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Sample records for zygosaccharomyces bailii gas1

  1. Naturally occurring antifungal agents against Zygosaccharomyces bailii and their synergism.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Kubo, Isao

    2005-06-29

    Polygodial was found to exhibit a fungicidal activity against a food spoilage yeast, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, with the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of 50 microg/mL (0.17 mM). The time-kill curve study showed that polygodial was fungicidal at any growth stage. The primary action of polygodial comes from its ability to disrupt the native membrane-associated function of integral proteins as nonionic surface active agents (surfactants) followed by a decrease in plasma membrane fluidity. The fungicidal activity of polygodial was increased 128-fold in combination with a sublethal amount (equivalent of 1/2 MFC) of anethole and vice versa relative to the fungicidal activity of anethole. The fungicidal activity of sorbic acid was enhanced 512-fold in combination with 1/2 MFC of polygodial. Conversely, the fungicidal activity of polygodial was enhanced 128-fold in combination with 1/2 MFC of sorbic acid.

  2. A differential medium for the enumeration of the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii in wine.

    PubMed

    Schuller, D; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    2000-11-01

    A collection of yeasts, isolated mostly from spoiled wines, was used in order to develop a differential medium for Zygosaccharomyces bailii. The 118 selected strains of 21 species differed in their origin and resistance to preservatives and belonged to the genera Pichia, Torulaspora, Dekkera, Debaryomyces, Saccharomycodes, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Kloeckera, Lodderomyces, Schizosaccharomyces, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, and Zygosaccharomyces. The design of the culture medium was based on the different ability of the various yeast species to grow in a mineral medium with glucose and formic acid (mixed-substrate medium) as the only carbon and energy sources and supplemented with an acid-base indicator. By manipulating the concentration of the acid and the sugar it was possible to select conditions where only Z. bailii strains gave rise to alkalinization, associated with a color change of the medium (positive response). The final composition of the mixed medium was adjusted as a compromise between the percentage of recovery and selectivity for Z. bailii. This was accomplished by the use of pure or mixed cultures of the yeast strains and applying the membrane filtration methodology. The microbiological analysis of two samples of contaminated Vinho Verde showed that the new medium can be considered as a differential medium to distinguish Z. bailii from other contaminating yeasts, having potential application in the microbiological control of wines and probably other beverages and foods.

  3. Assessing physio-macromolecular effects of lactic acid on Zygosaccharomyces bailii cells during microaerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kuanyshev, Nurzhan; Ami, Diletta; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Morrissey, John P; Branduardi, Paola

    2016-08-01

    The ability of Zygosaccharomyces bailii to grow at low pH and in the presence of considerable amounts of weak organic acids, at lethal condition for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, increased the interest in the biotechnological potential of the yeast. To understand the mechanism of tolerance and growth effect of weak acids on Z. bailii, we evaluated the physiological and macromolecular changes of the yeast exposed to sub lethal concentrations of lactic acid. Lactic acid represents one of the important commodity chemical which can be produced by microbial fermentation. We assessed physiological effect of lactic acid by bioreactor fermentation using synthetic media at low pH in the presence of lactic acid. Samples collected from bioreactors were stained with propidium iodide (PI) which revealed that, despite lactic acid negatively influence the growth rate, the number of PI positive cells is similar to that of the control. Moreover, we have performed Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) microspectroscopy analysis on intact cells of the same samples. This technique has been never applied before to study Z. bailii under this condition. The analyses revealed lactic acid induced macromolecular changes in the overall cellular protein secondary structures, and alterations of cell wall and membrane physico-chemical properties. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Zygosaccharomyces bailii Is a Potential Producer of Various Flavor Compounds in Chinese Maotai-Flavor Liquor Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhi, Yan; Wu, Qun; Du, Rubing; Xu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is a common yeast in various food fermentations. Understanding the metabolic properties and genetic mechanisms of Z. bailii is important for its industrial applications. Fermentation characteristics of Z. bailii MT15 from Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor fermentation were studied. Z. bailii MT15 produced various flavor compounds, including 19 alcohols, six acids, three esters, three ketones, and two aldehydes. Moreover, production of acids and aldehydes were increased by 110 and 41%, respectively, at 37°C (the maximum temperature in liquor fermentation) compared with that at 30°C, indicating its excellent flavor productivity. Z. bailii MT15 is a diploid with genome size of 20.19 Mb. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed that 12 genes related to amino acid transport were significantly up-regulated (2.41- to 5.11-fold) at 37°C. Moreover, genes ARO8, ARO9, and ALDH4 involved in amino acid metabolism also showed higher expression levels (>1.71-fold) at 37°C. Increased substrate supply and a vigorous metabolism might be beneficial for the increased production of acids and aldehydes at 37°C. This work revealed the potential contribution of Z. bailii to various flavor compounds in food fermentation, and produced insights into the metabolic mechanisms of Z. bailii in flavor production. PMID:29312273

  5. Genome sequence of the highly weak-acid-tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii IST302, amenable to genetic manipulations and physiological studies.

    PubMed

    Palma, Margarida; Münsterkötter, Martin; Peça, João; Güldener, Ulrich; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2017-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most problematic spoilage yeast species found in the food and beverage industry particularly in acidic products, due to its exceptional resistance to weak acid stress. This article describes the annotation of the genome sequence of Z. bailii IST302, a strain recently proven to be amenable to genetic manipulations and physiological studies. The work was based on the annotated genomes of strain ISA1307, an interspecies hybrid between Z. bailii and a closely related species, and the Z. bailii reference strain CLIB 213T. The resulting genome sequence of Z. bailii IST302 is distributed through 105 scaffolds, comprising a total of 5142 genes and a size of 10.8 Mb. Contrasting with CLIB 213T, strain IST302 does not form cell aggregates, allowing its manipulation in the laboratory for genetic and physiological studies. Comparative cell cycle analysis with the haploid and diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains BY4741 and BY4743, respectively, suggests that Z. bailii IST302 is haploid. This is an additional trait that makes this strain attractive for the functional analysis of non-essential genes envisaging the elucidation of mechanisms underlying its high tolerance to weak acid food preservatives, or the investigation and exploitation of the potential of this resilient yeast species as cell factory. © FEMS 2017.

  6. Lipidomic Profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii Reveals Critical Changes in Lipid Composition in Response to Acetic Acid Stress

    PubMed Central

    Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L−1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L−1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  7. Evaluation of Zygosaccharomyces bailii BCV 08 as a co-starter in wine fermentation for the improvement of ethyl esters production.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Juliano; Schneider, Rosana de Cassia de Souza; Camargo Mendes, Sandra Denise; Welke, Juliane Elisa; Zini, Cláudia Alcaraz; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Valente, Patrícia

    2015-04-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii BCV 08, a yeast isolated from red wine barrels in Brazil, was evaluated as co-starter in fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Z. bailii BCV 08 was preliminarily shown to produce high levels of esters, and the production was optimized in bench and bioreactor scales using grape must. White wine vinifications were conducted with mixed cultures containing different proportions of Z. bailii BCV 08 and an enological strain of S. cerevisiae. In all trials that contained Z. bailii BCV 08, the production of ethyl esters was enhanced in comparison to the vinification control. Our results clearly show the potential of Z. bailii BCV 08 as a mixed starter with S. cerevisiae in order to increase the aromatic complexity of wine. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Adaptive Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii: A Physiological Genomics Perspective.

    PubMed

    Palma, Margarida; Guerreiro, Joana F; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2018-01-01

    Acetic acid is an important microbial growth inhibitor in the food industry; it is used as a preservative in foods and beverages and is produced during normal yeast metabolism in biotechnological processes. Acetic acid is also a major inhibitory compound present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates affecting the use of this promising carbon source for sustainable bioprocesses. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae response and adaptation to acetic acid have been studied for years, only recently they have been examined in more detail in Zygosaccharomyces bailii . However, due to its remarkable tolerance to acetic acid and other weak acids this yeast species is a major threat in the spoilage of acidic foods and beverages and considered as an interesting alternative cell factory in Biotechnology. This review paper emphasizes genome-wide strategies that are providing global insights into the molecular targets, signaling pathways and mechanisms behind S. cerevisiae and Z. bailii tolerance to acetic acid, and extends this information to other weak acids whenever relevant. Such comprehensive perspective and the knowledge gathered in these two yeast species allowed the identification of candidate molecular targets, either for the design of effective strategies to overcome yeast spoilage in acidic foods and beverages, or for the rational genome engineering to construct more robust industrial strains. Examples of successful applications are provided.

  9. Adaptive Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii: A Physiological Genomics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Margarida; Guerreiro, Joana F.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2018-01-01

    Acetic acid is an important microbial growth inhibitor in the food industry; it is used as a preservative in foods and beverages and is produced during normal yeast metabolism in biotechnological processes. Acetic acid is also a major inhibitory compound present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates affecting the use of this promising carbon source for sustainable bioprocesses. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae response and adaptation to acetic acid have been studied for years, only recently they have been examined in more detail in Zygosaccharomyces bailii. However, due to its remarkable tolerance to acetic acid and other weak acids this yeast species is a major threat in the spoilage of acidic foods and beverages and considered as an interesting alternative cell factory in Biotechnology. This review paper emphasizes genome-wide strategies that are providing global insights into the molecular targets, signaling pathways and mechanisms behind S. cerevisiae and Z. bailii tolerance to acetic acid, and extends this information to other weak acids whenever relevant. Such comprehensive perspective and the knowledge gathered in these two yeast species allowed the identification of candidate molecular targets, either for the design of effective strategies to overcome yeast spoilage in acidic foods and beverages, or for the rational genome engineering to construct more robust industrial strains. Examples of successful applications are provided. PMID:29515554

  10. Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics for Identification and Strain Discrimination of the Wine Spoilage Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Mark A.; Thornton, Roy J.

    2013-01-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%. PMID:23913433

  11. Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics for identification and strain discrimination of the wine spoilage yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Susan B; Thornton, Mark A; Thornton, Roy J

    2013-10-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%.

  12. The importance of expressing antimicrobial agents on water basis in growth/no growth interface models: a case study for Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Dang, T D T; Vermeulen, A; Mertens, L; Geeraerd, A H; Van Impe, J F; Devlieghere, F

    2011-01-31

    In a previous study on Zygosaccharomyces bailii, three growth/no growth models have been developed, predicting growth probability of the yeast at different conditions typical for acidified foods (Dang, T.D.T., Mertens, L., Vermeulen, A., Geeraerd, A.H., Van Impe, J.F., Debevere, J., Devlieghere, F., 2010. Modeling the growth/no growth boundary of Z. bailii in acidic conditions: A contribution to the alternative method to preserve foods without using chemical preservatives. International Journal of Food Microbiology 137, 1-12). In these broth-based models, the variables were pH, water activity and acetic acid, with acetic acid concentration expressed in volume % on the total culture medium (i.e., broth). To continue the previous study, validation experiments were performed for 15 selected combinations of intrinsic factors to assess the performance of the model at 22°C (60days) in a real food product (ketchup). Although the majority of experimental results were consistent, some remarkable deviations between prediction and validation were observed, e.g., Z. bailii growth occurred in conditions where almost no growth had been predicted. A thorough investigation revealed that the difference between two ways of expressing acetic acid concentration (i.e., on broth basis and on water basis) is rather significant, particularly for media containing high amounts of dry matter. Consequently, the use of broth-based concentrations in the models was not appropriate. Three models with acetic acid concentration expressed on water basis were established and it was observed that predictions by these models well matched the validation results; therefore a "systematic error" in broth-based models was recognized. In practice, quantities of antimicrobial agents are often calculated based on the water content of food products. Hence, to assure reliable predictions and facilitate the application of models (developed from lab media with high dry matter contents), it is important to express

  13. Antifungal properties of peptidomimetics with an arginine-[β-(2,5,7-tri-tert-butylindol-3-yl)alanine]-arginine motif against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Camilla Eggert; Larsen, Camilla Josephine; Franzyk, Henrik; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2015-05-01

    Due to increased occurrence of infections and food spoilage caused by yeast, there is an unmet need for new antifungal agents. The arginine-β-(2,5,7-tri-tert-butylindol-3-yl) alanine-arginine (R-Tbt-R) motif was previously proved useful in the design of an antifungal tripeptide. Here, an array of peptidomimetics based on this motif was investigated for antifungal and hemolytic activity. The five most promising modified tetrapeptide analogues ( 6: and 9-12: contain an additional C-terminal hydrophobic residue, and these were found to exhibit antifungal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MIC 6 and 12 μg mL(-1)) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (MIC 6-25 μg mL(-1)). Four compounds ( 6: and 9-11: , had limited hemolytic activity (<10% hemolysis at 8 × MIC). Determination of their killing kinetics revealed that compound 9: displayed fungicidal effect. Testing against cells from an S. cerevisiae deletion mutant library indicated that interaction with yeast-specific fungal sphingolipids, most likely constitutes a crucial step in the mode of action. Interestingly, a lack of activity of peptidomimetics 6: and 9-11: towards Candida spp. was shown to be due to degradation or sequestering by the yeast. Due to their ultrashort nature, antifungal activity and low toxicity, the four compounds may have potential as leads for novel preservatives. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Advances in the control of wine spoilage by Zygosaccharomyces and Dekkera/Brettanomyces.

    PubMed

    Zuehlke, J M; Petrova, B; Edwards, C G

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of yeast spoilage, as well as the available control technologies, is vital to producing consistent, high-quality wine. Zygosaccharomyces bailii contamination may result in refermentation and CO2 production in sweet wines or grape juice concentrate, whereas Brettanomyces bruxellensis spoilage often contributes off-odors and flavors to red wines. Early detection of these yeasts by selective/differential media or genetic methods is important to minimize potential spoilage. More established methods of microbial control include sulfur dioxide, dimethyl dicarbonate, and filtration. Current research is focused on the use of chitosan, pulsed electric fields, low electric current, and ultrasonics as means to protect wine quality.

  15. Differentiation of four Aspergillus species and one Zygosaccharomyces with two electronic tongues based on different measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Söderström, C; Rudnitskaya, A; Legin, A; Krantz-Rülcker, C

    2005-09-29

    Two electronic tongues based on different measurement techniques were applied to the discrimination of four molds and one yeast. Chosen microorganisms were different species of Aspergillus and yeast specie Zygosaccharomyces bailii, which are known as food contaminants. The electronic tongue developed in Linköping University was based on voltammetry. Four working electrodes made of noble metals were used in a standard three-electrode configuration in this case. The St. Petersburg electronic tongue consisted of 27 potentiometric chemical sensors with enhanced cross-sensitivity. Sensors with chalcogenide glass and plasticized PVC membranes were used. Two sets of samples were measured using both electronic tongues. Firstly, broths were measured in which either one of the molds or the yeast grew until late logarithmic phase or border of the stationary phase. Broths inoculated by either one of molds or the yeast was measured at five different times during microorganism growth. Data were evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA), partial least square regression (PLS) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was found that both measurement techniques could differentiate between fungi species. Merged data from both electronic tongues improved differentiation of the samples in selected cases.

  16. Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis, a new ascosporogenous yeast from 'Kombucha tea'.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, C P; Robnett, C J; Basehoar-Powers, E

    2001-07-01

    A new ascosporogenous yeast, Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis sp. n. (type strain NRRL YB-4811, CBS 8849), is described; it was isolated from Kombucha tea, a popular fermented tea-based beverage. The four known strains of the new species have identical nucleotide sequences in domain D1/D2 of 26S rDNA. Phylogenetic analysis of D1/D2 and 18S rDNA sequences places Z. kombuchaensis near Zygosaccharomyces lentus. The two species are indistinguishable on standard physiological tests used for yeast identification, but can be recognized from differences in restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns obtained by digestion of 18S-ITS1 amplicons with the restriction enzymes DdeI and MboI.

  17. Interactions between Zygosaccharomyces mellis and Wallemia sebi in diluted molasses.

    PubMed

    Vindeløv, J; Arneborg, N

    2001-01-22

    The yeast Zygosaccharomyces mellis and the mould Wallemia sebi were isolated from the same sample of crystalline sugar. Interactions between these fungi were investigated using a diluted molasses medium (water activity 0.89, pH 6.0) as a model system for the syrup film covering the surface of moist crystalline sugar. Single and mixed cultures of Z. mellis and W. sebi were incubated at 25 degrees C for 400 h. Our results show that the growth of Z. mellis in single culture was limited by available glucose and fructose, and that W sebi was able to invert sucrose to glucose and fructose in both single and mixed culture. Furthermore, the presence of W. sebi in the mixed culture increased the maximum specific growth rate of Z. mellis from 0.074 to 0.19 h(-1) and the growth yield of Z. mellis from 7.3 x 10(6) to 5.4 x 10(7) cfu/ml. These results indicate that the ability of W. sebi to invert sucrose may stimulate the growth of Z. mellis. Finally, the presence of Z. mellis inhibited the ability of W. sebi to invert sucrose: W. sebi was able to invert 1.0 g sucrose/l per h in single culture but only 0.6 g sucrose/l per h in mixed culture. As predicted by Raoults law, this corresponded to a reduction in the water activity of the growth medium from 0.890 to 0.850 in single culture, and to 0.865 in mixed culture.

  18. Zygosaccharomyces favi sp. nov., an obligate osmophilic yeast species from bee bread and honey.

    PubMed

    Čadež, Neža; Fülöp, László; Dlauchy, Dénes; Péter, Gábor

    2015-03-01

    Five yeast strains representing a hitherto undescribed yeast species were isolated from bee bread and honey in Hungary. They are obligate osmophilic, i.e. they are unable to grow in/on high water activity culture media. Following isogamous conjugation, they form 1-4 spheroid or subspheroid ascospores in persistent asci. The analysis of the sequences of their large subunit rRNA gene D1/D2 domain placed the new species in the Zygosaccharomyces clade. In terms of pairwise sequence similarity, Zygosaccharomyces gambellarensis is the most closely related species. Comparisons of D1/D2, internal transcribed spacer and translation elongation factor-1α (EF-1α) gene sequences of the five strains with that of the type strain of Z. gambellarensis revealed that they represent a new yeast species. The name Zygosaccharomyces favi sp. nov. (type strain: NCAIM Y.01994(T) = CBS 13653(T) = NRRL Y-63719(T) = ZIM 2551(T)) is proposed for this new yeast species, which based on phenotype can be distinguished from related Zygosaccharomyces species by its obligate osmophilic nature. Some intragenomic sequence variability, mainly indels, was detected among the ITS copies of the strains of the new species.

  19. Evaluation of fingerprinting techniques to assess genotype variation among Zygosaccharomyces strains.

    PubMed

    Dakal, Tikam Chand; Solieri, Lisa; Giudici, Paolo

    2018-06-01

    Molecular typing techniques are key tools in surveillance of food spoilage yeasts, in investigations on intra-species population diversity, and in tracing selected starters during fermentation. Unlike previous works on strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces spoilage species, here Zygosaccharomyces mellis and the Zygosaccharoymces rouxii complex yeasts, which include Z. rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces sapae, and a mosaic lineage (ML) of putatively hybrids, were evaluated by three typing methods for intra- and inter-species resolution. Overall these yeasts are relevant for food fermentation and spoilage, but are quite difficult to discriminate at strain and species level as they evolved by reticulation. A pool of 76 strains from different sources were typed by M13 and (GTG) 5 MSP-PCR fingerprinting and PCR-RFLP of ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS). We demonstrated that M13 overcame (GTG) 5 fingerprinting to group Z. sapae, Z. rouxii, Z. mellis and the ML isolates in congruent distinct clusters. Even if (GTG) 5 primer yielded a number of DNA fingerprints comparable with those obtained by M13 primer, it failed to discriminate Z. sapae, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii at species level. Clustering of IGS RFLP patterns obtained with three endonucleases produced groups congruent with species assignment and highlighted intra-species diversity similar to that observed by M13 fingerprinting. However, IGS PCR amplification failed for 14 ML and 6 Z. mellis strains under the experimental conditions tested here, indicating that this marker could be less easy to use in fast typing protocol. Finally, our results posit that the genetic diversity within Z. sapae and Z. mellis could be shaped by isolation source. The information generated in this study would facilitate the monitoring of these yeasts during food processing and storage, and provides preliminary evidences about Z. sapae and Z. mellis intra-species diversity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcriptional Response to Lactic Acid Stress in the Hybrid Yeast Zygosaccharomyces parabailii

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lactic acid has a wide range of applications starting from its undissociated form, and its production using cell factories requires stress-tolerant microbial hosts. The interspecies hybrid yeast Zygosaccharomyces parabailii has great potential to be exploited as a novel host for lactic acid production, due to high organic acid tolerance at low pH and a fermentative metabolism with a high growth rate. Here we used mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze Z. parabailii's transcriptional response to lactic acid added exogenously, and we explore the biological mechanisms involved in tolerance. Z. parabailii contains two homeologous copies of most genes. Under lactic acid stress, the two genes in each homeolog pair tend to diverge in expression to a significantly greater extent than under control conditions, indicating that stress tolerance is facilitated by interactions between the two gene sets in the hybrid. Lactic acid induces downregulation of genes related to cell wall and plasma membrane functions, possibly altering the rate of diffusion of lactic acid into cells. Genes related to iron transport and redox processes were upregulated, suggesting an important role for respiratory functions and oxidative stress defense. We found differences in the expression profiles of genes putatively regulated by Haa1 and Aft1/Aft2, previously described as lactic acid responsive in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) genes form a lactic acid-responsive gene family that has been specifically amplified in Z. parabailii in comparison to other closely related species. Our study provides a useful starting point for the engineering of Z. parabailii as a host for lactic acid production. IMPORTANCE Hybrid yeasts are important in biotechnology because of their tolerance to harsh industrial conditions. The molecular mechanisms of tolerance can be studied by analyzing differential gene expression under conditions of interest and relating gene expression

  1. Transcriptional Response to Lactic Acid Stress in the Hybrid Yeast Zygosaccharomyces parabailii.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Merino, Raúl A; Kuanyshev, Nurzhan; Byrne, Kevin P; Varela, Javier A; Morrissey, John P; Porro, Danilo; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Branduardi, Paola

    2018-03-01

    Lactic acid has a wide range of applications starting from its undissociated form, and its production using cell factories requires stress-tolerant microbial hosts. The interspecies hybrid yeast Zygosaccharomyces parabailii has great potential to be exploited as a novel host for lactic acid production, due to high organic acid tolerance at low pH and a fermentative metabolism with a high growth rate. Here we used mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze Z. parabailii 's transcriptional response to lactic acid added exogenously, and we explore the biological mechanisms involved in tolerance. Z. parabailii contains two homeologous copies of most genes. Under lactic acid stress, the two genes in each homeolog pair tend to diverge in expression to a significantly greater extent than under control conditions, indicating that stress tolerance is facilitated by interactions between the two gene sets in the hybrid. Lactic acid induces downregulation of genes related to cell wall and plasma membrane functions, possibly altering the rate of diffusion of lactic acid into cells. Genes related to iron transport and redox processes were upregulated, suggesting an important role for respiratory functions and oxidative stress defense. We found differences in the expression profiles of genes putatively regulated by Haa1 and Aft1/Aft2, previously described as lactic acid responsive in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Furthermore, formate dehydrogenase ( FDH ) genes form a lactic acid-responsive gene family that has been specifically amplified in Z. parabailii in comparison to other closely related species. Our study provides a useful starting point for the engineering of Z. parabailii as a host for lactic acid production. IMPORTANCE Hybrid yeasts are important in biotechnology because of their tolerance to harsh industrial conditions. The molecular mechanisms of tolerance can be studied by analyzing differential gene expression under conditions of interest and relating gene expression patterns

  2. Contrasting Patterns of rDNA Homogenization within the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chand Dakal, Tikam; Giudici, Paolo; Solieri, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are generally expected to evolve as a coherent family, where repeats within such a family are more similar to each other than to orthologs in related species. The continuous homogenization of repeats within individual genomes is a recombination process termed concerted evolution. Here, we investigated the extent and the direction of concerted evolution in 43 yeast strains of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii species complex (Z. rouxii, Z. sapae, Z. mellis), by analyzing two portions of the 35S rDNA cistron, namely the D1/D2 domains at the 5’ end of the 26S rRNA gene and the segment including the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 (ITS regions). We demonstrate that intra-genomic rDNA sequence variation is unusually frequent in this clade and that rDNA arrays in single genomes consist of an intermixing of Z. rouxii, Z. sapae and Z. mellis-like sequences, putatively evolved by reticulate evolutionary events that involved repeated hybridization between lineages. The levels and distribution of sequence polymorphisms vary across rDNA repeats in different individuals, reflecting four patterns of rDNA evolution: I) rDNA repeats that are homogeneous within a genome but are chimeras derived from two parental lineages via recombination: Z. rouxii in the ITS region and Z. sapae in the D1/D2 region; II) intra-genomic rDNA repeats that retain polymorphisms only in ITS regions; III) rDNA repeats that vary only in their D1/D2 domains; IV) heterogeneous rDNA arrays that have both polymorphic ITS and D1/D2 regions. We argue that an ongoing process of homogenization following allodiplodization or incomplete lineage sorting gave rise to divergent evolutionary trajectories in different strains, depending upon temporal, structural and functional constraints. We discuss the consequences of these findings for Zygosaccharomyces species delineation and, more in general, for yeast barcoding. PMID:27501051

  3. Incidence of osmophilic yeasts and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii during the production of concentrate grape juices.

    PubMed

    Rojo, M C; Torres Palazzolo, C; Cuello, R; González, M; Guevara, F; Ponsone, M L; Mercado, L A; Martínez, C; Combina, M

    2017-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is the main spoilage yeast of grape juice concentrates. Detection and identification of Z. rouxii during the production of grape juice concentrate is critical to prevent spoilage in the final product. In this work, three grape juice concentrate processing plants were assessed by identifying osmophilic yeasts in juices and surfaces during different stages of a complete production line. Subsequently, molecular typing of Z. rouxii isolates was done to determine the strain distribution of this spoilage yeast. Osmotolerant yeast species, other than Z. rouxii, were mainly recovered from processing plant environments. Z. rouxii was only isolated from surface samples with grape juice remains. Z. rouxii was largely isolated from grape juice samples with some degree of concentration. Storage of grape juice pre-concentrate and concentrate allowed an increase in the Z. rouxii population. A widely distributed dominant molecular Z. rouxii pattern was found in samples from all three processing plants, suggesting resident microbes inside the plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Detoxification of Aflatoxin B₁ by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii with Solid State Fermentation in Peanut Meal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guanghui; Chen, Yujie; Kong, Qing; Ma, Yunxiao; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-20

    Aflatoxins are highly carcinogenic, teratogenetic, and morbigenous secondary metabolites of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus that can contaminate multiple staple foods, such as peanut, maize, and tree nuts. In this study, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii was screened out and identified from fermented soy paste-one kind of traditional Chinese food-to detoxify aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) by aerobic solid state fermentation in peanut meal. The optimal degradation condition was chosen from single factor experiment, and the most effective detoxification rate was about 97%. As for liquid fermentation, we tested the binding ability of Z. rouxii , and the highest binding rate reached was 74.3% (nonviable cells of Z. rouxii ) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Moreover, the biotransformation of AFB₁ through fermentation of Z. rouxii in peanut meal was further verified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). According to TIC scan, after fermentation by Z. rouxii, the AFB₁ in peanut meal was prominently degraded to the lowering peaks of AFB₁. Additionally, m / s statistics demonstrated that AFB₁ may be degraded to some new products whose structural properties may be different from AFB₁, or the degradation products may be dissolved in the aqueous phase rather than the organic phase. As far as we know, this is the first report indicating that the safe strain of Z. rouxii has the ability to detoxify AFB₁.

  5. Detoxification of Aflatoxin B1 by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii with Solid State Fermentation in Peanut Meal

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guanghui; Chen, Yujie; Kong, Qing; Ma, Yunxiao; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxins are highly carcinogenic, teratogenetic, and morbigenous secondary metabolites of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus that can contaminate multiple staple foods, such as peanut, maize, and tree nuts. In this study, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii was screened out and identified from fermented soy paste—one kind of traditional Chinese food—to detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) by aerobic solid state fermentation in peanut meal. The optimal degradation condition was chosen from single factor experiment, and the most effective detoxification rate was about 97%. As for liquid fermentation, we tested the binding ability of Z. rouxii, and the highest binding rate reached was 74.3% (nonviable cells of Z. rouxii) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Moreover, the biotransformation of AFB1 through fermentation of Z. rouxii in peanut meal was further verified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). According to TIC scan, after fermentation by Z. rouxii, the AFB1 in peanut meal was prominently degraded to the lowering peaks of AFB1. Additionally, m/s statistics demonstrated that AFB1 may be degraded to some new products whose structural properties may be different from AFB1, or the degradation products may be dissolved in the aqueous phase rather than the organic phase. As far as we know, this is the first report indicating that the safe strain of Z. rouxii has the ability to detoxify AFB1. PMID:28117705

  6. Effects of dielectric barrier discharge plasma on the inactivation of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and quality of apple juice.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qisen; Liu, Xiufang; Li, Junguang; Liu, Shengnan; Zhang, Hua; Bai, Yanhong

    2018-07-15

    This work aimed to evaluate the effects of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on inactivation of spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (Z. rouxii), in apple juice. Results showed that DBD plasma treatment at 90 W for 140 s resulted in about 5-log reduction of Z. rouxii in apple juice. The levels of extracellular nucleic acids and proteins as well as contents of H 2 O 2 and NO 2 - in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) medium increased significantly after DBD plasma treatment at 90 W for 40-200 s. The increases in membrane permeability and generation of reactive species would likely contribute to DBD plasma-mediated inactivation of Z. rouxii. DBD plasma caused significant changes in pH, titratable acidity, and certain color parameters of apple juice, but had no effect on the contents of total soluble solids, reducing sugar, and total phenolics. This study provides key implications for the application of DBD plasma in fruit juice processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of sodium chloride and cadmium on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunsheng; Xu, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xiaoyan

    2014-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a salt-tolerant yeast species capable of removing cadmium (Cd) pollutant from aqueous solution. Presently, the physiological characteristics of Z. rouxii under the stress of sodium chloride (NaCl) and Cd are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of NaCl and Cd on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii after stress treatment for 24 h. Results showed that NaCl or Cd alone negatively affected the growth of Z. rouxii, but the growth-inhibiting effect of Cd on Z. rouxii was reduced in the presence of NaCl. Flow cytometry assay showed that under Cd stress, NaCl significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death of Z. rouxii compared with those in the absence of NaCl. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) of Z. rouxii were significantly enhanced by 2%-6% NaCl, which likely contributed to the high salt tolerance of Z. rouxii. The POD activity was inhibited by 20 mg L-1 Cd while the SOD and CAT activities were enhanced by 8 mg L-1 Cd and inhibited by 20 mg L-1 or 50 mg L-1 Cd. The inhibitory effect of high-level Cd on the antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii was counteracted by the combined use of NaCl, especially at 6%. This probably accounted for the decrease in Cd-induced ROS production and cell death of Z. rouxii after incubation with NaCl and Cd. Our work provided physiological clues as to the use of Z. rouxii as a biosorbent for Cd removal from seawater and liquid highly salty food.

  8. Early detection of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii--spawned spoilage in apple juice by electronic nose combined with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huxuan; Hu, Zhongqiu; Long, Fangyu; Guo, Chunfeng; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2016-01-18

    Spoilage spawned by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii can cause sensory defect in apple juice, which could hardly be perceived in the early stage and therefore would lead to the serious economic loss. Thus, it is essential to detect the contamination in early stage to avoid costly waste of products or recalls. In this work the performance of an electronic nose (e-nose) coupled with chemometric analysis was evaluated for diagnosis of the contamination in apple juice, using test panel evaluation as reference. The feasibility of using e-nose responses to predict the spoilage level of apple juice was also evaluated. Coupled with linear discriminant analysis (LDA), detection of the contamination was achieved after 12h, corresponding to the cell concentration of less than 2.0 log 10 CFU/mL, the level at which the test panelists could not yet identify the contamination, indicating that the signals of e-nose could be utilized as early indicators for the onset of contamination. Loading analysis indicated that sensors 2, 6, 7 and 8 were the most important in the detection of Z. rouxii-contaminated apple juice. Moreover, Z. rouxii counts in unknown samples could be well predicted by the established models using partial least squares (PLS) algorithm with high correlation coefficient (R) of 0.98 (Z. rouxii strain ATCC 2623 and ATCC 8383) and 0.97 (Z. rouxii strain B-WHX-12-53). Based on these results, e-nose appears to be promising for rapid analysis of the odor in apple juice during processing or on the shelf to realize the early detection of potential contamination caused by Z. rouxii strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A hydrophobic filter confers the cation selectivity of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii plasma-membrane Na+/H+ antiporter.

    PubMed

    Kinclova-Zimmermannova, Olga; Falson, Pierre; Cmunt, Denis; Sychrova, Hana

    2015-04-24

    Na(+)/H(+) antiporters may recognize all alkali-metal cations as substrates but may transport them selectively. Plasma-membrane Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Sod2-22 antiporter exports Na(+) and Li(+), but not K(+). The molecular basis of this selectivity is unknown. We combined protein structure modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, phenotype analysis and cation efflux measurements to localize and characterize the cation selectivity region. A three-dimensional model of the ZrSod2-22 transmembrane domain was generated based on the X-ray structure of the Escherichia coli NhaA antiporter and primary sequence alignments with homologous yeast antiporters. The model suggested a close proximity of Thr141, Ala179 and Val375 from transmembrane segments 4, 5 and 11, respectively, forming a hydrophobic hole in the putative cation pathway's core. A series of mutagenesis experiments verified the model and showed that structural modifications of the hole resulted in altered cation selectivity and transport activity. The triple ZrSod2-22 mutant T141S-A179T-V375I gained K(+) transport capacity. The point mutation A179T restricted the antiporter substrate specificity to Li(+) and reduced its transport activity, while serine at this position preserved the native cation selectivity. The negative effect of the A179T mutation can be eliminated by introducing a second mutation, T141S or T141A, in the preceding transmembrane domain. Our experimental results confirm that the three residues found through modeling play a central role in the determination of cation selectivity and transport activity in Z. rouxii Na(+)/H(+) antiporter and that the cation selectivity can be modulated by repositioning a single local methyl group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of salt-tolerant yeast of Candida versatilis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii on the production of biogenic amines during soy sauce fermentation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; Hou, Li-Hua; Guo, Hong-Lian; Wang, Chun-Ling; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Liu, Jin-Fu; Cao, Xiao-Hong

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to enhance and improve the quality and safety of soy sauce. In the present work, the change of biogenic amines, such as histamine, tyramine, cadaverine, spermidine, was examined by the treatment of Candida versatilis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, and the influence of salt-tolerant yeast on biogenic amines was analysed during the whole fermentation process. The results showed that the content of biogenic amines was elevated after yeast treatment and the content of biogenic amines was influenced by using yeast. The dominating biogenic amine in soy sauce was tyramine. At the end of fermentation, the concentrations of biogenic amines produced by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida versatilis in the soy mash were 122.71 mg kg(-1) and 69.96 mg kg(-1) . The changes of biogenic amines in high-salt liquid soy mash during fermentation process indicated that a variety of biogenic amines were increased in the fermentation ageing period, which may be due to amino acid decarboxylation to form biogenic amines by yeast decarboxylase. The fermentation period of soy sauce should be longer than 5 months because biogenic amines began to decline after this time period. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Potassium supply and homeostasis in the osmotolerant non-conventional yeasts Zygosaccharomyces rouxii differ from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stříbný, Jiří; Kinclová-Zimmermannová, Olga; Sychrová, Hana

    2012-12-01

    Three different transport systems exist to accumulate a sufficient amount of potassium cations in yeasts. The most common of these are Trk-type transporters, which are used by all yeast species. Though most yeast species employ two different types of transporters, we only identified one gene encoding a potassium uptake system (Trk-type) in the genome of the highly osmotolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, and our results showed that ZrTrk1 is its major (and probably only) specific potassium uptake system. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the product of the ZrTRK1 gene is localized to the plasma membrane and its presence efficiently complements the phenotypes of S. cerevisiae trk1∆ trk2∆ cells. Deletion of the ZrTRK1 gene resulted in Z. rouxii cells being almost incapable of growth at low K(+) concentrations and it changed some cell physiological parameters in a way that differs from S. cerevisiae. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, Z. rouxii cells without the TRK1 gene contained less potassium than the control cells and their plasma membrane was significantly hyperpolarized compared with those of the parental strain when grown in the presence of 100 mM KCl. On the other hand, subsequent potassium starvation led to a substantial depolarization which is again different from S. cerevisiae. Plasma-membrane hyperpolarization did not prevent the efflux of potassium from Z. rouxii trk1Δ cells during potassium starvation, and the activity of ZrPma1 is less affected by the absence of ZrTRK1 than in S. cerevisiae. The use of a newly constructed Z. rouxii-specific plasmid for the expression of pHluorin showed that the intracellular pH of the Z. rouxii wild type and the trk1∆ mutant is not significantly different. Together with the fact that Z. rouxii cells contain a significantly lower amount of intracellular potassium than identically grown S. cerevisiae cells, our results suggest that this highly osmotolerant yeast species maintain its intracellular pH and

  12. Molecular monitoring of spoilage yeasts during the production of candied fruit nougats to determine food contamination sources.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Patricia; Fernández-Espinar, M Teresa; Querol, Amparo

    2005-06-15

    In the present work, we have analysed the yeast microbiota present in a manufacturing plant of candied fruits and nougats. Four yeasts species (Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Sporobolomyces roseus, and Debaryomyces hansenii) and a filamentous fungi (Nectria mauriiticola) were identified according to restriction analysis of 5.8S-ITS rDNA. These identifications were subsequently confirmed by sequencing the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. Z. rouxii and Z. bailii were isolated at high frequency along the whole manufacturing process. Since food alteration by Z. bailii and Z. rouxii is the cause of important economic losses for the food industry, there is a need for differentiating yeasts at the strain level as an essential part of quality control programs in this industry. For this purpose, we have tested the performance of three molecular techniques (RFLP mtDNA, RAPD-PCR, and microsatellite with (GAC)5 and (GTG)5 primers) to differentiate strains belonging to these two Zygosaccharomyces species. Those techniques with the best discriminatory power were applied to differentiate Zygosaccharomyces species isolates. The results of this analysis indicate that one strain of Z. bailii and two strains of Z. rouxii were involved in the spoilage of candied fruits. Moreover, the Z. bailii strain was also present in the spoiled nougat, hence being responsible of this alteration.

  13. Effects of pH and sugar concentration in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii growth and time for spoilage in concentrated grape juice at isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Rojo, M C; Arroyo López, F N; Lerena, M C; Mercado, L; Torres, A; Combina, M

    2014-04-01

    The effect of pH (1.7-3.2) and sugar concentration (64-68 °Brix) on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MC9 using response surface methodology was studied. Experiments were carried out in concentrated grape juice inoculated with Z. rouxii at isothermal conditions (23 °C) for 60 days. pH was the variable with the highest effect on growth parameters (potential maximum growth rate and lag phase duration), although the effect of sugar concentration were also significant. In a second experiment, the time for spoilage by this microorganism in concentrated grape juice was evaluated at isothermal (23 °C) and non-isothermal conditions, in an effort to reproduce standard storage and overseas shipping temperature conditions, respectively. Results show that pH was again the environmental factor with the highest impact on delaying the spoilage of the product. Thereby, a pH value below 2.0 was enough to increase the shelf life of the product for more than 60 days in both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. The information obtained in the present work could be used by producers and buyers to predict the growth and time for spoilage of Z. rouxii in concentrated grape juice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Colony formation by sublethally heat-injured Zygosaccharomyces rouxii as affected by solutes in the recovery medium and procedure for sterilizing medium.

    PubMed Central

    Golden, D A; Beuchat, L R

    1990-01-01

    Recovery and colony formation by healthy and sublethally heat-injured cells of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii as influenced by the procedure for sterilizing recovery media (YM agar [YMA], wort agar, cornmeal agar, and oatmeal agar) were investigated. Media were supplemented with various concentrations of glucose, sucrose, glycerol, or sorbitol and sterilized by autoclaving (110 degrees C, 15 min) and by repeated treatment with steam (100 degrees C). An increase in sensitivity was observed when heat-injured cells were plated on glucose-supplemented YMA at an aw of 0.880 compared with aws of 0.933 and 0.998. Colonies which developed from unheated and heated cells on YMA at aws of 0.998 and 0.933 generally exceeded 0.5 mm in diameter within 3.5 to 4 days of incubation at 25 degrees C, whereas colonies formed on YMA at an aw of 0.880 typically did not exceed 0.5 mm in diameter until after 5.5 to 6.5 days of incubation. The number of colonies exceeding 0.5 mm in diameter which were formed by heat-injured cells on YMA at an aw of 0.880 was 2 to 3 logs less than the total number of colonies detected, i.e., on YMA at an aw of 0.933 and using no limits of exclusion based on colony diameter. A substantial portion of cells which survived heat treatment were sublethally injured as evidenced by increased sensitivity to a suboptimum aw (0.880). In no instance was recovery of Z. rouxii significantly affected by medium sterilization procedure when glucose or sorbitol was used as the aw-suppressing solute.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2403251

  15. Colony formation by sublethally heat-injured Zygosaccharomyces rouxii as affected by solutes in the recovery medium and procedure for sterilizing medium.

    PubMed

    Golden, D A; Beuchat, L R

    1990-08-01

    Recovery and colony formation by healthy and sublethally heat-injured cells of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii as influenced by the procedure for sterilizing recovery media (YM agar [YMA], wort agar, cornmeal agar, and oatmeal agar) were investigated. Media were supplemented with various concentrations of glucose, sucrose, glycerol, or sorbitol and sterilized by autoclaving (110 degrees C, 15 min) and by repeated treatment with steam (100 degrees C). An increase in sensitivity was observed when heat-injured cells were plated on glucose-supplemented YMA at an aw of 0.880 compared with aws of 0.933 and 0.998. Colonies which developed from unheated and heated cells on YMA at aws of 0.998 and 0.933 generally exceeded 0.5 mm in diameter within 3.5 to 4 days of incubation at 25 degrees C, whereas colonies formed on YMA at an aw of 0.880 typically did not exceed 0.5 mm in diameter until after 5.5 to 6.5 days of incubation. The number of colonies exceeding 0.5 mm in diameter which were formed by heat-injured cells on YMA at an aw of 0.880 was 2 to 3 logs less than the total number of colonies detected, i.e., on YMA at an aw of 0.933 and using no limits of exclusion based on colony diameter. A substantial portion of cells which survived heat treatment were sublethally injured as evidenced by increased sensitivity to a suboptimum aw (0.880). In no instance was recovery of Z. rouxii significantly affected by medium sterilization procedure when glucose or sorbitol was used as the aw-suppressing solute.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Formation of 4-Hydroxy-2,5-Dimethyl-3[2H]-Furanone by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii: Identification of an Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, Tobias; Brühlmann, Fredi; Schwab, Wilfried

    2003-01-01

    The formation of the important flavor compound 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3[2H]-furanone (HDMF; Furaneol) from d-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate by the yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii was studied with regard to the identification of intermediates present in the culture medium. Addition of o-phenylenediamine, a trapping reagent for α-dicarbonyls, to the culture medium and subsequent analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography with diode array detection revealed the formation of three quinoxaline derivatives derived from d-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate under the applied growth conditions (30°C; pH 4 to 5). Isolation and characterization of these compounds by tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy led to the identification of phosphoric acid mono-(2,3,4-trihydroxy-4-quinoxaline-2-yl-butyl) ester (Q1), phosphoric acid mono-[2,3-dihydroxy-3-(3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-yl)-propyl] ester (Q2), and phosphoric acid mono-[2-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-yl)-propyl] ester (Q3). Q1 and Q2 were formed independently of Z. rouxii cells, whereas Q3 was detected only in incubation systems containing the yeast. Identification of Q2 demonstrated for the first time the chemical formation of 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose-6-phosphate in the culture medium, a generally expected but never identified intermediate in the formation pathway of HDMF. Since HDMF was detected only in the presence of Z. rouxii cells, additional enzymatic steps were presumed. Incubation of periplasmic and cytosolic protein extracts obtained from yeast cells with d-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate led to the formation of HDMF, implying the presence of the required enzymes in both extracts. PMID:12839760

  17. 2,5-Dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone as a secondary metabolite from D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate metabolism by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii.

    PubMed

    Dahlen, T; Hauck, T; Wein, M; Schwab, W

    2001-01-01

    2,5-Dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) is an important aroma compound found in many fruits such as strawberries and pineapples and it is also produced by the soy-sauce-fermenting yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii after the addition of d-fructose-1,6-diphosphate to yeast-peptone-dextrose nutrient media. Dilute DMHF solutions exhibit a strawberry-like flavor while DMHF concentrates have a caramel-like aroma. In media containing D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate as the sole carbon source, growth of Z. rouxii and formation of DMHF were not observed. Although Z. rouxii cells grew in media with D-glucose as the sole carbon source, DMHF was only produced when media were supplemented with D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate. The DMHF concentration always correlated with the yeast cell count and D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate concentration. Addition of CaCl2 (up to 50 g.l(-1)) led to a higher DMHF concentration. Addition of Na2SO3 reduced the growth of Z. rouxii and inhibited DMHF formation. The amount of DMHF formed by Z. rouxii was not significantly affected by the addition of KH2PO4. DMHF concentrations of 5 and 10 g.l(-1) partially and completely inhibited the growth of Z. rouxii cells, respectively. Only the singly labeled furanone was formed after the addition of 1-13C-D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate to the medium. However, unlabeled DMHF was formed in the presence of (13)C(6)-D-glucose. Therefore, the carbons of the furanone originate exclusively from exogenously supplied D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate as no exchange with the internal pool of D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate occurs. This implies that DMHF is a secondary metabolite of Z. rouxii formed from D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate. We assume that at least the first step of the metabolism of D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate takes place in the cell wall or membrane of the yeast.

  18. Expression of Gas1 in Mouse Brain: Release and Role in Neuronal Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Elizabeth; Zarco, Natanael; Aguirre-Pineda, Nicolás; Lara-Lozano, Manuel; Vergara, Paula; González-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Aguilar-Roblero, Raúl; Segovia, José

    2018-05-01

    Growth arrest-specific 1 (Gas1) is a pleiotropic protein that induces apoptosis of tumor cells and has important roles during development. Recently, the presence of two forms of Gas1 was reported: one attached to the cell membrane by a GPI anchor; and a soluble extracellular form shed by cells. Previously, we showed that Gas1 is expressed in different areas of the adult mouse CNS. Here, we report the levels of Gas1 mRNA protein in different regions and analyzed its expressions in glutamatergic, GABAergic, and dopaminergic neurons. We found that Gas1 is expressed in GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in the Purkinje-molecular layer of the cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus, and fastigial nucleus, as well as in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. In all cases, Gas1 was found in the cell bodies, but not in the neuropil. The Purkinje and the molecular layers show the highest levels of Gas1, whereas the granule cell layer has low levels. Moreover, we detected the expression and release of Gas1 from primary cultures of Purkinje cells and from hippocampal neurons as well as from neuronal cell lines, but not from cerebellar granular cells. In addition, using SH-SY5Y cells differentiated with retinoic acid as a neuronal model, we found that extracellular Gas1 promotes neurite outgrowth, increases the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, and stimulates the inhibition of GSK3β. These findings demonstrate that Gas1 is expressed and released by neurons and promotes differentiation, suggesting an important role for Gas1 in cellular signaling in the CNS.

  19. Gas1 expression in parietal cells of Bowman's capsule in experimental diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Luna-Antonio, Brenda I; Rodriguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Namorado-Tonix, Carmen; Vergara, Paula; Segovia, Jose; Reyes, Jose L

    2017-07-01

    Gas1 (Growth Arrest-Specific 1) is a pleiotropic protein with novel functions including anti-proliferative and proapoptotic activities. In the kidney, the expression of Gas1 has been described in mesangial cells. In this study, we described that renal parietal cells of Bowman's capsule (BC) and the distal nephron cells also express Gas1. The role of Gas1 in the kidney is not yet known. There is a subpopulation of progenitor cells in Bowman's capsule with self-renewal properties which can eventually differentiate into podocytes as a possible mechanism of regeneration in the early stages of diabetic nephropathy. We analyzed the expression of Gas1 in the parietal cells of Bowman's capsule in murine experimental diabetes. We found that diabetes reduced the expression of Gas1 and increased the expression of progenitor markers like NCAM, CD24, and SIX1/2, and mesenchymal markers like PAX2 in the Bowman's capsule. We also analyzed the expression of WT1 (a podocyte-specific marker) on BC and observed an increase in the number of WT1 positive cells in diabetes. In contrast, nephrin, another podocyte-specific protein, decreases its expression in the first week of diabetes in the glomerular tuft, which is gradually restored during the second and third weeks of diabetes. These results suggest that in diabetes the decrease of Gas1 promotes the activation of parietal progenitor cells of Bowman's capsule that might differentiate into podocytes and compensate their loss observed in this pathology.

  20. Gas1 extends the range of Hedgehog action by facilitating its signaling

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, David C.; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Cellular signaling initiated by Hedgehog binding to Patched1 has profound importance in mammalian embryogenesis, genetic disease, and cancer. Hedgehog acts as a morphogen to specify distinctive cell fates using different concentration thresholds, but our knowledge of how the concentration gradient is interpreted into the activity gradient is incomplete. The membrane protein Growth Arrest-Specific Gene 1 (GAS1) was thought to be a negative regulator of the Hedgehog concentration gradient. Here, we report unexpected genetic evidence that Gas1 positively regulates Hedgehog signaling in multiple developmental contexts, an effect particularly noticeable at regions where Hedgehog acts at low concentration. Using a combination of in vitro cell culture and in ovo electroporation assays, we demonstrate that GAS1 acts cooperatively with Patched1 for Hedgehog binding and enhances signaling activity in a cell-autonomous manner. Our data support a model in which GAS1 helps transform the Hedgehog protein gradient into the observed activity gradient. We propose that Gas1 is an evolutionarily novel, vertebrate-specific Hedgehog pathway regulator. PMID:17504940

  1. Boc modifies the spectrum of holoprosencephaly in the absence of Gas1 function

    PubMed Central

    Seppala, Maisa; Xavier, Guilherme M.; Fan, Chen-Ming; Cobourne, Martyn T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Holoprosencephaly is a heterogeneous developmental malformation of the central nervous system characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage, midline facial anomalies and wide phenotypic variation. Indeed, microforms represent the mildest manifestation, associated with facial anomalies but an intact central nervous system. In many cases, perturbations in sonic hedgehog signaling are responsible for holoprosencephaly. Here, we have elucidated the contribution of Gas1 and an additional hedgehog co-receptor, Boc during early development of the craniofacial midline, by generating single and compound mutant mice. Significantly, we find Boc has an essential role in the etiology of a unique form of lobar holoprosencephaly that only occurs in conjunction with combined loss of Gas1. Whilst Gas1−/− mice have microform holoprosencephaly characterized by a single median maxillary central incisor, cleft palate and pituitary anomalies, Boc−/− mice have a normal facial midline. However, Gas1−/−; Boc−/− mutants have lobar holoprosencephaly associated with clefting of the lip, palate and tongue, secondary to reduced sonic hedgehog transduction in the central nervous system and face. Moreover, maxillary incisor development is severely disrupted in these mice, arresting prior to cellular differentiation as a result of apoptosis in the odontogenic epithelium. Thus, Boc and Gas1 retain an essential function in these tooth germs, independent of their role in midline development of the central nervous system and face. Collectively, this phenotype demonstrates both redundancy and individual requirements for Gas1 and Boc during sonic hedgehog transduction in the craniofacial midline and suggests BOC as a potential digenic locus for lobar holoprosencephaly in human populations. PMID:25063195

  2. Genetic interactions between the hedgehog co-receptors Gas1 and Boc regulate cell proliferation during murine palatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Guilherme M.; Seppala, Maisa; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N.; Fan, Chen-Ming; Cobourne, Martyn T.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal regulation of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been described in a variety of human cancers and developmental anomalies, which highlights the essential role of this signaling molecule in cell cycle regulation and embryonic development. Gas1 and Boc are membrane co-receptors for Shh, which demonstrate overlapping domains of expression in the early face. This study aims to investigate potential interactions between these co-receptors during formation of the secondary palate. Mice with targeted mutation in Gas1 and Boc were used to generate Gas1; Boc compound mutants. The expression of key Hedgehog signaling family members was examined in detail during palatogenesis via radioactive in situ hybridization. Morphometric analysis involved computational quantification of BrdU-labeling and cell packing; whilst TUNEL staining was used to assay cell death. Ablation of Boc in a Gas1 mutant background leads to reduced Shh activity in the palatal shelves and an increase in the penetrance and severity of cleft palate, associated with failed elevation, increased proliferation and reduced cell death. Our findings suggest a dual requirement for Boc and Gas1 during early development of the palate, mediating cell cycle regulation during growth and subsequent fusion of the palatal shelves. PMID:27811357

  3. Annexin A1, Annexin A2, and Dyrk 1B are upregulated during GAS1-induced cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sánchez, Gilberto; Jiménez, Adriana; Quezada-Ramírez, Marco A; Estudillo, Enrique; Ayala-Sarmiento, Alberto E; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Hernández-Soto, Justino; Hernández-Hernández, Fidel C; Cázares-Raga, Febe E; Segovia, Jose

    2018-05-01

    GAS1 is a pleiotropic protein that has been investigated because of its ability to induce cell proliferation, cell arrest, and apoptosis, depending on the cellular or the physiological context in which it is expressed. At this point, we have information about the molecular mechanisms by which GAS1 induces proliferation and apoptosis; but very few studies have been focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which GAS1 induces cell arrest. With the aim of expanding our knowledge on this subject, we first focused our research on finding proteins that were preferentially expressed in cells arrested by serum deprivation. By using a proteomics approach and mass spectrometry analysis, we identified 17 proteins in the 2-DE protein profile of serum deprived NIH3T3 cells. Among them, Annexin A1 (Anxa1), Annexin A2 (Anxa2), dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1B (Dyrk1B), and Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3, F (eIf3f) were upregulated at transcriptional the level in proliferative NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that Anxa1, Anxa2, and Dyrk1b are upregulated at both the transcriptional and translational levels by the overexpression of GAS1. Thus, our results suggest that the upregulation of Anxa1, Anxa2, and Dyrk1b could be related to the ability of GAS1 to induce cell arrest and maintain cell viability. Finally, we provided further evidence showing that GAS1 through Dyrk 1B leads not only to the arrest of NIH3T3 cells but also maintains cell viability. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Evaluation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAS1 with respect to its involvement in tolerance to low pH and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Matsushika, Akinori; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2017-08-01

    We previously showed that overexpression of IoGAS1, which was isolated from the multiple stress-tolerant yeast Issatchenkia orientalis, endows Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with the ability to grow and ferment under acidic and high-salt conditions. The deduced amino acid sequence of the IoGAS1 gene product exhibits 60% identity with the S. cerevisiae Gas1 protein, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein essential for maintaining cell wall integrity. However, the functional roles of ScGAS1 in stress tolerance and pH regulation remain unclear. In the present study, we characterized ScGAS1 regarding its roles in tolerance to low pH and high salt concentrations. Transcriptional analysis indicated that, as for the IoGAS1 gene, ScGAS1 expression was pH dependent, with maximum expression at pH 3.0; the presence of salt increased endogenous expression of both GAS1 genes at almost all pH levels. These results suggested that ScGAS1, like IoGAS1, is involved in a novel acid- and salt-stress adaptation mechanism in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of ScGAS1 in S. cerevisiae improved growth and ethanol production from glucose under acid stress without added salt, although the stress tolerance of the ScGAS1-overexpressing strain was inferior to that of the IoGAS1-overexpressing strain. However, overexpression of ScGAS1 did not result in increased tolerance of S. cerevisiae to combined acid and salt stress, even though ScGAS1 appears to be a salt-responsive gene. Thus, ScGAS1 is directly implicated in tolerance to low pH but does not confer salinity tolerance, supporting the view that ScGAS1 and IoGAS1 have overlapping yet distinct roles in stress tolerance in yeast. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Unexpected Function of the Glucanosyltransferase Gas1 in the DNA Damage Response Linked to Histone H3 Acetyltransferases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Eustice, Moriah; Pillus, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin organization and structure are crucial for transcriptional regulation, DNA replication, and damage repair. Although initially characterized in remodeling cell wall glucans, the β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase Gas1 was recently discovered to regulate transcriptional silencing in a manner separable from its activity at the cell wall. However, the function of Gas1 in modulating chromatin remains largely unexplored. Our genetic characterization revealed that GAS1 had critical interactions with genes encoding the histone H3 lysine acetyltransferases Gcn5 and Sas3. Specifically, whereas the gas1gcn5 double mutant was synthetically lethal, deletion of both GAS1 and SAS3 restored silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The loss of GAS1 also led to broad DNA damage sensitivity with reduced Rad53 phosphorylation and defective cell cycle checkpoint activation following exposure to select genotoxins. Deletion of SAS3 in the gas1 background restored both Rad53 phosphorylation and checkpoint activation following exposure to genotoxins that trigger the DNA replication checkpoint. Our analysis thus uncovers previously unsuspected functions for both Gas1 and Sas3 in DNA damage response and cell cycle regulation. PMID:24532730

  6. A genome-wide shRNA screen identifies GAS1 as a novel melanoma metastasis suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Gobeil, Stephane; Zhu, Xiaochun; Doillon, Charles J; Green, Michael R

    2008-11-01

    Metastasis suppressor genes inhibit one or more steps required for metastasis without affecting primary tumor formation. Due to the complexity of the metastatic process, the development of experimental approaches for identifying genes involved in metastasis prevention has been challenging. Here we describe a genome-wide RNAi screening strategy to identify candidate metastasis suppressor genes. Following expression in weakly metastatic B16-F0 mouse melanoma cells, shRNAs were selected based upon enhanced satellite colony formation in a three-dimensional cell culture system and confirmed in a mouse experimental metastasis assay. Using this approach we discovered 22 genes whose knockdown increased metastasis without affecting primary tumor growth. We focused on one of these genes, Gas1 (Growth arrest-specific 1), because we found that it was substantially down-regulated in highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells, which contributed to the high metastatic potential of this mouse cell line. We further demonstrated that Gas1 has all the expected properties of a melanoma tumor suppressor including: suppression of metastasis in a spontaneous metastasis assay, promotion of apoptosis following dissemination of cells to secondary sites, and frequent down-regulation in human melanoma metastasis-derived cell lines and metastatic tumor samples. Thus, we developed a genome-wide shRNA screening strategy that enables the discovery of new metastasis suppressor genes.

  7. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Issatchenkia orientalis GPI-Anchored Protein, IoGas1, Required for Resistance to Low pH and Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Matsushika, Akinori; Negi, Kanako; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    The use of yeasts tolerant to acid (low pH) and salt stress is of industrial importance for several bioproduction processes. To identify new candidate genes having potential roles in low-pH tolerance, we screened an expression genomic DNA library of a multiple-stress-tolerant yeast, Issatchenkia orientalis (Pichia kudriavzevii), for clones that allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to grow under highly acidic conditions (pH 2.0). A genomic DNA clone containing two putative open reading frames was obtained, of which the putative protein-coding gene comprising 1629 bp was retransformed into the host. This transformant grew significantly at pH 2.0, and at pH 2.5 in the presence of 7.5% Na2SO4. The predicted amino acid sequence of this new gene, named I. orientalis GAS1 (IoGAS1), was 60% identical to the S. cerevisiae Gas1 protein, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein essential for maintaining cell wall integrity, and 58–59% identical to Candida albicans Phr1 and Phr2, pH-responsive proteins implicated in cell wall assembly and virulence. Northern hybridization analyses indicated that, as for the C. albicans homologs, IoGAS1 expression was pH-dependent, with expression increasing with decreasing pH (from 4.0 to 2.0) of the medium. These results suggest that IoGAS1 represents a novel pH-regulated system required for the adaptation of I. orientalis to environments of diverse pH. Heterologous expression of IoGAS1 complemented the growth and morphological defects of a S. cerevisiae gas1Δ mutant, demonstrating that IoGAS1 and the corresponding S. cerevisiae gene play similar roles in cell wall biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that two conserved glutamate residues (E161 and E262) in the IoGas1 protein play a crucial role in yeast morphogenesis and tolerance to low pH and salt stress. Furthermore, overexpression of IoGAS1 in S. cerevisiae remarkably improved the ethanol fermentation ability at pH 2.5, and at pH 2.0 in the presence of

  8. MiR-34a targets GAS1 to promote cell proliferation and inhibit apoptosis in papillary thyroid carcinoma via PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yanfei; Qin, Huadong; Cui, Yunfu, E-mail: yfma77@126.com

    Highlights: •MiR-34a is up- and GAS1 is down-regulated in papillary thyroid carcinoma. •GAS1 is a direct target for miR-34a. •MiR-34a promotes PTC cells proliferation and inhibits apoptosis through PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are fundamental regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and are implicated in tumorigenesis of many cancers. MiR-34a is best known as a tumor suppressor through repression of growth factors and oncogenes. Growth arrest specific1 (GAS1) protein is a tumor suppressor that inhibits cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis through inhibition of RET receptor tyrosine kinase. Both miR-34a and GAS1 are frequently down-regulated in various tumors.more » However, it has been reported that while GAS1 is down-regulated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), miR-34a is up-regulated in this specific type of cancer, although their potential roles in PTC tumorigenesis have not been examined to date. A computational search revealed that miR-34a putatively binds to the 3′-UTR of GAS1 gene. In the present study, we confirmed previous findings that miR-34a is up-regulated and GAS1 down-regulated in PTC tissues. Further studies indicated that GAS1 is directly targeted by miR-34a. Overexpression of miR-34a promoted PTC cell proliferation and colony formation and inhibited apoptosis, whereas knockdown of miR-34a showed the opposite effects. Silencing of GAS1 had similar growth-promoting effects as overexpression of miR-34a. Furthermore, miR-34a overexpression led to activation of PI3K/Akt/Bad signaling pathway in PTC cells, and depletion of Akt reversed the pro-growth, anti-apoptotic effects of miR-34a. Taken together, our results demonstrate that miR-34a regulates GAS1 expression to promote proliferation and suppress apoptosis in PTC cells via PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway. MiR-34a functions as an oncogene in PTC.« less

  9. Evolution of divergent DNA recognition specificities in VDE homing endonucleases from two yeast species.

    PubMed

    Posey, Karen L; Koufopanou, Vassiliki; Burt, Austin; Gimble, Frederick S

    2004-01-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are mobile DNA elements that are thought to confer no benefit to their host. They encode site-specific DNA endonucleases that perpetuate the element within a species population by homing and disseminate it between species by horizontal transfer. Several yeast species contain the VMA1 HEG that encodes the intein-associated VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE). The evolutionary state of VDEs from 12 species was assessed by assaying their endonuclease activities. Only two enzymes are active, PI-ZbaI from Zygosaccharomyces bailii and PI-ScaI from Saccharomyces cariocanus. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii recognition sequence significantly faster than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae site, which differs at six nucleotide positions. A mutational analysis indicates that PI-ZbaI cleaves the S.cerevisiae substrate poorly due to the absence of a contact that is analogous to one made in PI-SceI between Gln-55 and nucleotides +9/+10. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii substrate primarily due to a single base-pair substitution (A/T+5 --> T/A+5). Structural modeling of the PI-ZbaI/DNA complex suggests that Arg-331, which is absent in PI-SceI, contacts T/A+5, and the reduced activity observed in a PI-ZbaI R331A mutant provides evidence for this interaction. These data illustrate that homing endonucleases evolve altered specificity as they adapt to recognize alternative target sites.

  10. Characterization of culturable yeast species associating with whole crop corn and total mixed ration silage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huili; Hao, Wei; Ning, Tingting; Zheng, Mingli; Xu, Chuncheng

    2018-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the association of yeast species with improved aerobic stability of total mixed ration (TMR) silages with prolonged ensiling, and clarified the characteristics of yeast species and their role during aerobic deterioration. Methods Whole crop corn (WCC) silages and TMR silages formulated with WCC were ensiled for 7, 14, 28, and 56 d and used for an aerobic stability test. Predominant yeast species were isolated from different periods and identified by sequencing analyses of the 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain. Characteristics (assimilation and tolerance) of the yeast species and their role during aerobic deterioration were investigated. Results In addition to species of Candida glabrata and Pichia kudriavzevii (P. kudriavzevii) previously isolated in WCC and TMR, Pichia manshurica (P. manshurica), Candida ethanolica (C. ethanolica), and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (Z. bailii) isolated at great frequency during deterioration, were capable of assimilating lactic or acetic acid and tolerant to acetic acid and might function more in deteriorating TMR silages at early fermentation (7 d and 14 d). With ensiling prolonged to 28 d, silages became more (p<0.01) stable when exposed to air, coinciding with the inhibition of yeast to below the detection limit. Species of P. manshurica that were predominant in deteriorating WCC silages were not detectable in TMR silages. In addition, the predominant yeast species of Z. bailii in deteriorating TMR silages at later fermentation (28 d and 56 d) were not observed in both WCC and WCC silages. Conclusion The inhibition of yeasts, particularly P. kudriavzevii, probably account for the improved aerobic stability of TMR silages at later fermentation. Fewer species seemed to be involved in aerobic deterioration of silages at later fermentation and Z. bailii was most likely to initiate the aerobic deterioration of TMR silages at later fermentation. The use of WCC in TMR might not influence the predominant yeast

  11. Characterization of culturable yeast species associating with whole crop corn and total mixed ration silage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huili; Hao, Wei; Ning, Tingting; Zheng, Mingli; Xu, Chuncheng

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the association of yeast species with improved aerobic stability of total mixed ration (TMR) silages with prolonged ensiling, and clarified the characteristics of yeast species and their role during aerobic deterioration. Whole crop corn (WCC) silages and TMR silages formulated with WCC were ensiled for 7, 14, 28, and 56 d and used for an aerobic stability test. Predominant yeast species were isolated from different periods and identified by sequencing analyses of the 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain. Characteristics (assimilation and tolerance) of the yeast species and their role during aerobic deterioration were investigated. In addition to species of Candida glabrata and Pichia kudriavzevii ( P. kudriavzevii ) previously isolated in WCC and TMR, Pichia manshurica ( P. manshurica ), Candida ethanolica ( C. ethanolica ), and Zygosaccharomyces bailii ( Z. bailii ) isolated at great frequency during deterioration, were capable of assimilating lactic or acetic acid and tolerant to acetic acid and might function more in deteriorating TMR silages at early fermentation (7 d and 14 d). With ensiling prolonged to 28 d, silages became more (p<0.01) stable when exposed to air, coinciding with the inhibition of yeast to below the detection limit. Species of P. manshurica that were predominant in deteriorating WCC silages were not detectable in TMR silages. In addition, the predominant yeast species of Z. bailii in deteriorating TMR silages at later fermentation (28 d and 56 d) were not observed in both WCC and WCC silages. The inhibition of yeasts, particularly P. kudriavzevii , probably account for the improved aerobic stability of TMR silages at later fermentation. Fewer species seemed to be involved in aerobic deterioration of silages at later fermentation and Z. bailii was most likely to initiate the aerobic deterioration of TMR silages at later fermentation. The use of WCC in TMR might not influence the predominant yeast species during aerobic

  12. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species.

  13. The occurrence of spoilage yeasts in cream-filled bakery products.

    PubMed

    Osimani, Andrea; Milanović, Vesna; Taccari, Manuela; Cardinali, Federica; Pasquini, Marina; Aquilanti, Lucia; Clementi, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    Filling creams can provide an adequate substrate for spoilage yeasts because some yeasts can tolerate the high osmotic stress in these products. To discover the source of spoilage of a cream-filled baked product, end products, raw materials, indoor air and work surfaces were subjected to microbiological and molecular analyses. The efficacy of disinfectants against spoilage yeasts was also assessed. The analyses on end products revealed the presence of the closest relatives to Zygosaccharomyces bailii with counts ranging from 1.40 to 4.72 log cfu g -1 . No spoilage yeasts were found in the indoor air and work surfaces. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, carried out directly on filling creams collected from unopened cans, showed the presence of bands ascribed to the closest relatives to Z. bailii sensu lato, although with counts < 1 log cfu g -1 . Susceptibility testing of yeast isolates to disinfectants showed a significantly lower effect of 10% alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride. Different responses of isolates to the tested disinfectants were seen. To guarantee the quality of end products, reliable and sensitive methods must be used. Moreover, hygiene and the application of good manufacturing practices represent the most efficient way for the prevention and minimization of cross-contamination. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Suitability of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus plantarum as probiotics intended for fruit juices containing citrus extracts.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Campaniello, Daniela; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Maddalena, Lucia; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2013-11-01

    A strain of Lactobacillus plantarum and 4 strains of bifidobacteria were inoculated in apple juice and in a commercial beverage labeled as "red-fruit juice," containing citrus extracts as natural preservatives; the suitability of the probiotics was evaluated in relation to their resistance to 2 kinds of citrus extracts (biocitro and lemon extract), survival in juices at 4 and 37 °C, and inhibition of Zygosaccharomyces bailii. Cell count of L. plantarum and bifidobacteria over time was fitted through the Weibull equation, for the evaluation of the first reduction time (δ), death time, and microbiological shelf life (the break-point was set to 7 log cfu/mL). Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis experienced the highest δ-value (23.21 d) and death time (96.59 d) in the red-fruit juice at 4 °C, whereas L. plantarum was the most promising strain in apple juice at 37 °C. Biocitro and lemon extract did not exert a biocidal effect toward probiotics; moreover, the probiotics controlled the growth of Z. bailii and the combination of L. plantarum with 40 ppm of biocitro reduced the level of the yeast after 18 d by 2 log cfu/mL. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. The application of non-Saccharomyces yeast in fermentations with limited aeration as a strategy for the production of wine with reduced alcohol content.

    PubMed

    Contreras, A; Hidalgo, C; Schmidt, S; Henschke, P A; Curtin, C; Varela, C

    2015-07-16

    High alcohol concentrations reduce the complexity of wine sensory properties. In addition, health and economic drivers have the wine industry actively seeking technologies that facilitate the production of wines with lower alcohol content. One of the simplest approaches to achieve this aim would be the use of wine yeast strains which are less efficient at transforming grape sugars into ethanol, however commercially available wine yeasts produce very similar ethanol yields. Non-conventional yeast, in particular non-Saccharomyces species, have shown potential for producing wines with lower alcohol content. These yeasts are naturally present in the early stages of fermentation but in general are not capable of completing alcoholic fermentation. We have evaluated 48 non-Saccharomyces isolates to identify strains that, with limited aeration and in sequential inoculation regimes with S. cerevisiae, could be used for the production of wine with lower ethanol concentration. Two of these, Torulaspora delbrueckii AWRI1152 and Zygosaccharomyces bailii AWRI1578, enabled the production of wine with reduced ethanol concentration under limited aerobic conditions. Depending on the aeration regime T. delbrueckii AWRI1152 and Z. bailii AWRI1578 showed a reduction in ethanol concentration of 1.5% (v/v) and 2.0% (v/v) respectively, compared to the S. cerevisiae anaerobic control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling the efficacy of triplet antimicrobial combinations: yeast suppression by lauric arginate, cinnamic acid, and sodium benzoate or potassium sorbate as a case study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yumei; Normand, Mark D; Weiss, Jochen; Peleg, Micha

    2010-03-01

    The growth of four spoilage yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, and Brettanomyces naardenensis, was inhibited with three-agent (triplet) combinations of lauric arginate, cinnamic acid, and sodium benzoate or potassium sorbate. The inhibition efficacy was determined by monitoring the optical density of yeast cultures grown in microtiter plates for 7 days. The relationship between the optical density and the sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate concentrations followed a single-term exponential decay model. The critical effective concentration was defined as the concentration at which the optical density was 0.05, which became an efficacy criterion for the mixtures. Critical concentrations of sodium benzoate or potassium sorbate as a function of the lauric arginate and cinnamic acid concentrations were then fitted with an empirical model that mapped three-agent combinations of equal efficacy. The contours of this function are presented in tabulated form and as two- and three-dimensional plots. Triplet combinations were highly effective against all four spoilage yeasts at three practical pH levels, especially at pH 3.0. The triplet combinations were particularly effective for inhibiting growth of Z. bailii, and combinations containing potassium sorbate had synergistic activities. The equal efficacy concentration model also allowed tabulation of the cost of the various combinations of agents and identification of those most economically feasible.

  17. Evolution of divergent DNA recognition specificities in VDE homing endonucleases from two yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Karen L.; Koufopanou, Vassiliki; Burt, Austin; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2004-01-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are mobile DNA elements that are thought to confer no benefit to their host. They encode site-specific DNA endonucleases that perpetuate the element within a species population by homing and disseminate it between species by horizontal transfer. Several yeast species contain the VMA1 HEG that encodes the intein-associated VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE). The evolutionary state of VDEs from 12 species was assessed by assaying their endonuclease activities. Only two enzymes are active, PI-ZbaI from Zygosaccharomyces bailii and PI-ScaI from Saccharomyces cariocanus. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii recognition sequence significantly faster than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae site, which differs at six nucleotide positions. A mutational analysis indicates that PI-ZbaI cleaves the S.cerevisiae substrate poorly due to the absence of a contact that is analogous to one made in PI-SceI between Gln-55 and nucleotides +9/+10. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii substrate primarily due to a single base-pair substitution (A/T+5 → T/A+5). Structural modeling of the PI-ZbaI/DNA complex suggests that Arg-331, which is absent in PI-SceI, contacts T/A+5, and the reduced activity observed in a PI-ZbaI R331A mutant provides evidence for this interaction. These data illustrate that homing endonucleases evolve altered specificity as they adapt to recognize alternative target sites. PMID:15280510

  18. Effectiveness of chitosan against wine-related microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bağder Elmaci, Simel; Gülgör, Gökşen; Tokatli, Mehmet; Erten, Hüseyin; İşci, Asli; Özçelik, Filiz

    2015-03-01

    The antimicrobial action of chitosan against wine related microorganisms, including Lactobacillus plantarum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Oeonococcus oeni, Lactobacillus hilgardii, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Zygosaccharomyces bailii was examined in laboratory media. In order to assess the potential applicability of chitosan as a microbial control agent for wine, the effect of chitosan, applied individually and/or in combination with sulphur dioxide (SO2), on the growth of microorganisms involved in various stages of winemaking and on the fermentative performance of S. cerevisiae was investigated. Of the seven wine-related microorganisms studied, S. cerevisiae exhibited the strongest resistance to antimicrobial action of chitosan in laboratory media with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) greater than 2 g/L. L. hilgardii, O. oeni and B. bruxellensis were the most susceptible to chitosan since they were completely inactivated by chitosan at 0.2 g/L. The MIC of chitosan for L. plantarum, H. uvarum and Z. bailii was 2, 0.4 and 0.4 g/L, respectively. In wine experiments, it was found that chitosan had a retarding effect on alcoholic fermentation without significantly altering the viability and the fermentative performance of S. cerevisiae. With regard to non-Saccharomyces yeasts (H. uvarum and Z. bailii) involved in winemaking, the early deaths of these yeasts in mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae were not probably due to the antimicrobial action of chitosan but rather due to ethanol produced by the yeasts. The complex interactions between chitosan and wine ingredients as well as microbial interactions during wine fermentation considerably affect the efficacy of chitosan. It was concluded that chitosan was worthy of further investigation as an alternative or complementary preservative to SO2 in wine industry.

  19. A novel photosensitization treatment for the inactivation of fungal spores and cells mediated by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Fahad; Mereddy, Ram; Sultanbawa, Yasmina

    2017-08-01

    The global concerns regarding the emergence of fungicide-resistant strains and the impact of the excessive use of fungicidal practises on our health, food, and environment have increased, leading to a demand for alternative clean green technologies as treatments. Photosensitization is a treatment that utilises a photosensitiser, light and oxygen to cause cell damage to microorganisms. The effect of photosensitization mediated by curcumin on Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium griseofulvum, Penicillium chrysogenum, Fusarium oxysporum, Candida albicans and Zygosaccharomyces bailii was investigated using three methods. The viability of spores/cells suspended in aqueous buffer using different concentrations of curcumin solution (100-1000μM) and light dose (0, 24, 48, 72 and 96J/cm 2 ) were determined. Spraying curcumin solution on inoculated surfaces of agar plates followed by irradiation and soaking spores/cells in curcumin solution prior to irradiation was also investigated. In aqueous mixtures, photosensitised spores/cells of F. oxysporum and C. albicans were inhibited at all light doses and curcumin concentrations, while inactivation of A. niger, A. flavus P. griseofulvum, P. chrysogenum and Z. bailii were highly significant (P<0.001) reduced by 99%, 88.9%, 78%, 99.7% and 99.2% respectively. On the surface of agar plates, spores/cells exposed to a light dose of 360J/cm 2 sprayed with curcumin at 800μM showed complete inhibition for A. niger, F. oxysporum, C. albicans and Z. bailii, while A. flavus P. griseofulvum, and P. chrysogenum reduced by 75%, 80.4% and 88.5% respectively. Soaking spores/cells with curcumin solution prior to irradiation did not have a significant effect on the percentage reduction. These observations suggest that a novel photosensitization mediated curcumin treatment is effective against fungal spores/cells and the variation of percentage reduction was dependent on curcumin concentration, light dosage and fungal species

  20. Unraveling microbial ecology of industrial-scale Kombucha fermentations by metabarcoding and culture-based methods.

    PubMed

    Coton, Monika; Pawtowski, Audrey; Taminiau, Bernard; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Deniel, Franck; Coulloumme-Labarthe, Laurent; Fall, Abdoulaye; Daube, Georges; Coton, Emmanuel

    2017-05-01

    Kombucha, historically an Asian tea-based fermented drink, has recently become trendy in Western countries. Producers claim it bears health-enhancing properties that may come from the tea or metabolites produced by its microbiome. Despite its long history of production, microbial richness and dynamics have not been fully unraveled, especially at an industrial scale. Moreover, the impact of tea type (green or black) on microbial ecology was not studied. Here, we compared microbial communities from industrial-scale black and green tea fermentations, still traditionally carried out by a microbial biofilm, using culture-dependent and metabarcoding approaches. Dominant bacterial species belonged to Acetobacteraceae and to a lesser extent Lactobacteriaceae, while the main identified yeasts corresponded to Dekkera, Hanseniaspora and Zygosaccharomyces during all fermentations. Species richness decreased over the 8-day fermentation. Among acetic acid bacteria, Gluconacetobacter europaeus, Gluconobacter oxydans, G. saccharivorans and Acetobacter peroxydans emerged as dominant species. The main lactic acid bacteria, Oenococcus oeni, was strongly associated with green tea fermentations. Tea type did not influence yeast community, with Dekkera bruxellensis, D. anomala, Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Hanseniaspora valbyensis as most dominant. This study unraveled a distinctive core microbial community which is essential for fermentation control and could lead to Kombucha quality standardization. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Maternal 5mCpG Imprints at the PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML Differentially Methylated Regions Are Decoupled From Parent-of-Origin Expression Effects in Multiple Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    de Sá Machado Araújo, Graziela; da Silva Francisco Junior, Ronaldo; dos Santos Ferreira, Cristina; Mozer Rodrigues, Pedro Thyago; Terra Machado, Douglas; Louvain de Souza, Thais; Teixeira de Souza, Jozimara; Figueiredo Osorio da Silva, Cleiton; Alves da Silva, Antônio Francisco; Andrade, Claudia Caixeta Franco; da Silva, Alan Tardin; Ramos, Victor; Garcia, Ana Beatriz; Machado, Filipe Brum; Medina-Acosta, Enrique

    2018-01-01

    A hallmark of imprinted genes in mammals is the occurrence of parent-of-origin-dependent asymmetry of DNA cytosine methylation (5mC) of alleles at CpG islands (CGIs) in their promoter regions. This 5mCpG asymmetry between the parental alleles creates allele-specific imprinted differentially methylated regions (iDMRs). iDMRs are often coupled to the transcriptional repression of the methylated allele and the activation of the unmethylated allele in a tissue-specific, developmental-stage-specific and/or isoform-specific fashion. iDMRs function as regulatory platforms, built through the recruitment of chemical modifications to histones to achieve differential, parent-of-origin-dependent chromatin segmentation states. Here, we used a comparative computational data mining approach to identify 125 novel constitutive candidate iDMRs that integrate the maximal number of allele-specific methylation region records overlapping CGIs in human methylomes. Twenty-nine candidate iDMRs display gametic 5mCpG asymmetry, and another 96 are candidate secondary iDMRs. We established the maternal origin of the 5mCpG imprints of one gametic (PARD6G-AS1) and one secondary (GCSAML) iDMRs. We also found a constitutively hemimethylated, nonimprinted domain at the PWWP2AP1 promoter CGI with oocyte-derived methylation asymmetry. Given that the 5mCpG level at the iDMRs is not a sufficient criterion to predict active or silent locus states and that iDMRs can regulate genes from a distance of more than 1 Mb, we used RNA-Seq experiments from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project and public archives to assess the transcriptional expression profiles of SNPs across 4.6 Mb spans around the novel maternal iDMRs. We showed that PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML are expressed biallelically in multiple tissues. We found evidence of tissue-specific monoallelic expression of ZNF124 and OR2L13, located 363 kb upstream and 419 kb downstream, respectively, of the GCSAML iDMR. We hypothesize that the GCSAML iDMR regulates the tissue-specific, monoallelic expression of ZNF124 but not of OR2L13. We annotated the non-coding epigenomic marks in the two maternal iDMRs using data from the Roadmap Epigenomics project and showed that the PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML iDMRs achieve contrasting activation and repression chromatin segmentations. Lastly, we found that the maternal 5mCpG imprints are perturbed in several hematopoietic cancers. We conclude that the maternal 5mCpG imprints at PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML iDMRs are decoupled from parent-of-origin transcriptional expression effects in multiple tissues. PMID:29545821

  2. Production and characterization of a novel yeast extracellular invertase activity towards improved dibenzothiophene biodesulfurization.

    PubMed

    Arez, Bruno F; Alves, Luís; Paixão, Susana M

    2014-11-01

    The main goal of this work was the production and characterization of a novel invertase activity from Zygosaccharomyces bailii strain Talf1 for further application to biodesulfurization (BDS) in order to expand the exploitable alternative carbon sources to renewable sucrose-rich feedstock. The maximum invertase activity (163 U ml(-1)) was achieved after 7 days of Z. bailii strain Talf1 cultivation at pH 5.5-6.0, 25 °C, and 150 rpm in Yeast Malt Broth with 25 % Jerusalem artichoke pulp as inducer substrate. The optimum pH and temperature for the crude enzyme activity were 5.5 and 50 °C, respectively, and moreover, high stability was observed at 30 °C for pH 5.5-6.5. The application of Talf1 crude invertase extract (1 %) to a BDS process by Gordonia alkanivorans strain 1B at 30 °C and pH 7.5 was carried out through a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) approach in which 10 g l(-1) sucrose and 250 μM dibenzothiophene were used as sole carbon and sulfur sources, respectively. Growth and desulfurization profiles were evaluated and compared with those of BDS without invertase addition. Despite its lower stability at pH 7.5 (loss of activity within 24 h), Talf1 invertase was able to catalyze the full hydrolysis of 10 g l(-1) sucrose in culture medium into invert sugar, contributing to a faster uptake of the monosaccharides by strain 1B during BDS. In SSF approach, the desulfurizing bacterium increased its μmax from 0.035 to 0.070 h(-1) and attained a 2-hydroxybiphenyl productivity of 5.80 μM/h in about 3 days instead of 7 days, corresponding to an improvement of 2.6-fold in relation to the productivity obtained in BDS process without invertase addition.

  3. Effect of Ethanol, Sulfur Dioxide and Glucose on the Growth of Wine Spoilage Yeasts Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Mahesh; Oro, Inês; Ferreira-Dias, Suzana; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study the effect of three factors, sulfur dioxide, ethanol and glucose, on the growth of wine spoilage yeast species, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Seventeen central composite rotatable design (CCRD) trials were designed for each test yeast using realistic concentrations of the factors (variables) in premium red wine. Polynomial regression equations were fitted to experimental data points, and the growth inhibitory conditions of these three variables were determined. The overall results showed Sa. ludwigii as the most resistant species growing under high ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations, i.e., 15% (v/v)/20 mg L-1, 14% (v/v)/32 mg L-1 and 12.5% (v/v)/40 mg L-1, whereas other yeasts did not survive under the same levels of ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations. The inhibitory effect of ethanol was primarily observed during longer incubation periods, compared with sulfur dioxide, which showed an immediate effect. In some CCRD trials, Sa. ludwigii and S. cerevisiae showed growth recovery after a short death period under the exposure of 20–32 mg L-1 sulfur dioxide in the presence of 11% (v/v) or more ethanol. However, Sc. pombe and Z. bailii did not show such growth recovery under similar conditions. Up to 10 g L-1 of glucose did not prevent cell death under the sulfur dioxide or ethanol stress. This observation demonstrates that the sugar levels commonly used in wine to sweeten the mouthfeel do not increase wine susceptibility to spoilage yeasts, contrary to the anecdotal evidence. PMID:26107389

  4. Aerobic Stability and Effects of Yeasts during Deterioration of Non-fermented and Fermented Total Mixed Ration with Different Moisture Levels.

    PubMed

    Hao, W; Wang, H L; Ning, T T; Yang, F Y; Xu, C C

    2015-06-01

    The present experiment evaluated the influence of moisture level and anaerobic fermentation on aerobic stability of total mixed ration (TMR). The dynamic changes in chemical composition and microbial population that occur after air exposure were examined, and the species of yeast associated with the deterioration process were also identified in both non-fermented and fermented TMR to deepen the understanding of aerobic deterioration. The moisture levels of TMR in this experiment were adjusted to 400 g/kg (low moisture level, LML), 450 g/kg (medium moisture level, MML), and 500 g/kg (high moisture level, HML), and both non-fermented and 56-d-fermented TMR were subjected to air exposure to determine aerobic stability. Aerobic deterioration resulted in high losses of nutritional components and largely reduced dry matter digestibility. Non-fermented TMR deteriorated during 48 h of air exposure and the HML treatment was more aerobically unstable. On dry matter (DM) basis, yeast populations significantly increased from 10(7) to 10(10) cfu/g during air exposure, and Candida ethanolica was the predominant species during deterioration in non-fermented TMR. Fermented TMR exhibited considerable resistance to aerobic deterioration. Spoilage was only observed in the HML treatment and its yeast population increased dramatically to 10(9) cfu/g DM when air exposure progressed to 30 d. Zygosaccharomyces bailii was the sole yeast species isolated when spoilage occurred. These results confirmed that non-fermented and fermented TMR with a HML are more prone to spoilage, and fermented TMR has considerable resistance to aerobic deterioration. Yeasts can trigger aerobic deterioration in both non-fermented and fermented TMR. C. ethanolica may be involved in the spoilage of non-fermented TMR and the vigorous growth of Z. bailii can initiate aerobic deterioration in fermented TMR.

  5. Aerobic Stability and Effects of Yeasts during Deterioration of Non-fermented and Fermented Total Mixed Ration with Different Moisture Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hao, W.; Wang, H. L.; Ning, T. T.; Yang, F. Y.; Xu, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment evaluated the influence of moisture level and anaerobic fermentation on aerobic stability of total mixed ration (TMR). The dynamic changes in chemical composition and microbial population that occur after air exposure were examined, and the species of yeast associated with the deterioration process were also identified in both non-fermented and fermented TMR to deepen the understanding of aerobic deterioration. The moisture levels of TMR in this experiment were adjusted to 400 g/kg (low moisture level, LML), 450 g/kg (medium moisture level, MML), and 500 g/kg (high moisture level, HML), and both non-fermented and 56-d-fermented TMR were subjected to air exposure to determine aerobic stability. Aerobic deterioration resulted in high losses of nutritional components and largely reduced dry matter digestibility. Non-fermented TMR deteriorated during 48 h of air exposure and the HML treatment was more aerobically unstable. On dry matter (DM) basis, yeast populations significantly increased from 107 to 1010 cfu/g during air exposure, and Candida ethanolica was the predominant species during deterioration in non-fermented TMR. Fermented TMR exhibited considerable resistance to aerobic deterioration. Spoilage was only observed in the HML treatment and its yeast population increased dramatically to 109 cfu/g DM when air exposure progressed to 30 d. Zygosaccharomyces bailii was the sole yeast species isolated when spoilage occurred. These results confirmed that non-fermented and fermented TMR with a HML are more prone to spoilage, and fermented TMR has considerable resistance to aerobic deterioration. Yeasts can trigger aerobic deterioration in both non-fermented and fermented TMR. C. ethanolica may be involved in the spoilage of non-fermented TMR and the vigorous growth of Z. bailii can initiate aerobic deterioration in fermented TMR. PMID:25925059

  6. Yeast species associated with wine grapes in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang-Shi; Cheng, Chao; Li, Zheng; Chen, Jing-Yu; Yan, Bin; Han, Bei-Zhong; Reeves, Malcolm

    2010-03-31

    Having more information on the yeast ecology of grapes is important for wine-makers to produce wine with high quality and typical attributes. China is a significant wine-consuming country and is becoming a serious wine-producer, but little has been reported about the yeast ecology of local ecosystems. This study provides the first step towards the exploitation of the yeast wealth in China's vine-growing regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the yeast population density and diversity on three grape varieties cultivated in four representative vine-growing regions of China. Yeast species diversity was evaluated by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequence analysis of the 5.8S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) region of cultivable yeasts. The grapes harbored yeast populations at 10(2)-10(6)CFU/mL, consisting mostly of non-Saccharomyces species. Seventeen different yeast species belonging to eight genera were detected on the grape samples tested, including Hanseniaspora uvarum, Cryptococcus flavescens, Pichia fermentans, Candida zemplinina, Cryptococcus carnescens, Candida inconpicua, Zygosaccharomyces fermentati, Issatchenkia terricola, Candida quercitrusa, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Candida bombi, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Sporidiobolus pararoseus, Cryptococcus magnus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Issatchenkia orientalis and Pichia guilliermondii. H. uvarum and C. flavescens were the dominant species present on the grapes. For the first time Sporidiobolus pararoseus was discovered as an inhabitant of the grape ecosystem. The yeast community on grape berries was influenced by the grape chemical composition, vine-variety and vine-growing region. This study is the first to identify the yeast communities associated with grapes in China using molecular methods. The results enrich our knowledge of wine-related microorganisms, and can be used to promote the development of the local wine

  7. Application of proanthocyanidins from peanut skins as a natural yeast inhibitory agent.

    PubMed

    Sarnoski, Paul J; Boyer, Renee R; O'Keefe, Sean F

    2012-04-01

    Proanthocyanidins were extracted from peanut skins and investigated for their antimicrobial activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Zygosaccharomyces bisporus in traditional growth media (Sabouraud Dextrose and Maltose broth) and a simulated apple juice beverage. Peanut skins extracts (PSE) were prepared through a multisolvent extraction procedure. The PSE extended the lag phase growth of the 3 yeasts studied at a concentration of 1 mg/mL and at 10 mg/mL yeast growth was totally inhibited for 120 h. PSE was fractionated by normal phase high performance liquid chromatography and the active components/fractions were determined. Compounds present in the fractions were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine the compounds responsible for inhibition. Fractions consisting mostly of A-type proanthocyanidin dimers, trimers, and tetramers showed the highest percent inhibition toward the yeasts tested in this study. Both optical density (OD) and standard enumeration plating methods were performed in this study. The OD method led to an overestimation of the inhibitory effects of PSE, the 2 methods agreed in respect to treatment effects but not the severity of the inhibition. There is a growing consumer demand for "fresh like" products containing reduced amounts of chemical preservatives without compromising food safety and quality. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if an extract of peanut skins containing flavonoid rich compounds could function as a natural antimicrobial in a model beverage system. Proteins were removed through the process of producing the peanut skin extract, thus it is unlikely to contain peanut allergens. The antimicrobial compounds mentioned in this study were successfully integrated into a model beverage system, and were found to have antimicrobial effect. However, the incorporation of these compounds would likely lead to negative sensory attributes at the concentration needed

  8. Wine aromatic compound production and fermentative behaviour within different non-Saccharomyces species and clones.

    PubMed

    Escribano, R; González-Arenzana, L; Portu, J; Garijo, P; López-Alfaro, I; López, R; Santamaría, P; Gutiérrez, A R

    2018-06-01

    Twenty-five enological yeasts belonging to nine different species (Candida zeylanoides, Cryptococcus uzbekistanensis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Williopsis pratensis, Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were screened for aroma formation and fermentative behaviour as part of a non-Saccharomyces yeast selection programme. Pure cultures were inoculated in pasteurized grape juice in order to perform alcoholic fermentations. Some non-Saccharomyces species did not ferment, others did not get established and none of them completed alcoholic fermentations. The physico-chemical parameters of the wines and the abundance of aromatic compounds at the end of alcoholic fermentation highlighted the notable differences in the aroma-forming ability and fermentative behaviour of the different non-Saccharomyces species, but not within clones. Lower diversity was detected within non-Saccharomyces species than that reported in S. cerevisiae with regard to enological behaviour and aromatic profiles. Metschnikowia pulcherrima and L. thermotolerans are the two species with higher possibilities to become an inoculum. Few significant differences were found within clones of the same species, but very important parameters in wine quality, such as volatile acidity, ethyl acetate and acetoin, which would justify selection programmes within those species. The results also demonstrated that T. delbrueckii and L. thermotolerans are two close species in their aromatic profiles. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Detection of antifungal properties in Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei SM20, SM29, and SM63 and molecular typing of the strains.

    PubMed

    Schwenninger, Susanne Miescher; von Ah, Ueli; Niederer, Brigitte; Teuber, Michael; Meile, Leo

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacilli isolated from different food and feed samples such as raw milk, cheese, yoghurt, olives, sour dough, as well as corn and grass silage, were screened for their antifungal activities. Out of 1,424 isolates tested, 82 were shown to be inhibitory to different yeasts (Candida spp. and Zygosaccharomyces bailii) and a Penicillium sp., which were previously isolated from spoiled yoghurt and fruits. Carbohydrate fermentation patterns suggested that a substantial portion, 25%, belonged to the Lactobacillus casei group, including L. casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus. The isolates SM20 (DSM14514), SM29 (DSM14515), and SM63 (DSM14516) were classified by PCR using species-specific primers to target the corresponding type strains (L. casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus) as controls. Further molecular typing methods such as randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene allowed classifying strains SM20, SM29, and SM63 as L. paracasei subsp. paracasei in accordance with the new reclassification of the L. casei group proposed by Collins et al.

  10. Characterization of in vitro antifungal activities of small and American cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos L. and V. macrocarpon Aiton) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) concentrates in sugar reduced fruit spreads.

    PubMed

    Ermis, Ertan; Hertel, Christian; Schneider, Christin; Carle, Reinhold; Stintzing, Florian; Schmidt, Herbert

    2015-07-02

    In this study, cranberry and lingonberry concentrates were added to commercial sugar-reduced fruit spreads (raspberry-Aloe vera, strawberry-guava, and strawberry-lime), and tested for their antifungal activities. Selected strains of the species Absidia glauca, Penicillium brevicompactum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, as well as xerophilic environmental isolates of the genera Penicillium and Eurotium were used for challenge testing. Initially, varying concentrations of synthetic antifungal agents, such as sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate were tested against these fungi on wort agar containing 31% fructose at different pH values. Subsequently, the experiments were conducted in fruit spreads containing different concentrations of cranberry and lingonberry concentrates. The results of this study demonstrate that these concentrates were able to inhibit growth of visible colonies of xerophilic and non-xerophilic fungi. Cranberry and lingonberry concentrates are interesting candidates for natural preservation against fungal growth in sugar reduced fruit spreads. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of crude epicarp and seed extracts from mature avocado fruit (Persea americana) of three cultivars.

    PubMed

    Raymond Chia, Teck Wah; Dykes, Gary A

    2010-07-01

    The epicarp and seed of Persea Americana Mill. var. Hass (Lauraceae), Persea Americana Mill. var. Shepard, and Persea americana Mill. var Fuerte cultivars of mature avocados (n = 3) were ground separately and extracted with both absolute ethanol and distilled water. Extracts were analyzed for antimicrobial activity using the microtiter broth microdilution assay against four Gram-positive bacteria, six Gram-negative bacteria, and one yeast. Antimicrobial activity against two molds was determined by the hole plate method. The ethanol extracts showed antimicrobial activity (104.2-416.7 microg/mL) toward both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (except Escherichia coli), while inhibition of the water extracts was only observed for Listeria monocytogenes (93.8-375.0 microg/mL) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (354.2 microg/mL). The minimum concentration required to inhibit Zygosaccharomyces bailii was 500 microg/mL for the ethanol extracts, while no inhibition was observed for the water extracts. No inhibition by either ethanol or water extracts was observed against Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus flavus.

  12. Yeast community associated with the solid state fermentation of traditional Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Chen, Liangqiang; Xu, Yan

    2013-09-02

    Yeasts are the most important group of microorganisms contributing to liquor quality in the solid-state fermentation process of Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor. There occurred a complex yeast community structure during this process, including stages of Daqu (the starter) making, stacking fermentation on the ground and liquor fermentation in the pits. In the Daqu making stage, few yeast strains accumulated. However, the stacking fermentation stage accumulated nine yeast species with different physio-biochemical characteristics. But only four species kept dominant until liquor fermentation, which were Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia membranifaciens, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, implying their important functions in liquor making. The four species tended to inhabit in different locations of the stack and pits during stacking and liquor fermentation, due to the condition heterogeneity of the solid-state fermentation, including the different fermentation temperature profiles and oxygen density in different locations. Moreover, yeast population was much larger in the upper layer than that in the middle and bottom layers in liquor fermentation, which was in accordance with the profile of reducing sugar consumption and ethanol production. This was a systematical investigation of yeast community structure dynamics in the Maotai-flavor liquor fermentation process. It would be of help to understand the fermentative mechanism in solid-state fermentation for Maotai-flavor liquor. © 2013.

  13. Yeast diversity on grapes in two German wine growing regions.

    PubMed

    Brysch-Herzberg, Michael; Seidel, Martin

    2015-12-02

    The yeast diversity on wine grapes in Germany, one of the most northern wine growing regions of the world, was investigated by means of a culture dependent approach. All yeast isolates were identified by sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA and the ITS region. Besides Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima, which are well known to be abundant on grapes, Metschnikowia viticola, Rhodosporidium babjevae, and Curvibasidium pallidicorallinum, as well as two potentially new species related to Sporidiobolus pararoseus and Filobasidium floriforme, turned out to be typical members of the grape yeast community. We found M. viticola in about half of the grape samples in high abundance. Our data strongly suggest that M. viticola is one of the most important fermenting yeast species on grapes in the temperate climate of Germany. The frequent occurrence of Cu. pallidicorallinum and strains related to F. floriforme is a new finding. The current investigation provides information on the distribution of recently described yeast species, some of which are known from a very few strains up to now. Interestingly yeasts known for their role in the wine making process, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces bayanus ssp. uvarum, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, were not found in the grape samples. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Yeast communities associated with artisanal mezcal fermentations from Agave salmiana.

    PubMed

    Verdugo Valdez, A; Segura Garcia, L; Kirchmayr, M; Ramírez Rodríguez, P; González Esquinca, A; Coria, R; Gschaedler Mathis, A

    2011-11-01

    The aims of this work were to characterize the fermentation process of mezcal from San Luis Potosi, México and identify the yeasts present in the fermentation using molecular culture-dependent methods (RFLP of the 5.8S-ITS and sequencing of the D1/D2 domain) and also by using a culture-independent method (DGGE). The alcoholic fermentations of two separate musts obtained from Agave salmiana were analyzed. Sugar, ethanol and major volatile compounds concentrations were higher in the first fermentation, which shows the importance of having a quality standard for raw materials, particularly in the concentration of fructans, in order to produce fermented Agave salmiana must with similar characteristics. One hundred ninety-two (192) different yeast colonies were identified, from those present on WL agar plates, by RFLP analysis of the ITS1-5.8S- ITS2 from the rRNA gene, with restriction endonucleases, HhaI, HaeIII and HinfI. The identified yeasts were: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia kluyveri, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Clavispora lusitaniae, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Candida ethanolica and Saccharomyces exiguus. These identifications were confirmed by sequencing the D1-D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene. With the PCR-DGGE method, bands corresponding to S. cerevisiae, K. marxianus and T. delbrueckii were clearly detected, confirming the results obtained with classic techniques.

  15. Fabrication, stability and efficacy of dual-component antimicrobial nanoemulsions: essential oil (thyme oil) and cationic surfactant (lauric arginate).

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuhua; McLandsborough, Lynne; McClements, David Julian

    2015-04-01

    The influence of a cationic surfactant (lauric arginate, LAE) on the physical properties and antimicrobial efficacy of thyme oil nanoemulsions was investigated. Nanoemulsions prepared from pure thyme oil were highly unstable due to Ostwald ripening, but they could be stabilized by adding a ripening inhibitor (corn oil) to the oil phase prior to homogenisation. The loading capacity and antimicrobial efficacy of thyme oil nanoemulsions were significantly increased by adding LAE. In the absence of LAE, at least 60 wt% corn oil had to be added to the lipid phase to inhibit Ostwald ripening; but in the presence of 0.1 wt% LAE, only 30 wt% corn oil was needed. LAE addition substantially increased the antimicrobial efficacy of the thyme oil nanoemulsions: 200 μg/ml thyme oil was needed to inhibit growth of a spoilage yeast (Zygosaccharomyces bailii) if LAE was added, whereas ⩾ 400 μg/ml was needed in the absence of LAE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. South Brazilian wines: culturable yeasts associated to bottled wines produced in Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Castrillón, Mauricio; Mendes, Sandra Denise Camargo; Valente, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the presence and role of yeasts in bottled wines helps to know and control the organoleptic quality of the final product. The South Region of Brazil is an important wine producer, and the state of "Rio Grande do Sul" (RS) accounts for 90% of Brazilian wines. The state of "Santa Catarina" (SC) started the production in 1975, and is currently the fifth Brazilian producer. As there is little information about yeasts present in Brazilian wines, our main objective was to assess the composition of culturable yeasts associated to bottled wines produced in RS and SC, South of Brazil. We sampled 20 RS and 29 SC bottled wines produced between 2003 and 2011, and we isolated culturable yeasts in non-selective agar plates. We identified all isolates by sequencing of the D1/D2 domain of LSU rDNA or ITS1-5.8 S-ITS2 region, and comparison with type strain sequences deposited in GenBank database. Six yeast species were shared in the final product in both regions. We obtained two spoilage yeast profiles: RS with Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Pichia membranifaciens (Dekkera bruxellensis was found only in specific table wines); and SC with Dekkera bruxellensis and Pichia manshurica. Knowledge concerning the different spoilage profiles is important for winemaking practices in both regions.

  17. Inactivation of food spoilage microorganisms by hydrodynamic cavitation to achieve pasteurization and sterilization of fluid foods.

    PubMed

    Milly, P J; Toledo, R T; Harrison, M A; Armstead, D

    2007-11-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation is the formation of gas bubbles in a fluid due to pressure fluctuations induced by mechanical means. Various high-acid (pH < [corrected]/= 4.6) fluid foods were processed in a hydrodynamic cavitation reactor to determine if commercial sterility can be achieved at reduced processing temperatures. Sporicidal properties of the process were also tested on a low-acid (pH > [corrected] 4.6) fluid food. Fluid foods were pumped under pressure into a hydrodynamic cavitation reactor and subjected to 2 rotor speeds and flow rates to achieve 2 designated exit temperatures. Thermal inactivation kinetics were used to determine heat-induced lethality for all organisms. Calcium-fortified apple juice processed at 3000 and 3600 rpm rotor speeds on the reactor went through a transient temperature change from 20 to 65.6 or 76.7 degrees C and the total process lethality exceeded 5-log reduction of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus sakei cells, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii cells and ascospores. Tomato juice inoculated with Bacillus coagulans spores and processed at 3000 and 3600 rpm rotor speeds endured a transient temperature from 37.8 to 93.3 or 104.4 degrees C with viable CFU reductions of 0.88 and 3.10 log cycles, respectively. Skim milk inoculated with Clostridium sporogenes putrefactive anaerobe 3679 spores and processed at 3000 or 3600 rpm rotor speeds endured a transient temperature from 48.9 to 104.4 or 115.6 degrees C with CFU reductions of 0.69 and 2.84 log cycles, respectively. Utilizing hydrodynamic cavitation to obtain minimally processed pasteurized low-acid and commercially sterilized high-acid fluid foods is possible with appropriate process considerations for different products.

  18. Simultaneously saccharification and fermentation approach as a tool for enhanced fossil fuels biodesulfurization.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Susana M; Arez, Bruno F; Roseiro, José C; Alves, Luís

    2016-11-01

    Biodesulfurization can be a complementary technology to the hydrodesulfurization, the commonly physical-chemical process used for sulfur removal from crude oil. The desulfurizing bacterium Gordonia alkanivorans strain 1B as a fructophilic microorganism requires fructose as C-source. In this context, the main goal of this work was the optimization of a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) approach using the Zygosaccharomyces bailii strain Talf1 crude enzymes with invertase activity and sucrose as a cheaper fructose-rich commercial C-source (50% fructose) towards dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization by strain 1B. The determination of optimal conditions, for both sucrose hydrolysis and DBT desulfurization was carried out through two sequential experimental uniform designs according to the Doehlert distribution for two factors: pH (5.5-7.5) and temperature (28-38 °C), with the enzyme load of 1.16 U/g/L; and enzyme load (0-4 U/g/L) and temperature (28-38 °C), with pH at 7.5. Based on 2-hydroxybiphenyl production, the analysis of the response surfaces obtained pointed out for pH 7.5, 32 °C and 1.8 U/g/L as optimal conditions. Further optimized SSF of sucrose during the DBT desulfurization process permitted to attain a 4-fold enhanced biodesulfurization. This study opens a new focus of research through the exploitation of sustainable low cost sucrose-rich feedstocks towards a more economical viable bioprocess scale-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Production of glutaminase(E.C. 3.2.1.5) from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in solid-state fermentation and modeling the growth of Z. rouxii therein.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Padma; Singhal, Rekha S

    2010-04-01

    Glutaminase production in Zygosacchromyces rouxii by solid-state fermentation (SSF) is detailed. Substrates screening showed best results with oatmeal (OM) and wheatbran (WB). Further, a 1:1 combination of OM: WB gave 0.614units/gds with artificial sea water (ASW) as moistening agent. Evaluation of additional carbon, nitrogen, aminoacids and minerals supplementation was done. A central composite design was employed to investigate effects of four variables, viz. moisture content, glucose, corn steep liquor and glutamine on production. A 4-fold increase in enzyme production was obtained. Studies were undertaken to analyze the time course model the microbial growth and nutrient utilization during SSF. Logistic equation (R2=0.8973), describing the growth model of Z.rouxii was obtained, with maximum values of micronm and Xm at 0.326h-1 and 7.35% of dry matter weight loss, respectively. A good-fit model to describe utilization of total carbohydrate (R2=0.9906) nitrogen concentration (R2=0.9869) with time was obtained. The model was used successfully to predict enzyme production (R2=0.7950).

  20. Rotational Energy Transfer and Collisional Induced Raman Linewidths in N2 Gas. 1; Energy Transfer Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Green, Sheldon; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotationally inelastic transitions of N2 have been studied in the coupled state (CS) and infinite-order-sudden (IOS) approximations, using the N2-N2 rigidrotor potential of van der Avoird et al. For benchmarking purposes, close coupling (CC) calculations have also been carried out over a limited energy range. The CC and CS cross sections have been obtained both with and without identical molecule exchange symmetry, whereas exchange was neglected in the IOS calculations. The CS results track the CC cross sections rather well; between 113 - 219 cm(exp -1) the average deviation is 14%. Comparison between the CS and IOS cross sections at the high energy end of the CS calculation, 500 - 680 cm(exp -1), shows that IOS is sensitive to the amount of inelasticity and the results for large DELTA J transitions are subject to larger errors. It is found that the state-to-state cross sections with even and odd exchange symmetry agree to better than 2% and are well represented as a sum of direct and exchange cross sections for distinguishable molecules, an indication of the applicability of a classical treatment for this system. This result, however, does not apply to partial cross sections for given total J, but arises from a near cancellation in summing over partial waves. In order to use rigid-rotor results for the calculation of effective rotational excitation rates of N2 in the v=1 vibrational level colliding with bath N2 molecules in the v=0 level, it is assumed that exchange scattering between molecules in different vibrational levels is negligible and direct scattering is independent of Y. Good agreement with room temperature experimental data is obtained. The effective rates determined using the IOS and energy corrected sudden (ECS) approximations are also in reasonable agreement with experiment, with the ECS results being somewhat better. The problem with a degeneracy factor in earlier cross section expressions for collisions between identical molecules is pointed out and corrected.

  1. 21 CFR 180.25 - Mannitol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fructose. (2) The fermentation of sugars or sugar alcohols such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, or sorbitol using the yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. (3) A pure culture fermentation of sugars such as fructose...

  2. 21 CFR 180.25 - Mannitol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fructose. (2) The fermentation of sugars or sugar alcohols such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, or sorbitol using the yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. (3) A pure culture fermentation of sugars such as fructose...

  3. Stingless Bee Larvae Require Fungal Steroid to Pupate.

    PubMed

    Paludo, Camila R; Menezes, Cristiano; Silva-Junior, Eduardo A; Vollet-Neto, Ayrton; Andrade-Dominguez, Andres; Pishchany, Gleb; Khadempour, Lily; do Nascimento, Fabio S; Currie, Cameron R; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon; Pupo, Mônica T

    2018-01-18

    The larval stage of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona depilis must consume a specific brood cell fungus in order to continue development. Here we show that this fungus is a member of the genus Zygosaccharomyces and provides essential steroid precursors to the developing bee. Insect pupation requires ecdysteroid hormones, and as insects cannot synthesize sterols de novo, they must obtain steroids in their diet. Larval in vitro culturing assays demonstrated that consuming ergosterol recapitulates the developmental effects on S. depilis as ingestion of Zygosaccharomyces sp. cells. Thus, we determined the molecular underpinning of this intimate mutualistic symbiosis. Phylogenetic analyses showed that similar cases of bee-Zygosaccharomyces symbiosis may exist. This unprecedented case of bee-fungus symbiosis driven by steroid requirement brings new perspectives regarding pollinator-microbiota interaction and preservation.

  4. Organoleptic Analysis of Doughs Fermented with Yeasts From A Nigerian Palm Wine (Elaeis guineensis) and Certain Commercial Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    B, Boboye; I, Dayo-Owoyemi; F. A, Akinyosoye

    2008-01-01

    Yeasts isolated from a freshly tapped palm wine obtained from Akure, Nigeria were identified as Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Geotrichum lactis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. Each of the isolates was used to ferment wheat flour dough and baked. Sensory analysis of the doughs was carried out on leavening, texture, aroma, taste and appearance. Saccharomyces cerevisiae performed best in leavening the dough while Debaryomyces hansenii produced doughs with the best taste and aroma. Appearances of the doughs made with all the isolated yeasts did not differ significantly (P<0.05) from that of the dough that lacked yeast. PMID:19088921

  5. Metabolism of the Fusarium mycotoxins zearalenone and deoxynivalenol by yeast strains of technological relevance.

    PubMed

    Böswald, C; Engelhardt, G; Vogel, H; Wallnöfer, P R

    1995-01-01

    The Fusarium mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA), added at a level of 2 micrograms/ml, was reduced stereoselectively by cultures of Candida tropicalis, Torulaspora delbrückii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, and 7 Saccharomyces strains to both alpha- and beta-zearalenol. In contrast, only alpha-zearalenol was produced from ZEA by Pichia fermentans and several yeast strains of the genera Candida, Hansenula, Brettanomyces, Schizosaccharomyces, and Saccharomycopsis. No glucose conjugates of ZEA (zearalenone-4-beta-D-glucopyranoside) were detected. The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) was not metabolized by any of the yeast strains that were used for analysis.

  6. The contribution of moulds and yeasts to the fermentation of 'agbelima' cassava dough.

    PubMed

    Amoa-Awua, W K; Frisvad, J C; Sefa-Dedeh, S; Jakobsen, M

    1997-09-01

    Agbelima, a fermented cassava meal widely consumed in Ghana, Togo and Benin, is produced by fermenting grated cassava with one of several types of traditional cassava dough inoculum. During fermentation a smooth textured sour dough is produced, the toxicity of cassava is reduced and there is a build up of volatile aroma compounds. Four types of inocula were included in the present investigation. In one type moulds were found to form a dominant part of the microbiota, the species present being Penicillium sclerotiorum, P. citrinum, P. nodulum, Geotrichum candidum and a basidiomycete. All these moulds were found to possess cellulase activity which was responsible for the hydrolysis of cassava tuber cellulose during fermentation leading to a breakdown of the coarse texture of cassava dough. The yeasts Candida krusei, C. tropicalis and Zygosaccharomyces spp. were present in high numbers in the four types of inocula including the moudly inoculum. The yeasts C. tropicalis and some strains of Zygosaccharomyces, all of which possessed cellulase activity, were also found to contribute to the modification of cassava texture during fermentation. All yeasts and moulds exhibited linamarase activity and were therefore capable of breaking down the cyanogenic glucosides present in cassava.

  7. Comparative evaluation of microbial diversity and metabolite profiles in doenjang, a fermented soybean paste, during the two different industrial manufacturing processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Sarah; Singh, Digar; Oh, Ji Young; Jeon, Eun Jung; Ryu, Hyung SeoK; Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2017-04-15

    Two different doenjang manufacturing processes, the industrial process (IP) and the modified industrial process (mIP) with specific microbial assortments, were subjected to metabolite profiling using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS). The multivariate analyses indicated that both primary and secondary metabolites exhibited distinct patterns according to the fermentation processes (IP and mIP). Microbial community analysis for doenjang using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), exhibited that both bacteria and fungi contributed proportionally for each step in the process viz., soybean, steaming, drying, meju fermentation, cooling, brining, and aging. Further, correlation analysis indicated that Aspergillus population was linked to sugar metabolism, Bacillus spp. with that of fatty acids, whereas Tetragenococcus and Zygosaccharomyces were found associated with amino acids. These results suggest that the components and quality of doenjang are critically influenced by the microbial assortments in each process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microbial terroir and food innovation: The case of yeast biodiversity in wine.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Garofalo, Carmela; Chiriatti, Maria Assunta; Grieco, Francesco; Spano, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces represents a heterogeneous class in the grape/must/wine environments including several yeast genera (e.g., Saccharomyces, Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Candida, Metschnikowia, Kluyveromyces, Zygosaccharomyces, Torulaspora, Dekkera and Schizosaccharomyces) and species. Since, each species may differently contribute to the improvement/depreciation of wine qualities, it appears clear the reason why species belong to non-Saccharomyces are also considered a biotechnological resource in wine fermentation. Here, we briefly review the oenological significance of this specific part of microbiota associated with grapes/musts/wine. Moreover, the diversity of cultivable non-Saccharomyces genera and their contribute to typical wines fermentations will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethyl Carbamate Formation Regulated by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Nonconventional Yeasts in Solid-State Fermentation of Chinese Moutai-Flavor Liquor.

    PubMed

    Du, Hai; Song, Zhewei; Xu, Yan

    2018-01-10

    This study aimed to identify specific microorganisms related to the formation of precursors of EC (ethyl carbamate) in the solid-state fermentation of Chinese Moutai-flavor liquor. The EC content was significantly correlated with the urea content during the fermentation process (R 2 = 0.772, P < 0.01). Differences in urea production and degradation were found at both species and functional gene levels by metatranscriptomic sequencing and culture-dependent analysis. Lactobacillus spp. could competitively degrade arginine through the arginine deiminase pathway with yeasts, and most Lactobacillus species were capable of degrading urea. Some dominant nonconventional yeasts, such as Pichia, Schizosaccharomyces, and Zygosaccharomyces species, were shown to produce low amounts of urea relative to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover, unusual urea degradation pathways (urea carboxylase, allophanate hydrolase, and ATP-independent urease) were identified. Our results indicate that EC precursor levels in the solid-state fermentation can be controlled using lactic acid bacteria and nonconventional yeasts.

  10. Formation by yeast of 2-furanmethanethiol and ethyl 2-mercaptopropionate aroma compounds in Japanese soy sauce.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qi; Hatakeyama, Makoto; Sugawara, Etsuko

    2014-01-01

    Two aroma compounds of volatile thiols, 2-furanmethanethiol (2FM) and ethyl 2-mercaptopropionate (ET2MP), were formed in five types of Japanese soy sauce during fermentation by yeast. The concentrations of 2FM and ET2MP in the soy sauce samples increased during alcoholic fermentation. The concentrations of 2FM and ET2MP were higher in the soy sauce fermented by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii than in that fermented by Candida versatilis. The enantiomers of ET2MP were separated by gas chromatography in a capillary column. The average enantiomeric ratio of ET2MP in the soy sauce was approximately 1:1. 2FM was formed by yeast in a medium prepared from cysteine and furfural, and cysteine is considered the key precursor of 2FM by yeast in soy sauce.

  11. Rational selection of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts for mixed starters based on ester formation and enological traits.

    PubMed

    Viana, Fernando; Gil, José V; Genovés, Salvador; Vallés, Salvador; Manzanares, Paloma

    2008-09-01

    Thirty-eight yeast strains belonging to the genera Candida, Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Torulaspora and Zygosaccharomyces were screened for ester formation on synthetic microbiological medium. The genera Hanseniaspora and Pichia stood out as the best acetate ester producers. Based on the ester profile Hanseniaspora guilliermondii 11027 and 11102, Hanseniaspora osmophila 1471 and Pichia membranifaciens 10113 and 10550 were selected for further characterization of enological traits. When growing on must H. osmophila 1471, which displayed a glucophilic nature and was able to consume more than 90% of initial must sugars, produced levels of acetic acid, medium chain fatty acids and ethyl acetate, within the ranges described for wine. On the other hand, it was found to be a strong producer of 2-phenylethyl acetate. Our data suggest that H. osmophila 1471 is a good candidate for mixed starters, although the possible interactions with S. cerevisiae deserve further research.

  12. Batch-batch stable microbial community in the traditional fermentation process of huyumei broad bean pastes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linjiang; Fan, Zihao; Kuai, Hui; Li, Qi

    2017-09-01

    During natural fermentation processes, a characteristic microbial community structure (MCS) is naturally formed, and it is interesting to know about its batch-batch stability. This issue was explored in a traditional semi-solid-state fermentation process of huyumei, a Chinese broad bean paste product. The results showed that this MCS mainly contained four aerobic Bacillus species (8 log CFU per g), including B. subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. methylotrophicus, and B. tequilensis, and the facultative anaerobe B. cereus with a low concentration (4 log CFU per g), besides a very small amount of the yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (2 log CFU per g). The dynamic change of the MCS in the brine fermentation process showed that the abundance of dominant species varied within a small range, and in the beginning of process the growth of lactic acid bacteria was inhibited and Staphylococcus spp. lost its viability. Also, the MCS and its dynamic change were proved to be highly reproducible among seven batches of fermentation. Therefore, the MCS naturally and stably forms between different batches of the traditional semi-solid-state fermentation of huyumei. Revealing microbial community structure and its batch-batch stability is helpful for understanding the mechanisms of community formation and flavour production in a traditional fermentation. This issue in a traditional semi-solid-state fermentation of huyumei broad bean paste was firstly explored. This fermentation process was revealed to be dominated by a high concentration of four aerobic species of Bacillus, a low concentration of B. cereus and a small amount of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. Lactic acid bacteria and Staphylococcus spp. lost its viability at the beginning of fermentation. Such the community structure was proved to be highly reproducible among seven batches. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Complete genome sequence and comparative genomics of the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Indu; Tomar, Rajul; Ganesan, K; Prasad, G S; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2017-03-23

    The probiotic yeast, Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) is known to be effective against many gastrointestinal disorders and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. To understand molecular basis of probiotic-properties ascribed to Sb we determined the complete genomes of two strains of Sb i.e. Biocodex and unique28 and the draft genomes for three other Sb strains that are marketed as probiotics in India. We compared these genomes with 145 strains of S. cerevisiae (Sc) to understand genome-level similarities and differences between these yeasts. A distinctive feature of Sb from other Sc is absence of Ty elements Ty1, Ty3, Ty4 and associated LTR. However, we could identify complete Ty2 and Ty5 elements in Sb. The genes for hexose transporters HXT11 and HXT9, and asparagine-utilization are absent in all Sb strains. We find differences in repeat periods and copy numbers of repeats in flocculin genes that are likely related to the differential adhesion of Sb as compared to Sc. Core-proteome based taxonomy places Sb strains along with wine strains of Sc. We find the introgression of five genes from Z. bailii into the chromosome IV of Sb and wine strains of Sc. Intriguingly, genes involved in conferring known probiotic properties to Sb are conserved in most Sc strains.

  14. Kristeller maneuvers or fundal pressure and maternal/neonatal morbidity: obstetric and judicial literature review.

    PubMed

    Malvasi, Antonio; Zaami, Simona; Tinelli, Andrea; Trojano, Giuseppe; Montanari Vergallo, Gianluca; Marinelli, Enrico

    2018-02-21

    A significant amount of data concerning maternal-fetal damage arising from the exertion of Kristeller maneuvers (KMs) or fundal pressure (FP) go unreleased due to medicolegal implications. For this reason, the paper gathers information as to the real magnitude of litigation related to FP-induced damages and injuries. The authors have undertaken a research in order to include general search engines (PubMed-Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Google, GyneWeb) and legal databases (De Jure, Italian database of jurisprudence daily update; Westlaw, Thomson Reuters, American ruling database and Bailii, UK Court Ruling Database). Results confirm said phenomenon to be more wide ranging than it appears through official channels. Several courts of law, both in the United States of America (USA) and in European Union (EU) Member States as well, have ruled against the use of the maneuver itself, assuming a stance conducive to a presumption of guilt against those doctors and healthcare providers who resorted to KMs or FP during deliveries. Given how rife FP is in mainstream obstetric practice, it is as if there were a wide gap between obstetric real-life and what official jurisprudence and healthcare institutions-sanctioned official practices are. The authors think that it would be desirable to draft specifically targeted guidelines or recommendations on maneuvers during vaginal delivery, in which to point out exactly what kinds of maneuvering techniques are to be absolutely banned and what maneuvers are to be allowed, and under what conditions their application can be considered appropriate.

  15. Effect of xantham gum, steviosides, clove, and cinnamon essential oils on the sensory and microbiological quality of a low sugar tomato jam.

    PubMed

    Gliemmo, María F; Montagnani, María A; Schelegueda, Laura I; González, Malena M; Campos, Carmen A

    2016-03-01

    The partial or total decrease of sugar content in the formulation of jams affects their physical, chemical and microbiological stability. In order to minimize these technological problems, we studied the effect of xanthan gum (XG), steviosides, cinnamon (CO), and clove (CLO) essential oils on the sensory and microbiological quality of a low sugar tomato jam. Levels of 0.250 g/100 g steviosides and 0.450 g/100 g XG showed maximum score of overall acceptability of jam. The combination of essential oils produced synergistic and additive effects in vitro on growth of Z. bailii and Z. rouxii, respectively. However, in the jam, CO was more effective and CLO did not modify the CO action. Cell surface was one of the sites of action of CO since a decrease in yeast cell surface hydrophobicity was observed. From the microbiological and sensory points of view, 0.0060 g/100 g CO showed the maximum score of jam overall acceptability and did not cause yeast inactivation but it could be useful as an additional stress factor against yeast post--process contamination. The adequate levels of XG, steviosides, and CO can improve the quality of a low sugar jam formulation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Culture medium optimization for osmotolerant yeasts by use of a parallel fermenter system and rapid microbiological testing.

    PubMed

    Pfannebecker, Jens; Schiffer-Hetz, Claudia; Fröhlich, Jürgen; Becker, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, a culture medium for qualitative detection of osmotolerant yeasts, named OM, was developed. For the development, culture media with different concentrations of glucose, fructose, potassium chloride and glycerin were analyzed in a Biolumix™ test incubator. Selectivity for osmotolerant yeasts was guaranteed by a water activity (a w )-value of 0.91. The best results regarding fast growth of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (WH 1002) were achieved in a culture medium consisting of 45% glucose, 5% fructose and 0.5% yeast extract and in a medium with 30% glucose, 10% glycerin, 5% potassium chloride and 0.5% yeast extract. Substances to stimulate yeast fermentation rates were analyzed in a RAMOS ® parallel fermenter system, enabling online measurement of the carbon dioxide transfer rate (CTR) in shaking flasks. Significant increases of the CTR was achieved by adding especially 0.1-0.2% ammonium salts ((NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 , (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 or NH 4 NO 3 ), 0.5% meat peptone and 1% malt extract. Detection times and the CTR of 23 food-borne yeast strains of the genera Zygosaccharomyces, Torulaspora, Schizosaccharomyces, Candida and Wickerhamomyces were analyzed in OM bouillon in comparison to the selective culture media YEG50, MYG50 and DG18 in the parallel fermenter system. The OM culture medium enabled the detection of 10 2 CFU/g within a time period of 2-3days, depending on the analyzed yeast species. Compared with YEG50 and MYG50 the detection times could be reduced. As an example, W. anomalus (WH 1021) was detected after 124h in YEG50, 95.5h in MYG50 and 55h in OM bouillon. Compared to YEG50 the maximum CO 2 transfer rates for Z. rouxii (WH 1001), T. delbrueckii (DSM 70526), S. pombe (DSM 70576) and W. anomalus (WH 1016) increased by a factor ≥2.6. Furthermore, enrichment cultures of inoculated high-sugar products in OM culture medium were analyzed in the Biolumix™ system. The results proved that detection times of 3days for Z. rouxii and T. delbrueckii

  17. Social status shapes the bacterial and fungal gut communities of the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ji-Hyun; Jung, Mi-Ja; Kim, Pil Soo; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2018-01-31

    Despite the fungal abundance in honey and bee bread, little is known about the fungal gut community of the honey bee and its effect on host fitness. Using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and ITS2 region amplicons, we analysed the bacterial and fungal gut communities of the honey bee as affected by the host social status. Both communities were significantly affected by the host social status. The bacterial gut community was similar to those characterised in previous studies. The fungal gut communities of most worker bees were highly dominated by Saccharomyces but foraging bees and queens were colonised by diverse fungal species and Zygosaccharomyces, respectively. The high fungal density and positive correlation between Saccharomyces species and Lactobacillus species, known yeast antagonists, were only observed in the nurse bee; this suggested that the conflict between Saccharomyces and Lactobacillus was compromised by the metabolism of the host and/or other gut microbes. PICRUSt analysis revealed significant differences in enriched gene clusters of the bacterial gut communities of the nurse and foraging bees, suggesting that different host social status might induce changes in the gut microbiota, and, that consequently, gut microbial community shifts to adapt to the gut environment.

  18. Composition and diversity of rhizosphere fungal community in Coptis chinensis Franch. continuous cropping fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longyun; Wu, Xiaoli; Wang, Yu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, effects of continuous cropping on soil properties, enzyme activities, and relative abundance, community composition and diversity of fungal taxa were investigated. Rhizosphere soil from field continuously cropped for one-year, three-year and five-year by Coptis chinensis Franch. was collected and analyzed. Illumina high-throughput sequencing analysis showed that continuous cropping of C. chinensis resulted in a significant and continuous decline in the richness and diversity of soil fungal population. Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, and Glomeromycota were the dominant phyla of fungi detected in rhizosphere soil. Fungal genera such as Phoma, Volutella, Pachycudonia, Heterodermia, Gibberella, Cladosporium, Trichocladium, and Sporothrix, were more dominant in continuously cropped samples for three-year and five-year compared to that for one-year. By contrast, genera, such as Zygosaccharomyces, Pseudotaeniolina, Hydnum, Umbelopsis, Humicola, Crustoderma, Psilocybe, Coralloidiomyces, Mortierella, Polyporus, Pyrenula, and Monographella showed higher relative abundance in one-year samples than that in three-year and five-year samples. Cluster analysis of the fungal communities from three samples of rhizosphere soil from C. chinensis field revealed that the fungal community composition, diversity, and structure were significantly affected by the continuous cropping. Continuous cropping of C. chinensis also led to significant declines in soil pH, urease, and catalase activities. Redundancy analysis showed that the soil pH had the most significant effect on soil fungal population under continuous cropping of C. chinensis. PMID:29538438

  19. Composition and diversity of rhizosphere fungal community in Coptis chinensis Franch. continuous cropping fields.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuhong; Pan, Yuan; Li, Longyun; Wu, Xiaoli; Wang, Yu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, effects of continuous cropping on soil properties, enzyme activities, and relative abundance, community composition and diversity of fungal taxa were investigated. Rhizosphere soil from field continuously cropped for one-year, three-year and five-year by Coptis chinensis Franch. was collected and analyzed. Illumina high-throughput sequencing analysis showed that continuous cropping of C. chinensis resulted in a significant and continuous decline in the richness and diversity of soil fungal population. Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, and Glomeromycota were the dominant phyla of fungi detected in rhizosphere soil. Fungal genera such as Phoma, Volutella, Pachycudonia, Heterodermia, Gibberella, Cladosporium, Trichocladium, and Sporothrix, were more dominant in continuously cropped samples for three-year and five-year compared to that for one-year. By contrast, genera, such as Zygosaccharomyces, Pseudotaeniolina, Hydnum, Umbelopsis, Humicola, Crustoderma, Psilocybe, Coralloidiomyces, Mortierella, Polyporus, Pyrenula, and Monographella showed higher relative abundance in one-year samples than that in three-year and five-year samples. Cluster analysis of the fungal communities from three samples of rhizosphere soil from C. chinensis field revealed that the fungal community composition, diversity, and structure were significantly affected by the continuous cropping. Continuous cropping of C. chinensis also led to significant declines in soil pH, urease, and catalase activities. Redundancy analysis showed that the soil pH had the most significant effect on soil fungal population under continuous cropping of C. chinensis.

  20. Production of arabitol by yeasts: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kordowska-Wiater, M

    2015-08-01

    Arabitol belongs to the pentitol family and is used in the food industry as a sweetener and in the production of human therapeutics as an anticariogenic agent and an adipose tissue reducer. It can also be utilized as a substrate for chemical products such as arabinoic and xylonic acids, propylene, ethylene glycol, xylitol and others. It is included on the list of 12 building block C3-C6 compounds, designated for further biotechnological research. This polyol can be produced by yeasts in the processes of bioconversion or biotransformation of waste materials from agriculture, the forest industry (l-arabinose, glucose) and the biodiesel industry (glycerol). The present review discusses research on native yeasts from the genera Candida, Pichia, Debaryomyces and Zygosaccharomyces as well as genetically modified strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which are able to utilize biomass hydrolysates to effectively produce L- or D-arabitol. The metabolic pathways of these yeasts leading from sugars and glycerol to arabitol are presented. Although the number of reports concerning microbial production of arabitol is rather limited, the research on this topic has been growing for the last several years, with researchers looking for new micro-organisms, substrates and technologies. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-06-30

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and Zygosaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Occurrence of yeasts in psittacines droppings from captive birds in Italy.

    PubMed

    Mancianti, Francesca; Nardoni, Simona; Ceccherelli, Renato

    2002-01-01

    Three-hundred twenty five droppings from parrots raised in the premises of 4 breeders and in several private households were cultured for yeasts. One-hundred sixty droppings (49.2%) resulted positive. From these specimens 212 isolates belonging to 27 different species were obtained. Mainly Candida species such as C. albicans, C. catenulata, C. curvata, C. famata, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondi, C. holmii, C. intermedia, C. krusei, C. lambica, C. lusitaniae, C. membranaefaciens, C. parapsilosis, C. pelliculosa, C. sake and C. valida were isolated. Debarvomyces marama, D. polymorphus, Geotrichum sp., Pichia etchelsii, P. ohmeri, Rhodotorula glutinis, R. rubra, Rhodotorula sp., Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. kluyiveri and Zygosaccharomyces sp. were also obtained. Dark colonies on Staib medium were never observed. The psittacine birds apparently serve as carriers for several Candida species or their perfect states and to a lesser extent for other opportunistic yeasts such as Rhodotorula, Trichosporon and Saccharomyces spp., which are considered part of the transient microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract. The most striking finding was the absence of Cryptococcus spp. among the isolates. The present survey confirms the role of pet birds in carrying potential zoonotic yeasts.

  3. Fructanase and fructosyltransferase activity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from fermenting musts of Mezcal.

    PubMed

    Arrizon, Javier; Morel, Sandrine; Gschaedler, Anne; Monsan, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    Fructanase and fructosyltransferase are interesting for the tequila process and prebiotics production (functional food industry). In this study, one hundred thirty non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from "Mezcal de Oaxaca" were screened for fructanase and fructosyltransferase activity. On solid medium, fifty isolates grew on Agave tequilana fructans (ATF), inulin or levan. In liquid media, inulin and ATF induced fructanase activities of between 0.02 and 0.27U/ml depending of yeast isolate. High fructanase activity on sucrose was observed for Kluyveromyces marxianus and Torulaspora delbrueckii, while the highest fructanase activity on inulin and ATF was observed for Issatchenkia orientalis, Cryptococcus albidus, and Candida apicola. Zygosaccharomyces bisporus and Candida boidinii had a high hydrolytic activity on levan. Sixteen yeasts belonging to K. marxianus, T. delbrueckii and C. apicola species were positive for fructosyltransferase activity. Mezcal microbiota proved to showed to be a source for new fructanase and fructosyltransferases with potential application in the tequila and food industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sequence-based analysis of the microbial composition of water kefir from multiple sources.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Alan J; O'Sullivan, Orla; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; Cotter, Paul D

    2013-11-01

    Water kefir is a water-sucrose-based beverage, fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast to produce a final product that is lightly carbonated, acidic and that has a low alcohol percentage. The microorganisms present in water kefir are introduced via water kefir grains, which consist of a polysaccharide matrix in which the microorganisms are embedded. We aimed to provide a comprehensive sequencing-based analysis of the bacterial population of water kefir beverages and grains, while providing an initial insight into the corresponding fungal population. To facilitate this objective, four water kefirs were sourced from the UK, Canada and the United States. Culture-independent, high-throughput, sequencing-based analyses revealed that the bacterial fraction of each water kefir and grain was dominated by Zymomonas, an ethanol-producing bacterium, which has not previously been detected at such a scale. The other genera detected were representatives of the lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria. Our analysis of the fungal component established that it was comprised of the genera Dekkera, Hanseniaspora, Saccharomyces, Zygosaccharomyces, Torulaspora and Lachancea. This information will assist in the ultimate identification of the microorganisms responsible for the potentially health-promoting attributes of these beverages. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid identification of the genus Dekkera/Brettanomyces, the Dekkera subgroup and all individual species.

    PubMed

    Hulin, M; Harrison, E; Stratford, M; Wheals, A E

    2014-09-18

    The genus Dekkera/Brettanomyces comprises five described species: Dekkera bruxellensis, D. anomala, Brettanomyces custersianus, B. naardenensis and B. nanus. Some of them, especially D. bruxellensis, are important spoilage organisms, particularly in the wine and beverage industries. Because of their economic importance many different methods have been developed to identify members of the genus in general and D. bruxellensis in particular. These methods vary in their rapidity, complexity and cost but, partly because of confidentiality issues, it is unclear which methods are used, or how widely, in the relevant industries. Building on previous work with the genera Saccharomyces and Zygosaccharomyces, a suite of eight PCR primer pairs has been designed either on the D1-D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene or translation elongation factor TEF1-α. These primers can specifically identify the genus as a whole, only Dekkera species, each one of the five recognised species as well as a significant subgroup of D. bruxellensis represented by NCYC 3426. Multiplexing has also been tried and it has been shown to be possible with some combinations of genus or Dekkera-level and species-specific primers. Using direct colony PCR amplification followed by gel electrophoresis, a clear positive result can be obtained in less than 3h, thus providing a quick, reliable and inexpensive way to identify target species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion for the delivery of starter cultures in reduced-salt moromi fermentation of soy sauce.

    PubMed

    Devanthi, Putu Virgina Partha; Linforth, Robert; El Kadri, Hani; Gkatzionis, Konstantinos

    2018-08-15

    This study investigated the application of water-oil-water (W 1 /O/W 2 ) double emulsions (DE) for yeast encapsulation and sequential inoculation of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Tetragenococcus halophilus in moromi stage of soy sauce fermentation with reduced NaCl and/or substitution with KCl. Z. rouxii and T. halophilus were incorporated in the internal W 1 and external W 2 phase of DE, respectively. NaCl reduction and substitution promoted T. halophilus growth to 8.88 log CFU/mL, accompanied with faster sugar depletion and enhanced lactic acid production. Reducing NaCl without substitution increased the final pH (5.49) and decreased alcohols, acids, esters, furan and phenol content. However, the application of DE resulted in moromi with similar microbiological and physicochemical characteristics to that of high-salt. Principal component analysis of GC-MS data demonstrated that the reduced-salt moromi had identical aroma profile to that obtained in the standard one, indicating the feasibility of producing low-salt soy sauce without compromising its quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Monitoring of Yeast Communities and Volatile Flavor Changes During Traditional Korean Soy Sauce Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Ran; Jeong, Do-Youn; Baik, Sang-Ho

    2015-09-01

    Flavor development in soy sauce is significantly related to the diversity of yeast species. Due to its unique fermentation with meju, the process of making Korean soy sauce gives rise to a specific yeast community and, therefore, flavor profile; however, no detailed analysis of the identifying these structure has been performed. Changes in yeast community structure during Korean soy sauce fermentation were examined using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods with simultaneous analysis of the changes in volatile compounds by GC-MS analysis. During fermentation, Candida, Pichia, and Rhodotorula sp. were the dominant species, whereas Debaryomyces, Torulaspora, and Zygosaccharomyces sp. were detected only at the early stage. In addition, Cryptococcus, Microbotryum, Tetrapisispora, and Wickerhamomyces were detected as minor strains. Among the 62 compounds identified in this study, alcohols, ketones, and pyrazines were present as the major groups during the initial stages, whereas the abundance of acids with aldehydes increased as the fermentation progressed. Finally, the impacts of 10 different yeast strains found to participate in fermentation on the formation of volatile compounds were evaluated under soy-based conditions. It was revealed that specific species produced different profiles of volatile compounds, some of which were significant flavor contributors, especially volatile alcohols, aldehydes, esters, and ketones. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Effect of halotolerant starter microorganisms on chemical characteristics of fermented chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) sauce.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Shuji; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Kawai, Yuji; Yamazaki, Koji; Tanaka, Akira; Nishikiori, Takafumi; Ohta, Tomoki

    2010-05-26

    Chum salmon sauce mash was inoculated with barley koji (barley steamed and molded with Aspergillus oryzae ) and halotolerant microorganisms (HTMs), Zygosaccharomyces rouxii , Candida versatilis , and Tetragenococcus halophilus , in nine different combinations under non-aseptic conditions similar to the industrial fish sauce production and fermented at 35 +/- 2.5 degrees C for 84 days. The changes in the chemical components, color, and sensory properties during fermentation were investigated. Free amino acid content was increased, and the browning of fish sauce was enhanced by the usage of barley koji during fermentation. The halotolerant yeast (HTY) produced ethanol and repressed the browning by consumption of reducing sugar. Inoculated Z. rouxii in the fish sauce mash produced 2-phenylethanol (2-PE) and 4-hydoxy-2(or 5)-ethyl-5(or 2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF), and C. versatilis in the fish sauce mash produced 4-ethylguaiacol (4-EG), known as characteristic flavor compounds in soy sauce, adding soy-sauce-like flavor to the fish sauce. Thus, inoculation of HTMs and barley koji was effective for conferring the soy-sauce-like flavor and increasing free amino acid and ethanol contents in fish sauce product.

  9. Evaluation of indirect impedance for measuring microbial growth in complex food matrices.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N; Chang, Z; Bravo Almeida, C; Michel, M; Iversen, C; Callanan, M

    2014-09-01

    The suitability of indirect impedance to accurately measure microbial growth in real food matrices was investigated. A variety of semi-solid and liquid food products were inoculated with Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteriditis, Candida tropicalis or Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and CO2 production was monitored using a conductimetric (Don Whitely R.A.B.I.T.) system. The majority (80%) of food and microbe combinations produced a detectable growth signal. The linearity of conductance responses in selected food products was investigated and a good correlation (R(2) ≥ 0.84) was observed between inoculum levels and times to detection. Specific growth rate estimations from the data were sufficiently accurate for predictive modeling in some cases. This initial evaluation of the suitability of indirect impedance to generate microbial growth data in complex food matrices indicates significant potential for the technology as an alternative to plating methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbiota during fermentation of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) sauce mash inoculated with halotolerant microbial starters: analyses using the plate count method and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE).

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Shuji; Yasokawa, Daisuke; Nagashima, Koji; Yamazaki, Koji; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Ohta, Tomoki; Kawai, Yuji

    2010-06-01

    Nine different combinations of mugi koji (barley steamed and molded with Aspergillus oryzae) and halotolerant microorganisms (HTMs), Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Candida versatilis, and Tetragenococcus halophilus, were inoculated into chum salmon sauce mash under a non-aseptic condition used in industrial fish sauce production and fermented at 35 +/- 2.5 degrees C for 84 days to elucidate the microbial dynamics (i.e., microbial count and microbiota) during fermentation. The viable count of halotolerant yeast (HTY) in fermented chum salmon sauce (FCSS) mash showed various time courses dependent on the combination of the starter microorganisms. Halotolerant lactic acid bacteria (HTL) were detected morphologically and physiologically only from FCSS mash inoculated with T. halophilus alone or with T. halophilus and C. versatilis during the first 28 days of fermentation. Only four fungal species, Z. rouxii, C. versatilis, Pichia guilliermondii, and A. oryzae, were detected throughout the fermentation by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). In FCSS mash, dominant HTMs, especially eumycetes, were nonexistent. However, under the non-aseptic conditions, undesirable wild yeast such as P. guilliermondii grew fortuitously. Therefore, HTY inoculation into FCSS mash at the beginning of fermentation is effective in preventing the growth of wild yeast and the resultant unfavorable flavor. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of Safe and Flavor-Rich Doenjang (Korean Fermented Soybean Paste) Using Autochthonous Mixed Starters at the Pilot Plant Scale.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jin; Hyun, Jiye; Choi, Yong-Ho; Hurh, Byung-Serk; Choi, Sang-Ho; Lee, Inhyung

    2018-06-01

    Doenjang (Korean fermented soybean paste) with an improved flavor and safety was prepared by the simultaneous fermentation of autochthonous mixed starters at the pilot plan scale. First, whole soybean meju was fermented by coculturing safety-verified starters Aspergillus oryzae MJS14 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens zip6 or Bacillus subtilis D119C. These fermented whole soybean meju were aged in a brine solution after the additional inoculation of Tetragenococcus halophilus 7BDE22 and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii SMY045 to yield doenjang. Four doenjang batches prepared using a combination of mold, bacilli, lactic acid bacteria, and yeast starters were free of safety issues and had the general properties of traditional doenjang, a rich flavor and taste. All doenjang batches received a high consumer acceptability score, especially the ABsT and ABsTZ batches. This study suggests that flavor-rich doenjang similar to traditional doenjang can be manufactured safely and reproducibly in industry by mimicking the simultaneous fermentation of autochthonous mixed starters as in traditional doenjang fermentation. The development of a pilot plant process for doenjang fermentation using safety-verified autochthonous mixed starter will facilitate the manufacture of flavor-rich doenjang similar to traditional doenjang safely and reproducibly in industry. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  12. Detection and identification of wild yeasts in Champús, a fermented Colombian maize beverage.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Cadavid, Esteban; Chaves-López, Clemencia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Paparella, Antonello; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the predominant yeasts in Champús, a traditional Colombian cereal-based beverage with a low alcoholic content. Samples of Champús from 20 production sites in the Cauca Valley region were analysed. A total of 235 yeast isolates were identified by conventional microbiological analyses and by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2. The dominant species were: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Issatchenkia orientalis, Pichia fermentans, Pichia kluyveri var. kluyveri, Zygosaccharomyces fermentati, Torulospora delbruekii, Galactomyces geotrichum and Hanseniaspora spp. Model Champús systems were inoculated with single strains of some isolated sporogenus species and the aromatic profiles were analysed by SPME. Analysis of data showed that Champús strains produced high amounts of esters. The aromatic compounds produced by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts from Champús can exert a relevant influence on the sensory characteristics of the fermented beverage. The Champús strains could thus represent an important source for new yeast biotypes with potential industrial applications.

  13. Monitoring of the microbial communities involved in the soy sauce manufacturing process by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu

    2012-08-01

    Soy sauce is a traditional seasoning produced through the fermentation of soybeans and wheat using microbes. In this study, the microbial communities involved in the soy sauce manufacturing process were analyzed by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The bacterial DGGE profile indicated that the bacterial microbes in the koji were Weissella cibaria (Weissella confusa, Weissella kimchii, Weissella salipiscis, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus iners, or Streptococcus thermophilus), Staphylococcus gallinarum (or Staphylococcus xylosus), and Staphylococcus kloosii. In addition to these bacteria, Tetragenococcus halophilus was also detected in the mash during lactic acid fermentation. The fungal DGGE profile indicated that the fungal microbes in the koji were not only Aspergillus oryzae but also several yeasts. In the mash, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii appeared in the early fermentation stage, Candida etchellsii (or Candida nodaensis) and Candida versatilis were detected at the middle fermentation stage, and Candida etchellsii was detected at the mature fermentation stage. These results suggest that the microbial communities present during the soy sauce manufacturing process change drastically throughout its production. This is the first report to reveal the microbial communities involved in the soy sauce manufacturing process using a culture-independent method. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Controlled mixed fermentation at winery scale using Zygotorulaspora florentina and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Livio; Romani, Cristina; Gobbi, Mirko; Comitini, Francesca; Ciani, Maurizio; Domizio, Paola

    2016-10-03

    Over the last few years the use of multi-starter inocula has become an attractive biotechnological practice in the search for wine with high flavour complexity or distinctive characters. This has been possible through exploiting the particular oenological features of some non-Saccharomyces yeast strains, and the effects that derive from their specific interactions with Saccharomyces. In the present study, we evaluated the selected strain Zygotorulaspora florentina (formerly Zygosaccharomyces florentinus) in mixed culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, from the laboratory scale to the winery scale. The scale-up fermentation and substrate composition (i.e., white or red musts) influenced the analytical composition of the mixed fermentation. At the laboratory scale, mixed fermentation with Z. florentina exhibited an enhancement of polysaccharides and 2-phenylethanol content and a reduction of volatile acidity. At the winery scale, different fermentation characteristics of Z. florentina were observed. Using Sangiovese red grape juice, sequential fermentation trials showed a significantly higher concentration of glycerol and esters while the sensorial analysis of the resulting wines showed higher floral notes and lower perception of astringency. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this yeasts association has been evaluated at the winery scale indicating the potential use of this mixed culture in red grape varieties. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Microbial Diversity during Fermentation of Sweet Paste, a Chinese Traditional Seasoning, Using PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ping; Hu, Yuanliang; Liao, Tingting; Wang, Zhaoting; Zhao, Shumiao; Liang, Yunxiang; Hu, Yongmei

    2017-04-28

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the changes in the microbial community and biochemical properties of a traditional sweet paste during fermentation. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed that Aspergillus oryzae was the predominant species in the koji (the fungal mixture), and the majority of the fungi isolated belonged to two Zygosaccharomyces species in the mash. The bacterial DGGE profiles revealed the presence of Bacillus subtilis during fermentation, and Lactobacillus acidipiscis, Lactobacillus pubuzihii, Lactobacillus sp., Staphylococcus kloosi, and several uncultured bacteria were also detected in the mash after 14 days of main fermentation. Additionally, during main fermentation, amino-type nitrogen and total acid increased gradually to a maximum of 6.77 ± 0.25 g/kg and 19.10 ± 0.58 g/kg (30 days) respectively, and the concentration of reducing sugar increased to 337.41 ± 3.99 g/kg (7 days). The 180-day fermented sweet paste contained 261.46 ± 19.49 g/kg reducing sugar and its pH value remained at around 4.65. This study has used the PCR-DGGE technique to demonstrate the microbial community (including bacteria and fungi) in sweet paste and provides useful information (biochemical properties) about the assessment of the quality of sweet paste throughout fermentation.

  16. Biotechnological exploitation of Tetrapisispora phaffii killer toxin: heterologous production in Komagataella phaffii (Pichia pastoris).

    PubMed

    Chessa, Rossella; Landolfo, Sara; Ciani, Maurizio; Budroni, Marilena; Zara, Severino; Ustun, Murat; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Mannazzu, Ilaria

    2017-04-01

    The use of natural antimicrobials from plants, animals and microorganisms to inhibit the growth of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms is becoming more frequent. This parallels the increased consumer interest towards consumption of minimally processed food and 'greener' food and beverage additives. Among the natural antimicrobials of microbial origin, the killer toxin produced by the yeast Tetrapisispora phaffii, known as Kpkt, appears to be a promising natural antimicrobial agent. Kpkt is a glycoprotein with β-1,3-glucanase and killer activity, which induces ultrastructural modifications to the cell wall of yeast of the genera Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Zygosaccharomyces. Moreover, Kpkt maintains its killer activity in grape must for at least 14 days under winemaking conditions, thus suggesting its use against spoilage yeast in wine making and the sweet beverage industry. Here, the aim was to explore the possibility of high production of Kpkt for biotechnological exploitation. Molecular tools for heterologous production of Kpkt in Komagataella phaffii GS115 were developed, and two recombinant clones that produce up to 23 mg/L recombinant Kpkt (rKpkt) were obtained. Similar to native Kpkt, rKpkt has β-glucanase and killer activities. Moreover, it shows a wider spectrum of action with respect to native Kpkt. This includes effects on Dekkera bruxellensis, a spoilage yeast of interest not only in wine making, but also for the biofuel industry, thus widening the potential applications of this rKpkt.

  17. Characterization of butter spoiling yeasts and their inhibition by some spices.

    PubMed

    Sagdic, Osman; Ozturk, Ismet; Bayram, Okan; Kesmen, Zulal; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the yeasts in packaged and unpackaged butters and screen antiyeast activity of spices, including marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), summer savory (Satureja hortensis L.), and black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) against the most dominant yeast species in the packaged and unpackaged butters. Mean total yeast populations were 5.40 log CFU/g in unpackaged butter samples and 2.22 log CFU/g in packaged butter samples, indicating better hygienic quality of packaged samples. Forty-nine yeast species were isolated and identified from butter samples with the most prevalent isolates belonging to genera Candida-C. kefyr, C. zeylanoides, and C. lambica-and with moderate number of isolates belonging to genera Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, and Zygosaccharomyces. Black cumin exhibited the highest antiyeast activity against C. zeylanoides and C. lambica species, even inhibited these species, while summer savory inhibited C. kefyr. The results of this study revealed clear antimicrobial potential of black cumin against the yeast species isolated from butters. Marjoram, summer savory, and black cumin could be used as natural antimicrobial agents against spoilage yeasts in food preservation, especially in butter. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. 40 CFR 63.7545 - What notifications must I submit and when?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials within the meaning of § 241.3, and justification for the selection of fuel(s) burned during the... designed to burn natural gas, refinery gas, or other gas 1 fuels that is subject to this subpart, and you intend to use a fuel other than natural gas, refinery gas, or other gas 1 fuel to fire the affected unit...

  19. Solution structure and biophysical characterization of the multifaceted signalling effector protein growth arrest specific-1.

    PubMed

    Rosti, Katja; Goldman, Adrian; Kajander, Tommi

    2015-02-28

    The protein growth arrest specific-1 (GAS1) was discovered based on its ability to stop the cell cycle. During development it is involved in embryonic patterning, inhibits cell proliferation and mediates cell death, and has therefore been considered as a tumor suppressor. GAS1 is known to signal through two different cell membrane receptors: Rearranged during transformation (RET), and the sonic hedgehog receptor Patched-1. Sonic Hedgehog signalling is important in stem cell renewal and RET mediated signalling in neuronal survival. Disorders in both sonic hedgehog and RET signalling are connected to cancer progression. The neuroprotective effect of RET is controlled by glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor receptor alphas (GFRαs). Human Growth arrest specific-1 is a distant homolog of the GFRαs. We have produced and purified recombinant human GAS1 protein, and confirmed that GAS1 is a monomer in solution by static light scattering and small angle X-ray scattering analysis. The low resolution solution structure reveals that GAS1 is more elongated and flexible than the GFRαs, and the homology modelling of the individual domains show that they differ from GFRαs by lacking the amino acids for neurotrophic factor binding. In addition, GAS1 has an extended loop in the N-terminal domain that is conserved in vertebrates after the divergence of fishes and amphibians. We conclude that GAS1 most likely differs from GFRαs functionally, based on comparative structural analysis, while it is able to bind the extracellular part of RET in a neurotrophic factor independent manner, although with low affinity in solution. Our structural characterization indicates that GAS1 differs from GFRα's significantly also in its conformation, which probably reflects the functional differences between GAS1 and the GFRαs.

  20. Unraveling Core Functional Microbiota in Traditional Solid-State Fermentation by High-Throughput Amplicons and Metatranscriptomics Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhewei; Du, Hai; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Fermentation microbiota is specific microorganisms that generate different types of metabolites in many productions. In traditional solid-state fermentation, the structural composition and functional capacity of the core microbiota determine the quality and quantity of products. As a typical example of food fermentation, Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor production involves a complex of various microorganisms and a wide variety of metabolites. However, the microbial succession and functional shift of the core microbiota in this traditional food fermentation remain unclear. Here, high-throughput amplicons (16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and internal transcribed space amplicon sequencing) and metatranscriptomics sequencing technologies were combined to reveal the structure and function of the core microbiota in Chinese soy sauce aroma type liquor production. In addition, ultra-performance liquid chromatography and headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were employed to provide qualitative and quantitative analysis of the major flavor metabolites. A total of 10 fungal and 11 bacterial genera were identified as the core microbiota. In addition, metatranscriptomic analysis revealed pyruvate metabolism in yeasts (genera Pichia, Schizosaccharomyces, Saccharomyces, and Zygosaccharomyces) and lactic acid bacteria (genus Lactobacillus) classified into two stages in the production of flavor components. Stage I involved high-level alcohol (ethanol) production, with the genus Schizosaccharomyces serving as the core functional microorganism. Stage II involved high-level acid (lactic acid and acetic acid) production, with the genus Lactobacillus serving as the core functional microorganism. The functional shift from the genus Schizosaccharomyces to the genus Lactobacillus drives flavor component conversion from alcohol (ethanol) to acid (lactic acid and acetic acid) in Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor production. Our findings provide insight into the

  1. Shelf-life evaluation of natural antimicrobials for Concord and Niagara grape juices.

    PubMed

    Siricururatana, P; Iyer, M M; Manns, D C; Churey, J J; Worobo, R W; Padilla-Zakour, O I

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of natural antimicrobials for shelf-life extension of cold-filled still and carbonated Concord and Niagara grape juices, which have traditionally been preserved with chemical preservatives. Commercial juices were inoculated with a spoilage yeast cocktail of Dekkera, Kluveromyces, Brettanomyces, and Zygosaccharomyces at 10(2) and 10(4) CFU/ml. The following agents were added to still juices: no preservative (negative control), 0.05% potassium sorbate plus 0.05% sodium benzoate (positive control), 0.1 or 0.2% cultured dextrose, 250 ppm of dimethyldicarbonate (DMDC), 10 or 20 ppm of natamycin, and 250 ppm of DMDC plus 5 or 10 ppm of natamycin. Carbonated juice was treated with the negative control, positive control, and 250 ppm of DMDC plus 10 ppm of natamycin. Microbial stability of samples was assessed every 2 weeks during 6 months of storage at 21°C by yeast enumeration and measurement of turbidity, pH, and °Brix. Juices were deemed spoiled when yeast counts exceeded 10(6) CFU/ml. Cultured dextrose was not effective at levels tested in both types of juice. The most promising results were obtained with DMDC and natamycin combination treatments in still Niagara juice and in carbonated Concord and Niagara juices. In these treatments, shelf-life extension similar to that of the positive control (153 to 161 days) was achieved while maintaining similar turbidity, pH, and °Brix. Spoiled juices had lower pH and °Brix values and higher turbidity due to microbial activity and increased in microbial levels.

  2. Yeast Identification During Fermentation of Turkish Gemlik Olives.

    PubMed

    Mujdeci, Gamze; Arévalo-Villena, María; Ozbas, Z Yesim; Briones Pérez, Ana

    2018-05-01

    Naturally fermented black table olives of the Gemlik variety are one of the most consumed fermented products in Turkey. The objective of this work was to identify yeast strains isolated during their natural fermentation by using Restriction Fragments Lengths Polymorphism-Polimerase Chain Reaction (RFLP-PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. The study also focused on determining the effect of regional differences on yeast microflora of naturally fermented Gemlik olives. A total of 47 yeast strains belonging to 12 different species which had been previously isolated from the natural brine of Akhisar and Iznik-Gemlik cv. olives were characterized by molecular methods. Forty-two of the tested strains could be identified by RFLP-PCR to species level. These yeast species were determined as Candida mycetangi, Candida hellenica, Candida membranaefaciens, Candida famata, Candida pelliculosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Zygosaccharomyces mrakii. Five strains were identified by DNA sequencing. These strains belonged to three different species: Aureobasidium pullulans, Kloeckera apiculate, and Cryptococcus saitoi. The most frequent species were C. famata and C. pelliculosa in both regions. This work studies the yeasts from Turkish table olives which could prove to be of importance to the food industry in that area. On the other hand, it compares identification by molecular and classical biochemical methods and offers an idea about the differences between the ecosystems of Gemlik olives in the Akhisar (AO) and Iznik (IO) regions. The study could be useful in characterizing a very important product and, in this way, could help to promote its marketing. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  3. Use of whey lactose from dairy industry for economical kefiran production by Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens in mixed cultures with yeasts.

    PubMed

    Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Radchabut, Sirilaor

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of producing kefiran industrially, whey lactose, a by-product from dairy industry, was used as a low cost carbon source. Because the accumulation of lactic acid as a by-product of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens inhibited cell growth and kefiran production, the kefir grain derived and non-derived yeasts were screened for their abilities to reduce lactic acid and promote kefiran production in a mixed culture. Six species of yeasts were examined: Torulaspora delbrueckii IFO 1626; Saccharomyces cerevisiae IFO 0216; Debaryomyces hansenii TISTR 5155; Saccharomyces exiguus TISTR 5081; Zygosaccharomyces rouxii TISTR 5044; and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis TISTR 5018. The mixed culture of L. kefiranofaciens with S. cerevisiae IFO 0216 enhanced the kefiran production best from 568 mg/L in the pure culture up to 807 and 938 mg/L in the mixed cultures under anaerobic and microaerobic conditions, respectively. The optimal conditions for kefiran production by the mixed culture were: whey lactose 4%; yeast extract 4%; initial pH of 5.5; and initial amounts of L. kefiranofaciens and S. cerevisiae IFO 0216 of 2.1×10(7) and 4.0×10(6)CFU/mL, respectively. Scaling up the mixed culture in a 2L bioreactor with dissolved oxygen control at 5% and pH control at 5.5 gave the maximum kefiran production of 2,580 mg/L in batch culture and 3,250 mg/L in fed-batch culture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fermentation and microflora of plaa-som, a thai fermented fish product prepared with different salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Paludan-Müller, Christine; Madsen, Mette; Sophanodora, Pairat; Gram, Lone; Møller, Peter Lange

    2002-02-25

    Plaa-som is a Thai fermented fish product prepared from snakehead fish, salt, palm syrup and sometimes roasted rice. We studied the effects of different salt concentrations on decrease in pH and on microflora composition during fermentation. Two low-salt batches were prepared, containing 6% and 7% salt (w/w) as well as two high-salt batches, containing 9% and 11% salt. pH decreased rapidly from 6 to 4.5 in low-salt batches, whereas in high-salt batches, a slow or no decrease in pH was found. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts were isolated as the dominant microorganisms during fermentation. LAB counts increased to 10(8)-10(9) cfu g(-1) and yeast counts to 10(7)-5 x 10(7) cfu g(-1) in all batches, except in the 11% salt batch, where counts were 1-2 log lower. Phenotypic tests, ITS-PCR, carbohydrate fermentations and 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified LAB isolates as Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus alimentarius/farciminis, Weisella confusa, L. plantarum and Lactococcus garviae. The latter species was only isolated from high-salt batches. Phenotypic characteristics, ITS-PCR and carbohydrate assimilation identified 95% of the yeasts as Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. It is concluded that the fermentation of plaa-som is delayed by a salt-level of 9% due to an inhibition of LAB growth. The growth of Z. rouxii has no influence on the fermentation rate, but may contribute positively to the flavour development of the product.

  5. Characterization of Osmotolerant Yeasts and Yeast-Like Molds from Apple Orchards and Apple Juice Processing Plants in China and Investigation of Their Spoilage Potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huxuan; Hu, Zhongqiu; Long, Fangyu; Niu, Chen; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-08-01

    Yeasts and yeast-like fungal isolates were recovered from apple orchards and apple juice processing plants located in the Shaanxi province of China. The strains were evaluated for osmotolerance by growing them in 50% (w/v) glucose. Of the strains tested, 66 were positive for osmotolerance and were subsequently identified by 26S or 5.8S-ITS ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. Physiological tests and RAPD-PCR analysis were performed to reveal the polymorphism of isolates belonging to the same species. Further, the spoilage potential of the 66 isolates was determining by evaluating their growth in 50% to 70% (w/v) glucose and measuring gas generation in 50% (w/v) glucose. Thirteen osmotolerant isolates representing 9 species were obtained from 10 apple orchards and 53 target isolates representing 19 species were recovered from 2 apple juice processing plants. In total, members of 14 genera and 23 species of osmotolerant isolates including yeast-like molds were recovered from all sources. The commonly recovered osmotolerant isolates belonged to Kluyveromyces marxianus, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Candida tropicalis, and Pichia kudriavzevii. The polymorphism of isolates belonging to the same species was limited to 1 to 3 biotypes. The majority of species were capable of growing within a range of glucose concentration, similar to sugar concentrations found in apple juice products with a lag phase from 96 to 192 h. Overall, Z. rouxii was particularly the most tolerant to high glucose concentration with the shortest lag phase of 48 h in 70% (w/v) glucose and the fastest gas generation rate in 50% (w/v) glucose. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Leaching of rare earth elements from fluorescent powder using the tea fungus Kombucha.

    PubMed

    Hopfe, Stefanie; Flemming, Katrin; Lehmann, Falk; Möckel, Robert; Kutschke, Sabine; Pollmann, Katrin

    2017-04-01

    In most modern technologies such as flat screens, highly effective magnets and lasers, as well as luminescence phosphors, Rare Earth Elements (REE) are used. Unfortunately no environmentally friendly recycling process exists so far. In comparison to other elements the interaction of microorganisms with REE has been studied to a less extent. However, as REE are ubiquitously present in nature it can be assumed that microorganisms play an important role in the biogeochemistry of REE. This study investigates the potential of organic acid-producing microbes for extracting REE from industrial waste. In Germany, 175 tons of fluorescent phosphor (FP) are collected per year as a distinct fraction from the recycling of compact fluorescent lamps. Because the FP contains about 10% of REE-oxides bound in the so-called triband dyes it is a readily accessible secondary resource of REE. Using the symbiotic mixed culture Kombucha, consisting of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria, REE were leached at a significant rate. The highest leaching-rates were observed in shake cultures using the entire Kombucha-consortium or its supernatant as leaching agent compared to experiments using the isolates Zygosaccharomyces lentus and Komagataeibacter hansenii as leaching organisms. During the cultivation, the pH decreased as a result of organic acid production (mainly acetic and gluconic acid). Thus, the underlying mechanism of the triband dye solubilisation is probably linked to the carboxyl-functionality or a proton excess. In accordance with the higher solubility of REE-oxides compared to REE-phosphates and -aluminates, the red dye Y 2 O 3 :Eu 2+ containing relatively expensive REE was shown to be preferentially solubilized. These results show that it is possible to dissolve the REE-compounds of FP with the help of microbial processes. Moreover, they provide the basis for the development of an eco-friendly alternative to the currently applied methods that use strong inorganic acids or toxic

  7. The yeast spectrum of the 'tea fungus Kombucha'.

    PubMed

    Mayser, P; Fromme, S; Leitzmann, C; Gründer, K

    1995-01-01

    The tea fungus 'Kombucha' is a symbiosis of Acetobacter, including Acetobacter xylinum as a characteristic species, and various yeasts. A characteristic yeast species or genus has not yet been identified. Kombucha is mainly cultivated in sugared black tea to produce a slightly acidulous effervescent beverage that is said to have several curative effects. In addition to sugar, the beverage contains small amounts of alcohol and various acids, including acetic acid, gluconic acid and lactic acid, as well as some antibiotic substances. To characterize the yeast spectrum with special consideration given to facultatively pathogenic yeasts, two commercially available specimens of tea fungus and 32 from private households in Germany were analysed by micromorphological and biochemical methods. Yeasts of the genera Brettanomyces, Zygosaccharomyces and Saccharomyces were identified in 56%, 29% and 26% respectively. The species Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Candida kefyr were only demonstrated in isolated cases. Furthermore, the tests revealed pellicle-forming yeasts such as Candida krusei or Issatchenkia orientalis/occidentalis as well as species of the apiculatus yeasts (Kloeckera, Hanseniaspora). Thus, the genus Brettanomyces may be a typical group of yeasts that are especially adapted to the environment of the tea fungus. However, to investigate further the beneficial effects of tea fungus, a spectrum of the other typical genera must be defined. Only three specimens showed definite contaminations. In one case, no yeasts could be isolated because of massive contamination with Penicillium spp. In the remaining two samples (from one household), Candida albicans was demonstrated. The low rate of contamination might be explained by protective mechanisms, such as formation of organic acids and antibiotic substances. Thus, subjects with a healthy metabolism do not need to be advised against cultivating Kombucha. However, those suffering from immunosuppression should preferably

  8. Sequence-based analysis of the bacterial and fungal compositions of multiple kombucha (tea fungus) samples.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Alan J; O'Sullivan, Orla; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; Cotter, Paul D

    2014-04-01

    Kombucha is a sweetened tea beverage that, as a consequence of fermentation, contains ethanol, carbon dioxide, a high concentration of acid (gluconic, acetic and lactic) as well as a number of other metabolites and is thought to contain a number of health-promoting components. The sucrose-tea solution is fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast embedded within a cellulosic pellicle, which forms a floating mat in the tea, and generates a new layer with each successful fermentation. The specific identity of the microbial populations present has been the focus of attention but, to date, the majority of studies have relied on culture-based analyses. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the kombucha microbiota we have carried out the first culture-independent, high-throughput sequencing analysis of the bacterial and fungal populations of 5 distinct pellicles as well as the resultant fermented kombucha at two time points. Following the analysis it was established that the major bacterial genus present was Gluconacetobacter, present at >85% in most samples, with only trace populations of Acetobacter detected (<2%). A prominent Lactobacillus population was also identified (up to 30%), with a number of sub-dominant genera, not previously associated with kombucha, also being revealed. The yeast populations were found to be dominated by Zygosaccharomyces at >95% in the fermented beverage, with a greater fungal diversity present in the cellulosic pellicle, including numerous species not identified in kombucha previously. Ultimately, this study represents the most accurate description of the microbiology of kombucha to date. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of strain isolated from dates (Phœnix dactylifera L.) for enhancing very high gravity ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Djelal, Hayet; Chniti, Sofien; Jemni, Monia; Weill, Amélie; Sayed, Walaa; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2017-04-01

    Ethanol production from by-products of dates in very high gravity was conducted in batch fermentation using two yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, as well as a native strain: an osmophilic strain of bacteria which was isolated for the first time from the juice of dates (Phoenix dactylifera L.). The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S ribosomal RNA and gyrB sequence and physiological analysis indicated that the strain identified belongs to the genus of Bacillus, B. amyloliquefaciens. The ethanol yields produced from the syrup of dates (175 g L -1 and 360 g L -1 of total sugar) were 40.6% and 29.5%, respectively. By comparing the ethanol production by the isolated bacteria to that obtained using Z. rouxii and S. cerevisiae, it can be concluded that B. amyloliquefaciens was suitable for ethanol production from the syrup of dates and can consume the three types of sugar (glucose, fructose, and sucrose). Using Z. rouxii, fructose was preferentially consumed, while glucose was consumed only after fructose depletion. From this, B. amyloliquefaciens was promising for the bioethanol industry. In addition, this latter showed a good tolerance for high sugar concentration (36%), allowing ethanol production in batch fermentation at pH 5.0 and 28 °C in date syrup medium. Promising ethanol yield produced to sugar consumed were observed for the two osmotolerant microorganisms, Z. rouxii and B. amyloliquefaciens, nearly 32-33%, which were further improved when they were cocultivated, leading to an ethanol to glucose yield of 42-43%.

  10. Is there a common water-activity limit for the three domains of life?

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Andrew; Cray, Jonathan A; Williams, Jim P; Santos, Ricardo; Sahay, Richa; Neuenkirchen, Nils; McClure, Colin D; Grant, Irene R; Houghton, Jonathan DR; Quinn, John P; Timson, David J; Patil, Satish V; Singhal, Rekha S; Antón, Josefa; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Hocking, Ailsa D; Lievens, Bart; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Voytek, Mary A; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Oren, Aharon; Timmis, Kenneth N; McGenity, Terry J; Hallsworth, John E

    2015-01-01

    Archaea and Bacteria constitute a majority of life systems on Earth but have long been considered inferior to Eukarya in terms of solute tolerance. Whereas the most halophilic prokaryotes are known for an ability to multiply at saturated NaCl (water activity (aw) 0.755) some xerophilic fungi can germinate, usually at high-sugar concentrations, at values as low as 0.650–0.605 aw. Here, we present evidence that halophilic prokayotes can grow down to water activities of <0.755 for Halanaerobium lacusrosei (0.748), Halobacterium strain 004.1 (0.728), Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Halococcus morrhuae (0.717), Haloquadratum walsbyi (0.709), Halococcus salifodinae (0.693), Halobacterium noricense (0.687), Natrinema pallidum (0.681) and haloarchaeal strains GN-2 and GN-5 (0.635 aw). Furthermore, extrapolation of growth curves (prone to giving conservative estimates) indicated theoretical minima down to 0.611 aw for extreme, obligately halophilic Archaea and Bacteria. These were compared with minima for the most solute-tolerant Bacteria in high-sugar (or other non-saline) media (Mycobacterium spp., Tetragenococcus halophilus, Saccharibacter floricola, Staphylococcus aureus and so on) and eukaryotic microbes in saline (Wallemia spp., Basipetospora halophila, Dunaliella spp. and so on) and high-sugar substrates (for example, Xeromyces bisporus, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Aspergillus and Eurotium spp.). We also manipulated the balance of chaotropic and kosmotropic stressors for the extreme, xerophilic fungi Aspergillus penicilloides and X. bisporus and, via this approach, their established water-activity limits for mycelial growth (∼0.65) were reduced to 0.640. Furthermore, extrapolations indicated theoretical limits of 0.632 and 0.636 aw for A. penicilloides and X. bisporus, respectively. Collectively, these findings suggest that there is a common water-activity limit that is determined by physicochemical constraints for the three domains of life. PMID:25500507

  11. Unraveling Core Functional Microbiota in Traditional Solid-State Fermentation by High-Throughput Amplicons and Metatranscriptomics Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhewei; Du, Hai; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Fermentation microbiota is specific microorganisms that generate different types of metabolites in many productions. In traditional solid-state fermentation, the structural composition and functional capacity of the core microbiota determine the quality and quantity of products. As a typical example of food fermentation, Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor production involves a complex of various microorganisms and a wide variety of metabolites. However, the microbial succession and functional shift of the core microbiota in this traditional food fermentation remain unclear. Here, high-throughput amplicons (16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and internal transcribed space amplicon sequencing) and metatranscriptomics sequencing technologies were combined to reveal the structure and function of the core microbiota in Chinese soy sauce aroma type liquor production. In addition, ultra-performance liquid chromatography and headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were employed to provide qualitative and quantitative analysis of the major flavor metabolites. A total of 10 fungal and 11 bacterial genera were identified as the core microbiota. In addition, metatranscriptomic analysis revealed pyruvate metabolism in yeasts (genera Pichia, Schizosaccharomyces, Saccharomyces , and Zygosaccharomyces ) and lactic acid bacteria (genus Lactobacillus ) classified into two stages in the production of flavor components. Stage I involved high-level alcohol (ethanol) production, with the genus Schizosaccharomyces serving as the core functional microorganism. Stage II involved high-level acid (lactic acid and acetic acid) production, with the genus Lactobacillus serving as the core functional microorganism. The functional shift from the genus Schizosaccharomyces to the genus Lactobacillus drives flavor component conversion from alcohol (ethanol) to acid (lactic acid and acetic acid) in Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor production. Our findings provide insight into

  12. Adaptive Evolution under Extreme Genetic Drift in Oxidatively Stressed Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Christy, Stephen F; Wernick, Riana I; Lue, Michael J; Velasco, Griselda; Howe, Dana K; Denver, Dee R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A mutation-accumulation (MA) experiment with Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes was conducted in which replicate, independently evolving lines were initiated from a low-fitness mitochondrial electron transport chain mutant, gas-1. The original intent of the study was to assess the effect of electron transport chain dysfunction involving elevated reactive oxygen species production on patterns of spontaneous germline mutation. In contrast to results of standard MA experiments, gas-1 MA lines evolved slightly higher mean fitness alongside reduced among-line genetic variance compared with their ancestor. Likewise, the gas-1 MA lines experienced partial recovery to wildtype reactive oxygen species levels. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis revealed that the molecular spectrum but not the overall rate of nuclear DNA mutation differed from wildtype patterns. Further analysis revealed an enrichment of mutations in loci that occur in a gas-1-centric region of the C. elegans interactome, and could be classified into a small number of functional-genomic categories. Characterization of a backcrossed four-mutation set isolated from one gas-1 MA line revealed this combination to be beneficial on both gas-1 mutant and wildtype genetic backgrounds. Our combined results suggest that selection favoring beneficial mutations can be powerful even under unfavorable population genetic conditions, and agree with fitness landscape theory predicting an inverse relationship between population fitness and the likelihood of adaptation. PMID:29069345

  13. Profiling of dynamic changes in the microbial community during the soy sauce fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Wei, Quanzeng; Wang, Hongbin; Chen, Zhixin; Lv, Zhijia; Xie, Yufeng; Lu, Fuping

    2013-10-01

    Soy sauce is a traditional condiment manufactured by natural inoculation and mixed culture fermentation. As is well known, it is the microbial community that plays an important role in the formation of its flavors. However, to date, its dynamic changes during the long period of fermentation process are still unclear, intensively constraining the improvement and control of the soy sauce quality. In this work, we revealed the dynamic changes of the microbial community by combining a cultured dependent method and a cultured independent method of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Results indicated that the two methods verified and complemented each other in profiling microbial community, and that significant dynamics of the microbial community existed during the fermentation process, especially the strong inhibition of the growth of most of the microbes when entering into the mash stage from the koji stage. In the analysis of bacterial community, Staphylococcus and Bacillus were found to be the dominant bacteria and detected in the whole fermentation process. Kurthia and Klebsiella began to appear in the koji stage and then fade away in the early stage of the mash fermentation. In the analysis of fungal community, Aspergillus sojae and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii were found to be the dominant fungi in the koji and mash fermentation, respectively. It was clearly shown that when A. sojae decreased and disappeared in the middle stage of the mash fermentation, Z. rouxii appeared and increased at the meantime. Aspergillus parasiticus, Trichosporon ovoides and Trichosporon asahii also appeared in the koji and the early period of the mash fermentation and disappeared thereafter. Similar to Z. rouxii, Millerozyma farinosa and Peronospora farinosa were also found spontaneously which appeared in the mid-late period of the mash fermentation. The principal component analysis suggested that the microbial community underwent significant changes in

  14. [Vulvovaginitis caused by Candida spp. and Trichomonas vaginalis in sexually active women].

    PubMed

    Azzam-W, Maha; Cermeño-Vivas, Julman R; Orellán-García, Yida; Penna, Salvador J

    2002-03-01

    Vulvovaginitis accounts for 20 to 30% of gynecological diseases and it is observed in women from 20 to 30 years of age. It has a higher frequency in women using oral contraceptives and during the third trimester of pregnancy. The aim of this research was to assess the prevalence of Candida spp and Trichomonas vaginalis in patients with the diagnosis of vulvovaginitis from the Gynecology Service in Hospital Universitario "Ruiz y Páez" in Ciudad Bolívar and Hospital "Raúl Leoni" in San Félix (Bolívar State, Venezuela). Two hundred women with symptoms of vulvovaginitis were examined, and samples were taken from the uterocervical cul-de-sac. Each patient was asked to fill a questionnaire. The following studies were made in each sample: a) fresh wet mount examination, b) orange acridine and Giemsa stains for Trichomonas and c) culture for the identification of yeasts. The latter were identified by means of the germinal tube assay, resistance to actidione and the presence of clamidospores in rice-cream agar and sugar utilization test, using the commercial kit ID32C (BioMérieux). Only in 57 women of 200 patients with vulvovaginitis the causative agent was demonstrated; Candida spp was present in 84.2% (n = 48) and Trichomonas vaginalis in 14% (n = 8). A single case of Zygosaccharomyces spp (1.8%) was detected. The age group mainly affected was that of 25-35 years old, the 38.6% of the studied population. Candida species detected were: C. albicans in 87% of cases (n = 42), C. glabrata, in 10.42% (n = 5), and C. guillermondii, in 2.08 (n = 1). Vaginal flux, vulvar pruritus and leucorrhoea were observed in significant number of patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis. The use of antibiotics was considered predisposing factor for Trichomonas vaginalis infection. The relationship between age and the etiological agent was not statistically significant. Due to the low specificity of clinical manifestations of infections caused by Candida spp and Trichomonas vaginalis, we

  15. Evolution of microbiological and chemical parameters during red wine making with extended post-fermentation maceration.

    PubMed

    Francesca, Nicola; Romano, Raffaele; Sannino, Ciro; Le Grottaglie, Laura; Settanni, Luca; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2014-02-03

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the microbiological, chemical, and sensory characteristics of red wine subjected to post-fermentation maceration that was extended to 90 days. For this purpose, the 'Aglianico di Taurasi' grape was used as a case study. The total yeast concentration increased until day 40 of maceration and decreased thereafter, whereas the concentration of lactic acid bacteria slightly increased. Dekkera/Brettanomyces spp. and acetic acid bacteria were not detected. The yeast community was composed of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bisporus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Pichia guilliermondii, Aureobasidium pullulans and Debaryomyces carsonii. Nine S. cerevisiae strains were detected at high levels at different times of maceration. The results of all the conventional chemical analyses of the wines were in agreement with the regulations of commercial production and, interestingly, the changes in terms of concentration demonstrated the presence of yeast and LAB populations that were not only alive but also in a metabolically active state until day 90 of maceration. The alcohol and glycerol contents slightly increased until day 90. The concentrations of malic acid decreased, whereas those of lactic acid slightly increased throughout the maceration process. Furthermore, different durations of maceration resulted in significant differences in the total polyphenol content, which was higher at 40-50 days. The main phenolic compounds were benzoic and cinnamic acids and catechins. Interestingly, the highest ratio between (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin was found on day 40. In addition, the highest antioxidant activity was observed between days 40 and 50. The concentration of volatile organic compounds, which were mainly represented by alcohols, increased until the end of the maceration process. Sensory analysis revealed that samples that were subjected to maceration for a long

  16. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  17. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  18. The microbial ecology of wine grape berries.

    PubMed

    Barata, A; Malfeito-Ferreira, M; Loureiro, V

    2012-02-15

    Grapes have a complex microbial ecology including filamentous fungi, yeasts and bacteria with different physiological characteristics and effects upon wine production. Some species are only found in grapes, such as parasitic fungi and environmental bacteria, while others have the ability to survive and grow in wines, constituting the wine microbial consortium. This consortium covers yeast species, lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria. The proportion of these microorganisms depends on the grape ripening stage and on the availability of nutrients. Grape berries are susceptible to fungal parasites until véraison after which the microbiota of truly intact berries is similar to that of plant leaves, which is dominated by basidiomycetous yeasts (e.g. Cryptococcus spp., Rhodotorula spp. Sporobolomyces spp.) and the yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans. The cuticle of visually intact berries may bear microfissures and softens with ripening, increasing nutrient availability and explaining the possible dominance by the oxidative or weakly fermentative ascomycetous populations (e.g. Candida spp., Hanseniaspora spp., Metschnikowia spp., Pichia spp.) approaching harvest time. When grape skin is clearly damaged, the availability of high sugar concentrations on the berry surface favours the increase of ascomycetes with higher fermentative activity like Pichia spp. and Zygoascus hellenicus, including dangerous wine spoilage yeasts (e.g. Zygosaccharomyces spp., Torulaspora spp.), and of acetic acid bacteria (e.g. Gluconobacter spp., Acetobacter spp.). The sugar fermenting species Saccharomyces cerevisiae is rarely found on unblemished berries, being favoured by grape damage. Lactic acid bacteria are minor partners of grape microbiota and while being the typical agent of malolactic fermentation, Oenococcus oeni has been seldom isolated from grapes in the vineyard. Environmental ubiquitous bacteria of the genus Enterobacter spp., Enterococcus spp., Bacillus spp

  19. Effect of mixed antimicrobial agents and flavors in active packaging films.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Laura; Escudero, Ana; Batlle, Ramón; Nerín, Cristina

    2009-09-23

    Active packaging is an emerging food technology to improve the quality and safety of food products. Many works have been developed to study the antimicrobial activity of essential oils. Essential oils have been traditionally used as flavorings in food, so they have an important odor impact but they have as well antimicrobial properties that could be used to protect the food. Recent developments in antimicrobial active packaging showed the efficiency of essential oils versus bread and bakery products among other applications. However, one of the main problems to face is the odor and taste they could provide to the packaged food. Using some aromas to mask the odor could be a good approach. That is why the main objective of this paper is to develop an antimicrobial packaging material based on the combination of the most active compounds of essential oils (hydrocinnamaldehyde, oregano essential oil, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, and carvacrol) together with some aromas commonly used in the food industry. A study of the concentration required to get the antimicrobial properties, the organoleptic compatibility with typical aroma present in many food systems (vanilla, banana, and strawberry), and the right combination of both systems has been carried out. Antimicrobial tests of both the mentioned aromas, the main components of some essential oils, and the combination of both groups were carried out against bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli), yeasts (Candida albicans, Debaryomyces hansenii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii), and molds (Botrytis cinerae, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium roqueforti, Eurotium repens, Penicillium islandicum, Penicillium commune, Penicillium nalgiovensis). The sensory properties of the combinations were evaluated with a triangular test and classification was by an order test; the odor threshold of the aroma compounds was also

  20. Glutathione S-transferase mediates an ageing response to mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Dancy, Beverley M.; Brockway, Nicole; Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Yang, Yoing; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Morgan, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    To understand primary mitochondrial disease, we utilized a complex I-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, gas-1. These animals strongly upregulate the expression of gst-14 (encoding a glutathione S-transferase). Knockdown of gst-14 dramatically extends the lifespan of gas-1 and increases hydroxynonenal (HNE) modified mitochondrial proteins without improving complex I function. We observed no change in reactive oxygen species levels as measured by Mitosox staining, consistent with a potential role of GST-14 in HNE clearance. The upregulation of gst-14 in gas-1 animals is specific to the pharynx. These data suggest that an HNE-mediated response in the pharynx could be beneficial for lifespan extension in the context of complex I dysfunction in C. elegans. Thus, whereas HNE is typically considered damaging, our work is consistent with recent reports of its role in signaling, and that in this case, the signal is pro-longevity in a model of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26704446

  1. Assessment of undiscovered conventional and continuous oil and gas resources of the Baltic Depression Province, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pitman, Janet K.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources of 282 million barrels of conventional oil, 576 billion cubic feet of conventional gas, 1.3 billion barrels of continuous oil, and 4.6 trillion cubic feet of shale gas in the Baltic Depression Province.

  2. 40 CFR Table Nn-1 to Subpart Hh of... - Default Factors for Calculation Methodology 1 of This Subpart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Calculation Methodology 1 of This Subpart Fuel Default high heating value factor Default CO2 emission factor (kg CO2/MMBtu) Natural Gas 1.028 MMBtu/Mscf 53.02 Propane 3.822 MMBtu/bbl 61.46 Normal butane 4.242...

  3. 40 CFR Table Nn-1 to Subpart Hh of... - Default Factors for Calculation Methodology 1 of This Subpart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Calculation Methodology 1 of This Subpart Fuel Default high heating value factor Default CO2 emission factor (kg CO2/MMBtu) Natural Gas 1.028 MMBtu/Mscf 53.02 Propane 3.822 MMBtu/bbl 61.46 Normal butane 4.242...

  4. 40 CFR Table Nn-1 to Subpart Hh of... - Default Factors for Calculation Methodology 1 of This Subpart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Calculation Methodology 1 of This Subpart Fuel Default high heating value factor Default CO2 emission factor (kg CO2/MMBtu) Natural Gas 1.028 MMBtu/Mscf 53.02 Propane 3.822 MMBtu/bbl 61.46 Normal butane 4.242...

  5. Leonardite char adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, C.L.

    1993-10-19

    A process of preparing lignite (low rank) coal filter material, suitable for use in lieu of more expensive activated carbon filter materials, is disclosed. The process comprises size reducing Leonardite coal material to a suitable filtering effective size, and thereafter heating the size reduced Leonardite preferably to at least 750 C in the presence of a flow of an inert gas. 1 figure.

  6. 40 CFR 86.099-11 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year diesel heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gas). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (ii) Total Hydrocarbon Equivalent (for methanol-fueled diesel engines). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (iii...

  7. 40 CFR 86.099-11 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year diesel heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gas). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (ii) Total Hydrocarbon Equivalent (for methanol-fueled diesel engines). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (iii...

  8. 40 CFR 86.099-11 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year diesel heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gas). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (ii) Total Hydrocarbon Equivalent (for methanol-fueled diesel engines). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (iii...

  9. 40 CFR 86.005-10 - Emission standards for 2005 and later model year Otto-cycle heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... petroleum gas. 1.0 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.37 grams per megajoule). (B) Oxides of Nitrogen plus Non-methane Hydrocarbon Equivalent (NO X + NMHCE) for engines fueled with methanol. 1.0 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.37 grams per megajoule). (C) A manufacturer may elect to include any or all of...

  10. 40 CFR 86.099-11 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year diesel heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gas). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (ii) Total Hydrocarbon Equivalent (for methanol-fueled diesel engines). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (iii...

  11. 40 CFR 86.099-11 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year diesel heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gas). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (ii) Total Hydrocarbon Equivalent (for methanol-fueled diesel engines). 1.3 grams per brake horsepower-hour (0.48 gram per megajoule), as measured under transient operating conditions. (iii...

  12. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for practical purposes Pittsburgh natural gas (containing a high percentage of methane) is a...) Unless special features of the lamp prevent ignition of explosive mixtures of methane and air by the... surrounded with explosive mixtures of Pittsburgh natural gas 1 and air. A sufficient number of tests of each...

  13. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for practical purposes Pittsburgh natural gas (containing a high percentage of methane) is a...) Unless special features of the lamp prevent ignition of explosive mixtures of methane and air by the... surrounded with explosive mixtures of Pittsburgh natural gas 1 and air. A sufficient number of tests of each...

  14. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for practical purposes Pittsburgh natural gas (containing a high percentage of methane) is a...) Unless special features of the lamp prevent ignition of explosive mixtures of methane and air by the... surrounded with explosive mixtures of Pittsburgh natural gas 1 and air. A sufficient number of tests of each...

  15. 40 CFR Table Nn-1 to Subpart Nn of... - Default Factors for Calculation Methodology 1 of This Subpart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids Pt. 98, Subpt. NN, Table NN-1 Table NN-1 to Subpart NN of Part 98... CO2emission factor (kg CO2/MMBtu) Natural Gas 1.026 MMBtu/Mscf 53.06 Propane 3.84 MMBtu/bbl 62.87 Normal...

  16. The Dual Activity Responsible for the Elongation and Branching of β-(1,3)-Glucan in the Fungal Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Simenel, Catherine; Garnaud, Cecile; Clavaud, Cecile; Tada, Rui; Barbin, Lise; Mouyna, Isabelle; Heddergott, Christoph; Popolo, Laura; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Delepierre, Muriel; Latge, Jean-Paul

    2017-06-20

    β-(1,3)-Glucan, the major fungal cell wall component, ramifies through β-(1,6)-glycosidic linkages, which facilitates its binding with other cell wall components contributing to proper cell wall assembly. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we developed a protocol to quantify β-(1,6)-branching on β-(1,3)-glucan. Permeabilized S. cerevisiae and radiolabeled substrate UDP-( 14 C)glucose allowed us to determine branching kinetics. A screening aimed at identifying deletion mutants with reduced branching among them revealed only two, the bgl2 Δ and gas1 Δ mutants, showing 15% and 70% reductions in the branching, respectively, compared to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, a recombinant Gas1p introduced β-(1,6)-branching on the β-(1,3)-oligomers following its β-(1,3)-elongase activity. Sequential elongation and branching activity of Gas1p occurred on linear β-(1,3)-oligomers as well as Bgl2p-catalyzed products [short β-(1,3)-oligomers linked by a linear β-(1,6)-linkage]. The double S. cerevisiae gas1 Δ bgl2 Δ mutant showed a drastically sick phenotype. An Sc Gas1p ortholog, Gel4p from Aspergillus fumigatus , also showed dual β-(1,3)-glucan elongating and branching activity. Both Sc Gas1p and A. fumigatus Gel4p sequences are endowed with a carbohydrate binding module (CBM), CBM43, which was required for the dual β-(1,3)-glucan elongating and branching activity. Our report unravels the β-(1,3)-glucan branching mechanism, a phenomenon occurring during construction of the cell wall which is essential for fungal life. IMPORTANCE The fungal cell wall is essential for growth, morphogenesis, protection, and survival. In spite of being essential, cell wall biogenesis, especially the core β-(1,3)-glucan ramification, is poorly understood; the ramified β-(1,3)-glucan interconnects other cell wall components. Once linear β-(1,3)-glucan is synthesized by plasma membrane-bound glucan synthase, the subsequent event is its branching event in the cell wall

  17. 40 CFR 98.158 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Service Emission factor(kg/hr/source) ≥10,000 ppmv Gas 0.0782 0.000131 Valves Light liquid 0.0892 0.000165 Pump seals Light liquid 0.243 0.00187 Compressor seals Gas 1.608 0.0894 Pressure... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.158 Definitions. All terms used in...

  18. β(1,3)-Glucanosyl-Transferase Activity Is Essential for Cell Wall Integrity and Viability of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    de Medina-Redondo, María; Arnáiz-Pita, Yolanda; Clavaud, Cécile; Fontaine, Thierry; del Rey, Francisco; Latgé, Jean Paul; Vázquez de Aldana, Carlos R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The formation of the cell wall in Schizosaccharomyces pombe requires the coordinated activity of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and modification of β-glucans. The β(1,3)-glucan synthase complex synthesizes linear β(1,3)-glucans, which remain unorganized until they are cross-linked to other β(1,3)-glucans and other cell wall components. Transferases of the GH72 family play important roles in cell wall assembly and its rearrangement in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus fumigatus. Four genes encoding β(1,3)-glucanosyl-transferases -gas1+, gas2+, gas4+ and gas5+- are present in S. pombe, although their function has not been analyzed. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report the characterization of the catalytic activity of gas1p, gas2p and gas5p together with studies directed to understand their function during vegetative growth. From the functional point of view, gas1p is essential for cell integrity and viability during vegetative growth, since gas1Δ mutants can only grow in osmotically supported media, while gas2p and gas5p play a minor role in cell wall construction. From the biochemical point of view, all of them display β(1,3)-glucanosyl-transferase activity, although they differ in their specificity for substrate length, cleavage point and product size. In light of all the above, together with the differences in expression profiles during the life cycle, the S. pombe GH72 proteins may accomplish complementary, non-overlapping functions in fission yeast. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that β(1,3)-glucanosyl-transferase activity is essential for viability in fission yeast, being required to maintain cell integrity during vegetative growth. PMID:21124977

  19. 40 CFR 98.408 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.408 Definitions. All terms...) Natural Gas 1.027 MMBtu/Mscf 53.02 Propane 3.836 MMBtu/bbl 63.02 Normal butane 4.326 MMBtu/bbl 64.93... Unit Default CO2 emission value(MT CO2/Unit) Natural Gas Mscf 0.054452 Propane Barrel 0.241745 Normal...

  20. --No Title--

    Science.gov Websites

    $stitle set definition sets G Power Generators /gen1*gen2/ F Fuels /oil,gas/ K Constants in Fuel better TABLE A(G,F,K) Coefficients in the fuel consumption equations 0 1 gen1.oil 1.4609 .18223 gen1.gas 1.5742 .19572 gen2.oil 0.8008 .24372 gen2.gas 0.7266 .27072; PARAMETER PMAX(G) Maximum power outputs of

  1. --No Title--

    Science.gov Websites

    $offtext $stitle set definition sets G Power Generators /gen1*gen2/ F Fuels /oil,gas/ K Constants in the fuel consumption equations 0 1 2 gen1.oil 1.4609 .15186 .00145 gen1.gas 1.5742 .16310 .001358 gen2.oil 0.8008 .20310 .000916 gen2.gas 0.7266 .22560 .000778; PARAMETER PMAX(G) Maximum power outputs

  2. 40 CFR Table C-2 to Subpart C - Default CH4 and N2O Emission Factors for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for Various Types of Fuel C Table C-2 to Subpart C Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Combustion Sources Pt. 98, Subpt. C, Table C-2 Table C-2 to Subpart C—Default CH4 and N2O Emission Factors... factor (kg N2O/mmBtu) Coal and Coke (All fuel types in Table C-1) 1.1 × 10−02 1.6 × 10−03 Natural Gas 1.0...

  3. 40 CFR Table C-2 to Subpart C - Default CH4 and N2O Emission Factors for Various Types of Fuel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for Various Types of Fuel C Table C-2 to Subpart C Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Combustion Sources Pt. 98, Subpt. C, Table C-2 Table C-2 to Subpart C—Default CH4 and N2O Emission Factors... factor (kg N2O/mmBtu) Coal and Coke (All fuel types in Table C-1) 1.1 × 10−02 1.6 × 10−03 Natural Gas 1.0...

  4. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of Hedgehog receptors in the developing inner and middle ear.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong-Oh; Ankamreddy, Harinarayana; Jakka, Naga Mahesh; Lee, Seokwon; Kim, Un-Kyung; Bok, Jinwoong

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear is a complex organ responsible for balance and hearing. Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a member of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins, has been shown to play important roles in several aspects of inner ear development, including dorsoventral axial specification, cochlear elongation, tonotopic patterning, and hair cell differentiation. Hh proteins initiate a downstream signaling cascade by binding to the Patched 1 (Ptch1) receptor. Recent studies have revealed that other types of co-receptors can also mediate Hh signaling, including growth arrest-specific 1 (Gas1), cell-adhesion molecules-related/down-regulated by oncogenes (Cdon), and biregional Cdon binding protein (Boc). However, little is known about the role of these Hh co-receptors in inner ear development. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of Gas1, Cdon, and Boc, as well as that of Ptch1, in the developing mouse inner ear from otocyst (embryonic day (E) 9.5) until birth and in the developing middle ear at E15.5. Ptch1, a readout of Hh signaling, was expressed in a graded pattern in response to Shh signaling throughout development. Expression patterns of Gas1, Cdon, and Boc differed from that of Ptch1, and each Hh co-receptor was expressed in specific cells and domains in the developing inner and middle ear. These unique and differential expression patterns of Hh co-receptors suggest their roles in mediating various time- and space-specific functions of Shh during ear development.

  5. The role of the sonic hedgehog signalling pathway in patients with midline defects and congenital hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Gregory, L C; Gaston-Massuet, C; Andoniadou, C L; Carreno, G; Webb, E A; Kelberman, D; McCabe, M J; Panagiotakopoulos, L; Saldanha, J W; Spoudeas, H A; Torpiano, J; Rossi, M; Raine, J; Canham, N; Martinez-Barbera, J P; Dattani, M T

    2015-05-01

    The Gli family of zinc finger (GLI) transcription factors mediates the sonic hedgehog signalling pathway (HH) essential for CNS, early pituitary and ventral forebrain development in mice. Human mutations in this pathway have been described in patients with holoprosencephaly (HPE), isolated congenital hypopituitarism (CH) and cranial/midline facial abnormalities. Mutations in Sonic hedgehog (SHH) have been associated with HPE but not CH, despite murine studies indicating involvement in pituitary development. We aimed to establish the role of the HH pathway in the aetiology of hypothalamo-pituitary disorders by screening our cohort of patients with midline defects and/or CH for mutations in SHH, GLI2, Shh brain enhancer 2 (SBE2) and growth-arrest specific 1 (GAS1). Two variants and a deletion of GLI2 were identified in three patients. A novel variant at a highly conserved residue in the zinc finger DNA-binding domain, c.1552G > A [pE518K], was identified in a patient with growth hormone deficiency and low normal free T4. A nonsynonymous variant, c.2159G > A [p.R720H], was identified in a patient with a short neck, cleft palate and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. A 26·6 Mb deletion, 2q12·3-q21·3, encompassing GLI2 and 77 other genes, was identified in a patient with short stature and impaired growth. Human embryonic expression studies and molecular characterisation of the GLI2 mutant p.E518K support the potential pathogenicity of GLI2 mutations. No mutations were identified in GAS1 or SBE2. A novel SHH variant, c.1295T>A [p.I432N], was identified in two siblings with variable midline defects but normal pituitary function. Our data suggest that mutations in SHH, GAS1 and SBE2 are not associated with hypopituitarism, although GLI2 is an important candidate for CH. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Construction of a Plasma Resource Recovery System at Hurlburt Field, Florida. Final Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-07

    1 h~ clean::.) nthcsr:; gas 1"- com cncd 111 energy\\ 1:1 an imcrnal cnmhustinn engi1w-drin:n generator !"he cngmc produ~c.; ck·ctn~1ty \\\\ lllch rs...day mWh megawatt-hours NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NEI National Emissions Inventory NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NESHAP...System (PRRS) at Hurlburt Field, Florida. This EA has been prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the Council

  7. Zeolite crystal growth in space - What has been learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, A., Jr.; Thompson, R. W.; Dixon, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    Three zeolite crystal growth experiments developed at WPI have been performed in space in last twelve months. One experiment, GAS-1, illustrated that to grow large, crystallographically uniform crystals in space, the precursor solutions should be mixed in microgravity. Another experiment evaluated the optimum mixing protocol for solutions that chemically interact ('gel') on contact. These results were utilized in setting the protocol for mixing nineteen zeolite solutions that were then processed and yielded zeolites A, X and mordenite. All solutions in which the nucleation event was influenced produced larger, more 'uniform' crystals than did identical solutions processed on earth.

  8. Market Potential of Downtown Cheyenne

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    utility companies and 4 oil and gas related concerns. These tax payers are summarized below. CITY OF CHEYENNE, WYOMING PRINCIPAL TAXPAYERS June 30...Husky Oil Co. Refinery 9,429,011 6.61% Union Pacific Railroad 8,036,532 5.64% Amoco Oil and Gas 4,967,542 3.48% 0 Wycon Chemical Co. Chemical...2,603,583 1.83% Mobil Oil Oil and Gas 1,965,632 1.38% Burlington Northern Railroad 1,483,681 1.04% $58,028,897 40.71% Source: Laramie County Tax

  9. Removal of dioxins and furans from flue gases by non-flammable adsorbents in a fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Fell, H J; Tuczek, M

    1998-01-01

    The presented adsorption--process KOMBISORBON is applied for high efficient off-gas purification, preferably of polychlorinated dioxins and furans from off-gas of incineration plants, which are generated, when these are operated under unfavourable conditions [2]. This off-gas purification process complies with german laws, which limit the concentration of these substances to less than 0.1 ng toxicity equivalents (TE) per cubic metre of gas [1]. The adsorbent, the adsorption process and its plant concept (fixed bed) is described in detail including economics and obtained operation results. Alternative removal technologies are briefly outlined.

  10. Comparative Proteomics Analyses of Two Races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans that Differ in Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erfeng; Ling, Jian; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Jiling; Yang, Yuhong; Mao, Zhenchuan; Wang, Xuchu; Xie, Bingyan

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a soil-inhabiting fungus that induces vascular wilt and root rot in a variety of plants. F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans (Foc), which comprises two races, can cause wilt disease in cabbage. Compared with race 1 (52557−TM, R1), race 2 (58385−TM, R2) exhibits much stronger pathogenicity. Here, we provide the first proteome reference maps for Foc mycelium and conidia and identify 145 proteins with different abundances among the two races. Of these proteins, most of the high-abundance proteins in the R2 mycelium and conidia are involved in carbohydrate, amino acid and ion metabolism, which indicates that these proteins may play important roles in isolate R2’s stronger pathogenicity. The expression levels of 20 typical genes demonstrate similarly altered patterns compared to the proteomic analysis. The protein glucanosyltransferase, which is involved in carbohydrate metabolism, was selected for research. We knocked out the corresponding gene (gas1) and found that Foc-∆gas1 significantly reduced growth rate and virulence compared with wild type isolates. These results deepened our understanding of the proteins related to F. oxysporum pathogenicity in cabbage Fusarium wilt and provided new opportunities to control this disease. PMID:26333982

  11. N-acetylcysteine and vitamin E rescue animal longevity and cellular oxidative stress in pre-clinical models of mitochondrial complex I disease.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Erzsebet; Ostrovsky, Julian; Peng, Min; Dingley, Stephen D; Tsukikawa, Mai; Kwon, Young Joon; McCormack, Shana E; Bennett, Michael; Xiao, Rui; Seiler, Christoph; Zhang, Zhe; Falk, Marni J

    2018-04-01

    Oxidative stress is a known contributing factor in mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease pathogenesis. Yet, no efficient means exists to objectively evaluate the comparative therapeutic efficacy or toxicity of different antioxidant compounds empirically used in human RC disease. We postulated that pre-clinical comparative analysis of diverse antioxidant drugs having suggested utility in primary RC disease using animal and cellular models of RC dysfunction may improve understanding of their integrated effects and physiologic mechanisms, and enable prioritization of lead antioxidant molecules to pursue in human clinical trials. Here, lifespan effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), vitamin E, vitamin C, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), mitochondrial-targeted CoQ10 (MS010), lipoate, and orotate were evaluated as the primary outcome in a well-established, short-lived C. elegans gas-1(fc21) animal model of RC complex I disease. Healthspan effects were interrogated to assess potential reversal of their globally disrupted in vivo mitochondrial physiology, transcriptome profiles, and intermediary metabolic flux. NAC or vitamin E fully rescued, and coenzyme Q, lipoic acid, orotic acid, and vitamin C partially rescued gas-1(fc21) lifespan toward that of wild-type N2 Bristol worms. MS010 and CoQ10 largely reversed biochemical pathway expression changes in gas-1(fc21) worms. While nearly all drugs normalized the upregulated expression of the "cellular antioxidant pathway", they failed to rescue the mutant worms' increased in vivo mitochondrial oxidant burden. NAC and vitamin E therapeutic efficacy were validated in human fibroblast and/or zebrafish complex I disease models. Remarkably, rotenone-induced zebrafish brain death was preventable partially with NAC and fully with vitamin E. Overall, these pre-clinical model animal data demonstrate that several classical antioxidant drugs do yield significant benefit on viability and survival in primary mitochondrial disease, where their major

  12. Measurement of inflight shell areal density perturbations in NIF capsule implosions near peak velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, B. A.; Pickworth, L.; Smalyuk, V.; Macphee, A.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H.; Barrios, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative measurements of shell-RhoR perturbations in capsules near peak implosion velocity (PV) are challenging. An external backlighter samples both sides of the shell, unless a re-entrant cone is used (potentially perturbing implosion). Emission from the hot core, after shock-stagnation and prior to PV, has been used as a self-backlighter, providing a means to sample one side of the capsule. Adding high-Z gas (~ 1% Ar) to the capsule fill in Symcaps (4He), has produced a continuum backlighter with significant increase in emission at photon energies ~ 8 keV over nominal fills. From images of the transmitted self-emission, above and below the K-edge of an internally doped Cu layer, we infer the growth at PV of imposed perturbations (100 nm amplitude, mode 40). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Thermochemical properties of silver tellurides including empressite (AgTe) and phase diagrams for Ag-Te and Ag-Te-O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, Mikhail V.; Osadchii, Evgeniy G.; Brichkina, Ekaterina A.

    2017-10-01

    This study compiles original experimental and literature data on the thermodynamic properties (ΔfG°, S°, ΔfH°) of silver tellurides (α-Ag2Te, β-Ag2Te, Ag1.9Te, Ag5Te3, AgTe) obtained by the method of solid-state galvanic cell with the RbAg4I5 and AgI solid electrolytes. The thermodynamic data for empressite (AgTe, pure fraction from Empress Josephine Mine, Colorado USA) have been obtained for the first time by the electrochemical experiment with the virtual reaction Ag + Te = AgTe. The Ag-Te phase diagrams in the T - x and log fTe2 (gas) - 1/ T coordinates have been refined, and the ternary Ag-Te-O diagrams with Ag-Te-TeO2 (paratellurite) composition range have been calculated.

  14. Portable Medical Diagnosis Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Matthew A. (Inventor); Straume, Tore (Inventor); Loftus, David J. (Inventor); Li, Jing (Inventor); Singh, Anup K. (Inventor); Davis, Cristina E. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A system that integrates several technologies into a single, portable medical diagnostic apparatus for analyzing a sample body fluid (liquid and/or gas): (1) a mechanism to capture airborne microdroplets and to separate the body fluid into a first fluid component (primarily gas) and a second fluid component (primarily liquid); (2) a volatilizer to convert a portion of the second fluid component into a third fluid component that is primarily a gas; (3) a functionalized nanostructure (NS) array configured to receive, identify, and estimate concentration of at least one constituent in the first and/or third fluid components; (4) a miniaturized differential mobility spectrometer (DMS) module; and (5) a biomarker sensor, to detect volatile and non-volatile molecules in a sample fluid, which may contain one or more components of blood, breath, perspiration, saliva, and urine.

  15. Molecular signals regulating translocation and toxicity of graphene oxide in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiuli; Zhao, Yunli; Li, Yiping; Wang, Dayong

    2014-09-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the toxic effects of graphene oxide (GO). However, the molecular basis for the translocation and toxicity of GO is still largely unclear. In the present study, we employed an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans assay system to identify molecular signals involved in the control of the translocation and toxicity of GO. We identified 7 genes whose mutations altered both the translocation and toxicity of GO. Mutations of the hsp-16.48, gas-1, sod-2, sod-3, and aak-2 genes caused greater GO translocation into the body and toxic effects on both primary and secondary targeted organs compared with wild type; however, mutations of the isp-1 and clk-1 genes resulted in significantly decreased GO translocation into the body and toxicity on both primary and secondary targeted organs compared with wild-type. Moreover, mutations of the hsp-16.48, gas-1, sod-2, sod-3, and aak-2 genes caused increased intestinal permeability and prolonged mean defecation cycle length in GO-exposed nematodes, whereas mutations of the isp-1 and clk-1 genes resulted in decreased intestinal permeability in GO-exposed nematodes. Therefore, for the underlying mechanism, we hypothesize that both intestinal permeability and defecation behavior may have crucial roles in controlling the functions of the identified molecular signals. The molecular signals may further contribute to the control of transgenerational toxic effects of GO. Our results provide an important insight into understanding the molecular basis for the in vivo translocation and toxicity of GO.Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the toxic effects of graphene oxide (GO). However, the molecular basis for the translocation and toxicity of GO is still largely unclear. In the present study, we employed an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans assay system to identify molecular signals involved in the control of the translocation and toxicity of GO. We identified 7 genes whose mutations

  16. Dryer cuts fuel usage by equivalent of 6-million scf/yr

    SciTech Connect

    List, K.H.; Powers, J.

    Drying is an integral part of the production of ZnO pellets, a specific requirement for producing a uniform end product. The dryer has to be able to cure the product for a finite period at temperatures up to 500/sup 0/C in the same unit. Substantial savings have been realized because the dryer has enabled the user to optimize operating conditions. Continuous on-stream operations requiring minimum operator attendance, automatic controls, simplicity of design contruction, and the unit's ability to use waste heat also contribute to these savings. Gas exhausted from a nearby kiln provides the total heat requirement for the dryer.more » Positive delivery of the hot flue gas is assured by a blower and automatically controlled dampers. Annual fuel savings based on the use of waste heat, amounts to an equiv of 6 million scf of natural gas. 1 figure.« less

  17. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.

    The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset of the wider dialogue on natural gas: 1. What are the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity?; 2. What are the existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and how are they changing in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns?; 3. How are natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices?; andmore » 4. How might demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years?« less

  18. Discovery of germacrene A synthases in Barnadesia spinosa: The first committed step in sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis in the basal member of the Asteraceae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trinh-Don; Faraldos, Juan A; Vardakou, Maria; Salmon, Melissa; O'Maille, Paul E; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2016-10-28

    The Andes-endemic Barnadesioideae lineage is the oldest surviving and phylogenetically basal subfamily of the Asteraceae (Compositae), a prolific group of flowering plants with world-wide distribution (∼24,000 species) marked by a rich diversity of sesquiterpene lactones (STLs). Intriguingly, there is no evidence that members of the Barnadesioideae produce STLs, specialized metabolites thought to have contributed to the adaptive success of the Asteraceae family outside South America. The biosynthesis of STLs requires the intimate expression and functional integration of germacrene A synthase (GAS) and germacrene A oxidase (GAO) to sequentially cyclize and oxidize farnesyl diphosphate into the advanced intermediate germacrene A acid leading to diverse STLs. Our previous discovery of GAO activity conserved across all major subfamilies of Asteraceae, including the phylogenetically basal lineage of Barnadesioideae, prompted further investigation of the presence of the gateway GAS in Barnadesioideae. Herein we isolated two terpene synthases (BsGAS1/BsGAS2) from the basal Barnadesia spinosa (Barnadesioideae) that displayed robust GAS activity when reconstituted in yeast and characterized in vitro. Despite the apparent lack of STLs in the Barnadesioideae, this work unambiguously confirms the presence of GAS in the basal genera of the Asteraceae. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the two BsGASs fall into two distinct clades of the Asteraceae's GASs, and BsGAS1 clade is only retained in the evolutionary closer Cichorioideae subfamily, implicating BsGAS2 is likely the ancestral base of most GASs found in the lineages outside the Barnadesioideae. Taken together, these results show the enzymatic capacities of GAS and GAO emerged prior to the subsequent radiation of STL-producing Asteraceae subfamilies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Induction of autophagy and apoptosis by miR-148a through the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu-You; He, Ya-Jun; Yang, Qi-Hong; Huang, Wei; Liu, Zhi-He; Ye, Guo-Rong; Tang, Shao-Hui; Shu, Jian-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved biological process that is activated in response to stress. Increasing evidence indicate that dysregulated miRNAs significantly contribute to autophagy and are thus implicated in various pathological conditions, including hepatic fibrosis. MiR-148a, a member of the miR-148/152 family, has been found to be downregulated in hepatic fibrosis and human hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the role of miR-148a in the development of hepatic fibrosis remains largely unknown. In this study, we describe the epigenetic regulation of miR-148a and its impact on autophagy in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), exploring new targets of miR-148a. We found that miR-148a expression was significantly increased under starvation-induced conditions in LX-2 and T-6 cells. In addition, dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that miR-148a suppressed target gene expression by directly interacting with the 3’-untranslated regions (3’-UTRs) of growth arrest-specific gene 1 (Gas1) transcripts. Intriguingly, Gas1, which encodes a Hedgehog surface binding receptor and facilitates the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, inhibited autophagosome synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrated a novel function for miR-148a as a potent inducer of autophagy in HSCs. Overexpressing of miR-148a increased autophagic activity, which inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis in HSCs. In conclusion, these data support a novel role for miR-148a as a key regulator of autophagy through the Hh signaling pathway, making miR-148a a potential candidate for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26609469

  20. Microbially synthesized modular virus-like particles and capsomeres displaying group A streptococcus hypervariable antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Chuan, Yap P; Wibowo, Nani; Connors, Natalie K; Wu, Yang; Hughes, Fiona K; Batzloff, Michael R; Lua, Linda H L; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-06-01

    Effective and low-cost vaccines are essential to control severe group A streptococcus (GAS) infections prevalent in low-income nations and the Australian aboriginal communities. Highly diverse and endemic circulating GAS strains mandate broad-coverage and customized vaccines. This study describes an approach to deliver cross-reactive antigens from endemic GAS strains using modular virus-like particle (VLP) and capsomere systems. The antigens studied were three heterologous N-terminal peptides (GAS1, GAS2, and GAS3) from the GAS surface M-protein that are specific to endemic strains in Australia Northern Territory Aboriginal communities. In vivo data presented here demonstrated salient characteristics of the modular delivery systems in the context of GAS vaccine design. First, the antigenic peptides, when delivered by unadjuvanted modular VLPs or adjuvanted capsomeres, induced high titers of peptide-specific IgG antibodies (over 1 × 10(4) ). Second, delivery by capsomere was superior to VLP for one of the peptides investigated (GAS3), demonstrating that the delivery system relative effectiveness was antigen-dependant. Third, significant cross-reactivity of GAS2-induced IgG with GAS1 was observed using either VLP or capsomere, showing the possibility of broad-coverage vaccine design using these delivery systems and cross-reactive antigens. Fourth, a formulation containing three pre-mixed modular VLPs, each at a low dose of 5 μg (corresponding to <600 ng of each GAS peptide), induced significant titers of IgGs specific to each peptide, demonstrating that a multivalent, broad-coverage VLP vaccine formulation was possible. In summary, the modular VLPs and capsomeres reported here demonstrate, with promising preliminary data, innovative ways to design GAS vaccines using VLP and capsomere delivery systems amenable to microbial synthesis, potentially adoptable by developing countries. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Hydrogen Gas Inhalation Treatment in Acute Cerebral Infarction: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Study on Safety and Neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hirohisa; Nishijima, Yoji; Ohta, Shigeo; Sakamoto, Masaki; Kinone, Kazunori; Horikosi, Tohru; Tamaki, Mituyuki; Takeshita, Hirosi; Futatuki, Tomoko; Ohishi, Wataru; Ishiguro, Taichi; Okamoto, Saori; Ishii, Shou; Takanami, Hiroko

    2017-11-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) acts as a therapeutic antioxidant. Inhalation of H 2 gas (1-4%) was effective for the improvement of cerebral infarction in multiple animal experiments. Thus, for actual applications, a randomized controlled clinical study is desired to evaluate the effects of inhalation of H 2 gas. Here, we evaluate the H 2 treatment on acute cerebral infarction. Through this randomized controlled clinical study, we assessed the safety and effectiveness of H 2 treatment in patients with cerebral infarction in an acute stage with mild- to moderate-severity National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores (NIHSS = 2-6). We enrolled 50 patients (25 each in the H 2 group and the control group) with a therapeutic time window of 6 to 24 hours. The H 2 group inhaled 3% H 2 gas (1 hour twice a day), and the control group received conventional intravenous medications for the initial 7 days. The evaluations included daily vital signs, NIHSS scores, physical therapy indices, weekly blood chemistry, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans over the 2-week study period. The H 2 group showed no significant adverse effects with improvements in oxygen saturation. The following significant effects were found: the relative signal intensity of MRI, which indicated the severity of the infarction site, NIHSS scores for clinically quantifying stroke severity, and physical therapy evaluation, as judged by the Barthel Index. H 2 treatment was safe and effective in patients with acute cerebral infarction. These results suggested a potential for widespread and general application of H 2 gas. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell wall integrity modulates RHO1 activity via the exchange factor ROM2.

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, M; Delley, P A; Schmidt, A; Hall, M N

    1998-01-01

    The essential phosphatidylinositol kinase homologue TOR2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae controls the actin cytoskeleton by activating a GTPase switch consisting of RHO1 (GTPase), ROM2 (GEF) and SAC7 (GAP). We have identified two mutations, rot1-1 and rot2-1, that suppress the loss of TOR2 and are synthetic-lethal. The wild-type ROT1 and ROT2 genes and a multicopy suppressor, BIG1, were isolated by their ability to rescue the rot1-1 rot2-1 double mutant. ROT2 encodes glucosidase II, and ROT1 and BIG1 encode novel proteins. We present evidence that cell wall defects activate RHO1. First, rot1, rot2, big1, cwh41, gas1 and fks1 mutations all confer cell wall defects and suppress tor2(ts). Second, destabilizing the cell wall by supplementing the growth medium with 0.005% SDS also suppresses a tor2(ts) mutation. Third, disturbing the cell wall with SDS or a rot1, rot2, big1, cwh41, gas1 or fks1 mutation increases GDP/GTP exchange activity toward RHO1. These results suggest that cell wall defects suppress a tor2 mutation by activating RHO1 independently of TOR2, thereby inducing TOR2-independent polarization of the actin cytoskeleton and cell wall synthesis. Activation of RHO1, a subunit of the cell wall synthesis enzyme glucan synthase, by a cell wall alteration would ensure that cell wall synthesis occurs only when and where needed. The mechanism of RHO1 activation by a cell wall alteration is via the exchange factor ROM2 and could be analogous to signalling by integrin receptors in mammalian cells. PMID:9545237

  3. IR Li2Ga2GeS6 nanocrystallized GeS2-Ga2S3-Li2S electroconductive chalcogenide glass with good nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiming; Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    GeS2-Ga2S3-Li2S electroconductive glasses were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method through carefully controlling the heating rate. Comparing with the reference of glass-forming region, our investigated GeS2-Ga2S3-Li2S system was extended to the cation ratio of 0–20% Li with around 40% Ga. GeS2-Ga2S3-Li2S glass-ceramics containing IR Li2Ga2GeS6 nonlinear nanocrystals were obtained by the more carefully controlled heating rate. Its optical nonlinearity was investigated by the Maker fringe measurements, the maximum second harmonic intensity was observed to be 0.35 of the reference Z-cut quartz. IR Li2Ga2GeS6 nonlinear crystals were directly obtained at the composition of 40GeS2-30GaS1.5-30LiS0.5. PMID:25030713

  4. Viscous Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Michelle; Stevens, Cacey; Nagel, Sidney

    2008-11-01

    The splashing of both inviscid and viscous drops on smooth, dry surfaces can be completely suppressed by decreasing the pressure of the surrounding gas [1,2,3]. However, at sufficiently high pressure when splashing does occur, the shape and dynamics of the ejected liquid sheets depends strongly on the liquid viscosity. This, as well as the dependence of the threshold pressure on viscosity [2], suggests that the splashing of viscous and inviscid liquids is caused by different mechanisms. When a low-viscosity (˜1 cst) liquid splashes, a corona is ejected immediately upon impact. In more viscous fluids (10 cst silicone oil), our experiments show that a thin sheet, resembling a flattened version of the corona seen in the inviscid case, emerges out of a much thicker spreading film. However, for these viscous fluids, the ejection of the thin sheet does not occur immediately. As the ambient pressure is lowered, the sheet ejection time is delayed longer and longer after impact until no sheet is ejected at all. [1] L. Xu, W.W. Zhang, S.R. Nagel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 184505 (2005). [2] L. Xu, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056316 (2007). [3] C. Stevens et al., FC.00003 DFD 2007

  5. Genome-Scale Analysis Reveals Sst2 as the Principal Regulator of Mating Pheromone Signaling in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae†

    PubMed Central

    Chasse, Scott A.; Flanary, Paul; Parnell, Stephen C.; Hao, Nan; Cha, Jiyoung Y.; Siderovski, David P.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2006-01-01

    A common property of G protein-coupled receptors is that they become less responsive with prolonged stimulation. Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins) are well known to accelerate G protein GTPase activity and do so by stabilizing the transition state conformation of the G protein α subunit. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae there are four RGS-homologous proteins (Sst2, Rgs2, Rax1, and Mdm1) and two Gα proteins (Gpa1 and Gpa2). We show that Sst2 is the only RGS protein that binds selectively to the transition state conformation of Gpa1. The other RGS proteins also bind Gpa1 and modulate pheromone signaling, but to a lesser extent and in a manner clearly distinct from Sst2. To identify other candidate pathway regulators, we compared pheromone responses in 4,349 gene deletion mutants representing nearly all nonessential genes in yeast. A number of mutants produced an increase (sst2, bar1, asc1, and ygl024w) or decrease (cla4) in pheromone sensitivity or resulted in pheromone-independent signaling (sst2, pbs2, gas1, and ygl024w). These findings suggest that Sst2 is the principal regulator of Gpa1-mediated signaling in vivo but that other proteins also contribute in distinct ways to pathway regulation. PMID:16467474

  6. Bioinspired Cocatalysts Decorated WO3 Nanotube Toward Unparalleled Hydrogen Sulfide Chemiresistor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ha; Jang, Ji-Soo; Koo, Won-Tae; Choi, Seon-Jin; Cho, Hee-Jin; Kim, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Joon; Kim, Il-Doo

    2018-06-22

    Herein, we incorporated dual biotemplates, i.e., cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and apoferritin, into electrospinning solution to achieve three distinct benefits, i.e., (i) facile synthesis of a WO 3 nanotube by utilizing the self-agglomerating nature of CNC in the core of as-spun nanofibers, (ii) effective sensitization by partial phase transition from WO 3 to Na 2 W 4 O 13 induced by interaction between sodium-doped CNC and WO 3 during calcination, and (iii) uniform functionalization with monodispersive apoferritin-derived Pt catalytic nanoparticles (2.22 ± 0.42 nm). Interestingly, the sensitization effect of Na 2 W 4 O 13 on WO 3 resulted in highly selective H 2 S sensing characteristics against seven different interfering molecules. Furthermore, synergistic effects with a bioinspired Pt catalyst induced a remarkably enhanced H 2 S response ( R air / R gas = 203.5), unparalleled selectivity ( R air / R gas < 1.3 for the interfering molecules), and rapid response (<10 s)/recovery (<30 s) time at 1 ppm of H 2 S under 95% relative humidity level. This work paves the way for a new class of cosensitization routes to overcome critical shortcomings of SMO-based chemical sensors, thus providing a potential platform for diagnosis of halitosis.

  7. Valorization of Flue Gas by Combining Photocatalytic Gas Pretreatment with Microalgae Production.

    PubMed

    Eynde, Erik Van; Lenaerts, Britt; Tytgat, Tom; Blust, Ronny; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    Utilization of flue gas for algae cultivation seems to be a promising route because flue gas from fossil-fuel combustion processes contains the high amounts of carbon (CO2) and nitrogen (NO) that are required for algae growth. NO is a poor nitrogen source for algae cultivation because of its low reactivity and solublilty in water and its toxicity for algae at high concentrations. Here, we present a novel strategy to valorize NO from flue gas as feedstock for algae production by combining a photocatalytic gas pretreatment unit with a microalgal photobioreactor. The photocatalytic air pretreatment transforms NO gas into NO2 gas and thereby enhances the absorption of NOx in the cultivation broth. The absorbed NOx will form NO2(-) and NO3(-) that can be used as a nitrogen source by algae. The effect of photocatalytic air pretreatment on the growth and biomass productivity of the algae Thalassiosira weissflogii in a semicontinuous system aerated with a model flue gas (1% CO2 and 50 ppm of NO) is investigated during a long-term experiment. The integrated system makes it possible to produce algae with NO from flue gas as the sole nitrogen source and reduces the NOx content in the exhaust gas by 84%.

  8. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Sylla, F.; Lambert, G.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 1019 cm-3 range well suited for LWFA.

  9. Astronomy on the Moon: Geological considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    1992-01-01

    The Moon is an excellent site for astronomical observations. This paper describes two geological aspects related to astronomy from the Moon. First it evaluates the sources of gases near a lunar base as input to calculations reported in a separate paper on the growth of an artificial lunar atmosphere. The results suggest that mining for He-3 could produce the most gas (1 kg/sec), but rocket exhaust (0.1 kg/sec) and habitat venting (0.5 kg/sec) are also important. Second, the paper discusses criteria that need to be considered when determining the site of a lunar astronomical facility. These are longitude and latitude (equatorial sites are favored), topography (important to be relatively flat for ease of installation), distance from a lunar base (to be free of seismic noise, dust, and gases), the site's value to lunar geoscience (other factors being equal, a geologically diverse site is better), and its value as a materials resource (mining and observatories are incompatible).

  10. DR-GAS: a database of functional genetic variants and their phosphorylation states in human DNA repair systems.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Manika; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2014-04-01

    We present DR-GAS(1), a unique, consolidated and comprehensive DNA repair genetic association studies database of human DNA repair system. It presents information on repair genes, assorted mechanisms of DNA repair, linkage disequilibrium, haplotype blocks, nsSNPs, phosphorylation sites, associated diseases, and pathways involved in repair systems. DNA repair is an intricate process which plays an essential role in maintaining the integrity of the genome by eradicating the damaging effect of internal and external changes in the genome. Hence, it is crucial to extensively understand the intact process of DNA repair, genes involved, non-synonymous SNPs which perhaps affect the function, phosphorylated residues and other related genetic parameters. All the corresponding entries for DNA repair genes, such as proteins, OMIM IDs, literature references and pathways are cross-referenced to their respective primary databases. DNA repair genes and their associated parameters are either represented in tabular or in graphical form through images elucidated by computational and statistical analyses. It is believed that the database will assist molecular biologists, biotechnologists, therapeutic developers and other scientific community to encounter biologically meaningful information, and meticulous contribution of genetic level information towards treacherous diseases in human DNA repair systems. DR-GAS is freely available for academic and research purposes at: http://www.bioinfoindia.org/drgas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Protective effect of inhalation of hydrogen gas on radiation-induced dermatitis and skin injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Sadahiro; Fujita, Masanori; Ishihara, Masayuki; Tachibana, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Kaji, Tatsumi; Kawauchi, Toshio; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of inhalation of hydrogen-containing gas (1.3% hydrogen + 20.8% oxygen + 77.9% nitrogen) (HCG) on radiation-induced dermatitis and on the healing of healing-impaired skin wounds in rats was examined using a rat model of radiation-induced skin injury. An X-ray dose of 20 Gy was irradiated onto the lower part of the back through two holes in a lead shield. Irradiation was performed before or after inhalation of HCG for 2 h. Inhalation of HCG significantly reduced the severity of radiodermatitis and accelerated healing-impaired wound repair. Staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) showed that the proportion of apoptotic keratinocytes and the level of staining in the X-irradiated skin of rats that pre-inhaled HCG were significantly lower than that of rats which did not pre-inhale HCG. Cutaneous full-thickness wounds were then created in the X-irradiated area to examine the time-course of wound healing. X-irradiation significantly increased the time required for wound healing, but the inhalation of HCG prior to the irradiation significantly decreased the delay in wound healing compared with the control and post-inhalation of HCG groups. Therefore, radiation-induced skin injury can potentially be alleviated by the pre-inhalation of HCG. PMID:25034733

  12. Visualizing density perturbations in the capsule shell in NIF implosions near peak velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickworth, L. A.; Hammel, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Macphee, A.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H. F.; Field, J.; Barrios, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Engineering features on the capsule (surface roughness, support structures, etc.) can introduce outer surface perturbations that are ultimately detrimental to the performance of the capsule. Recent experiments have assessed minimal support structures and alternate pulse shapes using a re-entrant cone and back lighter that is perturbing to the implosion below radii of 500 μ m. Emission from the hot core, after shock-stagnation and prior to peak velocity (PV), has been used as a self-backlighter, providing a means to sample one side of the capsule at smaller radii. Adding high-Z gas ( 1 % Ar) to the capsule fill in Symcaps (4He), has produced a continuum backlighter with significant increase in emission at hv 8 keV over nominal fills. High-resolution imaging diagnostics with photon energy selectivity form 2D images of the transmitted self-emission, above and below the K-edge of an internally doped Cu layer. We can infer from these images the growth at PV of outer surface perturbations. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-697620.

  13. Phloem loading in Verbascum phoeniceum L. depends on the synthesis of raffinose-family oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    McCaskill, Ashlee; Turgeon, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Phloem loading is the initial step in photoassimilate export and the one that creates the driving force for mass flow. It has been proposed that loading occurs symplastically in species that translocate carbohydrate primarily as raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs). In these plants, dense fields of plasmodesmata connect bundle sheath cells to specialized companion cells (intermediary cells) in the minor veins. According to the polymer trap model, advanced as a mechanism of symplastic loading, sucrose from the mesophyll diffuses into intermediary cells and is converted there to RFOs. This process keeps the sucrose concentration low and, because of the larger size of the RFOs, prevents back diffusion. To test this model, the RFO pathway was down-regulated in Verbascum phoeniceum L. by suppressing the synthesis of galactinol synthase (GAS), which catalyzes the first committed step in RFO production. Two GAS genes (VpGAS1 and VpGAS2) were cloned and shown to be expressed in intermediary cells. Simultaneous RNAi suppression of both genes resulted in pronounced inhibition of RFO synthesis. Phloem transport was negatively affected, as evidenced by the accumulation of carbohydrate in the lamina and the reduced capacity of leaves to export sugars during a prolonged dark period. In plants with severe down-regulation, additional symptoms of reduced export were obvious, including impaired growth, leaf chlorosis, and necrosis and curling of leaf margins. PMID:18048337

  14. SWITCH-China: A Systems Approach to Decarbonizing China's Power System.

    PubMed

    He, Gang; Avrin, Anne-Perrine; Nelson, James H; Johnston, Josiah; Mileva, Ana; Tian, Jianwei; Kammen, Daniel M

    2016-06-07

    We present an integrated model, SWITCH-China, of the Chinese power sector with which to analyze the economic and technological implications of a medium to long-term decarbonization scenario while accounting for very-short-term renewable variability. On the basis of the model and assumptions used, we find that the announced 2030 carbon peak can be achieved with a carbon price of ∼$40/tCO2. Current trends in renewable energy price reductions alone are insufficient to replace coal; however, an 80% carbon emission reduction by 2050 is achievable in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Target Scenario with an optimal electricity mix in 2050 including nuclear (14%), wind (23%), solar (27%), hydro (6%), gas (1%), coal (3%), and carbon capture and sequestration coal energy (26%). The co-benefits of carbon-price strategy would offset 22% to 42% of the increased electricity costs if the true cost of coal and the social cost of carbon are incorporated. In such a scenario, aggressive attention to research and both technological and financial innovation mechanisms are crucial to enabling the transition at a reasonable cost, along with strong carbon policies.

  15. Impact analysis of leading sub sector on basic sector to regional income in Siak Regency, Riau Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, P.; Nugraha, I.; Abdillah, F.

    2018-02-01

    During this time Siak regency only known as oil producing regency in Riau province, but based on the vision of spatial planning Siak’s regency in 2031 there was a shift from petroleum towards to other sectors such as agribusiness, agroindustry and tourism. The purpose of this study was to identify the sector base, the leading subsectors and shift with their characteristics and to identify the leading subsectors development priority. The method used in this research consisted of the method of Location Quotient (LQ, Shift Share, and Overlay method). The research results were used Location Quotient (LQ) to identify sector’s base in Siak regency based on the document of PDRB. The sector’s refers to the constant prices year of 2000 were mining and quarrying sector (2.25). The sector’s base using document of PDRB at constant prices 2000 without oil and gas sector was the agricultural sector with a value of LQ was 2,45. The leading sub sector in the Siak regency with mining and quarrying sector was oil and gas (1.02) and leading sub sector without oil and gas sector was the plantation sector (1.48) and forestry sector (1.73). Overlay analysis results shown that agriculture sector as a sector base and plantation and forestry as a leading sub sector has positive value and categorize as progressive and competitiveness. Because of that, this leading sub sector gets high priority to developing.

  16. Demonstration of an ethane spectrometer for methane source identification.

    PubMed

    Yacovitch, Tara I; Herndon, Scott C; Roscioli, Joseph R; Floerchinger, Cody; McGovern, Ryan M; Agnese, Michael; Pétron, Gabrielle; Kofler, Jonathan; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Conley, Stephen A; Kort, Eric A; Nähle, Lars; Fischer, Marc; Hildebrandt, Lars; Koeth, Johannes; McManus, J Barry; Nelson, David D; Zahniser, Mark S; Kolb, Charles E

    2014-07-15

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and tropospheric ozone precursor. Simultaneous observation of ethane with methane can help identify specific methane source types. Aerodyne Ethane-Mini spectrometers, employing recently available mid-infrared distributed feedback tunable diode lasers (DFB-TDL), provide 1 s ethane measurements with sub-ppb precision. In this work, an Ethane-Mini spectrometer has been integrated into two mobile sampling platforms, a ground vehicle and a small airplane, and used to measure ethane/methane enhancement ratios downwind of methane sources. Methane emissions with precisely known sources are shown to have ethane/methane enhancement ratios that differ greatly depending on the source type. Large differences between biogenic and thermogenic sources are observed. Variation within thermogenic sources are detected and tabulated. Methane emitters are classified by their expected ethane content. Categories include the following: biogenic (<0.2%), dry gas (1-6%), wet gas (>6%), pipeline grade natural gas (<15%), and processed natural gas liquids (>30%). Regional scale observations in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas show two distinct ethane/methane enhancement ratios bridged by a transitional region. These results demonstrate the usefulness of continuous and fast ethane measurements in experimental studies of methane emissions, particularly in the oil and natural gas sector.

  17. C-Terminal Truncation of α-COP Affects Functioning of Secretory Organelles and Calcium Homeostasis in Hansenula polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Chechenova, Maria B.; Romanova, Nina V.; Deev, Alexander V.; Packeiser, Anna N.; Smirnov, Vladimir N.; Agaphonov, Michael O.; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, COPI vesicles retrieve resident proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum and mediate intra-Golgi transport. Here, we studied the Hansenula polymorpha homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RET1 gene, encoding α-COP, a subunit of the COPI protein complex. H. polymorpha ret1 mutants, which expressed truncated α-COP lacking more than 300 C-terminal amino acids, manifested an enhanced ability to secrete human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and an inability to grow with a shortage of Ca2+ ions, whereas a lack of α-COP expression was lethal. The α-COP defect also caused alteration of intracellular transport of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein Gas1p, secretion of abnormal uPA forms, and reductions in the levels of Pmr1p, a Golgi Ca2+-ATPase. Overexpression of Pmr1p suppressed some ret1 mutant phenotypes, namely, Ca2+ dependence and enhanced uPA secretion. The role of COPI-dependent vesicular transport in cellular Ca2+ homeostasis is discussed. PMID:14871936

  18. Flow behaviour and transitions in surfactant-laden gas-liquid vertical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Chakraborty, Sourojeet; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to elucidate the effect of surfactant additives on vertical gas-liquid counter-current pipe flows. Two experimental campaigns were undertaken, one with water and one with a light oil (Exxsol D80) as the liquid phase; in both cases air was used as the gaseous phase. Suitable surfactants were added to the liquid phase up to the critical micelle concentration (CMC); measurements in the absence of additives were also taken, for benchmarking. The experiments were performed in a 32-mm bore and 5-m long vertical pipe, over a range of superficial velocities (liquid: 1 to 7 m/s, gas: 1 to 44 m/s). High-speed axial- and side-view imaging was performed at different lengths along the pipe, together with pressure drop measurements. Flow regime maps were then obtained describing the observed flow behaviour and related phenomena, i.e., downwards/upwards annular flow, flooding, bridging, gas/liquid entrainment, oscillatory film flow, standing waves, climbing films, churn flow and dryout. Comparisons of the air-water and oil-water results will be presented and discussed, along with the role of the surfactants in affecting overall and detailed flow behaviour and transitions; in particular, a possible mechanism underlying the phenomenon of flooding will be presented. EPSRC UK Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  19. Tunable one-dimensional electron gas carrier densities at nanostructured oxide interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Lipeng; Xu, Haixuan; Kent, Paul R. C.; ...

    2016-05-06

    The emergence of two-dimensional metallic states at the LaAlO 3/SrTiO 3 (LAO/STO) heterostructure interface is known to occur at a critical thickness of four LAO over layers. This insulator-to-metal transition can be explained through the polar catastrophe mechanism arising from the divergence of the electrostatic potential at the LAO surface. Here, we demonstrate that nanostructuring can be effective in reducing or eliminating this critical thickness. Employing a modified polar catastrophe" model, we demonstrate that the nanowire heterostructure electrostatic potential diverges more rapidly as a function of layer thickness than in a regular heterostructure. Our first principles calculations indicate that formore » nanowire heterostructure geometries a one-dimensional electron gas (1DEG) can be induced, consistent with recent experimental observations of 1D conductivity in LAO/STO steps. Similar to LAO/STO 2DEGs, we predict that the 1D charge density will decay laterally within a few unit cells away from the nanowire; thus providing a mechanism for tuning the carrier behavior between 1D and 2D conductivity. Furthermore, our work provides insight into the creation and manipulation of charge density at an oxide heterostructure interface and therefore may be beneficial for future nanoelectronic devices and for the engineering of novel quantum phases.« less

  20. SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, T.

    The next generation subsea developments will be facing a number of new challenges which have to be solved to maintain a cost-efficient solution for production of oil and gas: (1) Smaller fields, i.e. cost reduction through volume will no longer be valid. (2) Freedom in configuration of subsea development. The current idea of standardization will not be directly applicable for cost reduction. (3) Various water depth. The same technology should be applicable for both guideline- and guideline less water depth. (4) Development in new areas of the world where drilling rig deployable system is a must. (5) Various types ofmore » fluid processing may be required as an integral part of a subsea production system. The next generation subsea production system should be universal and applicable to any subsea field development. Kongsberg Offshore a.s. (KOS) have gained extensive experience in supplying standardized total subsea systems. The paper presents the approach taken by KOS to develop the next generation subsea system, and discussed the challenges associated with this.« less

  1. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO.

  2. Unveiling the Role of Galactic Rotation on Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utreras, José; Becerra, Fernando; Escala, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    We study the star formation process at galactic scales and the role of rotation through numerical simulations of spiral and starburst galaxies using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo. We focus on the study of three integrated star formation laws found in the literature: the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) and Silk-Elmegreen (SE) laws, and the dimensionally homogeneous equation proposed by Escala {{{Σ }}}{SFR}\\propto \\sqrt{G/L}{{{Σ }}}{gas}1.5. We show that using the last we take into account the effects of the integration along the line of sight and find a unique regime of star formation for both types of galaxies, suppressing the observed bi-modality of the KS law. We find that the efficiencies displayed by our simulations are anti-correlated with the angular velocity of the disk Ω for the three laws studied in this work. Finally, we show that the dimensionless efficiency of star formation is well represented by an exponentially decreasing function of -1.9{{Ω }}{t}{ff}{ini}, where {t}{ff}{ini} is the initial free-fall time. This leads to a unique galactic star formation relation which reduces the scatter of the bi-modal KS, SE, and Escala relations by 43%, 43%, and 35%, respectively.

  3. Chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry to elucidate the topology of integral membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Debelyy, Mykhaylo O.; Waridel, Patrice; Quadroni, Manfredo; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Here we made an attempt to obtain partial structural information on the topology of multispan integral membrane proteins of yeast by isolating organellar membranes, removing peripheral membrane proteins at pH 11.5 and introducing chemical crosslinks between vicinal amino acids either using homo- or hetero-bifunctional crosslinkers. Proteins were digested with specific proteases and the products analysed by mass spectrometry. Dedicated software tools were used together with filtering steps optimized to remove false positive crosslinks. In proteins of known structure, crosslinks were found only between loops residing on the same side of the membrane. As may be expected, crosslinks were mainly found in very abundant proteins. Our approach seems to hold to promise to yield low resolution topological information for naturally very abundant or strongly overexpressed proteins with relatively little effort. Here, we report novel XL-MS-based topology data for 17 integral membrane proteins (Akr1p, Fks1p, Gas1p, Ggc1p, Gpt2p, Ifa38p, Ist2p, Lag1p, Pet9p, Pma1p, Por1p, Sct1p, Sec61p, Slc1p, Spf1p, Vph1p, Ybt1p). PMID:29073188

  4. A DISTANT ECHO OF MILKY WAY CENTRAL ACTIVITY CLOSES THE GALAXY’s BARYON CENSUS

    SciTech Connect

    Nicastro, F.; Senatore, F.; Krongold, Y.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the presence of large amounts of million-degree gas in the Milky Way’s interstellar and circum-galactic medium. This gas (1) permeates both the Galactic plane and the halo, (2) extends to distances larger than 60–200 kpc from the center, and (3) its mass is sufficient to close the Galaxy’s baryon census. Moreover, we show that a vast, ∼6 kpc radius, spherically symmetric central region of the Milky Way above and below the 0.16 kpc thick plane has either been emptied of hot gas or the density of this gas within the cavity has a peculiar profile, increasing frommore » the center up to a radius of ∼6 kpc, and then decreasing with a typical halo density profile. This, and several other converging pieces of evidence, suggest that the current surface of the cavity, at 6 kpc from the Galaxy’s center, traces the distant echo of a period of strong nuclear activity of our supermassive black hole, occurring about 6 Myr ago.« less

  5. Complex oxide ferroelectrics: Electrostatic doping by domain walls

    DOE PAGES

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2015-06-19

    Electrically conducting interfaces can form, rather unexpectedly, by breaking the translational symmetry of electrically insulating complex oxides. For example, a nanometre-thick heteroepitaxial interface between electronically insulating LaAlO 3 and SrTiO 3 supports a 2D electron gas1 with high mobility of >1,000 cm 2 V -1 s -1 (ref. 2). Such interfaces can exhibit magnetism, superconductivity and phase transitions that may form the functional basis of future electronic devices2. A peculiar conducting interface can be created within a polar ferroelectric oxide by breaking the translational symmetry of the ferroelectric order parameter and creating a so-called ferroelectric domain wall (Fig. 1a,b). Ifmore » the direction of atomic displacements changes at the wall in such a way as to create a discontinuity in the polarization component normal to the wall (Fig. 1a), the domain wall becomes electrostatically charged. It may then attract compensating mobile charges of opposite sign produced by dopant ionization, photoexcitation or other effects, thereby locally, electrostatically doping the host ferroelectric film. In contrast to conductive interfaces between epitaxially grown oxides, domain walls can be reversibly created, positioned and shaped by electric fields, enabling reconfigurable circuitry within the same volume of the material. Now, writing in Nature Nanotechnology, Arnaud Crassous and colleagues at EPFL and University of Geneva demonstrate control and stability of charged conducting domain walls in ferroelectric thin films of BiFeO 3 down to the nanoscale.« less

  6. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA.

  7. LOFA analysis in helium and Pb-Li circuits of LLCB TBM by FE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Ranjithkumar, S.; Sharma, Deepak; Danani, Chandan

    2017-04-01

    One of the main ITER objectives is to demonstrate the feasibility of the breeding blanket concepts that would lead to tritium self-sufficiency and the extraction of a high-grade heat for electricity production. India has developed the LLCB TBM to be tested in ITER for the validation of design concepts for tritium breeding blankets relevant DEMO and future power reactor. LLCB concept has the unique features of combination of both solid (lithium titanate as packed pebble bed) and liquid breeders (molten lead lithium). India specific IN-RAFMS is the structural material for TBM. The First Wall is actively cooled by high-pressure helium (He) gas [1]. It is important to validate the design of TBM to withstand various loads acting on it including accident analysis like LOCA, LOFA etc. Detailed thermal-hydraulic simulation studies including LOFA in helium and Pb-Li circuits of LLCB TBM have been performed using Finite Element using ANSYS. These analyses will provide important information about the temperature distribution in different materials used in TBM during steady state and transient condition. Thermal-hydraulic safety requirement has also been envisaged for the initiation the FPPS (Fusion Power Shutdown System) during LOFA. All these analysis will be presented in detail in this paper.

  8. Toxicity evaluation of boron nitride nanospheres and water-soluble boron nitride in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Hui; Tang, Chengchun; Lei, Shijun; Shen, Wanqing; Wang, Cong; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanomaterials have been increasingly explored for potential biological applications. However, their toxicity remains poorly understood. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a whole-animal model for toxicity analysis of two representative types of BN nanomaterials – BN nanospheres (BNNSs) and highly water-soluble BN nanomaterial (named BN-800-2) – we found that BNNSs overall toxicity was less than soluble BN-800-2 with irregular shapes. The concentration thresholds for BNNSs and BN-800-2 were 100 µg·mL−1 and 10 µg·mL−1, respectively. Above this concentration, both delayed growth, decreased life span, reduced progeny, retarded locomotion behavior, and changed the expression of phenotype-related genes to various extents. BNNSs and BN-800-2 increased oxidative stress levels in C. elegans by promoting reactive oxygen species production. Our results further showed that oxidative stress response and MAPK signaling-related genes, such as GAS1, SOD2, SOD3, MEK1, and PMK1, might be key factors for reactive oxygen species production and toxic responses to BNNSs and BN-800-2 exposure. Together, our results suggest that when concentrations are lower than 10 µg·mL−1, BNNSs are more biocompatible than BN-800-2 and are potentially biocompatible material. PMID:28860759

  9. Toxicity evaluation of boron nitride nanospheres and water-soluble boron nitride in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Hui; Tang, Chengchun; Lei, Shijun; Shen, Wanqing; Wang, Cong; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanomaterials have been increasingly explored for potential biological applications. However, their toxicity remains poorly understood. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a whole-animal model for toxicity analysis of two representative types of BN nanomaterials - BN nanospheres (BNNSs) and highly water-soluble BN nanomaterial (named BN-800-2) - we found that BNNSs overall toxicity was less than soluble BN-800-2 with irregular shapes. The concentration thresholds for BNNSs and BN-800-2 were 100 µg·mL -1 and 10 µg·mL -1 , respectively. Above this concentration, both delayed growth, decreased life span, reduced progeny, retarded locomotion behavior, and changed the expression of phenotype-related genes to various extents. BNNSs and BN-800-2 increased oxidative stress levels in C. elegans by promoting reactive oxygen species production. Our results further showed that oxidative stress response and MAPK signaling-related genes, such as GAS1 , SOD2 , SOD3 , MEK1 , and PMK1 , might be key factors for reactive oxygen species production and toxic responses to BNNSs and BN-800-2 exposure. Together, our results suggest that when concentrations are lower than 10 µg·mL -1 , BNNSs are more biocompatible than BN-800-2 and are potentially biocompatible material.

  10. Characterization of fine particle and gaseous emissions during school bus idling.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, J S; Williams, D C; Dong, Y; Logan, R

    2007-07-15

    The particulate matter (PM) and gaseous emissions from six diesel school buses were determined over a simulated waiting period typical of schools in the northeastern U.S. Testing was conducted for both continuous idle and hot restart conditions using a suite of on-line particle and gas analyzers installed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Diesel Emissions Aerosol Laboratory. The specific pollutants measured encompassed total PM-2.5 mass (PM < or = 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter), PM-2.5 number concentration, particle size distribution, particle-surface polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and a tracer gas (1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane) in the diluted sample stream. Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), total hydrocarbons (THC), oxygen, formaldehyde, and the tracer gas were also measured in the raw exhaust. Results of the study showed little difference in the measured emissions between a 10 min post-restart idle and a 10 min continuous idle with the exception of THC and formaldehyde. However, an emissions pulse was observed during engine restart. A predictive equation was developed from the experimental data, which allows a comparison between continuous idle and hot restart for NO(x), CO, PM2.5, and PAHs and which considers factors such as the restart emissions pulse and periods when the engine is not running. This equation indicates that restart is the preferred operating scenario as long as there is no extended idling after the engine is restarted.

  11. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, F., E-mail: fernando.brandi@ino.it; Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia; Giammanco, F.

    2016-08-15

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gasmore » flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} range well suited for LWFA.« less

  12. Thermodynamic analyses of hydrogen production from sub-quality natural gas. Part I: Pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali

    Sub-quality natural gas (SQNG) is defined as natural gas whose composition exceeds pipeline specifications of nitrogen, carbon dioxide (CO 2) and/or hydrogen sulfide (H 2S). Approximately one-third of the U.S. natural gas resource is sub-quality gas [1]. Due to the high cost of removing H 2S from hydrocarbons using current processing technologies, SQNG wells are often capped and the gas remains in the ground. We propose and analyze a two-step hydrogen production scheme using SQNG as feedstock. The first step of the process involves hydrocarbon processing (via steam-methane reformation, autothermal steam-methane reformation, pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis) in the presence of H 2S. Our analyses reveal that H 2S existing in SQNG is stable and can be considered as an inert gas. No sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and/or sulfur trioxide (SO 3) is formed from the introduction of oxygen to SQNG. In the second step, after the separation of hydrogen from the main stream, un-reacted H 2S is used to reform the remaining methane, generating more hydrogen and carbon disulfide (CS 2). Thermodynamic analyses on SQNG feedstock containing up to 10% (v/v) H 2S have shown that no H 2S separation is required in this process. The Part I of this paper includes only thermodynamic analyses for SQNG pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis.

  13. WISDOM Project - II. Molecular gas measurement of the supermassive black hole mass in NGC 4697

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Onishi, Kyoko; Cappellari, Michele; Iguchi, Satoru; Sarzi, Marc

    2017-07-01

    As part of the mm-Wave Interferometric Survey of Dark Object Masses (WISDOM) project, we present an estimate of the mass of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the nearby fast-rotating early-type galaxy NGC 4697. This estimate is based on Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle-3 observations of the 12CO(2-1) emission line with a linear resolution of 29 pc (0.53 arcsec). We find that NGC 4697 hosts a small relaxed central molecular gas disc with a mass of 1.6 × 107 M⊙, co-spatial with the obscuring dust disc visible in optical Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We also resolve thermal 1 mm continuum emission from the dust in this disc. NGC 4697 is found to have a very low molecular gas velocity dispersion, σgas = 1.65^{+0.68}_{-0.65} km s-1. This seems to be partially because the giant molecular cloud mass function is not fully sampled, but other mechanisms such as chemical differentiation in a hard radiation field or morphological quenching also seem to be required. We detect a Keplerian increase of the rotation of the molecular gas in the very centre of NGC 4697, and use forward modelling of the ALMA data cube in a Bayesian framework with the KINematic Molecular Simulation (kinms) code to estimate an SMBH mass of (1.3_{-0.17}^{+0.18}) × 108 M⊙ and an I-band mass-to-light ratio of 2.14_{-0.05}^{+0.04} M⊙/L⊙ (at the 99 per cent confidence level). Our estimate of the SMBH mass is entirely consistent with previous measurements from stellar kinematics. This increases confidence in the growing number of SMBH mass estimates being obtained in the ALMA era.

  14. Anxiety symptoms and risk of cognitive decline in older community-dwelling men.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Ahmed M; Ganguli, Mary; Yaffe, Kristine; Hanlon, Joseph T; Lopez, Oscar L; Wilson, John W; Cauley, Jane A

    2017-07-01

    Previous research regarding anxiety as a predictor of future cognitive decline in older adults is limited and inconsistent. We examined the independent relationship between anxiety symptoms and subsequent cognitive decline. We included 2,818 community-dwelling older men (mean age = 76.1, SD ±5.3 years) who were followed on an average for 3.4 years. We assessed anxiety symptoms at baseline using the Goldberg Anxiety Scale (GAS; range = 0-9). We assessed cognitive function at baseline and at two subsequent visits using the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS; global cognition) and the Trails B test (executive function). At baseline, there were 690 (24%) men with mild anxiety symptoms (GAS 1-4) and 226 (8%) men with moderate/severe symptoms (GAS 5-9). Men with anxiety symptoms were more likely to have depressed mood, poor sleep, more chronic medical conditions, and more impairment in activities of daily living compared to those with no anxiety symptoms. Compared to those with no anxiety symptoms at baseline, men with any anxiety symptoms were more likely to have substantial worsening in Trails B completion time (OR = 1.56, 95% CI 1.19, 2.05). The association was attenuated after adjusting for potential confounders, including depression and poor sleep, but remained significant (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.04, 1.88). In cognitively healthy older men, mild anxiety symptoms may potentially predict future decline in executive functioning. Anxiety is likely a manifestation of an underlying neurodegenerative process rather than a cause.

  15. A Latex Metabolite Benefits Plant Fitness under Root Herbivore Attack.

    PubMed

    Huber, Meret; Epping, Janina; Schulze Gronover, Christian; Fricke, Julia; Aziz, Zohra; Brillatz, Théo; Swyers, Michael; Köllner, Tobias G; Vogel, Heiko; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Robert, Christelle A M; Verhoeven, Koen; Preite, Veronica; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Erb, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under herbivore attack is scarce, especially below ground. Here, we tested whether latex secondary metabolites produced by the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) decrease the performance of its major native insect root herbivore, the larvae of the common cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha), and benefit plant vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Across 17 T. officinale genotypes screened by gas and liquid chromatography, latex concentrations of the sesquiterpene lactone taraxinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (TA-G) were negatively associated with M. melolontha larval growth. Adding purified TA-G to artificial diet at ecologically relevant concentrations reduced larval feeding. Silencing the germacrene A synthase ToGAS1, an enzyme that was identified to catalyze the first committed step of TA-G biosynthesis, resulted in a 90% reduction of TA-G levels and a pronounced increase in M. melolontha feeding. Transgenic, TA-G-deficient lines were preferred by M. melolontha and suffered three times more root biomass reduction than control lines. In a common garden experiment involving over 2,000 T. officinale individuals belonging to 17 different genotypes, high TA-G concentrations were associated with the maintenance of high vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a latex secondary metabolite benefits plants under herbivore attack, a result that provides a mechanistic framework for root herbivore driven natural selection and evolution of plant defenses below ground.

  16. Two Variants of a High-Throughput Fluorescent Microplate Assay of Polysaccharide Endotransglycosylases.

    PubMed

    Kováčová, Kristína; Farkaš, Vladimír

    2016-04-01

    Polysaccharide endotransglycosylases (PETs) are the cell wall-modifying enzymes of fungi and plants. They catalyze random endo-splitting of the polysaccharide donor molecule and transfer of the newly formed reducing sugar residue to the nonreducing end of an acceptor molecule which can be a polysaccharide or an oligosaccharide. Owing to their important role in the cell wall formation, the inhibition of PETs represents an attractive strategy in the fight against fungal infections. We have elaborated two variants of a versatile high-throughput microplate fluorimetric assay that could be used for effective identification of PETs and screening of their inhibitors. Both assays use the respective polysaccharides as the donors and sulforhodamine-labeled oligosaccharides as the acceptors but differ from each other by mode of how the labeled polysaccharide products of transglycosylation are separated from the unreacted oligosaccharide acceptors. In the first variant, the reactions take place in a layer of agar gel laid on the bottoms of the wells of a microtitration plate. After the reaction, the high-Mr transglycosylation products are precipitated with 66 % ethanol and retained within the gel while the low-Mr products and the unreacted acceptors are washed out. In the second variant, the donor polysaccharides are adsorbed to the surface of a microplate well and remain adsorbed there also after becoming labeled in the course of the transglycosylation reaction whereas the unused low-Mr acceptors are washed out. As a proof of versatility, assays of heterologously expressed transglycosylases ScGas1, ScCrh1, and ScCrh2 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, CaPhr1 and CaPhr2 from Candida albicans, and of a plant xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) are demonstrated.

  17. Presence of a large β(1-3)glucan linked to chitin at the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mother-bud neck suggests involvement in localized growth control.

    PubMed

    Cabib, Enrico; Blanco, Noelia; Arroyo, Javier

    2012-04-01

    Previous results suggested that the chitin ring present at the yeast mother-bud neck, which is linked specifically to the nonreducing ends of β(1-3)glucan, may help to suppress cell wall growth at the neck by competing with β(1-6)glucan and thereby with mannoproteins for their attachment to the same sites. Here we explored whether the linkage of chitin to β(1-3)glucan may also prevent the remodeling of this polysaccharide that would be necessary for cell wall growth. By a novel mild procedure, β(1-3)glucan was isolated from cell walls, solubilized by carboxymethylation, and fractionated by size exclusion chromatography, giving rise to a very high-molecular-weight peak and to highly polydisperse material. The latter material, soluble in alkali, may correspond to glucan being remodeled, whereas the large-size fraction would be the final cross-linked structural product. In fact, the β(1-3)glucan of buds, where growth occurs, is solubilized by alkali. A gas1 mutant with an expected defect in glucan elongation showed a large increase in the polydisperse fraction. By a procedure involving sodium hydroxide treatment, carboxymethylation, fractionation by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose, and fractionation by size chromatography on Sephacryl columns, it was shown that the β(1-3)glucan attached to chitin consists mostly of high-molecular-weight material. Therefore, it appears that linkage to chitin results in a polysaccharide that cannot be further remodeled and does not contribute to growth at the neck. In the course of these experiments, the new finding was made that part of the chitin forms a noncovalent complex with β(1-3)glucan.

  18. Sulfur Solubility In Silicate Melts: A Thermochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, R.; Ottonello, G.

    A termochemical model for calculating sulfur solubility of simple and complex silicate melts has been developed in the framework of the Toop-Samis polymeric approach combined with a Flood - Grjotheim theoretical treatment of silicate slags [1,2]. The model allows one to compute sulfide and sulfate content of silicate melts whenever fugacity of gaseous sulphur is provided. "Electrically equivalent ion fractions" are needed to weigh the contribution of the various disproportion reactions of the type: MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas MSmelt+1/2O2 ,gas (1) MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas + 3/2O2 ,gas MSO4 ,melt (2) Eqs. 1 and 2 account for the oxide-sulfide and the oxide-sulfate disproportiona- tion in silicate melt. Electrically equivalent ion fractions are computed, in a fused salt Temkin notation, over the appropriate matrixes (anionic and cationic). The extension of such matrixes is calculated in the framework of a polymeric model previously developed [1,2,3] and based on a parameterization of acid-base properties of melts. No adjustable parameters are used and model activities follow the raoultian behavior implicit in the ion matrix solution of the Temkin notation. The model is based on a huge amount of data available in literature and displays a high heuristic capability with virtually no compositional limits, as long as the structural role assigned to each oxide holds. REFERENCES: [1] Ottonello G., Moretti R., Marini L. and Vetuschi Zuccolini M. (2001), Chem. Geol., 174, 157-179. [2] Moretti R. (2002) PhD Thesis, University of Pisa. [3] Ottonello G. (2001) J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 282, 72-85.

  19. Cocaine and methamphetamine induce opposing changes in BOLD signal response in rats.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Saeid; Xun, Zhu; See, Ronald E; Joseph, Jane E; Reichel, Carmela M

    2016-07-01

    Neuroimaging studies in psychostimulant addicts have reported functional neural activity changes in brain regions involved in relapse. However, the difference between the effects of the psychostimulants methamphetamine and cocaine on neuronal activity in a similar setting not been clarified. Since studies in humans are limited by the inability to study the initial impact of psychostimulant drugs, we addressed this issue in a rat model. Here, we report methamphetamine and cocaine-induced blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal change using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in rats receiving drug for the first time during the imaging session. Twenty-three male Long Evans rats underwent fMRI imaging and received an intravenous infusion of methamphetamine, cocaine, or saline. Anatomical and pharmacological fMRI (pfMRI) were performed on a 7T BioSpec dedicated research MR scanner under isoflurane gas (1.5-2%). After collecting baseline data for 10min, rats received drug over the next 10min for a total 40min scan time. Data were then preprocessed and statistically analyzed in anatomically defined regions of interest (ROIs) that have been implicated in persistent drug seeking and relapse. Methamphetamine during the imaging session resulted in a sustained negative BOLD signal change in key regions of the relapse circuit, except for the prefrontal cortex. In contrast, cocaine evoked a positive or unchanged BOLD signal in these same regions. In all of the investigated ROIs, there were no changes in BOLD signal following saline. Acute methamphetamine and cocaine have distinct patterns of functional activity as measured by pfMRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Presence of a Large β(1-3)Glucan Linked to Chitin at the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mother-Bud Neck Suggests Involvement in Localized Growth Control

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Noelia; Arroyo, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Previous results suggested that the chitin ring present at the yeast mother-bud neck, which is linked specifically to the nonreducing ends of β(1-3)glucan, may help to suppress cell wall growth at the neck by competing with β(1-6)glucan and thereby with mannoproteins for their attachment to the same sites. Here we explored whether the linkage of chitin to β(1-3)glucan may also prevent the remodeling of this polysaccharide that would be necessary for cell wall growth. By a novel mild procedure, β(1-3)glucan was isolated from cell walls, solubilized by carboxymethylation, and fractionated by size exclusion chromatography, giving rise to a very high-molecular-weight peak and to highly polydisperse material. The latter material, soluble in alkali, may correspond to glucan being remodeled, whereas the large-size fraction would be the final cross-linked structural product. In fact, the β(1-3)glucan of buds, where growth occurs, is solubilized by alkali. A gas1 mutant with an expected defect in glucan elongation showed a large increase in the polydisperse fraction. By a procedure involving sodium hydroxide treatment, carboxymethylation, fractionation by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose, and fractionation by size chromatography on Sephacryl columns, it was shown that the β(1-3)glucan attached to chitin consists mostly of high-molecular-weight material. Therefore, it appears that linkage to chitin results in a polysaccharide that cannot be further remodeled and does not contribute to growth at the neck. In the course of these experiments, the new finding was made that part of the chitin forms a noncovalent complex with β(1-3)glucan. PMID:22366124

  1. Profiles of Global Gene Expression in Ionizing-Radiation–Damaged Human Diploid Fibroblasts Reveal Synchronization behind the G1 Checkpoint in a G0-like State of Quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tong; Chou, Jeff W.; Simpson, Dennis A.; Zhou, Yingchun; Mullen, Thomas E.; Medeiros, Margarida; Bushel, Pierre R.; Paules, Richard S.; Yang, Xuebin; Hurban, Patrick; Lobenhofer, Edward K.; Kaufmann, William K.

    2006-01-01

    Cell cycle arrest and stereotypic transcriptional responses to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR) were quantified in telomerase-expressing human diploid fibroblasts. Analysis of cytotoxicity demonstrated that 1.5 Gy IR inactivated colony formation by 40–45% in three fibroblast lines; this dose was used in all subsequent analyses. Fibroblasts exhibited > 90% arrest of progression from G2 to M at 2 hr post-IR and a similarly severe arrest of progression from G1 to S at 6 and 12 hr post-IR. Normal rates of DNA synthesis and mitosis 6 and 12 hr post-IR caused the S and M compartments to empty by > 70% at 24 hr. Global gene expression was analyzed in IR-treated cells. A microarray analysis algorithm, EPIG, identified nine IR-responsive patterns of gene expression that were common to the three fibroblast lines, including a dominant p53-dependent G1 checkpoint response. Many p53 target genes, such as CDKN1A, GADD45, BTG2, and PLK3, were significantly up-regulated at 2 hr post-IR. Many genes whose expression is regulated by E2F family transcription factors, including CDK2, CCNE1, CDC6, CDC2, MCM2, were significantly down-regulated at 24 hr post-IR. Numerous genes that participate in DNA metabolism were also markedly repressed in arrested fibroblasts apparently as a result of cell synchronization behind the G1 checkpoint. However, cluster and principal component analyses of gene expression revealed a profile 24 hr post-IR with similarity to that of G0 growth quiescence. The results reveal a highly stereotypic pattern of response to IR in human diploid fibroblasts that reflects primarily synchronization behind the G1 checkpoint but with prominent induction of additional markers of G0 quiescence such as GAS1. PMID:16581545

  2. High CO2 absorption capacity by chemisorption at cations and anions in choline-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Shubhankar; Filippov, Andrei; Shah, Faiz Ullah

    2017-11-29

    The effect of CO 2 absorption on the aromaticity and hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids is investigated. Five different ionic liquids with choline based cations and aprotic N-heterocyclic anions were synthesized. Purity and structures of the synthesized ionic liquids were characterized by 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. CO 2 capture performance was studied at 20 °C and 40 °C under three different pressures (1, 3, 6 bar). The IL [N 1,1,6,2OH ][4-Triz] showed the highest CO 2 capture capacity (28.6 wt%, 1.57 mol of CO 2 per mol of the IL, 6.48 mol of CO 2 per kg of the ionic liquid) at 20 °C and 1 bar. The high CO 2 capture capacity of the [N 1,1,6,2OH ][4-Triz] IL is due to the formation of carbonic acid (-OCO 2 H) together with carbamate by participation of the -OH group of the [N 1,1,6,2OH ] + cation in the CO 2 capture process. The structure of the adduct formed by CO 2 reaction with the IL [N 1,1,6,2OH ][4-Triz] was probed by using IR, 13 C NMR and 1 H- 13 C HMBC NMR experiments utilizing 13 C labeled CO 2 gas. 1 H and 13 C PFG NMR studies were performed before and after CO 2 absorption to explore the effect of cation-anion structures on the microscopic ion dynamics in ILs. The ionic mobility was significantly increased after CO 2 reaction due to lowering of aromaticity in the case of ILs with aromatic N-heterocyclic anions.

  3. Pre- and postnatal exposure of mice to concentrated urban PM2.5 decreases the number of alveoli and leads to altered lung function at an early stage of life.

    PubMed

    de Barros Mendes Lopes, Thais; Groth, Espen E; Veras, Mariana; Furuya, Tatiane K; de Souza Xavier Costa, Natalia; Ribeiro Júnior, Gabriel; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi; de Almeida, Francine M; Cardoso, Wellington V; Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento; Chammas, Roger; Mauad, Thais

    2018-06-04

    Gestational exposure to air pollution is associated with negative outcomes in newborns and children. In a previous study, we demonstrated a synergistic negative effect of pre- and postnatal exposure to PM 2.5 on lung development in mice. However, the means by which air pollution affects development of the lung have not yet been identified. In this study, we exposed pregnant BALB/c mice and their offspring to concentrated urban PM 2.5 (from São Paulo, Brazil; target dose 600 μg/m 3 for 1 h daily). Exposure was started on embryonic day 5.5 (E5.5, time of placental implantation). Lung tissue of fetuses and offspring was submitted to stereological and transcriptomic analyses at E14.5 (pseudoglandular stage of lung development), E18.5 (saccular stage) and P40 (postnatal day 40, alveolarized lung). Additionally, lung function and cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were studied in offspring animals at P40. Compared to control animals that were exposed to filtered air throughout gestation and postnatal life, PM-exposed mice exhibited higher lung elastance and a lower alveolar number at P40 whilst the total lung volume and cellularity of BAL fluid were not affected. Glandular and saccular structures of fetal lungs were not altered upon gestational exposure; transcriptomic signatures, however, showed changes related to DNA damage and its regulation, inflammation and regulation of cell proliferation. A differential expression was validated at E14.5 for the candidates Sox8, Angptl4 and Gas1. Our data substantiate the in utero biomolecular effect of gestational exposure to air pollution and provide first-time stereological evidence that pre- and early life-postnatal exposure compromise lung development, leading to a reduced number of alveoli and an impairment of lung function in the adult mouse. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mixed microalgae consortia growth under higher concentration of CO2 from unfiltered coal fired flue gas: Fatty acid profiling and biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Ambreen; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Manzoor, Maleeha; Jabeen, Faiza; Iqbal, Munawar; Uz Zaman, Qamar; Schenk, Peer M; Asif Tahir, M

    2018-02-01

    Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from oleaginous microalgae feedstock. Biodiesel fuel properties were studied and compared with biodiesel standards. Qualitative analysis of FAME was done while cultivating mixed microalgae consortia under three concentrations of coal fired flue gas (1%, 3.0% and 5.5% CO 2 ). Under 1% CO 2 concentration (flue gas), the FAME content was 280.3 μg/mL, whereas the lipid content was 14.03 μg/mL/D (day). Both FAMEs and lipid contents were low at other CO 2 concentrations (3.0 and 5.5%). However, mixed consortia in the presence of phosphate buffer and flue gas (PB + FG) showed higher saturated fatty acids (SFA) (36.28%) and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) (63.72%) versus 5.5% CO 2 concentration, which might be responsible for oxidative stability of biodiesel. Subsequently, higher cetane number (52) and low iodine value (136.3 gI 2 /100 g) biodiesel produced from mixed consortia (PB + FG) under 5.5% CO 2 along with 50 mM phosphate buffer were found in accordance with European (EN 14214) standard. Results revealed that phosphate buffer significantly enhanced the biodiesel quality, but reduced the FAME yield. This study intended to develop an integrated approach for significant improvement in biodiesel quality under surplus phosphorus by utilizing waste flue gas (as CO 2 source) using microalgae. The CO 2 sequestration from industrial flue gas not only reduced greenhouse gases, but may also ensure the sustainable and eco-benign production of biodiesel. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Genomic analysis of human lung fibroblasts exposed to vanadium pentoxide to identify candidate genes for occupational bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jennifer L; Antao-Menezes, Aurita; Turpin, Elizabeth A; Wallace, Duncan G; Mangum, James B; Pluta, Linda J; Thomas, Russell S; Bonner, James C

    2007-01-01

    Background Exposure to vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) is a cause of occupational bronchitis. We evaluated gene expression profiles in cultured human lung fibroblasts exposed to V2O5 in vitro in order to identify candidate genes that could play a role in inflammation, fibrosis, and repair during the pathogenesis of V2O5-induced bronchitis. Methods Normal human lung fibroblasts were exposed to V2O5 in a time course experiment. Gene expression was measured at various time points over a 24 hr period using the Affymetrix Human Genome U133A 2.0 Array. Selected genes that were significantly changed in the microarray experiment were validated by RT-PCR. Results V2O5 altered more than 1,400 genes, of which ~300 were induced while >1,100 genes were suppressed. Gene ontology categories (GO) categories unique to induced genes included inflammatory response and immune response, while GO catogories unique to suppressed genes included ubiquitin cycle and cell cycle. A dozen genes were validated by RT-PCR, including growth factors (HBEGF, VEGF, CTGF), chemokines (IL8, CXCL9, CXCL10), oxidative stress response genes (SOD2, PIPOX, OXR1), and DNA-binding proteins (GAS1, STAT1). Conclusion Our study identified a variety of genes that could play pivotal roles in inflammation, fibrosis and repair during V2O5-induced bronchitis. The induction of genes that mediate inflammation and immune responses, as well as suppression of genes involved in growth arrest appear to be important to the lung fibrotic reaction to V2O5. PMID:17459161

  6. Alma Survey of Circumstellar Disks in the Young Stellar Cluster IC 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruíz-Rodríguez, D.; Cieza, L. A.; Williams, J. P.; Andrews, S. M.; Principe, D. A.; Caceres, C.; Canovas, H.; Casassus, S.; Schreiber, M. R.; Kastner, J. H.

    2018-05-01

    We present a 1.3 mm continuum survey of the young (2-3 Myr) stellar cluster IC 348, which lies at a distance of 310 pc, and is dominated by low-mass stars (M⋆ ˜ 0.1-0.6 M⊙). We observed 136 Class II sources (disks that are optically thick in the infrared) at 0.8″ (200 au) resolution with a 3σ sensitivity of ˜ 0.45 mJy (Mdust ˜ 1.3 M⊕). We detect 40 of the targets and construct a mm-continuum luminosity function. We compare the disk mass distribution in IC 348 to those of younger and older regions, taking into account the dependence on stellar mass. We find a clear evolution in disk masses from 1 to 5-10 Myr. The disk masses in IC 348 are significantly lower than those in Taurus (1-3 Myr) and Lupus (1-3 Myr), similar to those of Chamaleon I, (2-3 Myr) and σ Ori (3-5 Myr) and significantly higher than in Upper Scorpius (5-10 Myr). About 20 disks in our sample (˜5% of the cluster members) have estimated masses (dust + gas) >1 MJup and hence might be the precursors of giant planets in the cluster. Some of the most massive disks include transition objects with inner opacity holes based on their infrared SEDs. From a stacking analysis of the 96 non-detections, we find that these disks have a typical dust mass of just ≲ 0.4 M⊕, even though the vast majority of their infrared SEDs remain optically thick and show little signs of evolution. Such low-mass disks may be the precursors of the small rocky planets found by Kepler around M-type stars.

  7. CHANDRA and XMM-NEWTON observations of the bimodal PLANCK SZ-detected clustered CKG345.40-39.34 (A3716) with high and low entropy subcluster cores

    DOE PAGES

    Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; ...

    2015-04-22

    Here, we present results from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT observations of the Planck SZ-detected cluster A3716 (PLCKG345.40-39.34-G345). We show that G345 is, in fact, two subclusters separated on the sky by 400 kpc. We measure the subclusters' gas temperatures (~2–3 keV), total (~1–2 × 10 14more » $${{M}_{\\odot }}$$) and gas (~1–2 × 10 13 $${{M}_{\\odot }}$$) masses, gas mass fraction within r500, entropy profiles, and X-ray luminosities (~10 43 erg s -1). Using the gas density and temperature profiles for both subclusters, we show that there is good (0.8σ) agreement between the expected Sunyaev–Zel'dovich signal predicted from the X-ray data and that measured from the Planck mission, and better agreement within 0.6σ when we re-computed the Planck value assuming a two component cluster model, with relative amplitudes fixed based on the X-ray data. Dynamical analysis shows that the two galaxy subclusters are very likely ($$\\gt 97\\%$$ probability) gravitationally bound, and in the most likely scenario, the subclusters will undergo core passage in 500 ± 200 Myr. The northern subcluster is centrally peaked and has a low entropy core, while the southern subcluster has a high central entropy. Finally, the high central entropy in the southern subcluster can be explained either by the mergers of several groups, as suggested by the presence of five giant ellipticals or by active galactic nucleus energy injection, as suggested by the presence of a strong radio source in one of its massive elliptical galaxies, or by a combination of both processes.« less

  8. A Latex Metabolite Benefits Plant Fitness under Root Herbivore Attack

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Meret; Epping, Janina; Schulze Gronover, Christian; Fricke, Julia; Aziz, Zohra; Brillatz, Théo; Swyers, Michael; Köllner, Tobias G.; Vogel, Heiko; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Robert, Christelle A. M.; Verhoeven, Koen; Preite, Veronica; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Erb, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under herbivore attack is scarce, especially below ground. Here, we tested whether latex secondary metabolites produced by the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) decrease the performance of its major native insect root herbivore, the larvae of the common cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha), and benefit plant vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Across 17 T. officinale genotypes screened by gas and liquid chromatography, latex concentrations of the sesquiterpene lactone taraxinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (TA-G) were negatively associated with M. melolontha larval growth. Adding purified TA-G to artificial diet at ecologically relevant concentrations reduced larval feeding. Silencing the germacrene A synthase ToGAS1, an enzyme that was identified to catalyze the first committed step of TA-G biosynthesis, resulted in a 90% reduction of TA-G levels and a pronounced increase in M. melolontha feeding. Transgenic, TA-G-deficient lines were preferred by M. melolontha and suffered three times more root biomass reduction than control lines. In a common garden experiment involving over 2,000 T. officinale individuals belonging to 17 different genotypes, high TA-G concentrations were associated with the maintenance of high vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a latex secondary metabolite benefits plants under herbivore attack, a result that provides a mechanistic framework for root herbivore driven natural selection and evolution of plant defenses below ground. PMID:26731567

  9. Cocaine and methamphetamine induce opposing changes in BOLD signal response in rats

    PubMed Central

    See, Ronald E.; Joseph, Jane E.; Reichel, Carmela M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging studies in psychostimulant addicts have reported functional neural activity changes in brain regions involved in relapse. However, the difference between the effects of the psychostimulants methamphetamine and cocaine on neuronal activity in a similar setting not been clarified. Since studies in humans are limited by the inability to study the initial impact of psychostimulant drugs, we addressed this issue in a rat model. Objective Here, we report methamphetamine and cocaine-induced blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal change using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in rats receiving drug for the first time during the imaging session. Methods Twenty-three male Long Evans rats underwent fMRI imaging and received an intravenous infusion of methamphetamine, cocaine, or saline. Anatomical and pharmacological fMRI (pfMRI) were performed on a 7T BioSpec dedicated research MR scanner under isoflurane gas (1.5-2%). After collecting baseline data for 10 min, rats received drug over the next 10 min for a total 40 min scan time. Data were then preprocessed and statistically analyzed in anatomically defined regions of interest (ROIs) that have been implicated in persistent drug seeking and relapse. Results Methamphetamine during the imaging session resulted in a sustained negative BOLD signal change in key regions of the relapse circuit, except for the prefrontal cortex. In contrast, cocaine evoked a positive or unchanged BOLD signal in these same regions. In all of the investigated ROIs, there were no changes in BOLD signal following saline. Conclusion Acute methamphetamine and cocaine have distinct patterns of functional activity as measured by pfMRI. PMID:27103569

  10. An analysis of flaring and venting activity in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew R; Coderre, Adam R

    2011-02-01

    Alberta, Canada, is an important global producer of petroleum resources. In association with this production, large amounts of gas (1.14 billion m3 in 2008) are flared or vented. Although the amount of flaring and venting has been measurably reduced since 2002, data from 2005 reveal sharp increases in venting, which have important implications in terms of resource conservation and greenhouse gas emissions (which exceeded 8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2008). With use of extensive monthly production data for 18,203 active batteries spanning the years 2002-2008 obtained in close cooperation with the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, a detailed analysis has been completed to examine activity patterns of flaring and venting and reasons behind these trends in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry. In any given year, approximately 6000 batteries reported flaring and/or venting, but the distribution of volumes flared and vented at individual sites was highly skewed, such that small numbers of sites handled large fractions of the total gas flaring and venting in the Province. Examination of month-to-month volume variability at individual sites, cast in terms of a nominal turndown ratio that would be required for a compressor to capture that gas and direct it into a pipeline, further revealed that volumes at a majority of sites were reasonably stable and there was no evidence that larger or more stable sites had been preferentially reduced, leaving potential barriers to future mitigation. Through linking of geospatial data with production data coupled with additional statistical analysis, the 31.2% increase in venting volumes since 2005 was revealed to be predominantly associated with increased production of heavier oils and bitumen in the Lloydminster region of the Province. Overall, the data suggest that quite significant reductions in flaring and venting could be realized by seeking mitigation solutions for only the largest batteries in

  11. Onboard measurement system of atmospheric carbon monoxide in the Pacific by voluntary observing ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, H.; Tanimoto, H.; Nojiri, Y.; Mukai, H.; Machida, T.; Tohjima, Y.

    2011-11-01

    Long-term monitoring of carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios in the atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean is being carried out on commercial cargo vessels participating in the National Institute for Environmental Studies Voluntary Observing Ships program. The program provides a regular platform for measurement of atmospheric CO along four cruise routes: from Japan to Oceania, the United States, Canada, and Southeast Asia. Flask samples are collected during every cruise for subsequent analysis in the laboratory, and in 2005, continuous shipboard CO measurements were initiated on three of the routes. Here, we describe the system we developed for onboard measurement of CO mixing ratios with a commercially available gas filter correlation CO analyzer. The fully automated system measures CO in ambient air, and the detector sensitivity and background signals are calibrated by referencing the measurements to a CO-in-air standard gas (~1 ppmv) and to CO-free air scrubbed with a catalyst, respectively. We examined the artificial production of CO in the high-pressure working gas standards during storage by referencing the measurements to CO standard gases maintained as our primary scale before and after use on the ships. The onboard performance of the continuous CO measurement system was evaluated by comparing its data with data from laboratory analyses of flask samples using gas chromatography with a reduction gas detector. The reasonably good consistency between the two independent measurement methods demonstrated the good performance of both methods over the course of 3-5 years. The continuous measurement system was more useful than the flask sampling method for regionally polluted air masses, which were often encountered on Southeast Asian cruises.

  12. Onboard measurement system of atmospheric carbon monoxide over the Pacific Ocean by voluntary observing ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, H.; Tanimoto, H.; Nojiri, Y.; Mukai, H.; Machida, T.; Tohjima, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Long-term monitoring of carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios in the atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean is being carried out on commercial cargo vessels participating in the National Institute for Environmental Studies Voluntary Observing Ships program. The program provides a regular platform for measurement of atmospheric CO along four cruising routes: from Japan to Oceania, from Japan to the United States, from Japan to Canada, and from Japan to Southeast Asia. Flask samples are collected during every cruise for subsequent analysis in the laboratory, and in 2005, continuous shipboard CO measurements were initiated on three of the routes. Here, we describe the system we developed for onboard measurement of CO mixing ratios with a commercially available gas filter correlation CO analyzer. The fully automated system measures CO in ambient air, and the detector sensitivity and background signals are calibrated by referencing the measurements to a CO-in-air standard gas (~1 ppmv) and to CO-free air scrubbed with a catalyst, respectively. We examined the artificial production of CO in the high-pressure working gas standards (CO balanced with purified air at ppmv levels) during storage by referencing the measurements to CO standard gases maintained as our primary scale before and after use on the ships. The onboard performance of the continuous CO measurement system was evaluated by comparing its data with data from laboratory analyses of flask samples using gas chromatography with a reduction gas detector. The reasonably good consistency between the two independent measurement methods demonstrated the good performance of both methods over the course of 3-5 yr. The continuous measurement system was more useful than the flask sampling method for regionally polluted air masses, which were often encountered on Southeast Asian cruises.

  13. The Arf-inducing Transcription Factor Dmp1 Encodes a Transcriptional Activator of Amphiregulin, Thrombospondin-1, JunB and Egr1

    PubMed Central

    Mallakin, Ali; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Kai, Fumitake; Taneja, Pankaj; Kendig, Robert D.; Frazier, Donna P.; Maglic, Dejan; Matise, Lauren A.; Willingham, Mark C.; Inoue, Kazushi

    2009-01-01

    Dmp1 (Dmtf1) encodes a Myb-like transcription factor implicated in tumor suppression through direct activation of the Arf-p53 pathway. The human DMP1 gene is frequently deleted in non-small cell lung cancers, especially those that retain wild-type INK4a/ARF and/or p53. To identify novel genes that are regulated by Dmp1, transcriptional profiles of lung tissue from Dmp1-null and wild-type mice were generated using the GeneChip Microarray. Comparative analysis of gene expression changes between the two groups resulted in identification of numerous genes that may be regulated by Dmp1. Notably, amphiregulin (Areg), thrombospondin-1 (Tsp-1), JunB, Egr1, adrenomedullin (Adm), Bcl-3 and methyl-CpG binding domain protein 1 (Mbd1) were downregulated in the lungs from Dmp1-null mice while Gas1 and Ect2 genes were upregulated. These target genes were chosen for further analyses since they are involved in cell proliferation, transcription, angiogenesis/metastasis, apoptosis, or DNA methylation, and thus could account for the tumor suppressor phenotype of Dmp1. Dmp1 directly bound to the genomic loci of Areg, Tsp-1, JunB and Egr1. Significant upregulation or downregulation of the novel Dmp1 target genes was observed upon transient expression of Dmp1 in alveolar epithelial cells, an effect which was nullified by the inhibition of de novo mRNA synthesis. Interestingly, these genes and their protein products were significantly downregulated or upregulated in the lungs from Dmp1-heterozygous mice as well. Identification of novel Dmp1 target genes not only provides insights into the effects of Dmp1 on global gene expression, but also sheds light on the mechanism of haploid insufficiency of Dmp1 in tumor suppression. PMID:19816943

  14. Effect of Normobaric versus Hypobaric Oxygenation on Gaseous Microemboli Removal in a Diffusion Membrane Oxygenator: An In Vitro Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Schuldes, Matthew; Riley, Jeffrey B.; Francis, Stephen G.; Clingan, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Gaseous microemboli (GME) are an abnormal physiological occurrence during cardiopulmonary bypass and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Several studies have correlated negative sequelae with exposure to increased amounts of GME. Hypobaric oxygenation is effective at eliminating GME in hollow-fiber microporous membrane oxygenators. However, hollow-fiber diffusion membrane oxygenators, which are commonly used for ECMO, have yet to be validated. The purpose of this study was to determine if hypobaric oxygenation, compared against normobaric oxygenation, can reduce introduced GME when used on diffusion membrane oxygenators. Comparison of a sealed Quadrox-iD with hypobaric sweep gas (.67 atm) vs. an unmodified Quadrox-iD with normal atmospheric sweep gas (1 atm) in terms of GME transmission during continuous air introduction (50 mL/min) in a recirculating in vitro circuit, over a range of flow rates (3.5, 5 L/min) and crystalloid prime temperatures (37°C, 28°C, and 18°C). GME were measured using three EDAC Doppler probes positioned pre-oxygenator, post-oxygenator, and at the arterial cannula. Hypobaric oxygenation vs. normobaric oxygenation significantly reduced hollow-fiber diffusion membrane oxygenator GME transmission at all combination of pump flows and temperatures. There was further significant reduction in GME count between the oxygenator outlet and at the arterial cannula. Hypobaric oxygenation used on hollow-fiber diffusion membrane oxygenators can further reduce GME compared to normobaric oxygenation. This technique may be a safe approach to eliminate GME during ECMO. PMID:27729706

  15. Proteome analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus identifies glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins associated to the cell wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, J M; Magnin, T; Tagat, E; Legrand, R; Bernard, M; Diaquin, M; Fudali, C; Latgé, J P

    2001-08-01

    Previous studies in Aspergillus fumigatus (Mouyna I., Fontaine T., Vai M., Monod M., Fonzi W. A., Diaquin M., Popolo L., Hartland R. P., Latgé J.-P, J. Biol. Chem. 2000, 275, 14882-14889) have shown that a glucanosyltransferase playing an important role in fungal cell wall biosynthesis is glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored to the membrane. To identify other GPI-anchored proteins putatively involved in cell wall biogenesis, a proteomic analysis has been undertaken in A. fumigatus and the protein data were matched with the yeast genomic data. GPI-anchored proteins of A. fumigatus were released from membrane preparation by an endogenous GPI-phospholipase C, purified by liquid chromatography and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. They were characterized by their peptide mass fingerprint through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-(MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry and by internal amino acid sequencing. Nine GPI-anchored proteins were identified in A. fumigatus. Five of them were homologs of putatively GPI-anchored yeast proteins (Csa1p, Crh1p, Crh2p, Ecm33p, Gas1p) of unknown function but shown by gene disruption analysis to play a role in cell wall morphogenesis. In addition, a comparative study performed with chitin synthase and glucanosyl transferase mutants of A. fumigatus showed that a modification of the growth phenotype seen in these mutants was associated to an alteration of the pattern of GPI-anchored proteins. These results suggest that GPI-anchored proteins identified in this study are involved in A. fumigatus cell wall organization.

  16. A Select Subset of Electron Transport Chain Genes Associated with Optic Atrophy Link Mitochondria to Axon Regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Wendy M; Hubert, Thomas; Wu, Zilu; Chisholm, Andrew D; Jin, Yishi

    2017-01-01

    The role of mitochondria within injured neurons is an area of active interest since these organelles are vital for the production of cellular energy in the form of ATP. Using mechanosensory neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to test regeneration after neuronal injury in vivo , we surveyed genes related to mitochondrial function for effects on axon regrowth after laser axotomy. Genes involved in mitochondrial transport, calcium uptake, mitophagy, or fission and fusion were largely dispensable for axon regrowth, with the exception of eat-3/Opa1 . Surprisingly, many genes encoding components of the electron transport chain were dispensable for regrowth, except for the iron-sulfur proteins gas-1, nduf-2.2, nduf-7 , and isp-1 , and the putative oxidoreductase rad-8 . In these mutants, axonal development was essentially normal and axons responded normally to injury by forming regenerative growth cones, but were impaired in subsequent axon extension. Overexpression of nduf-2.2 or isp-1 was sufficient to enhance regrowth, suggesting that mitochondrial function is rate-limiting in axon regeneration. Moreover, loss of function in isp-1 reduced the enhanced regeneration caused by either a gain-of-function mutation in the calcium channel EGL-19 or overexpression of the MAP kinase DLK-1. While the cellular function of RAD-8 remains unclear, our genetic analyses place rad-8 in the same pathway as other electron transport genes in axon regeneration. Unexpectedly, rad-8 regrowth defects were suppressed by altered function in the ubiquinone biosynthesis gene clk-1 . Furthermore, we found that inhibition of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response via deletion of atfs-1 suppressed the defective regrowth in nduf-2.2 mutants. Together, our data indicate that while axon regeneration is not significantly affected by general dysfunction of cellular respiration, it is sensitive to the proper functioning of a select subset of electron transport chain genes, or to the

  17. A Select Subset of Electron Transport Chain Genes Associated with Optic Atrophy Link Mitochondria to Axon Regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Wendy M.; Hubert, Thomas; Wu, Zilu; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Jin, Yishi

    2017-01-01

    The role of mitochondria within injured neurons is an area of active interest since these organelles are vital for the production of cellular energy in the form of ATP. Using mechanosensory neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to test regeneration after neuronal injury in vivo, we surveyed genes related to mitochondrial function for effects on axon regrowth after laser axotomy. Genes involved in mitochondrial transport, calcium uptake, mitophagy, or fission and fusion were largely dispensable for axon regrowth, with the exception of eat-3/Opa1. Surprisingly, many genes encoding components of the electron transport chain were dispensable for regrowth, except for the iron-sulfur proteins gas-1, nduf-2.2, nduf-7, and isp-1, and the putative oxidoreductase rad-8. In these mutants, axonal development was essentially normal and axons responded normally to injury by forming regenerative growth cones, but were impaired in subsequent axon extension. Overexpression of nduf-2.2 or isp-1 was sufficient to enhance regrowth, suggesting that mitochondrial function is rate-limiting in axon regeneration. Moreover, loss of function in isp-1 reduced the enhanced regeneration caused by either a gain-of-function mutation in the calcium channel EGL-19 or overexpression of the MAP kinase DLK-1. While the cellular function of RAD-8 remains unclear, our genetic analyses place rad-8 in the same pathway as other electron transport genes in axon regeneration. Unexpectedly, rad-8 regrowth defects were suppressed by altered function in the ubiquinone biosynthesis gene clk-1. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response via deletion of atfs-1 suppressed the defective regrowth in nduf-2.2 mutants. Together, our data indicate that while axon regeneration is not significantly affected by general dysfunction of cellular respiration, it is sensitive to the proper functioning of a select subset of electron transport chain genes, or to the cellular

  18. Catalytic properties of the Gas family β-(1,3)-glucanosyltransferases active in fungal cell-wall biogenesis as determined by a novel fluorescent assay.

    PubMed

    Mazáň, Marián; Ragni, Enrico; Popolo, Laura; Farkaš, Vladimír

    2011-09-01

    BGTs [β-(1,3)-glucanosyltransglycosylases; EC 2.4.1.-] of the GH72 (family 72 of glycosylhydrolases) are GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-anchored proteins that play an important role in the biogenesis of fungal cell walls. They randomly cleave glycosidic linkages in β-(1,3)-glucan chains and ligate the polysaccharide portions containing newly formed reducing ends to C(3)(OH) at non-reducing ends of other β-(1,3)-glucan molecules. We have developed a sensitive fluorescence-based method for the assay of transglycosylating activity of GH72 enzymes. In the new assay, laminarin [β-(1,3)-glucan] is used as the glucanosyl donor and LamOS (laminarioligosaccharides) fluorescently labelled with SR (sulforhodamine) serve as the acceptors. The new fluorescent assay was employed for partial biochemical characterization of the heterologously expressed Gas family proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All the Gas enzymes specifically used laminarin as the glucanosyl donor and a SR-LamOS of DP (degree of polymerization) ≥5 as the acceptors. Gas proteins expressed in distinct stages of the yeast life cycle showed differences in their pH optima. Gas1p and Gas5p, which are expressed during vegetative growth, had the highest activity at pH 4.5 and 3.5 respectively, whereas the sporulation-specific Gas2p and Gas4p were most active between pH 5 and 6. The novel fluorescent assay provides a suitable tool for the screening of potential glucanosyltransferases or their inhibitors.

  19. Hot Gas Flows in T Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardila, David R.; Herczeg, G.; Gregory, S. G.; Ingleby, L.; France, K.; Brown, A.; Edwards, S.; Linsky, J.; Yang, H.; Valenti, J. A.; Johns-Krull, C. M.; Alexander, R.; Bergin, E. A.; Bethell, T.; Brown, J.; Calvet, N.; Espaillat, C.; Hervé, A.; Hillenbrand, L.; Hussain, G.; Roueff, E.; Schindhelm, E.; Walter, F. M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe observations of the hot gas 1e5 K) ultraviolet lines C IV and He II, in Classical and Weak T Tauri Stars (CTTSs, WTTSs). Our goal is to provide observational constraints for realistic models. Most of the data for this work comes from the Hubble proposal “The Disks, Accretion, and Outflows (DAO) of T Tau stars” (PI Herczeg). The DAO program is the largest and most sensitive high resolution spectroscopic survey of young stars in the UV ever undertaken and it provides a rich source of information for these objects. The sample of high resolution COS and STIS spectra presented here comprises 35 stars: one Herbig Ae star, 28 CTTSs, and 6 WTTSs. For CTTSs, the lines consist of two kinematic components. The relative strengths of the narrow and broad components (NC, BC) are similar in C IV but in He II the NC is stronger than the BC, and dominates the line profile. We do not find correlations between disk inclination and the velocity centroid, width, or shape of the CIV line profile. The NC of the C IV line in CTTSs increases in strength with accretion rate, and its contribution to the line increases from ˜20% to ˜80%, for the accretion rates considered here (1e-10 to 1e-7 Msun/yr). The CTTSs C IV lines are redshifted by ˜20 km/s while the CTTSs He II are redshifted by ˜10 km/s. Because the He II line and the C IV NC have the same width in CTTSs and in WTTSs, but are correlated with accretion, we suggest that they are produced in the stellar transition region. The accretion shock model predicts that the velocity of the post-shock emission should be 4x smaller than the velocity of the pre-shock emission. Identifying the post-shock emission with the NC and the pre-shock with the BC, we find that this is approximately the case in 11 out of 23 objects. The model cannot explain 11 systems in which the velocity of the NC is smaller than the velocity of the BC, or systems in which one of the velocities is negative (five CTTSs). The hot gas lines in some systems

  20. 17β-Estradiol suppresses Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology in male hypergastrinemic INS-GAS mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Masahiro; Ge, Zhongming; García, Alexis; Rogers, Arlin B.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Taylor, Nancy S.; Xu, Shilu; Watanabe, Koichiro; Feng, Yan; Marini, Robert P.; Whary, Mark T.; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer is male predominant and animal studies suggest that sex hormones influence gastric carcinogenesis. We investigated the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) or castration on H.pylori-induced gastritis in male INS-GAS/FVB/N (Tg(Ins1-GAS)1Sbr) mice. Comparisons were made to previously evaluated sham (n = 8) and H.pylori-infected (n = 8), intact male INS-GAS mice which had developed severe corpus gastritis accompanied by atrophy, hyperplasia, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the epithelium within 16 weeks postinfection (all P < 0.01). Castration at 8 weeks of age had no sparing effect on lesions in uninfected (n = 5) or H.pylori-infected mice (n = 7) but all lesion subfeatures were attenuated by E2 in H.pylori-infected mice (n = 7) (P < 0.001). Notably, inflammation was not reduced but glandular atrophy, hyperplasia, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia were also less severe in uninfected, E2-treated mice (n = 7) (P < 0.01). Attenuation of gastric lesions by E2 was associated with lower messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of interferon (IFN)-γ (P < 0.05) and interleukin (IL)-1β (P < 0.004), and higher IL-10 (P < 0.02) as well as decreased numbers of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells when compared with infected intact males. Infected E2-treated mice also developed higher Th2-associated anti-H.pylori IgG1 responses (P < 0.05) and significantly lower Ki-67 indices of epithelial proliferation (P < 0.05). E2 elevated expression of mRNA for Foxp3 (P < 0.0001) and IL-10 (P < 0.01), and decreased IL-1β (P < 0.01) in uninfected, intact male mice compared with controls. Therefore, estrogen supplementation, but not castration, attenuated gastric lesions in H.pylori-infected male INS-GAS mice and to a lesser extent in uninfected mice, potentially by enhancing IL-10 function, which in turn decreased IFN-γ and IL-1β responses induced by H.pylori. PMID:21565825

  1. Hydrogen gas inhalation inhibits progression to the "irreversible" stage of shock after severe hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sano, Motoaki; Hayashida, Kei; Tamura, Tomoyoshi; Homma, Koichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Junichi

    2017-09-01

    Mortality of hemorrhagic shock primarily depends on whether or not the patients can endure the loss of circulating volume until radical treatment is applied. We investigated whether hydrogen (H2) gas inhalation would influence the tolerance to hemorrhagic shock and improve survival. Hemorrhagic shock was achieved by withdrawing blood until the mean arterial blood pressure reached 30-35 mm Hg. After 60 minutes of shock, the rats were resuscitated with a volume of normal saline equal to four times the volume of shed blood. The rats were assigned to either the H2 gas (1.3% H2, 26% O2, 72.7% N2)-treated group or the control gas (26% O2, 74% N2)-treated group. Inhalation of the specified gas mixture began at the initiation of blood withdrawal and continued for 2 hours after fluid resuscitation. The survival rate at 6 hours after fluid resuscitation was 80% in H2 gas-treated rats and 30% in control gas-treated rats (p < 0.05). The volume of blood that was removed through a catheter to induce shock was significantly larger in the H2 gas-treated rats than in the control rats. Despite losing more blood, the increase in serum potassium levels was suppressed in the H2 gas-treated rats after 60 minutes of shock. Fluid resuscitation completely restored blood pressure in the H2 gas-treated rats, whereas it failed to fully restore the blood pressure in the control gas-treated rats. At 2 hours after fluid resuscitation, blood pressure remained in the normal range and metabolic acidosis was well compensated in the H2 gas-treated rats, whereas we observed decreased blood pressure and uncompensated metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in the surviving control gas-treated rats. H2 gas inhalation delays the progression to irreversible shock. Clinically, H2 gas inhalation is expected to stabilize the subject until curative treatment can be performed, thereby increasing the probability of survival after hemorrhagic shock.

  2. Total Petroleum Systems of the Carpathian - Balkanian Basin Province of Romania and Bulgaria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pawlewicz, Mark

    2007-01-01

    thermal maturation. Undiscovered resources in the Carpathian-Balkanian Basin Province are estimated, at the mean, to be 2,076 billion cubic feet of gas, 1,013 million barrels of oil, and 116 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

  3. Giant Impacts and Earth's Primordial Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnor, C.; Asphaug, E.

    2002-09-01

    Estimates of Earth's accretion timescale based on modeling (e.g. Wetherill 1990) and isotopic evidence (Halliday and Porcelli 2000) indicate that the Earth formed in 25-100 Myr. At least a portion of this accretion took place in the presence of the solar nebula. While the problem of nailing down the nebular lifetime remains open, observations of dust disks surrounding young stars and meteoritic evidence suggest that the gas disk existed and was involved in making planetary material for 10 Myr (e.g. Podosek & Cassen 1994, Trilling et al. 2001). The persistence of a remnant of the nebula's original gas disk during terrestrial planet accretion is certainly plausible. The existence of this remnant nebula has dynamical (Agnor & Ward 2002, Kominami & Ida 2002) and geochemical (Porcelli & Pepin 2000) implications for terrestrial planet formation. Nakazawa et al. (1985) explored the structure of Earth's primordial atmosphere as the solar nebula was dissipating. They found that even for low surface densities of nebular gas ( σ gas ~ 1 g cm-2 or ~0.1% of the minimum mass nebula), Earth can capture a significant primordial atmosphere directly from the nebula (i.e. total mass up to a few lunar masses, or ~ 105 times the current atmosphere). Such a massive primordial atmosphere may have played a dynamical role in the formation of the Moon (e.g. models of lunar capture have employed aerodynamic drag in Earth's atmosphere as the primary mechanism for reducing the Moon's orbital energy, Nakazawa et al. 1983). Conversely, the formation of the Moon may have played a role in removing Earth's primordial atmosphere. Giant impacts have been suggested as one possible mechanism that could accomplish global atmospheric removal (Ahrens 1993). We are using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the removal of Earth's primordial atmosphere via giant impact. We employ initial conditions similar to recent works on lunar formation (e.g. Canup & Asphaug 2001) but also include ideal gas

  4. ANIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND VANADIUM FROM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.; Long, R.S.

    1958-12-16

    Uranium and vanadium can be economically purified and recovered from non- salt roast carbonate leach liquors by adsorption on a strongly basic anionic exchange resin and subsequent selective elution by one of three alternative methods. Method 1 comprises selectively eluting uranium from the resin with an ammonium sulfate solution followed by eluting vanadium from the resin with either 5 M NaCl, saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, saturated NaHCO/sub 3/, 1 M NaOH, or saturated S0/sub 2/ solutions. Method II comprises selectively eluting vanadium from the resin with either concentrated NaCl or S0/sub 2/ solutions subsequent to pretreatment of the column with either S0/sub 2/ gas, 1 N HCl, or 0.1 N H/sub 2/8O/sub 4/ followed by eluting uranium from the resin with solutions containing 0.9 M NH/sub 4/Cl or NaCl and 0.1 Cl. Method III comprises flowing the carbonate leac solutlon through a first column of a strongly basic anlonlc exchange resin untll vanadium breakthrough occurs, so that the effluent solution is enriched ln uranium content and the vanadium is chiefly retalned by the resln, absorbing the uranlum from the enriched effluent solution on a second column of a strongly basic anionic exchange resin, pretreating the first column with either 0.1 N HCl, 0.1 H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, C0/sub 2/ gas, or ammonium sulfate, selectively eluting the vanadlum from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, pretreatlng the second column with either 0.1 N HCl or S0/sub 2/ gas, selectively eluting residual vanadium from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, and then eluting the uranium from the column with either 0.1 N HCl and 1 N NaCl orO.l N HCl and 1 N NH/sub 4/Cl.

  5. The buccohypophyseal canal is an ancestral vertebrate trait maintained by modulation in sonic hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The pituitary gland is formed by the juxtaposition of two tissues: neuroectoderm arising from the basal diencephalon, and oral epithelium, which invaginates towards the central nervous system from the roof of the mouth. The oral invagination that reaches the brain from the mouth is referred to as Rathke’s pouch, with the tip forming the adenohypophysis and the stalk disappearing after the earliest stages of development. In tetrapods, formation of the cranial base establishes a definitive barrier between the pituitary and oral cavity; however, numerous extinct and extant vertebrate species retain an open buccohypophyseal canal in adulthood, a vestige of the stalk of Rathke’s pouch. Little is currently known about the formation and function of this structure. Here we have investigated molecular mechanisms driving the formation of the buccohypophyseal canal and their evolutionary significance. Results We show that Rathke’s pouch is located at a boundary region delineated by endoderm, neural crest-derived oral mesenchyme and the anterior limit of the notochord, using CD1, R26R-Sox17-Cre and R26R-Wnt1-Cre mouse lines. As revealed by synchrotron X-ray microtomography after iodine staining in mouse embryos, the pouch has a lobulated three-dimensional structure that embraces the descending diencephalon during pituitary formation. Polarisfl/fl; Wnt1-Cre, Ofd1-/- and Kif3a-/- primary cilia mouse mutants have abnormal sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and all present with malformations of the anterior pituitary gland and midline structures of the anterior cranial base. Changes in the expressions of Shh downstream genes are confirmed in Gas1-/- mice. From an evolutionary perspective, persistence of the buccohypophyseal canal is a basal character for all vertebrates and its maintenance in several groups is related to a specific morphology of the midline that can be related to modulation in Shh signaling. Conclusion These results provide insight into a poorly

  6. The photoelectric heating mechanism for very small graphitic grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakes, E. L. O.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the gas heating associated with the photoelectric ejection of electrons from a size distribution of interstellar carbon grains which extends into the molecular domain. We have considered a wide range of physical conditions for the interstellar gas (1 less than G(sub 0) less than 10(exp 5), with G(sub 0) being the intensity of the incident far-UV field in units of the Habing interstellar radiation field; 2.5 x 10( exp -3) less than n(sub e) less than 75/cu cm, with n(sub e) being the electron density; 10 less than T less than 10,000 K, with T being the gas temperature). The results show that about half of the heating is due to grains less than 1500 C atoms (less than 15 A). The other half originates in somewhat larger grains (1500-4.5 x 10(exp 5) C atoms; 15 less than 100 A). While grains larger than this do absorb about half of the available far-UV photons, they do not contribute appreciably to the gas heating. This strong dependence of gas heating on size results from the decrease in yield and from the increased grain charge (hence larger Coulomb losses) with increasing grain size. We have determined the net photoelectric heating rate and evaluated a simple analytical expression for the heating efficiency, dependent only on G(sub 0), T, and n(sub e). This expression is accurate to 3% over the whole parameter range and is valid up to gas temperatures of 10(exp 4) K, at which point the dominant gas-dust heat exchange mechanism becomes the recombination of electrons with grains rather than photoelectric ejection. The calculated heating efficiency for neutral grains is in good agreement with that derived from observations of the diffuse interstellar clouds. Our results also agree well with the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer (FIRAS) observations on the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite. Finally, our photoelectric heating efficiency is compared to previous studies.

  7. An alternative origin for extraterrestrial biomolecules from the hot and ionized photosphere of the protosolar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. V.; Derenne, S.; Tissandier, L.; Marrocchi, Y.; Anquetil, C.; Marty, B.

    2017-12-01

    Organic matter (OM) synthesized from plasma experiments (so-called Nebulotron) can provide an insight into the processes of organosynthesis within the ionized gas phase of the protosolar nebula (PSN). Organic materials recovered from Nebulotron experiments have a record of success in reproducing key features of chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM), including the aromatic/aliphatic and soluble/insoluble ratios [1], the occurrence of D/H hot and cold spots [2], spectral features as well as elementary and isotopic patterns observed in trapped noble gases [3]. However, up until now little attention has been paid to the soluble fraction of the recovered OM (SOM). In this study, a high-vacuum plasma setting was designed to produce organic condensates from a CO-N2-H2 gas mixture reminiscent of the PSN. The chemical diversity of the synthetized SOM has been investigated by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. Our results show that a large range of biomolecules detected in meteorites and comets could have been directly synthetized from the gas phase of the PSN under high ionization rates and temperatures > 800 K. Among other molecules, urea, formamide, glycerol, hydantoin, carboxylic acids, as well as amino acid and nucleobase derivatives are reported. While photochemical processing of interstellar icy grains or asteroidal aqueous alteration are often advocated for the origin of biomolecules in extraterrestrial samples, our results suggest that biomolecule production was also effective in the hot and ionized photosphere of the PSN. Interestingly, solid-state 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectra of the Nebulotron IOM, indicates that they are very low in aromatics relative to extraterrestrial samples. Given that aromatic units in meteoritic IOM likely result from the cyclization/aromatization of aliphatic chains in the gas [1], Nebulotron-like aliphatic materials could represent the initial precursors of meteoritic OM [4]. These materials would be widespread in the

  8. The buccohypophyseal canal is an ancestral vertebrate trait maintained by modulation in sonic hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Khonsari, Roman H; Seppala, Maisa; Pradel, Alan; Dutel, Hugo; Clément, Gaël; Lebedev, Oleg; Ghafoor, Sarah; Rothova, Michaela; Tucker, Abigael; Maisey, John G; Fan, Chen-Ming; Kawasaki, Maiko; Ohazama, Atsushi; Tafforeau, Paul; Franco, Brunella; Helms, Jill; Haycraft, Courtney J; David, Albert; Janvier, Philippe; Cobourne, Martyn T; Sharpe, Paul T

    2013-03-28

    The pituitary gland is formed by the juxtaposition of two tissues: neuroectoderm arising from the basal diencephalon, and oral epithelium, which invaginates towards the central nervous system from the roof of the mouth. The oral invagination that reaches the brain from the mouth is referred to as Rathke's pouch, with the tip forming the adenohypophysis and the stalk disappearing after the earliest stages of development. In tetrapods, formation of the cranial base establishes a definitive barrier between the pituitary and oral cavity; however, numerous extinct and extant vertebrate species retain an open buccohypophyseal canal in adulthood, a vestige of the stalk of Rathke's pouch. Little is currently known about the formation and function of this structure. Here we have investigated molecular mechanisms driving the formation of the buccohypophyseal canal and their evolutionary significance. We show that Rathke's pouch is located at a boundary region delineated by endoderm, neural crest-derived oral mesenchyme and the anterior limit of the notochord, using CD1, R26R-Sox17-Cre and R26R-Wnt1-Cre mouse lines. As revealed by synchrotron X-ray microtomography after iodine staining in mouse embryos, the pouch has a lobulated three-dimensional structure that embraces the descending diencephalon during pituitary formation. Polaris(fl/fl); Wnt1-Cre, Ofd1(-/-) and Kif3a(-/-) primary cilia mouse mutants have abnormal sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and all present with malformations of the anterior pituitary gland and midline structures of the anterior cranial base. Changes in the expressions of Shh downstream genes are confirmed in Gas1(-/-) mice. From an evolutionary perspective, persistence of the buccohypophyseal canal is a basal character for all vertebrates and its maintenance in several groups is related to a specific morphology of the midline that can be related to modulation in Shh signaling. These results provide insight into a poorly understood ancestral vertebrate

  9. Effects of volcano profile on dilute pyroclastic density currents: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronzo, D. M.; Valentine, G. A.; Dellino, P.; de Tullio, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Explosive activity and lava dome collapse at stratovolcanoes can lead to pyroclastic density currents (PDCs; mixtures of volcanic gas, air, and volcanic particles) that produce complex deposits and pose a hazard to surrounding populations. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of dilute PDCs (characterized by a turbulent suspended load and deposition through a bed load) are carried out with the Euler-Lagrange approach of multiphase physics. The fluid phase is modeled as a dusty gas (1.88 kg/m3 dense), and the solid phase is modeled as discrete particles (1 mm, 5 mm, and 10 mm; 1500 kg/m3 dense and irregularly-shaped), which are two-way coupled to the gas, i.e. they affect the fluid turbulence. The initial PDC, which enters a volcano domain 5 km long and 1.9 km high, has the following characteristics: thickness of 200 m, velocity of 20 m/s, temperature of 573 K, turbulence of 5 %, and sediment concentration of 3 % by volume. The actual physics of flow boundary zone is simulated at the PDC base, by monitoring the sediment flux toward the substrate, which acts through the flow boundary zone, and the grain-size distribution. Also, the PDC velocity and dynamic pressure are calculated. The simulations show that PDC transport, deposition, and hazard potential are sensitive to the shape of the volcano slope (profile) down which they flow. In particular, three generic volcano profiles, straight, concave-upward, and convex-upward are focused on. Dilute PDCs that flow down a constant slope gradually decelerate over the simulated run-out distance (5 km in the horizontal direction) due to a combination of sedimentation, which reduces the density of the PDC, and mixing with the atmosphere. However, dilute PDCs down a concave-upward slope accelerate high on the volcano flanks and have less sedimentation until they begin to decelerate over the shallow lower slopes. A convex-upward slope causes dilute PDCs to lose relatively more of their pyroclast load on the upper slopes of a

  10. Recent advances in hopanoids analysis: Quantification protocols overview, main research targets and selected problems of complex data exploration.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Paweł K; Portka, Joanna K

    2015-09-01

    Pentacyclic triterpenoids, particularly hopanoids, are organism-specific compounds and are generally considered as useful biomarkers that allow fingerprinting and classification of biological, environmental and geological samples. Simultaneous quantification of various hopanoids together with battery of related non-polar and low-molecular mass compounds may provide principal information for geochemical and environmental research focusing on both modern and ancient investigations. Target compounds can be derived from microbial biomass, water columns, sediments, coals, crude fossils or rocks. This create number of analytical problems due to different composition of the analytical matrix and interfering compounds and therefore, proper optimization of quantification protocols for such biomarkers is still the challenge. In this work we summarizing typical analytical protocols that were recently applied for quantification of hopanoids like compounds from different samples. Main steps including components of interest extraction, pre-purification, fractionation, derivatization and quantification involving gas (1D and 2D) as well as liquid separation techniques (liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, planar and low resolution column chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography) are described and discussed from practical point of view, mainly based on the experimental papers that were published within last two years, where significant increase in hopanoids research was noticed. The second aim of this review is to describe the latest research trends concerning determination of hopanoids and related low-molecular mass lipids analyzed in various samples including sediments, rocks, coals, crude oils and plant fossils as well as stromatolites and microbial biomass cultivated under different conditions. It has been found that majority of the most recent papers are based on uni- or bivariate approach for complex data analysis. Data interpretation involves

  11. Formation of a Structure II Hydrate by 1,4-Thioxane in Sea Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, K. C.; Mancillas, O.; Walz, P. M.; Peltzer, E. T.; Brewer, P. G.

    2007-12-01

    We have show that a sII clathrate hydrate containing 1,4-thioxane (TO) will form under the appropriate pressure and temperature conditions. The molecular size of TO poised it at the boundary between sII hydrate formation either as the sole cage occupant, or where a second help gas molecule is required to stabilize the small hydrate cages. In addition to its size, TO is chemical similar to cyclic ethers, such as tetrahydrofuran, which readily form clathrate hydrates. For the experimental temperatures in this study (all above 273.15 K), a pure TO hydrate was not observed to form. However, binary hydrates of TO and either CH4 and N2 were readily formed under moderate pressure conditions (33-158 bar). Both Raman spectroscopy and visual observations were used to verify that a solid hydrate formed and that TO was trapped in the cages. For TO + CH4, a pressure-temperature phase equilibria diagram was created. This showed that the addition of TO increased hydrate stability versus a pure CH4 system by approximately 10 degC, indicating that should CH4 gas be present a TO hydrate would readily form at shallow depths under typical oceanic temperature regimes. TO is of environmental interest as a breakdown product of mustard gas (1,1'-thiobis[2-chloroethane] as a result of hydrolysis in sea water, and has been shown to occur in seafloor chemical weapon disposal sites. In the years after World War II large quantities of chemical weapons were disposed of in the ocean at sites off the US east and west coasts, off Japan, in the Baltic and Adriatic Seas, and in the Russian Arctic, until the signing of the London Convention in 1972. Mustard gas represents the largest tonnage of weapons materiel and while the general scheme of breakdown by hydrolysis is known there is little information on the actual behavior of these breakdown products in marine sediments. This work illuminates such gaps in knowledge, and formation of a hydrate profoundly alters molecular mobility and diffusion away

  12. Fabrication of water-dispersible and highly conductive PSS-doped PANI/graphene nanocomposites using a high-molecular weight PSS dopant and their application in H2S detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sunghun; Lee, Jun Seop; Jun, Jaemoon; Kim, Sung Gun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2014-11-01

    This work describes the fabrication of poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid)-doped polyaniline/graphene (PSS-doped PANI/graphene) nanocomposites and their use as sensing elements for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) detection. PSS with a weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of 1.96 × 106 was synthesized using low-temperature free-radical polymerization. The PSS was used as both a doping agent and a binding agent for the polymerization of aniline monomers in a biphasic system (water-chloroform) at -50 °C. The high Mw of PSS resulted in relatively large particle sizes and smooth surfaces of the PSS-doped PANI. These physical characteristics, in turn, resulted in low interparticle resistance and high conductivity. In addition, the PSS allowed homogeneous dispersion of reduced graphene sheets through electrostatic repulsion. The prepared PSS-doped PANI/graphene solutions showed good compatibility with flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates, making them suitable for flexible sensor electrodes. Changes in the charge-transport properties, such as protonation level, conjugation length, crystalline structure, and charge-transfer resistance, of the electrode materials were the main factors influencing the electrical and sensor performance of the PSS-doped PANI-based electrodes. PSS-doped PANI/graphene composites containing 30 wt% graphene showed the highest conductivity (168.4 S cm-1) and the lowest minimum detection level (MDL) for H2S gas (1 ppm). This result is consistent with the observed improvements in charge transport in the electrode materials via strong π-π stacking interactions between the PANI and the graphene sheets.This work describes the fabrication of poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid)-doped polyaniline/graphene (PSS-doped PANI/graphene) nanocomposites and their use as sensing elements for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) detection. PSS with a weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of 1.96 × 106 was synthesized using low-temperature free-radical polymerization. The PSS was

  13. The Partial Molar Volume and Compressibility of the FeO Component in Model Basalts (Mixed CaAl2Si2O8-CaMgSi2O6-CaFeSi2O6 Liquids) at 0 GPa: evidence of Fe2+ in 6-fold coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2010-12-01

    FeO is an important component in magmatic liquids and yet its partial molar volume at one bar is not as well known as that for Fe2O3 because of the difficulty of performing double-bob density measurements under reducing conditions. Moreover, there is growing evidence from spectroscopic studies that Fe2+ occurs in 4, 5, and 6-fold coordination in silicate melts, and it is expected that the partial molar volume and compressibility of the FeO component will vary accordingly. We have conducted both density and relaxed sound speed measurements on four liquids in the An-Di-Hd (CaAl2Si2O8-CaMgSi2O6-CaFeSi2O6) system: (1) Di-Hd (50:50), (2) An-Hd (50:50), (3) An-Di-Hd (33:33:33) and (4) Hd (100). Densities were measured between 1573 and 1838 K at one bar with the double-bob Archimedean method using molybdenum bobs and crucibles in a reducing gas (1%CO-99%Ar) environment. The sound speeds were measured under similar conditions with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer, and used to calculate isothermal compressibility. All the density data for the three multi-component (model basalt) liquids were combined with density data on SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO-K2O-Na2O liquids (Lange, 1997) in a fit to a linear volume equation; the results lead to a partial molar volume (±1σ) for FeO =11.7 ± 0.3(±1σ) cm3/mol at 1723 K. This value is similar to that for crystalline FeO at 298 K (halite structure; 12.06 cm3/mol), which suggests an average Fe2+ coordination of ~6 in these model basalt compositions. In contrast, the fitted partial molar volume of FeO in pure hedenbergite liquid is 14.6 ± 0.3 at 1723 K, which is consistent with an average Fe2+ coordination of 4.3 derived from EXAFS spectroscopy (Rossano, 2000). Similarly, all the compressibility data for the three multi-component liquids were combined with compressibility data on SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO liquids (Ai and Lange, 2008) in a fit to an ideal mixing model for melt compressibility; the results lead to a partial molar

  14. The Partial Molar Volume and Compressibility of FeO in CaO-SiO2 Liquids: Systematic Variation with Fe2+ Coordination Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Iron is an important element in magmatic liquid, since its concentration can range up to 18% in some basaltic liquids, and it has two oxidation states. In order to model magmatic processes, thermodynamic descriptions of silicate melts must include precise information for both the FeO and Fe2O3 components. Currently, the partial molar volume of FeO is not as well known as that for Fe2O3 because of the difficulty of performing double-bob density measurements under reducing conditions. Yet these data are required in order to convert sound speed measurements on FeO-bearing liquids into compressibility data, which in turn are needed extend density models for magmatic liquids to elevated pressures. Moreover, there is growing evidence from the spectroscopic literature that Fe2+ occurs in 4, 5, and 6-fold coordination in silicate melts, and thus it is possible that the partial molar volume and compressibility of FeO may vary with Fe2+ coordination, and thus with melt composition. To explore these issues, we have conducted both density and relaxed sound speed measurements on liquids in the CaO-FeO-SiO2 system, where the CaO/SiO2 ratio was systematically varied at constant FeO concentration (40 mol%). Density was measured between 1594 and 1813K with the double-bob Archimedean method using molybdenum bobs and crucible in a reducing gas (1%CO-99%Ar) environment. The sounds speeds were measured under similar conditions with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer. The derived partial molar volume of FeO increases systematically from 13.7 to 15.2 cm3/mol at 1673 K as the CaO/SiO2 ratio increases and the Fe2+ coordination number decreases. From a comparison with the crystalline volume of FeO (halite structure; 12.06 cm3/mol), which serves as a lower limit for VFeO in silicate liquids when Fe2+ is in 6-fold coordination, we estimate that the average Fe2+ coordination in our experimental melts extends up to values between 5 and 4, consistent with the spectroscopic literature. The

  15. The Toucan's Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    The Southern constellation Tucana (the Toucan) is probably best known as the home of the Small Magellanic Cloud, one of the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. But Tucana also hosts another famous object that shines thousands of lights, like a magnificent, oversized diamond in the sky: the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. More popularly known as 47 Tuc, it is surpassed in size and brightness by only one other globular cluster, Omega Centauri. Globular clusters are gigantic families of stars, comprising several tens of thousands of stars, all thought to be born at the same time from the same cloud of gas [1]. As such, they constitute unique laboratories for the study of how stars evolve and interact. This is even more so because they are located at the same distance, so the brightness of different types of stars, at different stages in their evolution can be directly compared. The stars in globular clusters are held together by their mutual gravity which gives them their spherical shape, hence their name. Globular clusters are thought to be among the oldest objects in our Milky Way galaxy, and contain therefore mostly old, low-mass stars. ESO PR Photo 20/06 ESO PR Photo 20/06 Globular Cluster 47 Tuc 47 Tucanae is an impressive globular cluster that is visible with the unaided eye from the southern hemisphere. It was discovered in 1751 by the French astronomer Nicholas Louis de Lacaille who cataloged it in his list of southern nebulous objects. Located about 16 000 light years away, it has a total mass of about 1 million times the mass of the Sun and is 120 light years across, making it appear on the sky as big as the full moon. The colour image of 47 Tucanae presented here was taken with FORS1 on ESO's Very Large Telescope in 2001. The image covers only the densest, very central part of the cluster. The globular cluster extends in reality four times further away! As can be seen however, the density of stars rapidly drops off when moving away from the centre. The red

  16. EDITORIAL: Multitasking in nanotechnology Multitasking in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-06-01

    resonance imaging and cancer treatment by hyperthermia. The introduction of scanning probe microscopy in the 1980s transposed the physics of nanoscale structures from elegant mathematical hypotheses to concrete observables. But if seeing is believing, control is power. Atomic force microscope probes could also be adopted as patterning devices, empowering researchers to manipulate the nanoworld to exacting designs [6]. There is even a report of early graphene fabrication from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite using this approach [7]. One of the natural advantages of patterning with a microscope probe is the opportunity for real-time monitoring of the process [8], and such dual functionality may be applied to current state of the art high-speed atomic force microscopy systems. With the 'coming of age' of high-speed atomic force microscopy, it is now possible to record movies of biological systems at the nanoscale to reveal the processes governing these systems in action [9]. As Toshio Ando explains in his recent review of the field, attempts at manipulating samples with the same probe used for high-speed atomic force microscopy imaging have already been reported. The vista of possibilities this opens includes the potential to observe the re-assembly of biological systems following deliberate breaking and the examination of complicated molecular architectures. The escalating interest in nanoscale research opened the flood gates for ZnO studies, as the community became captivated by the potential application of the nanomaterial's electronic properties in transparent electrodes in liquid crystal displays, thin-film transistors and light-emitting diodes. Zinc oxide's piezoelectric properties have also inspired researchers to investigate the energy harvesting potential of these structures [10]. The functions can be combined to produce self-powered vibration [11] and gas [1] sensing devices. In the sensor reported by Zhong Lin Wang and his colleagues in this issue, the Zn