept

  19. Assessing Core Competencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  20. Assessing the State of State Assessments: Perspectives on Assessing Young Children. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SERVE: SouthEastern Regional Vision for Education, Greensboro, NC.

    A number of preschool and kindergarten assessment systems are being put into place across the nation, with a variety of purposes and collection methods. The "Assessing the State of State Assessments" symposium was convened to provide an opportunity for persons working most closely with state assessment systems to identify common…

  1. [Quality assessment in anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Kupperwasser, B

    1996-01-01

    Quality assessment (assurance/improvement) is the set of methods used to measure and improve the delivered care and the department's performance against pre-established criteria or standards. The four stages of the self-maintained quality assessment cycle are: problem identification, problem analysis, problem correction and evaluation of corrective actions. Quality assessment is a measurable entity for which it is necessary to define and calibrate measurement parameters (indicators) from available data gathered from the hospital anaesthesia environment. Problem identification comes from the accumulation of indicators. There are four types of quality indicators: structure, process, outcome and sentinel indicators. The latter signal a quality defect, are independent of outcomes, are easier to analyse by statistical methods and closely related to processes and main targets of quality improvement. The three types of methods to analyse the problems (indicators) are: peer review, quantitative methods and risks management techniques. Peer review is performed by qualified anaesthesiologists. To improve its validity, the review process should be explicited and conclusions based on standards of practice and literature references. The quantitative methods are statistical analyses applied to the collected data and presented in a graphic format (histogram, Pareto diagram, control charts). The risks management techniques include: a) critical incident analysis establishing an objective relationship between a 'critical' event and the associated human behaviours; b) system accident analysis, based on the fact that accidents continue to occur despite safety systems and sophisticated technologies, checks of all the process components leading to the impredictable outcome and not just the human factors; c) cause-effect diagrams facilitate the problem analysis in reducing its causes to four fundamental components (persons, regulations, equipment, process). Definition and implementation

  2. Audit and Assessment Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Craig

    Project to assess 46 low-income multifamily residences owned and managed by THRHA in up to 14 southeast Alaska communities. The Objective of project was to identify efficiency measures to reduce energy costs by 30% for low-income multifamily housing by; 1. Decreasing energy demand by increasing multifamily housing energy efficiency; 2. Reducing household energy consumption through energy conservation education and installation of energy upgrades; and 3. Projecting energy savings based on fossil fuel reduction to environmentally and economically benefit Tribal southeast communities

  3. SEASAT economic assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, K.; Steele, W.

    1974-01-01

    The SEASAT program will provide scientific and economic benefits from global remote sensing of the ocean's dynamic and physical characteristics. The program as presently envisioned consists of: (1) SEASAT A; (2) SEASAT B; and (3) Operational SEASAT. This economic assessment was to identify, rationalize, quantify and validate the economic benefits evolving from SEASAT. These benefits will arise from improvements in the operating efficiency of systems that interface with the ocean. SEASAT data will be combined with data from other ocean and atmospheric sampling systems and then processed through analytical models of the interaction between oceans and atmosphere to yield accurate global measurements and global long range forecasts of ocean conditions and weather.

  4. Design Producibility Assessment System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-30

    Data Base Material Code 17 - 4PH Manufactu Description Precipitation-Handling, corrosion-resist steel Strategic? No Strip Sheet Bar Wire Tube Yes Yes Yes...planned production quantity: 10000 PRODUCTION FACILITIES 5 Select the design material: 17 - 4PH <PgUp> Page Up, <PgDn> Page Down, <Fl> Help, <Esc> Exit DPAS...vl.00 Saturday June 17 , 1989 11:06 am Design Producibility Assessment System Select the design material: 17 - 4PH Select the design material’s form

  5. Aircraft Wheel Life Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    L"tV. bM) ~2. REOTDAEJ M YEAN AE CVNE & T AL ND SUBTI. ,5 PU 0010125 AIRCRAFT WHEEL LIFE ASSESSMENT - 13 43105 "s TA 01 B. F. SPENCER, JR., D. J...methodology is the finite element program ANTWIL (ANalysis of Tire-Wheel Interface Loads) [Kandarpa et al ., 1991) which recovers the pressure...to deter- mine the propagation behavior of cracks in the bead seat region [Enneking, 1987; Lawler, et al ., 1989]. While the results of the effort

  6. 2007 TOXICOLOGY AND RISK ASSESSMENT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has announced The 2007 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference Cincinnati Marriott North, West Chester (Cincinnati), OHApril 23- 26, 2007 - Click to register!The Annual Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference is a unique meeting where several Government Agencies come together to discuss toxicology and risk assessment issues that are not only of concern to the government, but also to a broader audience including academia and industry. The theme of this year's conference is Emerging Issues and Challenges in Risk Assessment and the preliminary agenda includes: Plenary Sessions and prominent speakers (tentative) include: Issues of Emerging Chemical ContaminantsUncertainty and Variability in Risk Assessment Use of Mechanistic data in IARC evaluationsParallel Sessions:Uncertainty and Variability in Dose-Response Assessment Recent Advances in Toxicity and Risk Assessment of RDX The Use of Epidemiologic Data for Risk Assessment Applications Cumulative Health Risk Assessment:

  7. Needs assessment final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, Jose A.

    1992-01-01

    The stated purposes of the Management Science Faculty Fellowship Project were to: (1) provide a comprehensive analysis of KSC management training for engineers and other management professionals from project/program lead through executive levels; and (2) development of evaluation methodologies which can be used to perform ongoing program-wide course-to-course assessments. This report will focus primarily in the first stated purpose for the project. Ideally, the analysis of KSC management training will build in the current system and efficiently propose improvements to achieve existing goals and objectives while helping to identify new visions and new outcomes for the Center's Management Training Mission. Section 2 describes the objectives, approach, and specific tasks used to analyze KSC's Management training System. Section 3 discusses the main conclusions derived from an analysis of the available training data. Section 4 discusses the characteristics and benefits envisioned for a Management Training System. Section 5 proposes a Training System as identified by the results of a Needs Assessment exercise conducted at KSC this summer. Section 6 presents a number of recommendations for future work.

  8. Assessing Potential Propulsion Breakthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    2005-01-01

    The term, propulsion breakthrough, refers to concepts like propellantless space drives and faster-than-light travel, the kind of breakthroughs that would make interstellar exploration practical. Although no such breakthroughs appear imminent, a variety of investigations into these goals have begun. From 1996 to 2002, NASA supported the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Project to examine physics in the context of breakthrough spaceflight. Three facets of these assessments are now reported: (1) predicting benefits, (2) selecting research, and (3) recent technical progress. Predicting benefits is challenging since the breakthroughs are still only notional concepts, but kinetic energy can serve as a basis for comparison. In terms of kinetic energy, a hypothetical space drive could require many orders of magnitude less energy than a rocket for journeys to our nearest neighboring star. Assessing research options is challenging when the goals are beyond known physics and when the implications of success are profound. To mitigate the challenges, a selection process is described where: (a) research tasks are constrained to only address the immediate unknowns, curious effects or critical issues, (b) reliability of assertions is more important than their implications, and (c) reviewers judge credibility rather than feasibility. The recent findings of a number of tasks, some selected using this process, are discussed. Of the 14 tasks included, six reached null conclusions, four remain unresolved, and four have opportunities for sequels. A dominant theme with the sequels is research about the properties of space, inertial frames, and the quantum vacuum.

  9. Assessing potential propulsion breakthroughs.

    PubMed

    Millis, Marc G

    2005-12-01

    The term, propulsion breakthrough, refers to concepts like propellantless space drives and faster-than-light travel, the kind of breakthroughs that would make interstellar exploration practical. Although no such breakthroughs appear imminent, a variety of investigations have begun. During 1996-2002 NASA supported the breakthrough propulsion physics project to examine physics in the context of breakthrough spaceflight. Three facets of these assessments are now reported: (1) predicting benefits, (2) selecting research, and (3) recent technical progress. Predicting benefits is challenging, since the breakthroughs are still only notional concepts, but energy can serve as a basis for comparison. A hypothetical space drive would require many orders of magnitude less energy than a rocket for journeys to our nearest neighboring star. Assessing research options is challenging when the goals are beyond known physics and when the implications of success are profound. To mitigate the challenges, a selection process is described where: (1) research tasks are constrained to only address the immediate unknowns, curious effects, or critical issues; (2) reliability of assertions is more important than their implications; and (3) reviewers judge credibility rather than feasibility. The recent findings of a number of tasks, some selected using this process, are discussed. Of the 14 tasks included, six reached null conclusions, four remain unresolved, and four have opportunities for sequels. A dominant theme with the sequels is research about the properties of space, inertial frames, and the quantum vacuum.

  10. Software Process Assessment (SPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda H.; Sheppard, Sylvia B.; Butler, Scott A.

    1994-01-01

    NASA's environment mirrors the changes taking place in the nation at large, i.e. workers are being asked to do more work with fewer resources. For software developers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the effects of this change are that we must continue to produce quality code that is maintainable and reusable, but we must learn to produce it more efficiently and less expensively. To accomplish this goal, the Data Systems Technology Division (DSTD) at GSFC is trying a variety of both proven and state-of-the-art techniques for software development (e.g., object-oriented design, prototyping, designing for reuse, etc.). In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques, the Software Process Assessment (SPA) program was initiated. SPA was begun under the assumption that the effects of different software development processes, techniques, and tools, on the resulting product must be evaluated in an objective manner in order to assess any benefits that may have accrued. SPA involves the collection and analysis of software product and process data. These data include metrics such as effort, code changes, size, complexity, and code readability. This paper describes the SPA data collection and analysis methodology and presents examples of benefits realized thus far by DSTD's software developers and managers.

  11. Mask Industry Assessment: 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. David

    2011-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the tenth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report has been used as one of the baselines to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It continues to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was essentially the same as the 2005 through 2010 surveys. Questions are grouped into following categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  12. Mask industry assessment: 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2008-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the seventh in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 through 2007 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  13. Mask industry assessment: 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2009-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the eighth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 through 2008 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This in combination with the past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  14. Mask Industry Assessment: 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Chan, David Y.

    2010-09-01

    A survey created supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the ninth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was basically the same as the 2005 through 2009 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  15. Assessing Online Collaborative Discourse.

    PubMed

    Breen, Henny

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study using transcript analysis was undertaken to clarify the value of Harasim's Online Collaborative Learning Theory as a way to assess the collaborative process within nursing education. The theory incorporated three phases: (a) idea generating; (b) idea organizing; and (c) intellectual convergence. The transcripts of asynchronous discussions from a 2-week module about disaster nursing using a virtual community were analyzed and formed the data for this study. This study supports the use of Online Collaborative Learning Theory as a framework for assessing online collaborative discourse. Individual or group outcomes were required for the students to move through all three phases of the theory. The phases of the Online Collaborative Learning Theory could be used to evaluate the student's ability to collaborate. It is recommended that group process skills, which have more to do with interpersonal skills, be evaluated separately from collaborative learning, which has more to do with cognitive skills. Both are required for practicing nurses. When evaluated separately, the student learning needs are more clearly delineated. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Health care technology assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  17. Assessing elders using the functional health pattern assessment model.

    PubMed

    Beyea, S; Matzo, M

    1989-01-01

    The impact of older Americans on the health care system requires we increase our students' awareness of their unique needs. The authors discuss strategies to develop skills using Gordon's Functional Health Patterns Assessment for assessing older clients.

  18. Heavy vehicle driver workload assessment. Task 5, workload assessment protocol

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    This report presents a description of a prescriptive workload assessment protocol for use in evaluating in-cab devices in heavy vehicles. The primary objective of this heavy vehicle driver workload assessment protocol is to identify the components an...

  19. Use of a tracing task to assess visuomotor performance for evidence of concussion and recuperation.

    PubMed

    Kelty-Stephen, Damian G; Qureshi Ahmad, Mona; Stirling, Leia

    2015-12-01

    The likelihood of suffering a concussion while playing a contact sport ranges from 15-45% per year of play. These rates are highly variable as athletes seldom report concussive symptoms, or do not recognize their symptoms. We performed a prospective cohort study (n = 206, aged 10-17) to examine visuomotor tracing to determine the sensitivity for detecting neuromotor components of concussion. Tracing variability measures were investigated for a mean shift with presentation of concussion-related symptoms and a linear return toward baseline over subsequent return visits. Furthermore, previous research relating brain injury to the dissociation of smooth movements into "submovements" led to the expectation that cumulative micropause duration, a measure of motion continuity, might detect likelihood of injury. Separate linear mixed effects regressions of tracing measures indicated that 4 of the 5 tracing measures captured both short-term effects of injury and longer-term effects of recovery with subsequent visits. Cumulative micropause duration has a positive relationship with likelihood of participants having had a concussion. The present results suggest that future research should evaluate how well the coefficients for the tracing parameter in the logistic regression help to detect concussion in novel cases. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Assessed by a Teacher Like Me: Race and Teacher Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouazad, Amine

    2014-01-01

    Do teachers assess same-race students more favorably? This paper uses nationally representative data on teacher assessments of student ability that can be compared with test scores to determine whether teachers give better assessments to same-race students. The data set follows students from kindergarten to grade 5, a period during which racial…

  1. Bibliography of Assessment Alternatives: Mathematics. January 1998 Edition. Innovative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Mathematics alternative assessment continues to be a hot topic with much activity on development, standards setting, and relation to reform. This document defines alternative assessment as any assessment in which students construct a response to a question rather than choosing a response from a list. This annotated bibliography contains the…

  2. Assessment for Learning Tasks and the Peer Assessment Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauf, Lorraine; Dole, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    A program of Assessment for Learning (AfL) was implemented with 107 Year 12 students as part of their preparation for a major external test. Students completed extended mathematics tasks and selected student responses were used for peer assessment purposes. This paper reports on two of the AfL elements, namely task selection and peer assessment as…

  3. Nondiscriminatory Assessment and the System of Multicultural Pluralistic Assessment (SOMPA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiscus, Edward D.; And Others

    The paper describes the System of Multicultural Pluralistic Assessment (SOMPA), a method of meeting the nondiscriminatory assessment requirements of P.L. 94-142 (the Education for All Handicapped Children Act). The need for nondiscriminatory assessment and types of nondiscriminatory tests (such as culture fair, culture specific, and Piagetian…

  4. Involving Assessment Buddies in the Assessment of Design Project Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osmond, Jane; Clough, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of a specially developed assessment and feedback system implemented within a second year industrial design module at Coventry University, UK. The "Assessment Buddy" system was developed in response to the need for a successful assessment and feedback method that could cope with the complexities of a…

  5. Prior Learning Assessment: How Institutions Use Portfolio Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein-Collins, Becky; Hain, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The term Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) refers not to a single kind of assessment but rather an entire family of assessment methods that can be used by institutions. Some of these methods are exam-based. In addition, there are other methods of PLA. One of the more innovative methods of offering PLA, however, is through the development of student…

  6. Authentic Assessment: A Handbook for Educators. Assessment Bookshelf Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Diane

    This book reviews the assessment movement, from the history of testing to the practical considerations of enhancing classroom experiences for teachers and students. It explores making time for assessment, tailoring assessment to desired outcomes, and scoring and evaluating student performance. The chapters are: (1) "Where We've Been: Standardized…

  7. Economic Assessment: A Model for Assessing Ability to Pay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Patricia; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the client's ability to pay is the cornerstone to fee collections in any service organization. York County Counseling Services implemented a new method of fee assessment and collection based on the principles of providing a service worth paying for, accurate assessment of ability to pay, and a budget-payment system. (Author)

  8. Approaching Assessment from a Learning Perspective: Elevating Assessment beyond Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Michele; George, Beena

    2014-01-01

    Assessment is a key process in assuring quality education but how is it linked to the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL)? How can we join teaching and learning to the assessment process rather than view it as a stand-alone component in course and/or program development? This paper explores the relationship between assessment and the SoTL…

  9. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. governmentmore » agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing

  10. Microbiological Quantitative Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Silvia; Schaffner, Donald W.

    The meat and poultry industry faces ongoing challenges due to the natural association of pathogens of concern (e.g., Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7) with a variety of domesticated food animals. In addition, pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes pose a significant cross-contamination risk during further meat and poultry processing, distribution, and storage. Furthermore, the meat and poultry industries are constantly changing with the addition of new products, use of new raw materials, and targeting of new consumer populations, each of which may give rise to potential new risks. National and international regulations are increasingly using a “risk-based” approach to food safety (where the regulatory focus is driven by the magnitude of the risk), so risk assessment is becoming a valuable tool to systematically organize and evaluate the potential public health risk posed by food processing operations.

  11. Information Technology Resources Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Information Technology Resources Assessment (ITRA) is being published as a companion document to the Department of Energy (DOE) FY 1994--FY 1998 Information Resources Management Long-Range Plan. This document represents a collaborative effort between the Office of Information Resources Management and the Office of Energy Research that was undertaken to achieve, in part, the Technology Strategic Objective of IRM Vision 21. An integral part of this objective, technology forecasting provides an understanding of the information technology horizon and presents a perspective and focus on technologies of particular interest to DOE program activities. Specifically, this document provides site planners with anmore » overview of the status and use of new information technology for their planning consideration.« less

  12. Assessing Psychodynamic Conflict.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Joshua; Constantinides, Prometheas; Perry, J Christopher; Drapeau, Martin; Sheptycki, Amanda R

    2015-09-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapies suggest that symptomatic relief is provided, in part, with the resolution of psychic conflicts. Clinical researchers have used innovative methods to investigate such phenomenon. This article aims to review the literature on quantitative psychodynamic conflict rating scales. An electronic search of the literature was conducted to retrieve quantitative observer-rated scales used to assess conflict noting each measure's theoretical model, information source, and training and clinical experience required. Scales were also examined for levels of reliability and validity. Five quantitative observer-rated conflict scales were identified. Reliability varied from poor to excellent with each measure demonstrating good validity. However a small number of studies and limited links to current conflict theory suggest further clinical research is needed.

  13. Mask industry quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strott, Al; Bassist, Larry

    1994-12-01

    Product quality and timely delivery are two of the most important parameters in determining the success of a mask manufacturing facility. Because of the sensitivity of this data, very little was known about industry performance in these areas until an assessment was authored and presented at the 1993 BACUS Symposium by Larry Regis of Intel Corporation, Neil Paulsen of Intel Corporation, and James A. Reynolds of Reynolds Consulting. This data has been updated and will be published and presented at this year's BACUS Symposium. Contributor identities will again remain protected by utilizing Arthur Andersen & Company to compile the submittals. Participation was consistent with last year's representation of over 75% of the total merchant and captive mask volume in the United States. The data compiled includes shipments, customer return rate, customer return reasons from 1988 through Q2, 1994, performance to schedule, plate survival yield, and throughput time (TPT).

  14. Ixtoc oil spill assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, P.

    The blowout of the Ixtoc I oil well in the Bay of Campeche resulted in the largest documented spill in history. Approximately half a million metric tons of oil were released from June 3, 1979 to March 23, 1980. Of that amount, an estimated 11 thousand metric tons impacted south Texas beaches. As a result of the movement of oil from the Ixtoc I well blowout into the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf (STOCS) environment, a study was undertaken to establish the magnitude and areal extent of perturbation of the benthic community caused by chemical residues of Ixtoc oil. Themore » study focused on the inner shelf region to the 60-metre isobath and examined both the biology and hydrocarbon geochemistry of 12 sites coincident with those of four previously studied (1975-1977) baseline transects. Additionally, 26 sites within the region sampled during 1979 (mid-spill) for chemical parameters and again in 1980 (post-spill) for chemical and biological parameters, and 39 other sites sampled in 1979 for chemical parameters, were studied. The Burmah Agate oil tanker collided with the freighter Mimosa in November, 1979 5 miles off of Galveston, Texas and spilled part of its cargo of light crude oil. Approximately 21 thousand metric tons of the spilled oil burned in an ensuing fire. As the potentially complicating impact of the Burmah Agate tanker collision was of importance in the region, a set of six sites in the Galveston region were sampled to gain knowledge of the presence and nature of introduced chemical residues from this event. This study established a chemical and biological framework for carrying out spill assessment studies of this nature. It utilized a significant environmental data base for post-impact studies for the first time, and identified several sampling methodology deficiencies which, if corrected, may help to fine-tune such assessments.« less

  15. Models for Pesticide Risk Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA considers the toxicity of the pesticide as well as the amount of pesticide to which a person or the environments may be exposed in risk assessment. Scientists use mathematical models to predict pesticide concentrations in exposure assessment.

  16. National Lakes Assessment 2007 Results

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Lakes Assessment samples over 1,000 lakes, ponds and reservoirs across the country. Key findings from this assessment in 2007 include the biological condition and most widespread stressors of these waterbodies.

  17. "Orthogonality" in Learning and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, David

    2014-01-01

    This chapter proposes a simple framework, "orthogonality," to help clarify what stakeholders think about learning in college, how we assess outcomes, and how clear assessment methods might help increase confidence in returns on investment.

  18. School Counselors and Student Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacher, Joan H.; Murray-Ward, Mildred; Uellendahl, Gail E.

    2005-01-01

    National school counselor certification examinations and state credentialing standards require knowledge of and skill development in assessment (California Commission on Teacher Credentialing [CCTC], 2001; National Board for Certified Counselors, 1998). And, professional associations have specified assessment competencies (American School…

  19. Framework for Ecological Risk Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is the first step in a long-term effort to develop risk assessment guidelines for ecological effects. Its primary purpose is to offer a simple, flexible structure for conducting and evaluating ecological risk assessment within EPA.

  20. Environmental Tools and Radiological Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation details two tools (SADA and FRAMES) available for use in environmental assessments of chemicals that can also be used for radiological assessments of the environment. Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporate...

  1. Framework for Metals Risk Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Framework for Metals Risk Assessment is a science-based document that addresses the special attributes and behaviors of metals and metal compounds to be considered when assessing their human health and ecological risks.

  2. CALTRANS CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-01-01

    The following report was developed for the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) to summarize a vulnerability assessment conducted for assets in Caltrans District 4. The assessment was developed to specifically identify the potential eff...

  3. DOE limited standard: Operations assessments

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    Purpose of this standard is to provide DOE Field Element assessors with a guide for conducting operations assessments, and provide DOE Field Element managers with the criteria of the EM Operations Assessment Program. Sections 6.1 to 6.21 provide examples of how to assess specific areas; the general techniques of operations assessments (Section 5) may be applied to other areas of health and safety (e.g. fire protection, criticality safety, quality assurance, occupational safety, etc.).

  4. Implicit spiritual assessment: an alternative approach for assessing client spirituality.

    PubMed

    Hodge, David R

    2013-07-01

    To provide optimal services, a spiritual assessment is often administered to understand the intersection between clients' spirituality and service provision. Traditional assessment approaches, however, may be ineffective with clients who are uncomfortable with spiritual language or who are otherwise hesitant to discuss spirituality overtly. This article orients readers to an implicit spiritual assessment, an alternative approach that may be more valid with such clients. The process of administering an implicit assessment is discussed, sample questions are provided to help operationalize this approach, and suggestions are offered to integrate an implicit assessment with more traditional assessment approaches. By using terminology that is implicitly spiritual in nature, an implicit assessment enables practitioners to identify and operationalize dimensions of clients' experience that may be critical to effective service provision but would otherwise be overlooked.

  5. Objective Data Assessment (ODA) Methods as Nutritional Assessment Tools.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional screening and assessment should be a standard of care for all patients because nutritional management plays an important role in clinical practice. However, there is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malnutrition or undernutrition, although a large number of nutritional screening and assessment tools have been developed. Nutritional screening and assessment tools are classified into two categories, namely, subjective global assessment (SGA) and objective data assessment (ODA). SGA assesses nutritional status based on the features of medical history and physical examination. On the other hand, ODA consists of objective data provided from various analyses, such as anthropometry, bioimpedance analysis (BIA), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), laboratory tests, and functional tests. This review highlights knowledge on the performance of ODA methods for the assessment of nutritional status in clinical practice. J. Med. Invest. 62: 119-122, August, 2015.

  6. Linking Assessment and School Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raham, Helen

    1999-01-01

    School systems have recently experienced a dramatic shift toward the use of large-scale assessment to improve school performance. Discusses the ways in which external assessment may benefit education, the need for multiple measures of various dimensions of school success, and guidelines for using assessment to create a dynamic cycle of continuous…

  7. Behavioral assessment of personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Nelson-Gray, R O; Farmer, R F

    1999-04-01

    This article examines the definition of personality disorders (PDs) from a functional analytical framework and discusses the potential utility of such a framework to account for behavioral tendencies associated with PD pathology. Also reviewed are specific behavioral assessment methods that can be employed in the assessment of PDs, and how information derived from these assessments may be linked to specific intervention strategies.

  8. Policymakers' Views of Student Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Lorraine M.

    The gap between policymaker enthusiasm for the uses of student assessment and expert caution is analyzed by examining new forms of student assessment as an education policy strategy. The study is based on interviews with 34 national and state policymakers and focuses on their differing expectations of what assessment policy can accomplish and how…

  9. Accessibility Principles for Reading Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlow, Martha L.; Laitusis, Cara Cahalan; Dillon, Deborah R.; Cook, Linda L.; Moen, Ross E.; Abedi, Jamal; O'Brien, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Within the context of standards-based educational systems, states are using large scale reading assessments to help ensure that all children have the opportunity to learn essential knowledge and skills. The challenge for developers of accessible reading assessments is to develop assessments that measure only those student characteristics that are…

  10. Assessment-Ready Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelting-Gibson, Lynn; Karsted, Kimberly; Weikert, Angela

    2013-01-01

    As teacher educators search for ways to prepare future educators for the challenges of assessment implementation, we suggest that authentic practice by preservice teachers in an informal learning environment promotes assessment implementation. The analysis of 28 volunteer assessment students' reflections revealed that practicing assessment…

  11. Formative Assessment: A Cybernetic Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, Bertil; Hamilton, David

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers alternative assessment, feedback and cybernetics. For more than 30 years, debates about the bi-polarity of formative and summative assessment have served as surrogates for discussions about the workings of the mind, the social implications of assessment and, as important, the role of instruction in the advancement of learning.…

  12. REGIONAL SCALE COMPARATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional Vulnerability Assessment (ReVA) is an approach to regional-scale ecological risk assessment that is currently under development by EPA's Office of Research and Development. The pilot assessment will be done for the mid-Atlantic region and builds on data collected for th...

  13. 1973 Assessment Workshops: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womer, Frank B.; Lehmann, Irvin J.

    Three 3-day assessment workshops were held in Boulder, Colorado from June 19-29, for personnel in the assessment field from state departments of education. Seventy-six participants from 35 states, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and the District of Columbia attended. Two of the three workshops concentrated on National Assessment as one model for…

  14. Work Keys: Developing the Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLarty, Joyce R.

    The American College Testing Program is developing a new program, Work Keys, a system to develop and assess employability skills. It consists of four components: (1) a systematic process for profiling job skill requirements; (2) assessments that measure learners' job skill levels; (3) procedures and formats for conveying assessment results so they…

  15. Assessment of Hearing Impaired Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Doin E., Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The issue of Directions contains 11 articles on assessment of hearing impaired individuals. Entries have the following titles and authors: "Classroom Assessment Techniques for Hearing Impaired Students--A Literature Review" (B. McKee, M. Hausknecht); "Informal Assessment of Hearing Impaired Students In the Classroom" (B. Culhane, R. Hein);…

  16. Technological Applications in Science Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Stanley L.; Kumar, David D.

    Educational technology has been a focus of development and research in science teaching and learning. This document reviews research dealing with computer and hypermedia applications to assessment in science education. The paper reports the findings first for computer applications for assessment and then for hypermedia applications in assessment.…

  17. Gestalt Effect of Self Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    Defining self assessment as the involvement of students in identifying standards and/or criteria to apply to their work and making judgements about the extent to which they have met these criteria and standards, this paper seeks to highlight the gestalt effect of self assessment. The total effect of self assessment on the learner is greater than…

  18. Improving International Assessment through Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, David

    2018-01-01

    In this article I advocate for a new discussion in the field of international large-scale assessments; one that calls for a reexamination of international large-scale assessments (ILSAs) and their use. Expanding on the high-quality work in this special issue I focus on three inherent limitations to international large-scale assessments noted by…

  19. Assessment from the Ground up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Berkeley Evaluation and Assessment Research (BEAR) Center at the University of California is developing assessments that are as psychometrically sound as standardized tests and as instructionally relevant as teacher-made, classroom assessments. The BEAR system employs four principles similar to those outlined by the National Research Council:…

  20. Technology assessment and citizen action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mottur, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    Citizen participation in the nation's total social, political, economic decisionmaking processes was studied. Impediments are discussed which prevent citizens from taking effective assessment action; these include finance, organization and motivation, and information. The proposal for establishing citizens assessment associations is considered along with implications of citizen assessment action.

  1. Does Assessment Kill Student Creativity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ronald A.

    2005-01-01

    Does assessment kill creativity? In this article, creativity is defined and discussed and an overview of creativity and motivational research is provided to describe how assessment practices can influence students' creativity. Recommendations for protecting creativity when assessing students also are provided.

  2. English Teachers Classroom Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saefurrohman; Balinas, Elvira S.

    2016-01-01

    The new language assessment policies in the Philippines and in Indonesia have impact on English teachers' assessment practices. Classroom assessment; as mandated in the current curriculum of both countries swifts from sources of information to the inseparable process of teaching and learning. This study describes Filipino and Indonesian high…

  3. Academic Challenges: Student Outcomes Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Long Beach. Office of the Chancellor.

    A "meta-assessment" was done of 13 pilot projects on student outcomes assessment in a variety of disciplines at 11 campuses in the California State University (CSU) system. These projects had developed both quantitative and qualitative strategies for collecting data on student learning outcomes. The meta-assessment was designed to…

  4. Psychological Assessment of the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pool, Donald A.

    The paper examines issues, philosophy and guidelines for psychological assessment of the disabled. Focused on are: (1) adjustments in testing procedures and (2) applicability of standard norms with commonly used psychological test instruments for the assessment of ability, interest, and personality. The importance of accurate assessment for…

  5. Does Pre-Assessment Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2018-01-01

    Exactly what is a pre-assessment, and how are they best used? In this article, Thomas R. Guskey explores the theoretical underpinnings of pre-assessments and provides an overview of the research. He also details the three forms that pre-assessments take: prerequisite, present, and preview.

  6. Concepts & Procedures for Academic Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau Community Coll., Garden City, NY.

    This document describes the formulation of academic assessment at Nassau Community College (NCC) (New York), presenting methods that can help faculty implement classroom assessment in the courses they teach. Section 1, the introduction, discusses assessment from philosophical and historical perspectives. Section 2 presents the five steps of…

  7. Assessment and Learning: Some Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Dylan William states that the central claim in Baird, et al.'s piece is that if theories of assessment take into account theories of learning, assessments will somehow be more valid, and some of the more egregious effects of assessment on learning will be ameliorated. William responds to this claim by arguing that it seems…

  8. Quality Assurance in Teachers' Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipps, Caroline V.

    The teacher assessment that is the subject of this paper is an essentially informal activity. The teacher assesses the student by posing questions, observing activities, and evaluating work in a planned or ad hoc way. The information obtained may be partial or fragmented, but repeating such assessments over time will allow the buildup of a solid…

  9. Data Science in Educational Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, David C.; Webb, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    This article is the second of two articles in this special issue that were developed following discussions of the Assessment Working Group at EDUsummIT 2013. The article extends the analysis of assessments of collaborative problem solving (CPS) to examine the significance of the data concerning this complex assessment problem and then for…

  10. Classroom Implementation. Issues in Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinowski, Patricia A., Ed.

    This booklet, second in a series on issues in assessment, seeks to describe an initiative supported by Finger Lakes Community College (New York) to use classroom assessment techniques (CATs) in different academic areas and to present an overview of some assessment approaches that have been used in the classroom. Papers include: (1) "Enhancing…

  11. Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) is an integrated assessment model that links the world's energy, agriculture and land use systems with a climate model. The model is designed to assess various climate change policies and technology strategies for the globe over long tim...

  12. A Smorgasbord of Assessment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Kathy A.

    2010-01-01

    The wealth of assessment options that exists offers teachers and students a "menu" of selections. Just as matching appetite needs with appropriate food selection is fundamental to a successful dining experience, matching assessment options to targeted achievement needs is crucial to an effective assessment experience. The author uses a…

  13. Integrated Assessment Model Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Clarke, L.; Edmonds, J. A.; Weyant, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated assessment models of climate change (IAMs) are widely used to provide insights into the dynamics of the coupled human and socio-economic system, including emission mitigation analysis and the generation of future emission scenarios. Similar to the climate modeling community, the integrated assessment community has a two decade history of model inter-comparison, which has served as one of the primary venues for model evaluation and confirmation. While analysis of historical trends in the socio-economic system has long played a key role in diagnostics of future scenarios from IAMs, formal hindcast experiments are just now being contemplated as evaluation exercises. Some initial thoughts on setting up such IAM evaluation experiments are discussed. Socio-economic systems do not follow strict physical laws, which means that evaluation needs to take place in a context, unlike that of physical system models, in which there are few fixed, unchanging relationships. Of course strict validation of even earth system models is not possible (Oreskes etal 2004), a fact borne out by the inability of models to constrain the climate sensitivity. Energy-system models have also been grappling with some of the same questions over the last quarter century. For example, one of "the many questions in the energy field that are waiting for answers in the next 20 years" identified by Hans Landsberg in 1985 was "Will the price of oil resume its upward movement?" Of course we are still asking this question today. While, arguably, even fewer constraints apply to socio-economic systems, numerous historical trends and patterns have been identified, although often only in broad terms, that are used to guide the development of model components, parameter ranges, and scenario assumptions. IAM evaluation exercises are expected to provide useful information for interpreting model results and improving model behavior. A key step is the recognition of model boundaries, that is, what is inside

  14. Quality standards for predialysis education: results from a consensus conference

    PubMed Central

    Isnard Bagnis, Corinne; Crepaldi, Carlo; Dean, Jessica; Goovaerts, Tony; Melander, Stefan; Nilsson, Eva-Lena; Prieto-Velasco, Mario; Trujillo, Carmen; Zambon, Roberto; Mooney, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This position statement was compiled following an expert meeting in March 2013, Zurich, Switzerland. Attendees were invited from a spread of European renal units with established and respected renal replacement therapy option education programmes. Discussions centred around optimal ways of creating an education team, setting realistic and meaningful objectives for patient education, and assessing the quality of education delivered. PMID:24957808

  15. Geomatics Education: Need Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, A.

    2014-11-01

    the other hand, the industry requires high skilled manpower, high experienced manpower. This is a low equilibrium situation. Since the need is enhancing day by day, the shortage of the skilled manpower is increasing, the need of the geomatics education emerges. This paper researches on the need assessment of the education in geospatial specialization. It emphasises on the challenges and issues prevail in geospatial education and in the specialized fields of remote sensing and GIS. This paper analyse the need assessment through all the three actors: government, geospatial industry and education institutions.

  16. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme.more » Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that

  17. 360-degree physician performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Isser; Jennings, Kelly; Greengarten, Moshe; Brans, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Few jurisdictions have a robust common approach to assessing the quantitative and qualitative dimensions of physician performance. In this article, we examine the need for 360-degree physician performance assessment and review the literature supporting comprehensive physician assessment. An evidence-based, "best practice" approach to the development of a 360-degree physician performance assessment framework is presented, including an overview of a tool kit to support implementation. The focus of the framework is to support physician career planning and to enhance the quality of patient care. Finally, the legal considerations related to implementing 360-degree physician performance assessment are explored.

  18. A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoudi, Hossein, E-mail: mahmoudi@uni-hohenheim.de; Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C.; Renn, Ortwin

    An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the socialmore » impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.« less

  19. Policy formulation and technology assessment.

    PubMed

    Banta, H D; Behney, C J

    1981-01-01

    Describes technology assessment and its application to the health field; examines evaluation of efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness; discusses the use of technology assessment in policy formulation, especially by federal programs; suggests a system for assessment of medical technologies; and offers some observations about the future of technology assessment in policy making. Technology assessment began formally in 1965 in the Committee on Science and Astronautics of the House of Representatives as a process of examining technology and its impacts. Only a few attempts have been made since then to apply the concepts of technology assessment to health care. The amount of money currently devoted to assessing the efficacy and safety of medical technologies is small, and many important technologies have not been assessed. Priorities for clinical trials should therefore be set. Cost effectiveness analysis is a useful tool in decision making but because of its inherent limitations, it should not be the sole or even primary determinant of a decision. Technology assessment is apparently infrequently used as a decision-assisting tool by 3rd party payers, federal government agencies funding biomedical research, or the federal program which is designed to control physician utilization of certain technologies. Only the FDA regularly utilizes technology assessment. A systematic program of technology assessment would require identification of technologies needing testing, setting of priorities for such tests, synthesizing of information gained and its dessemination to decision makers.

  20. Environmental probabilistic quantitative assessment methodologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, four petroleum resource assessment methodologies are presented as possible pollution assessment methodologies, even though petroleum as a resource is desirable, whereas pollution is undesirable. A methodology is defined in this paper to consist of a probability model and a probabilistic method, where the method is used to solve the model. The following four basic types of probability models are considered: 1) direct assessment, 2) accumulation size, 3) volumetric yield, and 4) reservoir engineering. Three of the four petroleum resource assessment methodologies were written as microcomputer systems, viz. TRIAGG for direct assessment, APRAS for accumulation size, and FASPU for reservoir engineering. A fourth microcomputer system termed PROBDIST supports the three assessment systems. The three assessment systems have different probability models but the same type of probabilistic method. The type of advantages of the analytic method are in computational speed and flexibility, making it ideal for a microcomputer. -from Author